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Sample records for proteomic safety biomarkers

  1. Proteomics Discovery of Disease Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Mamoun; Petricoin, Emanuel F

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological developments in proteomics have shown promising initiatives in identifying novel biomarkers of various diseases. Such technologies are capable of investigating multiple samples and generating large amount of data end-points. Examples of two promising proteomics technologies are mass spectrometry, including an instrument based on surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization, and protein microarrays. Proteomics data must, however, undergo analytical processing using bioinformatics. Due to limitations in proteomics tools including shortcomings in bioinformatics analysis, predictive bioinformatics can be utilized as an alternative strategy prior to performing elaborate, high-throughput proteomics procedures. This review describes mass spectrometry, protein microarrays, and bioinformatics and their roles in biomarker discovery, and highlights the significance of integration between proteomics and bioinformatics.

  2. The discovery and development of proteomic safety biomarkers for the detection of drug-induced liver toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Amacher, David E.

    2010-05-15

    Biomarkers are biometric measurements that provide critical quantitative information about the biological condition of the animal or individual being tested. In drug safety studies, established toxicity biomarkers are used along with other conventional study data to determine dose-limiting organ toxicity, and to define species sensitivity for new chemical entities intended for possible use as human medicines. A continuing goal of drug safety scientists in the pharmaceutical industry is to discover and develop better trans-species biomarkers that can be used to determine target organ toxicities for preclinical species in short-term studies at dose levels that are some multiple of the intended human dose and again later in full development for monitoring clinical trials at lower therapeutic doses. Of particular value are early, predictive, noninvasive biomarkers that have in vitro, in vivo, and clinical transferability. Such translational biomarkers bridge animal testing used in preclinical science and human studies that are part of subsequent clinical testing. Although suitable for in vivo preclinical regulatory studies, conventional hepatic safety biomarkers are basically confirmatory markers because they signal organ toxicity after some pathological damage has occurred, and are therefore not well-suited for short-term, predictive screening assays early in the discovery-to-development progression of new chemical entities (NCEs) available in limited quantities. Efforts between regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry are underway for the coordinated discovery, qualification, verification and validation of early predictive toxicity biomarkers. Early predictive safety biomarkers are those that are detectable and quantifiable prior to the onset of irreversible tissue injury and which are associated with a mechanism of action relevant to a specific type of potential hepatic injury. Potential drug toxicity biomarkers are typically endogenous macromolecules in

  3. [Proteomic biomarkers in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Bandrés, Sara; Durán, Raquel; Barrero, Francisco; Ramírez, Manuel; Vives, Francisco

    2014-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement and is caused by the death of the dopaminergic neurons in the compact part of the substantia nigra. Its diagnosis is essentially clinical, but although the signs and symptoms of PD are well known, the rate of diagnostic error is relatively high. It is estimated that 10-30% of patients initially diagnosed with PD are later reclassified. This disease has a high prevalence beyond the age of 60, and one of its biggest problems is that it is diagnosed when the degenerative process is already at a very advanced stage. Therefore, it is necessary to look for other biomarkers that make it possible to carry out an early diagnosis of PD, follow up its development, distinguish it from other related pathologies (parkinsonisms) and help monitor the effect of novel therapies. The fact that there are mutations that lead to PD, as well as polygenetic combinations that can act as risk factors, suggests the possibility of measuring the proteins resulting from the expression of these genes in peripheral tissues. And once their sensitivity and specificity have been proved they could be used as biomarkers for PD, even in the early phases of the disease. The aim of this work is to focus on a detailed review of the main candidate proteomic biomarkers researched to date by discussing the most recent literature.

  4. Biomarker discovery of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Xiao, Ta; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Cho, William C S; Xiao, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in southern China and southern Asia, and poses one of the most serious public health problems in these areas. Early diagnosis, predicting metastasis, recurrence, prognosis and therapeutic response of NPC remain a challenge. Discovery of diagnostic and predictive biomarkers is an ideal way to achieve these objectives. Proteomics has great potential in identifying cancer biomarkers. Comparative proteomics has identified a large number of potential biomarkers associated with NPC, although the clinical performance of such biomarkers needs to be further validated. In this article, we review the latest discovery and progress of biomarkers for early diagnosis, predicting metastasis, recurrence, prognosis and therapeutic response of NPC, inform the readers of the current status of proteomics-based NPC biomarker findings and suggest avenues for future work.

  5. Proteomic Approaches for Biomarker Panels in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Neagu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic technologies remain the main backbone of biomarkers discovery in cancer. The continuous development of proteomic technologies also enlarges the bioinformatics domain, thus founding the main pillars of cancer therapy. The main source for diagnostic/prognostic/therapy monitoring biomarker panels are molecules that have a dual role, being both indicators of disease development and therapy targets. Proteomic technologies, such as mass-spectrometry approaches and protein array technologies, represent the main technologies that can depict these biomarkers. Herein, we will illustrate some of the most recent strategies for biomarker discovery in cancer, including the development of immune-markers and the use of cancer stem cells as target therapy. The challenges of proteomic biomarker discovery need new forms of cross-disciplinary conglomerates that will result in increased and tailored access to treatments for patients; diagnostic companies would benefit from the enhanced co-development of companion diagnostics and pharmaceutical companies. In the technology optimization in biomarkers, immune assays are the leaders of discovery machinery.

  6. Statistical Aspects in Proteomic Biomarker Discovery.

    PubMed

    Jung, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In the pursuit of a personalized medicine, i.e., the individual treatment of a patient, many medical decision problems are desired to be supported by biomarkers that can help to make a diagnosis, prediction, or prognosis. Proteomic biomarkers are of special interest since they can not only be detected in tissue samples but can also often be easily detected in diverse body fluids. Statistical methods play an important role in the discovery and validation of proteomic biomarkers. They are necessary in the planning of experiments, in the processing of raw signals, and in the final data analysis. This review provides an overview on the most frequent experimental settings including sample size considerations, and focuses on exploratory data analysis and classifier development.

  7. Proteomic biomarkers in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M D; Nogal, A; Molina-Pinelo, S; Carnero, A; Paz-Ares, L

    2013-09-01

    The correct understanding of tumour development relies on the comprehensive study of proteins. They are the main orchestrators of vital processes, such as signalling pathways, which drive the carcinogenic process. Proteomic technologies can be applied to cancer research to detect differential protein expression and to assess different responses to treatment. Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related death in the world. Mostly diagnosed at late stages of the disease, lung cancer has one of the lowest 5-year survival rates at 15 %. The use of different proteomic techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), isotope labelling (ICAT, SILAC, iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry may yield new knowledge on the underlying biology of lung cancer and also allow the development of new early detection tests and the identification of changes in the cancer protein network that are associated with prognosis and drug resistance. PMID:23606351

  8. Proteomic discovery of diabetic nephropathy biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Michael L; Klein, Jon B

    2010-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex systemic disease with complications that result from both genetic predisposition and dysregulated metabolic pathways. It is highly prevalent, with current estimates stating that there are 17.5 million diagnosed and 6.6 million undiagnosed patients with diabetes in the United States. DM and its complications impose a significant societal and economic burden. The medical costs of common microvascular complications of uncontrolled DM, diabetic nephropathy (DN) and diabetic retinopathy account for 29% and 15%, respectively, of the $116 billion worth expenditures associated with diabetes. A substantial gap exists in our knowledge related to the understanding of these complications. To advance therapy and decrease the societal burden of DM, there is a clear need for biomarkers that can diagnose DN at an early stage and predict its course. Proteomics has evolved into a high-throughput, analytical discipline used to analyze complex biological data sets. These open-ended, hypothesis-generating approaches, when appropriately designed and interpreted, are well suited to the study of the pathogenic mechanisms of diabetic microvascular disease and the identification of biomarkers of DN. In this study, we review the evolving role played by proteomics in expanding our understanding of the diagnosis and pathogenesis of DN. PMID:21044770

  9. Serum proteomics for biomarker discovery in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Yusuf

    2012-08-16

    Proteomic platforms have gained increasing attention in the clinical spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This approach allows for the unbiased discovery of circulating biochemical markers, i.e., it is not limited to known molecules of presumed importance. This manuscript provides an overview of proteomic serum biomarker discovery in NAFLD. Hemoglobin is currently the most widely replicated proteomic circulating biomarker of NAFLD; it was identified as a biomarker of fatty liver in two distinct proteomic studies and subsequently validated using distinct analytical methods by independent research groups in large replication cohorts. Given the increasing availability of numerous serum samples and the refinement of the technological platforms available to scrutinize the blood proteome, large collaborative studies between academia and industry are warmly encouraged to identify novel, unbiased circulating biomarkers of NAFLD.

  10. Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Charles L.

    2011-12-31

    Research for the DOE Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers focused on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). RVFV and VEEV are Category A and B pathogens respectively. Among the priority threats, RVFV and VEEV rank high in their potential for being weaponized and introduced to the United States, spreading quickly, and having a large health and economic impact. In addition, they both have live attenuated vaccine, which allows work to be performed at BSL-2. While the molecular biology of RVFV and VEEV are increasingly well-characterized, little is known about its host-pathogen interactions. Our research is aimed at determining critical alterations in host signaling pathways to identify therapeutics targeted against the host.

  11. A novel profile biomarker diagnosis for mass spectral proteomics.

    PubMed

    Han, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics technologies have allowed for a great progress in identifying disease biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. However, they face acute challenges from a data reproducibility standpoint, in that no two independent studies have been found to produce the same proteomic patterns. Such reproducibility issues cause the identified biomarker patterns to lose repeatability and prevent real clinical usage. In this work, we propose a profile biomarker approach to overcome this problem from a machine-learning viewpoint by developing a novel derivative component analysis (DCA). As an implicit feature selection algorithm, derivative component analysis enables the separation of true signals from red herrings by capturing subtle data behaviors and removing system noises from a proteomic profile. We further demonstrate its advantages in disease diagnosis by viewing input data as a profile biomarker. The results from our profile biomarker diagnosis suggest an effective solution to overcoming proteomics data's reproducibility problem, present an alternative method for biomarker discovery in proteomics, and provide a good candidate for clinical proteomic diagnosis.

  12. A novel profile biomarker diagnosis for mass spectral proteomics.

    PubMed

    Han, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics technologies have allowed for a great progress in identifying disease biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. However, they face acute challenges from a data reproducibility standpoint, in that no two independent studies have been found to produce the same proteomic patterns. Such reproducibility issues cause the identified biomarker patterns to lose repeatability and prevent real clinical usage. In this work, we propose a profile biomarker approach to overcome this problem from a machine-learning viewpoint by developing a novel derivative component analysis (DCA). As an implicit feature selection algorithm, derivative component analysis enables the separation of true signals from red herrings by capturing subtle data behaviors and removing system noises from a proteomic profile. We further demonstrate its advantages in disease diagnosis by viewing input data as a profile biomarker. The results from our profile biomarker diagnosis suggest an effective solution to overcoming proteomics data's reproducibility problem, present an alternative method for biomarker discovery in proteomics, and provide a good candidate for clinical proteomic diagnosis. PMID:24297560

  13. Biomarker Discovery in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Caudle, W. Michael; Zhang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Biomarkers for neurodegenerative disorders are essential to facilitate disease diagnosis, ideally at early stages, monitor disease progression, and assess response to existing and future treatments. Application of proteomics to the human brain, cerebrospinal fluid and plasma has greatly hastened the unbiased and high-throughput searches for novel biomarkers. There are many steps critical to biomarker discovery, whether for neurodegenerative or other diseases, including sample preparation, protein/peptide separation and identification, as well as independent confirmation and validation. In this review we have summarized current proteomics technologies involved in discovery of biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases, practical considerations and limitations of several major aspects, as well as the current status of candidate biomarkers revealed by proteomics for Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. PMID:18938247

  14. Molecular biology tools: proteomics techniques in biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef; Keidel, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Despite worldwide efforts biomarker discovery by plasma proteomics was not successful so far. Several reasons for this failure are obvious. Mainly, proteome diversity is remarkable between different individuals and is caused by genetic, environmental and life style parameters. To recognize disease related proteins that could serve as potential biomarkers is only feasible by investigating a non realizable large number of patients. Furthermore, plasma proteomics comprises enormous technical hurdles for quantitative analysis. High reproducibility of blood sampling in clinical routine is hard to achieve. Quantitative proteome analysis has to struggle with the complexity of millions of protein species comprising typical plasma proteins, cellular leakage proteins and antibodies and concentration differences of more than 1011 between high and low abundant proteins. Therefore, no successful quantitative and comprehensive plasma proteome analysis is reported so far. A novel proteomics strategy is proposed for biomarker discovery in plasma. Instead of comparing the plasma proteome of different individuals it is recommended to analyze the proteomes of different time points of a single individual during the development of a disease. This strategy is realized by the use of plasma of the Bavarian Red Cross Blood Bank, were three million samples are stored under standardized conditions. To achieve reliable data the isotope coded protein labelling proteomics technology was used.

  15. Quantitative proteomics for identifying biomarkers for Rabies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rabies is a fatal acute viral disease of the central nervous system, which is a serious public health problem in Asian and African countries. Based on the clinical presentation, rabies can be classified into encephalitic (furious) or paralytic (numb) rabies. Early diagnosis of this disease is particularly important as rabies is invariably fatal if adequate post exposure prophylaxis is not administered immediately following the bite. Methods In this study, we carried out a quantitative proteomic analysis of the human brain tissue from cases of encephalitic and paralytic rabies along with normal human brain tissues using an 8-plex isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) strategy. Results and conclusion We identified 402 proteins, of which a number of proteins were differentially expressed between encephalitic and paralytic rabies, including several novel proteins. The differentially expressed molecules included karyopherin alpha 4 (KPNA4), which was overexpressed only in paralytic rabies, calcium calmodulin dependent kinase 2 alpha (CAMK2A), which was upregulated in paralytic rabies group and glutamate ammonia ligase (GLUL), which was overexpressed in paralytic as well as encephalitic rabies. We validated two of the upregulated molecules, GLUL and CAMK2A, by dot blot assays and further validated CAMK2A by immunohistochemistry. These molecules need to be further investigated in body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid in a larger cohort of rabies cases to determine their potential use as antemortem diagnostic biomarkers in rabies. This is the first study to systematically profile clinical subtypes of human rabies using an iTRAQ quantitative proteomics approach. PMID:23521751

  16. Proteomics, biomarkers, and HIV‐1: A current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Maire Rose

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than three decades of extensive research, HIV‐1 infection although well controlled with cART, remains incurable. Multifactorial complexity of the viral life‐cycle poses great challenges in understanding molecular mechanisms underlying this infection and the development of biomarkers, which we hope will lead us to its eradication. For a more in‐depth understanding of how the virus interacts with host target cells, T cells and macrophages, proteomic profiling techniques that offer strategies to investigate the proteome in its entirety were employed. Here, we review proteomic studies related to HIV‐1 infection and discuss perspectives and limitations of proteomic and systems biology approaches in future studies. PMID:26033875

  17. Advances in urinary proteome analysis and biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Fliser, Danilo; Novak, Jan; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Argilés, Angel; Jankowski, Vera; Girolami, Mark A; Jankowski, Joachim; Mischak, Harald

    2007-04-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis of kidney diseases and assessment of the prognosis are still challenges in clinical nephrology. Definition of biomarkers on the basis of proteome analysis, especially of the urine, has advanced recently and may provide new tools to solve those challenges. This article highlights the most promising technological approaches toward deciphering the human proteome and applications of the knowledge in clinical nephrology, with emphasis on the urinary proteome. The data in the current literature indicate that although a thorough investigation of the entire urinary proteome is still a distant goal, clinical applications are already available. Progress in the analysis of human proteome in health and disease will depend more on the standardization of data and availability of suitable bioinformatics and software solutions than on new technological advances. It is predicted that proteomics will play an important role in clinical nephrology in the very near future and that this progress will require interactive dialogue and collaboration between clinicians and analytical specialists.

  18. Perspective: Proteomic approach to detect biomarkers of human growth hormone

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Juan; List, Edward O.; Okada, Shigeru; Kopchick, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Several serum biomarkers for recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) have been established, however, none alone or in combination have generate a specific, sensitive, and reproducible ‘kit’ for the detection of rhGH abuse. Thus, the search for additional GH specific biomarkers continues. In this review, we focus on the use of proteomics in general and 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) in particular for the discovery of new GH induced serum biomarkers. Also, we review some of the protocols involved in 2DE. Finally, the possibility of tissues other than blood for biomarker discovery is discussed. PMID:19501004

  19. Computational biomarker pipeline from discovery to clinical implementation: plasma proteomic biomarkers for cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cohen Freue, Gabriela V; Meredith, Anna; Smith, Derek; Bergman, Axel; Sasaki, Mayu; Lam, Karen K Y; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Opushneva, Nina; Takhar, Mandeep; Lin, David; Wilson-McManus, Janet; Balshaw, Robert; Keown, Paul A; Borchers, Christoph H; McManus, Bruce; Ng, Raymond T; McMaster, W Robert

    2013-04-01

    Recent technical advances in the field of quantitative proteomics have stimulated a large number of biomarker discovery studies of various diseases, providing avenues for new treatments and diagnostics. However, inherent challenges have limited the successful translation of candidate biomarkers into clinical use, thus highlighting the need for a robust analytical methodology to transition from biomarker discovery to clinical implementation. We have developed an end-to-end computational proteomic pipeline for biomarkers studies. At the discovery stage, the pipeline emphasizes different aspects of experimental design, appropriate statistical methodologies, and quality assessment of results. At the validation stage, the pipeline focuses on the migration of the results to a platform appropriate for external validation, and the development of a classifier score based on corroborated protein biomarkers. At the last stage towards clinical implementation, the main aims are to develop and validate an assay suitable for clinical deployment, and to calibrate the biomarker classifier using the developed assay. The proposed pipeline was applied to a biomarker study in cardiac transplantation aimed at developing a minimally invasive clinical test to monitor acute rejection. Starting with an untargeted screening of the human plasma proteome, five candidate biomarker proteins were identified. Rejection-regulated proteins reflect cellular and humoral immune responses, acute phase inflammatory pathways, and lipid metabolism biological processes. A multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass-spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay was developed for the five candidate biomarkers and validated by enzyme-linked immune-sorbent (ELISA) and immunonephelometric assays (INA). A classifier score based on corroborated proteins demonstrated that the developed MRM-MS assay provides an appropriate methodology for an external validation, which is still in progress. Plasma proteomic biomarkers of acute cardiac

  20. A proteomics perspective: from animal welfare to food safety.

    PubMed

    Bassols, Anna; Turk, Romana; Roncada, Paola

    2014-03-01

    A fundamental issue of farm animal welfare is to keep animals clinically healthy, without disease or stress, particularly in intensive breeding, in order to produce safe and quality food. This issue is highly relevant for the food industry worldwide as they are directly linked to public health and welfare. The aim of this review is to explore how proteomics can assess and improve the knowledge useful for the strategic management of products of animal origin. Useful indications are provided about the latest proteomics tools for the development of novel biotechnologies serving the public health. The multivariate proteomics approach provides the bases for the discovery of biomarkers useful to investigate adaptation syndromes and oxidative stress. These two responses represent the milestones for the study of animal welfare. Moreover their implementation in the characterization and standardization of raw materials, process development, and quality and safety control of the final product of animal origin represents the current frontier in official surveillance and tests development.

  1. Genomic and Proteomic Biomarkers for Cancer: A Multitude of Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tainsky, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Biomarkers are molecular indicators of a biological status, and as biochemical species can be assayed to evaluate the presence of cancer and therapeutic interventions. Through a variety of mechanisms cancer cells provide the biomarker material for their own detection. Biomarkers may be detectable in the blood, other body fluids, or tissues. The expectation is that the level of an informative biomarker is related to the specific type of disease present in the body. Biomarkers have potential both as diagnostic indicators and monitors of the effectiveness of clinical interventions. Biomarkers are also able to stratify cancer patients to the most appropriate treatment. Effective biomarkers for the early detection of cancer should provide a patient with a better outcome which in turn will translate into more efficient delivery of healthcare. Technologies for the early detection of cancer have resulted in reductions in disease-associated mortalities from cancers that are otherwise deadly if allowed to progress. Such screening technologies have proven that early detection will decrease the morbidity and mortality from cancer. An emerging theme in biomarker research is the expectation that panels of biomarker analytes rather than single markers will be needed to have sufficient sensitivity and specificity for the presymptomatic detection of cancer. Biomarkers may provide prognostic information of disease enabling interventions using targeted therapeutic agents as well as course-corrections in cancer treatment. Novel genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies are being used to discover and validate tumor biomarkers individually and in panels. PMID:19406210

  2. Schizophrenia proteomics: biomarkers on the path to laboratory medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    Over two million Americans are afflicted with schizophrenia, a debilitating mental health disorder with a unique symptomatic and epidemiological profile. Genomics studies have hinted towards candidate schizophrenia susceptibility chromosomal loci and genes. Modern proteomic tools, particularly mass spectrometry and expression scanning, aim to identify both pathogenic-revealing and diagnostically significant biomarkers. Only a few studies on basic proteomics have been conducted for psychiatric disorders relative to the plethora of cancer specific experiments. One such proteomic utility enables the discovery of proteins and biological marker fingerprinting profiling techniques (SELDI-TOF-MS), and then subjects them to tandem mass spectrometric fragmentation and de novo protein sequencing (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) for the accurate identification and characterization of the proteins. Such utilities can explain the pathogenesis of neuro-psychiatric disease, provide more objective testing methods, and further demonstrate a biological basis to mental illness. Although clinical proteomics in schizophrenia have yet to reveal a biomarker with diagnostic specificity, methods that better characterize the disorder using endophenotypes can advance findings. Schizophrenia biomarkers could potentially revolutionize its psychopharmacology, changing it into a more hypothesis and genomic/proteomic-driven science. PMID:16846510

  3. Mass spectrometry-based membrane proteomics in cancer biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Mermelekas, George; Zoidakis, Jerome

    2014-06-01

    Membrane proteins are involved in central processes such as cell signaling, cell-cell interactions and communication, ion and metabolite transport and in general play a crucial role in cell homeostasis. Cancer and cancer metastasis have been correlated to protein expression levels and dysfunction, with membrane proteins playing an important role, and are thus used as drug targets and potential biomarkers for prognostic or diagnostic purposes. Despite the critical biological significance of membrane proteins, proteomic analysis has been a challenging task due to their hydrophobicity. In this review, recent advances in the proteomic analysis of membrane proteins are presented, focusing on membrane fraction enrichment techniques combined with labeled or label-free shotgun proteomics approaches for the identification of potential cancer biomarkers.

  4. Clinical proteomic biomarkers: relevant issues on study design & technical considerations in biomarker development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biomarker research is continuously expanding in the field of clinical proteomics. A combination of different proteomic–based methodologies can be applied depending on the specific clinical context of use. Moreover, current advancements in proteomic analytical platforms are leading to an expansion of biomarker candidates that can be identified. Specifically, mass spectrometric techniques could provide highly valuable tools for biomarker research. Ideally, these advances could provide with biomarkers that are clinically applicable for disease diagnosis and/ or prognosis. Unfortunately, in general the biomarker candidates fail to be implemented in clinical decision making. To improve on this current situation, a well-defined study design has to be established driven by a clear clinical need, while several checkpoints between the different phases of discovery, verification and validation have to be passed in order to increase the probability of establishing valid biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the technical proteomic platforms that are available along the different stages in the biomarker discovery pipeline, exemplified by clinical applications in the field of bladder cancer biomarker research. PMID:24679154

  5. Proteomics of gliomas: initial biomarker discovery and evolution of technology.

    PubMed

    Kalinina, Juliya; Peng, Junmin; Ritchie, James C; Van Meir, Erwin G

    2011-09-01

    Gliomas are a group of aggressive brain tumors that diffusely infiltrate adjacent brain tissues, rendering them largely incurable, even with multiple treatment modalities and agents. Mostly asymptomatic at early stages, they present in several subtypes with astrocytic or oligodendrocytic features and invariably progress to malignant forms. Gliomas are difficult to classify precisely because of interobserver variability during histopathologic grading. Identifying biological signatures of each glioma subtype through protein biomarker profiling of tumor or tumor-proximal fluids is therefore of high priority. Such profiling not only may provide clues regarding tumor classification but may identify clinical biomarkers and pathologic targets for the development of personalized treatments. In the past decade, differential proteomic profiling techniques have utilized tumor, cerebrospinal fluid, and plasma from glioma patients to identify the first candidate diagnostic, prognostic, predictive, and therapeutic response markers, highlighting the potential for glioma biomarker discovery. The number of markers identified, however, has been limited, their reproducibility between studies is unclear, and none have been validated for clinical use. Recent technological advancements in methodologies for high-throughput profiling, which provide easy access, rapid screening, low sample consumption, and accurate protein identification, are anticipated to accelerate brain tumor biomarker discovery. Reliable tools for biomarker verification forecast translation of the biomarkers into clinical diagnostics in the foreseeable future. Herein we update the reader on the recent trends and directions in glioma proteomics, including key findings and established and emerging technologies for analysis, together with challenges we are still facing in identifying and verifying potential glioma biomarkers.

  6. Proteomic Approaches in Biomarker Discovery: New Perspectives in Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kocevar, Nina; Komel, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in proteomic methods, including improved detection limits and sensitivity, these methods have not yet been established in routine clinical practice. The main limitations, which prevent their integration into clinics, are high cost of equipment, the need for highly trained personnel, and last, but not least, the establishment of reliable and accurate protein biomarkers or panels of protein biomarkers for detection of neoplasms. Furthermore, the complexity and heterogeneity of most solid tumours present obstacles in the discovery of specific protein signatures, which could be used for early detection of cancers, for prediction of disease outcome, and for determining the response to specific therapies. However, cancer proteome, as the end-point of pathological processes that underlie cancer development and progression, could represent an important source for the discovery of new biomarkers and molecular targets for tailored therapies. PMID:24550697

  7. Biomarker discovery and applications for foods and beverages: proteomics to nanoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello; Bansal, Vipul; Shukla, Ravi; Rakwal, Randeep

    2013-11-20

    Foods and beverages have been at the heart of our society for centuries, sustaining humankind - health, life, and the pleasures that go with it. The more we grow and develop as a civilization, the more we feel the need to know about the food we eat and beverages we drink. Moreover, with an ever increasing demand for food due to the growing human population food security remains a major concern. Food safety is another growing concern as the consumers prefer varied foods and beverages that are not only traded nationally but also globally. The 21st century science and technology is at a new high, especially in the field of biological sciences. The availability of genome sequences and associated high-throughput sensitive technologies means that foods are being analyzed at various levels. For example and in particular, high-throughput omics approaches are being applied to develop suitable biomarkers for foods and beverages and their applications in addressing quality, technology, authenticity, and safety issues. Proteomics are one of those technologies that are increasingly being utilized to profile expressed proteins in different foods and beverages. Acquired knowledge and protein information have now been translated to address safety of foods and beverages. Very recently, the power of proteomic technology has been integrated with another highly sensitive and miniaturized technology called nanotechnology, yielding a new term nanoproteomics. Nanoproteomics offer a real-time multiplexed analysis performed in a miniaturized assay, with low-sample consumption and high sensitivity. To name a few, nanomaterials - quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and nanowires - have demonstrated potential to overcome the challenges of sensitivity faced by proteomics for biomarker detection, discovery, and application. In this review, we will discuss the importance of biomarker discovery and applications for foods and beverages, the contribution of proteomic technology in

  8. Quantitative proteomic approaches in biomarker discovery of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Na-Young; Kim, Eun Hee; Choi, Joon; Lee, Hookeun; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2012-10-01

    Proteomics offers considerable opportunities for either enhancing our biological understanding or discovering biomarkers, blood and biopsied specimen-based proteomic approaches, provide reproducible and quantitative tools that can complement clinical assessments and aid clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Sometimes a differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) and the prediction of treatment response can be deduced by finding meaningful biomarkers, for which the central platform for proteomics is tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). A range of workflows are available for protein (or peptide) separation prior to MS/MS as well as bioinformatics analysis to achieve protein identification, for which two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and subsequent mass spectrometry (MS), liquid chromatography-MS, difference gel electrophoresis following 2-DE, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), stable isotope labeling by amino acids and label-free quantification are under development. In this article, the current status and perspective of these advanced proteomic technologies are introduced, with examples of recent biomarkers focused on the diagnosis, treatment response, prognosis of IBD, and even colitis-associated carcinogenesis in both animal models and human patients. PMID:22988922

  9. Proteomics for discovery of candidate colorectal cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Chaver, Paula; Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta S

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe and other Western countries, mainly due to the lack of well-validated clinically useful biomarkers with enough sensitivity and specificity to detect this disease at early stages. Although it is well known that the pathogenesis of CRC is a progressive accumulation of mutations in multiple genes, much less is known at the proteome level. Therefore, in the last years many proteomic studies have been conducted to find new candidate protein biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and as therapeutic targets for this malignancy, as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of colorectal carcinogenesis. An important advantage of the proteomic approaches is the capacity to look for multiple differentially expressed proteins in a single study. This review provides an overview of the recent reports describing the different proteomic tools used for the discovery of new protein markers for CRC such as two-dimensional electrophoresis methods, quantitative mass spectrometry-based techniques or protein microarrays. Additionally, we will also focus on the diverse biological samples used for CRC biomarker discovery such as tissue, serum and faeces, besides cell lines and murine models, discussing their advantages and disadvantages, and summarize the most frequently identified candidate CRC markers. PMID:24744574

  10. Capillary separations enabling tissue proteomics-based biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Lee, Cheng S; Wang, Weijie; DeVoe, Don L; Balgley, Brian M

    2006-09-01

    Development of the capability to enable large-scale proteome studies, analogous to comprehensive gene expression analysis, will clearly have far-reaching impacts on protein biomarker investigations of human diseases such as cancer through interrogation of the archived fresh frozen and formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue collections. This review therefore focuses on the most recent advances in microdissection techniques and proteome platforms for procuring homogeneous subpopulations of tumor cells or structures and performing comprehensive analysis of protein profiles within tissue specimens, respectively. Developments in capillary separations capable of providing extremely high resolving power and selective analyte enrichment are particularly highlighted for their roles within the broader context of a state-of-the-art integrated tissue proteome effort. The capabilities of CIEF-based multidimensional separations for performing proteome analysis from minute samples create new opportunities in the pursuit of biomarker discovery using enriched and selected cell populations procured from tissue specimens. These proteome technological advances combined with recently developed tissue microdissection techniques provide powerful tools for those seeking to gain a greater understanding at the global level of the cellular machinery associated with human diseases such as cancer.

  11. Cardiovascular proteomics: tools to develop novel biomarkers and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Arab, Sara; Gramolini, Anthony O; Ping, Peipei; Kislinger, Thomas; Stanley, Brian; van Eyk, Jennifer; Ouzounian, Maral; MacLennan, David H; Emili, Andrew; Liu, Peter P

    2006-11-01

    Proteomics is the new systems biological approach to the study of proteins and protein variation on a large scale as a result of biological processes and perturbations. The field is undergoing a dramatic transformation, owing to the completion and annotation of the human genome as well as technological advances to study proteins on a large scale. The new science of proteomics can potentially yield novel biomarkers reflecting cardiovascular disease, establish earlier detection strategies, and monitor responses to therapy. Technological advances permit the unprecedented large-scale identification of peptide sequences in a biological sample with mass spectrometry, whereas gel-based techniques provide further refinement on the status of post-translational modification. The application of high throughput protein evaluation with a subset of predefined targets, identified through proteomics, microarray profiling, and pathway analysis in animal models and human tissues, is gaining momentum in research and clinical applications. Proteomic analysis has provided important insights into ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and cardiovascular pathophysiology. The combination of proteomic biomarkers with clinical phenotypes and genetic haplotype information can lead to a more precise diagnosis and therapy on an individual basis--the fundamental premise of "personalized medicine."

  12. Aptamer-Based Multiplexed Proteomic Technology for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Larry; Ayers, Deborah; Bertino, Jennifer; Bock, Christopher; Bock, Ashley; Brody, Edward N.; Carter, Jeff; Dalby, Andrew B.; Eaton, Bruce E.; Fitzwater, Tim; Flather, Dylan; Forbes, Ashley; Foreman, Trudi; Fowler, Cate; Gawande, Bharat; Goss, Meredith; Gunn, Magda; Gupta, Shashi; Halladay, Dennis; Heil, Jim; Heilig, Joe; Hicke, Brian; Husar, Gregory; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale; Jennings, Susan; Katilius, Evaldas; Keeney, Tracy R.; Kim, Nancy; Koch, Tad H.; Kraemer, Stephan; Kroiss, Luke; Le, Ngan; Levine, Daniel; Lindsey, Wes; Lollo, Bridget; Mayfield, Wes; Mehan, Mike; Mehler, Robert; Nelson, Sally K.; Nelson, Michele; Nieuwlandt, Dan; Nikrad, Malti; Ochsner, Urs; Ostroff, Rachel M.; Otis, Matt; Parker, Thomas; Pietrasiewicz, Steve; Resnicow, Daniel I.; Rohloff, John; Sanders, Glenn; Sattin, Sarah; Schneider, Daniel; Singer, Britta; Stanton, Martin; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Alex; Stratford, Suzanne; Vaught, Jonathan D.; Vrkljan, Mike; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Watrobka, Mike; Waugh, Sheela; Weiss, Allison; Wilcox, Sheri K.; Wolfson, Alexey; Wolk, Steven K.; Zhang, Chi; Zichi, Dom

    2010-01-01

    Background The interrogation of proteomes (“proteomics”) in a highly multiplexed and efficient manner remains a coveted and challenging goal in biology and medicine. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a new aptamer-based proteomic technology for biomarker discovery capable of simultaneously measuring thousands of proteins from small sample volumes (15 µL of serum or plasma). Our current assay measures 813 proteins with low limits of detection (1 pM median), 7 logs of overall dynamic range (∼100 fM–1 µM), and 5% median coefficient of variation. This technology is enabled by a new generation of aptamers that contain chemically modified nucleotides, which greatly expand the physicochemical diversity of the large randomized nucleic acid libraries from which the aptamers are selected. Proteins in complex matrices such as plasma are measured with a process that transforms a signature of protein concentrations into a corresponding signature of DNA aptamer concentrations, which is quantified on a DNA microarray. Our assay takes advantage of the dual nature of aptamers as both folded protein-binding entities with defined shapes and unique nucleotide sequences recognizable by specific hybridization probes. To demonstrate the utility of our proteomics biomarker discovery technology, we applied it to a clinical study of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We identified two well known CKD biomarkers as well as an additional 58 potential CKD biomarkers. These results demonstrate the potential utility of our technology to rapidly discover unique protein signatures characteristic of various disease states. Conclusions/Significance We describe a versatile and powerful tool that allows large-scale comparison of proteome profiles among discrete populations. This unbiased and highly multiplexed search engine will enable the discovery of novel biomarkers in a manner that is unencumbered by our incomplete knowledge of biology, thereby helping to advance the next generation of

  13. Discovery of Biomarkers for Osteosarcoma by Proteomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Kubota, Daisuke; Kikuta, Kazutaka; Kaneko, Kazuo; Kawai, Akira; Kondo, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcomas are the most common malignant bone tumors, and the identification of useful tumor biomarkers and target proteins is required to predict the clinical outcome of patients and therapeutic response as well as to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Global protein expression studies, namely, proteomic studies, can offer important clues to understanding the tumor biology that cannot be obtained by other approaches. These studies, such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, have provided protein expression profiles of osteosarcoma that can be used to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers, as well as to understand biology of tumor progression and malignancy. In this paper, a brief description of the methodology will be provided followed by a few examples of the recent proteomic studies that have generated new information regarding osteosarcomas. PMID:23226966

  14. Proteomic Biomarkers Panel: New Insights in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Codrici, Elena; Rusu, Elena; Zilisteanu, Diana; Albulescu, Radu; Anton, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, despite being a “silent epidemic” disease, represents one of the main causes of mortality in general population, along with cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of poor prognosis for these patients. The specific objective of our study was to characterize the relationship between the inflammatory status, the bone disorders markers, and kidney failure in chronic kidney disease patient stages 2–4, in order to design a novel biomarker panel that improves early disease diagnosis and therapeutic response, thus being further integrated into clinical applications. A panel of proteomic biomarkers, assessed by xMAP array, which includes mediators of inflammation (IL-6, TNF-α) and mineral and bone disorder biomarkers (OPG, OPN, OCN, FGF-23, and Fetuin-A), was found to be more relevant than a single biomarker to detect early CKD stages. The association between inflammatory cytokines and bone disorders markers, IL-6, TNF-α, OPN, OPG, and FGF-23, reflects the severity of vascular changes in CKD and predicts disease progression. Proteomic xMAP analyses shed light on a new approach to clinical evaluation for CKD staging and prognosis.

  15. Proteomic Biomarkers Panel: New Insights in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Codrici, Elena; Rusu, Elena; Zilisteanu, Diana; Albulescu, Radu; Anton, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, despite being a “silent epidemic” disease, represents one of the main causes of mortality in general population, along with cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of poor prognosis for these patients. The specific objective of our study was to characterize the relationship between the inflammatory status, the bone disorders markers, and kidney failure in chronic kidney disease patient stages 2–4, in order to design a novel biomarker panel that improves early disease diagnosis and therapeutic response, thus being further integrated into clinical applications. A panel of proteomic biomarkers, assessed by xMAP array, which includes mediators of inflammation (IL-6, TNF-α) and mineral and bone disorder biomarkers (OPG, OPN, OCN, FGF-23, and Fetuin-A), was found to be more relevant than a single biomarker to detect early CKD stages. The association between inflammatory cytokines and bone disorders markers, IL-6, TNF-α, OPN, OPG, and FGF-23, reflects the severity of vascular changes in CKD and predicts disease progression. Proteomic xMAP analyses shed light on a new approach to clinical evaluation for CKD staging and prognosis. PMID:27667892

  16. Prostate cancer proteomics: The urgent need for clinically validated biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Evans, Caroline A; Glen, Adam; Eaton, Colby L; Larré, Stéphane; Catto, James W F; Hamdy, Freddie C; Wright, Phillip C; Rehman, Ishtiaq

    2009-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer diagnosis and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Currently, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the only biomarker widely used in the diagnosis and management of patients with PCa. However, PSA lacks diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, leading to false-negative and false-positive test results. PSA cannot distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, leading to many patients being over-treated with associated side-effects. Furthermore, PSA is unable to identify which tumors are likely to become unresponsive to treatment at an early stage. Thus, there is an urgent need for clinically validated biomarkers which will improve the diagnosis and management of PCa. Given the heterogeneity of PCa it is likely that a panel of biomarkers will be required. In the quest for PCa biomarkers, a wide range of samples including urine, serum, tissues, and cell lines have been studied using proteomic approaches such as 2-DE, SELDI-TOF, SILAC, ICAT, iTRAQ, and MALDI-IMS. The value of these technologies, and other emerging platforms such as selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), are discussed in the context of biomarker discovery, validation and addressing the "bottle-necks" that exist prior to clinical translation. PMID:26238619

  17. The Significance of Proteomic Biomarkers in Male Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zografos, Eleni; Gazouli, Maria; Tsangaris, Georgios; Marinos, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in men (MBC) is an uncommon malignancy and accounts for only 1% of all diagnosed breast cancers. By using genomic and transcriptomic approaches, researchers have been able to expand our insight into the genetic basis of breast cancer, by providing new biomarkers. We currently know that gene analysis by itself does not show the complete picture. Along with the genomic approach, proteomics are crucial for the improvement of breast cancer diagnosis, sub-classification, for predicting response to different treatment modalities and for predicting prognosis. There are great challenges in identifying discriminatory proteins and the use of specific techniques along with additional analytical tools is required. A number of techniques allow testing for proteins produced during specific diseases. In this review, an effort is made to summarize the studies and results linked to the implementation of proteomics in the field of MBC detection and diagnosis.

  18. The proteome of Hypobaric Induced Hypoxic Lung: Insights from Temporal Proteomic Profiling for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Srivastava, Mousami; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high altitude induces physiological responses due to hypoxia. Lungs being at the first level to face the alterations in oxygen levels are critical to counter and balance these changes. Studies have been done analysing pulmonary proteome alterations in response to exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. However, such studies have reported the alterations at specific time points and do not reflect the gradual proteomic changes. These studies also identify the various biochemical pathways and responses induced after immediate exposure and the resolution of these effects in challenge to hypobaric hypoxia. In the present study, using 2-DE/MS approach, we attempt to resolve these shortcomings by analysing the proteome alterations in lungs in response to different durations of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Our study thus highlights the gradual and dynamic changes in pulmonary proteome following hypobaric hypoxia. For the first time, we also report the possible consideration of SULT1A1, as a biomarker for the diagnosis of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Higher SULT1A1 levels were observed in rats as well as in humans exposed to high altitude, when compared to sea-level controls. This study can thus form the basis for identifying biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in responses to hypobaric hypoxia. PMID:26022216

  19. [Identification of predictive biomarkers to radiotherapy outcome through proteomics approaches].

    PubMed

    Lacombe, J; Mange, A; Azria, D; Solassol, J

    2013-02-01

    The success of radiotherapy mainly depends on the total administered dose. This dose must be homogenously delivered onto the tumor and must preserve the surrounding healthy tissue. However, several patients are hypersensitive to ionizing radiations and may develop important radiation-induced early and late side effects. The prediction of these side effects remains currently impossible, involving to limit the given dose with the risk to decrease the therapeutic benefit for patients. Therefore, one of the major challenges in radiobiology is to accurately predict tumour radioresistance and to determine normal tissue radiosensitivity to tailor treatment. Several studies have been carried out and different predictive assays have been described in this field. However, none of them showed significant results for clinical use. For several years, many technological advances in proteomic fields have been performed in order to identify new biomarkers. After a brief description of the main characteristics of tumor radioresistance and normal tissue radiosensitivity, we will develop in this review the different approaches proposed so far to identify predictive tools of radiotherapy outcome. We will then analyze in detail how proteomic studies can improve the understanding of mechanisms associated with radiosensitivity of healthy tissue and radioresistance of tumor cells and how they could highlight new predictive biomarkers in radiobiology.

  20. Overlap of proteomics biomarkers between women with pre-eclampsia and PCOS: a systematic review and biomarker database integration

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Gulafshana Hafeez; Galazis, Nicolas; Docheva, Nikolina; Layfield, Robert; Atiomo, William

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do any proteomic biomarkers previously identified for pre-eclampsia (PE) overlap with those identified in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). SUMMARY ANSWER Five previously identified proteomic biomarkers were found to be common in women with PE and PCOS when compared with controls. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Various studies have indicated an association between PCOS and PE; however, the pathophysiological mechanisms supporting this association are not known. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A systematic review and update of our PCOS proteomic biomarker database was performed, along with a parallel review of PE biomarkers. The study included papers from 1980 to December 2013. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS In all the studies analysed, there were a total of 1423 patients and controls. The number of proteomic biomarkers that were catalogued for PE was 192. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Five proteomic biomarkers were shown to be differentially expressed in women with PE and PCOS when compared with controls: transferrin, fibrinogen α, β and γ chain variants, kininogen-1, annexin 2 and peroxiredoxin 2. In PE, the biomarkers were identified in serum, plasma and placenta and in PCOS, the biomarkers were identified in serum, follicular fluid, and ovarian and omental biopsies. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION The techniques employed to detect proteomics have limited ability in identifying proteins that are of low abundance, some of which may have a diagnostic potential. The sample sizes and number of biomarkers identified from these studies do not exclude the risk of false positives, a limitation of all biomarker studies. The biomarkers common to PE and PCOS were identified from proteomic analyses of different tissues. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS This data amalgamation of the proteomic studies in PE and in PCOS, for the first time, discovered a panel of five biomarkers for PE which are common to women with PCOS, including transferrin

  1. Proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Kimhofer, T; Fye, H; Taylor-Robinson, S; Thursz, M; Holmes, E

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ranks third in overall global cancer-related mortality. Symptomatic presentation often means advanced disease where potentially curative treatment options become very limited. Numerous international guidelines propose the routine monitoring of those with the highest risk factors for the condition in order to diagnose potential tumourigenesis early. To aid this, the fields of metabonomic- and proteomic-based biomarker discovery have applied advanced tools to identify early changes in protein and metabolite expression in HCC patients vs controls. With robust validation, it is anticipated that from these candidates will rise a high-performance non-invasive test able to diagnose early HCC and related conditions. This review gathers the numerous markers proposed by studies using mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluates areas of consistency as well as discordance. PMID:25826224

  2. Proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kimhofer, T; Fye, H; Taylor-Robinson, S; Thursz, M; Holmes, E

    2015-03-31

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ranks third in overall global cancer-related mortality. Symptomatic presentation often means advanced disease where potentially curative treatment options become very limited. Numerous international guidelines propose the routine monitoring of those with the highest risk factors for the condition in order to diagnose potential tumourigenesis early. To aid this, the fields of metabonomic- and proteomic-based biomarker discovery have applied advanced tools to identify early changes in protein and metabolite expression in HCC patients vs controls. With robust validation, it is anticipated that from these candidates will rise a high-performance non-invasive test able to diagnose early HCC and related conditions. This review gathers the numerous markers proposed by studies using mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluates areas of consistency as well as discordance. PMID:25826224

  3. Proteomics reveals potential biomarkers of seed vigor in sugarbeet.

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Meinhard, Juliane; Job, Claudette; Strub, Jean-Marc; Fischer, Uwe; Pestsova, Elena; Westhoff, Peter; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Job, Dominique

    2011-05-01

    To unravel biomarkers of seed vigor, an important trait conditioning crop yield, a comparative proteomic study was conducted with sugarbeet seed samples of varying vigor as generated by an invigoration treatment called hydropriming and an aging treatment called controlled deterioration. Comparative proteomics revealed proteins exhibiting contrasting behavior between seed samples. Thus, 18 proteins were up-regulated during priming and down-regulated during aging and further displayed an up-regulation upon priming of the aged seeds, meaning that down-regulation of these spot volumes during aging was reversible upon subsequent priming. Also, 11 proteins exhibited the converse behavior characterized by a decrease and an increase of the spot volumes during priming and aging of the control seeds, respectively, and a decrease in the spot volumes upon priming of the aged seeds. The results underpinned the role in seed vigor of several metabolic pathways involved in lipid and starch mobilization, protein synthesis or the methyl cycle. They also corroborate previous studies suggesting that the glyoxylate enzyme isocitrate lyase, the capacity of protein synthesis and components of abscisic acid signaling pathways are likely contributors of seed vigor.

  4. Urinary proteomics as a novel tool for biomarker discovery in kidney diseases*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Yi-ding; Gu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Urine has become one of the most attractive biofluids in clinical proteomics, for its procurement is easy and noninvasive and it contains sufficient proteins and peptides. Urinary proteomics has thus rapidly developed and has been extensively applied to biomarker discovery in clinical diseases, especially kidney diseases. In this review, we discuss two important aspects of urinary proteomics in detail, namely, sample preparation and proteomic technologies. In addition, data mining in urinary proteomics is also briefly introduced. At last, we present several successful examples on the application of urinary proteomics for biomarker discovery in kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, renal Fanconi syndrome, acute kidney injury, and renal allograft rejection. PMID:20349519

  5. Impact of biomarker development on drug safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Marrer, Estelle; Dieterle, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Drug safety has always been a key aspect of drug development. Recently, the Vioxx case and several cases of serious adverse events being linked to high-profile products have increased the importance of drug safety, especially in the eyes of drug development companies and global regulatory agencies. Safety biomarkers are increasingly being seen as helping to provide the clarity, predictability, and certainty needed to gain confidence in decision making: early-stage projects can be stopped quicker, late-stage projects become less risky. Public and private organizations are investing heavily in terms of time, money and manpower on safety biomarker development. An illustrative and 'door opening' safety biomarker success story is the recent recognition of kidney safety biomarkers for pre-clinical and limited translational contexts by FDA and EMEA. This milestone achieved for kidney biomarkers and the 'know how' acquired is being transferred to other organ toxicities, namely liver, heart, vascular system. New technologies and molecular-based approaches, i.e., molecular pathology as a complement to the classical toolbox, allow promising discoveries in the safety biomarker field. This review will focus on the utility and use of safety biomarkers all along drug development, highlighting the present gaps and opportunities identified in organ toxicity monitoring. A last part will be dedicated to safety biomarker development in general, from identification to diagnostic tests, using the kidney safety biomarkers success as an illustrative example.

  6. High-content affinity-based proteomics: unlocking protein biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Brody, Edward N; Gold, Larry; Lawn, Richard M; Walker, Jeffrey J; Zichi, Dom

    2010-11-01

    Single protein biomarkers measured with antibody-based affinity assays are the basis of molecular diagnostics in clinical practice today. There is great hope in discovering new protein biomarkers and combinations of protein biomarkers for advancing medicine through monitoring health, diagnosing disease, guiding treatment, and developing new therapeutics. The goal of high-content proteomics is to unlock protein biomarker discovery by measuring many (thousands) or all (∼23,000) proteins in the human proteome in an unbiased, data-driven approach. High-content proteomics has proven technically difficult due to the diversity of proteins, the complexity of relevant biological samples, such as blood and tissue, and large concentration ranges (in the order of 10(12) in blood). Mass spectrometry and affinity methods based on antibodies have dominated approaches to high-content proteomics. For technical reasons, neither has achieved adequate simultaneous performance and high-content. Here we review antibody-based protein measurement, multiplexed antibody-based protein measurement, and limitations of antibodies for high-content proteomics due to their inherent cross-reactivity. Finally, we review a new affinity-based proteomic technology developed from the ground up to solve the problem of high content with high sensitivity and specificity. Based on a new generation of slow off-rate modified aptamers (SOMAmers), this technology is unlocking biomarker discovery.

  7. High-throughput proteomics: a new tool for quality and safety in fishery products.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Sara; Mullen, William; Cristobal, Susana

    2014-03-01

    In order to cope with the increasing demand for fishery products, sensitive technological tools are required to ensure high quality and wholesomeness and to monitor their production process in a sustainable manner while complying with the strict standards imposed by regulatory authorities. Proteomics may assist the industry as it allows an unbiased approach in the discovery of biomarkers that could be used to increase our understanding of different biological, physiological and ecological aspects that may be advantageous in optimizing quality and safety in aquatic species. The aim of this review is to highlight the potential of cost-effective high-throughput technologies, such as those offered by proteomics using "on-line" mass spectrometry to improve the efficiency of the industry in identifying biomarkers relevant for safe high quality products.

  8. Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics and Peptidomics for Systems Biology and Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Robert; Ma, Di; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    The scientific community has shown great interest in the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics and peptidomics for its applications in biology. Proteomics technologies have evolved to produce large datasets of proteins or peptides involved in various biological and disease progression processes producing testable hypothesis for complex biological questions. This review provides an introduction and insight to relevant topics in proteomics and peptidomics including biological material selection, sample preparation, separation techniques, peptide fragmentation, post-translation modifications, quantification, bioinformatics, and biomarker discovery and validation. In addition, current literature and remaining challenges and emerging technologies for proteomics and peptidomics are presented. PMID:24504115

  9. Proteomics of Microparticles with SILAC Quantification (PROMIS-Quan): A Novel Proteomic Method for Plasma Biomarker Quantification*

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Michal; Oren-Giladi, Pazit; Kaidar-Person, Orit; Shaked, Yuval; Geiger, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased proteomic analysis of plasma samples holds the promise to reveal clinically invaluable disease biomarkers. However, the tremendous dynamic range of the plasma proteome has so far hampered the identification of such low abundant markers. To overcome this challenge we analyzed the plasma microparticle proteome, and reached an unprecedented depth of over 3000 plasma proteins in single runs. To add a quantitative dimension, we developed PROMIS-Quan—PROteomics of MIcroparticles with Super-Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) Quantification, a novel mass spectrometry-based technology for plasma microparticle proteome quantification. PROMIS-Quan enables a two-step relative and absolute SILAC quantification. First, plasma microparticle proteomes are quantified relative to a super-SILAC mix composed of cell lines from distinct origins. Next, the absolute amounts of selected proteins of interest are quantified relative to the super-SILAC mix. We applied PROMIS-Quan to prostate cancer and compared plasma microparticle samples of healthy individuals and prostate cancer patients. We identified in total 5374 plasma-microparticle proteins, and revealed a predictive signature of three proteins that were elevated in the patient-derived plasma microparticles. Finally, PROMIS-Quan enabled determination of the absolute quantitative changes in prostate specific antigen (PSA) upon treatment. We propose PROMIS-Quan as an innovative platform for biomarker discovery, validation, and quantification in both the biomedical research and in the clinical worlds. PMID:25624350

  10. Biomarker-based drug safety assessment in the age of systems pharmacology: from foundational to regulatory science.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Hong, Huixiao; Mendrick, Donna L; Tang, Yun; Cheng, Feixiong

    2015-01-01

    Improved biomarker-based assessment of drug safety is needed in drug discovery and development as well as regulatory evaluation. However, identifying drug safety-related biomarkers such as genes, proteins, miRNA and single-nucleotide polymorphisms remains a big challenge. The advances of 'omics' and computational technologies such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, systems biology, network biology and systems pharmacology enable us to explore drug actions at the organ and organismal levels. Computational and experimental systems pharmacology approaches could be utilized to facilitate biomarker-based drug safety assessment for drug discovery and development and to inform better regulatory decisions. In this article, we review the current status and advances of systems pharmacology approaches for the development of predictive models to identify biomarkers for drug safety assessment.

  11. A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ngounou Wetie, Armand G; Wormwood, Kelly L; Russell, Stefanie; Ryan, Jeanne P; Darie, Costel C; Woods, Alisa G

    2015-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prevalence is increasing, with current estimates at 1/68-1/50 individuals diagnosed with an ASD. Diagnosis is based on behavioral assessments. Early diagnosis and intervention is known to greatly improve functional outcomes in people with ASD. Diagnosis, treatment monitoring and prognosis of ASD symptoms could be facilitated with biomarkers to complement behavioral assessments. Mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics may help reveal biomarkers for ASD. In this pilot study, we have analyzed the salivary proteome in individuals with ASD compared to neurotypical control subjects, using MS-based proteomics. Our goal is to optimize methods for salivary proteomic biomarker discovery and to identify initial putative biomarkers in people with ASDs. The salivary proteome is virtually unstudied in ASD, and saliva could provide an easily accessible biomaterial for analysis. Using nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we found statistically significant differences in several salivary proteins, including elevated prolactin-inducible protein, lactotransferrin, Ig kappa chain C region, Ig gamma-1 chain C region, Ig lambda-2 chain C regions, neutrophil elastase, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1. Our results indicate that this is an effective method for identification of salivary protein biomarkers, support the concept that immune system and gastrointestinal disturbances may be present in individuals with ASDs and point toward the need for larger studies in behaviorally-characterized individuals.

  12. Statistical design for biospecimen cohort size in proteomics-based biomarker discovery and verification studies.

    PubMed

    Skates, Steven J; Gillette, Michael A; LaBaer, Joshua; Carr, Steven A; Anderson, Leigh; Liebler, Daniel C; Ransohoff, David; Rifai, Nader; Kondratovich, Marina; Težak, Živana; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Oberg, Ann L; Wright, Ian; Barnes, Grady; Gail, Mitchell; Mesri, Mehdi; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Rodriguez, Henry; Boja, Emily S

    2013-12-01

    Protein biomarkers are needed to deepen our understanding of cancer biology and to improve our ability to diagnose, monitor, and treat cancers. Important analytical and clinical hurdles must be overcome to allow the most promising protein biomarker candidates to advance into clinical validation studies. Although contemporary proteomics technologies support the measurement of large numbers of proteins in individual clinical specimens, sample throughput remains comparatively low. This problem is amplified in typical clinical proteomics research studies, which routinely suffer from a lack of proper experimental design, resulting in analysis of too few biospecimens to achieve adequate statistical power at each stage of a biomarker pipeline. To address this critical shortcoming, a joint workshop was held by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) with participation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). An important output from the workshop was a statistical framework for the design of biomarker discovery and verification studies. Herein, we describe the use of quantitative clinical judgments to set statistical criteria for clinical relevance and the development of an approach to calculate biospecimen sample size for proteomic studies in discovery and verification stages prior to clinical validation stage. This represents a first step toward building a consensus on quantitative criteria for statistical design of proteomics biomarker discovery and verification research.

  13. Proteomics in colorectal cancer translational research: biomarker discovery for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Meike; Fijneman, Remond J A; Verheul, Henk M W; Meijer, Gerrit A; Jimenez, Connie R

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related death in the western world. Screening to detect the disease in an early stage is the most effective approach to tackle this problem. In addition, better diagnostic tools for assessment of prognosis and prediction of response to drug therapy will allow for personalized therapies and better outcomes. Protein biomarkers that reflect tumor biology have the potential to address a wide range of clinical needs. These include diagnostic (screening) biomarkers for early detection, prognostic biomarkers for estimation of disease outcome, predictive biomarkers for adjuvant treatment stratification, and surveillance biomarkers for disease monitoring and treatment response. An important source for the discovery of potential biomarkers comes from mass spectrometry based proteomics research of the biology of CRC development. Here, we review recent colon cancer proteomics studies directed at identification of biomarker proteins. These include studies that use preclinical models (i.e. cell lines or murine tissues) as well as clinical materials (e.g. tissue and stool samples). We separately highlight some studies that focused on identification of cancer stem cell (CSC) related proteins in tumor spheroids, an in vitro model system for investigating CRC treatment response. Recent proteomics studies have generated many new candidate protein biomarkers. However, the lack of follow-up studies that lead to biomarker verification and/or validation remains a limiting factor in the translation of these candidate biomarkers into clinical applications. This is partly due to technological limitations which are bound to diminish with new technologies, including selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS). Antibodies are still required, though, both to perform high-throughput validation as well as to develop cost-effective tests for routine use in a clinical setting.

  14. Novel alternative splicing isoform biomarkers identification from high-throughput plasma proteomics profiling of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the biopharmaceutical industry, biomarkers define molecular taxonomies of patients and diseases and serve as surrogate endpoints in early-phase drug trials. Molecular biomarkers can be much more sensitive than traditional lab tests. Discriminating disease biomarkers by traditional method such as DNA microarray has proved challenging. Alternative splicing isoform represents a new class of diagnostic biomarkers. Recent scientific evidence is demonstrating that the differentiation and quantification of individual alternative splicing isoforms could improve insights into disease diagnosis and management. Identifying and characterizing alternative splicing isoforms are essential to the study of molecular mechanisms and early detection of complex diseases such as breast cancer. However, there are limitations with traditional methods used for alternative splicing isoform determination such as transcriptome-level, low level of coverage and poor focus on alternative splicing. Results Therefore, we presented a peptidomics approach to searching novel alternative splicing isoforms in clinical proteomics. Our results showed that the approach has significant potential in enabling discovery of new types of high-quality alternative splicing isoform biomarkers. Conclusions We developed a peptidomics approach for the proteomics community to analyze, identify, and characterize alternative splicing isoforms from MS-based proteomics experiments with more coverage and exclusive focus on alternative splicing. The approach can help generate novel hypotheses on molecular risk factors and molecular mechanisms of cancer in early stage, leading to identification of potentially highly specific alternative splicing isoform biomarkers for early detection of cancer. PMID:24565027

  15. LC-MS/MS-based serum proteomics for identification of candidate biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Song, Ehwang; Zhu, Rui; Di Poto, Cristina; Wang, Minkun; Luo, Yue; Varghese, Rency S; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Ziada, Dina Hazem; Desai, Chirag S; Shetty, Kirti; Mechref, Yehia; Ressom, Habtom W

    2015-07-01

    Associating changes in protein levels with the onset of cancer has been widely investigated to identify clinically relevant diagnostic biomarkers. In the present study, we analyzed sera from 205 patients recruited in the United States and Egypt for biomarker discovery using label-free proteomic analysis by LC-MS/MS. We performed untargeted proteomic analysis of sera to identify candidate proteins with statistically significant differences between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and patients with liver cirrhosis. We further evaluated the significance of 101 proteins in sera from the same 205 patients through targeted quantitation by MRM on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. This led to the identification of 21 candidate protein biomarkers that were significantly altered in both the United States and Egyptian cohorts. Among the 21 candidates, ten were previously reported as HCC-associated proteins (eight exhibiting consistent trends with our observation), whereas 11 are new candidates discovered by this study. Pathway analysis based on the significant proteins reveals upregulation of the complement and coagulation cascades pathway and downregulation of the antigen processing and presentation pathway in HCC cases versus patients with liver cirrhosis. The results of this study demonstrate the power of combining untargeted and targeted quantitation methods for a comprehensive serum proteomic analysis, to evaluate changes in protein levels and discover novel diagnostic biomarkers. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001171 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001171).

  16. Urine Proteome Biomarkers in Kidney Diseases. I. Limits, Perspectives, and First Focus on Normal Urine

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, Laura; Bruschi, Maurizio; Candiano, Giovanni; Lugani, Francesca; Petretto, Andrea; Bonanni, Alice; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2016-01-01

    Urine proteome is a potential source of information in renal diseases, and it is considered a natural area of investigation for biomarkers. Technology developments have markedly increased the power analysis on urinary proteins, and it is time to confront methodologies and results of major studies on the topics. This is a first part of a series of reviews that will focus on the urine proteome as a site for detecting biomarkers of renal diseases; the theme of the first review concerns methodological aspects applied to normal urine. Main issues are techniques for urine pretreatment, separation of exosomes, use of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, mass spectrometry approaches, and analysis of data sets. Available studies show important differences, suggesting a major confounding effect of the technologies utilized for analysis. The objective is to obtain consensus about which approaches should be utilized for studying urine proteome in renal diseases. PMID:26997865

  17. Identification of Serum Biomarkers for Gastric Cancer Diagnosis Using a Human Proteome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Wang, Jingfang; Li, Jianfang; Zhang, Hainan; Guo, Shujuan; Yan, Min; Zhu, Zhenggang; Lan, Bin; Ding, Youcheng; Xu, Ming; Li, Wei; Gu, Xiaonian; Qi, Chong; Zhu, Heng; Shao, Zhifeng; Liu, Bingya; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to globally discover serum biomarkers for diagnosis of gastric cancer (GC). GC serum autoantibodies were discovered and validated using serum samples from independent patient cohorts encompassing 1,401 participants divided into three groups, i.e. healthy, GC patients, and GC-related disease group. To discover biomarkers for GC, the human proteome microarray was first applied to screen specific autoantibodies in a total of 87 serum samples from GC patients and healthy controls. Potential biomarkers were identified via a statistical analysis protocol. Targeted protein microarrays with only the potential biomarkers were constructed and used to validate the candidate biomarkers using 914 samples. To provide further validation, the abundance of autoantibodies specific to the biomarker candidates was analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the serum biomarkers. Finally, the efficacy of prognosis efficacy of the final four biomarkers was evaluated by analyzing the clinical records. The final panel of biomarkers consisting of COPS2, CTSF, NT5E, and TERF1 provides high diagnostic power, with 95% sensitivity and 92% specificity to differentiate GC patients from healthy individuals. Prognosis analysis showed that the panel could also serve as independent predictors of the overall GC patient survival. The panel of four serum biomarkers (COPS2, CTSF, NT5E, and TERF1) could serve as a noninvasive diagnostic index for GC, and the combination of them could potentially be used as a predictor of the overall GC survival rate. PMID:26598640

  18. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2016-10-18

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  19. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  20. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  1. Translation of proteomic biomarkers into FDA approved cancer diagnostics: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Füzéry, Anna K; Levin, Joshua; Chan, Maria M; Chan, Daniel W

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been made over the past few decades to discover novel cancer biomarkers for use in clinical practice. However, a striking discrepancy exists between the effort directed toward biomarker discovery and the number of markers that make it into clinical practice. One of the confounding issues in translating a novel discovery into clinical practice is that quite often the scientists working on biomarker discovery have limited knowledge of the analytical, diagnostic, and regulatory requirements for a clinical assay. This review provides an introduction to such considerations with the aim of generating more extensive discussion for study design, assay performance, and regulatory approval in the process of translating new proteomic biomarkers from discovery into cancer diagnostics. We first describe the analytical requirements for a robust clinical biomarker assay, including concepts of precision, trueness, specificity and analytical interference, and carryover. We next introduce the clinical considerations of diagnostic accuracy, receiver operating characteristic analysis, positive and negative predictive values, and clinical utility. We finish the review by describing components of the FDA approval process for protein-based biomarkers, including classification of biomarker assays as medical devices, analytical and clinical performance requirements, and the approval process workflow. While we recognize that the road from biomarker discovery, validation, and regulatory approval to the translation into the clinical setting could be long and difficult, the reward for patients, clinicians and scientists could be rather significant. PMID:24088261

  2. Translation of proteomic biomarkers into FDA approved cancer diagnostics: issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous efforts have been made over the past few decades to discover novel cancer biomarkers for use in clinical practice. However, a striking discrepancy exists between the effort directed toward biomarker discovery and the number of markers that make it into clinical practice. One of the confounding issues in translating a novel discovery into clinical practice is that quite often the scientists working on biomarker discovery have limited knowledge of the analytical, diagnostic, and regulatory requirements for a clinical assay. This review provides an introduction to such considerations with the aim of generating more extensive discussion for study design, assay performance, and regulatory approval in the process of translating new proteomic biomarkers from discovery into cancer diagnostics. We first describe the analytical requirements for a robust clinical biomarker assay, including concepts of precision, trueness, specificity and analytical interference, and carryover. We next introduce the clinical considerations of diagnostic accuracy, receiver operating characteristic analysis, positive and negative predictive values, and clinical utility. We finish the review by describing components of the FDA approval process for protein-based biomarkers, including classification of biomarker assays as medical devices, analytical and clinical performance requirements, and the approval process workflow. While we recognize that the road from biomarker discovery, validation, and regulatory approval to the translation into the clinical setting could be long and difficult, the reward for patients, clinicians and scientists could be rather significant. PMID:24088261

  3. The Present and Future of Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer: Proteomics, Genomics, and Immunology Advancements

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreau, Pierre-Olivier; Stagg, John; Soulières, Denis; Saad, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common form of cancer in men worldwide. Biomarkers have emerged as essential tools for treatment and assessment since the variability of disease behavior, the cost and diversity of treatments, and the related impairment of quality of life have given rise to a need for a personalized approach. High-throughput technology platforms in proteomics and genomics have accelerated the development of biomarkers. Furthermore, recent successes of several new agents in PC, including immunotherapy, have stimulated the search for predictors of response and resistance and have improved the understanding of the biological mechanisms at work. This review provides an overview of currently established biomarkers in PC, as well as a selection of the most promising biomarkers within these particular fields of development. PMID:27168728

  4. Biomarkers for Bone Tumors: Discovery from Genomics and Proteomics Studies and Their Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Wan-Ibrahim, Wan I; Singh, Vivek A; Hashim, Onn H; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of bone tumor currently relies on imaging and biopsy, and hence, the need to find less invasive ways for its accurate detection. More recently, numerous promising deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein biomarkers with significant prognostic, diagnostic and/or predictive abilities for various types of bone tumors have been identified from genomics and proteomics studies. This article reviewed the putative biomarkers for the more common types of bone tumors (that is, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, chondrosarcoma [malignant] and giant cell tumor [benign]) that were unveiled from the studies. The benefits and drawbacks of these biomarkers, as well as the technology platforms involved in the research, were also discussed. Challenges faced in the biomarker discovery studies and the problems in their translation from the bench to the clinical settings were also addressed. PMID:26581086

  5. Analytical Validation Considerations of Multiplex Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Platforms for Measuring Protein Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein biomarker discovery and validation in current omics era are vital for healthcare professionals to improve diagnosis, detect cancers at an early stage, identify the likelihood of cancer recurrence, stratify stages with differential survival outcomes, and monitor therapeutic responses. The success of such biomarkers would have a huge impact on how we improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients and alleviate the financial burden of healthcare systems. In the past, the genomics community (mostly through large-scale, deep genomic sequencing technologies) has been steadily improving our understanding of the molecular basis of disease, with a number of biomarker panels already authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use (e.g., MammaPrint, two recently cleared devices using next-generation sequencing platforms to detect DNA changes in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene). Clinical proteomics, on the other hand, albeit its ability to delineate the functional units of a cell, more likely driving the phenotypic differences of a disease (i.e., proteins and protein–protein interaction networks and signaling pathways underlying the disease), “staggers” to make a significant impact with only an average ∼1.5 protein biomarkers per year approved by the FDA over the past 15–20 years. This statistic itself raises the concern that major roadblocks have been impeding an efficient transition of protein marker candidates in biomarker development despite major technological advances in proteomics in recent years. PMID:25171765

  6. Analytical validation considerations of multiplex mass-spectrometry-based proteomic platforms for measuring protein biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Boja, Emily S; Fehniger, Thomas E; Baker, Mark S; Marko-Varga, György; Rodriguez, Henry

    2014-12-01

    Protein biomarker discovery and validation in current omics era are vital for healthcare professionals to improve diagnosis, detect cancers at an early stage, identify the likelihood of cancer recurrence, stratify stages with differential survival outcomes, and monitor therapeutic responses. The success of such biomarkers would have a huge impact on how we improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients and alleviate the financial burden of healthcare systems. In the past, the genomics community (mostly through large-scale, deep genomic sequencing technologies) has been steadily improving our understanding of the molecular basis of disease, with a number of biomarker panels already authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use (e.g., MammaPrint, two recently cleared devices using next-generation sequencing platforms to detect DNA changes in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene). Clinical proteomics, on the other hand, albeit its ability to delineate the functional units of a cell, more likely driving the phenotypic differences of a disease (i.e., proteins and protein-protein interaction networks and signaling pathways underlying the disease), "staggers" to make a significant impact with only an average ∼ 1.5 protein biomarkers per year approved by the FDA over the past 15-20 years. This statistic itself raises the concern that major roadblocks have been impeding an efficient transition of protein marker candidates in biomarker development despite major technological advances in proteomics in recent years.

  7. Candidate-based proteomics in the search for biomarkers of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Leigh

    2005-01-01

    The key concept of proteomics (looking at many proteins at once) opens new avenues in the search for clinically useful biomarkers of disease, treatment response and ageing. As the number of proteins that can be detected in plasma or serum (the primary clinical diagnostic samples) increases towards 1000, a paradoxical decline has occurred in the number of new protein markers approved for diagnostic use in clinical laboratories. This review explores the limitations of current proteomics protein discovery platforms, and proposes an alternative approach, applicable to a range of biological/physiological problems, in which quantitative mass spectrometric methods developed for analytical chemistry are employed to measure limited sets of candidate markers in large sets of clinical samples. A set of 177 candidate biomarker proteins with reported associations to cardiovascular disease and stroke are presented as a starting point for such a ‘directed proteomics’ approach. PMID:15611012

  8. Identification of prosaposin and transgelin as potential biomarkers for gallbladder cancer using quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Bhunia, Shushruta; Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Gowda, Harsha; Advani, Jayshree; Shrivastav, Braj R; Navani, Sanjay; Leal, Pamela; Roa, Juan Carlos; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Gupta, Sanjeev; Chatterjee, Aditi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Tiwari, Pramod K

    2014-04-18

    Gallbladder cancer is an uncommon but lethal malignancy with particularly high incidence in Chile, India, Japan and China. There is a paucity of unbiased large-scale studies investigating molecular basis of gallbladder cancer. To systematically identify differentially regulated proteins in gallbladder cancer, iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics of gallbladder cancer was carried out using Fourier transform high resolution mass spectrometry. Of the 2575 proteins identified, proteins upregulated in gallbladder cancer included several lysosomal proteins such as prosaposin, cathepsin Z and cathepsin H. Downregulated proteins included serine protease HTRA1 and transgelin, which have been reported to be downregulated in several other cancers. Novel biomarker candidates including prosaposin and transgelin were validated to be upregulated and downregulated, respectively, in gallbladder cancer using tissue microarrays. Our study provides the first large scale proteomic characterization of gallbladder cancer which will serve as a resource for future discovery of biomarkers for gallbladder cancer.

  9. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF URINE IDENTIFIES SPECIFIC FRAGMENTS OF SERPINA-1 AND ALBUMIN AS BIOMARKERS OF PREECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    Buhimschi, Irina A.; Zhao, Guomao; Funai, Edmund F.; Harris, Nathan; Sasson, Isaac E.; Bernstein, Ira M.; Saade, George R.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The cause of preeclampsia remains unknown and the diagnosis can be uncertain. We used proteomic-based analysis of urine to improve disease classification and extend the pathophysiological understanding of preeclampsia. Study design Urine samples from 284 women were analyzed by mass spectrometry-based proteomics (SELDI). In the exploratory phase, 59 samples were used to extract the proteomic fingerprint characteristic of severe preeclampsia requiring mandated delivery and develop a diagnostic algorithm. In the challenge phase we sought to prospectively validate the algorithm in 225 women screened for a variety of high and low-risk conditions, including preeclampsia. Of these, 19 women were followed longitudinally throughout pregnancy. Presence of biomarkers was interpreted relative to clinical classification, need for delivery and other urine laboratory measures (ratios of protein-to-creatinine and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1-to-placental growth factor). In the translational phase biomarker identification by tandem mass spectrometry and validation experiments in urine, serum and placenta were employed to identify, quantify and localize the biomarkers or related proteins. Results We report that women with preeclampsia appear to present a unique urine proteomic fingerprint which predicts preeclampsia in need for mandated delivery with highest accuracy. This characteristic proteomic profile also has the ability to distinguish preeclampsia from other hypertensive or proteinuric disorders in pregnancy. Pregnant women followed longitudinally who developed preeclampsia displayed abnormal urinary profiles >10 weeks prior to clinical manifestation. Tandem mass spectrometry followed by de-novo sequencing identified the biomarkers as non-random cleavage products of SERPINA-1 and albumin. Of these, the 21-aminoacid C-terminus fragment of SERPINA-1 was highly associated with severe forms of preeclampsia requiring early delivery. In preeclampsia, increased and

  10. Data for chicken semen proteome and label free quantitative analyses displaying sperm quality biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Labas, Valérie; Grasseau, Isabelle; Cahier, Karine; Gargaros, Audrey; Harichaux, Grégoire; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Alves, Sabine; Bourin, Marie; Gérard, Nadine; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Understanding of biology of the avian male gamete is essential to improve the conservation of genetic resources and performances in farming. In this study, the semen proteome of the main domestic avian species (Gallus gallus) and evaluation of the molecular phenotype related to sperm quality were investigated using GeLC-MS/MS approach and label-free quantitative proteomic based on Spectral Counting (SC) and extracted ion chromatograms (XIC) methods. Here we describe in details the peptide/protein inventory of chicken ejaculated spermatozoa (SPZ) and seminal plasma (SP). We also show differential analyses of chicken semen (SPZ and corresponding SP) from 11 males demonstrating different levels of fertilizing capacity and sperm motility. The interpretation and description of these data can be found in a research article published by Labas and colleagues in the Journal of Proteomics in 2014 [1]. This is a new resource for exploring the molecular mechanisms involved in fertilizing capacity and to reveal new sets of fertility biomarkers.

  11. Urinary Proteomics Pilot Study for Biomarker Discovery and Diagnosis in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Rossing, Kasper; Bosselmann, Helle Skovmand; Gustafsson, Finn; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Gu, Yu-Mei; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Mischak, Harald; Staessen, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Biomarker discovery and new insights into the pathophysiology of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) may emerge from recent advances in high-throughput urinary proteomics. This could lead to improved diagnosis, risk stratification and management of HFrEF. Methods and Results Urine samples were analyzed by on-line capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionization micro time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-MS) to generate individual urinary proteome profiles. In an initial biomarker discovery cohort, analysis of urinary proteome profiles from 33 HFrEF patients and 29 age- and sex-matched individuals without HFrEF resulted in identification of 103 peptides that were significantly differentially excreted in HFrEF. These 103 peptides were used to establish the support vector machine-based HFrEF classifier HFrEF103. In a subsequent validation cohort, HFrEF103 very accurately (area under the curve, AUC = 0.972) discriminated between HFrEF patients (N = 94, sensitivity = 93.6%) and control individuals with and without impaired renal function and hypertension (N = 552, specificity = 92.9%). Interestingly, HFrEF103 showed low sensitivity (12.6%) in individuals with diastolic left ventricular dysfunction (N = 176). The HFrEF-related peptide biomarkers mainly included fragments of fibrillar type I and III collagen but also, e.g., of fibrinogen beta and alpha-1-antitrypsin. Conclusion CE-MS based urine proteome analysis served as a sensitive tool to determine a vast array of HFrEF-related urinary peptide biomarkers which might help improving our understanding and diagnosis of heart failure. PMID:27308822

  12. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics: the road to lung cancer biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Indovina, Paola; Marcelli, Eleonora; Pentimalli, Francesca; Tanganelli, Piero; Tarro, Giulio; Giordano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and women in Western nations, and is among the deadliest cancers with a 5-year survival rate of 15%. The high mortality caused by lung cancer is attributable to a late-stage diagnosis and the lack of effective treatments. So, it is crucial to identify new biomarkers that could function not only to detect lung cancer at an early stage but also to shed light on the molecular mechanisms that underlie cancer development and serve as the basis for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Considering that DNA-based biomarkers for lung cancer showed inadequate sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility, proteomics could represent a better tool for the identification of useful biomarkers and therapeutic targets for this cancer type. Among the proteomics technologies, the most powerful tool is mass spectrometry. In this review, we describe studies that use mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies to analyze tumor proteins and peptides, which might represent new diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive markers for lung cancer. We focus in particular on those findings that hold promise to impact significantly on the clinical management of this disease.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid proteomics and protein biomarkers in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Feneberg, Emily; Otto, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises a spectrum of rare neurodegenerative diseases with an estimated prevalence of 15-22 cases per 100,000 persons including the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). The pathogenesis of the diseases is still unclear and clinical diagnosis of FTLD is hampered by overlapping symptoms within the FTLD subtypes and with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Intracellular protein aggregates in the brain are a major hallmark of FTLD and implicate alterations in protein metabolism or function in the disease's pathogenesis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which surrounds the brain can be used to study changes in neurodegenerative diseases and to identify disease-related mechanisms or neurochemical biomarkers for diagnosis. In the present review, we will give an overview of the current literature on proteomic studies in CSF of FTLD patients. Reports of targeted and unbiased proteomic approaches are included and the results are discussed in regard of their informative value about disease pathology and the suitability to be used as diagnostic biomarkers. Finally, we will give some future perspectives on CSF proteomics and a list of candidate biomarkers which might be interesting for validation in further studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology.

  14. We are what we eat: food safety and proteomics.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Zolla, Lello

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we lead the reader through the evolution of proteomics application to the study of quality control in production processes of foods (including food of plant origin and transgenic plants in particular, but also meat, wine and beer, and milk) and food safety (screening for foodborne pathogens). These topics are attracting a great deal of attention, especially in recent years, when the international community has become increasingly aware of the central role of food quality and safety and their influence on the health of end-consumers. Early proteomics studies in the field of food research were mainly aimed at performing exploratory analyses of food (bovine, swine, chicken, or lamb meat, but also transgenic food such as genetically modified maize, for example) and beverages (wine), with the goal of improving the quality of the end-products. Recently, developments in the field of proteomics have also allowed the study of safety issues, as the technical advantages of sensitive techniques such as mass spectrometry have guaranteed a faster and improved individuation of food contaminating pathogens with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Biomarkers for pancreatic cancer: recent achievements in proteomics and genomics through classical and multivariate statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Emilio; Robotti, Elisa

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most aggressive and lethal neoplastic diseases. A valid alternative to the usual invasive diagnostic tools would certainly be the determination of biomarkers in peripheral fluids to provide less invasive tools for early diagnosis. Nowadays, biomarkers are generally investigated mainly in peripheral blood and tissues through high-throughput omics techniques comparing control vs pathological samples. The results can be evaluated by two main strategies: (1) classical methods in which the identification of significant biomarkers is accomplished by monovariate statistical tests where each biomarker is considered as independent from the others; and (2) multivariate methods, taking into consideration the correlations existing among the biomarkers themselves. This last approach is very powerful since it allows the identification of pools of biomarkers with diagnostic and prognostic performances which are superior to single markers in terms of sensitivity, specificity and robustness. Multivariate techniques are usually applied with variable selection procedures to provide a restricted set of biomarkers with the best predictive ability; however, standard selection methods are usually aimed at the identification of the smallest set of variables with the best predictive ability and exhaustivity is usually neglected. The exhaustive search for biomarkers is instead an important alternative to standard variable selection since it can provide information about the etiology of the pathology by producing a comprehensive set of markers. In this review, the most recent applications of the omics techniques (proteomics, genomics and metabolomics) to the identification of exploratory biomarkers for PC will be presented with particular regard to the statistical methods adopted for their identification. The basic theory related to classical and multivariate methods for identification of biomarkers is presented and then, the most recent applications in

  16. Clinical proteomics identifies potential biomarkers in Helicobacter pylori for gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Hao; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2014-02-14

    The development of gastrointestinal diseases has been found to be associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and various biochemical stresses in stomach and intestine. These stresses, such as oxidative, osmotic and acid stresses, may bring about bi-directional effects on both hosts and H. pylori, leading to changes of protein expression in their proteomes. Therefore, proteins differentially expressed in H. pylori under various stresses not only reflect gastrointestinal environment but also provide useful biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. In this regard, proteomic technology is an ideal tool to identify potential biomarkers as it can systematically monitor proteins and protein variation on a large scale of cell's translational landscape, permitting in-depth analyses of host and pathogen interactions. By performing two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by liquid chromatography-nanoESI-mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS), we have successfully pinpointed alkylhydroperoxide reductase (AhpC), neutrophil-activating protein and non-heme iron-binding ferritin as three prospective biomarkers showing up-regulation in H. pylori under oxidative, osmotic and acid stresses, respectively. Further biochemical characterization reveals that various environmental stresses can induce protein structure change and functional conversion in the identified biomarkers. Especially salient is the antioxidant enzyme AhpC, an abundant antioxidant protein present in H. pylori. It switches from a peroxide reductase of low-molecular-weight (LMW) oligomers to a molecular chaperone of high-molecular-weight (HMW) complexes under oxidative stress. Different seropositivy responses against LMW or HMW AhpC in H. pylori-infected patients faithfully match the disease progression from disease-free healthy persons to patients with gastric ulcer and cancer. These results has established AhpC of H. pylori as a promising diagnostic marker for

  17. Targeted proteomics for biomarker discovery and validation of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis C infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Gul M; Larry, Denner; Petersen, John R; Elferink, Cornelis J

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related mortality is high because early detection modalities are hampered by inaccuracy, expense and inherent procedural risks. Thus there is an urgent need for minimally invasive, highly specific and sensitive biomarkers that enable early disease detection when therapeutic intervention remains practical. Successful therapeutic intervention is predicated on the ability to detect the cancer early. Similar unmet medical needs abound in most fields of medicine and require novel methodological approaches. Proteomic profiling of body fluids presents a sensitive diagnostic tool for early cancer detection. Here we describe such a strategy of comparative proteomics to identify potential serum-based biomarkers to distinguish high-risk chronic hepatitis C virus infected patients from HCC patients. In order to compensate for the extraordinary dynamic range in serum proteins, enrichment methods that compress the dynamic range without surrendering proteome complexity can help minimize the problems associated with many depletion methods. The enriched serum can be resolved using 2D-difference in-gel electrophoresis and the spots showing statistically significant changes selected for identification by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Subsequent quantitative verification and validation of these candidate biomarkers represent an obligatory and rate-limiting process that is greatly enabled by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). SRM is a tandem mass spectrometry method suitable for identification and quantitation of target peptides within complex mixtures independent on peptide-specific antibodies. Ultimately, multiplexed SRM and dynamic multiple reaction monitoring can be utilized for the simultaneous analysis of a biomarker panel derived from support vector machine learning approaches, which allows monitoring a specific disease state such as early HCC. Overall, this approach yields high probability biomarkers for clinical validation in

  18. UPLC-MS(E) application in disease biomarker discovery: the discoveries in proteomics to metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Yong; Lin, Rui-Chao

    2014-05-25

    In the last decade, proteomics and metabolomics have contributed substantially to our understanding of different diseases. Proteomics and metabolomics aims to comprehensively identify proteins and metabolites to gain insight into the cellular signaling pathways underlying disease and to discover novel biomarkers for screening, early detection and diagnosis, as well as for determining prognoses and predicting responses to specific treatments. For comprehensive analysis of cellular proteins and metabolites, analytical methods of wider dynamic range higher resolution and good sensitivity are required. Ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry(Elevated Energy) (UPLC-MS(E)) is currently one of the most versatile techniques. UPLC-MS(E) is an established technology in proteomics studies and is now expanding into metabolite research. MS(E) was used for simultaneous acquisition of precursor ion information and fragment ion data at low and high collision energy in one analytical run, providing similar information to conventional MS(2). In this review, UPLC-MS(E) application in proteomics and metabolomics was highlighted to assess protein and metabolite changes in different diseases, including cancer, neuropsychiatric pharmacology studies from clinical trials and animal models. In addition, the future prospects for complete proteomics and metabolomics are discussed.

  19. Biomarker discovery and compound evaluation using two-hybrid proteomic systems.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Marc E

    2006-10-01

    Many proteomic technologies require a heavy investment in expertise and technology, which place these approaches beyond many labs and small companies. However, proteomic approaches are ideal for pilot experiments, identifying relevant biomarkers and protein pathways for development or analysis of therapeutic compounds. The two-hybrid proteomic systems are available and affordable to most researchers, requiring little more than standard microbiological equipment. The screens rapidly generate data, identifying protein interactions that can be used to construct small local protein networks. Using data from large-scale projects, these small local protein networks can be used to identify the larger cellular pathways that are being affected by therapeutic compounds in the screen. The foundation for the two-hybrid proteomic systems are commercially available, as are high quality cDNA libraries. The straightforwardness of the two-hybrid proteomic system allows smaller groups to focus their resources on critical cellular pathways and molecular targets by taking advantage of a trusted molecular assay and an ever growing set of postgenomic era databases.

  20. Proteomic profiling in MPTP monkey model for early Parkinson disease biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiangmin; Shi, Min; Gunasingh Masilamoni, Jeyaraj; Dator, Romel; Movius, James; Aro, Patrick; Smith, Yoland; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Identification of reliable and robust biomarkers is crucial to enable early diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) and monitoring disease progression. While imperfect, the slow, chronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced non-human primate animal model system of parkinsonism is an abundant source of pre-motor or early stage PD biomarker discovery. Here, we present a study of a MPTP rhesus monkey model of PD that utilizes complementary quantitative iTRAQ-based proteomic, glycoproteomics and phosphoproteomics approaches. We compared the glycoprotein, non-glycoprotein, and phosphoprotein profiles in the putamen of asymptomatic and symptomatic MPTP-treated monkeys as well as saline injected controls. We identified 86 glycoproteins, 163 non-glycoproteins, and 71 phosphoproteins differentially expressed in the MPTP-treated groups. Functional analysis of the data sets inferred the biological processes and pathways that link to neurodegeneration in PD and related disorders. Several potential biomarkers identified in this study have already been translated for their usefulness in PD diagnosis in human subjects and further validation investigations are currently under way. In addition to providing potential early PD biomarkers, this comprehensive quantitative proteomic study may also shed insights regarding the mechanisms underlying early PD development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology. PMID:25617661

  1. Integrated proteomics pipeline yields novel biomarkers for predicting preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jenny E; Tuytten, Robin; Thomas, Grégoire; Laroy, Wouter; Kas, Koen; Vanpoucke, Griet; Roberts, Claire T; Kenny, Louise C; Simpson, Nigel A B; Baker, Philip N; North, Robyn A

    2013-06-01

    Preeclampsia, a hypertensive pregnancy complication, is largely unpredictable in healthy nulliparous pregnant women. Accurate preeclampsia prediction in this population would transform antenatal care. To identify novel protein markers relevant to the prediction of preeclampsia, a 3-step mass spectrometric work flow was applied. On selection of candidate biomarkers, mostly from an unbiased discovery experiment (19 women), targeted quantitation was used to verify and validate candidate biomarkers in 2 independent cohorts from the SCOPE (SCreening fOr Pregnancy Endpoints) study. Candidate proteins were measured in plasma specimens collected at 19 to 21 weeks' gestation from 100 women who later developed preeclampsia and 200 women without preeclampsia recruited from Australia and New Zealand. Protein levels (n=25), age, and blood pressure were then analyzed using logistic regression to identify multimarker models (maximum 6 markers) that met predefined criteria: sensitivity ≥50% at 20% positive predictive value. These 44 algorithms were then tested in an independent European cohort (n=300) yielding 8 validated models. These 8 models detected 50% to 56% of preeclampsia cases in the training and validation sets; the detection rate for preterm preeclampsia cases was 80%. Validated models combine insulin-like growth factor acid labile subunit and soluble endoglin, supplemented with maximally 4 markers of placental growth factor, serine peptidase inhibitor Kunitz type 1, melanoma cell adhesion molecule, selenoprotein P, and blood pressure. Predictive performances were maintained when exchanging mass spectrometry measurements with ELISA measurements for insulin-like growth factor acid labile subunit. In conclusion, we demonstrated that biomarker combinations centered on insulin-like growth factor acid labile subunit have the potential to predict preeclampsia in healthy nulliparous women.

  2. A List of Candidate Cancer Biomarkers for Targeted Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Polanski, Malu; Anderson, N. Leigh

    2006-01-01

    We have compiled from literature and other sources a list of 1261 proteins believed to be differentially expressed in human cancer. These proteins, only some of which have been detected in plasma to date, represent a population of candidate plasma biomarkers that could be useful in early cancer detection and monitoring given sufficiently sensitive specific assays. We have begun to prioritize these markers for future validation by frequency of literature citations, both total and as a function of time. The candidates include proteins involved in oncogenesis, angiogenesis, development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, hematopoiesis, immune and hormonal responses, cell signaling, nucleotide function, hydrolysis, cellular homing, cell cycle and structure, the acute phase response and hormonal control. Many have been detected in studies of tissue or nuclear components; nevertheless we hypothesize that most if not all should be present in plasma at some level. Of the 1261 candidates only 9 have been approved as “tumor associated antigens” by the FDA. We propose that systematic collection and large-scale validation of candidate biomarkers would fill the gap currently existing between basic research and clinical use of advanced diagnostics. PMID:19690635

  3. Biomarkers: Dynamic "Tools" for Health and Safety Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today informational flow from biomarkers contributes importantly to various types of health effects research, risk assessment and risk management decisions that impact, or have the potential to impact, public health and safety. Therefore, dependent upon the nature of the health r...

  4. Plasma Proteome Biomarkers of Inflammation in School Aged Children in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Eun; West, Keith P.; Cole, Robert N.; Schulze, Kerry J.; Christian, Parul; Wu, Lee Shu-Fune; Yager, James D.; Groopman, John; Ruczinski, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a condition stemming from complex host defense and tissue repair mechanisms, often simply characterized by plasma levels of a single acute reactant. We attempted to identify candidate biomarkers of systemic inflammation within the plasma proteome. We applied quantitative proteomics using isobaric mass tags (iTRAQ) tandem mass spectrometry to quantify proteins in plasma of 500 Nepalese children 6–8 years of age. We evaluated those that co-vary with inflammation, indexed by α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), a conventional biomarker of inflammation in population studies. Among 982 proteins quantified in >10% of samples, 99 were strongly associated with AGP at a family-wise error rate of 0.1%. Magnitude and significance of association varied more among proteins positively (n = 41) than negatively associated (n = 58) with AGP. The former included known positive acute phase proteins including C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, complement components, protease inhibitors, transport proteins with anti-oxidative activity, and numerous unexpected intracellular signaling molecules. Negatively associated proteins exhibited distinct differences in abundance between secretory hepatic proteins involved in transporting or binding lipids, micronutrients (vitamin A and calcium), growth factors and sex hormones, and proteins of largely extra-hepatic origin involved in the formation and metabolic regulation of extracellular matrix. With the same analytical approach and the significance threshold, seventy-two out of the 99 proteins were commonly associated with CRP, an established biomarker of inflammation, suggesting the validity of the identified proteins. Our findings have revealed a vast plasma proteome within a free-living population of children that comprise functional biomarkers of homeostatic and induced host defense, nutrient metabolism and tissue repair, representing a set of plasma proteins that may be used to assess dynamics and extent of inflammation for

  5. Urine Proteomics to Detect Biomarkers for Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luís F.; Solé-Gonzalez, Amanda; Kalko, Susana G.; Bañon-Maneus, Elisenda; Solé, Manel; Diekmann, Fritz; Gutierrez-Dalmau, Alex; Abian, Joaquin; Campistol, Josep M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite optimal immunosuppressive therapy, more than 50% of kidney transplants fail because of chronic allograft dysfunction. A noninvasive means to diagnose chronic allograft dysfunction may allow earlier interventions that could improve graft half-life. In this proof-of-concept study, we used mass spectrometry to analyze differences in the urinary polypeptide patterns of 32 patients with chronic allograft dysfunction (14 with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 18 with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection) and 18 control subjects (eight stable recipients and 10 healthy control subjects). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed good segregation of samples in groups corresponding mainly to the four biomedical conditions. Moreover, the composition of the proteome of the pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy group differed from that of the chronic active antibody-mediated rejection group, and an independent validation set confirmed these results. The 14 protein ions that best discriminated between these two groups correctly identified 100% of the patients with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 100% of the patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection. In summary, this study establishes a pattern for two histologic lesions associated with distinct graft outcomes and constitutes a first step to designing a specific, noninvasive diagnostic tool for chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:19056874

  6. Proteomic analysis for early neurodegenerative biomarker detection in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Vincenzetti, Silvia; Nasuti, Cinzia; Fedeli, Donatella; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Pucciarelli, Stefania; Gabbianelli, Rosita

    2016-02-01

    The exposure to xenobiotics in the early stages of life represents the most important component in the etiology of many neurodegenerative disorders. Proteomic analysis of plasma and brain samples from early life treated animal model was performed in order to identify early biomarkers of neurodegeneration. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified four proteins in the plasma of adolescent rats that deviated from the control group. Low expression levels of transthyretin and plasma transferrin, and the absence of long-chain fatty acid transport 1 were measured. On the other hand, the same proteomic approach was done on striatum of an adult rat model of neurodegeneration. Mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase and voltage-dependent anion channel were under expressed, while mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase, myelin basic protein and ubiquitin-60S ribosomal protein L40 were absent in striatum of animal model compared to control group. Data show that early biomarkers for the diagnosis of neurodegeneration can be obtained by proteomic analysis, starting from adolescent age and the results highlight the time frame for the onset of neurodegeneration due to early exposure to xenobiotics. PMID:26631339

  7. Proteomics in food: Quality, safety, microbes, and allergens.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristian; Roncada, Paola; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Bonizzi, Luigi; Soggiu, Alessio

    2016-03-01

    Food safety and quality and their associated risks pose a major concern worldwide regarding not only the relative economical losses but also the potential danger to consumer's health. Customer's confidence in the integrity of the food supply could be hampered by inappropriate food safety measures. A lack of measures and reliable assays to evaluate and maintain a good control of food characteristics may affect the food industry economy and shatter consumer confidence. It is imperative to create and to establish fast and reliable analytical methods that allow a good and rapid analysis of food products during the whole food chain. Proteomics can represent a powerful tool to address this issue, due to its proven excellent quantitative and qualitative drawbacks in protein analysis. This review illustrates the applications of proteomics in the past few years in food science focusing on food of animal origin with some brief hints on other types. Aim of this review is to highlight the importance of this science as a valuable tool to assess food quality and safety. Emphasis is also posed in food processing, allergies, and possible contaminants like bacteria, fungi, and other pathogens.

  8. Blood-Based Proteomic Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Alison L.; Westwood, Sarah; Lovestone, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and its long prodromal phase poses challenges for early diagnosis and yet allows for the possibility of the development of disease modifying treatments for secondary prevention. It is, therefore, of importance to develop biomarkers, in particular, in the preclinical or early phases that reflect the pathological characteristics of the disease and, moreover, could be of utility in triaging subjects for preventative therapeutic clinical trials. Much research has sought biomarkers for diagnostic purposes by comparing affected people to unaffected controls. However, given that AD pathology precedes disease onset, a pathology endophenotype design for biomarker discovery creates the opportunity for detection of much earlier markers of disease. Blood-based biomarkers potentially provide a minimally invasive option for this purpose and research in the field has adopted various “omics” approaches in order to achieve this. This review will, therefore, examine the current literature regarding blood-based proteomic biomarkers of AD and its associated pathology. PMID:26635716

  9. Data from human salivary proteome – A resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sivadasan, Priya; Kumar Gupta, Manoj; Sathe, Gajanan J.; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Palit, Priyanka; Gowda, Harsha; Suresh, Amritha; Abraham Kuriakose, Moni; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Salivary proteins are an important source for developing marker-based assays for oral cancers. To get an insight into the proteins present in human saliva, we applied multiple strategies involving affinity-based depletion of abundant proteins, fractionation of the resulting proteins or their tryptic peptides followed by LC–MS/MS analysis, using high resolution mass spectrometry. By integrating the protein identifications observed by us with those from similar workflows employed in earlier investigations, we compiled an updated salivary proteome. We have mapped the salivary proteome to the published data on differentially expressed proteins from oral cancer tissues and also for their secretory features using prediction tools, SignalP 4.1, TMHMM 2c and Exocarta. Proteotypic peptides for the subset of proteins implicated in oral cancer and mapped to any two of the prediction tools for secretory potential have been listed. The data here are related to the research article “Human saliva proteome – a resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer” in the Journal of Proteomics [1]. PMID:26217819

  10. Proteomics and metabolomics for mechanistic insights and biomarker discovery in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Chung, Yuen-Li; Mayr, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    In the last decade, proteomics and metabolomics have contributed substantially to our understanding of cardiovascular diseases. The unbiased assessment of pathophysiological processes without a priori assumptions complements other molecular biology techniques that are currently used in a reductionist approach. In this review, we highlight some of the "omics" methods used to assess protein and metabolite changes in cardiovascular disease. A discrete biological function is very rarely attributed to a single molecule; more often it is the combined input of many proteins. In contrast to the reductionist approach, in which molecules are studied individually, "omics" platforms allow the study of more complex interactions in biological systems. Combining proteomics and metabolomics to quantify changes in metabolites and their corresponding enzymes will advance our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and aid the identification of novel biomarkers for cardiovascular disease.

  11. High-Density Lipoprotein Proteomics: Identifying New Drug Targets and Biomarkers by Understanding Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Scott; Durairaj, Anita; Lu, Jason L.; Davidson, W. Sean

    2010-01-01

    Recent proteomics studies on human plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have discovered up to 50 individual protein constituents. Many of these have known functions that vary surprisingly from the lipid transport roles commonly thought to mediate HDL’s ability to protect from coronary artery disease. Given newly discovered roles in inflammation, protease inhibition, complement regulation, and innate immunity, many have begun to view HDL as a broad collection of distinct particle subfamilies, each distinguished by unique protein compositions and functions. Herein we review recent applications of high-resolution proteomics to HDL and summarize evidence supporting the idea of HDL functional subspeciation. These studies have set the stage for a more complete understanding of the molecular basis of HDL functional heterogeneity and hold promise for the identification of new biomarkers that can predict disease or evaluate the success of clinical interventions. PMID:20625533

  12. Identification of serum biomarkers in dogs naturally infected with Babesia canis canis using a proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Canine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease that is caused by the haemoprotozoan parasites of the genus Babesia. There are limited data on serum proteomics in dogs, and none of the effect of babesiosis on the serum proteome. The aim of this study was to identify the potential serum biomarkers of babesiosis using proteomic techniques in order to increase our understanding about disease pathogenesis. Results Serum samples were collected from 25 dogs of various breeds and sex with naturally occurring babesiosis caused by B. canis canis. Blood was collected on the day of admission (day 0), and subsequently on the 1st and 6th day of treatment. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) of pooled serum samples of dogs with naturally occurring babesiosis (day 0, day 1 and day 6) and healthy dogs were run in triplicate. 2DE image analysis showed 64 differentially expressed spots with p ≤ 0.05 and 49 spots with fold change ≥2. Six selected spots were excised manually and subjected to trypsin digest prior to identification by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry on an Amazon ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass spectrometry data was processed using Data Analysis software and the automated Matrix Science Mascot Daemon server. Protein identifications were assigned using the Mascot search engine to interrogate protein sequences in the NCBI Genbank database. A number of differentially expressed serum proteins involved in inflammation mediated acute phase response, complement and coagulation cascades, apolipoproteins and vitamin D metabolism pathway were identified in dogs with babesiosis. Conclusions Our findings confirmed two dominant pathogenic mechanisms of babesiosis, haemolysis and acute phase response. These results may provide possible serum biomarker candidates for clinical monitoring of babesiosis and this study could serve as the basis for further proteomic investigations in canine babesiosis. PMID:24885808

  13. Development of a pharmaceutical hepatotoxicity biomarker panel using a discovery to targeted proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ben C; Miller, Christine A; Sposny, Alexandra; Hewitt, Phillip; Wells, Martin; Gallagher, William M; Pennington, Stephen R

    2012-08-01

    There is a pressing and continued need for improved predictive power in preclinical pharmaceutical toxicology assessment as substantial numbers of drugs are still removed from the market, or from late-stage development, because of unanticipated issues of toxicity. In recent years a number of consortia have been formed with a view to integrating -omics molecular profiling strategies to increase the sensitivity and predictive power of preclinical toxicology evaluation. In this study we report on the LC-MS based proteomic analysis of the effects of the hepatotoxic compound EMD 335823 on liver from rats using an integrated discovery to targeted proteomics approach. This compound was one of a larger panel studied by a variety of molecular profiling techniques as part of the InnoMed PredTox Consortium. Label-free LC-MS analysis of hepatotoxicant EMD 335823 treated animals revealed only moderate correlation of individual protein expression with changes in mRNA expression observed by transcriptomic analysis of the same liver samples. Significantly however, analysis of the protein and transcript changes at the pathway level revealed they were in good agreement. This higher level analysis was also consistent with the previously suspected PPARα activity of the compound. Subsequently, a panel of potential biomarkers of liver toxicity was assembled from the label-free LC-MS proteomics discovery data, the previously acquired transcriptomics data and selected candidates identified from the literature. We developed and then deployed optimized selected reaction monitoring assays to undertake multiplexed measurement of 48 putative toxicity biomarkers in liver tissue. The development of the selected reaction monitoring assays was facilitated by the construction of a peptide MS/MS spectral library from pooled control and treated rat liver lysate using peptide fractionation by strong cation exchange and off-gel electrophoresis coupled to LC-MS/MS. After iterative optimization and

  14. Development of a Pharmaceutical Hepatotoxicity Biomarker Panel Using a Discovery to Targeted Proteomics Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Ben C.; Miller, Christine A.; Sposny, Alexandra; Hewitt, Phillip; Wells, Martin; Gallagher, William M.; Pennington, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a pressing and continued need for improved predictive power in preclinical pharmaceutical toxicology assessment as substantial numbers of drugs are still removed from the market, or from late-stage development, because of unanticipated issues of toxicity. In recent years a number of consortia have been formed with a view to integrating -omics molecular profiling strategies to increase the sensitivity and predictive power of preclinical toxicology evaluation. In this study we report on the LC-MS based proteomic analysis of the effects of the hepatotoxic compound EMD 335823 on liver from rats using an integrated discovery to targeted proteomics approach. This compound was one of a larger panel studied by a variety of molecular profiling techniques as part of the InnoMed PredTox Consortium. Label-free LC-MS analysis of hepatotoxicant EMD 335823 treated animals revealed only moderate correlation of individual protein expression with changes in mRNA expression observed by transcriptomic analysis of the same liver samples. Significantly however, analysis of the protein and transcript changes at the pathway level revealed they were in good agreement. This higher level analysis was also consistent with the previously suspected PPARα activity of the compound. Subsequently, a panel of potential biomarkers of liver toxicity was assembled from the label-free LC-MS proteomics discovery data, the previously acquired transcriptomics data and selected candidates identified from the literature. We developed and then deployed optimized selected reaction monitoring assays to undertake multiplexed measurement of 48 putative toxicity biomarkers in liver tissue. The development of the selected reaction monitoring assays was facilitated by the construction of a peptide MS/MS spectral library from pooled control and treated rat liver lysate using peptide fractionation by strong cation exchange and off-gel electrophoresis coupled to LC-MS/MS. After iterative optimization and

  15. A targeted proteomic strategy for the measurement of oral cancer candidate biomarkers in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Bollinger, James G; Rivera, César; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Paes Leme, Adriana F; MacCoss, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), are the sixth most common malignancy in the world and are characterized by poor prognosis and a low survival rate. Saliva is oral fluid with intimate contact with OSCC. Besides non-invasive, simple, and rapid to collect, saliva is a potential source of biomarkers. In this study, we build an SRM assay that targets fourteen OSCC candidate biomarker proteins, which were evaluated in a set of clinically-derived saliva samples. Using Skyline software package, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher abundance of the C1R, LCN2, SLPI, FAM49B, TAGLN2, CFB, C3, C4B, LRG1, SERPINA1 candidate biomarkers in the saliva of OSCC patients. Furthermore, our study also demonstrated that CFB, C3, C4B, SERPINA1 and LRG1 are associated with the risk of developing OSCC. Overall, this study successfully used targeted proteomics to measure in saliva a panel of biomarker candidates for OSCC.

  16. A targeted proteomic strategy for the measurement of oral cancer candidate biomarkers in human saliva

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Bollinger, James G.; Rivera, César; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P.; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Paes Leme, Adriana F.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), are the sixth most common malignancy in the world and are characterized by poor prognosis and a low survival rate. Saliva is oral fluid with intimate contact with OSCC. Besides non-invasive, simple, and rapid to collect, saliva is a potential source of biomarkers. In this study, we build an SRM assay that targets fourteen OSCC candidate biomarker proteins, which were evaluated in a set of clinically-derived saliva samples. Using Skyline software package, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher abundance of the C1R, LCN2, SLPI, FAM49B, TAGLN2, CFB, C3, C4B, LRG1, SERPINA1 candidate biomarkers in the saliva of OSCC patients. Furthermore, our study also demonstrated that CFB, C3, C4B, SERPINA1 and LRG1 are associated with the risk of developing OSCC. Overall, this study successfully used targeted proteomics to measure in saliva a panel of biomarker candidates for OSCC. PMID:26552850

  17. Quantitative tissue proteomics of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma for novel biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Harsh; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A; Renuse, Santosh; Harsha, HC; Kumar, Praveen; Sharma, Jyoti; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Nair, Bipin; Rajagopalan, Sudha; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah Veerendra; Vijayakumar, M; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Prasad, Thotterthodi Subrahmanya Keshava

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is among the top ten most frequent malignancies worldwide. In this study, our objective was to identify potential biomarkers for ESCC through a quantitative proteomic approach using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) approach. We compared the protein expression profiles of ESCC tumor tissues with the corresponding adjacent normal tissue from ten patients. LC-MS/MS analysis of strong cation exchange chromatography fractions was performed on an Accurate Mass QTOF mass spectrometer, which led to the identification of 687 proteins. In all, 257 proteins were identified as differentially expressed in ESCC as compared with normal. We found several previously known protein biomarkers to be upregulated in ESCC including thrombospondin 1 (THBS1), periostin 1 (POSTN) and heat shock 70 kDa protein 9 (HSPA9) confirming the validity of our approach. In addition, several novel proteins that had not been reported previously were identified in our screen. These novel biomarker candidates included prosaposin (PSAP), plectin 1 (PLEC1) and protein disulfide isomerase A 4 (PDIA4) that were further validated to be overexpressed by immunohistochemical labeling using tissue microarrays. The success of our study shows that this mass spectrometric strategy can be applied to cancers in general to develop a panel of candidate biomarkers, which can then be validated by other techniques. PMID:21743296

  18. Development of Diagnostic Biomarkers for Detecting Diabetic Retinopathy at Early Stages Using Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jonghwa; Min, Hophil; Kim, Sang Jin; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Kyunggon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Park, Taesung; Kim, Youngsoo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common microvascular complication caused by diabetes mellitus (DM) and is a leading cause of vision impairment and loss among adults. Here, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis to discover biomarkers for DR. First, to identify biomarker candidates that are specifically expressed in human vitreous, we performed data-mining on both previously published DR-related studies and our experimental data; 96 proteins were then selected. To confirm and validate the selected biomarker candidates, candidates were selected, confirmed, and validated using plasma from diabetic patients without DR (No DR) and diabetics with mild or moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (Mi or Mo NPDR) using semiquantitative multiple reaction monitoring (SQ-MRM) and stable-isotope dilution multiple reaction monitoring (SID-MRM). Additionally, we performed a multiplex assay using 15 biomarker candidates identified in the SID-MRM analysis, which resulted in merged AUC values of 0.99 (No DR versus Mo NPDR) and 0.93 (No DR versus Mi and Mo NPDR). Although further validation with a larger sample size is needed, the 4-protein marker panel (APO4, C7, CLU, and ITIH2) could represent a useful multibiomarker model for detecting the early stages of DR. PMID:26665153

  19. Proteomics-based safety evaluation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Haniu, Hisao; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Kenji; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluated the biological responses to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Human monoblastic leukemia cells (U937) were exposed to As-grown MWCNTs and MWCNTs that were thermally treated at 1800 deg. C (HTT1800) and 2800 deg. C (HTT2800). Cell proliferation was highly inhibited by As-grown but not HTT2800. However, both As-grown and HTT1800, which include some impurities, were cytotoxic. Proteomics analysis of MWCNT-exposed cells revealed 37 protein spots on 2-dimensional electrophoresis gels that significantly changed (p < 0.05) after exposure to HTT1800 with a little iron and 20 spots that changed after exposure to HTT2800. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified 45 proteins that included heat shock protein beta-1, neutral alpha-glucosidase AB, and DNA mismatch repair protein Msh2. These altered proteins play roles in metabolism, biosynthesis, response to stress, and cell differentiation. Although HTT2800 did not inhibit cell proliferation or cause cytotoxicity in vitro, some proteins related to the response to stress were changed. Moreover, DJ-1 protein, which is a biomarker of Parkinson's disease and is related to cancer, was identified after exposure to both MWCNTs. These results show that the cytotoxicity of MWCNTs depends on their impurities, such as iron, while MWCNTs themselves cause some biological responses directly and/or indirectly in vitro. Our proteomics-based approach for detecting biological responses to nanomaterials is a promising new method for detailed safety evaluations.

  20. Proteomic Characterization of Nipple Aspirate Fluid: Identification of Potential Biomarkers of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Covington, Chandice C.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Abdullah, Mohamed S.; Pounds, Joel G.; Smith, Richard D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2003-07-01

    Mammary ductal cells are the cellular origin for 70 to 80% of breast cancers. Nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) contains proteins directly secreted by the ductal cells in non-lactating women. Proteomic approaches offer a largely unbiased way to evaluate NAF as a source of biomarkers and are sufficiently sensitive for analysis of small NAF volumes (10 to 50 ml). In this study, we initially evaluated a new process for obtaining NAF and found that this process resulted in volumes of NAF suitable for analysis in {approx}90% of subjects. Proteomic characterization of NAF identified 64 proteins. Although it is likely this list primarily includes abundant and moderately abundant NAF proteins, very few of these proteins have previously been reported in NAF. At least 15 of the NAF proteins identified have previously been reported to be altered in serum or tumor tissue from women with breast cancer, including cathepsin D and osteopontin. In summary, this study provides the first characterization of the NAF proteome and identifies several candidate proteins for future studies on breast cancer markers in NAF.

  1. Proteomic characterization of nipple aspirate fluid: Identification of potential biomarkers of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Covington, Chandice C.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Abdullah, Mohamed S.; Pounds, Joel G.; Smith, Richard D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2003-03-01

    Mammary ductal cells are the origin for 70 to 80% of breast cancers. Nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) contains proteins directly secreted by the ductal and lobular epithelium in non-lactating women. Proteomic approaches offer a largely unbiased way to evaluate NAF as a source of biomarkers and are sufficiently sensitive for analysis of small NAF volumes (10 to 50 ml). In this study, we initially evaluated a new process for obtaining NAF and discovered that this process resulted in a volume of NAF that was suitable for analysis in ~90% of subjects. Proteomic characterization of NAF identified 64 proteins. Although this list primarily includes abundant and moderately abundant NAF proteins, very few of these proteins have previously been reported in NAF. At least 15 of the NAF proteins identified have previously been reported to be altered in serum or tumor tissue from women with breast cancer, including cathepsin D and osteopontin. In summary, this study provides the first characterization of the NAF proteome and identifies several candidate proteins for future studies on breast cancer markers in NAF.

  2. Proteomic Characterization of Nipple Aspirate Fluid: Identification of Potential Biomarkers of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Covington, Chandice C.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Abdullah, Mohamed S.; Pounds, Joel G.; Smith, Richard D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2003-07-01

    Mammary ductal cells are the cellular origin for 70 to 80% of breast cancers. Nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) contains proteins directly secreted by the ductal and lobular epithelium in non-lactating women. Proteomic approaches offer a largely unbiased way to evaluate NAF as a source of biomarkers and are sufficiently sensitive for analysis of small NAF volumes (10 to 50 ml). In this study, we initially evaluated a new process for obtaining NAF and discovered that this process resulted in adequate volume of NAF suitable for analysis in {approx}90% of subjects. Proteomic characterization of NAF identified 64 proteins. Although this list primarily includes abundant and moderately abundant NAF proteins, very few of these proteins have previously been reported in NAF. At least 15 of the NAF proteins identified have previously been reported to be altered in serum or tumor tissue from women with breast cancer, including cathepsin D and osteopontin. In summary, this study provides the first characterization of the NAF proteome and identifies several candidate proteins for future studies on breast cancer markers in NAF.

  3. Data for chicken semen proteome and label free quantitative analyses displaying sperm quality biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Labas, Valérie; Grasseau, Isabelle; Cahier, Karine; Gargaros, Audrey; Harichaux, Grégoire; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Alves, Sabine; Bourin, Marie; Gérard, Nadine; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of biology of the avian male gamete is essential to improve the conservation of genetic resources and performances in farming. In this study, the semen proteome of the main domestic avian species (Gallus gallus) and evaluation of the molecular phenotype related to sperm quality were investigated using GeLC–MS/MS approach and label-free quantitative proteomic based on Spectral Counting (SC) and extracted ion chromatograms (XIC) methods. Here we describe in details the peptide/protein inventory of chicken ejaculated spermatozoa (SPZ) and seminal plasma (SP). We also show differential analyses of chicken semen (SPZ and corresponding SP) from 11 males demonstrating different levels of fertilizing capacity and sperm motility. The interpretation and description of these data can be found in a research article published by Labas and colleagues in the Journal of Proteomics in 2014 [1]. This is a new resource for exploring the molecular mechanisms involved in fertilizing capacity and to reveal new sets of fertility biomarkers. PMID:26217683

  4. Biological variation of the platelet proteome in the elderly population and its implication for biomarker research.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Wolfgang; Zellner, Maria; Diestinger, Michael; Babeluk, Rita; Marchetti, Martina; Goll, Alexandra; Zehetmayer, Sonja; Bauer, Peter; Rappold, Eduard; Miller, Ingrid; Roth, Erich; Allmaier, Günter; Oehler, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge about the extent of total variation experienced between samples from different individuals is of great importance for the design of not only proteomics but every clinical study. This variation defines the smallest statistically significant detectable signal difference when comparing two groups of individuals. We isolated platelets from 20 healthy human volunteers aged 56-100 years because this age group is most commonly encountered in the clinics. We determined the technical and total variation experienced in a proteome analysis using two-dimensional DIGE with IPGs in the pI ranges 4-7 and 6-9. Only spots that were reproducibly detectable in at least 90% of all gels (n = 908) were included in the study. All spots had a similar technical variation with a median coefficient of variation (cv) of about 7%. In contrast, spots showed a more diverse total variation between individuals with a surprisingly low median cv of only 18%. Because most known biomarkers show an effect size in a 1-2-fold range of their cv, any future clinical proteomics study with platelets will require an analytical method that is able to detect such small quantitative differences. In addition, we calculated the minimal number of samples (sample size) needed to detect given protein expression differences with statistical significance.

  5. Application of systems biology principles to protein biomarker discovery: Urinary exosomal proteome in renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Samarjit; Knepper, Mark A.; Bagnasco, Serena M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In MS-based studies to discover urinary protein biomarkers, an important question is how to analyze the data to find the most promising potential biomarkers to be advanced to large-scale validation studies. Here, we describe a ‘systems biology-based’ approach to address this question. Experimental design We analyzed large-scale LC-MS/MS data of urinary exosomes from renal allograft recipients with biopsy-proven evidence of immunological rejection or tubular injury. We asked whether bioinformatic analysis of urinary exosomal proteins can identify protein groups that correlate with biopsy findings and whether the protein groups fit with general knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved. Results LC-MS/MS analysis of urinary exosomal proteomes identified more than 1000 proteins in each pathologic group. These protein lists were analyzed computationally to identify Biological Process and KEGG Pathway terms that are significantly associated with each pathological group. Among the most informative terms for each group were: “sodium ion transport” for tubular injury; “immune response” for all rejection; “epithelial cell differentiation” for cell-mediated rejection; and “acute inflammatory response” for antibody-mediated rejection. Based on these terms, candidate biomarkers were identified using a novel strategy to allow a dichotomous classification between different pathologic categories. Conclusions and clinical relevance The terms and candidate biomarkers identified make rational connections to pathophysiological mechanisms, suggesting that the described bioinformatic approach will be useful in advancing large-scale biomarker identification studies toward a validation phase. PMID:22641613

  6. Salivary Proteomic and Genomic Biomarkers for Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shen; Wang, Jianghua; Meijer, Jiska; Ieong, Sonya; Xie, Yongming; Yu, Tianwei; Zhou, Hui; Henry, Sharon; Vissink, Arjan; Pijpe, Justin; Kallenberg, Cees; Elashoff, David; Loo, Joseph A.; Wong, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify a panel of protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) biomarkers in human whole saliva (WS) that may be used in the detection of primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SS). Methods Mass spectrometry and expression microarray profiling were used to identify candidate protein and mRNA biomarkers of primary SS in WS samples. Validation of the discovered mRNA and protein biomarkers was also demonstrated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting techniques. Results Sixteen WS proteins were found to be down-regulated and 25 WS proteins were found to be up-regulated in primary SS patients compared with matched healthy control subjects. These proteins reflected the damage of glandular cells and inflammation of the oral cavity system in patients with primary SS. In addition, 16 WS peptides (10 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated in primary SS) were found at significantly different levels (P <0.05) in primary SS patients and controls. Using stringent criteria (3-fold change; P <0.0005), 27 mRNA in saliva samples were found to be significantly up-regulated in the primary SS patients. Strikingly, 19 of 27 genes that were found to be overex-pressed were interferon-inducible or were related to lymphocyte filtration and antigen presentation known to be involved in the pathogenesis of primary SS. Conclusion Our preliminary study has indicated that WS from patients with primary SS contains molecular signatures that reflect damaged glandular cells and an activated immune response in this autoimmune disease. These candidate proteomic and genomic biomarkers may improve the clinical detection of primary SS once they have been further validated. We also found that WS contains more informative proteins, peptides, and mRNA, as compared with gland-specific saliva, that can be used in generating candidate biomarkers for the detection of primary SS. PMID:17968930

  7. Protein corona as a proteome fingerprint: The example of hidden biomarkers for cow mastitis.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Giovanni; Magro, Massimiliano; Terzo, Milo; Zaccarin, Mattia; Da Dalt, Laura; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Baratella, Davide; Gabai, Gianfranco; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Proteome modifications in a biological fluid can potentially indicate the occurrence of pathologies, even if the identification of a proteome fingerprint correlated to a specific disease represents a very difficult task. When a nanomaterial is introduced into a biological fluid, macromolecules compete to form a protein corona on the nanoparticle surface, and depending on the specific proteome, different patterns of proteins will form the final protein corona shell depending on their affinity for the nanoparticle surface. Novel surface active maghemite nanoparticles (SAMNs) display a remarkable selectivity toward protein corona formation, and they are able to concentrate proteins and peptides presenting high affinities for their surface even if they are present in very low amounts. Thus, SAMNs may confer visibility to hidden biomarkers correlated to the occurrence of a pathology. In the present report, SAMNs were introduced into milk samples from healthy cows and from animals affected by mastitis, and the selectively bound protein corona shell was easily analyzed and quantified by gel electrophoresis and characterized by mass spectrometry. Upon incubation in mastitic milk, SAMNs were able to selectively bind αs2-casein fragments containing the FALPQYLK sequence, as part of the larger casocidin-1 peptide with strong antibacterial activity, which were not present in healthy samples. Thus, SAMNs can be used as a future candidate for the rapid diagnosis of mastitis in bovine milk. The present report proposes protein competition for SAMN protein corona formation as a means of mirroring proteome modifications. Thus, the selected protein shell on the nanoparticles results in a fingerprint of the specific pathology.

  8. Amino Acid Sequence Determination of Protein Biomarkers of Campylobacter upsaliensis and C. helveticus by 'Composite' Sequence Proteomic Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified the protein biomarkers observed in the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectra (MALDI-TOF-MS) of cell lysates of five different strains of Campylobacter upsaliensis and one strain of C. helveticus by proteomic techniques. Only one of these strains ...

  9. A Quantitative Proteomic Approach to Prion Disease Biomarker Research: Delving into the Glycoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xin; Herbst, Allen; Ma, Di; Aiken, Judd; Li, Lingjun

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) – based proteomic approaches have evolved as powerful tools for the discovery of biomarkers. However, the identification of potential protein biomarkers from biofluid samples is challenging because of the limited dynamic range of detection. Currently there is a lack of sensitive and reliable pre-mortem diagnostic test for prion diseases. Here, we describe the use of a combined MS-based approach for biomarker discovery in prion diseases from mouse plasma samples. To overcome the limited dynamic range of detection and sample complexity of plasma samples, we used lectin affinity chromatography and multi-dimensional separations to enrich and isolate glycoproteins at low abundance. Relative quantitation of a panel of proteins was obtained by a combination of isotopic labeling and validated by spectral counting. Overall 708 proteins were identified, 53 of which showed more than 2-fold increase in concentration whereas 58 exhibited more than 2-fold decrease. A few of the potential candidate markers were previously associated with prion or other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21469646

  10. Proteomic Profiling of Exosomes Leads to the Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duijvesz, Diederick; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hoogland, Marije; Vredenbregt-van den Berg, Mirella S.; Willemsen, Rob; Luider, Theo N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Jenster, Guido

    2013-12-31

    Introduction: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, biomarker discovery from body fluids is often hampered by the high abundance of many proteins unrelated to disease. An attractive alternative biomarker discovery approach is the isolation of small vesicles (exosomes, ~100 nm). They contain proteins that are specific to the tissue from which they are derived and therefore can be considered as treasure chests for disease-specific marker discovery. Profiling prostate cancer-derived exosomes could reveal new markers for this malignancy. Materials and Methods: Exosomes were isolated from 2 immortalized primary prostate epithelial cells (PNT2C2 and RWPE-1) and 2 PCa cell lines (PC346C and VCaP) by ultracentrifugation. Proteomic analyses utilized a nanoLC coupled with an LTQ-Orbitrap operated in tandem MS (MS/MS) mode, followed by the Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag approach. Exosomal proteins were validated by Western blotting. A Tissue Micro Array, containing 481 different PCa samples (radical prostatectomy), was used to correlate candidate markers with several clinical-pathological parameters such as PSA, Gleason score, biochemical recurrence, and (PCa-related) death. Results: Proteomic characterization resulted in the identification of 263 proteins by at least 2 peptides. Specifically analysis of exosomes from PNT2C2, RWPE-1, PC346C, and VCaP identified 248, 233, 169, and 216 proteins, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed 52 proteins differently expressed between PCa and control cells, 9 of which were more abundant in PCa. Validation by Western blotting confirmed a higher abundance of FASN, XPO1 and PDCD6IP (ALIX) in PCa exosomes. The Tissue Micro 4 Array showed strong correlation of higher Gleason scores and local recurrence with increased cytoplasmic XPO1 (P<0.001). Conclusions: Differentially abundant proteins of cell line-derived exosomes make a clear subdivision between

  11. Comparative Tissue Proteomics of Microdissected Specimens Reveals Novel Candidate Biomarkers of Bladder Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Lun; Chung, Ting; Wu, Chih-Ching; Ng, Kwai-Fong; Yu, Jau-Song; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Chang, Yu-Sun; Liang, Ying; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ting

    2015-01-01

    More than 380,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed worldwide, accounting for ∼150,200 deaths each year. To discover potential biomarkers of bladder cancer, we employed a strategy combining laser microdissection, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling, and liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) analysis to profile proteomic changes in fresh-frozen bladder tumor specimens. Cellular proteins from four pairs of surgically resected primary bladder cancer tumor and adjacent nontumorous tissue were extracted for use in two batches of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation experiments, which identified a total of 3220 proteins. A DAVID (database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery) analysis of dysregulated proteins revealed that the three top-ranking biological processes were extracellular matrix organization, extracellular structure organization, and oxidation-reduction. Biological processes including response to organic substances, response to metal ions, and response to inorganic substances were highlighted by up-expressed proteins in bladder cancer. Seven differentially expressed proteins were selected as potential bladder cancer biomarkers for further verification. Immunohistochemical analyses showed significantly elevated levels of three proteins—SLC3A2, STMN1, and TAGLN2—in tumor cells compared with noncancerous bladder epithelial cells, and suggested that TAGLN2 could be a useful tumor tissue marker for diagnosis (AUC = 0.999) and evaluating lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer patients. ELISA results revealed significantly increased urinary levels of both STMN1 and TAGLN2 in bladder cancer subgroups compared with control groups. In comparisons with age-matched hernia urine specimens, urinary TAGLN2 in bladder cancer samples showed the largest fold change (7.13-fold), with an area-under-the-curve value of 0.70 (p < 0.001, n = 205). Overall, TAGLN2 showed the most significant

  12. Bio-markers: traceability in food safety issues.

    PubMed

    Raspor, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Research and practice are focusing on development, validation and harmonization of technologies and methodologies to ensure complete traceability process throughout the food chain. The main goals are: scale-up, implementation and validation of methods in whole food chains, assurance of authenticity, validity of labelling and application of HACCP (hazard analysis and critical control point) to the entire food chain. The current review is to sum the scientific and technological basis for ensuring complete traceability. Tracing and tracking (traceability) of foods are complex processes due to the (bio)markers, technical solutions and different circumstances in different technologies which produces various foods (processed, semi-processed, or raw). Since the food is produced for human or animal consumption we need suitable markers to be stable and traceable all along the production chain. Specific biomarkers can have a function in technology and in nutrition. Such approach would make this development faster and more comprehensive and would make possible that food effect could be monitored with same set of biomarkers in consumer. This would help to develop and implement food safety standards that would be based on real physiological function of particular food component.

  13. Discovery of Prognostic Biomarker Candidates of Lacunar Infarction by Quantitative Proteomics of Microvesicles Enriched Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Arnab; Chen, Christopher P.; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Background Lacunar infarction (LACI) is a subtype of acute ischemic stroke affecting around 25% of all ischemic stroke cases. Despite having an excellent recovery during acute phase, certain LACI patients have poor mid- to long-term prognosis due to the recurrence of vascular events or a decline in cognitive functions. Hence, blood-based biomarkers could be complementary prognostic and research tools. Methods and Finding Plasma was collected from forty five patients following a non-disabling LACI along with seventeen matched control subjects. The LACI patients were monitored prospectively for up to five years for the occurrence of adverse outcomes and grouped accordingly (i.e., LACI-no adverse outcome, LACI-recurrent vascular event, and LACI-cognitive decline without any recurrence of vascular events). Microvesicles-enriched fractions isolated from the pooled plasma of four groups were profiled by an iTRAQ-guided discovery approach to quantify the differential proteome. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000748. Bioinformatics analysis and data mining revealed up-regulation of brain-specific proteins including myelin basic protein, proteins of coagulation cascade (e.g., fibrinogen alpha chain, fibrinogen beta chain) and focal adhesion (e.g., integrin alpha-IIb, talin-1, and filamin-A) while albumin was down-regulated in both groups of patients with adverse outcome. Conclusion This data set may offer important insight into the mechanisms of poor prognosis and provide candidate prognostic biomarkers for validation on larger cohort of individual LACI patients. PMID:24752076

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Pneumococcal Meningitis Reveals Potential Biomarkers Associated with Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goonetilleke, Upali R.; Scarborough, Matthew; Ward, Stephen A.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with pneumococcal meningitis often die or have severe neurological damage despite optimal antibiotic therapy. New or improved therapy is required. The delivery of new interventions will require an improved understanding of the disease pathogenesis. Our objective was to learn more about the pathophysiology of severe meningitis through the interpretation of differences in the proteomic profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with meningitis. Methods Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CSF from normal subjects (controls, n = 10) and patients with pneumococcal meningitis (n = 20) was analyzed. Spot differences were compared and identified between controls, nonsurvivors (n = 9), and survivors (n = 11). Results Protein concentration in CSF of patients with meningitis was 4-fold higher than in CSF of control subjects (7.0 mg/mL vs 0.23 mg/mL; P < .01). A mean of 2466 discrete protein spots was present in CSF of patients with meningitis. Thirty-four protein spots were differentially expressed in CSF of nonsurvivors, compared with survivors. None of these protein spots were observed in CSF of control subjects. Conclusions Proteomic screening of CSF yields potential biomarkers capable of differentiating control subjects from nonsurvivors and survivors of meningitis. Proteins involved in the inflammatory process and central metabolism were represented in the differentially expressed protein repertoire. PMID:20608875

  15. Proteomic profiling in the sera of workers occupationally exposed to arsenic and lead: identification of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Rihong; Su, Suhua; Lu, Xin; Liao, Ruiqing; Ge, Xianmin; He, Min; Huang, Yuanjiao; Mai, Sui; Lu, Xi; Christiani, David

    2005-12-01

    Arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) are important inorganic toxicants in the environment. Frequently, humans are exposed to the mixtures of As and Pb, but little is known about the expression of biomarkers resulting from such mixed exposures. In this study, we analyzed serum proteomic profiles in a group of smelter workers with the aim of identifying protein biomarkers of mixed As and Pb exposure. Forty-six male workers co-exposed to As and Pb were studied. Forty-five age-matched male office workers were chosen as controls. Urine As and blood Pb concentrations were determined. Serum proteomic profiles were analyzed by Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometer on the WCX2 ProteinChip. Using Recursive support vector machine (RSVM) algorithm, a panel of five peptides/proteins (2097 Da, 2953 Da, 3941 Da, 5338 Da, and 5639 Da) was selected based on their collective contribution to the optional separation between higher metal mixture exposure and non-exposure controls. Among these five selected markers, the 3941 Da was down-regulated and the four other proteins were up-regulated. Descriptive statistics confirmed that these five proteins differed significantly between metal exposure and non-exposure. Interestingly, the combined use of the five selected biomarkers could achieve higher discriminative power than single marker. These results demonstrated that proteomic technology, in conjunction with bioinformatics tools, could facilitate the discovery of new and better biomarkers of mixed metal exposure.

  16. Detection of biomarkers of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri through mass spectrometry and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Moura, Hercules; Izquierdo, Fernando; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Wagner, Glauber; Pinto, Tatiana; del Aguila, Carmen; Barr, John R

    2015-01-01

    Emerging methods based on mass spectrometry (MS) can be used in the rapid identification of microorganisms. Thus far, these practical and rapidly evolving methods have mainly been applied to characterize prokaryotes. We applied matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF MS in the analysis of whole cells of 18 N. fowleri isolates belonging to three genotypes. Fourteen originated from the cerebrospinal fluid or brain tissue of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis patients and four originated from water samples of hot springs, rivers, lakes or municipal water supplies. Whole Naegleria trophozoites grown in axenic cultures were washed and mixed with MALDI matrix. Mass spectra were acquired with a 4700 TOF-TOF instrument. MALDI-TOF MS yielded consistent patterns for all isolates examined. Using a combination of novel data processing methods for visual peak comparison, statistical analysis and proteomics database searching we were able to detect several biomarkers that can differentiate all species and isolates studied, along with common biomarkers for all N. fowleri isolates. Naegleria fowleri could be easily separated from other species within the genus Naegleria. A number of peaks detected were tentatively identified. MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is a rapid, reproducible, high-throughput alternative method for identifying Naegleria isolates. This method has potential for studying eukaryotic agents. PMID:25231600

  17. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Investigation of HSP90A as a Potential Biomarker for HCC

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Deng, Xiaofang; Zang, Ning; Li, Hongtao; Li, Gang; Li, Cuiping; He, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death in adults. Despite recent advances in the clinical technologies, the screening and diagnostic efficacy for HCC remains poor. Discovering novel and reliable HCC biomarkers is urgently needed. Material/Methods We performed a transcriptome-proteome integrated assay to track the possible HCC biomarkers from the process of HCC-derived gene expression in malignant cells to its protein product released into serum. Results Our screening results demonstrated that heat shock protein 90A (HSP90A), which participates in the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway and many other cancer-related pathways, warrants further investigation. The expression of HSP90A was increased in the HCC cells, serum, and tissues. Immunohistochemistry analysis on 76 clinical tissue samples also suggested the relevance between HSP90A expression and HCC metastatic behavior. Conclusions These findings suggest a role for HSP90A in HCC pathogenesis and the potential use of HSP90A for the screening and diagnosis of this malignancy. PMID:26704341

  18. Detection of biomarkers of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri through mass spectrometry and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Moura, Hercules; Izquierdo, Fernando; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Wagner, Glauber; Pinto, Tatiana; del Aguila, Carmen; Barr, John R

    2015-01-01

    Emerging methods based on mass spectrometry (MS) can be used in the rapid identification of microorganisms. Thus far, these practical and rapidly evolving methods have mainly been applied to characterize prokaryotes. We applied matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF MS in the analysis of whole cells of 18 N. fowleri isolates belonging to three genotypes. Fourteen originated from the cerebrospinal fluid or brain tissue of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis patients and four originated from water samples of hot springs, rivers, lakes or municipal water supplies. Whole Naegleria trophozoites grown in axenic cultures were washed and mixed with MALDI matrix. Mass spectra were acquired with a 4700 TOF-TOF instrument. MALDI-TOF MS yielded consistent patterns for all isolates examined. Using a combination of novel data processing methods for visual peak comparison, statistical analysis and proteomics database searching we were able to detect several biomarkers that can differentiate all species and isolates studied, along with common biomarkers for all N. fowleri isolates. Naegleria fowleri could be easily separated from other species within the genus Naegleria. A number of peaks detected were tentatively identified. MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is a rapid, reproducible, high-throughput alternative method for identifying Naegleria isolates. This method has potential for studying eukaryotic agents.

  19. In-depth Proteomic Analysis of Six Types of Exudative Pleural Effusions for Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Biomarker Discovery*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei-Jun; Chen, Chi-De; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Lee, Chien-Wei; Huang, Lien-Hung; Yu, Jau-Song; Chang, Yu-Sun; Wu, Chih-Ching; Yu, Chia-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusion (PE), a tumor-proximal body fluid, may be a promising source for biomarker discovery in human cancers. Because a variety of pathological conditions can lead to PE, characterization of the relative PE proteomic profiles from different types of PEs would accelerate discovery of potential PE biomarkers specifically used to diagnose pulmonary disorders. Using quantitative proteomic approaches, we identified 772 nonredundant proteins from six types of exudative PEs, including three malignant PEs (MPE, from lung, breast, and gastric cancers), one lung cancer paramalignant PE, and two benign diseases (tuberculosis and pneumonia). Spectral counting was utilized to semiquantify PE protein levels. Principal component analysis, hierarchical clustering, and Gene Ontology of cellular process analyses revealed differential levels and functional profiling of proteins in each type of PE. We identified 30 candidate proteins with twofold higher levels (q<0.05) in lung cancer MPEs than in the two benign PEs. Three potential markers, MET, DPP4, and PTPRF, were further verified by ELISA using 345 PE samples. The protein levels of these potential biomarkers were significantly higher in lung cancer MPE than in benign diseases or lung cancer paramalignant PE. The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve for three combined biomarkers in discriminating lung cancer MPE from benign diseases was 0.903. We also observed that the PE protein levels were more clearly discriminated in effusions in which the cytological examination was positive and that they would be useful in rescuing the false negative of cytological examination in diagnosis of nonsmall cell lung cancer-MPE. Western blotting analysis further demonstrated that MET overexpression in lung cancer cells would contribute to the elevation of soluble MET in MPE. Our results collectively demonstrate the utility of label-free quantitative proteomic approaches in establishing differential PE proteomes and

  20. Global liver proteome analysis using iTRAQ labeling quantitative proteomic technology to reveal biomarkers in mice exposed to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS).

    PubMed

    Tan, Feng; Jin, Yihe; Liu, Wei; Quan, Xie; Chen, Jingwen; Liang, Zhen

    2012-11-01

    Proteomic analysis allows detection of changes of proteins expression in organisms exposed to environmental pollutants, leading to the discovery of biomarkers of exposure and understanding of the action mechanism of toxicity. In the present study, we applied iTRAQ labeling quantitative proteomic technology for global characterization of the liver proteome in mice exposed to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). This successfully identified and quantified 1038 unique proteins. Seventy-one proteins showed a significant expression change in the treated groups (1.0, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg of body weight) compared with the control group, and 16 proteins displayed strong dose-dependent changes. Gene ontology analysis showed that these differential proteins were significantly enriched and mainly involved in lipid metabolism, transport, biosynthetic processes, and response to stimulus. We detected significantly increased expression levels of enzymes regulating peroxisomal β-oxidation-including long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, bifunctional enzyme, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase A. PFOS also significantly induced cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases that are responsible for the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. The expressions of several proteins with important biological functions-such as cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and apolipoprotein A-I, also correlated with PFOS exposure. Together, the present results provide insight into the molecular mechanism and biomarkers for PFOS-induced effects.

  1. Proteomic strategies in the search for novel pancreatic cancer biomarkers and drug targets: recent advances and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Orla; Henry, Michael; McVey, Gerard; Clynes, Martin; Moriarty, Michael; Meleady, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest cancers; despite a low incidence rate it is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Improvement of the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment remains the main focus of pancreatic cancer research. Rapid developments in proteomic technologies has improved our understanding of the pancreatic cancer proteome. Here, the authors summarise the recent proteomic strategies undertaken in the search for: novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, pancreatic cancer-specific proteins which may be used for novel targeted therapies and proteins which may be useful for monitoring disease progression post-therapy. Recent advances and findings discussed here provide great promise of having a significant clinical impact and improving the outcome of patients with this malignancy. PMID:26985644

  2. Autoantibody Profiling of Glioma Serum Samples to Identify Biomarkers Using Human Proteome Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Parvez; Gupta, Shabarni; Choudhary, Saket; Pandala, Narendra Goud; Atak, Apurva; Richharia, Annie; KP, Manubhai; Zhu, Heng; Epari, Sridhar; Noronha, Santosh B.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-01-01

    The heterogeneity and poor prognosis associated with gliomas, makes biomarker identification imperative. Here, we report autoantibody signatures across various grades of glioma serum samples and sub-categories of glioblastoma multiforme using Human Proteome chips containing ~17000 full-length human proteins. The deduced sets of classifier proteins helped to distinguish Grade II, III and IV samples from the healthy subjects with 88, 89 and 94% sensitivity and 87, 100 and 73% specificity, respectively. Proteins namely, SNX1, EYA1, PQBP1 and IGHG1 showed dysregulation across various grades. Sub-classes of GBM, based on its proximity to the sub-ventricular zone, have been reported to have different prognostic outcomes. To this end, we identified dysregulation of NEDD9, a protein involved in cell migration, with probable prognostic potential. Another subcategory of patients where the IDH1 gene is mutated, are known to have better prognosis as compared to patients carrying the wild type gene. On a comparison of these two cohorts, we found STUB1 and YWHAH proteins dysregulated in Grade II glioma patients. In addition to common pathways associated with tumourigenesis, we found enrichment of immunoregulatory and cytoskeletal remodelling pathways, emphasizing the need to explore biochemical alterations arising due to autoimmune responses in glioma. PMID:26370624

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Human Serum for Finding Pathogenic Factors and Potential Biomarkers in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chongdong; Zhang, Nawei; Yu, Haiqiang; Chen, Yuxuan; Liang, Yong; Deng, Haiteng; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2010-01-01

    Objective(s) To apply a novel proteomic method to discover potential pathogenic factors and biomarkers of preeclampsia. Study design Sera from five patients complicated with preeclampsia and five healthy pregnant controls were separately pooled. Each pool was treated with peptide ligand library beads (PLLBs) to remove high abundance proteins by affinity and thus enrich low abundance proteins. The proteins from the eluate were analyzed by a combination of 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS. Protein expression levels were quantified using spectral counts and the extracted ion current. Results 1172 unique proteins in preeclampsia and 1149 in healthy controls were identified in the present study. 51 proteins were differentially expressed between preeclampsia and healthy pregnant women including chorionic somatommammptropin hormone (CSH) and fibulin-1. 31 proteins identified were up-regulated and 20 were down-regulated. Conclusions The results demonstrate that peptide ligand library combining with 1D gel-LC-MS/MS analysis is an efficient method to identify differentially expressed proteins in sera and two biological processes of complement and coagulation activations and lipid metabolism were involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. PMID:21145106

  4. Gene Expression and Proteome Analysis as Sources of Biomarkers in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, Mihaela Adriana; Voiculescu, Suzana; Rosca, Adrian E.; Moraru, Liliana; Greabu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the world's leading skin cancer in terms of frequency at the moment and its incidence continues to rise each year, leading to profound negative psychosocial and economic consequences. UV exposure is the most important environmental factor in the development of BCC in genetically predisposed individuals, this being reflected by the anatomical distribution of lesions mainly on sun-exposed skin areas. Early diagnosis and prompt management are of crucial importance in order to prevent local tissue destruction and subsequent disfigurement. Although various noninvasive or minimal invasive techniques have demonstrated their utility in increasing diagnostic accuracy of BCC and progress has been made in its treatment options, recurrent, aggressive, and metastatic variants of BCC still pose significant challenge for the healthcare system. Analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiling of tumor cells and of tumoral microenvironment in various tissues strongly suggests that certain molecules involved in skin cancer pathogenic pathways might represent novel predictive and prognostic biomarkers in BCC. PMID:27578920

  5. Targeted proteomic approach in prostatic tissue: a panel of potential biomarkers for cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Rosa; Damiano, Rocco; Savino, Rocco; Sindona, Giovanni; Napoli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the sixth highest causes of cancer-related deaths in men. The molecular events underlying its behavior and evolution are not completely understood. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the only approved Food and Drug Administration biomarker. A panel of ten stage-specific tumoral and adjacent non tumoral tissues from patients affected by PCa (Gleason score 6, 3+3; PSA 10 ÷19 ng/ml) was investigated by MS-based proteomics approach. The proposed method was based on identifying the base-soluble proteins from tissue, established an efficient study, which lead to a deeper molecular perspective understanding of the PCa. A total of 164 proteins were found and 132 of these were evaluated differentially expressed in tumoral tissues. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) showed that among all dataset obtained, 105 molecules were involved in epithelial neoplasia with a p-value of 3.62E-05, whereas, only 11 molecules detected were ascribed to sentinel tissue and bodily fluids. PMID:27713912

  6. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Relative Protein Quantification and Biomarker Identification in Primary Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Lisa; Sickmann, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a highly sensitive and effective tool to identify and quantify potential biomarkers in repeated dose toxicity studies using primary cell culture systems. In this respect, 8-plex isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification labeling is the method of choice for relative quantification. After cell lysis and tryptic protein digestion, an individual isobaric tag is added to the amine groups of arginine and lysine. Then, up to eight differentially labeled samples are mixed and analyzed together in a mass spectrometry experiment. During peptide fragmentation in the mass spectrometer, the individual tag intensity of each identified peptide could be detected, reflecting the peptide intensities in the eight samples. The identified peptides are matched to their specific protein using specific search engines and finally to eight individual relative protein quantities. The two-dimensional fractionation of complex peptide mixtures minimizes the possibility of co-fragmentation of peptides from different origin in the mass spectrometer, which leads to a higher number of peptide search matches and therefore to better identification and quantification results.

  7. Gene Expression and Proteome Analysis as Sources of Biomarkers in Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Mihai; Caruntu, Constantin; Ghita, Mihaela Adriana; Voiculescu, Vlad; Voiculescu, Suzana; Rosca, Adrian E; Caruntu, Ana; Moraru, Liliana; Popa, Iris Maria; Calenic, Bogdan; Greabu, Maria; Costea, Daniela Elena

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the world's leading skin cancer in terms of frequency at the moment and its incidence continues to rise each year, leading to profound negative psychosocial and economic consequences. UV exposure is the most important environmental factor in the development of BCC in genetically predisposed individuals, this being reflected by the anatomical distribution of lesions mainly on sun-exposed skin areas. Early diagnosis and prompt management are of crucial importance in order to prevent local tissue destruction and subsequent disfigurement. Although various noninvasive or minimal invasive techniques have demonstrated their utility in increasing diagnostic accuracy of BCC and progress has been made in its treatment options, recurrent, aggressive, and metastatic variants of BCC still pose significant challenge for the healthcare system. Analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiling of tumor cells and of tumoral microenvironment in various tissues strongly suggests that certain molecules involved in skin cancer pathogenic pathways might represent novel predictive and prognostic biomarkers in BCC. PMID:27578920

  8. The Discovery of Novel Genomic, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Biomarkers in Cardiovascular and Peripheral Vascular Disease: The State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Stefano; Metzinger, Laurent; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in western countries and also responsible of a huge burden in terms of disability, functional decline, and healthcare costs. Biomarkers are measurable biological elements that reflect particular physiological or pathological states or predisposition towards diseases and they are currently widely studied in medicine and especially in CD. In this context, biomarkers can also be used to assess the severity or the evolution of several diseases, as well as the effectiveness of particular therapies. Genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics have opened new windows on disease phenomena and may permit in the next future an effective development of novel diagnostic and prognostic medicine in order to better prevent or treat CD. This review will consider the current evidence of novel biomarkers with clear implications in the improvement of risk assessment, prevention strategies, and medical decision making in the field of CD. PMID:27298828

  9. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identified HSC71 as a Novel Serum Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushi; Cai, Yi; Yu, Hongyan; Li, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most lethal urologic cancers and about 80% of RCC are of the clear-cell type (ccRCC). However, there are no serum biomarkers for the accurate diagnosis of RCC. In this study, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis on serum samples from ccRCC patients and control group by using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis to access differentially expressed proteins. Overall, 16 proteins were significantly upregulated (ratio > 1.5) and 14 proteins were significantly downregulated (ratio < 0.67) in early-stage ccRCC compared to control group. HSC71 was selected and subsequently validated by Western blot in six independent sets of patients. ELISA subsequently confirmed HSC71 as a potential serum biomarker for distinguishing RCC from benign urologic disease with an operating characteristic curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76~0.96), achieving sensitivity of 87% (95% CI 69%~96%) at a specificity of 80% (95% CI 61~92%) with a threshold of 15 ng/mL. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis led to identification of serum HSC71 as a novel serum biomarker of RCC, particularly useful in early diagnosis of ccRCC. PMID:26425554

  10. Evaluation of Multi-Protein Immunoaffinity Subtraction for Plasma Proteomics and Candidate Biomarker Discovery Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Wei-Jun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Strategies for removal of high-abundance proteins have been increasingly utilized in proteomic studies of serum/plasma and other body fluids to enhance the detection of low-abundance proteins and achieve broader proteome coverage; however, both the reproducibility and specificity of the high-abundance protein depletion process still represent common concerns. Here, we report a detailed evaluation of immunoaffinity subtraction performed applying the ProteomeLab IgY-12 system which is commonly used in human serum/plasma proteome characterization in combination with high resolution LC-MS/MS. Plasma samples were repeatedly processed implementing this system, and the resulting flow-through fractions and bound fractions were individually analyzed for comparison. The removal of target proteins by the immunoaffinity subtraction system and the overall process was highly reproducible. Non-target proteins, including one spiked protein standard (rabbit glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), were also observed to bind to the column at different levels, but in a reproducible manner. The results suggest that multi-protein immunoaffinity subtraction systems can be readily integrated into quantitative strategies to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins in biomarker discovery studies. PMID:16854842

  11. Assessment of Metabolomic and Proteomic Biomarkers in Detection and Prognosis of Progression of Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Duranton, Flore; Gayrard, Nathalie; Argilés, Àngel; Lundin, Ulrika; Weinberger, Klaus M.; Dakna, Mohammed; Delles, Christian; Mullen, William; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Koeck, Thomas; Zürbig, Petra; Mischak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is part of a number of systemic and renal diseases and may reach epidemic proportions over the next decade. Efforts have been made to improve diagnosis and management of CKD. We hypothesised that combining metabolomic and proteomic approaches could generate a more systemic and complete view of the disease mechanisms. To test this approach, we examined samples from a cohort of 49 patients representing different stages of CKD. Urine samples were analysed for proteomic changes using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and urine and plasma samples for metabolomic changes using different mass spectrometry-based techniques. The training set included 20 CKD patients selected according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at mild (59.9±16.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) or advanced (8.9±4.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) CKD and the remaining 29 patients left for the test set. We identified a panel of 76 statistically significant metabolites and peptides that correlated with CKD in the training set. We combined these biomarkers in different classifiers and then performed correlation analyses with eGFR at baseline and follow-up after 2.8±0.8 years in the test set. A solely plasma metabolite biomarker-based classifier significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function in the test set at baseline and follow-up (ρ = −0.8031; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.6009; p = 0.0019, respectively). Similarly, a urinary metabolite biomarker-based classifier did reveal significant association to kidney function (ρ = −0.6557; p = 0.0001 and ρ = −0.6574; p = 0.0005). A classifier utilising 46 identified urinary peptide biomarkers performed statistically equivalent to the urinary and plasma metabolite classifier (ρ = −0.7752; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.8400; p<0.0001). The combination of both urinary proteomic and urinary and plasma metabolic biomarkers did not improve the correlation with eGFR. In

  12. Proteomic signature of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD): Toward diagnostically predictive biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Demerjian, Garabed Gary; Sims, Anothony Benjamin; Stack, Brendan Curran

    2011-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articulates the mandible with the maxilla. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysfunctions of this joint, which range from acute to chronic inflammation, trauma and dislocations, developmental anomalies and neoplasia. TMD manifest as signs and symptoms that involve the surrounding muscles, ligaments, bones, synovial capsule, connective tissue, teeth and innervations proximal and distal to this joint. TMD induce proximal and distal, chronic and acute, dull or intense pain and discomfort, muscle spasm, clicking/popping sounds upon opening and closing of the mouth, and chewing or speaking difficulties. The trigeminal cranial nerve V, and its branches provide the primary sensory innervation to the TMJ. Our clinical work suggests that the auriculotemporal (AT) nerve, a branch of the mandibular nerve, the largest of the three divisions of the trigeminal nerve, plays a critical role in TMD sequelae. The AT nerve provides the somatosensory fibers that supply the joint, the middle ear, and the temporal region. By projecting fibers toward the otic ganglion, the AT nerve establishes an important bridge to the sympathetic system. As it courses posteriorly to the condylar head of the TMJ, compression, injury or irritation of the AT nerve can lead to significant neurologic and neuro-muscular disorders, including Tourette's syndrome,Torticolli, gait or balance disorders and Parkinson’s disease. Here, we propose that a proteomic signature of TMD can be obtained by assessing certain biomarkers in local (e.g., synovial fluid at the joint) and distal body fluids (e.g., saliva, cerebrospinal fluid), which can aid TMD diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:21364835

  13. Validation of Serum Biomarkers Derived from Proteomic Analysis for the Early Screening of Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Kolialexi, Aggeliki; Gourgiotis, Dimitrios; Daskalakis, George; Marmarinos, Antonis; Lykoudi, Alexandra; Mavreli, Danai; Mavrou, Ariadni; Papantoniou, Nikolas

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To examine the potential value of previously identified biomarkers using proteomics in early screening for preeclampsia (PE). Methods. 24 blood samples from women who subsequently developed PE and 48 from uncomplicated pregnancies were obtained at 11–13 weeks and analysed after delivery. Cystatin-C, sVCAM-1, and Pappalysin-1 were quantified by ELISA. Maternal characteristics and medical history were recorded. Results. Median values of Cystatin-C, sVCAM-1, and Pappalysin-1 in the PE group as compared to controls were 909.1 gEq/mL versus 480.0 gEq/mL, P = .000, 832.0 gEq/mL versus 738.8 gEq/mL, P = .024, and 234.4 gEq/mL versus 74.9 gEq/mL, P = .064, respectively. Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUC, standard error (SE)) for predicting PE were Cystatin-C: 0.90 (SE 0.04), VCAM-1: 0.66 (SE 0.074), and Pappalysin-1: 0.63 (SE 0.083). To discriminate between cases at risk for PE and normal controls, cut-off values of 546.8 gEq/mL for Cystatin-C, 1059.5 gEq/mL for sVCAM-1, and 220.8 gEq/mL for Pappalysin-1 were chosen, providing sensitivity of 91%, 41%, and 54% and specificity of 85%, 100%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusions. sVCAM-1 and Pappalysin-1 do not improve early screening for PE. Cystatin-C, however, seems to be associated with subsequent PE development, but larger studies are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:25628472

  14. Identification of Biomarkers by Proteomics for Prenatal Screening for Neural Tube Defects.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guosong; He, Pingya; Du, Ying; Zhang, Su

    2016-01-01

    Neural tube defect (NTD) is a serious congenital defect, but current methods for identifying NTD are limited. We used proteomic analysis of maternal serum to identify NTD-specific proteins whose levels differed between women with NTD fetuses (n = 50) and those with healthy fetuses (n = 40). Three NTD-specific protein peaks (8,130.6, 15,941.7, and 3,960.3 m/z) were identified using MALDI-TOF-mass spectrophotemetry, and were included in a diagnostic model developed using Biomarker Patterns software. The model used cut-offs for the relative intensity of the three peaks to indicate if a case had or did not have NTD. The model identified 48 of the 50 NTD cases and 36 of the 40 control cases correctly, resulting in the sensitivity of 96.0% (48/50) and the specificity of 90.0% (36/40). The diagnostic model was also tested on 105 clinical cases at high risk for NTD, as determined by having high alpha-fetoprotein levels, resulting in the sensitivity of 100% (101/101) and the specificity of 75.0% (3/4). Using the International Protein Index database, we identified proteins with a molecular mass of 8,130.6 Da as ADP-ribosylation factor 1 and a protein similar to cold agglutinin FS-1 antibody light-chain. The 15,941.7-Da peak corresponded to vitamin K3 protein, and the identity of the 3,960.3-Da protein was unclear. Thus, this study developed a diagnostic model consisting of the three peaks which may be indicators of NTD. This new assay may be at least as accurate for diagnosing NTD compared with the commonly used clinical test that assesses alpha-fetoprotein levels.

  15. Evaluation of Multi-Protein Immunoaffinity Subtraction for Plasma Proteomics and Candidate Biomarker Discovery Using Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    The detection of low-abundance protein disease biomarkers from human blood poses significant challenges due to the high dynamic range of protein concentrations that span more than 10 orders of magnitude, as well as the extreme complexity of the serum/plasma proteome. Therefore, experimental strategies that include the removal of high-abundance proteins have been increasingly utilized in proteomic studies of serum, plasma, and other body fluids to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins and achieve broader proteome coverage. However, both the specificity and reproducibility of the high-abundance protein depletion process represent common concerns. Here, we report a detailed evaluation of the performance of two commercially available immunoaffinity subtraction systems commonly used in human serum/plasma proteome characterization by high resolution LC-MS/MS. One system uses mammalian IgG antibodies to remove six of the most abundant plasma proteins, and the other uses chicken immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) antibodies to remove twelve of the most abundant plasma proteins. Plasma samples were repeatedly processed using these two systems, and the resulting flow-through fractions and bound fractions were individually analyzed for comparison. Removal of target proteins by both immunoaffinity subtraction systems proved reproducible and efficient. Nontarget proteins, including spiked protein standards, were also observed to bind to the columns, but in a fairly reproducible manner. The results suggest that these multi-protein immunoaffinity subtraction systems are both highly effective and reproducible for removing high-abundance proteins and therefore, can be readily integrated into quantitative strategies to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins in biomarker discovery studies.

  16. Identification of novel translational urinary biomarkers for acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury using proteomic profiling in mice.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Laarakkers, Coby M M; van der Kuur, Ellen C; Morava-Kozicz, Eva; Wevers, Ron A; Augustijn, Kevin D; Touw, Daan J; Sandel, Maro H; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure. Currently, no adequate predictive biomarkers for DILI are available. This study describes a translational approach using proteomic profiling for the identification of urinary proteins related to acute liver injury induced by acetaminophen (APAP). Mice were given a single intraperitoneal dose of APAP (0-350 mg/kg bw) followed by 24 h urine collection. Doses of ≥275 mg/kg bw APAP resulted in hepatic centrilobular necrosis and significantly elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values (p<0.0001). Proteomic profiling resulted in the identification of 12 differentially excreted proteins in urine of mice with acute liver injury (p<0.001), including superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3) and calmodulin (CaM), as novel biomarkers for APAP-induced liver injury. Urinary levels of SOD1 and CA3 increased with rising plasma ALT levels, but urinary CaM was already present in mice treated with high dose of APAP without elevated plasma ALT levels. Importantly, we showed in human urine after APAP intoxication the presence of SOD1 and CA3, whereas both proteins were absent in control urine samples. Urinary concentrations of CaM were significantly increased and correlated well with plasma APAP concentrations (r = 0.97; p<0.0001) in human APAP intoxicants, who did not present with elevated plasma ALT levels. In conclusion, using this urinary proteomics approach we demonstrate CA3, SOD1 and, most importantly, CaM as potential human biomarkers for APAP-induced liver injury.

  17. From SOMAmer-Based Biomarker Discovery to Diagnostic and Clinical Applications: A SOMAmer-Based, Streamlined Multiplex Proteomic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Stephan; Vaught, Jonathan D.; Bock, Christopher; Gold, Larry; Katilius, Evaldas; Keeney, Tracy R.; Kim, Nancy; Saccomano, Nicholas A.; Wilcox, Sheri K.; Zichi, Dom; Sanders, Glenn M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we reported a SOMAmer-based, highly multiplexed assay for the purpose of biomarker identification. To enable seamless transition from highly multiplexed biomarker discovery assays to a format suitable and convenient for diagnostic and life-science applications, we developed a streamlined, plate-based version of the assay. The plate-based version of the assay is robust, sensitive (sub-picomolar), rapid, can be highly multiplexed (upwards of 60 analytes), and fully automated. We demonstrate that quantification by microarray-based hybridization, Luminex bead-based methods, and qPCR are each compatible with our platform, further expanding the breadth of proteomic applications for a wide user community. PMID:22022604

  18. Randomized Trial of Glucosamine and Chondroitin Supplementation on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Plasma Proteomics Profiles in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Sandi L.; White, Emily; Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Zhang, Yuzheng; Rho, Junghyun; Song, Xiaoling; Milne, Ginger L.; Lampe, Paul D.; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucosamine and chondroitin are popular non-vitamin dietary supplements used for osteoarthritis. Long-term use is associated with lower incidence of colorectal and lung cancers and with lower mortality; however, the mechanism underlying these observations is unknown. In vitro and animal studies show that glucosamine and chondroitin inhibit NF-kB, a central mediator of inflammation, but no definitive trials have been done in healthy humans. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to assess the effects of glucosamine hydrochloride (1500 mg/d) plus chondroitin sulfate (1200 mg/d) for 28 days compared to placebo in 18 (9 men, 9 women) healthy, overweight (body mass index 25.0–32.5 kg/m2) adults, aged 20–55 y. We examined 4 serum inflammatory biomarkers: C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors I and II; a urinary inflammation biomarker: prostaglandin E2-metabolite; and a urinary oxidative stress biomarker: F2-isoprostane. Plasma proteomics on an antibody array was performed to explore other pathways modulated by glucosamine and chondroitin. Results Serum CRP concentrations were 23% lower after glucosamine and chondroitin compared to placebo (P = 0.048). There were no significant differences in other biomarkers. In the proteomics analyses, several pathways were significantly different between the interventions after Bonferroni correction, the most significant being a reduction in the “cytokine activity” pathway (P = 2.6 x 10-16), after glucosamine and chondroitin compared to placebo. Conclusion Glucosamine and chondroitin supplementation may lower systemic inflammation and alter other pathways in healthy, overweight individuals. This study adds evidence for potential mechanisms supporting epidemiologic findings that glucosamine and chondroitin are associated with reduced risk of lung and colorectal cancer. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01682694 PMID

  19. Potential for proteomic approaches in determining efficacy biomarkers following administration of fish oils rich in omega-3 fatty acids: application in pancreatic cancers.

    PubMed

    Runau, Franscois; Arshad, Ali; Isherwood, John; Norris, Leonie; Howells, Lynne; Metcalfe, Matthew; Dennison, Ashley

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease with a significantly poor prognosis. Despite modern advances in other medical, surgical, and oncologic therapy, the outcome from pancreatic cancer has improved little over the last 40 years. To improve the management of this difficult disease, trials investigating the use of dietary and parenteral fish oils rich in omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids, exhibiting proven anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties, have revealed favorable results in pancreatic cancers. Proteomics is the large-scale study of proteins that attempts to characterize the complete set of proteins encoded by the genome of an organism and that, with the use of sensitive mass spectrometric-based techniques, has allowed high-throughput analysis of the proteome to aid identification of putative biomarkers pertinent to given disease states. These biomarkers provide useful insight into potentially discovering new markers for early detection or elucidating the efficacy of treatment on pancreatic cancers. Here, our review identifies potential proteomic-based biomarkers in pancreatic cancer relating to apoptosis, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metabolic regulation in clinical studies. We also reviewed proteomic biomarkers from the administration of ω-3 fatty acids that act on similar anticarcinogenic pathways as above and reflect that proteomic studies on the effect of ω-3 fatty acids in pancreatic cancer will yield favorable results.

  20. New perspectives on bioactivity of olive oil: evidence from animal models, human interventions and the use of urinary proteomic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Combet, E; Figueira, M E; Koeck, T; Mullen, W; Bronze, M R

    2015-08-01

    Olive oil (OO) is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet and has been associated with longevity and a lower incidence of chronic diseases, particularly CHD. Cardioprotective effects of OO consumption have been widely related with improved lipoprotein profile, endothelial function and inflammation, linked to health claims of oleic acid and phenolic content of OO. With CVD being a leading cause of death worldwide, a review of the potential mechanisms underpinning the impact of OO in the prevention of disease is warranted. The current body of evidence relies on mechanistic studies involving animal and cell-based models, epidemiological studies of OO intake and risk factor, small- and large-scale human interventions, and the emerging use of novel biomarker techniques associated with disease risk. Although model systems are important for mechanistic research nutrition, methodologies and experimental designs with strong translational value are still lacking. The present review critically appraises the available evidence to date, with particular focus on emerging novel biomarkers for disease risk assessment. New perspectives on OO research are outlined, especially those with scope to clarify key mechanisms by which OO consumption exerts health benefits. The use of urinary proteomic biomarkers, as highly specific disease biomarkers, is highlighted towards a higher translational approach involving OO in nutritional recommendations.

  1. Metabolomic and proteomic biomarkers for III-V semiconductors: Chemical-specific porphyrinurias and proteinurias

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Bruce A. . E-mail: bxf9@cdc.gov; Conner, Elizabeth A.; Yamauchi, Hiroshi

    2005-08-07

    A pressing need exists to develop and validate molecular biomarkers to assess the early effects of chemical agents, both individually and in mixtures. This is particularly true for new and chemically intensive industries such as the semiconductor industry. Previous studies from this laboratory and others have demonstrated element-specific alterations of the heme biosynthetic pathway for the III-V semiconductors gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium arsenide (InAs) with attendant increased urinary excretion of specific heme precursors. These data represent an example of a metabolomic biomarker to assess chemical effects early, before clinical disease develops. Previous studies have demonstrated that the intratracheal or subcutaneous administration of GaAs and InAs particles to hamsters produces the induction of the major stress protein gene families in renal proximal tubule cells. This was monitored by 35-S methionine labeling of gene products followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis after exposure to InAs particles. The present studies examined whether these effects were associated with the development of compound-specific proteinuria after 10 or 30 days following subcutaneous injection of GaAs or InAs particles in hamsters. The results of these studies demonstrated the development of GaAs- and InAs-specific alterations in renal tubule cell protein expression patterns that varied at 10 and 30 days. At the 30-day point, cells in hamsters that received InAs particles showed marked attenuation of protein expression, suggesting inhibition of the stress protein response. These changes were associated with GaAs and InAs proteinuria patterns as monitored by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The intensity of the protein excretion patterns increased between the 10- and 30-day points and was most pronounced for animals in the 30-day InAs treatment group. No overt morphologic signs of cell death were seen in renal tubule cells of these animals

  2. Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, Kim K.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-02-01

    Proteomics aims to characterize the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of proteins in biological systems, the protein response to environmental stimuli, and the differences in protein states between diseased and control biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) plays a crucial role in enabling the analysis of proteomes and typically is the method of choice for identifying proteins present in biological systems. Peptide (and consequently protein) identifications are made by comparing measured masses to calculated values obtained from genome data. Several methodologies based on MS have been developed for the analysis of proteomes. The complexity of the biological systems requires that the proteome be separated prior to analysis. Both gel based and liquid chromatography based separations have proven very useful in this regard. Typically, separated proteins are analyzed with MS either intact (top-down proteomics) or are digested into peptides (bottom-up) prior to MS analysis. Additionally, several procedures, with and without stable isotopic labeling, have been introduced to facilitate protein quantitation (e.g. characterize changes in protein abundances between given biological states).

  3. Proteomic identification of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein as a plasma biomarker of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wen-Dong; Li, Jun-Zheng; Hu, Shui-Wang; Peng, Xiao-Wei; Li, Gang; Liu, Xiong; Chen, Huai-Hong; Xu, Xia; Li, Xiang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) has very poor prognosis compared with other head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Late-stage diagnosis of HSCC increases mortality. Therefore, more effective biomarkers for early diagnosis of HSCC are necessary. Unfortunately, appropriate biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis have not been identified yet. However, recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to identify plasma proteins as biomarkers for HSCC. In the present study, plasma samples were analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). A total of 26 proteins representing 12 unique gene products were identified. The up-regulation proteins were alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein (AHSG), complement C4-B, haptoglobin, C-reactive protein, and ceruloplasmin, whereas the down-regulation proteins were serum albumin, angiotensinogen, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, Ig gamma-3 chain C region, fibrinogen gamma chain, apolipoprotein A-I, and Ig kappa chain C region. Among all the differentially expressed proteins, AHSG was validated by western blot and ELISA. The results were consistent with the data from 2D-DIGE, further suggesting that AHSG may be employed as a potential biomarker for the early diagnosis of HSCC. In summary, this study was the first to use 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF platform to identify the potential plasma biomarkers for HSCC. The plasma AHSG showed great potential for HSCC screening. PMID:26464644

  4. Proteomic identification of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein as a plasma biomarker of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wen-Dong; Li, Jun-Zheng; Hu, Shui-Wang; Peng, Xiao-Wei; Li, Gang; Liu, Xiong; Chen, Huai-Hong; Xu, Xia; Li, Xiang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) has very poor prognosis compared with other head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Late-stage diagnosis of HSCC increases mortality. Therefore, more effective biomarkers for early diagnosis of HSCC are necessary. Unfortunately, appropriate biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis have not been identified yet. However, recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to identify plasma proteins as biomarkers for HSCC. In the present study, plasma samples were analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and differentially expressed proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). A total of 26 proteins representing 12 unique gene products were identified. The up-regulation proteins were alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein (AHSG), complement C4-B, haptoglobin, C-reactive protein, and ceruloplasmin, whereas the down-regulation proteins were serum albumin, angiotensinogen, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, Ig gamma-3 chain C region, fibrinogen gamma chain, apolipoprotein A-I, and Ig kappa chain C region. Among all the differentially expressed proteins, AHSG was validated by western blot and ELISA. The results were consistent with the data from 2D-DIGE, further suggesting that AHSG may be employed as a potential biomarker for the early diagnosis of HSCC. In summary, this study was the first to use 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF platform to identify the potential plasma biomarkers for HSCC. The plasma AHSG showed great potential for HSCC screening. PMID:26464644

  5. Proteomic analysis of lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms: there's more than biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Zamò, Alberto; Cecconi, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms comprise a broad spectrum of different tumours, classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) on the basis of a combination of morphology, immunophenotypic, genetic and clinical features. Up to date for many of these neoplasms no single feature is regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The application of proteomics to the study of neoplastic haematological diseases could help in the search for new diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as in the development of new therapeutic strategies. In this review, we focus on the actual role of proteomics technologies in the study of neoplastic haematology. In particular, we analyse the results obtained in the field of body fluid, cell lines, and tissues proteomics, and discuss the improvement allowed by the new developed proteomic strategies, such as nanofluidic systems, analysis of formalin-fixed tissues, and quantitative high throughput techniques (SILAC, ICAT, iTRAQ).

  6. IgY14 and SuperMix immunoaffinity separations coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for human plasma proteomic biomarker discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Zhou, Jianying; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hossain, Mahmud; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-02-01

    Interest in the application of advanced proteomics technologies to human blood plasma- or serum-based clinical samples for the purpose of discovering disease biomarkers continues to grow; however, the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in these types of samples (often >10 orders of magnitude) represents a significant analytical challenge, particularly for detecting low-abundance candidate biomarkers. In response, immunoaffinity separation methods for depleting multiple high- and moderate-abundance proteins have become key tools for enriching low-abundance proteins and enhancing detection of these proteins in plasma proteomics. Herein, we describe IgY14 and tandem IgY14-Supermix separation methods for removing 14 high-abundance and up to 60 moderate-abundance proteins, respectively, from human blood plasma and highlight their utility when combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for interrogating the human plasma proteome.

  7. Searching for the noninvasive biomarker Holy Grail: Are urine proteomics the answer?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, biobehavioral nursing scientists have focused their attention on the search for biomarkers or biological signatures to identify patients at risk for various health problems and poor disease outcomes. In response to the national impetus for biomarker discovery, the measurement of biological...

  8. Direct cancer tissue proteomics: a method to identify candidate cancer biomarkers from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissues.

    PubMed

    Hwang, S-I; Thumar, J; Lundgren, D H; Rezaul, K; Mayya, V; Wu, L; Eng, J; Wright, M E; Han, D K

    2007-01-01

    Successful treatment of multiple cancer types requires early detection and identification of reliable biomarkers present in specific cancer tissues. To test the feasibility of identifying proteins from archival cancer tissues, we have developed a methodology, termed direct tissue proteomics (DTP), which can be used to identify proteins directly from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate cancer tissue samples. Using minute prostate biopsy sections, we demonstrate the identification of 428 prostate-expressed proteins using the shotgun method. Because the DTP method is not quantitative, we employed the absolute quantification method and demonstrate picogram level quantification of prostate-specific antigen. In depth bioinformatics analysis of these expressed proteins affords the categorization of metabolic pathways that may be important for distinct stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we validate Wnt-3 as an upregulated protein in cancerous prostate cells by immunohistochemistry. We propose that this general strategy provides a roadmap for successful identification of critical molecular targets of multiple cancer types.

  9. Feasibility of investigating differential proteomic expression in depression: implications for biomarker development in mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Frye, M A; Nassan, M; Jenkins, G D; Kung, S; Veldic, M; Palmer, B A; Feeder, S E; Tye, S J; Choi, D S; Biernacka, J M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether proteomic profiling in serum samples can be utilized in identifying and differentiating mood disorders. A consecutive sample of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of unipolar (UP n=52) or bipolar depression (BP-I n=46, BP-II n=49) and controls (n=141) were recruited. A 7.5-ml blood sample was drawn for proteomic multiplex profiling of 320 proteins utilizing the Myriad RBM Discovery Multi-Analyte Profiling platform. After correcting for multiple testing and adjusting for covariates, growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15), hemopexin (HPX), hepsin (HPN), matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP-4) and transthyretin (TTR) all showed statistically significant differences among groups. In a series of three post hoc analyses correcting for multiple testing, MMP-7 was significantly different in mood disorder (BP-I+BP-II+UP) vs controls, MMP-7, GDF-15, HPN were significantly different in bipolar cases (BP-I+BP-II) vs controls, and GDF-15, HPX, HPN, RBP-4 and TTR proteins were all significantly different in BP-I vs controls. Good diagnostic accuracy (ROC-AUC⩾0.8) was obtained most notably for GDF-15, RBP-4 and TTR when comparing BP-I vs controls. While based on a small sample not adjusted for medication state, this discovery sample with a conservative method of correction suggests feasibility in using proteomic panels to assist in identifying and distinguishing mood disorders, in particular bipolar I disorder. Replication studies for confirmation, consideration of state vs trait serial assays to delineate proteomic expression of bipolar depression vs previous mania, and utility studies to assess proteomic expression profiling as an advanced decision making tool or companion diagnostic are encouraged. PMID:26645624

  10. Liver proteome response of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to several environmental contaminants: potential insights into biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Brian C; Ralston-Hooper, Kimberly J; Kowalski, Kevin A; Dorota Inerowicz, H; Adamec, Jiri; Sepúlveda, María S

    2009-10-19

    Liver proteome response of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to environmental contaminants was analyzed to identify novel biomarkers of exposure. Adult male bass were exposed to cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)), atrazine, PCB 126, phenanthrene, or toxaphene via intraperitoneal injection with target body burdens of 0.00067, 3.0, 2.5, 50, and 100 microg/g, respectively. After a 96 h exposure, hepatic proteins were separated with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and differentially expressed proteins (vs. controls) recognized and identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. We identified, 30, 18, eight, 19, and five proteins as differentially expressed within the CdCl(2), atrazine, PCB 126, phenanthrene, and toxaphene treatments, respectively. Alterations were observed in the expression of proteins associated with cellular ion homeostasis (toxaphene), oxidative stress (phenanthrene, PCB 126), and energy production including glycolysis (CdCl(2), atrazine) and ATP synthesis (atrazine). This work supports the further evaluation of several of these proteins as biomarkers of contaminant exposure in fish.

  11. Identification of HSPA8 as a candidate biomarker for endometrial carcinoma by using iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Nianchun; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Shufen; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Although there are advances in diagnostic, predictive, and therapeutic strategies, discovering protein biomarker for early detection is required for improving the survival rate of the patients with endometrial carcinoma. In this study, we identify proteins that are differentially expressed between the Stage I endometrial carcinoma and the normal pericarcinous tissues by using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis. Totally, we screened 1,266 proteins. Among them, 103 proteins were significantly overexpressed, and 30 were significantly downexpressed in endometrial carcinoma. Using the bioinformatics analysis, we identified a list of proteins that might be closely associated with endometrial carcinoma, including CCT7, HSPA8, PCBP2, LONP1, PFN1, and EEF2. We validated the gene overexpression of these molecules in the endometrial carcinoma tissues and found that HSPA8 was most significantly upregulated. We further validated the overexpression of HSPA8 by using immunoblot analysis. Then, HSPA8 siRNA was transferred into the endometrial cancer cells RL-95-2 and HEC-1B. The depletion of HSPA8 siRNAs significantly reduced cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis, and suppressed cell growth in both cell lines. Taken together, HSPA8 plays a vital role in the development of endometrial carcinoma. HSPA8 is a candidate biomarker for early diagnosis and therapy of Stage I endometrial carcinoma. PMID:27110132

  12. Environmental monitoring of Domingo Rubio stream (Huelva Estuary, SW Spain) by combining conventional biomarkers and proteomic analysis in Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Montes Nieto, Rafael; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, José-Luis; López-Barea, Juan

    2010-02-01

    Element load, conventional biomarkers and altered protein expression profiles were studied in Carcinus maenas crabs, to assess contamination of "Domingo Rubio" stream, an aquatic ecosystem that receives pyritic metals, industrial contaminants, and pesticides. Lower antioxidative activities - glucose-6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases, catalase - were found in parallel to higher levels of damaged biomolecules - malondialdehyde, oxidized glutathione -, due to oxidative lesions promoted by contaminants, as the increased levels of essential - Zn, Cu, Co - and nonessential - Cr, Ni, Cd - elements. Utility of Proteomics to assess environmental quality was confirmed, especially after considering the six proteins identified by de novo sequencing through capLC-muESI-ITMS/MS and homology search on databases. They include tripartite motif-containing protein 11 and ATF7 transcription factor (upregulated), plus CBR-NHR-218 nuclear hormone receptor, two components of the ABC transporters and aldehyde dehydrogenase (downregulated). These proteins could be used as novel potential biomarkers of the deleterious effects of pollutants present in the area. PMID:19815320

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Urine to Identify Breast Cancer Biomarker Candidates Using a Label-Free LC-MS/MS Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beretov, Julia; Wasinger, Valerie C.; Millar, Ewan K. A.; Schwartz, Peter; Graham, Peter H.; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease and is a leading cause of death in women. Early diagnosis and monitoring progression of breast cancer are important for improving prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify protein biomarkers in urine for early screening detection and monitoring invasive breast cancer progression. Method We performed a comparative proteomic analysis using ion count relative quantification label free LC-MS/MS analysis of urine from breast cancer patients (n = 20) and healthy control women (n = 20). Results Unbiased label free LC-MS/MS-based proteomics was used to provide a profile of abundant proteins in the biological system of breast cancer patients. Data analysis revealed 59 urinary proteins that were significantly different in breast cancer patients compared to the normal control subjects (p<0.05, fold change >3). Thirty-six urinary proteins were exclusively found in specific breast cancer stages, with 24 increasing and 12 decreasing in their abundance. Amongst the 59 significant urinary proteins identified, a list of 13 novel up-regulated proteins were revealed that may be used to detect breast cancer. These include stage specific markers associated with pre-invasive breast cancer in the ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) samples (Leucine LRC36, MAST4 and Uncharacterized protein CI131), early invasive breast cancer (DYH8, HBA, PEPA, uncharacterized protein C4orf14 (CD014), filaggrin and MMRN2) and metastatic breast cancer (AGRIN, NEGR1, FIBA and Keratin KIC10). Preliminary validation of 3 potential markers (ECM1, MAST4 and filaggrin) identified was performed in breast cancer cell lines by Western blotting. One potential marker MAST4 was further validated in human breast cancer tissues as well as individual human breast cancer urine samples with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. Conclusions Our results indicate that urine is a useful non-invasive source of biomarkers and the profile patterns

  14. Combined Methods for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening, Using Retina Photographs and Tear Fluid Proteomics Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Torok, Zsolt; Peto, Tunde; Csosz, Eva; Tukacs, Edit; Molnar, Agnes M; Berta, Andras; Tozser, Jozsef; Hajdu, Andras; Nagy, Valeria; Domokos, Balint; Csutak, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    Background. It is estimated that 347 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus (DM), and almost 5 million are blind due to diabetic retinopathy (DR). The progression of DR can be slowed down with early diagnosis and treatment. Therefore our aim was to develop a novel automated method for DR screening. Methods. 52 patients with diabetes mellitus were enrolled into the project. Of all patients, 39 had signs of DR. Digital retina images and tear fluid samples were taken from each eye. The results from the tear fluid proteomics analysis and from digital microaneurysm (MA) detection on fundus images were used as the input of a machine learning system. Results. MA detection method alone resulted in 0.84 sensitivity and 0.81 specificity. Using the proteomics data for analysis 0.87 sensitivity and 0.68 specificity values were achieved. The combined data analysis integrated the features of the proteomics data along with the number of detected MAs in the associated image and achieved sensitivity/specificity values of 0.93/0.78. Conclusions. As the two different types of data represent independent and complementary information on the outcome, the combined model resulted in a reliable screening method that is comparable to the requirements of DR screening programs applied in clinical routine.

  15. Combined Methods for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening, Using Retina Photographs and Tear Fluid Proteomics Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Zsolt; Peto, Tunde; Csosz, Eva; Tukacs, Edit; Molnar, Agnes M.; Berta, Andras; Tozser, Jozsef; Hajdu, Andras; Nagy, Valeria; Domokos, Balint; Csutak, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    Background. It is estimated that 347 million people suffer from diabetes mellitus (DM), and almost 5 million are blind due to diabetic retinopathy (DR). The progression of DR can be slowed down with early diagnosis and treatment. Therefore our aim was to develop a novel automated method for DR screening. Methods. 52 patients with diabetes mellitus were enrolled into the project. Of all patients, 39 had signs of DR. Digital retina images and tear fluid samples were taken from each eye. The results from the tear fluid proteomics analysis and from digital microaneurysm (MA) detection on fundus images were used as the input of a machine learning system. Results. MA detection method alone resulted in 0.84 sensitivity and 0.81 specificity. Using the proteomics data for analysis 0.87 sensitivity and 0.68 specificity values were achieved. The combined data analysis integrated the features of the proteomics data along with the number of detected MAs in the associated image and achieved sensitivity/specificity values of 0.93/0.78. Conclusions. As the two different types of data represent independent and complementary information on the outcome, the combined model resulted in a reliable screening method that is comparable to the requirements of DR screening programs applied in clinical routine. PMID:26221613

  16. Statistical considerations of optimal study design for human plasma proteomics and biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cong; Simpson, Kathryn L; Lancashire, Lee J; Walker, Michael J; Dawson, Martin J; Unwin, Richard D; Rembielak, Agata; Price, Patricia; West, Catharine; Dive, Caroline; Whetton, Anthony D

    2012-04-01

    A mass spectrometry-based plasma biomarker discovery workflow was developed to facilitate biomarker discovery. Plasma from either healthy volunteers or patients with pancreatic cancer was 8-plex iTRAQ labeled, fractionated by 2-dimensional reversed phase chromatography and subjected to MALDI ToF/ToF mass spectrometry. Data were processed using a q-value based statistical approach to maximize protein quantification and identification. Technical (between duplicate samples) and biological variance (between and within individuals) were calculated and power analysis was thereby enabled. An a priori power analysis was carried out using samples from healthy volunteers to define sample sizes required for robust biomarker identification. The result was subsequently validated with a post hoc power analysis using a real clinical setting involving pancreatic cancer patients. This demonstrated that six samples per group (e.g., pre- vs post-treatment) may provide sufficient statistical power for most proteins with changes>2 fold. A reference standard allowed direct comparison of protein expression changes between multiple experiments. Analysis of patient plasma prior to treatment identified 29 proteins with significant changes within individual patient. Changes in Peroxiredoxin II levels were confirmed by Western blot. This q-value based statistical approach in combination with reference standard samples can be applied with confidence in the design and execution of clinical studies for predictive, prognostic, and/or pharmacodynamic biomarker discovery. The power analysis provides information required prior to study initiation.

  17. Improving feature ranking for biomarker discovery in proteomics mass spectrometry data using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Soha; Zhang, Mengjie; Peng, Lifeng

    2014-07-01

    Feature selection on mass spectrometry (MS) data is essential for improving classification performance and biomarker discovery. The number of MS samples is typically very small compared with the high dimensionality of the samples, which makes the problem of biomarker discovery very hard. In this paper, we propose the use of genetic programming for biomarker detection and classification of MS data. The proposed approach is composed of two phases: in the first phase, feature selection and ranking are performed. In the second phase, classification is performed. The results show that the proposed method can achieve better classification performance and biomarker detection rate than the information gain- (IG) based and the RELIEF feature selection methods. Meanwhile, four classifiers, Naive Bayes, J48 decision tree, random forest and support vector machines, are also used to further test the performance of the top ranked features. The results show that the four classifiers using the top ranked features from the proposed method achieve better performance than the IG and the RELIEF methods. Furthermore, GP also outperforms a genetic algorithm approach on most of the used data sets.

  18. Proteomic biomarkers for ageing the mosquito Aedes aegypti to determine risk of pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Leon E; Monkman, James; Dave, Keyur A; Wockner, Leesa F; Birrell, Geoff W; Norris, Emma L; Kienzle, Vivian J; Sikulu, Maggy T; Ryan, Peter A; Gorman, Jeffery J; Kay, Brian H

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers of the age of mosquitoes are required to determine the risk of transmission of various pathogens as each pathogen undergoes a period of extrinsic incubation in the mosquito host. Using the 2-D Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) procedure, we investigated the abundance of up to 898 proteins from the Yellow Fever and dengue virus vector, Aedes aegypti, during ageing. By applying a mixed-effects model of protein expression, we identified five common patterns of abundance change during ageing and demonstrated an age-related decrease in variance for four of these. This supported a search for specific proteins with abundance changes that remain tightly associated with ageing for use as ageing biomarkers. Using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry we identified ten candidate proteins that satisfied strict biomarker discovery criteria (identified in two out of three multivariate analysis procedures and in two cohorts of mosquitoes). We validated the abundances of the four most suitable candidates (Actin depolymerising factor; ADF, Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A; eIF5A, insect cuticle protein Q17LN8, and Anterior fat body protein; AFP) using semi-quantitative Western analysis of individual mosquitoes of six ages. The redox-response protein Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) and electron shuttling protein Electron transfer oxidoreductase (ETO) were subject to post-translational modifications affecting their charge states with potential effects on function. For the four candidates we show remarkably consistent decreases in abundance during ageing, validating initial selections. In particular, the abundance of AFP is an ideal biomarker candidate for whether a female mosquito has lived long enough to be capable of dengue virus transmission. We have demonstrated proteins to be a suitable class of ageing biomarkers in mosquitoes and have identified candidates for epidemiological studies of dengue and the evaluation of new disease reduction projects targeting

  19. Proteomic Biomarkers for Ageing the Mosquito Aedes aegypti to Determine Risk of Pathogen Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Leon E.; Monkman, James; Dave, Keyur A.; Wockner, Leesa F.; Birrell, Geoff W.; Norris, Emma L.; Kienzle, Vivian J.; Sikulu, Maggy T.; Ryan, Peter A.; Gorman, Jeffery J.; Kay, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers of the age of mosquitoes are required to determine the risk of transmission of various pathogens as each pathogen undergoes a period of extrinsic incubation in the mosquito host. Using the 2-D Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) procedure, we investigated the abundance of up to 898 proteins from the Yellow Fever and dengue virus vector, Aedes aegypti, during ageing. By applying a mixed-effects model of protein expression, we identified five common patterns of abundance change during ageing and demonstrated an age-related decrease in variance for four of these. This supported a search for specific proteins with abundance changes that remain tightly associated with ageing for use as ageing biomarkers. Using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry we identified ten candidate proteins that satisfied strict biomarker discovery criteria (identified in two out of three multivariate analysis procedures and in two cohorts of mosquitoes). We validated the abundances of the four most suitable candidates (Actin depolymerising factor; ADF, Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A; eIF5A, insect cuticle protein Q17LN8, and Anterior fat body protein; AFP) using semi-quantitative Western analysis of individual mosquitoes of six ages. The redox-response protein Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) and electron shuttling protein Electron transfer oxidoreductase (ETO) were subject to post-translational modifications affecting their charge states with potential effects on function. For the four candidates we show remarkably consistent decreases in abundance during ageing, validating initial selections. In particular, the abundance of AFP is an ideal biomarker candidate for whether a female mosquito has lived long enough to be capable of dengue virus transmission. We have demonstrated proteins to be a suitable class of ageing biomarkers in mosquitoes and have identified candidates for epidemiological studies of dengue and the evaluation of new disease reduction projects targeting

  20. Proteomics Analysis of Brain Meningiomas in Pursuit of Novel Biomarkers of the Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Barkhoudarian, Garni; Whitelegge, Julian P; Kelly, Daniel F; Simonian, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the use of advanced proteomics techniques to identify novel protein markers that contribute to the transformation of benign meningiomas to more aggressive and malignant subtypes. Multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labelling and nano-LCMS was used to identify and quantify the differentially expressed proteins in WHO Grade I, II and III meningioma tissues. The proteins identified will help elucidate the process of transformation to malignancy and may contribute to improved diagnosis and treatment of these aggressive tumors PMID:27019568

  1. A lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform for identification of multiple liver cancer biomarkers in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Oh, Na Ree; Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Hoguen; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-09-18

    Aberrantly glycosylated proteins related to liver cancer progression were captured with specific lectin and identified from human plasma by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry as multiple biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The lectin fractionation for fucosylated protein glycoforms in human plasma was conducted with a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL). Following tryptic digestion of the lectin-captured fraction, plasma samples from 30 control cases (including 10 healthy, 10 hepatitis B virus [HBV], and 10 cirrhosis cases) and 10 HCC cases were quantitatively analyzed by MRM to identify which glycoproteins are viable HCC biomarkers. A1AG1, AACT, A1AT, and CERU were found to be potent biomarkers to differentiate HCC plasma from control plasmas. The AUROC generated independently from these four biomarker candidates ranged from 0.73 to 0.92. However, the lectin-coupled MRM assay with multiple combinations of biomarker candidates is superior statistically to those generated from the individual candidates with AUROC more than 0.95, which can be an alternative to the immunoassay inevitably requiring tedious development of multiple antibodies against biomarker candidates to be verified. Eventually the lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform was found to be efficient to identify multiple biomarkers from human plasma according to cancer progression.

  2. Proteomic-Based Detection of a Protein Cluster Dysregulated during Cardiovascular Development Identifies Biomarkers of Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Anjali K.; Krauthammer, Michael; Li, Puyao; Davidov, Eugene; Butler, Lucas C.; Copel, Joshua; Katajamaa, Mikko; Oresic, Matej; Buhimschi, Irina; Buhimschi, Catalin; Snyder, Michael; Madri, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs). However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies. Methodology/Principal Findings Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others) were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B) was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1) as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF) samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs. Conclusions/Significance The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs. PMID:19156209

  3. Label-Free LC-MS/MS Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Protein/Pathway Alterations and Candidate Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mahlon A; An, Jiyan; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Bowser, Robert P

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome has proven valuable to the study of neurodegenerative disorders. To identify new protein/pathway alterations and candidate biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we performed comparative proteomic profiling of CSF from sporadic ALS (sALS), healthy control (HC), and other neurological disease (OND) subjects using label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 1712 CSF proteins were detected and relatively quantified by spectral counting. Levels of several proteins with diverse biological functions were significantly altered in sALS samples. Enrichment analysis was used to link these alterations to biological pathways, which were predominantly related to inflammation, neuronal activity, and extracellular matrix regulation. We then used our CSF proteomic profiles to create a support vector machines classifier capable of discriminating training set ALS from non-ALS (HC and OND) samples. Four classifier proteins, WD repeat-containing protein 63, amyloid-like protein 1, SPARC-like protein 1, and cell adhesion molecule 3, were identified by feature selection and externally validated. The resultant classifier distinguished ALS from non-ALS samples with 83% sensitivity and 100% specificity in an independent test set. Collectively, our results illustrate the utility of CSF proteomic profiling for identifying ALS protein/pathway alterations and candidate disease biomarkers.

  4. Meningiomas and Proteomics: Focus on New Potential Biomarkers and Molecular Pathways.

    PubMed

    Abbritti, Rosaria Viola; Polito, Francesca; Cucinotta, Maria; Lo Giudice, Claudio; Caffo, Maria; Tomasello, Chiara; Germanò, Antonino; Aguennouz, Mohammed

    Meningiomas are one of the most common tumors affecting the central nervous system, exhibiting a great heterogeneity in grading, treatment and molecular background. This article provides an overview of the current literature regarding the molecular aspect of meningiomas. Analysis of potential biomarkers in serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pathological tissues was reported. Applying bioinformatic methods and matching the common proteic profile, arising from different biological samples, we highlighted the role of nine proteins, particularly related to tumorigenesis and grading of meningiomas: serpin peptidase inhibitor alpha 1, ceruloplasmin, hemopexin, albumin, C3, apolipoprotein, haptoglobin, amyloid-P-component serum and alpha-1-beta-glycoprotein. These proteins and their associated pathways, including complement and coagulation cascades, plasma lipoprotein particle remodeling and lipid metabolism could be considered possible diagnostic, prognostic biomarkers, and eventually therapeutic targets. Further investigations are needed to better characterize the role of these proteins and pathways in meningiomas. The role of new therapeutic strategies are also discussed. PMID:27566655

  5. Potential tumor biomarkers identified in ovarian cyst fluid by quantitative proteomic analysis, iTRAQ

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial-derived ovarian adenocarcinoma (EOC) is the most deadly gynecologic tumor, and the principle cause of the poor survival rate is diagnosis at a late stage. Screening and diagnostic biomarkers with acceptable specificity and sensitivity are lacking. Ovarian cyst fluid should harbor early ovarian cancer biomarkers because of its closeness to the tumor. We investigated ovarian cyst fluid as a source for discovering biomarkers for use in the diagnosis of EOC. Results Using quantitative mass spectrometry, iTRAQ MS, we identified 837 proteins in cyst fluid from benign, EOC stage I, and EOC stage III. Only patients of serous histology were included in the study. Comparing the benign (n = 5) with the malignant (n = 10) group, 87 of the proteins were significantly (p < 0.05) differentially expressed. Two proteins, serum amyloid A-4 (SAA4) and astacin-like metalloendopeptidase (ASTL), were selected for verification of the iTRAQ method and external validation with immunoblot in a larger cohort with mixed histology, in plasma (n = 68), and cyst fluid (n = 68). The protein selections were based on either high significance and high fold change or abundant appearance and several peptide recognitions in the sample sets (p = 0.04, FC = 1.95) and (p < 0.001, FC = 8.48) for SAA4 and ASTL respectively. Both were found to be significantly expressed (p < 0.05), but the methods did not correlate concerning ASTL. Conclusions Fluid from ovarian cysts connected directly to the primary tumor harbor many possible new tumor-specific biomarkers. We have identified 87 differentially expressed proteins and validated two candidates to verify the iTRAQ method. However several of the proteins are of interest for validation in a larger setting. PMID:23557354

  6. Development of micro immunosensors to study genomic and proteomic biomarkers related to cancer and Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha

    A report from the National Institutes of Health defines a disease biomarker as a "characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention." Early diagnosis is a crucial factor for incurable disease such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD). During the last decade researchers have discovered that biochemical changes caused by a disease can be detected considerably earlier as compared to physical manifestations/symptoms. In this dissertation electrochemical detection was utilized as the detection strategy as it offers high sensitivity/specificity, ease of operation, and capability of miniaturization and multiplexed detection. Electrochemical detection of biological analytes is an established field, and has matured at a rapid pace during the last 50 years and adapted itself to advances in micro/nanofabrication procedures. Carbon fiber microelectrodes were utilized as the platform sensor due to their high signal to noise ratio, ease and low-cost of fabrication, biocompatibility, and active carbon surface which allows conjugation with biorecognition moieties. This dissertation specifically focuses on the detection of 3 extensively validated biomarkers for cancer and AD. Firstly, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) a cancer biomarker was detected using a one-step, reagentless immunosensing strategy. The immunosensing strategy allowed a rapid and sensitive means of VEGF detection with a detection limit of about 38 pg/mL with a linear dynamic range of 0--100 pg/mL. Direct detection of AD-related biomarker amyloid beta (Abeta) was achieved by exploiting its inherent electroactivity. The quantification of the ratio of Abeta1-40/42 (or Abeta ratio) has been established as a reliable test to diagnose AD through human clinical trials. Triple barrel carbon fiber microelectrodes were used to simultaneously detect Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 in

  7. Comprehensive characterization of glioblastoma tumor tissues for biomarker identification using mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Heroux, Maxime S.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Halligan, Brian D.; Al-Gizawiy, Mona; Connelly, Jennifer M.; Mueller, Wade M.; Rand, Scott D.; Cochran, Elizabeth J.; LaViolette, Peter S.; Malkin, Mark G.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease; glioblastoma (GBM) is no exception. Short survival, poor prognosis, and very limited treatment options make it imperative to unravel the disease pathophysiology. The critically important identification of proteins that mediate various cellular events during disease is made possible with advancements in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. The objective of our study is to identify and characterize proteins that are differentially expressed in GBM to better understand their interactions and functions that lead to the disease condition. Further identification of upstream regulators will provide new potential therapeutic targets. We analyzed GBM tumors by SDS-PAGE fractionation with internal DNA markers followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS). Brain tissue specimens obtained for clinical purposes during epilepsy surgeries were used as controls, and the quantification of MS data was performed by label-free spectral counting. The differentially expressed proteins were further characterized by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify protein interactions, functions, and upstream regulators. Our study identified several important proteins that are involved in GBM progression. The IPA revealed glioma activation with z score 2.236 during unbiased core analysis. Upstream regulators STAT3 and SP1 were activated and CTNNα was inhibited. We verified overexpression of several proteins by immunoblot to complement the MS data. This work represents an important step towards the identification of GBM biomarkers, which could open avenues to identify therapeutic targets for better treatment of GBM patients. The workflow developed represents a powerful and efficient method to identify biomarkers in GBM. PMID:24803679

  8. Serum Proteomic Changes after Randomized Prolonged Erythropoietin Treatment and/or Endurance Training: Detection of Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Britt; Ludvigsen, Maja; Nellemann, Birgitte; Kopchick, John J.; Honoré, Bent; Jørgensen, Jens Otto L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite implementation of the biological passport to detect erythropoietin abuse, a need for additional biomarkers remains. We used a proteomic approach to identify novel serum biomarkers of prolonged erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) exposure (Darbepoietin-α) and/or aerobic training. Trial Design Thirty-six healthy young males were randomly assigned to the following groups: Sedentary-placebo (n = 9), Sedentary-ESA (n = 9), Training-placebo (n = 10), or Training-ESA (n = 8). They were treated with placebo/Darbepoietin-α subcutaneously once/week for 10 weeks followed by a 3-week washout period. Training consisted of supervised biking 3/week for 13 weeks at the highest possible intensity. Serum was collected at baseline, week 3 (high dose Darbepoietin-α), week 10 (reduced dose Darbepoietin-α), and after a 3-week washout period. Methods Serum proteins were separated according to charge and molecular mass (2D-gel electrophoresis). The identity of proteins from spots exhibiting altered intensity was determined by mass spectrometry. Results Six protein spots changed in response to Darbepoietin-α treatment. Comparing all 4 experimental groups, two protein spots (serotransferrin and haptoglobin/haptoglobin related protein) showed a significant response to Darbepoietin-α treatment. The haptoglobin/haptoglobin related protein spot showed a significantly lower intensity in all subjects in the training-ESA group during the treatment period and increased during the washout period. Conclusion An isoform of haptoglobin/haptoglobin related protein could be a new anti-doping marker and merits further research. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01320449 PMID:25679398

  9. Identification and Validation of Loa loa Microfilaria-Specific Biomarkers: a Rational Design Approach Using Proteomics and Novel Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Drame, Papa M.; Meng, Zhaojing; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Herrick, Jesica A.; Veenstra, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunoassays are currently needed to quantify Loa loa microfilariae (mf). To address this need, we have conducted proteomic and bioinformatic analyses of proteins present in the urine of a Loa mf-infected patient and used this information to identify putative biomarkers produced by L. loa mf. In total, 70 of the 15,444 described putative L. loa proteins were identified. Of these 70, 18 were L. loa mf specific, and 2 of these 18 (LOAG_16297 and LOAG_17808) were biologically immunogenic. We developed novel reverse luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) immunoassays to quantify these 2 proteins in individual plasma samples. Levels of these 2 proteins in microfilaremic L. loa-infected patients were positively correlated to mf densities in the corresponding blood samples (r = 0.71 and P < 0.0001 for LOAG_16297 and r = 0.61 and P = 0.0002 for LOAG_17808). For LOAG_16297, the levels in plasma were significantly higher in Loa-infected (geometric mean [GM], 0.045 µg/ml) than in uninfected (P < 0.0001), Wuchereria bancrofti-infected (P = 0.0005), and Onchocerca volvulus-infected (P < 0.0001) individuals, whereas for LOAG_17808 protein, they were not significantly different between Loa-infected (GM, 0.123 µg/ml) and uninfected (P = 0.06) and W. bancrofti-infected (P = 0.32) individuals. Moreover, only LOAG_16297 showed clear discriminative ability between L. loa and the other potentially coendemic filariae. Indeed, the specificity of the LOAG_16297 reverse LIPS assay was 96% (with a sensitivity of 77%). Thus, LOAG_16297 is a very promising biomarker that will be exploited in a quantitative point-of-care immunoassay for determination of L. loa mf densities. PMID:26884435

  10. Identification of novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by aptamer-based serum proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; McClorey, Graham; Manzano, Raquel; Betts, Corinne A.; Blain, Alison; Saleh, Amer F.; Gait, Michael J.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wood, Matthew J. A.; Roberts, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used to monitor the efficacy of experimental therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in clinical trials. Identification of novel protein biomarkers has been limited due to the massive complexity of the serum proteome and the presence of a small number of very highly abundant proteins. Here we have utilised an aptamer-based proteomics approach to profile 1,129 proteins in the serum of wild-type and mdx (dystrophin deficient) mice. The serum levels of 96 proteins were found to be significantly altered (P < 0.001, q < 0.01) in mdx mice. Additionally, systemic treatment with a peptide-antisense oligonucleotide conjugate designed to induce Dmd exon skipping and recover dystrophin protein expression caused many of the differentially abundant serum proteins to be restored towards wild-type levels. Results for five leading candidate protein biomarkers (Pgam1, Tnni3, Camk2b, Cycs and Adamts5) were validated by ELISA in the mouse samples. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was found to be significantly elevated in human DMD patient serum. This study has identified multiple novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in the serum of the mdx mouse with potential utility in DMD patients. PMID:26594036

  11. Identifying Biomarkers and Mechanisms of Toxic Metal Stress with Global Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Susan M.

    2012-04-16

    Hg is a wide-spread contaminant in the environment and is toxic in all of its various forms. Data suggest that RHg+ and Hg2+ are toxic in two ways. At low levels, Hg species appear to disrupt membrane-bound respiration causing a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that further damage the cell. At higher Hg concentrations, RHg+ and Hg2+ may form adducts with cysteine- and selenocysteine-containing proteins in all cellular compartments resulting in their inactivation. Although these mechansims for toxicity are generally accepted, the most sensitive targets associated with these mechanisms are not well understood. In this collaborative project involving three laboratories at three institutions, the overall goal was to develop of a mass spectrometry-based global proteomics methodology that could be used to identify Hg-adducted (and ideally, ROS-damaged) proteins in order to address these types of questions. The two objectives of this overall collaborative project were (1) to identify, quantify, and compare ROS- and Hg-damaged proteins in cells treated with various Hg species and concentrations to test this model for two mechanisms of Hg toxicity, and (2) to define the cellular roles of the ubiquitous bacterial mercury resistance (mer) locus with regards to how the proteins of this pathway interact to protect other cell proteins from Hg damage. The specific objectives and accomplishments of the Miller lab in this project included: (1) Development of algorithms for analysis of the Hg-proteomic mass spectrometry data to identify mercury adducted peptides and other trends in the data. (2) Investigation of the role of mer operon proteins in scavenging Hg(II) from other mer pathway proteins as a means of protecting cellular proteins from damage.

  12. Identification of Candidate Serum Biomarkers for Schistosoma mansoni Infected Mice Using Multiple Proteomic Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Kardoush, Manal I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is an important helminth infection of humans. There are few reliable diagnostic biomarkers for early infection, for recurrent infection or to document successful treatment. In this study, we compared serum protein profiles in uninfected and infected mice to identify disease stage-specific biomarkers. Methods Serum collected from CD1 mice infected with 50–200 Schistosoma mansoni cercariae were analyzed before infection and at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-infection using three mass spectrometric (MS) platforms. Results Using SELDI-TOF MS, 66 discriminating m/z peaks were detected between S. mansoni infected mice and healthy controls. Used in various combinations, these peaks could 1) reliably diagnose early-stage disease, 2) distinguish between acute and chronic infection and 3) diagnose S. mansoni infection regardless the parasite burden. The most important contributors to these diagnostic algorithms were peaks at 3.7, 13 and 46 kDa. Employing sample fractionation and differential gel electrophoresis, we analyzed gel slices either by MALDI-TOF MS or Velos Orbitrap MS. The former yielded eight differentially-expressed host proteins in the serum at different disease stages including transferrin and alpha 1- antitrypsin. The latter suggested the presence of a surprising number of parasite-origin proteins in the serum during both the acute (n = 200) and chronic (n = 105) stages. The Orbitrap platform also identified many differentially-expressed host-origin serum proteins during the acute and chronic stages (296 and 220 respectively). The presence of one of the schistosome proteins, glutathione S transferase (GST: 25 KDa), was confirmed by Western Blot. This study provides proof-of-principle for an approach that can yield a large number of novel candidate biomarkers for Schistosoma infection. PMID:27138990

  13. Discovery Proteomics And Nonparametric Modeling Pipeline In The Development Of A Candidate Biomarker Panel For Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Brasier, Allan R; Garcia, Josefina; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Spratt, Heidi M.; Comach, Guillermo; Ju, Hyunsu; Recinos, Adrian; Soman, Kizhake; Forshey, Brett M.; Halsey, Eric S.; Blair, Patrick J.; Rocha, Claudio; Bazan, Isabel; Victor, Sundar S; Wu, Zheng; Stafford, Susan; Watts, Douglas; Morrison, Amy C.; Scott, Thomas W.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary Dengue viral infection can produce capillary leakage associated with increased mortality known as Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF). Because the mortality of DHF can be reduced by early detection and intensive support, improved methods for its detection are needed. We applied multidimensional protein profiling to predict outcomes in a prospective Dengue surveillance study in South America. Plasma samples taken from initial clinical presentation of acute Dengue infection were subjected to proteomics analyses using ELISA and a recently developed biofluid analysis platform. Demographics, clinical laboratory measurements, 9 cytokines and 419 plasma proteins collected at the time of initial presentation were compared between the DF and DHF outcomes. Here, the subject’s gender, clinical parameters, 2 cytokines and 42 proteins discriminated between the outcomes. These factors were reduced by multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) that a highly accurate classification model based on 8 discriminant features with an AUC of 0.999. Model analysis indicated that the feature-outcome relationship were non-linear. Although this DHF risk model will need validation in a larger cohort, we conclude that approaches to develop predictive biomarker models for disease outcome will need to incorporate nonparametric modeling approaches. PMID:22376251

  14. Top-Down Proteomics with Mass Spectrometry Imaging: A Pilot Study towards Discovery of Biomarkers for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Mandal, Rakesh; Catherman, Adam; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    In the developing mammalian brain, inhibition of NMDA receptor can induce widespread neuroapoptosis, inhibit neurogenesis and cause impairment of learning and memory. Although some mechanistic insights into adverse neurological actions of these NMDA receptor antagonists exist, our understanding of the full spectrum of developmental events affected by early exposure to these chemical agents in the brain is still limited. Here we attempt to gain insights into the impact of pharmacologically induced excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in infancy on the brain proteome using mass spectrometric imaging (MSI). Our goal was to study changes in protein expression in postnatal day 10 (P10) rat brains following neonatal exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK801). Analysis of rat brains exposed to vehicle or MK801 and comparison of their MALDI MS images revealed differential relative abundances of several proteins. We then identified these markers such as ubiquitin, purkinje cell protein 4 (PEP-19), cytochrome c oxidase subunits and calmodulin, by a combination of reversed-phase (RP) HPLC fractionation and top-down tandem MS platform. More in-depth large scale study along with validation experiments will be carried out in the future. Overall, our findings indicate that a brief neonatal exposure to a compound that alters excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain has a long term effect on protein expression patterns during subsequent development, highlighting the utility of MALDI-MSI as a discovery tool for potential biomarkers. PMID:24710523

  15. Discovery proteomics and nonparametric modeling pipeline in the development of a candidate biomarker panel for dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Allan R; Garcia, Josefina; Wiktorowicz, John E; Spratt, Heidi M; Comach, Guillermo; Ju, Hyunsu; Recinos, Adrian; Soman, Kizhake; Forshey, Brett M; Halsey, Eric S; Blair, Patrick J; Rocha, Claudio; Bazan, Isabel; Victor, Sundar S; Wu, Zheng; Stafford, Susan; Watts, Douglas; Morrison, Amy C; Scott, Thomas W; Kochel, Tadeusz J

    2012-02-01

    Secondary dengue viral infection can produce capillary leakage associated with increased mortality known as dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Because the mortality of DHF can be reduced by early detection and intensive support, improved methods for its detection are needed. We applied multidimensional protein profiling to predict outcomes in a prospective dengue surveillance study in South America. Plasma samples taken from initial clinical presentation of acute dengue infection were subjected to proteomics analyses using ELISA and a recently developed biofluid analysis platform. Demographics, clinical laboratory measurements, nine cytokines, and 419 plasma proteins collected at the time of initial presentation were compared between the DF and DHF outcomes. Here, the subject's gender, clinical parameters, two cytokines, and 42 proteins discriminated between the outcomes. These factors were reduced by multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) that a highly accurate classification model based on eight discriminant features with an area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) of 0.999. Model analysis indicated that the feature-outcome relationship were nonlinear. Although this DHF risk model will need validation in a larger cohort, we conclude that approaches to develop predictive biomarker models for disease outcome will need to incorporate nonparametric modeling approaches.

  16. A Proteomic Approach Identifies Candidate Early Biomarkers to Predict Severe Dengue in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nhi, Dang My; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Ohyama, Kaname; Kimura, Daisuke; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Uchida, Leo; Thuong, Nguyen Van; Nhon, Cao Thi My; Phuc, Le Hong; Mai, Nguyen Thi; Mizukami, Shusaku; Bao, Lam Quoc; Doan, Nguyen Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Van Thanh; Quang, Luong Chan; Karbwang, Juntra; Yui, Katsuyuki; Morita, Kouichi; Huong, Vu Thi Que; Hirayama, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe dengue with severe plasma leakage (SD-SPL) is the most frequent of dengue severe form. Plasma biomarkers for early predictive diagnosis of SD-SPL are required in the primary clinics for the prevention of dengue death. Methodology Among 63 confirmed dengue pediatric patients recruited, hospital based longitudinal study detected six SD-SPL and ten dengue with warning sign (DWS). To identify the specific proteins increased or decreased in the SD-SPL plasma obtained 6–48 hours before the shock compared with the DWS, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology was performed using four patients each group. Validation was undertaken in 6 SD-SPL and 10 DWS patients. Principal findings Nineteen plasma proteins exhibited significantly different relative concentrations (p<0.05), with five over-expressed and fourteen under-expressed in SD-SPL compared with DWS. The individual protein was classified to either blood coagulation, vascular regulation, cellular transport-related processes or immune response. The immunoblot quantification showed angiotensinogen and antithrombin III significantly increased in SD-SPL whole plasma of early stage compared with DWS subjects. Even using this small number of samples, antithrombin III predicted SD-SPL before shock occurrence with accuracy. Conclusion Proteins identified here may serve as candidate predictive markers to diagnose SD-SPL for timely clinical management. Since the number of subjects are small, so further studies are needed to confirm all these biomarkers. PMID:26895439

  17. PTRF/Cavin-1 and MIF Proteins Are Identified as Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Biomarkers by Label-Free Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Gámez-Pozo, Angelo; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Calvo, Enrique; Agulló-Ortuño, María Teresa; López-Vacas, Rocío; Díaz, Esther; Camafeita, Emilio; Nistal, Manuel; Madero, Rosario; Espinosa, Enrique; López, Juan Antonio; Vara, Juan Ángel Fresno

    2012-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, biomedical sciences have entered in the “omics” era, mainly due to high-throughput genomics techniques and the recent application of mass spectrometry to proteomics analyses. However, there is still a time lag between these technological advances and their application in the clinical setting. Our work is designed to build bridges between high-performance proteomics and clinical routine. Protein extracts were obtained from fresh frozen normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer samples. We applied a phosphopeptide enrichment followed by LC-MS/MS. Subsequent label-free quantification and bioinformatics analyses were performed. We assessed protein patterns on these samples, showing dozens of differential markers between normal and tumor tissue. Gene ontology and interactome analyses identified signaling pathways altered on tumor tissue. We have identified two proteins, PTRF/cavin-1 and MIF, which are differentially expressed between normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer. These potential biomarkers were validated using western blot and immunohistochemistry. The application of discovery-based proteomics analyses in clinical samples allowed us to identify new potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:22461895

  18. Identification of PCSK9 as a novel serum biomarker for the prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    An, Dong; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Hui; Gu, Hui; Huang, Tianchu; Zhao, Guifeng; Liu, Bo; Wang, Weilin; Chen, Lizhu; Ma, Wei; Zhang, Henan; Cao, Songying; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    To identify candidate serum molecule biomarkers for the non-invasive early prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects (NTDs), we employed an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to analyze the proteomic changes in serum samples from embryonic day (E) 11 and E13 pregnant rats with spina bifida aperta (SBA) induced by all-trans retinoic acid. Among the 390 proteins identified, 40 proteins at E11 and 26 proteins at E13 displayed significant differential expression in the SBA groups. We confirmed 5 candidate proteins by ELISA. We observed the space-time expression changes of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) at different stages of fetal development, including a marked decrease in the sera of NTD pregnancies and gradual increase in the sera of normal pregnancies with embryonic development. PCSK9 demonstrated the diagnostic efficacy of potential NTD biomarkers [with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.763, 95% CI: 065–0.88]. Additionally, PCSK9 expression in the spinal cords and placentas of SBA rat fetuses was markedly decreased. PCSK9 could serve as a novel molecular biomarker for the non-invasive prenatal screening of NTDs and may be involved in the pathogenesis of NTDs at critical periods of fetal development. PMID:26691006

  19. Salivary proteomic analysis of diabetic patients for possible oral squamous cell carcinoma biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Jancsik, Veronika A; Gelencser, Gabor; Maasz, Gabor; Schmidt, Janos; Molnar, Gergo A; Wittmann, Istvan; Olasz, Lajos; Mark, Laszlo

    2014-07-01

    Since oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most important causes of death worldwide, the prevention and early detection plays a crucial role. Recent epidemiological studies have incriminated diabetes as a risk factor for the development of OSCC, as well as oral premalignant lesions. As for the last 20 years diabetes and oral squamous cell carcinoma rates have been increasing rapidly, therefore a reliable detection method of major saliva proteins as possible biomarkers for OSCC is of key priority. In this study we collected whole saliva samples from patients with diabetes and from healthy subjects. To reduce the risk of failure and to keep the investigation good reproducible, we proposed an examination and saliva collecting technique. The proteins were analyzed using SDS-PAGE and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Our findings show that the expression of Annexin A8, Peroxiredoxin-2 and Tyrosine kinase is elevated by patients having diabetes. All these proteins have been previously described in cancer saliva samples also in OSCC. Our current findings showed that testing saliva may be an effective and reliable method for detecting oral cancer in early stages.

  20. Biomarker Candidate Identification in Yersinia Pestis Using Organism-Wide Semiquantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, Kim K.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Baker, Scott E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-11-03

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is listed by the CDC as a level A select pathogen. To better enable detection, intervention and treatment of Y. pestis infections, it is necessary to understand its protein expression under conditions that promote or inhibit virulence. To this end, we have utilized a novel combination of the accurate mass and time tag methodology of mass spectrometry and clustering analysis using OmniViz™ to compare the protein abundance changes of 992 identified proteins under four growth conditions. Temperature and Ca2+ concentration were used to trigger virulence associated protein expression fundamental to the low calcium response. High-resolution liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were utilized to determine protein identity and abundance on the genome-wide level. The cluster analyses revealed, in a rapid visual platform, the reproducibility of the current method as well as relevant protein abundance changes of expected and novel proteins relating to a specific growth condition and sub-cellular location. Using this method, 89 proteins were identified as having a similar abundance change profile to 29 known virulence associated proteins, providing additional biomarker candidates for future detection and vaccine development strategies.

  1. Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Chaouch, Amina; Lochmüller, Hanns; Politano, Luisa; Bertini, Enrico; Spitali, Pietro; Hiller, Monika; Niks, Eric H; Gualandi, Francesca; Pontén, Fredrik; Bushby, Kate; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Schwartz, Elena; Le Priol, Yannick; Straub, Volker; Uhlén, Mathias; Cirak, Sebahattin; ‘t Hoen, Peter A C; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Schwenk, Jochen M; Nilsson, Peter; Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavoprotein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies. PMID:24920607

  2. Toward protein biomarkers for allergy: CD4+ T cell proteomics in allergic and nonallergic subjects sampled in and out of pollen season.

    PubMed

    Blüggel, Martin; Spertini, François; Lutter, Petra; Wassenberg, Jacqueline; Audran, Régine; Corthésy, Blaise; Müllner, Stefan; Blum, Stephanie; Wattenberg, Andreas; Mercenier, Annick; Affolter, Michael; Kussmann, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Allergy is an immunological disorder of the upper airways, lung, skin, and the gut with a growing prevalence over the last decades in Western countries. Atopy, the genetic predisposition for allergy, is strongly dependent on familial inheritance and environmental factors. These observations call for predictive markers of progression from atopy to allergy, a prerequisite to any active intervention in neonates and children (prophylactic interventions/primary prevention) or in adults (immunomodulatory interventions/secondary prevention). In an attempt to identify early biomarkers of the "atopic march" using minimally invasive sampling, CD4+ T cells from 20 adult volunteers (10 healthy and 10 with respiratory allergies) were isolated and quantitatively analyzed and their proteomes were compared in and out of pollen season (± antigen exposure). The proteome study based on high-resolution 2D gel electrophoresis revealed three candidate protein markers that distinguish the CD4+ T cell proteomes of normal from allergic individuals when sampled out of pollen season, namely Talin 1, Nipsnap homologue 3A, and Glutamate-cysteine ligase regulatory protein. Three proteins were found differentially expressed between the CD4+ T cell proteomes of normal and allergic subjects when sampled during pollen season: carbonyl reductase, glutathione S-transferase ω 1, and 2,4-dienoyl-CoA reductase. The results were partly validated by Western blotting. PMID:21410266

  3. Affinity proteomics led identification of vimentin as a potential biomarker in colon cancers: insights from serological screening and computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Shoiab; Mokhdomi, Taseem A; Chikan, Naveed A; Amin, Asif; Qazi, Hilal; Wani, Sajad H; Wafai, Asrar H; Tyub, Sumira; Mustafa, Farhat; Mir, Masood S; Chowdri, Nisar A; Qadri, Raies A

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic analysis using multiplex affinity reagents is perhaps the most reliable strategy to capture differentially expressed proteins that are slightly or immensely modified. In addition to expressional variation, it is comprehensively evident that the immunogenicity of a protein can be a deciding factor for instigating an inflammation afflicted-carcinogenesis. Considering both these factors, a simple and systematic strategy was designed to capture the immunogenic cancer biomarkers from sera of colorectal cancer patients. The affinity reagent, in the form of an antibody repertoire against the secretome of the HT29 cell line was used to grade the sera samples on the basis of the degree of immuno-reactivity and to capture differentially expressed antigens from the patient sera. Following affinity based 2DE-MALDI-TOF; the proteins were identified as (1) soluble vimentin; and (2) TGF-beta-inhibited membrane-associated protein (PP16B), in colon cancer sera and (3) keratin, type II cytoskeletal protein in rectal cancer sera. Pathway reconstruction and protein-protein networking of identified proteins predicted only Vimentin to be physically and genetically engaged in close proximity with the most established colorectal cancer associated tumorigenic pathways. Furthermore, our findings suggest that a possible surface stoichiometric shift in the structure of protein could be due to mutations in the coding sequence of Vimentin that may elicit its enhanced secretion possibly due to protein-hyperphosphorylation. Of the three proteins identified, only Vimentin showed higher expression in sera of colon cancer patients alone. Thus, it could be argued that vimentin might help in predicting individuals at higher risk of developing colon cancers. Our data are therefore suggestive of using vimentin as an antigen for tumor vaccination in an autologous set-up for colon cancers.

  4. SRM targeted proteomics in search for biomarkers of HCV-induced progression of fibrosis to cirrhosis in HALT-C patients.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shizhen; Zhou, Yong; Lok, Anna S; Tsodikov, Alex; Yan, Xiaowei; Gray, Li; Yuan, Min; Moritz, Robert L; Galas, David; Omenn, Gilbert S; Hood, Leroy

    2012-04-01

    The current gold standard for diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis is the traditional invasive liver biopsy. It is desirable to assess hepatic fibrosis with noninvasive means. Targeted proteomic techniques allow an unbiased assessment of proteins and might be useful to identify proteins related to hepatic fibrosis. We utilized selected reaction monitoring (SRM) targeted proteomics combined with an organ-specific blood protein strategy to identify and quantify 38 liver-specific proteins. A combination of protein C and retinol-binding protein 4 in serum gave promising preliminary results as candidate biomarkers to distinguish patients at different stages of hepatic fibrosis due to chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Also, alpha-1-B glycoprotein, complement factor H and insulin-like growth factor binding protein acid labile subunit performed well in distinguishing patients from healthy controls.

  5. Proteomic analysis in Daphnia magna exposed to As(III), As(V) and Cd heavy metals and their binary mixtures for screening potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Le, Thai-Hoang; Lim, Eun-Suk; Hong, Nam-Hui; Lee, Sung-Kyu; Shim, Yon Sik; Hwang, Jin Rae; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the effects of three widespread heavy metals, As(III), As(V) and Cd, and their binary mixtures on the proteomic profile in D. magna were examined to screen novel protein biomarkers using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis method (2DE). Ten 20d daphnia were exposed to the LC20 concentrations for each of a total of 8 treatments, including the control, As(III), As(V), Cd, [As(III)+As(V)], [As(III)+Cd], [As(V)+Cd], and [As(III), As(V), Cd], for 24h before protein isolation. Three replicates were performed for each treatment. These protein samples were employed for 2DE experiments with a pH gradient gel strip from pH 3 to pH 10. The protein spots were detected by a silver staining process and their intensities were analyzed by Progenesis software to discover the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in response to each heavy metal. A total of 117 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were found in daphnia responding to the 8 treatments and mapped onto a 2D proteome map, which provides some information of the molecular weight (MW) and pI value for each protein. All of these DEPs are considered as potential candidates for protein biomarkers in D. magna for detecting heavy metals in the aquatic ecosystem. Comparing the proteomic results among these treatments suggested that exposing D. magna to binary mixtures of heavy metals may result in some complex interactive molecular responses within them, rather than just the simple sum of the proteomic profiles of the individual chemicals, (As(III), As(V), and Cd).

  6. A decade of plant proteomics and mass spectrometry: translation of technical advancements to food security and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Pedreschi, Romina; Carpentier, Sebastien; Wang, Tai; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Kohli, Ajay; Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser; Bykova, Natalia V; Rampitsch, Christof; Zolla, Lello; Rafudeen, Mohamed Suhail; Cramer, Rainer; Bindschedler, Laurence Veronique; Tsakirpaloglou, Nikolaos; Ndimba, Roya Janeen; Farrant, Jill M; Renaut, Jenny; Job, Dominique; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Rakwal, Randeep

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous progress in plant proteomics driven by mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has been made since 2000 when few proteomics reports were published and plant proteomics was in its infancy. These achievements include the refinement of existing techniques and the search for new techniques to address food security, safety, and health issues. It is projected that in 2050, the world's population will reach 9-12 billion people demanding a food production increase of 34-70% (FAO, 2009) from today's food production. Provision of food in a sustainable and environmentally committed manner for such a demand without threatening natural resources, requires that agricultural production increases significantly and that postharvest handling and food manufacturing systems become more efficient requiring lower energy expenditure, a decrease in postharvest losses, less waste generation and food with longer shelf life. There is also a need to look for alternative protein sources to animal based (i.e., plant based) to be able to fulfill the increase in protein demands by 2050. Thus, plant biology has a critical role to play as a science capable of addressing such challenges. In this review, we discuss proteomics especially MS, as a platform, being utilized in plant biology research for the past 10 years having the potential to expedite the process of understanding plant biology for human benefits. The increasing application of proteomics technologies in food security, analysis, and safety is emphasized in this review. But, we are aware that no unique approach/technology is capable to address the global food issues. Proteomics-generated information/resources must be integrated and correlated with other omics-based approaches, information, and conventional programs to ensure sufficient food and resources for human development now and in the future. PMID:23315723

  7. A decade of plant proteomics and mass spectrometry: translation of technical advancements to food security and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Pedreschi, Romina; Carpentier, Sebastien; Wang, Tai; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Kohli, Ajay; Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser; Bykova, Natalia V; Rampitsch, Christof; Zolla, Lello; Rafudeen, Mohamed Suhail; Cramer, Rainer; Bindschedler, Laurence Veronique; Tsakirpaloglou, Nikolaos; Ndimba, Roya Janeen; Farrant, Jill M; Renaut, Jenny; Job, Dominique; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Rakwal, Randeep

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous progress in plant proteomics driven by mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has been made since 2000 when few proteomics reports were published and plant proteomics was in its infancy. These achievements include the refinement of existing techniques and the search for new techniques to address food security, safety, and health issues. It is projected that in 2050, the world's population will reach 9-12 billion people demanding a food production increase of 34-70% (FAO, 2009) from today's food production. Provision of food in a sustainable and environmentally committed manner for such a demand without threatening natural resources, requires that agricultural production increases significantly and that postharvest handling and food manufacturing systems become more efficient requiring lower energy expenditure, a decrease in postharvest losses, less waste generation and food with longer shelf life. There is also a need to look for alternative protein sources to animal based (i.e., plant based) to be able to fulfill the increase in protein demands by 2050. Thus, plant biology has a critical role to play as a science capable of addressing such challenges. In this review, we discuss proteomics especially MS, as a platform, being utilized in plant biology research for the past 10 years having the potential to expedite the process of understanding plant biology for human benefits. The increasing application of proteomics technologies in food security, analysis, and safety is emphasized in this review. But, we are aware that no unique approach/technology is capable to address the global food issues. Proteomics-generated information/resources must be integrated and correlated with other omics-based approaches, information, and conventional programs to ensure sufficient food and resources for human development now and in the future.

  8. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic Study Makes High-Density Lipoprotein a Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Yuh; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Lin, Shih-Yi

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipid and protein complex that consists of apolipoproteins and lower level HDL-associated enzymes. HDL dysfunction is a factor in atherosclerosis and decreases patient survival. Mass spectrometry- (MS-) based proteomics provides a high throughput approach for analyzing the composition and modifications of complex HDL proteins in diseases. HDL can be separated according to size, surface charge, electronegativity, or apoprotein composition. MS-based proteomics on subfractionated HDL then allows investigation of lipoprotein roles in diseases. Herein, we review recent developments in MS-based quantitative proteomic techniques, HDL proteomics and lipoprotein modifications in diseases, and HDL subfractionation studies. We also discuss future directions and perspectives in MS-based proteomics on HDL. PMID:26090384

  9. A comparative proteomic study of plasma in feline pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify diagnostic biomarkers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Meachem, Melissa D.; Snead, Elisabeth R.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Jackson, Marion L.; Dickinson, Ryan; Larson, Victoria; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    While pancreatitis is now recognized as a common ailment in cats, the diagnosis remains challenging due to discordant results and suboptimal sensitivity of ultrasound and specific feline pancreatic lipase (Spec fPL) assay. Pancreatitis also shares similar clinical features with pancreatic carcinoma, a rare but aggressive disease with a grave prognosis. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the plasma proteomes of normal healthy cats (n = 6), cats with pancreatitis (n = 6), and cats with pancreatic carcinoma (n = 6) in order to identify potential new biomarkers of feline pancreatic disease. After plasma protein separation by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein spots were detected by Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 staining and identified by mass spectrometry. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1), and apolipoprotein-A1 precursor (Pre Apo-A1) appeared to be differentially expressed, which suggests the presence of a systemic acute-phase response and alteration of lipid metabolism in cats with pancreatic disease. Future studies involving greater case numbers are needed in order to assess the utility of these proteins as potential biomarkers. More sensitive proteomic techniques may also be helpful in detecting significant but low-abundance proteins. PMID:26130850

  10. The identification of novel potential injury mechanisms and candidate biomarkers in renal allograft rejection by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Tara K; Salomonis, Nathan; Nicora, Carrie D; Ryu, Soyoung; He, Jintang; Dinh, Van; Orton, Daniel J; Moore, Ronald J; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Dai, Hong; Thien-Vu, Minh; Xiao, Wenzhong; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun; Camp, David G; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2014-02-01

    Early transplant dysfunction and failure because of immunological and nonimmunological factors still presents a significant clinical problem for transplant recipients. A critical unmet need is the noninvasive detection and prediction of immune injury such that acute injury can be reversed by proactive immunosuppression titration. In this study, we used iTRAQ -based proteomic discovery and targeted ELISA validation to discover and validate candidate urine protein biomarkers from 262 renal allograft recipients with biopsy-confirmed allograft injury. Urine samples were randomly split into a training set of 108 patients and an independent validation set of 154 patients, which comprised the clinical biopsy-confirmed phenotypes of acute rejection (AR) (n = 74), stable graft (STA) (n = 74), chronic allograft injury (CAI) (n = 58), BK virus nephritis (BKVN) (n = 38), nephrotic syndrome (NS) (n = 8), and healthy, normal control (HC) (n = 10). A total of 389 proteins were measured that displayed differential abundances across urine specimens of the injury types (p < 0.05) with a significant finding that SUMO2 (small ubiquitin-related modifier 2) was identified as a "hub" protein for graft injury irrespective of causation. Sixty-nine urine proteins had differences in abundance (p < 0.01) in AR compared with stable graft, of which 12 proteins were up-regulated in AR with a mean fold increase of 2.8. Nine urine proteins were highly specific for AR because of their significant differences (p < 0.01; fold increase >1.5) from all other transplant categories (HLA class II protein HLA-DRB1, KRT14, HIST1H4B, FGG, ACTB, FGB, FGA, KRT7, DPP4). Increased levels of three of these proteins, fibrinogen beta (FGB; p = 0.04), fibrinogen gamma (FGG; p = 0.03), and HLA DRB1 (p = 0.003) were validated by ELISA in AR using an independent sample set. The fibrinogen proteins further segregated AR from BK virus nephritis (FGB p = 0.03, FGG p = 0.02), a finding that supports the utility of

  11. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  12. Association of potential salivary biomarkers with diabetic retinopathy and its severity in type-2 diabetes mellitus: a proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Subrayan, Visvaraja

    2016-01-01

    Aim/hypothesis: The aim of our study was to characterize the human salivary proteome and determine the changes in protein expression in two different stages of diabetic retinopathy with type-2 diabetes mellitus: (1) with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and (2) with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Type-2 diabetes mellitus without diabetic retinopathy (XDR) was designated as control. Method: In this study, 45 saliva samples were collected (15 samples from XDR control group, 15 samples from NPDR disease group and 15 samples from PDR disease group). Salivary proteins were extracted, reduced, alkylated, trypsin digested and labeled with an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) before being analyzed by an Orbitrap fusion tribrid mass spectrometer. Protein annotation, fold change calculation and statistical analysis were interrogated by Proteome Discoverer. Biological pathway analysis was performed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD003723–PX003725. Results: A total of 315 proteins were identified from the salivary proteome and 119 proteins were found to be differentially expressed. The differentially expressed proteins from the NPDR disease group and the PDR disease group were assigned to respective canonical pathways indicating increased Liver X receptor/Retinoid X receptor (LXR/RXR) activation, Farnesoid X receptor/Retinoid X receptor (FXR/RXR) activation, acute phase response signaling, sucrose degradation V and regulation of actin-based motility by Rho in the PDR disease group compared to the NPDR disease group. Conclusions/Interpretation: Progression from non-proliferative to proliferative retinopathy in type-2 diabetic patients is a complex multi-mechanism and systemic process. Furthermore, saliva was shown to be a feasible alternative sample source for diabetic retinopathy biomarkers. PMID:27280065

  13. Urine Proteome Analysis Reflects Atherosclerotic Disease in an ApoE−/− Mouse Model and Allows the Discovery of New Candidate Biomarkers in Mouse and Human Atherosclerosis*

    PubMed Central

    von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Schiffer, Eric; Sackmann, Christine; Zürbig, Petra; Neudorfer, Irene; Zirlik, Andreas; Htun, Nay; Iphöfer, Alexander; Jänsch, Lothar; Mischak, Harald; Bode, Christoph; Chen, Yung C.; Peter, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis of atherosclerosis via single biomarkers has been attempted but remains elusive. However, a previous polymarker or pattern approach of urine polypeptides in humans reflected coronary artery disease with high accuracy. The aim of the current study is to use urine proteomics in ApoE−/− mice to discover proteins with pathophysiological roles in atherogenesis and to identify urinary polypeptide patterns reflecting early stages of atherosclerosis. Urine of ApoE−/− mice either on high fat diet (HFD) or chow diet was collected over 12 weeks; urine of wild type mice on HFD was used to exclude diet-related proteome changes. Capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS) of samples identified 16 polypeptides specific for ApoE−/− mice on HFD. In a blinded test set, these polypeptides allowed identification of atherosclerosis at a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 100%, as well as monitoring of disease progression. Sequencing of the discovered polypeptides identified fragments of α1-antitrypsin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), kidney androgen-regulated protein, and collagen. Using immunohistochemistry, α1-antitrypsin, EGF, and collagen type I were shown to be highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE−/− mice on HFD. Urinary excretion levels of collagen and α1-antitrypsin fragments also significantly correlated with intraplaque collagen and α1-antitrypsin content, mirroring plaque protein expression in the urine proteome. To provide further confirmation that the newly identified proteins are relevant in humans, the presence of collagen type I, α1-antitrypsin, and EGF was also confirmed in human atherosclerotic disease. Urine proteome analysis in mice exemplifies the potential of a novel multimarker approach for the noninvasive detection of atherosclerosis and monitoring of disease progression. Furthermore, this approach represents a novel discovery tool for the identification of proteins relevant in murine

  14. Urine proteome analysis reflects atherosclerotic disease in an ApoE-/- mouse model and allows the discovery of new candidate biomarkers in mouse and human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Schiffer, Eric; Sackmann, Christine; Zürbig, Petra; Neudorfer, Irene; Zirlik, Andreas; Htun, Nay; Iphöfer, Alexander; Jänsch, Lothar; Mischak, Harald; Bode, Christoph; Chen, Yung C; Peter, Karlheinz

    2012-07-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis of atherosclerosis via single biomarkers has been attempted but remains elusive. However, a previous polymarker or pattern approach of urine polypeptides in humans reflected coronary artery disease with high accuracy. The aim of the current study is to use urine proteomics in ApoE(-/-) mice to discover proteins with pathophysiological roles in atherogenesis and to identify urinary polypeptide patterns reflecting early stages of atherosclerosis. Urine of ApoE(-/-) mice either on high fat diet (HFD) or chow diet was collected over 12 weeks; urine of wild type mice on HFD was used to exclude diet-related proteome changes. Capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS) of samples identified 16 polypeptides specific for ApoE(-/-) mice on HFD. In a blinded test set, these polypeptides allowed identification of atherosclerosis at a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 100%, as well as monitoring of disease progression. Sequencing of the discovered polypeptides identified fragments of α(1)-antitrypsin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), kidney androgen-regulated protein, and collagen. Using immunohistochemistry, α(1)-antitrypsin, EGF, and collagen type I were shown to be highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE(-/-) mice on HFD. Urinary excretion levels of collagen and α(1)-antitrypsin fragments also significantly correlated with intraplaque collagen and α(1)-antitrypsin content, mirroring plaque protein expression in the urine proteome. To provide further confirmation that the newly identified proteins are relevant in humans, the presence of collagen type I, α(1)-antitrypsin, and EGF was also confirmed in human atherosclerotic disease. Urine proteome analysis in mice exemplifies the potential of a novel multimarker approach for the noninvasive detection of atherosclerosis and monitoring of disease progression. Furthermore, this approach represents a novel discovery tool for the identification of proteins relevant in

  15. Application of proteomics in the discovery of candidate protein biomarkers in a Diabetes Autoantibody Standardization Program sample subset

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Weijun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; mueller, Patricia W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-02-01

    Objective. Before biomarkers predictive of type 1 diabetes can be evaluated in proficiency evaluations, they must be identified and validated in initial, exploratory studies. Hypothesis-driven comparative studies may be performed to identify candidate biomarkers but are limited to the current knowledge of metabolic, signaling, and inflammatory pathways in the context of type 1 diabetes. Alternatively, untargeted “-omics” approaches may be employed in profiling studies to identify candidate biomarkers of type 1 diabetes.

  16. Identification of phosphorylated MYL12B as a potential plasma biomarker for septic acute kidney injury using a quantitative proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Dong, Xiu-Juan; Li, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Qiu-Lin; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and increasingly encountered complication in hospitalized patients with critical illness in intensive care units (ICU). According to the etiology, Sepsis-induced AKI (SAKI) is a leading contributor to AKI and significantly has very poor prognosis, which might be related to the late detection when the elevation of BUN and serum creatinine (SCr) is used. Many genes are up-regulated in the damaged kidney with the corresponding protein products appearing in plasma and urine. Some of these are candidate biomarkers for more timely diagnosis of SAKI. Therefore, extensive research efforts over this past decade have been directed at the discovery and validation of novel SAKI biomarkers to detect injury prior to changes in kidney function, a number of serum and urinary proteins, including NGAL, KIM-1, cystatin-C, IL-18, and L-FABP, have been identified for predicting SAKI before a rise in BUN and serum creatinine in several experimental and clinical trainings. Unfortunately, an ideal biomarker of SAKI with highly sensitivity and specificity has not been identified yet. Recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to discover biomarkers for SAKI. In the present study, kidney tissue samples from SAKI mice were analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and 4 up-regulated proteins, which were actin (ACTB), myosin regulatory light chain 12B (MYL12B), myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9), and myosin regulatory light chain 12A (MYL12A) were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Among all the varied proteins, MYL12B was validated by western blot. Interestingly, there was no change between the SAKI and control kidney tissues, however, phosphorylated MYL12B was detected to be consistent with the proteomics data. Furthermore, phosphorylated MYL12B was found similarly to be increased in SAKI plasma

  17. Identification of phosphorylated MYL12B as a potential plasma biomarker for septic acute kidney injury using a quantitative proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Dong, Xiu-Juan; Li, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Qiu-Lin; Su, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and increasingly encountered complication in hospitalized patients with critical illness in intensive care units (ICU). According to the etiology, Sepsis-induced AKI (SAKI) is a leading contributor to AKI and significantly has very poor prognosis, which might be related to the late detection when the elevation of BUN and serum creatinine (SCr) is used. Many genes are up-regulated in the damaged kidney with the corresponding protein products appearing in plasma and urine. Some of these are candidate biomarkers for more timely diagnosis of SAKI. Therefore, extensive research efforts over this past decade have been directed at the discovery and validation of novel SAKI biomarkers to detect injury prior to changes in kidney function, a number of serum and urinary proteins, including NGAL, KIM-1, cystatin-C, IL-18, and L-FABP, have been identified for predicting SAKI before a rise in BUN and serum creatinine in several experimental and clinical trainings. Unfortunately, an ideal biomarker of SAKI with highly sensitivity and specificity has not been identified yet. Recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to discover biomarkers for SAKI. In the present study, kidney tissue samples from SAKI mice were analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), and 4 up-regulated proteins, which were actin (ACTB), myosin regulatory light chain 12B (MYL12B), myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9), and myosin regulatory light chain 12A (MYL12A) were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Among all the varied proteins, MYL12B was validated by western blot. Interestingly, there was no change between the SAKI and control kidney tissues, however, phosphorylated MYL12B was detected to be consistent with the proteomics data. Furthermore, phosphorylated MYL12B was found similarly to be increased in SAKI plasma

  18. Biomarker Candidates of Chlamydophila pneumoniae Proteins and Protein Fragments Identified by Affinity-Proteomics Using FTICR-MS and LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susnea, Iuliana; Bunk, Sebastian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hermann, Corinna; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-04-01

    We report here an affinity-proteomics approach that combines 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with high performance mass spectrometry to the identification of both full length protein antigens and antigenic fragments of Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae). The present affinity-mass spectrometry approach effectively utilized high resolution FTICR mass spectrometry and LC-tandem-MS for protein identification, and enabled the identification of several new highly antigenic C. pneumoniae proteins that were not hitherto reported or previously detected only in other Chlamydia species, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. Moreover, high resolution affinity-MS provided the identification of several neo-antigenic protein fragments containing N- and C-terminal, and central domains such as fragments of the membrane protein Pmp21 and the secreted chlamydial proteasome-like factor (Cpaf), representing specific biomarker candidates.

  19. Label-free proteomic analysis of the hydrophobic membrane protein complement in articular chondrocytes: a technique for identification of membrane biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Zhang, Xiaofei; Liddell, Susan; Smith, Julia R.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: There is insufficient knowledge about the chondrocyte membranome and its molecular composition. Objective: To develop a Triton X-114 based separation technique using nanoLC-MS/MS combined with shotgun proteomics to identify chondrocyte membrane proteins. Materials and methods: Articular chondrocytes from equine metacarpophalangeal joints were separated into hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions; trypsin-digested proteins were analysed by nanoLC-MS/MS. Results: A total of 315 proteins were identified. The phase extraction method yielded a high proportion of membrane proteins (56%) including CD276, S100-A6 and three VDAC isoforms. Discussion: Defining the chondrocyte membranome is likely to reveal new biomarker targets for conventional and biological drug discovery. PMID:26864288

  20. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Analysis of Serum Proteins in Wistar Rats Treated with Sodium Fluoride: Insight into the Potential Mechanism and Candidate Biomarkers of Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yan; Zeng, Beibei; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Yanli; Wang, Nanlan; Wu, Yanqiu; Shen, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Fluorosis induced by exposure to high level fluoride is quite widespread in the world. The manifestations of fluorosis include dental mottling, bone damage, and impaired malfunction of soft tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of fluorosis has not been clarified until now. To explore the underlying mechanisms of fluorosis and screen out serum biomarkers, we carried out a quantitative proteomics study to identify differentially expressed serum proteins in Wistar rats treated with sodium fluoride (NaF) by using a proteomics approach of isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). We fed Wistar rats drinking water that had 50, 150, and 250 mg/L of dissolved NaF for 24 weeks. For the experimental duration, each rat was given an examination of the lower incisors to check for the condition of dental fluorosis (DF). By the end of the treatment, fluoride ion concentration in serum and lower incisors were detected. The results showed that NaF treatment can induce rat fluorosis. By iTRAQ analysis, a total of 37 differentially expressed serum proteins were identified between NaF-treated and control rats. These proteins were further analyzed by bioinformatics, out of which two proteins were validated by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assays (ELISA). The major proteins were involved in complement and coagulation cascade, inflammatory response, complement activation, defense response, and wound response, suggesting that inflammation and immune reactions may play a key role in fluorosis pathogenesis. These proteins may contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of fluoride toxicity, and may serve as potential biomarkers for fluorosis. PMID:27690006

  1. Identification of toxicological biomarkers of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in proteins secreted by HepG2 cells using proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seonyoung; Park, So-Young; Jeong, Ji; Cho, Eunkyung; Phark, Sohee; Lee, Min; Kwak, Dongsub; Lim, Ji-Youn; Jung, Woon-Won; Sul, Donggeun

    2010-05-01

    The effects of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on proteins secreted by HepG2 cells were studied using a proteomic approach. HepG2 cells were exposed to various concentrations of DEHP (0, 2.5, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 250 microM) for 24 or 48 h. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and comet assays were then conducted to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of DEHP, respectively. The MTT assay showed that 10 microM DEHP was the maximum concentration that did not cause cell death. In addition, the DNA damage in HepG2 cells exposed to DEHP was found to increase in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Proteomic analysis using two different pI ranges (4-7 and 6-9) and large size 2-DE revealed the presence of 2776 protein spots. A total of 35 (19 up- and 16 down-regulated) proteins were identified as biomarkers of DEHP by ESI-MS/MS. Several differentiated protein groups were also found. Proteins involved in apoptosis, transportation, signaling, energy metabolism, and cell structure and motility were found to be up- or down-regulated. Among these, the identities of cystatin C, Rho GDP inhibitor, retinol binding protein 4, gelsolin, DEK protein, Raf kinase inhibitory protein, triose phosphate isomerase, cofilin-1, and haptoglobin-related protein were confirmed by Western blot assay. Therefore, these proteins could be used as potential biomarkers of DEHP and human disease associated with DEHP.

  2. Integration of Serum Protein Biomarker and Tumor Associated Autoantibody Expression Data Increases the Ability of a Blood-Based Proteomic Assay to Identify Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Gordon, Kelly; Silver, Michael; Mulpuri, Rao; Letsios, Elias; Reese, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in breast imaging, the ability to accurately detect Breast Cancer (BC) remains a challenge. With the discovery of key biomarkers and protein signatures for BC, proteomic technologies are currently poised to serve as an ideal diagnostic adjunct to imaging. Research studies have shown that breast tumors are associated with systemic changes in levels of both serum protein biomarkers (SPB) and tumor associated autoantibodies (TAAb). However, the independent contribution of SPB and TAAb expression data for identifying BC relative to a combinatorial SPB and TAAb approach has not been fully investigated. This study evaluates these contributions using a retrospective cohort of pre-biopsy serum samples with known clinical outcomes collected from a single site, thus minimizing potential site-to-site variation and enabling direct assessment of SPB and TAAb contributions to identify BC. All serum samples (n = 210) were collected prior to biopsy. These specimens were obtained from 18 participants with no evidence of breast disease (ND), 92 participants diagnosed with Benign Breast Disease (BBD) and 100 participants diagnosed with BC, including DCIS. All BBD and BC diagnoses were based on pathology results from biopsy. Statistical models were developed to differentiate BC from non-BC (i.e., BBD and ND) using expression data from SPB alone, TAAb alone, and a combination of SPB and TAAb. When SPB data was independently used for modeling, clinical sensitivity and specificity for detection of BC were 74.7% and 77.0%, respectively. When TAAb data was independently used, clinical sensitivity and specificity for detection of BC were 72.2% and 70.8%, respectively. When modeling integrated data from both SPB and TAAb, the clinical sensitivity and specificity for detection of BC improved to 81.0% and 78.8%, respectively. These data demonstrate the benefit of the integration of SPB and TAAb data and strongly support the further development of combinatorial

  3. Integration of Serum Protein Biomarker and Tumor Associated Autoantibody Expression Data Increases the Ability of a Blood-Based Proteomic Assay to Identify Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Meredith C; Hollingsworth, Alan B; Gordon, Kelly; Silver, Michael; Mulpuri, Rao; Letsios, Elias; Reese, David E

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in breast imaging, the ability to accurately detect Breast Cancer (BC) remains a challenge. With the discovery of key biomarkers and protein signatures for BC, proteomic technologies are currently poised to serve as an ideal diagnostic adjunct to imaging. Research studies have shown that breast tumors are associated with systemic changes in levels of both serum protein biomarkers (SPB) and tumor associated autoantibodies (TAAb). However, the independent contribution of SPB and TAAb expression data for identifying BC relative to a combinatorial SPB and TAAb approach has not been fully investigated. This study evaluates these contributions using a retrospective cohort of pre-biopsy serum samples with known clinical outcomes collected from a single site, thus minimizing potential site-to-site variation and enabling direct assessment of SPB and TAAb contributions to identify BC. All serum samples (n = 210) were collected prior to biopsy. These specimens were obtained from 18 participants with no evidence of breast disease (ND), 92 participants diagnosed with Benign Breast Disease (BBD) and 100 participants diagnosed with BC, including DCIS. All BBD and BC diagnoses were based on pathology results from biopsy. Statistical models were developed to differentiate BC from non-BC (i.e., BBD and ND) using expression data from SPB alone, TAAb alone, and a combination of SPB and TAAb. When SPB data was independently used for modeling, clinical sensitivity and specificity for detection of BC were 74.7% and 77.0%, respectively. When TAAb data was independently used, clinical sensitivity and specificity for detection of BC were 72.2% and 70.8%, respectively. When modeling integrated data from both SPB and TAAb, the clinical sensitivity and specificity for detection of BC improved to 81.0% and 78.8%, respectively. These data demonstrate the benefit of the integration of SPB and TAAb data and strongly support the further development of combinatorial

  4. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tonry, Claire L; Leacy, Emma; Raso, Cinzia; Finn, Stephen P; Armstrong, John; Pennington, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i) might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease); (ii) would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii) those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i) provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii) address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii) make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making. PMID:27438858

  5. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tonry, Claire L.; Leacy, Emma; Raso, Cinzia; Finn, Stephen P.; Armstrong, John; Pennington, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i) might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease); (ii) would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii) those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i) provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii) address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii) make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making. PMID:27438858

  6. Proteomics-based identification and validation of novel plasma biomarkers phospholipid transfer protein and mannan-binding lectin serine protease-1 in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Ahn, Seong Joon; Woo, Se Joon; Hong, Hye Kyoung; Suh, Eui Jin; Ahn, Jeeyun; Park, Ji Hyun; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Lee, Ji Eun; Kim, Ki Woong; Park, Kyu Hyung; Lee, Cheolju

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of severe, progressive visual loss among the elderly. There are currently no established serological markers for the diagnosis of AMD. In this study, we carried out a large-scale quantitative proteomics analysis to identify plasma proteins that could serve as potential AMD biomarkers. We found that the plasma levels of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and mannan-binding lectin serine protease (MASP)-1 were increased in AMD patients relative to controls. The receiver operating characteristic curve based on data from an independent set of AMD patients and healthy controls had an area under the curve of 0.936 for PLTP and 0.716 for MASP-1, revealing excellent discrimination between the two groups. A proteogenomic combination model that incorporated PLTP and MASP-1 along with two known risk genotypes of age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 and complement factor H genes further enhanced discriminatory power. Additionally, PLTP and MASP-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were upregulated in retinal pigment epithelial cells upon exposure to oxidative stress in vitro. These results indicate that PLTP and MASP-1 can serve as plasma biomarkers for the early diagnosis and treatment of AMD, which is critical for preventing AMD-related blindness. PMID:27605007

  7. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Screen identifies LIPOCALIN-2 (LCN-2) as a potential biomarker for colonic lateral-spreading tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianfei; Li, Aimin; Guo, Yubin; Wang, Yadong; Zhao, Xinhua; Xiang, Li; Han, Zelong; Li, Yue; Xu, Wen; Zhuang, Kangmin; Yan, Qun; Zhong, Jietao; Xiong, Jing; Liu, Side

    2016-01-01

    The improvement and implementation of a colonoscopy technique has led to increased detection of laterally spreading tumors (LSTs), which are presumed to constitute an aggressive type of colonic neoplasm. Early diagnosis and treatment of LSTs is clinically challenging. To overcome this problem, we employed iTRAQ to identify LST-specific protein biomarkers potentially involved in LST progression. In this study, we identified 2,001 differentially expressed proteins in LSTs using iTRAQ-based proteomics technology. Lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) was the most up-regulated protein. LSTs expression levels of LCN-2 and matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9) showed positive correlation with worse pathological grading, and up-regulation of these proteins in LSTs was also reflected in serum. Furthermore, LCN-2 protein overexpression was positively correlated with MMP-9 protein up-regulation in the tumor tissue and serum of LST patients (former rs = 0.631, P = 0.000; latter rs = 0.815, P = 0.000). Our results suggest that LCN-2 constitutes a potential biomarker for LST disease progression and might be a novel therapeutic target in LSTs. PMID:27339395

  8. Proteomics-based identification and validation of novel plasma biomarkers phospholipid transfer protein and mannan-binding lectin serine protease-1 in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Ahn, Seong Joon; Woo, Se Joon; Hong, Hye Kyoung; Suh, Eui Jin; Ahn, Jeeyun; Park, Ji Hyun; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Lee, Ji Eun; Kim, Ki Woong; Park, Kyu Hyung; Lee, Cheolju

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of severe, progressive visual loss among the elderly. There are currently no established serological markers for the diagnosis of AMD. In this study, we carried out a large-scale quantitative proteomics analysis to identify plasma proteins that could serve as potential AMD biomarkers. We found that the plasma levels of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and mannan-binding lectin serine protease (MASP)-1 were increased in AMD patients relative to controls. The receiver operating characteristic curve based on data from an independent set of AMD patients and healthy controls had an area under the curve of 0.936 for PLTP and 0.716 for MASP-1, revealing excellent discrimination between the two groups. A proteogenomic combination model that incorporated PLTP and MASP-1 along with two known risk genotypes of age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 and complement factor H genes further enhanced discriminatory power. Additionally, PLTP and MASP-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were upregulated in retinal pigment epithelial cells upon exposure to oxidative stress in vitro. These results indicate that PLTP and MASP-1 can serve as plasma biomarkers for the early diagnosis and treatment of AMD, which is critical for preventing AMD-related blindness. PMID:27605007

  9. Proteomic study of serum using gel chromatography and MALDI-TOF MS reveals diagnostic biomarkers in male patients with liver-cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xin-Hua; Huang, He-Qing; Chen, Dong-Shi; Jin, Hong-Wei; Huang, Hui-Ying

    2007-03-01

    Human serum has been widely employed clinically for diagnosing various fatal diseases. However, the concentration of most proteins in human serum is too low to be directly measured using normal analytical methods. In order to obtain reliable analytical results from proteomic analysis of human serum, appropriate sample preparation is essential. A combined off-line analytical technique of gel chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been successfully established to separate proteins for MS analysis. Using these combined techniques, 176 mass signal peaks of proteins/peptides were found in 6 of 18 fractions from normal male serum (NMS) in the presence of buffer consisting of NH4HCO3 and acetonitrile. A simple gel chromatography column packed with Sephadex G-50 removed most signal-suppressing compounds such as salts and high abundance proteins (HAP). The molecular mass to charge (m/z) ratios of differential peptides revealed in serum of male patient with liver-cancer (LCMPS) compared to NMS were 5365, 5644 and 6462, and these peptides can be used as biomarkers to clinically diagnose liver-cancer. The simple and convenient chromatographic method described here is not only superior to recently described HPLC separation for MS analysis, but also reveals many novel and significant serum biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases.

  10. Proteomic profiling in incubation medium of mouse, rat and human precision-cut liver slices for biomarker detection regarding acute drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Hadi, Mackenzie; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Groothuis, Geny M M; Russel, Frans G M

    2014-09-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is one of the leading causes of drug withdrawal from the market. In this study, we investigated the applicability of protein profiling of the incubation medium of human, mouse and rat precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) exposed to liver injury-inducing drugs for biomarker identification, using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PCLS were incubated with acetaminophen (APAP), 3-acetamidophenol, diclofenac and lipopolysaccharide for 24-48 h. PCLS medium from all species treated with APAP demonstrated similar changes in protein profiles, as previously found in mouse urine after APAP-induced liver injury, including the same key proteins: superoxide dismutase 1, carbonic anhydrase 3 and calmodulin. Further analysis showed that the concentration of hepcidin, a hepatic iron-regulating hormone peptide, was reduced in PCLS medium after APAP treatment, resembling the decreased mouse plasma concentrations of hepcidin observed after APAP treatment. Interestingly, comparable results were obtained after 3-acetamidophenol incubation in rat and human, but not mouse PCLS. Incubation with diclofenac, but not with lipopolysaccharide, resulted in the same toxicity parameters as observed for APAP, albeit to a lesser extent. In conclusion, proteomics can be applied to identify potential translational biomarkers using the PCLS system.

  11. Identification of S100A9 as Biomarker of Responsiveness to the Methotrexate/Etanercept Combination in Rheumatoid Arthritis Using a Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Obry, Antoine; Lequerré, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie; Boyer, Olivier; Fardellone, Patrice; Philippe, Peggy; Le Loët, Xavier; Cosette, Pascal; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Objectives One way to optimize the drug prescription in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is to identify predictive biomarkers of drug responsiveness. Here, we investigated the potential "theranostic" value of proteins of the S100 family by monitoring levels of both S100A8 and S100A9 in blood samples from RA patients. Design For proteomic analysis, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and serum samples were collected in patients prior to initiation of the methotrexate/etanercept (MTX/ETA) combination. Firstly, relative mass spectrometry (MS) quantification focusing on S100A8 and S100A9 proteins was carried out from PBMCs samples to identify potential biomarkers. The same approach was also performed from serum samples from responder (R) and non responder (NR) patients. Finally, to confirm these results, an absolute quantification of S100A8, S100A9 proteins and calprotectin (heterodimer of S100A8/S100A9) was carried out on the serum samples using ELISA. Results MS analyses revealed that both S100A8 and S100A9 proteins were significantly accumulated in PBMC from responders. In contrast to PBMC, only the S100A9 protein was significantly overexpressed in the serum of R patients. Absolute quantification by ELISA confirmed this result and pointed out a similar expression level of S100A8 protein and calprotectin in sera from both R and NR groups. Thus, the S100A9 protein revealed to be predictive of MTX/ETA responsiveness, contrarily to parameters of inflammation and auto-antibodies which did not allow significant discrimination. Conclusion This is the first report of an overexpression of S100A9 protein in both PBMCs and serum of patients with subsequent response to the MTX/ETA combination. This protein thus represents an interesting biomarker candidate of therapeutic response in RA. PMID:25546405

  12. Proteomic analysis of serum proteins in triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice: implications for identifying biomarkers for use to screen potential candidate therapeutic drugs for early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xiaojing; Ren, Xiaohu; Huang, Peiwu; Li, Shuiming; Ma, Quan; Ying, Ming; Ni, Jiazuan; Liu, Jianjun; Yang, Xifei

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting the elderly worldwide. There is an urgent need to identify novel biomarkers of early AD. This study aims to search for potential early protein biomarkers in serum from a triple transgenic (PS1M146V/APPSwe/TauP301L) mouse model. Proteomic analysis via two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was performed on serum samples from wild-type (WT) and triple transgenic mice that were treated with or without coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) (800 mg/kg body weight/day), a powerful endogenous antioxidant displaying therapeutic benefits against AD pathology and cognitive impairment in multiple AD mouse models, for a period of three months beginning at two months of age. A total of 15 differentially expressed serum proteins were identified between the WT and AD transgenic mice. The administration of CoQ10 was found to alter the changes in the differentially expressed serum proteins by upregulating 10 proteins and down-regulating 10 proteins. Among the proteins modulated by CoQ10, clusterin and α-2-macroglobulin were validated via ELISA assay. These findings revealed significant changes in serum proteins in the AD mouse model at an early pathological stage and demonstrated that administration of CoQ10 could modulate these changes in serum proteins. Our study suggested that these differentially expressed serum proteins could serve as potential protein biomarkers of early AD and that screening for potential candidate AD therapeutic drugs and monitoring of therapeutic effects could be performed via measurement of the changes in these differentially expressed serum proteins. PMID:24496070

  13. Sources of Urinary Proteins and their Analysis by Urinary Proteomics for the Detection of Biomarkers of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Bruce A.; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Yusuke; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Spasovski, Goce; Novak, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Renal disorders account for a substantial fraction of the budget for health care in many countries. Proteinuria is a frequent manifestation in afflicted patients, but the origin of the proteins varies based on the nature of the disorder. The emerging field of urinary proteomics has the potential to replace kidney biopsy as the diagnostic procedure of choice for patients with some glomerular forms of renal disease. To fully realize this potential, it is vital to understand the basis for the urinary excretion of protein in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we discuss the structure of the nephron, the functional unit of the kidney, and the process by which proteins/peptides enter the urine. We discuss several aspects of proteinuria that impact the proteomic analysis of urine of patients with renal diseases. PMID:20161589

  14. Single-Nucleotide Variations in Cardiac Arrhythmias: Prospects for Genomics and Proteomics Based Biomarker Discovery and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Abunimer, Ayman; Smith, Krista; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Lam, Phuc; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a large contributor to causes of early death in developed countries. Some of these conditions, such as sudden cardiac death and atrial fibrillation, stem from arrhythmias—a spectrum of conditions with abnormal electrical activity in the heart. Genome-wide association studies can identify single nucleotide variations (SNVs) that may predispose individuals to developing acquired forms of arrhythmias. Through manual curation of published genome-wide association studies, we have collected a comprehensive list of 75 SNVs associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Ten of the SNVs result in amino acid changes and can be used in proteomic-based detection methods. In an effort to identify additional non-synonymous mutations that affect the proteome, we analyzed the post-translational modification S-nitrosylation, which is known to affect cardiac arrhythmias. We identified loss of seven known S-nitrosylation sites due to non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs). For predicted nitrosylation sites we found 1429 proteins where the sites are modified due to nsSNV. Analysis of the predicted S-nitrosylation dataset for over- or under-representation (compared to the complete human proteome) of pathways and functional elements shows significant statistical over-representation of the blood coagulation pathway. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis displays statistically over-represented terms related to muscle contraction, receptor activity, motor activity, cystoskeleton components, and microtubule activity. Through the genomic and proteomic context of SNVs and S-nitrosylation sites presented in this study, researchers can look for variation that can predispose individuals to cardiac arrhythmias. Such attempts to elucidate mechanisms of arrhythmia thereby add yet another useful parameter in predicting susceptibility for cardiac diseases. PMID:24705329

  15. Proteomics and the search for welfare and stress biomarkers in animal production in the one-health context.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ramell, A; de Almeida, A M; Cristobal, S; Rodrigues, P; Roncada, P; Bassols, A

    2016-06-21

    Stress and welfare are important factors in animal production in the context of growing production optimization and scrutiny by the general public. In a context in which animal and human health are intertwined aspects of the one-health concept it is of utmost importance to define the markers of stress and welfare. These are important tools for producers, retailers, regulatory agents and ultimately consumers to effectively monitor and assess the welfare state of production animals. Proteomics is the science that studies the proteins existing in a given tissue or fluid. In this review we address this topic by showing clear examples where proteomics has been used to study stress-induced changes at various levels. We adopt a multi-species (cattle, swine, small ruminants, poultry, fish and shellfish) approach under the effect of various stress inducers (handling, transport, management, nutritional, thermal and exposure to pollutants) clearly demonstrating how proteomics and systems biology are key elements to the study of stress and welfare in farm animals and powerful tools for animal welfare, health and productivity.

  16. Characterization of pepsinogen C as a potential biomarker for gastric cancer using a histo-proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Schimmel, Bettina; Bleul, Annett; Kaufmann, Roland; Hommann, Merten; Richter, Konrad K; Daffner, Wolfgang; Settmacher, Utz; Claussen, Uwe; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed 74 cryostat sections of central gastric tumor, tumor margin, and normal gastric epithelium using ProteinChip Arrays and SELDI-TOF MS. One peak was significantly down-regulated in tumor tissue (P = 1.43 x 10(-6)) and identified as pepsinogen C using MS/MS analysis and immunodepletion. This signal was further characterized by immunohistochemistry. This work demonstrates that differentially expressed signals can be identified and assessed using a proteomic approach comprising tissue-microdissection, protein profiling, and immunohistochemistry. PMID:16212435

  17. Circulating Extracellular Vesicles with Specific Proteome and Liver MicroRNAs Are Potential Biomarkers for Liver Injury in Experimental Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Povero, Davide; Eguchi, Akiko; Li, Hongying; Johnson, Casey D.; Papouchado, Bettina G.; Wree, Alexander; Messer, Karen; Feldstein, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in both adult and children. Currently there are no reliable methods to determine disease severity, monitor disease progression, or efficacy of therapy, other than an invasive liver biopsy. Design Choline Deficient L-Amino Acid (CDAA) and high fat diets were used as physiologically relevant mouse models of NAFLD. Circulating extracellular vesicles were isolated, fully characterized by proteomics and molecular analyses and compared to control groups. Liver-related microRNAs were isolated from purified extracellular vesicles and liver specimens. Results We observed statistically significant differences in the level of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in liver and blood between two control groups and NAFLD animals. Time-course studies showed that EV levels increase early during disease development and reflect changes in liver histolopathology. EV levels correlated with hepatocyte cell death (r2 = 0.64, p<0.05), fibrosis (r2 = 0.66, p<0.05) and pathological angiogenesis (r2 = 0.71, p<0.05). Extensive characterization of blood EVs identified both microparticles (MPs) and exosomes (EXO) present in blood of NAFLD animals. Proteomic analysis of blood EVs detected various differentially expressed proteins in NAFLD versus control animals. Moreover, unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified a signature that allowed for discrimination between NAFLD and controls. Finally, the liver appears to be an important source of circulating EVs in NAFLD animals as evidenced by the enrichment in blood with miR-122 and 192 - two microRNAs previously described in chronic liver diseases, coupled with a corresponding decrease in expression of these microRNAs in the liver. Conclusions These findings suggest a potential for using specific circulating EVs as sensitive and specific biomarkers for the noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD. PMID:25470250

  18. Proteomics Mapping of Cord Blood Identifies Haptoglobin “Switch-On” Pattern as Biomarker of Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Bhandari, Vineet; Dulay, Antonette T.; Nayeri, Unzila A.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S.; Pettker, Christian M.; Thung, Stephen; Zhao, Guomao; Han, Yiping W.; Bizzarro, Matthew; Buhimschi, Irina A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation (IAI) are important causes of preterm birth and early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). A prompt and accurate diagnosis of EONS is critical for improved neonatal outcomes. We sought to explore the cord blood proteome and identify biomarkers and functional protein networks characterizing EONS in preterm newborns. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied a prospective cohort of 180 premature newborns delivered May 2004-September 2009. A proteomics discovery phase employing two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry identified 19 differentially-expressed proteins in cord blood of newborns with culture-confirmed EONS (n = 3) versus GA-matched controls (n = 3). Ontological classifications of the proteins included transfer/carrier, immunity/defense, protease/extracellular matrix. The 1st-level external validation conducted in the remaining 174 samples confirmed elevated haptoglobin and haptoglobin-related protein immunoreactivity (Hp&HpRP) in newborns with EONS (presumed and culture-confirmed) independent of GA at birth and birthweight (P<0.001). Western blot concurred in determining that EONS babies had conspicuous Hp&HpRP bands in cord blood (“switch-on pattern”) as opposed to non-EONS newborns who had near-absent “switch-off pattern” (P<0.001). Fetal Hp phenotype independently impacted Hp&HpRP. A Bayesian latent-class analysis (LCA) was further used for unbiased classification of all 180 cases based on probability of “antenatal IAI exposure” as latent variable. This was then subjected to 2nd-level validation against indicators of adverse short-term neonatal outcome. The optimal LCA algorithm combined Hp&HpRP switch pattern (most input), interleukin-6 and neonatal hematological indices yielding two non-overlapping newborn clusters with low (≤20%) versus high (≥70%) probability of IAI exposure. This approach reclassified ∼30% of clinical EONS diagnoses

  19. Efficacy, Safety, and Biomarkers of Single-Agent Bevacizumab Therapy in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Malka, David; Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Dromain, Clarisse; Baey, Charlotte; Jacques, Nathalie; Pignon, Jean-Pierre; Vimond, Nadege; Bouvet-Forteau, Nathalie; De Baere, Thierry; Ducreux, Michel; Farace, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly vascularized tumor in which neoangiogenesis contributes to growth and metastasis. We assessed the safety, efficacy, and potential biomarkers of activity of bevacizumab in patients with advanced HCC. Methods. In this phase II trial, eligible patients received bevacizumab, 5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. The disease-control rate at 16 weeks (16W-DCR) was the primary endpoint. Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and plasma cytokines and angiogenic factors (CAFs) were measured at baseline and throughout treatment. Results. The 16W-DCR was 42% (95% confidence interval, 27%–57%). Six of the 43 patients who received bevacizumab achieved a partial response (objective response rate [ORR], 14%). Grade 3–4 asthenia, hemorrhage, and aminotransferase elevation occurred in five (12%), three (7%), and three (7%) patients, respectively. During treatment, placental growth factor markedly increased, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A dramatically decreased (p < .0001); soluble VEGF receptor-2 (p < .0001) and CECs (p = .03) transiently increased on day 3. High and increased CEC counts at day 15 were associated with the ORR (p = .04) and the 16W-DCR (p = .02), respectively. Lower interleukin (IL)-8 levels at baseline (p = .01) and throughout treatment (p ≤ .04) were associated with the 16W-DCR. High baseline IL-8 and IL-6 levels predicted shorter progression-free and overall survival times (p ≤ .04). Conclusion. Bevacizumab is active and well tolerated in patients with advanced HCC. The clinical value of CECs, IL-6, and IL-8 warrants further investigation. PMID:22707516

  20. Toward early safety alert endpoints: exploring biomarkers suggestive of microbicide failure.

    PubMed

    Mauck, Christine K; Lai, Jaim Jou; Weiner, Debra H; Chandra, Neelima; Fichorova, Raina N; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Hillier, Sharon L; Archer, David F; Creinin, Mitchell D; Schwartz, Jill L; Callahan, Marianne M; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2013-11-01

    Several microbicides, including nonoxynol-9 (N-9) and cellulose sulfate (CS), looked promising during early trials but failed in efficacy trials. We aimed to identify Phase I mucosal safety endpoints that might explain that failure. In a blinded, randomized, parallel trial, 60 healthy premenopausal sexually abstinent women applied Universal HEC placebo, 6% CS or 4% N-9 gel twice daily for 13½ days. Endpoints included immune biomarkers in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) and endocervical cytobrushes, inflammatory infiltrates in vaginal biopsies, epithelial integrity by naked eye, colposcopy, and histology, CVL anti-HIV activity, vaginal microflora, pH, and adverse events. Twenty women enrolled per group. Soluble/cellular markers were similar with CS and placebo, except secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) levels decreased in CVL, and CD3(+) and CD45(+) cells increased in biopsies after CS use. Increases in interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1, IL-1RA, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) and decreases in SLPI were significant with N-9. CVL anti-HIV activity was significantly higher during CS use compared to N-9 or placebo. CS users tended to have a higher prevalence of intermediate Nugent score, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus and fewer gram-negative rods. Most Nugent scores diagnostic for bacterial vaginosis were in N-9 users. All cases of histological inflammation or deep epithelial disruption occurred in N-9 users. While the surfactant N-9 showed obvious biochemical and histological signs of inflammation, more subtle changes, including depression of SLPI, tissue influx of CD45(+) and CD3(+) cells, and subclinical microflora shifts were associated with CS use and may help to explain the clinical failure of nonsurfactant microbicides. PMID:23885658

  1. Proteomic Characterization of Annexin l (ANX1) and Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSP27) as Biomarkers for Invasive Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Ho, Chun-Te; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Chang, Yu-Jia

    2015-01-01

    To search for reliable biomarkers and drug targets for management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we performed a global proteomic analysis of a pair of HCC cell lines with distinct differentiation statuses using 2-DE coupled with MALDI-TOF MS. In total, 106 and 55 proteins were successfully identified from the total cell lysate and the cytosolic, nuclear and membrane fractions in well-differentiated (HepG2) and poorly differentiated (SK-Hep–1) HCC clonal variants, respectively. Among these proteins, nine spots corresponding to proteins differentially expressed between HCC cell types were selected and confirmed by immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. Notably, Annexin 1 (ANX1), ANX–2, vimentin and stress-associated proteins, such as GRP78, HSP75, HSC–70, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and heat shock protein–27 (HSP27), were exclusively up-regulated in SK-Hep–1 cells. Elevated levels of ANX–4 and antioxidant/metabolic enzymes, such as MnSOD, peroxiredoxin, NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-enolase and UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, were observed in HepG2 cells. We functionally demonstrated that ANX1 and HSP27 were abundantly overexpressed only in highly invasive types of HCC cells, such as Mahlavu and SK-Hep–1. Knockdown of ANX1 or HSP27 in HCC cells resulted in a severe reduction in cell migration. The in-vitro observations of ANX1 and HSP27 expressions in HCC sample was demonstrated by immunohistochemical stains performed on HCC tissue microarrays. Poorly differentiated HCC tended to have stronger ANX1 and HSP27 expressions than well-differentiated or moderately differentiated HCC. Collectively, our findings suggest that ANX1 and HSP27 are two novel biomarkers for predicting invasive HCC phenotypes and could serve as potential treatment targets. PMID:26431426

  2. Proteomic Analysis in Type 2 Diabetes Patients before and after a Very Low Calorie Diet Reveals Potential Disease State and Intervention Specific Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Dharuri, Harish K.; Jeyakar, Skhandhan; Snel, Marieke; Juhasz, Peter; Lynch, Moira; Hines, Wade; Li, Xiaohong; Jazet, Ingrid M.; Adourian, Aram; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2014-01-01

    Very low calorie diets (VLCD) with and without exercise programs lead to major metabolic improvements in obese type 2 diabetes patients. The mechanisms underlying these improvements have so far not been elucidated fully. To further investigate the mechanisms of a VLCD with or without exercise and to uncover possible biomarkers associated with these interventions, blood samples were collected from 27 obese type 2 diabetes patients before and after a 16-week VLCD (Modifast ∼450 kcal/day). Thirteen of these patients followed an exercise program in addition to the VCLD. Plasma was obtained from 27 lean and 27 obese controls as well. Proteomic analysis was performed using mass spectrometry (MS) and targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and a large scale isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) approach. After the 16-week VLCD, there was a significant decrease in body weight and HbA1c in all patients, without differences between the two intervention groups. Targeted MRM analysis revealed differences in several proteins, which could be divided in diabetes-associated (fibrinogen, transthyretin), obesity-associated (complement C3), and diet-associated markers (apolipoproteins, especially apolipoprotein A-IV). To further investigate the effects of exercise, large scale iTRAQ analysis was performed. However, no proteins were found showing an exercise effect. Thus, in this study, specific proteins were found to be differentially expressed in type 2 diabetes patients versus controls and before and after a VLCD. These proteins are potential disease state and intervention specific biomarkers. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN76920690 PMID:25415563

  3. Rice proteomics: A move toward expanded proteome coverage to comparative and functional proteomics uncovers the mysteries of rice and plant biology.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep

    2011-05-01

    Growing rice is an important socio-economic activity. Rice proteomics has achieved a tremendous progress in establishing techniques to proteomes of almost all tissues, organs, and organelles during the past one decade (year 2000-2010). We have compiled these progresses time to time over this period. The present compilation discusses proteomics research in rice published between 1st April 2008 and 30th July 2010. Progress continues mainly towards protein cataloging deep into the proteome with high-confident protein assignment and some functional significance than ever before by (i) identifying previously unreported/low-abundance proteins, (ii) quantifying relative/absolute values of proteins, (iii) assigning protein responses to biotic/abiotic stresses, (iv) protein localization into organelles, (v) validating previous proteomes and eliminating false-positive proteins, and (vi) discovering potential biomarkers for tissues, organs, organelles, and for screening transgenic plants and food-safety evaluation. The notable achievements in global mapping of phosphorylation sites and identifying several novel secreted proteins into the extracellular space are worth appreciating. Our ever-increasing knowledge on the rice proteomics is beginning to impact the biology of not only rice, but also crops and plants. These major achievements will be discussed in this review keeping in mind newcomers, young, and established scientists in proteomics and plants.

  4. Proteomic analysis of apoplastic fluid of Coffea arabica leaves highlights novel biomarkers for resistance against Hemileia vastatrix

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Tenente, Rita; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Silva, Maria do Céu; Cardoso, Fernando M. H.; Planchon, Sébastien; Barros, Danielle R.; Renaut, Jenny; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2015-01-01

    A proteomic analysis of the apoplastic fluid (APF) of coffee leaves was conducted to investigate the cellular processes associated with incompatible (resistant) and compatible (susceptible) Coffea arabica-Hemileia vastatrix interactions, during the 24–96 hai period. The APF proteins were extracted by leaf vacuum infiltration and protein profiles were obtained by 2-DE. The comparative analysis of the gels revealed 210 polypeptide spots whose volume changed in abundance between samples (control, resistant and susceptible) during the 24–96 hai period. The proteins identified were involved mainly in protein degradation, cell wall metabolism and stress/defense responses, most of them being hydrolases (around 70%), particularly sugar hydrolases and peptidases/proteases. The changes in the APF proteome along the infection process revealed two distinct phases of defense responses, an initial/basal one (24–48 hai) and a late/specific one (72–96 hai). Compared to susceptibility, resistance was associated with a higher number of proteins, which was more evident in the late/specific phase. Proteins involved in the resistance response were mainly, glycohydrolases of the cell wall, serine proteases and pathogen related-like proteins (PR-proteins), suggesting that some of these proteins could be putative candidates for resistant markers of coffee to H. vastatrix. Antibodies were produced against chitinase, pectin methylesterase, serine carboxypeptidase, reticuline oxidase and subtilase and by an immunodetection assay it was observed an increase of these proteins in the resistant sample. With this methodology we have identified proteins that are candidate markers of resistance and that will be useful in coffee breeding programs to assist in the selection of cultivars with resistance to H. vastatrix. PMID:26175744

  5. Quantitative chemical proteomics for investigating the biomarkers of dioscin against liver fibrosis caused by CCl4 in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-07-14

    In the present work, the effect of dioscin against liver fibrosis in rats caused by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) was confirmed. Then, the differentially expressed proteins from rat liver were identified using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis technology. Ten new biomarkers including protein disulfide isomerase A3, selenium-binding protein 1, glutamine synthetase, senescence marker protein 30, hemopexin, keratin 8, keratin 18, vimentin, Annexin A5 and dermatopontin associated with liver fibrosis were found and validated, and new insights through affecting multiple drug targets and biological processes were also provided to reveal the mechanisms of dioscin against hepatic fibrosis for the first time. PMID:26069897

  6. Respiratory Toxicity Biomarkers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advancement in high throughput genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques have accelerated pace of lung biomarker discovery. A recent growth in the discovery of new lung toxicity/disease biomarkers have led to significant advances in our understanding of pathological proce...

  7. Biomarkers in pharmacology and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D C; Kodukula, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers, quantitatively measurable indicators of biological or pathogenic processes, once validated play a critical role in disease diagnostics, the prediction of disease progression, and/or monitoring of the response to treatment. They may also represent drug targets. A number of different methods can be used for biomarker discovery and validation, including proteomics methods, metabolomics, imaging, and genome wide association studies (GWASs) and can be analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plots. The relative utility of single biomarkers compared to biomarker panels is discussed, along with paradigms for biomarker development, the latter in the context of three large-scale biomarker consortia, the Critical Path Predictive Safety Testing Consortium (PSTC), the NCI Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The importance of systematic optimization of many parameters in biomarker analysis, including validation, reproducibility, study design, statistical analysis and avoidance of bias are critical features used by these consortia. Problems including introduction of bias into study designs, data reporting or data analysis are also reviewed.

  8. Evaluation of reverse phase protein array (RPPA)-based pathway-activation profiling in 84 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines as platform for cancer proteomics and biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Ummanni, Ramesh; Mannsperger, Heiko A; Sonntag, Johanna; Oswald, Marcus; Sharma, Ashwini K; König, Rainer; Korf, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    The reverse phase protein array (RPPA) approach was employed for a quantitative analysis of 71 cancer-relevant proteins and phosphoproteins in 84 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and by monitoring the activation state of selected receptor tyrosine kinases, PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK1/2 signaling, cell cycle control, apoptosis, and DNA damage. Additional information on NSCLC cell lines such as that of transcriptomic data, genomic aberrations, and drug sensitivity was analyzed in the context of proteomic data using supervised and non-supervised approaches for data analysis. First, the unsupervised analysis of proteomic data indicated that proteins clustering closely together reflect well-known signaling modules, e.g. PI3K/AKT- and RAS/RAF/ERK-signaling, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. However, mutations of EGFR, ERBB2, RAF, RAS, TP53, and PI3K were found dispersed across different signaling pathway clusters. Merely cell lines with an amplification of EGFR and/or ERBB2 clustered closely together on the proteomic, but not on the transcriptomic level. Secondly, supervised data analysis revealed that sensitivity towards anti-EGFR drugs generally correlated better with high level EGFR phosphorylation than with EGFR abundance itself. High level phosphorylation of RB and high abundance of AURKA were identified as candidates that can potentially predict sensitivity towards the aurora kinase inhibitor VX680. Examples shown demonstrate that the RPPA approach presents a useful platform for targeted proteomics with high potential for biomarker discovery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  9. Data processing pipelines for comprehensive profiling of proteomics samples by label-free LC-MS for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Christin, Christin; Bischoff, Rainer; Horvatovich, Péter

    2011-01-30

    Label-free quantitative LC-MS profiling of complex body fluids has become an important analytical tool for biomarker and biological knowledge discovery in the past decade. Accurate processing, statistical analysis and validation of acquired data diversified by the different types of mass spectrometers, mass spectrometer parameter settings and applied sample preparation steps are essential to answer complex life science research questions and understand the molecular mechanism of disease onset and developments. This review provides insight into the main modules of label-free data processing pipelines with statistical analysis and validation and discusses recent developments. Special emphasis is devoted to quality control methods, performance assessment of complete workflows and algorithms of individual modules. Finally, the review discusses the current state and trends in high throughput data processing and analysis solutions for users with little bioinformatics knowledge.

  10. The Application of a Three-Step Proteome Analysis for Identification of New Biomarkers of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abulaizi, Mayinuer; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Satoh, Mamoru; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Kodera, Yoshio; Obul, Jurat; Takano, Shigetsugu; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Miyazaki, Masaru; Nomura, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    We searched for novel tumor markers of pancreatic cancer by three-step serum proteome analysis. Twelve serum abundant proteins were depleted using immunoaffinity columns followed by fractionation by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Proteins in each fraction were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Then the gel was stained by Coomassie Brilliant Blue. Protein spots in which the expression levels were significantly different between cancer and normal control were identified by LC-MS/MS. One hundred and two spots were upregulated, and 84 spots were downregulated in serum samples obtained from patients with pancreatic cancers, and 58 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. These candidate proteins were validated using western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). As a result of these validation process, we could confirm that the serum levels of apolipoprotein A-IV, vitamin D-binding protein, plasma retinol-binding protein 4, and tetranectin were significantly decreased in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:22091389

  11. Proteomic response of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to CuO NPs and Cu²⁺: an exploratory biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Tânia; Chora, Suze; Pereira, Catarina G; Cardoso, Cátia; Bebianno, Maria João

    2014-10-01

    absence of the mussel genome precluded the identification of other proteins relevant to clarify the effects of CuO NPs in mussels' tissues, proteomics analysis provided additional knowledge of their potential effects at the protein level that after confirmation and validation can be used as putative new biomarkers in nanotoxicology.

  12. Proteomic Discovery and Development of a Multiplexed Targeted MRM-LC-MS/MS Assay for Urine Biomarkers of Extracellular Matrix Disruption in Mucopolysaccharidoses I, II, and VI.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Wendy E; Camuzeaux, Stephane; Doykov, Ivan; Patel, Nina; Preece, Rhian-Lauren; Footitt, Emma; Cleary, Maureen; Clayton, Peter; Grunewald, Stephanie; Abulhoul, Lara; Chakrapani, Anupam; Sebire, Neil J; Hindmarsh, Peter; de Koning, Tom J; Heales, Simon; Burke, Derek; Gissen, Paul; Mills, Kevin

    2015-12-15

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are lysosomal storage disorders that result from defects in the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans. Impaired muscle, bone, and connective tissue are typical clinical features of MPS due to disruption of the extracellular matrix. Markers of MPS disease pathology are needed to determine disease severity and monitor effects of existing and emerging new treatments on disease mechanisms. Urine samples from a small cohort of MPS-I, -II, and -VI patients (n = 12) were analyzed using label-free quantative proteomics. Fifty-three proteins including many associated with extracellular matrix organization were differently expressed. A targeted multiplexed peptide MRM LC-MS/MS assay was used on a larger validation cohort of patient samples (MPS-I n = 18, MPS-II n = 12, MPS-VI n = 6, control n = 20). MPS-I and -II groups were further subdivided according to disease severity. None of the markers assessed were altered significantly in the mild disease groups compared to controls. β-galactosidase, a lysosomal protein, was elevated 3.6-5.7-fold significantly (p < 0.05) in all disease groups apart from mild MPS-I and -II. Collagen type Iα, fatty-acid-binding-protein 5, nidogen-1, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 concentrations were elevated in severe MPS I and II groups. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7, and β-galactosidase were able to distinguish the severe neurological form of MPS-II from the milder non-neurological form. Protein Heg1 was significantly raised only in MPS-VI. This work describes the discovery of new biomarkers of MPS that represent disease pathology and allows the stratification of MPS-II patients according to disease severity. PMID:26537538

  13. Spatiotemporal proteomic analyses during pancreas cancer progression identifies serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) as a novel candidate biomarker for early stage disease.

    PubMed

    Mirus, Justin E; Zhang, Yuzheng; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Solan, Joell L; Lampe, Paul D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-12-01

    Pancreas cancer, or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, is the deadliest of solid tumors, with a five-year survival rate of <5%. Detection of resectable disease improves survival rates, but access to tissue and other biospecimens that could be used to develop early detection markers is confounded by the insidious nature of pancreas cancer. Mouse models that accurately recapitulate the human condition allow disease tracking from inception to invasion and can therefore be useful for studying early disease stages in which surgical resection is possible. Using a highly faithful mouse model of pancreas cancer in conjunction with a high-density antibody microarray containing ∼2500 antibodies, we interrogated the pancreatic tissue proteome at preinvasive and invasive stages of disease. The goal was to discover early stage tissue markers of pancreas cancer and follow them through histologically defined stages of disease using cohorts of mice lacking overt clinical signs and symptoms and those with end-stage metastatic disease, respectively. A panel of seven up-regulated proteins distinguishing pancreas cancer from normal pancreas was validated, and their levels were assessed in tissues collected at preinvasive, early invasive, and moribund stages of disease. Six of the seven markers also differentiated pancreas cancer from an experimental model of chronic pancreatitis. The levels of serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) increased between preinvasive and invasive stages, suggesting its potential as a tissue biomarker, and perhaps its involvement in progression from precursor pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry of STK4 at different stages of disease revealed a dynamic expression pattern further implicating it in early tumorigenic events. Immunohistochemistry of a panel of human pancreas cancers confirmed that STK4 levels were increased in tumor epithelia relative to normal tissue. Overall, this integrated approach

  14. Current advantages in the application of proteomics in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Vaiopoulou, Anna; Gazouli, Maria; Theodoropoulos, George; Zografos, George

    2012-11-01

    Since the formulation of the concept of proteomics, a plethora of proteomic technologies have been developed in order to study proteomes. In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), several studies use proteomics to try to better understand the disease and discover molecules which can be used as biomarkers. Biomarkers should be able to be used for diagnosis, therapy and prognosis. Although several biomarkers have been discovered, few biomarkers have clinical value. In this review, we analyze and report the current use of proteomic techniques to highlight biomarkers characterizing IBD, and different stages of disease activity. We also report the biomarkers and their potential clinical value.

  15. Identification of IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 As Compensatory Biomarkers for CA19-9 in Early-Stage Pancreatic Cancer Using a Combination of Antibody-Based and LC-MS/MS-Based Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Honda, Kazufumi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Iwasaki, Motoki; Uchida, Yasuo; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakamori, Shoji; Shimahara, Masashi; Ueno, Takaaki; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ioka, Tatsuya; Yasunami, Yohichi; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kaneda, Takashi; Kato, Takao; Yagihara, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Shigeyuki; Huang, Wilber; Yamada, Tesshi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumors, and reliable detection of early-stage pancreatic cancer and risk diseases for pancreatic cancer is essential to improve the prognosis. As 260 genes were previously reported to be upregulated in invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of pancreas (IDACP) cells, quantification of the corresponding proteins in plasma might be useful for IDACP diagnosis. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to identify plasma biomarkers for early detection of IDACP by using two proteomics strategies: antibody-based proteomics and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomics. Among the 260 genes, we focused on 130 encoded proteins with known function for which antibodies were available. Twenty-three proteins showed values of the area under the curve (AUC) of more than 0.8 in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) data of IDACP patients compared with healthy controls, and these proteins were selected as biomarker candidates. We then used our high-throughput selected reaction monitoring or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) methodology, together with an automated sample preparation system, micro LC and auto analysis system, to quantify these candidate proteins in plasma from healthy controls and IDACP patients on a large scale. The results revealed that insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)2 and IGFBP3 have the ability to discriminate IDACP patients at an early stage from healthy controls, and IGFBP2 appeared to be increased in risk diseases of pancreatic malignancy, such as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Furthermore, diagnosis of IDACP using the combination of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 is significantly more effective than CA19-9 alone. This suggests that IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 may serve as compensatory biomarkers for CA19-9. Early diagnosis with this marker combination may improve the prognosis of

  16. Identification of IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 As Compensatory Biomarkers for CA19-9 in Early-Stage Pancreatic Cancer Using a Combination of Antibody-Based and LC-MS/MS-Based Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Honda, Kazufumi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Iwasaki, Motoki; Uchida, Yasuo; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakamori, Shoji; Shimahara, Masashi; Ueno, Takaaki; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ioka, Tatsuya; Yasunami, Yohichi; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kaneda, Takashi; Kato, Takao; Yagihara, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Shigeyuki; Huang, Wilber; Yamada, Tesshi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumors, and reliable detection of early-stage pancreatic cancer and risk diseases for pancreatic cancer is essential to improve the prognosis. As 260 genes were previously reported to be upregulated in invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of pancreas (IDACP) cells, quantification of the corresponding proteins in plasma might be useful for IDACP diagnosis. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to identify plasma biomarkers for early detection of IDACP by using two proteomics strategies: antibody-based proteomics and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomics. Among the 260 genes, we focused on 130 encoded proteins with known function for which antibodies were available. Twenty-three proteins showed values of the area under the curve (AUC) of more than 0.8 in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) data of IDACP patients compared with healthy controls, and these proteins were selected as biomarker candidates. We then used our high-throughput selected reaction monitoring or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) methodology, together with an automated sample preparation system, micro LC and auto analysis system, to quantify these candidate proteins in plasma from healthy controls and IDACP patients on a large scale. The results revealed that insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)2 and IGFBP3 have the ability to discriminate IDACP patients at an early stage from healthy controls, and IGFBP2 appeared to be increased in risk diseases of pancreatic malignancy, such as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Furthermore, diagnosis of IDACP using the combination of carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA19-9), IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 is significantly more effective than CA19-9 alone. This suggests that IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 may serve as compensatory biomarkers for CA19-9. Early diagnosis with this marker combination may improve the prognosis of

  17. Multi-Scale Genomic, Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines to Identify Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Briffa, Romina; Um, Inhwa; Faratian, Dana; Zhou, Ying; Turnbull, Arran K.; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Selecting colorectal cancer (CRC) patients likely to respond to therapy remains a clinical challenge. The objectives of this study were to establish which genes were differentially expressed with respect to treatment sensitivity and relate this to copy number in a panel of 15 CRC cell lines. Copy number variations of the identified genes were assessed in a cohort of CRCs. IC50’s were measured for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ-235, a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Cell lines were profiled using array comparative genomic hybridisation, Illumina gene expression analysis, reverse phase protein arrays, and targeted sequencing of KRAS hotspot mutations. Frequent gains were observed at 2p, 3q, 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, 13q, 14q, and 17q and losses at 2q, 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 14q, 18q, and 20p. Frequently gained regions contained EGFR, PIK3CA, MYC, SMO, TRIB1, FZD1, and BRCA2, while frequently lost regions contained FHIT and MACROD2. TRIB1 was selected for further study. Gene enrichment analysis showed that differentially expressed genes with respect to treatment response were involved in Wnt signalling, EGF receptor signalling, apoptosis, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Stepwise integration of copy number and gene expression data yielded 47 candidate genes that were significantly correlated. PDCD6 was differentially expressed in all three treatment responses. Tissue microarrays were constructed for a cohort of 118 CRC patients and TRIB1 and MYC amplifications were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. TRIB1 and MYC were amplified in 14.5% and 7.4% of the cohort, respectively, and these amplifications were significantly correlated (p≤0.0001). TRIB1 protein expression in the patient cohort was significantly correlated with pERK, Akt, and Caspase 3 expression. In conclusion, a set of candidate predictive biomarkers for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ235 are described that warrant further study. Amplification of the putative oncogene TRIB1 has been described for

  18. Toward Biomarker Development in Large Clinical Cohorts: An Integrated High-Throughput 96-Well-Plate-Based Sample Preparation Workflow for Versatile Downstream Proteomic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zeyu; Liu, Xiaoli; Jiang, Jing; Huang, Haijun; Wang, Jie; Wu, Daxian; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-09-01

    We describe a cheap, robust, fast, high-throughput, and flexible proteomic sample processing method based on a regular 96-well plate by acetone precipitation under low centrifuge speed (96PACS), which enables predigestion processing of 96 samples within 2 h. Tested on a complex Huh-7 total lysate, 96PACS produced comparable proteome coverage and even showed better reproducibility than FASP. Quantitative performance of 96PACS was further tested using data-independent acquisition and parallel reaction monitoring quantitation in a set of 6 benchmark samples consisting of 6 serial dilutions of BSA spiked in complex E. coli proteome background. The protocol was also successfully modified for automation and was validated in a comparative label-free proteomic study to develop serum markers for early detection of liver fibrosis and necroinflammation in patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus. PMID:27471874

  19. Environmental proteomics and metallomics.

    PubMed

    López-Barea, Juan; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2006-04-01

    Monitoring environmental pollution using biomarkers requires detailed knowledge about the markers, and many only allow a partial assessment of pollution. New proteomic methods (environmental proteomics) can identify proteins that, after validation, might be useful as alternative biomarkers, although this approach also has its limitations, derived mainly from their application to non-model organisms. Initial studies using environmental proteomics were carried out in animals exposed to model pollutants, and led to the concept of protein expression signatures. Experiments have been carried out in model organisms (yeast, Arabidopsis, rat cells, or mice) exposed to model contaminants. Over the last few years, proteomics has been applied to organisms from ecosystems with different pollution levels, forming the basis of an environmental branch in proteomics. Another focus is connected with the presence of metals bound to biomolecules, which adds an additional dimension to metal-biomolecule and metalloprotein characterization - the field of metallomics. The metallomic approach considers the metallome: a whole individual metal or metalloid species within a cell or tissue. A metallomic analytical approach (MAA) is proposed as a new tool to study and identify metalloproteins.

  20. Proteomic investigation of signatures for geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Junying; Zhang, Fangbo; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Chunyu; Li, Xianyu; Li, Defeng; Liu, Xin; Yang, Hongjun; Huang, Luqi

    2014-12-01

    Evaluating the safety of traditional medicinal herbs and their major active constituents is critical for their widespread usage. Geniposide, a major active constituent with a defined structure from the traditional medicinal herb Gardenia jasminoides ELLIS fruit, exhibits remarkable anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, and antifibrotic properties and has been used in a variety of medical fields, mainly for the treatment of liver diseases. However, geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity and methods for the early detection of hepatotoxicity have yet to be reported. In this study, geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated. In addition, candidate biomarkers for the earlier detection of geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity were identified using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach on a geniposide overdose-induced liver injury in a rat model. Using an accurate intensity-based, absolute quantification (iBAQ)-based, one-step discovery and verification approach, a candidate biomarker panel was easily obtained from individual samples in response to different conditions. To determine the biomarkers' early detection abilities, five candidate biomarkers were selected and tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Two biomarkers, glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and glycogen phosphorylase (PYGL), were found to indicate hepatic injuries significantly earlier than the current gold standard liver biomarker. This study provides a first insight into geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity in a rat model and describes a method for the earlier detection of this hepatotoxicity, facilitating the efficient monitoring of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:25336395

  1. Proteomic investigation of signatures for geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Junying; Zhang, Fangbo; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Chunyu; Li, Xianyu; Li, Defeng; Liu, Xin; Yang, Hongjun; Huang, Luqi

    2014-12-01

    Evaluating the safety of traditional medicinal herbs and their major active constituents is critical for their widespread usage. Geniposide, a major active constituent with a defined structure from the traditional medicinal herb Gardenia jasminoides ELLIS fruit, exhibits remarkable anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, and antifibrotic properties and has been used in a variety of medical fields, mainly for the treatment of liver diseases. However, geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity and methods for the early detection of hepatotoxicity have yet to be reported. In this study, geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated. In addition, candidate biomarkers for the earlier detection of geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity were identified using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach on a geniposide overdose-induced liver injury in a rat model. Using an accurate intensity-based, absolute quantification (iBAQ)-based, one-step discovery and verification approach, a candidate biomarker panel was easily obtained from individual samples in response to different conditions. To determine the biomarkers' early detection abilities, five candidate biomarkers were selected and tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Two biomarkers, glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and glycogen phosphorylase (PYGL), were found to indicate hepatic injuries significantly earlier than the current gold standard liver biomarker. This study provides a first insight into geniposide-induced hepatotoxicity in a rat model and describes a method for the earlier detection of this hepatotoxicity, facilitating the efficient monitoring of drug-induced hepatotoxicity.

  2. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed. PMID:27187379

  3. Proteomics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Research

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yune-Jung; Chung, Min Kyung; Hwang, Daehee

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, diagnosis of RA is currently based on clinical manifestations, and there is no simple, practical assessment tool in the clinical field to assess disease activity and severity. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the discovery of new diagnostic RA biomarkers that can assist in evaluating disease activity, severity, and treatment response. Proteomics, the large-scale study of the proteome, has emerged as a powerful technique for protein identification and characterization. For the past 10 years, proteomic techniques have been applied to different biological samples (synovial tissue/fluid, blood, and urine) from RA patients and experimental animal models. In this review, we summarize the current state of the application of proteomics in RA and its importance in identifying biomarkers and treatment targets. PMID:26330803

  4. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis - discovery and implications.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Avishek, Kumar; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-01-01

    Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood-borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, subunit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in Leishmania donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters, and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines, e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen(-/-) in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated in normal

  5. Utility of specific biomarkers to assess safety of swine manure for biofertilizing purposes.

    PubMed

    Fongaro, G; Viancelli, A; Magri, M E; Elmahdy, E M; Biesus, L L; Kich, J D; Kunz, A; Barardi, C R M

    2014-05-01

    Swine production is an important economic activity in Brazil, and there is interest in the development of clean production mechanisms to support sustainable agro-industrial activities. The biomass derived from swine manure has good potential to be used as a biofertilizer due to its high nutrient concentration. However, the land application of manure should be based on safety parameters such as the presence of pathogens that can potentially infect animals and people. This study was designed to assess the presence of porcine circovirus-2 (PCV2), porcine adenovirus (PAdV), rotavirus-A (RV-A) and Salmonella spp. in liquid manure, as well the infectivity of two genotypes of circovirus-2 (PCV2a and PCV2b) present in liquid manure. Three swine farms were evaluated: 1) a nursery production farm (manure analyzed before and after anaerobic biodigestion), 2) a grow-finish production farm (analyzed before and after anaerobic biodigestion), and 3) a second grow-finish production farm (raw manure-affluent). PCV2, PAdV and RV-A were present before and after anaerobic biodigestion (either affluent or effluent) at all farms. Salmonella spp. were detected at farm 1 (affluent and effluent) and farm 3 (raw manure-affluent) but not farm 2 (affluent and effluent). When the ability of the anaerobic biodigestion process to reduce viral concentration was evaluated, no significant reduction was observed (P>0.05). Both the PCV2a and PCV2b genotypes were detected, suggesting viral co-infection in swine production. The results revealed infectious PCV2 even after anaerobic biodigestion treatment. The presence of Salmonella spp. and enteric viruses, especially infectious PCV2, in the final effluent from the anaerobic biodigester system suggests that the process is inefficient for pathogen inactivation. Due to the prevalence and infectivity of PCV2 and considering the successful use of molecular methods coupled to cell culture for detecting infectious PCV2, we suggest that this virus can be used

  6. Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Despite great strides in proteomics and the growing number of articles citing the discovery of potential biomarkers, the actual rate of introduction of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved protein analytes has been relatively unchanged over the past 10 years. One of reasons for the lack of new protein-based biomarkers approved has been a lack of information and understanding by the proteomics research community to the regulatory process used by the FDA.

  7. The Human Eye Proteome Project: perspectives on an emerging proteome.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; Enghild, Jan J; Venkatraman, Vidya; Dyrlund, Thomas F; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2013-08-01

    There are an estimated 285 million people with visual impairment worldwide, of whom 39 million are blind. The pathogenesis of many eye diseases remains poorly understood. The human eye is currently an emerging proteome that may provide key insight into the biological pathways of disease. We review proteomic investigations of the human eye and present a catalogue of 4842 nonredundant proteins identified in human eye tissues and biofluids to date. We highlight the need to identify new biomarkers for eye diseases using proteomics. Recent advances in proteomics do now allow the identification of hundreds to thousands of proteins in tissues and fluids, characterization of various PTMs and simultaneous quantification of multiple proteins. To facilitate proteomic studies of the eye, the Human Eye Proteome Project (HEPP) was organized in September 2012. The HEPP is one of the most recent components of the Biology/Disease-driven Human Proteome Project (B/D-HPP) whose overarching goal is to support the broad application of state-of-the-art measurements of proteins and proteomes by life scientists studying the molecular mechanisms of biological processes and human disease. The large repertoire of investigative proteomic tools has great potential to transform vision science and enhance understanding of physiology and disease processes that affect sight.

  8. Safety and efficacy of polycalcium for improving biomarkers of bone metabolism: a 4-week open-label clinical study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Park, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Dae; Cho, Hyung Rae; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Joo-Wan

    2013-03-01

    Polycalcium is a mixture of Polycan and calcium lactate-gluconate 1:9 (w/w) with demonstrated antiosteoporosis activity in vitro and in vivo studies. These studies were a 4-week open-label, single-center trial to evaluate the efficacy of oral Polycalcium on bone metabolism and safety. In total, 30 healthy women (range 40-60 years) were administered 400 mg of Polycalcium for 4 weeks. The primary efficacy parameter was urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPYR) levels, and serum osteocalcin (OSC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), urinary cross-linked C-telopeptide of type-1 collagen (CTx), urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type-1 collagen (NTx), calcium (Ca), and phosphorus (P) levels, which were evaluated for comparison before and after administration of Polycalcium. After 4 weeks of Polycalcium administration, 27 subjects completed the test plan. Three subjects withdrew their consent to participate. The values of blood OSC, BALP, serum Ca, and serum P from baseline to 4 weeks of treatment were changed by -28.44%, 14.37%, 6.11%, and 1.42%, respectively. Biomarkers of bone resorption: urinary DPYR, serum CTx, serum NTx, urinary Ca, and urinary P, at baseline after 4 weeks of treatment were changed by -13.40%, 6.67%, -5.13%, -22.43%, and -3.04%, respectively. Additionally, when considering the subjects' adverse effects and the results of the blood and urine tests over the 4-week trial period, the dose of 400  mg Polycalcium showed efficacy for improving bone metabolism and was well tolerated and safe. Polycalcium was apparently safe and efficacious.

  9. Immunocapture strategies in translational proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Fredolini, Claudia; Byström, Sanna; Pin, Elisa; Edfors, Fredrik; Tamburro, Davide; Iglesias, Maria Jesus; Häggmark, Anna; Hong, Mun-Gwan; Uhlen, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at clinical studies of human diseases, antibody-assisted assays have been applied to biomarker discovery and toward a streamlined translation from patient profiling to assays supporting personalized treatments. In recent years, integrated strategies to couple and combine antibodies with mass spectrometry-based proteomic efforts have emerged, allowing for novel possibilities in basic and clinical research. Described in this review are some of the field’s current and emerging immunocapture approaches from an affinity proteomics perspective. Discussed are some of their advantages, pitfalls and opportunities for the next phase in clinical and translational proteomics. PMID:26558424

  10. Proteomics Research in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Davalieva, Katarina; Maleva Kostovska, Ivana; Dwork, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite intense scientific efforts, the neuropathology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia are poorly understood. Proteomic studies, by testing large numbers of proteins for associations with disease, may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of schizophrenia. They may also indicate the types and locations of cells most likely to harbor pathological alterations. Investigations using proteomic approaches have already provided much information on quantitative and qualitative protein patterns in postmortem brain tissue, peripheral tissues and body fluids. Different proteomic technologies such as 2-D PAGE, 2-D DIGE, SELDI-TOF, shotgun proteomics with label-based (ICAT), and label-free (MSE) quantification have been applied to the study of schizophrenia for the past 15 years. This review summarizes the results, mostly from brain but also from other tissues and bodily fluids, of proteomics studies in schizophrenia. Emphasis is given to proteomics platforms, varying sources of material, proposed candidate biomarkers emerging from comparative proteomics studies, and the specificity of the putative markers in terms of other mental illnesses. We also compare proteins altered in schizophrenia with reports of protein or mRNA sequences that are relatively enriched in specific cell types. While proteomic studies of schizophrenia find abnormalities in the expression of many proteins that are not cell type-specific, there appears to be a disproportionate representation of proteins whose synthesis and localization are highly enriched in one or more brain cell type compared with other types of brain cells. Two of the three proteins most commonly altered in schizophrenia are aldolase C and glial fibrillary acidic protein, astrocytic proteins with entirely different functions, but the studies are approximately evenly divided with regard to the direction of the differences and the concordance or discordance between the two proteins. Alterations of common myelin

  11. L-selectin and P-selectin are novel biomarkers of cervicovaginal inflammation for preclinical mucosal safety assessment of anti-HIV-1 microbicide.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Maohua; He, Benxia; Yang, Jingyi; Bao, Rong; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Dihan; Chen, Yaoqing; Li, Liangzhu; Han, Chen; Yang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Cao, Yuan; Li, Yaoming; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yan, Huimin

    2012-06-01

    A major obstacle thwarting preclinical development of microbicides is the lack of a validated biomarker of cervicovaginal inflammation. Therefore, the present study aims to identify novel noninvasive soluble markers in a murine model for assessment of microbicide mucosal safety. By performing cytokine antibody array analysis, we identified two adhesion molecules, L-selectin and P-selectin, which significantly increased when mucosal inflammation was triggered by nonoxynol-9 (N9), an anti-HIV-1 microbicide candidate that failed clinical trials, in a refined murine model of agent-induced cervicovaginal inflammation. We found that patterns of detection of L-selectin and P-selectin were obviously different from those of the two previously defined biomarkers of cervicovaginal inflammation, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6). The levels of these two soluble selectins correlated better than those of MCP-1 and IL-6 with the duration and severity of mucosal inflammation triggered by N9 and two approved proinflammatory compounds, benzalkonium chloride (BZK) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), but not by two nonproinflammatory compounds, carboxymethyl celluose (CMC; microbicide excipients) and tenofovir (TFV; microbicide candidate). These data indicated that L-selectin and P-selectin can serve as additional novel cervicovaginal inflammation biomarkers for preclinical mucosal safety evaluation of candidate microbicides for the prevention of infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted pathogens. PMID:22391529

  12. Role of Proteomics in the Development of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kewal K

    2016-01-01

    Advances in proteomic technologies have made import contribution to the development of personalized medicine by facilitating detection of protein biomarkers, proteomics-based molecular diagnostics, as well as protein biochips and pharmacoproteomics. Application of nanobiotechnology in proteomics, nanoproteomics, has further enhanced applications in personalized medicine. Proteomics-based molecular diagnostics will have an important role in the diagnosis of certain conditions and understanding the pathomechanism of disease. Proteomics will be a good bridge between diagnostics and therapeutics; the integration of these will be important for advancing personalized medicine. Use of proteomic biomarkers and combination of pharmacoproteomics with pharmacogenomics will enable stratification of clinical trials and improve monitoring of patients for development of personalized therapies. Proteomics is an important component of several interacting technologies used for development of personalized medicine, which is depicted graphically. Finally, cancer is a good example of applications of proteomic technologies for personalized management of cancer.

  13. Model-based analysis of thromboxane B{sub 2} and prostaglandin E{sub 2} as biomarkers in the safety evaluation of naproxen

    SciTech Connect

    Sahota, Tarjinder; Sanderson, Ian; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2014-08-01

    The assessment of safety in traditional toxicology protocols relies on evidence arising from observed adverse events (AEs) in animals and on establishing their correlation with different measures of drug exposure (e.g., C{sub max} and AUC). Such correlations, however, ignore the role of biomarkers, which can provide further insight into the underlying pharmacological mechanisms. Here we use naproxen as a paradigm drug to explore the feasibility of a biomarker-guided approach for the prediction of AEs in humans. A standard toxicology protocol was set up for the evaluation of effects of naproxen in rat, in which four doses were tested (7.5, 15, 40 and 80 mg/kg). In addition to sparse blood sampling for the assessment of exposure, thromboxane B{sub 2} and prostaglandin E{sub 2} were also collected in satellite groups. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling was used to evaluate the predictive performance of the approach. A one-compartmental model with first order absorption was found to best describe the pharmacokinetics of naproxen. A nonlinear relationship between dose and bioavailability was observed which leads to a less than proportional increase in naproxen concentrations with increasing doses. The pharmacodynamics of TXB{sub 2} and PGE{sub 2} was described by direct inhibition models with maximum pharmacological effects achieved at doses > 7.5 mg/kg. The predicted PKPD relationship in humans was within 10-fold of the values previously published. Moreover, our results indicate that biomarkers can be used to assess interspecies differences in PKPD and extrapolated data from animals to humans. Biomarker sampling should be used systematically in general toxicity studies. - Highlights: • Prediction of a drug's safety profile from preclinical protocols remains challenging. • Pharmacokinetic measures of safe exposure (e.g., AUC) ignore the role of biomarkers. • PKPD relationships enable the evaluation of adverse events in a mechanistic manner. • Major differences

  14. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A.; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y.

    2014-09-15

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL

  15. Proteome research in food science.

    PubMed

    Pischetsrieder, Monika; Baeuerlein, Rainer

    2009-09-01

    The proteome is the totality of proteins present in a biological sample. In contrast to the static genome, the proteome is highly dynamic, influenced by the genome and many external factors, such as the state of development, tissue type, metabolic state, and various interactions. Thus, the proteome reflects very closely the biological (and chemical) processes occurring in a system. For proteome analysis, gel based and shotgun methods are most widely applied. Because of the potential to generate a systematic view of protein composition and biological as well as chemical interactions, the application of proteome analysis in food science is steadily growing. This tutorial review introduces several fields in food science, where proteomics has been successfully applied: analysis of food composition, safety assessment of genetically modified food, the search for marker proteins for food authentication, identification of food allergens, systematic analysis of the physiological activity of food, analysis of the effects of processing on food proteins and the improvement of food quality.

  16. Haptoglobin is a serological biomarker for adenocarcinoma lung cancer by using the ProteomeLab PF2D combined with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, You-Kang; Lai, Yu-Heng; Chu, Yen; Lee, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Chun-Yao; Wu, Semon

    2016-01-01

    Identification of serological biomarker is urgently needed for cancer screening, monitoring cancer progression, treatment response, and surveillance for recurrence in lung cancer. Therefore, we try to find new serological biomarker that has more specificity and sensitivity for lung cancer diagnostics. In this study, the 2-D liquid phase fractionation system (PF2D) and mass spectrometry approach has been used for comparison the serum profiles between lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Eight proteins were identified form PF2D and subsequently by mass spectrometry. Among these proteins, haptoglobin (HP) and apolipoprotein AI (APOA1) were chosen and validated with turbidimetric assay. We found that HP levels were significantly higher and APOA1 levels were significantly lower in lung cancer patients. However, after the participants were stratified by gender, the expression trends of HP and APOA1 in lung cancer patients existed only in men, which is gender specific phenomenon. HP, APOA1 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), used for distinguishing lung adenocarcinoma, had a sensitivity of 64%, 64% and 79%, respectively. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) of HP, APOA1 and CEA were 0.768, 0.761 and 0.884, respectively. When restricted to male subjects, HP, APOA1 and CEA showed sensitivity of 89%, 73% and 100%, respectively. AUC of HP, APOA1 and CEA were 0.929, 0.840 and 0.877, respectively. Therefore, our results showed that combined with PF2D system and mass spectrometry, this is a promising novel approach to identify new serological biomarkers for lung cancer research. In addition, HP may be a potential serological biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma diagnostics, especially in male subjects. PMID:27648369

  17. Haptoglobin is a serological biomarker for adenocarcinoma lung cancer by using the ProteomeLab PF2D combined with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chang, You-Kang; Lai, Yu-Heng; Chu, Yen; Lee, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Chun-Yao; Wu, Semon

    2016-01-01

    Identification of serological biomarker is urgently needed for cancer screening, monitoring cancer progression, treatment response, and surveillance for recurrence in lung cancer. Therefore, we try to find new serological biomarker that has more specificity and sensitivity for lung cancer diagnostics. In this study, the 2-D liquid phase fractionation system (PF2D) and mass spectrometry approach has been used for comparison the serum profiles between lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Eight proteins were identified form PF2D and subsequently by mass spectrometry. Among these proteins, haptoglobin (HP) and apolipoprotein AI (APOA1) were chosen and validated with turbidimetric assay. We found that HP levels were significantly higher and APOA1 levels were significantly lower in lung cancer patients. However, after the participants were stratified by gender, the expression trends of HP and APOA1 in lung cancer patients existed only in men, which is gender specific phenomenon. HP, APOA1 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), used for distinguishing lung adenocarcinoma, had a sensitivity of 64%, 64% and 79%, respectively. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) of HP, APOA1 and CEA were 0.768, 0.761 and 0.884, respectively. When restricted to male subjects, HP, APOA1 and CEA showed sensitivity of 89%, 73% and 100%, respectively. AUC of HP, APOA1 and CEA were 0.929, 0.840 and 0.877, respectively. Therefore, our results showed that combined with PF2D system and mass spectrometry, this is a promising novel approach to identify new serological biomarkers for lung cancer research. In addition, HP may be a potential serological biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma diagnostics, especially in male subjects. PMID:27648369

  18. Tear biomarkers for keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Nishtala, Krishnatej; Pahuja, Natasha; Shetty, Rohit; Nuijts, Rudy M M A; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconus is a progressive corneal thinning, ectatic condition, which affects vision. Recent advances in corneal topography measurements has helped advance proper diagnosis of this condition and increased research and clinical interests in the disease etiopathogenesis. Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding the progression of the disease and tear fluid has played a major role in the progress. This review discusses the importance of tear fluid as a source of biomarker for keratoconus and how advances in technology have helped map the complexity of tears and thereby molecular readouts of the disease. Expanding knowledge of the tear proteome, lipidome and metabolome opened up new avenues to study keratoconus and to identify probable prognostic or diagnostic biomarkers for the disease. A multidimensional approach of analyzing tear fluid of patients layering on proteomics, lipidomics and metabolomics is necessary in effectively decoding keratoconus and thereby identifying targets for its treatment. PMID:27493978

  19. Proteome Profiling of Urinary Exosomes Identifies Alpha 1-Antitrypsin and H2B1K as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers for Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Wu, His-Chin; Lin, Ching-Chan; Chang, Kai-Po; Yang, Chi-Rei; Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Chen, Chao-Jung

    2016-01-01

    MALDI-TOF spectrometry has not been used for urinary exosome analysis. We used it for determining UC biomarkers. From 2012 to 2015, we enrolled 129 consecutive patients with UC and 62 participants without UC. Exosomes from their urine were isolated, and analyzed through MALDI-TOF spectrometry. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of another 122 UC and 26 non-UC tissues was conducted to verify the discovered biomarkers. Two peaks at m/z 5593 (fragmented peptide of alpha-1-antitrypsin; sensitivity, 50.4%; specificity, 96.9%) and m/z 5947 (fragmented peptide of histone H2B1K sensitivity, 62.0%; specificity, 92.3%) were identified as UC diagnosis exosome biomarkers. UC patients with detectable histone H2B1K showed 2.29- and 3.11-fold increased risks of recurrence and progression, respectively, compared with those with nondetectable histone H2B1K. Verification results of IHC staining revealed significantly higher expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin (p = 0.038) and H2B1K (p = 0.005) in UC tissues than in normal tissues. The expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin and H2B1K in UC tissues was significantly correlated with UC grades (p < 0.05). Urinary exosome proteins alpha 1-antitrypsin and histone H2B1K, which are identified through MALDI-TOF analysis, could facilitate rapid diagnosis and prognosis of UC. PMID:27686150

  20. Integrated Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) and Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identifies Galectin-1 as a Potential Biomarker for Predicting Sorafenib Resistance in Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chao-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Shao, Yu-Yun; Ho, Wen-Ching; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Feng, Wen-Chi; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2015-06-01

    Sorafenib has become the standard therapy for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately, most patients eventually develop acquired resistance. Therefore, it is important to identify potential biomarkers that could predict the efficacy of sorafenib. To identify target proteins associated with the development of sorafenib resistance, we applied stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomic approach to analyze differences in protein expression levels between parental HuH-7 and sorafenib-acquired resistance HuH-7 (HuH-7(R)) cells in vitro, combined with an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) quantitative analysis of HuH-7 and HuH-7(R) tumors in vivo. In total, 2,450 quantified proteins were identified in common in SILAC and iTRAQ experiments, with 81 showing increased expression (>2.0-fold) with sorafenib resistance and 75 showing decreased expression (<0.5-fold). In silico analyses of these differentially expressed proteins predicted that 10 proteins were related to cancer with involvements in cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Knockdown of one of these candidate proteins, galectin-1, decreased cell proliferation and metastasis in HuH-7(R) cells and restored sensitivity to sorafenib. We verified galectin-1 as a predictive marker of sorafenib resistance and a downstream target of the AKT/mTOR/HIF-1α signaling pathway. In addition, increased galectin-1 expression in HCC patients' serum was associated with poor tumor control and low response rate. We also found that a high serum galectin-1 level was an independent factor associated with poor progression-free survival and overall survival. In conclusion, these results suggest that galectin-1 is a possible biomarker for predicting the response of HCC patients to treatment with sorafenib. As such, it may assist in the stratification of HCC and help direct personalized therapy.

  1. Integrated Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) and Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identifies Galectin-1 as a Potential Biomarker for Predicting Sorafenib Resistance in Liver Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chao-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Shao, Yu-Yun; Ho, Wen-Ching; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Feng, Wen-Chi; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib has become the standard therapy for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately, most patients eventually develop acquired resistance. Therefore, it is important to identify potential biomarkers that could predict the efficacy of sorafenib. To identify target proteins associated with the development of sorafenib resistance, we applied stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomic approach to analyze differences in protein expression levels between parental HuH-7 and sorafenib-acquired resistance HuH-7 (HuH-7R) cells in vitro, combined with an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) quantitative analysis of HuH-7 and HuH-7R tumors in vivo. In total, 2,450 quantified proteins were identified in common in SILAC and iTRAQ experiments, with 81 showing increased expression (>2.0-fold) with sorafenib resistance and 75 showing decreased expression (<0.5-fold). In silico analyses of these differentially expressed proteins predicted that 10 proteins were related to cancer with involvements in cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Knockdown of one of these candidate proteins, galectin-1, decreased cell proliferation and metastasis in HuH-7R cells and restored sensitivity to sorafenib. We verified galectin-1 as a predictive marker of sorafenib resistance and a downstream target of the AKT/mTOR/HIF-1α signaling pathway. In addition, increased galectin-1 expression in HCC patients' serum was associated with poor tumor control and low response rate. We also found that a high serum galectin-1 level was an independent factor associated with poor progression-free survival and overall survival. In conclusion, these results suggest that galectin-1 is a possible biomarker for predicting the response of HCC patients to treatment with sorafenib. As such, it may assist in the stratification of HCC and help direct personalized therapy. PMID:25850433

  2. Serum pharmacodynamic biomarkers for chronic corticosteroid treatment of children.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Yetrib; Conklin, Laurie S; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Brown, Kristy J; Morgenroth, Lauren P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Heier, Christopher R; Damsker, Jesse M; van den Anker, John N; Henricson, Erik; Clemens, Paula R; Mah, Jean K; McDonald, Craig; Hoffman, Eric P

    2016-08-17

    Corticosteroids are extensively used in pediatrics, yet the burden of side effects is significant. Availability of a simple, fast, and reliable biochemical read out of steroidal drug pharmacodynamics could enable a rapid and objective assessment of safety and efficacy of corticosteroids and aid development of corticosteroid replacement drugs. To identify potential corticosteroid responsive biomarkers we performed proteome profiling of serum samples from DMD and IBD patients with and without corticosteroid treatment using SOMAscan aptamer panel testing 1,129 proteins in <0.1 cc of sera. Ten pro-inflammatory proteins were elevated in untreated patients and suppressed by corticosteroids (MMP12, IL22RA2, CCL22, IGFBP2, FCER2, LY9, ITGa1/b1, LTa1/b2, ANGPT2 and FGG). These are candidate biomarkers for anti-inflammatory efficacy of corticosteroids. Known safety concerns were validated, including elevated non-fasting insulin (insulin resistance), and elevated angiotensinogen (salt retention). These were extended by new candidates for metabolism disturbances (leptin, afamin), stunting of growth (growth hormone binding protein), and connective tissue remodeling (MMP3). Significant suppression of multiple adrenal steroid hormones was also seen in treated children (reductions of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol and testosterone). A panel of new pharmacodynamic biomarkers for corticosteroids in children was defined. Future studies will need to bridge specific biomarkers to mechanism of drug action, and specific clinical outcomes.

  3. Serum pharmacodynamic biomarkers for chronic corticosteroid treatment of children.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Yetrib; Conklin, Laurie S; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Brown, Kristy J; Morgenroth, Lauren P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Heier, Christopher R; Damsker, Jesse M; van den Anker, John N; Henricson, Erik; Clemens, Paula R; Mah, Jean K; McDonald, Craig; Hoffman, Eric P

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids are extensively used in pediatrics, yet the burden of side effects is significant. Availability of a simple, fast, and reliable biochemical read out of steroidal drug pharmacodynamics could enable a rapid and objective assessment of safety and efficacy of corticosteroids and aid development of corticosteroid replacement drugs. To identify potential corticosteroid responsive biomarkers we performed proteome profiling of serum samples from DMD and IBD patients with and without corticosteroid treatment using SOMAscan aptamer panel testing 1,129 proteins in <0.1 cc of sera. Ten pro-inflammatory proteins were elevated in untreated patients and suppressed by corticosteroids (MMP12, IL22RA2, CCL22, IGFBP2, FCER2, LY9, ITGa1/b1, LTa1/b2, ANGPT2 and FGG). These are candidate biomarkers for anti-inflammatory efficacy of corticosteroids. Known safety concerns were validated, including elevated non-fasting insulin (insulin resistance), and elevated angiotensinogen (salt retention). These were extended by new candidates for metabolism disturbances (leptin, afamin), stunting of growth (growth hormone binding protein), and connective tissue remodeling (MMP3). Significant suppression of multiple adrenal steroid hormones was also seen in treated children (reductions of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol and testosterone). A panel of new pharmacodynamic biomarkers for corticosteroids in children was defined. Future studies will need to bridge specific biomarkers to mechanism of drug action, and specific clinical outcomes. PMID:27530235

  4. Serum pharmacodynamic biomarkers for chronic corticosteroid treatment of children

    PubMed Central

    Hathout, Yetrib; Conklin, Laurie S.; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Brown, Kristy J.; Morgenroth, Lauren P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Heier, Christopher R.; Damsker, Jesse M.; van den Anker, John N.; Henricson, Erik; Clemens, Paula R.; Mah, Jean K.; McDonald, Craig; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids are extensively used in pediatrics, yet the burden of side effects is significant. Availability of a simple, fast, and reliable biochemical read out of steroidal drug pharmacodynamics could enable a rapid and objective assessment of safety and efficacy of corticosteroids and aid development of corticosteroid replacement drugs. To identify potential corticosteroid responsive biomarkers we performed proteome profiling of serum samples from DMD and IBD patients with and without corticosteroid treatment using SOMAscan aptamer panel testing 1,129 proteins in <0.1 cc of sera. Ten pro-inflammatory proteins were elevated in untreated patients and suppressed by corticosteroids (MMP12, IL22RA2, CCL22, IGFBP2, FCER2, LY9, ITGa1/b1, LTa1/b2, ANGPT2 and FGG). These are candidate biomarkers for anti-inflammatory efficacy of corticosteroids. Known safety concerns were validated, including elevated non-fasting insulin (insulin resistance), and elevated angiotensinogen (salt retention). These were extended by new candidates for metabolism disturbances (leptin, afamin), stunting of growth (growth hormone binding protein), and connective tissue remodeling (MMP3). Significant suppression of multiple adrenal steroid hormones was also seen in treated children (reductions of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol and testosterone). A panel of new pharmacodynamic biomarkers for corticosteroids in children was defined. Future studies will need to bridge specific biomarkers to mechanism of drug action, and specific clinical outcomes. PMID:27530235

  5. Industry perspectives on biomarker qualification

    PubMed Central

    Womack, AW

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers have the potential to expedite drug development, increase patient safety, and optimize clinical response. Yet few have achieved regulatory qualification. A survey was conducted to clarify industry's perspective on biomarker qualification and identify the most promising biomarkers for drug development. The results across toxicities/clinical areas highlight challenges in regulatory qualification, although early prioritization and alignment on an evidentiary standard framework are key factors in facilitating biomarker development and qualification. PMID:26378777

  6. Proteomic profiling of lymphocytes in autoimmunity, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes play important roles in the balance between body defense and noxious agents involved in a number of diseases, e.g. autoimmune diseases, allergic inflammation and cancer. The proteomic analyses have been applied to identify and validate disease-associated and disease-specific biomarkers for therapeutic strategies of diseases. The proteomic profiles of lymphocytes may provide more information to understand their functions and roles in the development of diseases, although proteomic approaches in lymphocytes are still limited. The present review overviewed the proteomics-based studies on lymphocytes to headlight the proteomic profiles of lymphocytes in diseases, such as autoimmune diseases, allergic inflammation and cancer, with a special focus on lung diseases. We will explore the potential significance of diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets from the current status in proteomic studies of lymphocytes and discuss the value of the currently available proteomic methodologies in the lymphocytes research. PMID:24397796

  7. Proteomic profiling of N-linked glycoproteins identifies ConA-binding procathepsin D as a novel serum biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yi-Jun; Ward, Douglas G; Pang, Chun; Wang, Qi-Ming; Wei, Wenbin; Ma, Jin; Zhang, Juan; Lou, Qiang; Shimwell, Neil J; Martin, Ashley; Wong, Nathalie; Chao, Wei-Xia; Wang, Ming; Ma, Yuan-Fang; Johnson, Philip J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of, and potential therapeutic targets for, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Multilectin affinity chromatography was used to enrich N-linked glycoproteins from nontumorous liver and HCC tissues followed by 2DE and protein identification by MS. Twenty-eight differentially expressed proteins were identified. Western blotting validated consistently lower concentrations of human liver carboxylesterase 1 and haptoglobin, and higher concentration of procathepsin D (pCD) in HCC tissues. Knockdown of cathepsin D (CD) expression mediated by siRNA significantly inhibited the in vitro invasion of two HCC cell lines, SNU449 and SNU473, which normally secrete high-levels of CD. Prefractionation using individual lectins demonstrated an elevation in ConA-binding glycoforms of proCD and CD in HCC tissues. In the serum of HCC patients, "ConA-binding proCD" (ConA-pCD) is significantly increased in concentration and this increase is comprised of several distinct upregulated acidic isoforms (pI 4.5-5.5). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the sensitivity and specificity of serum ConA-pCD for HCC diagnosis were 85% and 80%, respectively. This is the first report that serum ConA-pCD is increased significantly in HCC and is potentially useful as a serological biomarker for diagnosis of HCC.

  8. The proteome of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Juliana M; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    On observing schizophrenia from a clinical point of view up to its molecular basis, one may conclude that this is likely to be one of the most complex human disorders to be characterized in all aspects. Such complexity is the reflex of an intricate combination of genetic and environmental components that influence brain functions since pre-natal neurodevelopment, passing by brain maturation, up to the onset of disease and disease establishment. The perfect function of tissues, organs, systems, and finally the organism depends heavily on the proper functioning of cells. Several lines of evidence, including genetics, genomics, transcriptomics, neuropathology, and pharmacology, have supported the idea that dysfunctional cells are causative to schizophrenia. Together with the above-mentioned techniques, proteomics have been contributing to understanding the biochemical basis of schizophrenia at the cellular and tissue level through the identification of differentially expressed proteins and consequently their biochemical pathways, mostly in the brain tissue but also in other cells. In addition, mass spectrometry-based proteomics have identified and precisely quantified proteins that may serve as biomarker candidates to prognosis, diagnosis, and medication monitoring in peripheral tissue. Here, we review all data produced by proteomic investigation in the last 5 years using tissue and/or cells from schizophrenic patients, focusing on postmortem brain tissue and peripheral blood serum and plasma. This information has provided integrated pictures of the biochemical systems involved in the pathobiology, and has suggested potential biomarkers, and warrant potential targets to alternative treatment therapies to schizophrenia. PMID:27336025

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma from California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) Reveals Apolipoprotein E as a Candidate Biomarker of Chronic Domoic Acid Toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Ferrante, Jason A; Chaves, J Mauro; Soper, Jennifer L; Almeida, Jonas S; Arthur, John M; Gulland, Frances M D; Janech, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is caused by exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid and has been linked to massive stranding events and mortality. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs in addition to the presence of domoic acid in body fluids. Chronic DAT further is characterized by reoccurring seizures progressing to status epilepticus. Diagnosis of chronic DAT is often slow and problematic, and minimally invasive tests for DAT have been the focus of numerous recent biomarker studies. The goal of this study was to retrospectively profile plasma proteins in a population of sea lions with chronic DAT and those without DAT using two dimensional gel electrophoresis to discover whether individual, multiple, or combinations of protein and clinical data could be utilized to identify sea lions with DAT. Using a training set of 32 sea lion sera, 20 proteins and their isoforms were identified that were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). Interestingly, 11 apolipoprotein E (ApoE) charge forms were decreased in DAT samples, indicating that ApoE charge form distributions may be important in the progression of DAT. In order to develop a classifier of chronic DAT, an independent blinded test set of 20 sea lions, seven with chronic DAT, was used to validate models utilizing ApoE charge forms and eosinophil counts. The resulting support vector machine had high sensitivity (85.7% with 92.3% negative predictive value) and high specificity (92.3% with 85.7% positive predictive value). These results suggest that ApoE and eosinophil counts along with machine learning can perform as a robust and accurate tool to diagnose chronic DAT. Although this analysis is specifically focused on blood biomarkers and routine clinical data, the results demonstrate promise for future studies combining additional variables in multidimensional space to create robust classifiers. PMID:25919366

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma from California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) Reveals Apolipoprotein E as a Candidate Biomarker of Chronic Domoic Acid Toxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Benjamin A.; Ferrante, Jason A.; Chaves, J. Mauro; Soper, Jennifer L.; Almeida, Jonas S.; Arthur, John M.; Gulland, Frances M. D.; Janech, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is caused by exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid and has been linked to massive stranding events and mortality. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs in addition to the presence of domoic acid in body fluids. Chronic DAT further is characterized by reoccurring seizures progressing to status epilepticus. Diagnosis of chronic DAT is often slow and problematic, and minimally invasive tests for DAT have been the focus of numerous recent biomarker studies. The goal of this study was to retrospectively profile plasma proteins in a population of sea lions with chronic DAT and those without DAT using two dimensional gel electrophoresis to discover whether individual, multiple, or combinations of protein and clinical data could be utilized to identify sea lions with DAT. Using a training set of 32 sea lion sera, 20 proteins and their isoforms were identified that were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). Interestingly, 11 apolipoprotein E (ApoE) charge forms were decreased in DAT samples, indicating that ApoE charge form distributions may be important in the progression of DAT. In order to develop a classifier of chronic DAT, an independent blinded test set of 20 sea lions, seven with chronic DAT, was used to validate models utilizing ApoE charge forms and eosinophil counts. The resulting support vector machine had high sensitivity (85.7% with 92.3% negative predictive value) and high specificity (92.3% with 85.7% positive predictive value). These results suggest that ApoE and eosinophil counts along with machine learning can perform as a robust and accurate tool to diagnose chronic DAT. Although this analysis is specifically focused on blood biomarkers and routine clinical data, the results demonstrate promise for future studies combining additional variables in multidimensional space to create robust classifiers. PMID:25919366

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma from California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) Reveals Apolipoprotein E as a Candidate Biomarker of Chronic Domoic Acid Toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Ferrante, Jason A; Chaves, J Mauro; Soper, Jennifer L; Almeida, Jonas S; Arthur, John M; Gulland, Frances M D; Janech, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is caused by exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid and has been linked to massive stranding events and mortality. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs in addition to the presence of domoic acid in body fluids. Chronic DAT further is characterized by reoccurring seizures progressing to status epilepticus. Diagnosis of chronic DAT is often slow and problematic, and minimally invasive tests for DAT have been the focus of numerous recent biomarker studies. The goal of this study was to retrospectively profile plasma proteins in a population of sea lions with chronic DAT and those without DAT using two dimensional gel electrophoresis to discover whether individual, multiple, or combinations of protein and clinical data could be utilized to identify sea lions with DAT. Using a training set of 32 sea lion sera, 20 proteins and their isoforms were identified that were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). Interestingly, 11 apolipoprotein E (ApoE) charge forms were decreased in DAT samples, indicating that ApoE charge form distributions may be important in the progression of DAT. In order to develop a classifier of chronic DAT, an independent blinded test set of 20 sea lions, seven with chronic DAT, was used to validate models utilizing ApoE charge forms and eosinophil counts. The resulting support vector machine had high sensitivity (85.7% with 92.3% negative predictive value) and high specificity (92.3% with 85.7% positive predictive value). These results suggest that ApoE and eosinophil counts along with machine learning can perform as a robust and accurate tool to diagnose chronic DAT. Although this analysis is specifically focused on blood biomarkers and routine clinical data, the results demonstrate promise for future studies combining additional variables in multidimensional space to create robust classifiers.

  12. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation for 8 weeks does not affect body composition, lipid profile, or safety biomarkers in overweight, hyperlipidemic men.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shama V; Jacques, Hélène; Plourde, Mélanie; Mitchell, Patricia L; McLeod, Roger S; Jones, Peter J H

    2011-07-01

    The usefulness of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) as a nutraceutical remains ambiguous. Our objective was, therefore, to investigate the effect of CLA on body composition, blood lipids, and safety biomarkers in overweight, hyperlipidemic men. A double-blinded, 3-phase crossover trial was conducted in overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2)), borderline hypercholesterolemic [LDL-cholesterol (C) ≥ 2.5 mmol/L] men aged 18-60 y. During three 8-wk phases, each separated by a 4-wk washout period, 27 participants consumed under supervision in random order 3.5 g/d of safflower oil (control), a 50:50 mixture of trans 10, cis 12 and cis 9, trans 11 (c9, t11) CLA:Clarinol G-80, and c9, t11 isomer:c9, t11 CLA. At baseline and endpoint of each phase, body weight, body fat mass, and lean body mass were measured by DXA. Blood lipid profiles and safety biomarkers, including insulin sensitivity, blood concentrations of adiponectin, and inflammatory (high sensitive-C-reactive protein, TNFα, and IL-6) and oxidative (oxidized-LDL) molecules, were measured. The effect of CLA consumption on fatty acid oxidation was also assessed. Compared with the control treatment, the CLA treatments did not affect changes in body weight, body composition, or blood lipids. In addition, CLA did not affect the β-oxidation rate of fatty acids or induce significant alterations in the safety markers tested. In conclusion, although no detrimental effects were caused by supplementation, these results do not confirm a role for CLA in either body weight or blood lipid regulation in humans.

  13. Protein biomarkers of alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Mariana P; Freeman, Willard M; Vrana, Kent E

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol abuse can lead to a number of health and social issues. Our current inability to accurately assess long-term drinking behaviors is an important obstacle to its diagnosis and treatment. Biomarkers for chronic alcohol consumption have made a number of important advances but have yet to become highly accurate and as accepted as objective tests for other diseases. Thus, there is a crucial need for the development of more sensitive and specific markers of alcohol abuse. Recent advancements in proteomic technologies have greatly increased the potential for alcohol abuse biomarker discovery. Here, the authors review established and novel protein biomarkers for long-term alcohol consumption and the proteomic technologies that have been used in their study. PMID:22967079

  14. Epigenetic biomarkers in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Banaudha, Krishna K; Verma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma or HCC) is a major cancer worldwide. Research in this field is needed to identify biomarkers that can be used for early detection of the disease as well as new approaches to its treatment. Epigenetic biomarkers provide an opportunity to understand liver cancer etiology and evaluate novel epigenetic inhibitors for treatment. Traditionally, liver cirrhosis, proteomic biomarkers, and the presence of hepatitis viruses have been used for the detection and diagnosis of liver cancer. Promising results from microRNA (miRNA) profiling and hypermethylation of selected genes have raised hopes of identifying new biomarkers. Some of these epigenetic biomarkers may be useful in risk assessment and for screening populations to identify who is likely to develop cancer. Challenges and opportunities in the field are discussed in this chapter.

  15. Drug safety evaluation through biomarker analysis-A toxicity study in the cynomolgus monkey using an antibody-cytotoxic conjugate against ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Frank Y. Tengstrand, Elizabeth; Lee, J.-W.; Li, Lily Y.; Silverman, Lee; Riordan, Bill; Miwa, Gerald; Milton, Mark; Alden, Carl; Lee, Frank

    2007-10-01

    Antibody-cytotoxin conjugates are complex novel therapeutic agents whose toxicological properties are not presently well understood. The objective of this study was to identify serum biomarkers that correlate with MLN8866 (an Antibody-Cytotoxic Conjugate, mAb8866-CT) pathological events in monkeys and to predict the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) level using biomarkers. Cynomolgus monkeys were administered a single dose MLN8666 (5, 15 or 30 mg/kg) by intravenous infusion and evaluated over a 7-day period. Exposure levels were determined by quantifying MLN8866 levels (C{sub max} and AUC{sub 0-96h}) in serum. The increase in MLN8866 C{sub max} and AUC{sub 0-96h} was approximately dose proportional. Two biomarkers in serum (m/z 316 and m/z 368) were identified to be correlated with MLN8866 toxicological outcomes. The predicted MTD, 11.4 mg/kg, was within the MTD range set by pathology results (5-15 mg/kg). Administration of MLN8866 at 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg dose levels resulted in changes in hematology parameters associated with impaired hematopoiesis and bone marrow toxicity. The projected MLN8866 MTD exposure level was integrated with toxicokinetic analysis and showed C{sub max} = 236 {mu}g/mL and AUC{sub 0-96h} = 7246 h mg/mL. The safety of three different MLN8866 dosing regimens with three dosing schedules was explored with pharmacokinetic modeling.

  16. Combined Proteomics and Transcriptomics Identifies Carboxypeptidase B1 and Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Associated Proteins as Putative Biomarkers of Metastasis in Low Grade Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Bouchal, Pavel; Dvořáková, Monika; Roumeliotis, Theodoros; Bortlíček, Zbyněk; Ihnatová, Ivana; Procházková, Iva; Ho, Jenny T. C.; Maryáš, Josef; Imrichová, Hana; Budinská, Eva; Vyzula, Rostislav; Garbis, Spiros D.; Vojtěšek, Bořivoj; Nenutil, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Current prognostic factors are insufficient for precise risk-discrimination in breast cancer patients with low grade breast tumors, which, in disagreement with theoretical prognosis, occasionally form early lymph node metastasis. To identify markers for this group of patients, we employed iTRAQ-2DLC-MS/MS proteomics to 24 lymph node positive and 24 lymph node negative grade 1 luminal A primary breast tumors. Another group of 48 high-grade tumors (luminal B, triple negative, Her-2 subtypes) was also analyzed to investigate marker specificity for grade 1 luminal A tumors. From the total of 4405 proteins identified (FDR<5%), the top 65 differentially expressed together with 30 previously identified and control markers were analyzed also at transcript level. Increased levels of carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1), PDZ and LIM domain protein 2 (PDLIM2), and ring finger protein 25 (RNF25) were associated specifically with lymph node positive grade 1 tumors, whereas stathmin 1 (STMN1) and thymosin beta 10 (TMSB10) associated with aggressive tumor phenotype also in high grade tumors at both protein and transcript level. For CPB1, these differences were also observed by immunohistochemical analysis on tissue microarrays. Up-regulation of putative biomarkers in lymph node positive (versus negative) luminal A tumors was validated by gene expression analysis of an independent published data set (n = 343) for CPB1 (p = 0.00155), PDLIM2 (p = 0.02027) and RELA (p = 0.00015). Moreover, statistically significant connections with patient survival were identified in another public data set (n = 1678). Our findings indicate unique pro-metastatic mechanisms in grade 1 tumors that can include up-regulation of CPB1, activation of NF-κB pathway and changes in cell survival and cytoskeleton. These putative biomarkers have potential to identify the specific minor subpopulation of breast cancer patients with low grade tumors who are at higher than expected risk of recurrence and who would benefit

  17. Serum proteomic profiling reveals fragments of MYOM3 as potential biomarkers for monitoring the outcome of therapeutic interventions in muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Rouillon, Jérémy; Poupiot, Jérôme; Zocevic, Aleksandar; Amor, Fatima; Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Wong, Brenda; Pinilla, Robin; Cosette, Jérémie; Coenen-Stass, Anna M.L.; Mcclorey, Graham; Roberts, Thomas C.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Servais, Laurent; Udd, Bjarne; Voit, Thomas; Richard, Isabelle; Svinartchouk, Fedor

    2015-01-01

    Therapy-responsive biomarkers are an important and unmet need in the muscular dystrophy field where new treatments are currently in clinical trials. By using a comprehensive high-resolution mass spectrometry approach and western blot validation, we found that two fragments of the myofibrillar structural protein myomesin-3 (MYOM3) are abnormally present in sera of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D) and their respective animal models. Levels of MYOM3 fragments were assayed in therapeutic model systems: (1) restoration of dystrophin expression by antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon-skipping in mdx mice and (2) stable restoration of α-sarcoglycan expression in KO-SGCA mice by systemic injection of a viral vector. Following administration of the therapeutic agents MYOM3 was restored toward wild-type levels. In the LGMD model, where different doses of vector were used, MYOM3 restoration was dose-dependent. MYOM3 fragments showed lower inter-individual variability compared with the commonly used creatine kinase assay, and correlated better with the restoration of the dystrophin-associated protein complex and muscle force. These data suggest that the MYOM3 fragments hold promise for minimally invasive assessment of experimental therapies for DMD and other neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26060189

  18. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Advanced Ovarian Cancer Tissue to Identify Potential Biomarkers of Responders and Nonresponders to First-Line Chemotherapy of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Urmila; Pokhriyal, Ruchika; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Hariprasad, Roopa; Khan, Mohd Imran; Gupta, Divya; Naru, Jasmine; Singh, Sundararajan Baskar; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Vanamail, Perumal; Kumar, Lalit; Kumar, Sunesh; Hariprasad, Gururao

    2016-01-01

    Conventional treatment for advanced ovarian cancer is an initial debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel. Despite initial high response, three-fourths of these women experience disease recurrence with a dismal prognosis. Patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer who underwent cytoreductive surgery were enrolled and tissue samples were collected. Post surgery, these patients were started on chemotherapy and followed up till the end of the cycle. Fluorescence-based differential in-gel expression coupled with mass spectrometric analysis was used for discovery phase of experiments, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and pathway analysis were performed for expression and functional validation of differentially expressed proteins. While aldehyde reductase, hnRNP, cyclophilin A, heat shock protein-27, and actin are upregulated in responders, prohibitin, enoyl-coA hydratase, peroxiredoxin, and fibrin-β are upregulated in the nonresponders. The expressions of some of these proteins correlated with increased apoptotic activity in responders and decreased apoptotic activity in nonresponders. Therefore, the proteins qualify as potential biomarkers to predict chemotherapy response. PMID:26997873

  19. Proteomics analysis in lung cancer: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Takefumi; Carbone, David P

    2007-01-01

    Recent technological developments in proteomic analysis are bringing us new insights into the molecular classification of tumours. Although proteomic analysis in cancer profiling is still under development both in terms of the instruments used and the data analytical tools, this method has great potential advantages for the analysis of biospecimens of many types. Direct measurement of abnormally expressed or modified proteins in the tumour tissue and/or patient blood may be an effective approach for discovering new biomarkers. Proteomics has the significant advantage of being able to discern not only changes in expression levels but also in post-translational modifications. Thus, the proteomics approach to protein profiling and biomarker discovery uncovers biomarkers from a different viewpoint than microarray analysis. This review summarizes the range of proteomics technologies employed for cancer profiling, and how they have been used to derive new classification models for human lung cancer.

  20. Natriuretic Peptides as Cardiovascular Safety Biomarkers in Rats: Comparison With Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Heart Weight.

    PubMed

    Engle, Steven K; Watson, David E

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is an important cause of failure during drug development. Blood-based biomarkers can be used to detect CV toxicity during preclinical development and prioritize compounds at lower risk of causing such toxicities. Evidence of myocardial degeneration can be detected by measuring concentrations of biomarkers such as cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase in blood; however, detection of functional changes in the CV system, such as blood pressure, generally requires studies in animals with surgically implanted pressure transducers. This is a significant limitation because sustained changes in blood pressure are often accompanied by changes in heart rate and together can lead to cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial degeneration in animals, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in humans. Increased concentrations of NPs in blood correlate with higher risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and MACE in humans. Their utility as biomarkers of CV function and toxicity in rodents was investigated by exploring the relationships between plasma concentrations of NTproANP and NTproBNP, blood pressure, heart rate, and heart weight in Sprague Dawley rats administered compounds that caused hypotension or hypertension, including nifedipine, fluprostenol, minoxidil, L-NAME, L-thyroxine, or sunitinib for 1-2 weeks. Changes in NTproANP and/or NTproBNP concentrations were inversely correlated with changes in blood pressure. NTproANP and NTproBNP concentrations were inconsistently correlated with relative heart weights. In addition, increased heart rate was associated with increased heart weights. These studies support the use of natriuretic peptides and heart rate to detect changes in blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in short-duration rat studies. PMID:26609138

  1. Hypoxia Integration in the Serological Proteome Analysis Unmasks Tumor Antigens and Fosters the Identification of Anti-Phospho-eEF2 Antibodies as Potential Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Marie; Sermeus, Alexandra; Branders, Samuel; Defresne, Florence; Dieu, Marc; Dupont, Pierre; Raes, Martine; De Ridder, Mark; Feron, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The expression by tumor cells of proteins with aberrant structure, expression or distribution accounts for the development of a humoral immune response. Autoantibodies (aAb) directed against tumor-associated antigens (TAA) may thus be particularly relevant for early detection of cancer. Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) aims to identify such circulating aAb through the immunoblotting of 2D-separated tumor cell proteins with cancer patient serum and the consecutive MS identification of proteins in reactive spots. This method has the advantage to use post-translationally modified proteins as a source of potential TAA. Here, we applied this strategy by using colorectal tumor cells pre-exposed to hypoxia in order to promote the expression of a pattern of TAA more likely to represent in vivo conditions. We used two human HCT116 and HT29 colorectal cancer cell lines exposed for 48 hours to 1% O2. Spots positive after immunoblotting of 2D-separated lysates of hypoxic cells with the sera of tumor-bearing mice, were collected and analysed by MS for protein identification. Among the hypoxia-specific immunogenic proteins, we identified a phosphorylated form of eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (phospho-Thr56 eEF2). We confirmed the increased phosphorylation of this protein in hypoxic colorectal tumor cells as well as in mouse tumors. Using a specific immunoassay, we could detect the presence of corresponding anti-phospho-Thr56 eEF2 aAb in the serum of tumor-bearing mice (vs healthy mice). We further documented that the detection of these aAb preceded the detection of a palpable tumor mass in mice and validated the presence of anti-phospho-Thr56 eEF2 aAb in the serum of patients with adenomatous polyps and colorectal carcinoma. In conclusion, this study validates a phosphorylated form of eEF2 as a new TAA and more generally, provides evidence that integrating hypoxia upstream of SERPA offers a more relevant repertoire of TAA able to unmask the presence of

  2. Proteomic analysis of HCV cirrhosis and HCV-induced HCC: Identifying biomarkers for monitoring HCV-cirrhotic patients awaiting liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Valeria R; Maluf, Daniel G; Archer, Kellie J; Yanek, Kenneth; Bornstein, Karen; Fisher, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Background Progression from chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results in protein changes in the peripheral blood. We evaluated global protein expression in plasma samples of HCV-cirrhotic and HCV-cirrhotic-HCC patients. Patients and Methods Plasma samples from 25 HCV-cirrhotic-HCC and 10 HCV-cirrhotic patients were quantitatively evaluated for protein expression. Tryptic peptides were analyzed using Thermo linear ion-trap mass specttometer (LTQ) coupled with a Surveyoy HPLC system (Thermo). SEQUEST and X!Tandem database search algorithms were used for peptide sequence identification. Protein relative quantification was performed using the area under the curve from the select ion chromatogram. A significant fold change between groups was based on controlling the False Discovery Rate (FDR) at less than 5%. Results We identified and quantified 2,320 proteins from the analysis of the different protein pattern between HCV-cirrhosis and HCV-HCC samples. Gene ontology terms (GO) classified the more important biologic process related to these proteins as signal transduction, regulation of transcription DNA-dependent, protein amino acid phosphorylation, cell adhesion, transport, and immune response. Seven proteins showed significant expression changes with a FDR<5% between cirrhosis and tumor groups. Moreover, 18 proteins showed significant expression changes (FDR<5%) when plasma samples from HCV-cirrhosis were compared with early HCV-HCC. Conclusions Differential protein expression was observed between samples from HCV patients with cirrhosis with and without HCC. Also, differences were observed between early and advanced HCV-HCC samples. This study provides important information for discovery of potential biomarkers for early HCC diagnosis in HCV cirrhotic patients. PMID:19136905

  3. A systems biology and proteomics-based approach identifies SRC and VEGFA as biomarkers in risk factor mediated coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    V, Alexandar; Nayar, Pradeep G; Murugesan, R; S, Shajahan; Krishnan, Jayalakshmi; Ahmed, Shiek S S J

    2016-07-19

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of death worldwide. The burden of CHD increases with risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Several studies have demonstrated the association of these classical risk factors with CHD. However, the mechanisms of these associations remain largely unclear due to the complexity of disease pathophysiology and the lack of an integrative approach that fails to provide a definite understanding of molecular linkage. To overcome these problems, we propose a novel systems biology approach that relates causative genes, interactomes and pathways to elucidate the risk factors mediating the molecular mechanisms and biomarkers for feasible diagnosis. The literature was mined to retrieve the causative genes of each risk factor and CHD to construct protein interactomes. The interactomes were examined to identify 298 common molecular signatures. The common signatures were mapped to the tissue network to synthesize a sub-network consisting of 82 proteins. Further, the dissection of the sub-network provides functional modules representing a diverse range of molecular functions, including the AKT/p13k, MAPK and wnt pathways. Also, the prioritization of functional modules identifies SRC, VEGFA and HIF1A as potential candidate markers. Further, we validate these candidates with the existing markers CRP, NOS3 and VCAM1 in the serum of 63 individuals, 33 with CHD and 30 controls, using ELISA. SRC, VEGFA, H1F1A, CRP and NOS3 were significantly altered in patients compared to controls. These results support the utility of these candidate markers for the diagnosis of CHD. Overall, our molecular observations indicate the influence of risk factors in the pathophysiology of CHD and identify serum markers for diagnosis. PMID:27279347

  4. Clinical proteomics and OMICS clues useful in translational medicine research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of the new proteomics era more than a decade ago, large-scale studies of protein profiling have been used to identify distinctive molecular signatures in a wide array of biological systems, spanning areas of basic biological research, clinical diagnostics, and biomarker discovery directed toward therapeutic applications. Recent advances in protein separation and identification techniques have significantly improved proteomic approaches, leading to enhancement of the depth and breadth of proteome coverage. Proteomic signatures, specific for multiple diseases, including cancer and pre-invasive lesions, are emerging. This article combines, in a simple manner, relevant proteomic and OMICS clues used in the discovery and development of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers that are applicable to all clinical fields, thus helping to improve applications of clinical proteomic strategies for translational medicine research. PMID:22642823

  5. The proteome of human saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2013-05-01

    Human saliva holds tremendous potential for transforming disease and health diagnostics given its richness of molecular information and non-invasive collection. Enumerating its molecular constituents is an important first step towards reaching this potential. Among the molecules in saliva, proteins and peptides arguably have the most value: they can directly indicate biochemical functions linked to a health condition/disease state, and they are attractive targets for biomarker assay development. However, cataloging and defining the human salivary proteome is challenging given the dynamic, chemically heterogeneous and complex nature of the system. In addition, the overall human saliva proteome is composed of several "sub-proteomes" which include: intact full length proteins, proteins carrying post-translational modifications (PTMs), low molecular weight peptides, and the metaproteome, derived from protein products from nonhuman organisms (e.g. microbes) present in the oral cavity. Presented here will be a summary of communal efforts to meet the challenge of characterizing the multifaceted saliva proteome, focusing on the use of mass spectrometry as the proteomic technology of choice. Implications of these efforts to characterize the salivary proteome in the context of disease diagnostics will also be discussed.

  6. Comparative proteomics lends insight into genotype-specific pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    Comparative proteomic analyses have emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of unique biomarkers and mechanisms of pathogenesis. In this issue of Proteomics, Murugaiyan et al. utilize difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to examine differential protein expression between nonpathogenic and pathogenic genotypes of Prototheca zopfii, a causative agent in bovine enteritis and mastitis. Their findings provide insights into molecular mechanisms of infection and evolutionary adaptation of pathogenic genotypes, demonstrating the power of comparative proteomic analyses. PMID:23925996

  7. Farm Animal Serum Proteomics and Impact on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Girolamo, Francesco Di; D’Amato, Alfonsina; Lante, Isabella; Signore, Fabrizio; Muraca, Marta; Putignani, Lorenza

    2014-01-01

    Due to the incompleteness of animal genome sequencing, the analysis and characterization of serum proteomes of most farm animals are still in their infancy, compared to the already well-documented human serum proteome. This review focuses on the implications of the farm animal serum proteomics in order to identify novel biomarkers for animal welfare, early diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of infectious disease treatment, and develop new vaccines, aiming at determining the reciprocal benefits for humans and animals. PMID:25257521

  8. Farm animal serum proteomics and impact on human health.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Francesco; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Lante, Isabella; Signore, Fabrizio; Muraca, Marta; Putignani, Lorenza

    2014-09-01

    Due to the incompleteness of animal genome sequencing, the analysis and characterization of serum proteomes of most farm animals are still in their infancy, compared to the already well-documented human serum proteome. This review focuses on the implications of the farm animal serum proteomics in order to identify novel biomarkers for animal welfare, early diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of infectious disease treatment, and develop new vaccines, aiming at determining the reciprocal benefits for humans and animals.

  9. Next-generation biomarkers for detecting kidney toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bonventre, Joseph V; Vaidya, Vishal S; Schmouder, Robert; Feig, Peter; Dieterle, Frank

    2011-01-01

    There is a paucity of biomarkers that reliably detect nephrotoxicity. The Predictive Safety Testing Consortium (PSTC) faced several challenges in identifying novel safety biomarkers in the renal setting. PMID:20458311

  10. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  11. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  12. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, Tore; Amundson, Sally A,; Blakely, William F.; Burns, Frederic J.; Chen, Allen; Dainiak, Nicholas; Franklin, Stephen; Leary, Julie A.; Loftus, David J.; Morgan, William F.; Pellmar, Terry C.; Stolc, Viktor; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-05-01

    A summary is provided of presentations and discussions from the NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop held September 27-28, 2007, at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Invited speakers were distinguished scientists representing key sectors of the radiation research community. Speakers addressed recent developments in the biomarker and biotechnology fields that may provide new opportunities for health-related assessment of radiation-exposed individuals, including for long-duration space travel. Topics discussed include the space radiation environment, biomarkers of radiation sensitivity and individual susceptibility, molecular signatures of low-dose responses, multivariate analysis of gene expression, biomarkers in biodefense, biomarkers in radiation oncology, biomarkers and triage following large-scale radiological incidents, integrated and multiple biomarker approaches, advances in whole-genome tiling arrays, advances in mass-spectrometry proteomics, radiation biodosimetry for estimation of cancer risk in a rat skin model, and confounding factors. Summary conclusions are provided at the end of the report.

  13. Urinary Biomarkers of Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    An, Manxia; Gao, Youhe

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are the measurable changes associated with a physiological or pathophysiological process. Unlike blood, urine is not subject to homeostatic mechanisms. Therefore, greater fluctuations could occur in urine than in blood, better reflecting the changes in human body. The roadmap of urine biomarker era was proposed. Although urine analysis has been attempted for clinical diagnosis, and urine has been monitored during the progression of many diseases, particularly urinary system diseases, whether urine can reflect brain disease status remains uncertain. As some biomarkers of brain diseases can be detected in the body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and blood, there is a possibility that urine also contain biomarkers of brain diseases. This review summarizes the clues of brain diseases reflected in the urine proteome and metabolome. PMID:26751805

  14. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer.

  15. Consolidation of proteomics data in the Cancer Proteomics database.

    PubMed

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Boddie, Paul; Frick, Rahel; Koehler, Christian J; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by abnormal cell growth and one of the major reasons for human deaths. Proteins are involved in the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer, furthermore they are affected by anti-cancer drugs, and protein biomarkers can be used to diagnose certain cancer types. Therefore, it is important to explore the proteomics background of cancer. In this report, we developed the Cancer Proteomics database to re-interrogate published proteome studies investigating cancer. The database is divided in three sections related to cancer processes, cancer types, and anti-cancer drugs. Currently, the Cancer Proteomics database contains 9778 entries of 4118 proteins extracted from 143 scientific articles covering all three sections: cell death (cancer process), prostate cancer (cancer type) and platinum-based anti-cancer drugs including carboplatin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin (anti-cancer drugs). The detailed information extracted from the literature includes basic information about the articles (e.g., PubMed ID, authors, journal name, publication year), information about the samples (type, study/reference, prognosis factor), and the proteomics workflow (Subcellular fractionation, protein, and peptide separation, mass spectrometry, quantification). Useful annotations such as hyperlinks to UniProt and PubMed were included. In addition, many filtering options were established as well as export functions. The database is freely available at http://cancerproteomics.uio.no.

  16. Microsomal proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Diana M; Adeli, Khosrow

    2009-01-01

    Proteomic profiling of subcellular compartments has many advantages over traditional proteomic approaches using whole cell lysates as it allows for detailed proteome analysis of a specific organelle and corresponding functional characteristics. The microsome is a critical, membranous compartment involved in the synthesis, sorting, and secretion of proteins as well as other metabolic functions. This chapter will describe detailed methods for the isolation of microsomal organelles including the ER, Golgi, and prechylomicron transport vesicle (PCTV), a recently identified vesicular system involved in intestinal lipoprotein assembly and secretion. Particular focus is given to the isolation of microsomes from primary hepatocytes and enterocytes freshly isolated from rodent liver and intestinal tissue, and their proteomic profiling using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

  17. Biomarkers to guide clinical therapeutics in rheumatology?

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, William H.; Mao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The use of biomarkers in rheumatology can help identify disease risk, improve diagnosis and prognosis, target therapy, assess response to treatment, and further our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of disease. Here, we discuss the recent advances in biomarkers for rheumatic disorders, existing impediments to progress in this field, and the potential of biomarkers to enable precision medicine and thereby transform rheumatology. Recent findings Although significant challenges remain, progress continues to be made in biomarker discovery and development for rheumatic diseases. The use of next-generation technologies, including large-scale sequencing, proteomic technologies, metabolomic technologies, mass cytometry, and other single-cell analysis and multianalyte analysis technologies, has yielded a slew of new candidate biomarkers. Nevertheless, these biomarkers still require rigorous validation and have yet to make their way into clinical practice and therapeutic development. This review focuses on advances in the biomarker field in the last 12 months as well as the challenges that remain. Summary Better biomarkers, ideally mechanistic ones, are needed to guide clinical decision making in rheumatology. Although the use of next-generation techniques for biomarker discovery is making headway, it is imperative that the roadblocks in our search for new biomarkers are overcome to enable identification of biomarkers with greater diagnostic and predictive utility. Identification of biomarkers with robust diagnostic and predictive utility would enable precision medicine in rheumatology. PMID:26720904

  18. Mass Spectrometry for Translational Proteomics: Progress and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-08-31

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics measurements have become increasingly utilized in a wide range of biological and biomedical applications, and have significantly enhanced the understanding of the complex and dynamic nature of the proteome and its connections to biology and diseases. While some MS techniques such as those for targeted analysis are increasingly applied with great success, others such as global quantitative analysis (for e.g. biomarker discovery) are more challenging and continue to be developed and refined to provide the desired throughput, sensitivity and/ or specificity. New MS capabilities and proteomics-based pipelines/strategies also keep enhancing for the advancement of clinical proteomics applications such as protein biomarker discovery and validation. Herein, we provide a brief review to summarize the current state of MS-based proteomics with respect to its advantages and present limitations, while highlighting its potential in future clinical applications.

  19. [Novel biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Araki, Shin-ichi

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. An early clinical sign of this complication is an increase of urinary albumin excretion, called microalbuminuria, which is not only a predictor of the progression of nephropathy, but also an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although microalbuminuria is clinically important to assess the prognosis of diabetic patients, it may be insufficient as an early and specific biomarker of diabetic nephropathy because of a large day-to-day variation and lack of a good correlation of microalbuminuria with renal dysfunction and pathohistological changes. Thus, more sensitive and specific biomarkers are needed to improve the diagnostic capability of identifying patients at high risk. The factors involved in renal tubulo-interstitial damage, the production and degradation of extracellular matrix, microinflammation, etc., are investigated as candidate molecules. Despite numerous efforts so far, the assessment of these biomarkers is still a subject of ongoing investigations. Recently, a variety of omics and quantitative techniques in systems biology are rapidly emerging in the field of biomarker discovery, including proteomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics, and they have been applied to search for novel putative biomarkers of diabetic nephropathy. Novel biomarkers or their combination with microalbuminuria provide a better diagnostic accuracy than microalbuminuria alone, and may be useful for establishing personal medicine. Furthermore, the identification of novel biomarkers may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying diabetic nephropathy.

  20. The use of proteomic technologies in breast cancer research.

    PubMed

    Mazur, M G; Pyatchanina, T V

    2016-09-01

    The main findings in the field of breast cancer proteomic research as well as modern strategies, technologies and methods of validation are reviewed. A special attention is focused on validated proteomic biomarkers of breast cancer. The data on proteomic profiling of stroma, tumor microenvironment, involvement of proteins in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis, and mechanisms of action of new generation drugs, are analyzed. The results of proteomic analysis are of high clinical importance and significantly improve tumor molecular profiling, stratification of patients, screening, diagnostics, and therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27685521

  1. Targeted proteomics identifies liquid-biopsy signatures for extracapsular prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunee; Jeon, Jouhyun; Mejia, Salvador; Yao, Cindy Q; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Gramolini, Anthony O; Lance, Raymond S; Troyer, Dean A; Drake, Richard R; Boutros, Paul C; Semmes, O. John; Kislinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are rapidly gaining importance in personalized medicine. Although numerous molecular signatures have been developed over the past decade, there is a lack of overlap and many biomarkers fail to validate in independent patient cohorts and hence are not useful for clinical application. For these reasons, identification of novel and robust biomarkers remains a formidable challenge. We combine targeted proteomics with computational biology to discover robust proteomic signatures for prostate cancer. Quantitative proteomics conducted in expressed prostatic secretions from men with extraprostatic and organ-confined prostate cancers identified 133 differentially expressed proteins. Using synthetic peptides, we evaluate them by targeted proteomics in a 74-patient cohort of expressed prostatic secretions in urine. We quantify a panel of 34 candidates in an independent 207-patient cohort. We apply machine-learning approaches to develop clinical predictive models for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Our results demonstrate that computationally guided proteomics can discover highly accurate non-invasive biomarkers. PMID:27350604

  2. A Review: Proteomics in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ze-Tan; Liang, Zhong-Guo; Zhu, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is generally effective in the treatment of major nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), this treatment still makes approximately 20% of patients radioresistant. Therefore, the identification of blood or biopsy biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to radioresistance and that can diagnosis early stages of NPC would be highly useful to improve this situation. Proteomics is widely used in NPC for searching biomarkers and comparing differentially expressed proteins. In this review, an overview of proteomics with different samples related to NPC and common proteomics methods was made. In conclusion, identical proteins are sorted as follows: Keratin is ranked the highest followed by such proteins as annexin, heat shock protein, 14-3-3σ, nm-23 protein, cathepsin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, enolase, triosephosphate isomerase, stathmin, prohibitin, and vimentin. This ranking indicates that these proteins may be NPC-related proteins and have potential value for further studies. PMID:26184160

  3. Nanoscale Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Masselon, Christophe D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes efforts to develop a liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) technology for ultra-sensitive proteomics studies, i.e. nanoscale proteomics. The approach combines high-efficiency nano-scale LC with advanced MS, including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS, to perform both single-stage MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) proteomic analyses. The technology developed enables large-scale protein identification from nanogram size proteomic samples and characterization of more abundant proteins from sub-picogram size complex samples. Protein identification in such studies using MS is feasible from <75 zeptomole of a protein, and the average proteome measurement throughput is >200 proteins/h and ~3 h/sample. Higher throughput (>1000 proteins/h) and more sensitive detection limits can be obtained using a “accurate mass and time” tag approach developed at our laboratory. These capabilities lay the foundation for studies from single or limited numbers of cells.

  4. Effects of a pre-workout supplement on lean mass, muscular performance, subjective workout experience and biomarkers of safety.

    PubMed

    Kedia, A William; Hofheins, Jennifer E; Habowski, Scott M; Ferrando, Arny A; Gothard, M David; Lopez, Hector L

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, trial conducted in two parts, we examined the effects of a multi-ingredient pre-exercise workout supplement blend of creatine, betaine and a dendrobium extract (MMP) on safety, performance, and body composition in healthy men and women undergoing a supervised program of resistance exercise. Part 1 was an acute hemodynamic safety study wherein forty young, healthy men and women (26.2 ± 5.3 years, 70.4 ± 3.3 inches, 83.7 ± 14.9 kg, 26.0 ± 3.2 kg●m(-2)) ingest one dose of either the MMP or comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator controlled, crossover fashion before having their resting heart rate, blood, ECG and comprehensive blood chemistry and blood counts completed. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures were generally raised (3.0-5.4 mm Hg, p<0.01) following supplementation with MPP whereas in the comparator group SBP was marginally reduced by 0.3 to 1.2 mm Hg, p>0.05 at all time points) and DBP was increased (3.0 - 3.9 mm Hg, p<0.05 at all time points). No changes in EKG-corrected QT interval were observed, and no serious adverse events were reported. Part 2 was a six-week training study wherein forty-three young, healthy men and women (24.3 ± 2.9 years, 70.5 ± 3.1 inches, 83.8 ± 9.6 kg, 26.1 ± 2.7 kg●m(-2)) supplemented with daily pre-workout doses of either the MPP or a comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator-controlled fashion while following a standardized resistance training program for six weeks. MPP and the comparator were isocaloric and delivered the same amount of caffeine. Significant improvements in visual analog scale (VAS) scores for energy (p<0.024) and concentration (p<0.041) were found along with consistently higher levels of focus accompanied by less fatigue when MPP was consumed in comparison to comparator during upper body muscular strength-endurance tests at weeks 3 and 6. MPP supplementation for 6 weeks did not improve dual-energy x

  5. Effects of a pre-workout supplement on lean mass, muscular performance, subjective workout experience and biomarkers of safety.

    PubMed

    Kedia, A William; Hofheins, Jennifer E; Habowski, Scott M; Ferrando, Arny A; Gothard, M David; Lopez, Hector L

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, trial conducted in two parts, we examined the effects of a multi-ingredient pre-exercise workout supplement blend of creatine, betaine and a dendrobium extract (MMP) on safety, performance, and body composition in healthy men and women undergoing a supervised program of resistance exercise. Part 1 was an acute hemodynamic safety study wherein forty young, healthy men and women (26.2 ± 5.3 years, 70.4 ± 3.3 inches, 83.7 ± 14.9 kg, 26.0 ± 3.2 kg●m(-2)) ingest one dose of either the MMP or comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator controlled, crossover fashion before having their resting heart rate, blood, ECG and comprehensive blood chemistry and blood counts completed. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures were generally raised (3.0-5.4 mm Hg, p<0.01) following supplementation with MPP whereas in the comparator group SBP was marginally reduced by 0.3 to 1.2 mm Hg, p>0.05 at all time points) and DBP was increased (3.0 - 3.9 mm Hg, p<0.05 at all time points). No changes in EKG-corrected QT interval were observed, and no serious adverse events were reported. Part 2 was a six-week training study wherein forty-three young, healthy men and women (24.3 ± 2.9 years, 70.5 ± 3.1 inches, 83.8 ± 9.6 kg, 26.1 ± 2.7 kg●m(-2)) supplemented with daily pre-workout doses of either the MPP or a comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator-controlled fashion while following a standardized resistance training program for six weeks. MPP and the comparator were isocaloric and delivered the same amount of caffeine. Significant improvements in visual analog scale (VAS) scores for energy (p<0.024) and concentration (p<0.041) were found along with consistently higher levels of focus accompanied by less fatigue when MPP was consumed in comparison to comparator during upper body muscular strength-endurance tests at weeks 3 and 6. MPP supplementation for 6 weeks did not improve dual-energy x

  6. Effects of a Pre-workout Supplement on Lean Mass, Muscular Performance, Subjective Workout Experience and Biomarkers of Safety

    PubMed Central

    Kedia, A. William; Hofheins, Jennifer E.; Habowski, Scott M.; Ferrando, Arny A.; Gothard, M. David; Lopez, Hector L.

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, trial conducted in two parts, we examined the effects of a multi-ingredient pre-exercise workout supplement blend of creatine, betaine and a dendrobium extract (MMP) on safety, performance, and body composition in healthy men and women undergoing a supervised program of resistance exercise. Part 1 was an acute hemodynamic safety study wherein forty young, healthy men and women (26.2 ± 5.3 years, 70.4 ± 3.3 inches, 83.7 ± 14.9 kg, 26.0 ± 3.2 kg●m-2) ingest one dose of either the MMP or comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator controlled, crossover fashion before having their resting heart rate, blood, ECG and comprehensive blood chemistry and blood counts completed. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures were generally raised (3.0-5.4 mm Hg, p<0.01) following supplementation with MPP whereas in the comparator group SBP was marginally reduced by 0.3 to 1.2 mm Hg, p>0.05 at all time points) and DBP was increased (3.0 - 3.9 mm Hg, p<0.05 at all time points). No changes in EKG-corrected QT interval were observed, and no serious adverse events were reported. Part 2 was a six-week training study wherein forty-three young, healthy men and women (24.3 ± 2.9 years, 70.5 ± 3.1 inches, 83.8 ± 9.6 kg, 26.1 ± 2.7 kg●m-2) supplemented with daily pre-workout doses of either the MPP or a comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator-controlled fashion while following a standardized resistance training program for six weeks. MPP and the comparator were isocaloric and delivered the same amount of caffeine. Significant improvements in visual analog scale (VAS) scores for energy (p<0.024) and concentration (p<0.041) were found along with consistently higher levels of focus accompanied by less fatigue when MPP was consumed in comparison to comparator during upper body muscular strength-endurance tests at weeks 3 and 6. MPP supplementation for 6 weeks did not improve dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry

  7. Lessons from the proteomic study of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Calamia, Valentina; Blanco, Francisco J

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic pathology and one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. It is a very complex disease whose etiopathogenesis is not fully understood. Furthermore, there are serious limitations for its management, since it lacks specific and sensitive biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring. Proteomic approaches performed in the last few decades have contributed to the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that participate in this pathology and they have also led to interesting panels of putative biomarker candidates. In the next few years, further efforts should be made for translating these findings into the clinical routines. It is expected that targeted proteomics strategies will be highly valuable for the verification and qualification of biomarkers of osteoarthritis.

  8. Proteomics insight into the biological safety of transgenic modification of rice as compared with conventional genetic breeding and spontaneous genotypic variation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chun Yan; Li, Qi; Yu, Hua Tao; Wang, Zizhang; Wang, Tai

    2012-05-01

    The potential of unintended effects caused by transgenic events is a key issue in the commercialization of genetically modified (GM) crops. To investigate whether transgenic events cause unintended effects, we used comparative proteomics approaches to evaluate proteome differences in seeds from 2 sets of GM indica rice, herbicide-resistant Bar68-1 carrying bar and insect-resistant 2036-1a carrying cry1Ac/sck, and their respective controls D68 and MH86, as well as indica variety MH63, a parental line for breeding MH86, and japonica variety ZH10. This experimental design allowed for comparing proteome difference caused by transgenes, conventional genetic breeding, and natural genetic variation. Proteomics analysis revealed the maximum numbers of differentially expressed proteins between indica and japonica cultivars, second among indica varieties with relative small difference between MH86 and MH63, and the minimum between GM rice and respective control, thus indicating GM events do not substantially alter proteome profiles as compared with conventional genetic breeding and natural genetic variation. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed 234 proteins differentially expressed in the 6 materials, and these proteins were involved in different cellular and metabolic processes with a prominent skew toward metabolism (31.2%), protein synthesis and destination (25.2%), and defense response (22.4%). In these seed proteomes, proteins implicated in the 3 prominent biological processes showed significantly different composite expression patterns and were major factors differentiating japonica and indica cultivars, as well as indica varieties. Thus, metabolism, protein synthesis and destination, and defense response in seeds are important in differentiating rice cultivars and varieties.

  9. Networks in proteomics analysis of cancer.

    PubMed

    Goh, Wilson Wen Bin; Wong, Limsoon

    2013-12-01

    Proteomics provides direct biological information on proteins but is still a limited platform. Borrowing from genomics, its cancer-specific applications can be broadly categorized as (1) pure diagnostics, (2) biomarkers, (3) identification of root causes and (4) identification of cancer-specific network rewirings. Biological networks capture complex relationships between proteins and provide an appropriate means of contextualization. While playing significantly larger roles, especially in 1 and 3, progress in proteomics-specific network-based methods is lagging as compared to genomics. Rapid hardware advances and improvements in proteomic identification and quantification have given rise to much better quality data alongside advent of new network-based analysis methods. However, a tighter integration between analytics and hardware is still essential for network analysis to play more significant roles in proteomics analysis.

  10. Drug target identification and quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Jin Kim, Yeoun; Heidbrink, Jenny L; Moore, Paul A; Ruben, Steven M

    2006-10-01

    The emerging technologies in proteomic analysis provide great opportunity for the discovery of novel therapeutic drug targets for unmet medical needs through delivering of key information on protein expression, post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions. This review presents a summary of current quantitative proteomic concepts and mass spectrometric technologies, which enable the acceleration of target discovery. Examples of the strategies and current technologies in the target identification/validation process are provided to illustrate the successful application of proteomics in target identification, in particular for monoclonal antibody therapies. Current bottlenecks and future directions of proteomic studies for target and biomarker identification are also discussed to better facilitate the application of this technology.

  11. Chlamydomonas proteomics.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Norbert; Atteia, Ariane; Decottignies, Paulette; Garin, Jérôme; Hippler, Michael; Kreimer, Georg; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Mittag, Maria; Wagner, Volker

    2009-06-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a biflagellate and photosynthetic unicellular alga that has long fascinated scientists because it combines characteristics of both plants and animals. Chlamydomonas offers the simplicity of a unicellular organism that is amenable to genetic screening, molecular, and biochemical approaches, as well as to transformation of its nuclear, plastid, or mitochondrial genomes. Over the past decade, proteomics based studies of Chlamydomonas have provided major research contributions in the areas of photosynthesis, molecular biology, and evolution. This review refers to technical and biological aspects of proteomics studies that have been recently performed on the C. reinhardtii model organism.

  12. Human saliva proteome: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2014-06-01

    Human saliva contains a rich mixture of biomolecules. Proteins are a major component of this mixture. Given their role as the molecular effectors within biological systems, ranging from catalysis to transport to structure, proteins have great potential as biomarkers of health and disease. The ability to collect these salivary biomarkers easily using non-invasive means makes saliva proteins even more attractive for diagnostic applications. Thousands of proteins are now to be known to be present in human saliva - discovered using proteomic technologies. Emerging technologies are now making it possible to go beyond large-scale cataloging of salivary proteins. These include approaches to catalog protein contributions from the community of microorganisms residing in the oral cavity (metaproteomics) that may reflect the health state of the human host. New mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods are also emerging, shifting the emphasis from large-scale discovery experiments to hypothesis-driven assays for profiling proteins of interest within saliva, enabling validation of their association with specific health conditions. This paper provides a brief overview of efforts to catalog the proteome of human saliva. Recent developments making possible characterization of the metaproteome of human saliva will be discussed, and technologies driving new mass spectrometry-based assays for targeted analysis of proteins within complex samples, such as saliva.

  13. Biomarker Discovery by Novel Sensors Based on Nanoproteomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Dasilva, Noelia; Díez, Paula; Matarraz, Sergio; González-González, María; Paradinas, Sara; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    During the last years, proteomics has facilitated biomarker discovery by coupling high-throughput techniques with novel nanosensors. In the present review, we focus on the study of label-based and label-free detection systems, as well as nanotechnology approaches, indicating their advantages and applications in biomarker discovery. In addition, several disease biomarkers are shown in order to display the clinical importance of the improvement of sensitivity and selectivity by using nanoproteomics approaches as novel sensors. PMID:22438764

  14. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  15. Legume proteomics: Progress, prospects, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Divya; Gayen, Dipak; Gayali, Saurabh; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Legumes are the major sources of food and fodder with strong commercial relevance, and are essential components of agricultural ecosystems owing to their ability to carry out endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. In recent years, legumes have become one of the major choices of plant research. The legume proteomics is currently represented by more than 100 reference maps and an equal number of stress-responsive proteomes. Among the 48 legumes in the protein databases, most proteomic studies have been accomplished in two model legumes, soybean, and barrel medic. This review highlights recent contributions in the field of legume proteomics to comprehend the defence and regulatory mechanisms during development and adaptation to climatic changes. Here, we attempted to provide a concise overview of the progress in legume proteomics and discuss future developments in three broad perspectives: (i) proteome of organs/tissues; (ii) subcellular compartments; and (iii) spatiotemporal changes in response to stress. Such data mining may aid in discovering potential biomarkers for plant growth, in general, apart from essential components involved in stress tolerance. The prospect of integrating proteome data with genome information from legumes will provide exciting opportunities for plant biologists to achieve long-term goals of crop improvement and sustainable agriculture.

  16. Platelet proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Reny, Jean-Luc; Nolli, Severine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are small cell fragments, produced by megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow. They play an important role in hemostasis and diverse thrombotic disorders. They are therefore primary targets of antithrombotic therapies. They are implicated in several pathophysiological pathways, such as inflammation or wound repair. In blood circulation, platelets are activated by several pathways including subendothelial matrix and thrombin, triggering the formation of the platelet plug. Studying their proteome is a powerful approach to understand their biology and function. However, particular attention must be paid to different experimental parameters, such as platelet quality and purity. Several technologies are involved during the platelet proteome processing, yielding information on protein identification, characterization, localization, and quantification. Recent technical improvements in proteomics combined with inter-disciplinary strategies, such as metabolomic, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics, will help to understand platelets biological mechanisms. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the platelet proteome under different environmental conditions may contribute to elucidate complex processes relevant to platelet function regarding bleeding disorders or platelet hyperreactivity and identify new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

  17. Measurement of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers of consequences or cause complications of pathological states, and prognosis of both evolution and therapeutic safety/efficacy.

    PubMed

    Amiral, Jean; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2016-08-01

    Utility of EVs, as biomarkers of cause or consequence of various pathological complications, and prognosis of blood components' therapy in terms of safety/efficacy and their potential associated hazards, primed by EVs involvements in pro-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and activations of both pro/anti-coagulatory and others associated pathways, as well as various cellular cross talks, are highlighted as the fundamental. Today EVs are becoming the "buzz" words of the current diagnosis, development and research [DDR] strategies, with the aim of ensuring safer therapeutic approaches in the current clinical practices, also incorporating their potential in long term cost effectiveness in health care systems. The main focus of this manuscript is to review the current opinions in some fundamental areas of EVs involvements in health and diseases. Firstly, our goal is highlighting what are EVs/MVs/MPs and how are they generated in physiology, pathology or blood products; classification and significance of EVs generated in vivo; followed by consequences and physiological/pathological induced effects of EVs generation in vivo. Secondly, specific cell origin EVs and association with malignancy; focus on EVs carrying TF and annexin V as a protective protein for harmful effects of EVs, and associations with LA; and incidence of anti-annexin V antibodies are also discussed. Thirdly, utility of EVs is presented: as diagnostic tools of disease markers; prognosis and follow-up of clinical states; evaluation of therapy efficacy; quality and risk assessment of blood products; followed by the laboratory tools for exploring, characterizing and measuring EVs, and/or their associated activity, using our own experiences of capture based assays. Finally, in perspective, the upcoming low volume sampling, fast, reliable and reproducibility and friendly use laboratory tools and the standardization of measurement methods are highlighted with the beneficial effects that we are witnessing in both

  18. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. Methods A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. Conclusions With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:26790878

  19. Saliva proteome research: current status and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Benjamin L; Cooper-White, Justin; Punyadeera, Chamindie K

    2013-09-01

    Human saliva harbours proteins of clinical relevance and about 30% of blood proteins are also present in saliva. This highlights that saliva can be used for clinical applications just as urine or blood. However, the translation of salivary biomarker discoveries into clinical settings is hampered by the dynamics and complexity of the salivary proteome. This review focuses on the current status of technological developments and achievements relating to approaches for unravelling the human salivary proteome. We discuss the dynamics of the salivary proteome, as well as the importance of sample preparation and processing techniques and their influence on downstream protein applications; post-translational modifications of salivary proteome and protein: protein interactions. In addition, we describe possible enrichment strategies for discerning post-translational modifications of salivary proteins, the potential utility of selected-reaction-monitoring techniques for biomarker discovery and validation, limitations to proteomics and the biomarker challenge and future perspectives. In summary, we provide recommendations for practical saliva sampling, processing and storage conditions to increase the quality of future studies in an emerging field of saliva clinical proteomics. We propose that the advent of technologies allowing sensitive and high throughput proteome-wide analyses, coupled to well-controlled study design, will allow saliva to enter clinical practice as an alternative to blood-based methods due to its simplistic nature of sampling, non-invasiveness, easy of collection and multiple collections by untrained professionals and cost-effective advantages. PMID:22612344

  20. Antibody microarrays as tools for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The cancer biomarkers field is being enriched by molecular profiling obtained by high-throughput approaches. Targeted antibody arrays are strongly contributing to the identification of protein cancer -biomarker candidates and functional proteomic analyses. Due to their versatility, novel technological and experimental design implementations are broadening the applications of antibody arrays. However, the cancer biomarker candidates delivered to date using this technology are still in their early developmental phase, requiring validation with high number of specimens focusing on specific clinical endpoints. Innovative strategies multiplexing protein measurements of protein extracts of cultured cells, tissue and body fluids using antibody arrays combined with appropriate validation approaches are enabling the -discovery of cancer-associated biomarkers. This review describes these strategies and cancer biomarker candidates reported to date that may assist in the diagnosis, surveillance, prognosis, and potentially for predictive and therapeutic purposes for patients affected with solid and hematological neoplasias.

  1. What Is Cancer Proteomics?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov The National Institutes of Health Clinical Proteomics Technologies for Cancer Contact Us Intranet Sign Up for ... of proteomics that involves the application of proteomic technologies on clinical specimens such as blood. Cancer, in ...

  2. Human Pituitary Adenoma Proteomics: New Progresses and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xianquan; Wang, Xiaowei; Cheng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a common intracranial neoplasm that impacts on human health through interfering hypothalamus–pituitary–target organ axis systems. The development of proteomics gives great promises in the clarification of molecular mechanisms of a PA and discovery of effective biomarkers for prediction, prevention, early-stage diagnosis, and treatment for a PA. A great progress in the field of PA proteomics has been made in the past 10 years, including (i) the use of laser-capture microdissection, (ii) proteomics analyses of functional PAs (such as prolactinoma), invasive and non-invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, NFPA heterogeneity, and hormone isoforms, (iii) the use of protein antibody array, (iv) serum proteomics and peptidomics, (v) the integration of proteomics and other omics data, and (vi) the proposal of multi-parameter systematic strategy for a PA. This review will summarize these progresses of proteomics in PAs, point out the existing drawbacks, propose the future research directions, and address the clinical relevance of PA proteomics data, in order to achieve our long-term goal that is use of proteomics to clarify molecular mechanisms, construct molecular networks, and discover effective biomarkers. PMID:27303365

  3. Human Pituitary Adenoma Proteomics: New Progresses and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xianquan; Wang, Xiaowei; Cheng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a common intracranial neoplasm that impacts on human health through interfering hypothalamus-pituitary-target organ axis systems. The development of proteomics gives great promises in the clarification of molecular mechanisms of a PA and discovery of effective biomarkers for prediction, prevention, early-stage diagnosis, and treatment for a PA. A great progress in the field of PA proteomics has been made in the past 10 years, including (i) the use of laser-capture microdissection, (ii) proteomics analyses of functional PAs (such as prolactinoma), invasive and non-invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, NFPA heterogeneity, and hormone isoforms, (iii) the use of protein antibody array, (iv) serum proteomics and peptidomics, (v) the integration of proteomics and other omics data, and (vi) the proposal of multi-parameter systematic strategy for a PA. This review will summarize these progresses of proteomics in PAs, point out the existing drawbacks, propose the future research directions, and address the clinical relevance of PA proteomics data, in order to achieve our long-term goal that is use of proteomics to clarify molecular mechanisms, construct molecular networks, and discover effective biomarkers. PMID:27303365

  4. Cross-study and cross-omics comparisons of three nephrotoxic compounds reveal mechanistic insights and new candidate biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Matheis, Katja A.; Com, Emmanuelle; Gautier, Jean-Charles; Guerreiro, Nelson; Brandenburg, Arnd; Gmuender, Hans; Sposny, Alexandra; Hewitt, Philip; Amberg, Alexander; Boernsen, Olaf; Riefke, Bjoern; Hoffmann, Dana; Mally, Angela; Kalkuhl, Arno; Suter, Laura; Dieterle, Frank; Staedtler, Frank

    2011-04-15

    The European InnoMed-PredTox project was a collaborative effort between 15 pharmaceutical companies, 2 small and mid-sized enterprises, and 3 universities with the goal of delivering deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms of kidney and liver toxicity and to identify mechanism-linked diagnostic or prognostic safety biomarker candidates by combining conventional toxicological parameters with 'omics' data. Mechanistic toxicity studies with 16 different compounds, 2 dose levels, and 3 time points were performed in male Crl: WI(Han) rats. Three of the 16 investigated compounds, BI-3 (FP007SE), Gentamicin (FP009SF), and IMM125 (FP013NO), induced kidney proximal tubule damage (PTD). In addition to histopathology and clinical chemistry, transcriptomics microarray and proteomics 2D-DIGE analysis were performed. Data from the three PTD studies were combined for a cross-study and cross-omics meta-analysis of the target organ. The mechanistic interpretation of kidney PTD-associated deregulated transcripts revealed, in addition to previously described kidney damage transcript biomarkers such as KIM-1, CLU and TIMP-1, a number of additional deregulated pathways congruent with histopathology observations on a single animal basis, including a specific effect on the complement system. The identification of new, more specific biomarker candidates for PTD was most successful when transcriptomics data were used. Combining transcriptomics data with proteomics data added extra value.

  5. Proteomics for prediction of disease progression and response to therapy in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Pena, Michelle J; Mischak, Harald; Heerspink, Hiddo J L

    2016-09-01

    The past decade has resulted in multiple new findings of potential proteomic biomarkers of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Many of these biomarkers reflect an important role in the (patho)physiology and biological processes of DKD. Situations in which proteomics could be applied in clinical practice include the identification of individuals at risk of progressive kidney disease and those who would respond well to treatment, in order to tailor therapy for those at highest risk. However, while many proteomic biomarkers have been discovered, and even found to be predictive, most lack rigorous external validation in sufficiently powered studies with renal endpoints. Moreover, studies assessing short-term changes in the proteome for therapy-monitoring purposes are lacking. Collaborations between academia and industry and enhanced interactions with regulatory agencies are needed to design new, sufficiently powered studies to implement proteomics in clinical practice. PMID:27344310

  6. Proteomics in veterinary medicine: applications and trends in disease pathogenesis and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ceciliani, F; Eckersall, D; Burchmore, R; Lecchi, C

    2014-03-01

    Advancement in electrophoresis and mass spectrometry techniques along with the recent progresses in genomics, culminating in bovine and pig genome sequencing, widened the potential application of proteomics in the field of veterinary medicine. The aim of the present review is to provide an in-depth perspective about the application of proteomics to animal disease pathogenesis, as well as its utilization in veterinary diagnostics. After an overview on the various proteomic techniques that are currently applied to veterinary sciences, the article focuses on proteomic approaches to animal disease pathogenesis. Included as well are recent achievements in immunoproteomics (ie, the identifications through proteomic techniques of antigen involved in immune response) and histoproteomics (ie, the application of proteomics in tissue processed for immunohistochemistry). Finally, the article focuses on clinical proteomics (ie, the application of proteomics to the identification of new biomarkers of animal diseases).

  7. Linkage of exposure and effects using genomics, proteomics and metabolomics in small fish models (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project combines the use of whole organism endpoints, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches, and computational modeling in a systems biology approach to 1) identify molecular indicators of exposure and biomarkers of effect to EDCs representing several modes/...

  8. Affordable proteomics: the two-hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Marc

    2003-06-01

    Numerous proteomic methodologies exist, but most require a heavy investment in expertise and technology. This puts these approaches out of reach for many laboratories and small companies, rarely allowing proteomics to be used as a pilot approach for biomarker or target identification. Two proteomic approaches, 2D gel electrophoresis and the two-hybrid systems, are currently available to most researchers. The two-hybrid systems, though accommodating to large-scale experiments, were originally designed as practical screens, that by comparison to current proteomics tools were small-scale, affordable and technically feasible. The screens rapidly generated data, identifying protein interactions that were previously uncharacterized. The foundation for a two-hybrid proteomic investigation can be purchased as separate kits from a number of companies. The true power of the technique lies not in its affordability, but rather in its portability. The two-hybrid system puts proteomics back into laboratories where the output of the screens can be evaluated by researchers with experience in the particular fields of basic research, cancer biology, toxicology or drug development.

  9. Biomarker assay translation from discovery to clinical studies in cancer drug development: quantification of emerging protein biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jean W; Figeys, Daniel; Vasilescu, Julian

    2007-01-01

    Many candidate biomarkers emerging from genomics and proteomics research have the potential to serve as predictive indexes for guiding the development of safer and more efficacious drugs. Research and development of biomarker discovery, selection, and clinical qualification, however, is still a relatively new field for the pharmaceutical industry. Advances in technology provide a plethora of analytical tools to discover and analyze mechanism-and-disease-specific biomarkers for drug development. In the discovery phase, differential proteomic analysis using mass spectrometry enables the identification of candidate biomarkers that are associated with a specific mechanism relevant to disease progression and affected by drug treatment. Reliable bioanalytical methods are then developed and implemented to select promising biomarkers for further studies in animals and humans. Quantitative analytical methods capable of generating reliable data constitute a solid basis for statistical assessment of the predictive utility of biomarkers. Biomarker method validation is diverse and for purposes that are very different from those of drug bioanalysis or diagnostic use. Besides being flexible, it should sufficiently demonstrate the method's ability to meet the study intent and the attendant regulatory requirements. Several papers have been published outlining specific requirements for successful biomarker method development and validation using a "Fit-for-Purpose" approach. Many of the challenges faced during biomarker discovery as well as during technology and process translation are discussed in this chapter, including preanalytical planning, assay development, and preclinical and clinical validation. Specific references to protein biomarkers for cancer drug development are also discussed.

  10. Acute Phase Response, Inflammation and Metabolic Syndrome Biomarkers of Libby Asbestos Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. Objective: We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help ...

  11. Acute Phase Response and Metabolic Syndrome Biomarkers of Libby Asbestos Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the disease diagnosis and environmental health risk assessment. Exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that rats exposed to LA would present a unique serum proteomic pro...

  12. NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop, September 27-28, 2007.

    PubMed

    Straume, Tore; Amundson, Sally A; Blakely, William F; Burns, Fredric J; Chen, Allen; Dainiak, Nicholas; Franklin, Stephen; Leary, Julie A; Loftus, David J; Morgan, William F; Pellmar, Terry C; Stolc, Viktor; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Vaughan, Andrew T; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2008-09-01

    A summary is provided of presentations and discussions at the NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop held September 27-28, 2007 at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. Invited speakers were distinguished scientists representing key sectors of the radiation research community. Speakers addressed recent developments in the biomarker and biotechnology fields that may provide new opportunities for health-related assessment of radiation-exposed individuals, including those exposed during long-duration space travel. Topics discussed included the space radiation environment, biomarkers of radiation sensitivity and individual susceptibility, molecular signatures of low-dose responses, multivariate analysis of gene expression, biomarkers in biodefense, biomarkers in radiation oncology, biomarkers and triage after large-scale radiological incidents, integrated and multiple biomarker approaches, advances in whole-genome tiling arrays, advances in mass spectrometry proteomics, radiation biodosimetry for estimation of cancer risk in a rat skin model, and confounding factors. A summary of conclusions is provided at the end of the report.

  13. Approaching clinical proteomics: current state and future fields of application in fluid proteomics.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Deufel, Thomas; Gerstner, Andreas; Hansen, Jens; Hochstrasser, Dennis; Kellner, Roland; Kubicek, Markus; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Maser, Edmund; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Meyer, Helmut E; Müllner, Stefan; Mutter, Wolfgang; Neumaier, Michael; Nollau, Peter; Nothwang, Hans G; Ponten, Fredrik; Radbruch, Andreas; Reinert, Knut; Rothe, Gregor; Stockinger, Hannes; Tarnok, Attila; Taussig, Mike J; Thiel, Andreas; Thiery, Joachim; Ueffing, Marius; Valet, Günther; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Verhuven, Wiltrud; Wagener, Christoph; Wagner, Oswald; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    The field of clinical proteomics offers opportunities to identify new disease biomarkers in body fluids, cells and tissues. These biomarkers can be used in clinical applications for diagnosis, stratification of patients for specific treatment, or therapy monitoring. New protein array formats and improved spectrometry technologies have brought these analyses to a level with potential for use in clinical diagnostics. The nature of the human body fluid proteome with its large dynamic range of protein concentrations presents problems with quantitation. The extreme complexity of the proteome in body fluids presents enormous challenges and requires the establishment of standard operating procedures for handling of specimens, increasing sensitivity for detection and bioinformatical tools for distribution of proteomic data into the public domain. From studies of in vitro diagnostics, especially in clinical chemistry, it is evident that most errors occur in the preanalytical phase and during implementation of the diagnostic strategy. This is also true for clinical proteomics, and especially for fluid proteomics because of the multiple pretreatment processes. These processes include depletion of high-abundance proteins from plasma or enrichment processes for urine where biological variation or differences in proteolytic activities in the sample along with preanalytical variables such as inter- and intra-assay variability will likely influence the results of proteomics studies. However, before proteomic analysis can be introduced at a broader level into the clinical setting, standardization of the preanalytical phase including patient preparation, sample collection, sample preparation, sample storage, measurement and data analysis needs to be improved. In this review, we discuss the recent technological advances and applications that fulfil the criteria for clinical proteomics, with the focus on fluid proteomics. These advances relate to preanalytical factors, analytical

  14. Proteomics of Uveal Melanoma: A Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Abildgaard, Søren K. O.; Vorum, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) continues to be associated with a high mortality rate of up to 50% due to metastatic spread primarily to the liver. Currently there are relatively effective treatments for the primary tumor, though the management of the metastatic disease remains inadequate. Conventional diagnostic tools have a low sensitivity for detecting metastasis, and early detection of metastatic spread would allow more treatment options that could ultimately increase survival of UM patients. Advanced proteomic methods have already helped to find potential biomarkers associated with UM pathogenesis and metastasis. In the present review we discuss the field of proteomics in relation to studies elucidating biomarkers of UM, where proteins such as S-100β, osteopontin (OPN), and melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) have been shown to be associated with metastasis. PMID:24078811

  15. The proteomics of formalin-fixed wax-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, David Cilia; Murray, Graeme I

    2013-04-01

    Proteomics, which is the global analysis of protein expression in cells and tissues, has emerged over the last ten to fifteen years as a key set of technologies to improve our understanding of disease processes and to identify new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive disease biomarkers. Whilst most proteomic studies have been conducted on fresh frozen tissue, the continuous improvements in technical procedures for protein extraction and separation, coupled with increasingly powerful bioinformatics, have provided the opportunity for proteomic analysis to be conducted on formalin-fixed wax-embedded tissue. This potential advance should allow proteomic analysis to be performed on the extensive archives of clinically annotated formalin fixed wax embedded tissue blocks stored in pathology departments worldwide. In this review the main techniques and their limitations involved in proteomic analysis of formalin fixed wax embedded tissue will be outlined and examples of their successful application will be indicated.

  16. Mass spectrometry based biomarker discovery, verification, and validation--quality assurance and control of protein biomarker assays.

    PubMed

    Parker, Carol E; Borchers, Christoph H

    2014-06-01

    In its early years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics focused on the cataloging of proteins found in different species or different tissues. By 2005, proteomics was being used for protein quantitation, typically based on "proteotypic" peptides which act as surrogates for the parent proteins. Biomarker discovery is usually done by non-targeted "shotgun" proteomics, using relative quantitation methods to determine protein expression changes that correlate with disease (output given as "up-or-down regulation" or "fold-increases"). MS-based techniques can also perform "absolute" quantitation which is required for clinical applications (output given as protein concentrations). Here we describe the differences between these methods, factors that affect the precision and accuracy of the results, and some examples of recent studies using MS-based proteomics to verify cancer-related biomarkers.

  17. Anthelmintic metabolism in parasitic helminths: proteomic insights.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Peter M; MacKintosh, Neil; Morphew, Russell M

    2012-08-01

    Anthelmintics are the cornerstone of parasitic helminth control. Surprisingly, understanding of the biochemical pathways used by parasitic helminths to detoxify anthelmintics is fragmented, despite the increasing global threat of anthelmintic resistance within the ruminant and equine industries. Reductionist biochemistry has likely over-estimated the enzymatic role of glutathione transferases in anthelmintic metabolism and neglected the potential role of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily (CYPs). Proteomic technologies offers the opportunity to support genomics, reverse genetics and pharmacokinetics, and provide an integrated insight into both the cellular mechanisms underpinning response to anthelmintics and also the identification of biomarker panels for monitoring the development of anthelmintic resistance. To date, there have been limited attempts to include proteomics in anthelmintic metabolism studies. Optimisations of membrane, post-translational modification and interaction proteomic technologies in helminths are needed to especially study Phase I CYPs and Phase III ABC transporter pumps for anthelmintics and their metabolites.

  18. Plasma proteomics, the Human Proteome Project, and cancer-associated alternative splice variant proteins.

    PubMed

    Omenn, Gilbert S

    2014-05-01

    This article addresses three inter-related subjects: the development of the Human Plasma Proteome Peptide Atlas, the launch of the Human Proteome Project, and the emergence of alternative splice variant transcripts and proteins as important features of evolution and pathogenesis. The current Plasma Peptide Atlas provides evidence on which peptides have been detected for every protein confidently identified in plasma; there are links to their spectra and their estimated abundance, facilitating the planning of targeted proteomics for biomarker studies. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) combines a chromosome-centric C-HPP with a biology and disease-driven B/D-HPP, upon a foundation of mass spectrometry, antibody, and knowledgebase resource pillars. The HPP aims to identify the approximately 7000 "missing proteins" and to characterize all proteins and their many isoforms. Success will enable the larger research community to utilize newly-available peptides, spectra, informative MS transitions, and databases for targeted analyses of priority proteins for each organ and disease. Among the isoforms of proteins, splice variants have the special feature of greatly enlarging protein diversity without enlarging the genome; evidence is accumulating of striking differential expression of splice variants in cancers. In this era of RNA-sequencing and advanced mass spectrometry, it is no longer sufficient to speak simply of increased or decreased expression of genes or proteins without carefully examining the splice variants in the protein mixture produced from each multi-exon gene. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  19. The Succinated Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  20. Environmental Proteomics: Changes in the Proteome of Marine Organisms in Response to Environmental Stress, Pollutants, Infection, Symbiosis, and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomanek, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Environmental proteomics, the study of changes in the abundance of proteins and their post-translational modifications, has become a powerful tool for generating hypotheses regarding how the environment affects the biology of marine organisms. Proteomics discovers hitherto unknown cellular effects of environmental stressors such as changes in thermal, osmotic, and anaerobic conditions. Proteomic analyses have advanced the characterization of the biological effects of pollutants and identified comprehensive and pollutant-specific sets of biomarkers, especially those highlighting post-translational modifications. Proteomic analyses of infected organisms have highlighted the broader changes occurring during immune responses and how the same pathways are attenuated during the maintenance of symbiotic relationships. Finally, proteomic changes occurring during the early life stages of marine organisms emphasize the importance of signaling events during development in a rapidly changing environment. Changes in proteins functioning in energy metabolism, cytoskeleton, protein stabilization and turnover, oxidative stress, and signaling are common responses to environmental change.

  1. [Variability of healthy human proteome].

    PubMed

    Pakharukova, N A; Pastushkova, L Kh; Moshkovskiĭ, S A; Larina, I M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyze investigations devoted to characteristic of protein variability and diversity of their posttranslational modifications in healthy humans. The numerous researches have demonstrated that proteomic profile has a considerable both intra- and inter-individual variability, and quite often normal variability of some proteins can be comparable to changes observed in pathological processes. Results obtained by our research group have confirmed high intra-individual variability of serum low-molecular subproteome of healthy volunteers, certified by a special medial committee. Proteins characterized by high variability in normal conditions (e.g. haptoglobin--0-40 mg/ml; lysozyme--0,01-0,1 mg/ml; C-reactive protein--0,01-0,3 mg/ml) should be excluded from the list of potential biomarkers. On the contrary, proteins and peptides characterized by insignificant dispersion in healthy population (such as albumin--coefficient of variation (CV) 9%; transferrin--CV14%; C3c complement--CV 17%, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein--CV 21%, alpha2-macroglobulin--CV 20%; transthyretin fragment--CV 28,3% and beta-chain alpha2-HS-glycoprotein--CV 29,7%) can provide us with important information about state of health. Thus investigations of plasticity in proteomic profiles of healthy humans will help to correct reference intervals used in clinical proteomics. PMID:23289293

  2. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes.

  3. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes. PMID:25398898

  4. Glycocapture-based proteomics for secretome analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zon W; Nice, Edouard C; Schilling, Oliver

    2013-02-01

    Protein glycosylation represents the most abundant extracellular posttranslational modification in multicellular organisms. These glycoproteins unequivocally comprise the major biomolecules involved in extracellular processes, such as growth factors, signaling proteins for cellular communication, enzymes, and proteases for on- and off-site processing. It is now known that altered protein glycosylation is a hallmark event in many different pathologies. Glycoproteins are found mostly in the so-called secretome, which comprises classically and nonclassically secreted proteins and protein fragments that are released from the cell surface through ectodomain shedding. Due to biological complexity and technical difficulty, comparably few studies have taken an in-depth investigation of cellular secretomes using system-wide approaches. The cellular secretomes are considered to be a valuable source of therapeutic targets and novel biomarkers. It is not surprising that many existing biomarkers, including biomarkers for breast, ovarian, prostate, and colorectal cancers are glycoproteins. Focused analysis of secreted glycoproteins could thus provide valuable information for early disease diagnosis, and surveillance. Furthermore, since most secreted proteins are glycosylated and glycosylation predominantly targets secreted proteins, the glycan/sugar moiety itself can be used as a chemical "handle" for the targeted analysis of cellular secretomes, thereby reducing sample complexity and allowing detection of low abundance proteins in proteomic workflows. This review will focus on various glycoprotein enrichment strategies that facilitate proteomics-based technologies for the quantitative analysis of cell secretomes and cell surface proteomes.

  5. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  6. Suction blister fluid as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins.

    PubMed

    Kool, Jeroen; Reubsaet, Léon; Wesseldijk, Feikje; Maravilha, Raquel T; Pinkse, Martijn W; D'Santos, Clive S; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Zijlstra, Freek J; Heck, Albert J R

    2007-10-01

    Early diagnosis is important for effective disease management. Measurement of biomarkers present at the local level of the skin could be advantageous in facilitating the diagnostic process. The analysis of the proteome of suction blister fluid, representative for the interstitial fluid of the skin, is therefore a desirable first step in the search for potential biomarkers involved in biological pathways of particular diseases. Here, we describe a global analysis of the suction blister fluid proteome as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins. The suction blister fluid proteome was compared with a serum proteome analyzed using identical protocols. By using stringent criteria allowing less than 1% false positive identifications, we were able to detect, using identical experimental conditions and amount of starting material, 401 proteins in suction blister fluid and 240 proteins in serum. As a major result of our analysis we construct a prejudiced list of 34 proteins, relatively highly and uniquely detected in suction blister fluid as compared to serum, with established and putative characteristics as biomarkers. We conclude that suction blister fluid might potentially serve as a good alternative biomarker body fluid for diseases that involve the skin.

  7. Biomarkers to Predict Antidepressant Response

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian A.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Narr, Katherine L.; Toga, Arthur; Hunter, Aimee M.; Faull, Kym; Whitelegge, Julian; Andrews, Anne M.; Loo, Joseph; Way, Baldwin; Nelson, Stanley F.; Horvath, Steven; Lebowitz, Barry D.

    2010-01-01

    During the past several years, we have achieved a deeper understanding of the etiology/pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). However, this improved understanding has not translated to improved treatment outcome. Treatment often results in symptomatic improvement, but not full recovery. Clinical approaches are largely trial-and-error, and when the first treatment does not result in recovery for the patient, there is little proven scientific basis for choosing the next. One approach to enhancing treatment outcomes in MDD has been the use of standardized sequential treatment algorithms and measurement-based care. Such treatment algorithms stand in contrast to the personalized medicine approach, in which biomarkers would guide decision making. Incorporation of biomarker measurements into treatment algorithms could speed recovery from MDD by shortening or eliminating lengthy and ineffective trials. Recent research results suggest several classes of physiologic biomarkers may be useful for predicting response. These include brain structural or functional findings, as well as genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic measures. Recent data indicate that such measures, at baseline or early in the course of treatment, may constitute useful predictors of treatment outcome. Once such biomarkers are validated, they could form the basis of new paradigms for antidepressant treatment selection. PMID:20963521

  8. Lipolytic proteomics.

    PubMed

    Schittmayer, Matthias; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Activity-based proteomics (ABP) employs small molecular probes to specifically label sets of enzymes based on their shared catalytic mechanism. Given that the vast majority of lipases belong to the family of serine hydrolases and share a nucleophilic active-site serine as part of a catalytic triad, activity-based probes are ideal tools to study lipases and lipolysis. Moreover, the ability of ABP to highlight or isolate specific subproteomes results in a massive decrease of sample complexity. Thereby, in-depth analysis of enzymes of interest with mass spectrometry becomes feasible. In this review, we cover probe design, technological developments, and applications of ABP of lipases, as well as give an overview of relevant identified proteins.

  9. The Specific α1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Prazosin Influences the Urine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mindi; Wu, Jianqiang; Gao, Youhe

    2016-01-01

    Urine, reflecting many changes in the body, is a better source than blood for biomarker discovery. However, even under physiological conditions, the urine proteome often varies. Understanding how various regulating factors affect urine proteome helps link changes to urine proteome with urinary biomarkers of physiological conditions as well as corresponding diseases. To evaluate the possible impact of α1-adrenergic receptor on urine proteome, this study investigated effects of the specific inhibitor prazosin on the urine proteome in a rat model by using tandem mass tagging and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 775 proteins were identified, approximately half of which were influenced by prazosin treatment, indicating that the sympathetic nervous system exerts a significant impact on urine proteome. Eight significantly changed proteins were previously annotated as urinary candidate biomarkers. Angiotensinogen, haptoglobin, and beta-2 microglobulin, which were reported to be associated with blood pressure, were validated via Western blot. Prazosin is widely used in clinical practice; thus, these protein changes should be considered when studying corresponding diseases such as hypertension, post-traumatic stress disorder and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The related physiological activities of α1-receptors, controlling blood pressure and fear response might significantly affect the urine proteome and warrant further biomarker studies. PMID:27780262

  10. Effects of Three Commonly-used Diuretics on the Urinary Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xundou; Zhao, Mindi; Li, Menglin; Jia, Lulu; Gao, Youhe

    2014-01-01

    Biomarker is the measurable change associated with a physiological or pathophysiological process. Unlike blood which has mechanisms to keep the internal environment homeostatic, urine is more likely to reflect changes of the body. As a result, urine is likely to be a better biomarker source than blood. However, since the urinary proteome is affected by many factors, including diuretics, careful evaluation of those effects is necessary if urinary proteomics is used for biomarker discovery. Here, we evaluated the effects of three commonly-used diuretics (furosemide, F; hydrochlorothiazide, H; and spirolactone, S) on the urinary proteome in rats. Urine samples were collected before and after intragastric administration of diuretics at therapeutic doses and the proteomes were analyzed using label-free liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Based on the criteria of P ⩽ 0.05, a fold change ⩾2, a spectral count ⩾5, and false positive rate (FDR) ⩽1%, 14 proteins (seven for F, five for H, and two for S) were identified by Progenesis LC–MS. The human orthologs of most of these 14 proteins are stable in the healthy human urinary proteome, and ten of them are reported as disease biomarkers. Thus, our results suggest that the effects of diuretics deserve more attention in future urinary protein biomarker studies. Moreover, the distinct effects of diuretics on the urinary proteome may provide clues to the mechanisms of diuretics. PMID:24508280

  11. Effect of consuming a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage on health-related biomarkers and safety parameters in Caucasian subjects with elevated levels of blood pressure and liver function biomarkers: a 4-week, open-label, non-comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Oki, Tomoyuki; Kano, Mitsuyoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Goto, Kazuhisa; Boelsma, Esther; Ishikawa, Fumiyasu; Suda, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    An open-label study with one treatment arm was conducted to investigate changes in health-related biomarkers (blood pressure and liver enzyme activity) and the safety of 4 weeks of consuming a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage in Caucasian subjects. Twenty healthy adults, 18-70 years of age, with a body mass index >25 kg/m(2), elevated blood pressure and elevated levels of liver function biomarkers consumed two cartons of purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage (125 ml, including 117 mg anthocyanin per carton) daily for 4 weeks. Hematology, serum clinical profile, dipstick urinalysis and blood pressure were determined before consumption, at 2 and 4 weeks of consumption and after a 2-week washout period. A trend was found toward lowering systolic blood pressure during the treatment period (p=0.0590). No significant changes were found in diastolic blood pressure throughout the study period. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower after 4 weeks of consumption compared with before consumption (p=0.0125) and was significantly higher after the 2-week washout period compared with after consumption (p=0.0496). The serum alanine aminotransferase level significantly increased over time, but aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyltransferase levels stayed within the normal range of reference values. Safety parameters of the blood and urine showed no clinically relevant changes. The consumption of a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage for 4 weeks resulted in no clinically relevant changes in safety parameters of the blood and urine and showed a trend toward lowering systolic blood pressure.

  12. Effect of consuming a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage on health-related biomarkers and safety parameters in Caucasian subjects with elevated levels of blood pressure and liver function biomarkers: a 4-week, open-label, non-comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    OKI, Tomoyuki; KANO, Mitsuyoshi; WATANABE, Osamu; GOTO, Kazuhisa; BOELSMA, Esther; ISHIKAWA, Fumiyasu; SUDA, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    An open-label study with one treatment arm was conducted to investigate changes in health-related biomarkers (blood pressure and liver enzyme activity) and the safety of 4 weeks of consuming a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage in Caucasian subjects. Twenty healthy adults, 18–70 years of age, with a body mass index >25 kg/m2, elevated blood pressure and elevated levels of liver function biomarkers consumed two cartons of purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage (125 ml, including 117 mg anthocyanin per carton) daily for 4 weeks. Hematology, serum clinical profile, dipstick urinalysis and blood pressure were determined before consumption, at 2 and 4 weeks of consumption and after a 2-week washout period. A trend was found toward lowering systolic blood pressure during the treatment period (p=0.0590). No significant changes were found in diastolic blood pressure throughout the study period. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower after 4 weeks of consumption compared with before consumption (p=0.0125) and was significantly higher after the 2-week washout period compared with after consumption (p=0.0496). The serum alanine aminotransferase level significantly increased over time, but aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyltransferase levels stayed within the normal range of reference values. Safety parameters of the blood and urine showed no clinically relevant changes. The consumption of a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage for 4 weeks resulted in no clinically relevant changes in safety parameters of the blood and urine and showed a trend toward lowering systolic blood pressure. PMID:27508114

  13. Effect of consuming a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage on health-related biomarkers and safety parameters in Caucasian subjects with elevated levels of blood pressure and liver function biomarkers: a 4-week, open-label, non-comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Oki, Tomoyuki; Kano, Mitsuyoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Goto, Kazuhisa; Boelsma, Esther; Ishikawa, Fumiyasu; Suda, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    An open-label study with one treatment arm was conducted to investigate changes in health-related biomarkers (blood pressure and liver enzyme activity) and the safety of 4 weeks of consuming a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage in Caucasian subjects. Twenty healthy adults, 18-70 years of age, with a body mass index >25 kg/m(2), elevated blood pressure and elevated levels of liver function biomarkers consumed two cartons of purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage (125 ml, including 117 mg anthocyanin per carton) daily for 4 weeks. Hematology, serum clinical profile, dipstick urinalysis and blood pressure were determined before consumption, at 2 and 4 weeks of consumption and after a 2-week washout period. A trend was found toward lowering systolic blood pressure during the treatment period (p=0.0590). No significant changes were found in diastolic blood pressure throughout the study period. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower after 4 weeks of consumption compared with before consumption (p=0.0125) and was significantly higher after the 2-week washout period compared with after consumption (p=0.0496). The serum alanine aminotransferase level significantly increased over time, but aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyltransferase levels stayed within the normal range of reference values. Safety parameters of the blood and urine showed no clinically relevant changes. The consumption of a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage for 4 weeks resulted in no clinically relevant changes in safety parameters of the blood and urine and showed a trend toward lowering systolic blood pressure. PMID:27508114

  14. Approaching clinical proteomics: current state and future fields of application in cellular proteomics.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Deufel, Thomas; Gerstner, Andreas; Hansen, Jens; Hochstrasser, Dennis; Kellner, Roland; Kubicek, Markus; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Maser, Edmund; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Meyer, Helmut E; Müllner, Stefan; Mutter, Wolfgang; Neumaier, Michael; Nollau, Peter; Nothwang, Hans G; Ponten, Fredrik; Radbruch, Andreas; Reinert, Knut; Rothe, Gregor; Stockinger, Hannes; Tárnok, Attila; Taussig, Mike J; Thiel, Andreas; Thiery, Joachim; Ueffing, Marius; Valet, Günther; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Wagener, Christoph; Wagner, Oswald; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-10-01

    Recent developments in proteomics technology offer new opportunities for clinical applications in hospital or specialized laboratories including the identification of novel biomarkers, monitoring of disease, detecting adverse effects of drugs, and environmental hazards. Advanced spectrometry technologies and the development of new protein array formats have brought these analyses to a standard, which now has the potential to be used in clinical diagnostics. Besides standardization of methodologies and distribution of proteomic data into public databases, the nature of the human body fluid proteome with its high dynamic range in protein concentrations, its quantitation problems, and its extreme complexity present enormous challenges. Molecular cell biology (cytomics) with its link to proteomics is a new fast moving scientific field, which addresses functional cell analysis and bioinformatic approaches to search for novel cellular proteomic biomarkers or their release products into body fluids that provide better insight into the enormous biocomplexity of disease processes and are suitable for patient stratification, therapeutic monitoring, and prediction of prognosis. Experience from studies of in vitro diagnostics and especially in clinical chemistry showed that the majority of errors occurs in the preanalytical phase and the setup of the diagnostic strategy. This is also true for clinical proteomics where similar preanalytical variables such as inter- and intra-assay variability due to biological variations or proteolytical activities in the sample will most likely also influence the results of proteomics studies. However, before complex proteomic analysis can be introduced at a broader level into the clinic, standardization of the preanalytical phase including patient preparation, sample collection, sample preparation, sample storage, measurement, and data analysis is another issue which has to be improved. In this report, we discuss the recent advances and

  15. Cancer Biomarkers: Are We Ready for the Prime Time?

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Alok; Verma, Mukesh

    2010-01-01

    A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. In cancer, a biomarker refers to a substance or process that is indicative of the presence of cancer in the body. A biomarker might be either a molecule secreted by a tumor or it can be a specific response of the body to the presence of cancer. Genetic, epigenetic, proteomic, glycomic, and imaging biomarkers can be used for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and epidemiology. These markers can be assayed in non-invasively collected biofluids. However, few cancer biomarkers are highly sensitive and specific for cancer detection at the present time. Consequently, biomarkers are not yet ready for routine use due to challenges in their clinical validation for early disease detection, diagnosis and monitoring to improve long-term survival of patients. PMID:24281040

  16. Circulating biomarker panels for targeted therapy in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Codrici, Elena; Popescu, Ionela Daniela; Mihai, Simona; Enciu, Ana Maria; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Popa, Adrian Claudiu; Neagu, Ana Iulia; Necula, Laura Georgiana; Mambet, Cristina; Neagu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    An important goal of oncology is the development of cancer risk-identifier biomarkers that aid early detection and target therapy. High-throughput profiling represents a major concern for cancer research, including brain tumors. A promising approach for efficacious monitoring of disease progression and therapy could be circulating biomarker panels using molecular proteomic patterns. Tailoring treatment by targeting specific protein-protein interactions and signaling networks, microRNA and cancer stem cell signaling in accordance with tumor phenotype or patient clustering based on biomarker panels represents the future of personalized medicine for brain tumors. Gathering current data regarding biomarker candidates, we address the major challenges surrounding the biomarker field of this devastating tumor type, exploring potential perspectives for the development of more effective predictive biomarker panels.

  17. Network-Based Protein Biomarker Discovery Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minhyung

    2016-01-01

    The advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies have enabled the generation of global proteome data from tissue or body fluid samples collected from a broad spectrum of human diseases. Comparative proteomic analysis of global proteome data identifies and prioritizes the proteins showing altered abundances, called differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), in disease samples, compared to control samples. Protein biomarker candidates that can serve as indicators of disease states are then selected as key molecules among these proteins. Recently, it has been addressed that cellular pathways can provide better indications of disease states than individual molecules and also network analysis of the DEPs enables effective identification of cellular pathways altered in disease conditions and key molecules representing the altered cellular pathways. Accordingly, a number of network-based approaches to identify disease-related pathways and representative molecules of such pathways have been developed. In this review, we summarize analytical platforms for network-based protein biomarker discovery and key components in the platforms. PMID:27103885

  18. Recent technological developments in proteomics shed new light on translational research on diabetic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhang; Yang, Cheng; Tao, Yimin; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Yufan

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has become a heavy social burden worldwide, but at present it is still difficult to predict and diagnose this ailment at an early stage. Various proteomics approaches have been applied to the pathophysiological study of diabetic microangiopathy. Conventional proteomics methods, including gel-based methods, exhibit limited sensitivity and robustness and have typically been used in high- or middle-abundance biomarker discovery. Clinical samples from patients with diabetic microangiopathy, such as biopsy samples, are minute in size. Therefore sample preparation, quantitative labelling and mass spectrometry technologies need to be optimized for low-abundance protein detection, multiple-sample processing and precision quantitation. In this review, we briefly introduce the recent technological developments in proteomics methods and summarize current proteomics-based, translational research on diabetic microangiopathy. Recent technological developments in proteomics tools may shed new light on the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy and biomarkers and therapeutic targets related to this condition.

  19. Coupling enrichment methods with proteomics for understanding and treating disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Shiloach, Joseph; Bowen, Michael A; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Owing to recent advances in proteomics analytical methods and bioinformatics capabilities there is a growing trend toward using these capabilities for the development of drugs to treat human disease, including target and drug evaluation, understanding mechanisms of drug action, and biomarker discovery. Currently, the genetic sequences of many major organisms are available, which have helped greatly in characterizing proteomes in model animal systems and humans. Through proteomics, global profiles of different disease states can be characterized (e.g. changes in types and relative levels as well as changes in PTMs such as glycosylation or phosphorylation). Although intracellular proteomics can provide a broad overview of physiology of cells and tissues, it has been difficult to quantify the low abundance proteins which can be important for understanding the diseased states and treatment progression. For this reason, there is increasing interest in coupling comparative proteomics methods with subcellular fractionation and enrichment techniques for membranes, nucleus, phosphoproteome, glycoproteome as well as low abundance serum proteins. In this review, we will provide examples of where the utilization of different proteomics-coupled enrichment techniques has aided target and biomarker discovery, understanding the drug targeting mechanism, and mAb discovery. Taken together, these improvements will help to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of various diseases including cancer, autoimmunity, inflammation, cardiovascular disease, and neurological conditions, and in the design and development of better medicines for treating these afflictions. PMID:25523641

  20. Development of a Targeted Urine Proteome Assay for Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cantley, Lloyd G.; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Stone, Kathryn L.; Chung, Lisa; Belcher, Justin; Abbott, Thomas; Cantley, Jennifer L.; Williams, Kenneth R.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Human urine is the least invasive and most readily available bio fluid whose proteome has been shown to change in response to disease or drug treatment. Urine is thus very amenable to quantitative proteomics and is a logical sample choice for identifying protein biomarkers for kidney diseases. In this study potential biomarkers were identified initially by using a multi-proteomics workflow to compare urine proteomes of kidney transplant patients who exhibited immediate versus delayed graft function. To comprehensively interrogate the urine proteome two “bottom up”, mass spectrometric-based discovery approaches, iTRAQ and Label Free Quantitation (LFQ), were complemented by Differential Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) analyses of intact urine proteins from kidney transplant recipients who received a deceased donor kidney. Differentially expressed proteins in the two patient groups were identified, and corresponding stable isotope–labeled internal peptide standard (SIS) peptides were synthesized for scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The Targeted Urine Proteome Assay (TUPA) was then developed by identifying those peptides for which there were at least 2 transitions for which interference in a urine matrix across 156 MRM runs was less than 30%. This resulted in a final assay that monitors 224 peptides corresponding to 167 quantifiable proteins. PMID:26220717

  1. Aberrant glycosylation associated with enzymes as cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the new roles for enzymes in personalized medicine builds on a rational approach to cancer biomarker discovery using enzyme-associated aberrant glycosylation. A hallmark of cancer, aberrant glycosylation is associated with differential expressions of enzymes such as glycosyltransferase and glycosidases. The aberrant expressions of the enzymes in turn cause cancer cells to produce glycoproteins with specific cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures. Content In this review we provide examples of cancer biomarker discovery using aberrant glycosylation in three areas. First, changes in glycosylation machinery such as glycosyltransferases/glycosidases could be used as cancer biomarkers. Second, most of the clinically useful cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins. Discovery of specific cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures of these existing biomarkers could improve their cancer specificity, such as the discovery of AFP-L3, fucosylated glycoforms of AFP. Third, cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures provide a compelling rationale for discovering new biomarkers using glycomic and glycoproteomic technologies. Summary As a hallmark of cancer, aberrant glycosylation allows for the rational design of biomarker discovery efforts. But more important, we need to translate these biomarkers from discovery to clinical diagnostics using good strategies, such as the lessons learned from translating the biomarkers discovered using proteomic technologies to OVA 1, the first FDA-cleared In Vitro Diagnostic Multivariate Index Assay (IVDMIA). These lessons, providing important guidance in current efforts in biomarker discovery and translation, are applicable to the discovery of aberrant glycosylation associated with enzymes as cancer biomarkers as well. PMID:21906357

  2. Biomarkers: background, classification and guidelines for applications in nutritional epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Corella, Dolores; Ordovás, José M

    2015-02-26

    One of the main problems in nutritional epidemiology is to assess food intake as well as nutrient/food component intake to a high level of validity and reliability. To help in this process, the need to have good biomarkers that more objectively allow us to evaluate the diet consumed in a more standardized, valid and precise way has often been commented upon. There are various definitions of biomarkers and also different classifications of the same. In general a biomarker can be defined as a characteristic that can objectively measure different biological samples and that can be evaluated as an exposure marker of normal or pathogenic biological processes or of responses to a certain intervention. The biological samples most commonly used in nutritional epidemiology are blood, red blood cells, plasma, serum, urine, nails, saliva, faeces and samples of different tissues. Exposure biomarkers (dietary intake), biomarkers of effects and biomarkers of disease status can be determined from these samples. In turn, exposure biomarkers can be temporarily categorized into markers of acute, medium term or chronic effects. Many difficulties arise in identifying good biomarkers. Currently, advances in omics are opening up new possibilities for obtaining new biomarkers of various kinds, using genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, lipidomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We shall review the present situation of biomarkers in nutritional epidemiology as well as the future trends of the new omic biomarkers.

  3. Detection of cell-free, liver-specific mRNAs in peripheral blood from rats with hepatotoxicity: a potential toxicological biomarker for safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Makoto; Yanai, Mariko; Ookubo, Shingo; Awasaki, Naoko; Takami, Kenji; Imai, Ryoetsu

    2008-12-01

    To verify the concept that cell-free organ/tissue-specific mRNAs leaking from drug-damaged organs/tissues into peripheral blood could be toxicological biomarkers for identification of the target organs of drug toxicity, we attempted to detect liver-specific mRNAs in peripheral blood from rats with chemical-induced hepatotoxicity. We selected alpha(1)-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (Ambp) and albumin mRNAs as tentative liver-specific biomarkers and successfully detected them by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR in peripheral blood 24 h after D-galactosamine HCl (D-gal) or acetaminophen administration. Moreover, albumin mRNA was detected 2 h after D-gal administration, although plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were still unchanged. On the other hand, in peripheral blood from rat with bupivacaine HCl-induced skeletal muscle damage, neither Ambp nor albumin mRNA was detectable while plasma creatine kinase, ALT, and AST levels prominently increased 2 or 12 h after dosing. Furthermore, Ambp mRNA was also detectable in filtered plasma from rats with liver damage, indicating that cell-free Ambp mRNA can be present in peripheral blood. In conclusion, cell-free, liver-specific Ambp, and albumin mRNAs were detectable in peripheral blood from rats with chemical-induced liver damage. It is believed that the detection of cell-free organ/tissue-specific mRNA in peripheral blood is a promising approach in the survey of toxicological biomarkers. PMID:18779383

  4. SELDI PROTEINCHIP-BASED LIVER BIOMARKERS IN FUNGICIDE EXPOSED ZEBRAFISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here is part of a three-phased small fish computational toxicology project using a combination of 1) whole organism endpoints, 2) genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches, and 3) computational modeling to (a) identify new molecular biomarkers of expos...

  5. Proteomics analysis of bodily fluids in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A; Chen, Ru

    2015-08-01

    Proteomics study of pancreatic cancer using bodily fluids emphasizes biomarker discovery and clinical application, presenting unique prospect and challenges. Depending on the physiological nature of the bodily fluid and its proximity to pancreatic cancer, the proteomes of bodily fluids, such as pancreatic juice, pancreatic cyst fluid, blood, bile, and urine, can be substantially different in terms of protein constitution and the dynamic range of protein concentration. Thus, a comprehensive discovery and specific detection of cancer-associated proteins within these varied fluids is a complex task, requiring rigorous experiment design and a concerted approach. While major challenges still remain, fluid proteomics studies in pancreatic cancer to date have provided a wealth of information in revealing proteome alterations associated with pancreatic cancer in various bodily fluids.

  6. Laboratory Medicine in the Scope of Proteomics and Genomics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Advances in technology, especially in molecular biology, allow for a fast expansion of diagnostic methods in routine clinical practice. New proteomics and genomics technologies could be used for disease specific biomarker discovery and to monitor patient response to the therapy. Genomics and proteomics may also help to establish new, molecular classification of the disease. Applying genomic and proteomic methods to body fluids (serum, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, etc) and tissue extracts would place valuable objective analytical power in the hands of the clinician however validation of those methods is an important issue. The rapid expansion of the diagnostic tools based on developments in proteomic and genomic technologies can be fundamental for the development of personalized medicine.

  7. Respiratory proteomics: from descriptive studies to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Teran, Luis M; Montes-Vizuet, Rosalia; Li, Xinping; Franz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are highly prevalent and affect humankind worldwide, causing extensive morbidity and mortality with the environment playing an important role. Given the complex structure of the airways, sophisticated tools are required for early diagnosis; initial symptoms are nonspecific, and the clinical diagnosis is made frequently late. Over the past few years, proteomics has made high technological progress in mass-spectrometry-based protein identification and has allowed us to gain new insights into disease mechanisms and identify potential novel therapeutic targets. This review will highlight the contributions of proteomics toward the understanding of the respiratory proteome listing potential biomarkers and its potential application to the clinic. We also outline the contributions of proteomics to creating a personalized approach in respiratory medicine.

  8. Translational biomarkers of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Beger, Richard D; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Yang, Xi; Gill, Pritmohinder S; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Sun, Jinchun; James, Laura P

    2015-09-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic drug that can cause liver injury, liver necrosis and liver failure. APAP-induced liver injury is associated with glutathione depletion, the formation of APAP protein adducts, the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and mitochondrial injury. The systems biology omics technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) have been used to discover potential translational biomarkers of liver injury. The following review provides a summary of the systems biology discovery process, analytical validation of biomarkers and translation of omics biomarkers from the nonclinical to clinical setting in APAP-induced liver injury.

  9. Proteomic contributions to personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B; Bepler, Gerold; Sutphen, Rebecca; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R; Benson, Kaaron; Hussein, Mohamad; Hazlehurst, Lori A; Yeatman, Timothy J; Hildreth, Lynne T; Sellers, Thomas A; Jacobsen, Paul B; Fenstermacher, David A; Dalton, William S

    2008-10-01

    Cancer impacts each patient and family differently. Our current understanding of the disease is primarily limited to clinical hallmarks of cancer, but many specific molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Genetic markers can be used to determine predisposition to tumor development, but molecularly targeted treatment strategies that improve patient prognosis are not widely available for most cancers. Individualized care plans, also described as personalized medicine, still must be developed by understanding and implementing basic science research into clinical treatment. Proteomics holds great promise in contributing to the prevention and cure of cancer because it provides unique tools for discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. As such, proteomics can help translate basic science discoveries into the clinical practice of personalized medicine. Here we describe how biological mass spectrometry and proteome analysis interact with other major patient care and research initiatives and present vignettes illustrating efforts in discovery of diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, development of treatment strategies in lung cancer, and monitoring prognosis and relapse in multiple myeloma patients.

  10. Mammalian plasma membrane proteins as potential biomarkers and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rucevic, Marijana; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2011-06-01

    Defining the plasma membrane proteome is crucial to understand the role of plasma membrane in fundamental biological processes. Change in membrane proteins is one of the first events that take place under pathological conditions, making plasma membrane proteins a likely source of potential disease biomarkers with prognostic or diagnostic potential. Membrane proteins are also potential targets for monoclonal antibodies and other drugs that block receptors or inhibit enzymes essential to the disease progress. Despite several advanced methods recently developed for the analysis of hydrophobic proteins and proteins with posttranslational modifications, integral membrane proteins are still under-represented in plasma membrane proteome. Recent advances in proteomic investigation of plasma membrane proteins, defining their roles as diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers and as target molecules in disease treatment, are presented.

  11. System-wide peripheral biomarker discovery using information theory.

    PubMed

    Alterovitz, Gil; Xiang, Michael; Liu, Jonathan; Chang, Amelia; Ramoni, Marco F

    2008-01-01

    The identification of reliable peripheral biomarkers for clinical diagnosis, patient prognosis, and biological functional studies would allow for access to biological information currently available only through invasive methods. Traditional approaches have so far considered aspects of tissues and biofluid markers independently. Here we introduce an information theoretic framework for biomarker discovery, integrating biofluid and tissue information. This allows us to identify tissue information in peripheral biofluids. We treat tissue-biofluid interactions as an information channel through functional space using 26 proteomes from 45 different sources to determine quantitatively the correspondence of each biofluid for specific tissues via relative entropy calculation of proteomes mapped onto phenotype, function, and drug space. Next, we identify candidate biofluids and biomarkers responsible for functional information transfer (p < 0.01). A total of 851 unique candidate biomarkers proxies were identified. The biomarkers were found to be significant functional tissue proxies compared to random proteins (p < 0.001). This proxy link is found to be further enhanced by filtering the biofluid proteins to include only significant tissue-biofluid information channels and is further validated by gene expression. Furthermore, many of the candidate biomarkers are novel and have yet to be explored. In addition to characterizing proteins and their interactions with a systemic perspective, our work can be used as a roadmap to guide biomedical investigation, from suggesting biofluids for study to constraining the search for biomarkers. This work has applications in disease screening, diagnosis, and protein function studies. PMID:18229689

  12. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R; Granato, Daniela C; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R; Winck, Flavia V; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Cruz, Karen S P; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W; Santos-Silva, Alan R; Coletta, Ricardo D; Sherman, Nicholas E; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2015-12-22

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS.

  13. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation

    PubMed Central

    Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R.; Granato, Daniela C.; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R.; Winck, Flavia V.; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P.; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R.; Cruz, Karen S. P.; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J.; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P.; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W.; Santos-Silva, Alan R.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS. PMID:26540631

  14. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (recent update).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil; Moon, Carolyn Seungyoun; Khogali, Azza; Haidous, Ali; Chabenne, Anthony; Ojo, Comfort; Jelebinkov, Miriana; Kurdi, Yousef; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder mostly affecting the aging population over sixty. Cardinal symptoms including, tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooling, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are already destroyed. Hence we need early, sensitive, specific, and economical peripheral and/or central biomarker(s) for the differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. These can be classified as clinical, biochemical, genetic, proteomic, and neuroimaging biomarkers. Novel discoveries of genetic as well as nongenetic biomarkers may be utilized for the personalized treatment of PD during preclinical (premotor) and clinical (motor) stages. Premotor biomarkers including hyper-echogenicity of substantia nigra, olfactory and autonomic dysfunction, depression, hyposmia, deafness, REM sleep disorder, and impulsive behavior may be noticed during preclinical stage. Neuroimaging biomarkers (PET, SPECT, MRI), and neuropsychological deficits can facilitate differential diagnosis. Single-cell profiling of dopaminergic neurons has identified pyridoxal kinase and lysosomal ATPase as biomarker genes for PD prognosis. Promising biomarkers include: fluid biomarkers, neuromelanin antibodies, pathological forms of α-Syn, DJ-1, amyloid β and tau in the CSF, patterns of gene expression, metabolomics, urate, as well as protein profiling in the blood and CSF samples. Reduced brain regional N-acetyl-aspartate is a biomarker for the in vivo assessment of neuronal loss using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T2 relaxation time with MRI. To confirm PD diagnosis, the PET biomarkers include [(18)F]-DOPA for estimating dopaminergic neurotransmission, [(18)F]dG for mitochondrial bioenergetics, [(18)F]BMS for mitochondrial complex-1, [(11)C](R)-PK11195 for microglial activation, SPECT imaging with (123)Iflupane and βCIT for dopamine transporter, and urinary

  15. A proteomic approach to porcine saliva.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Ana M; Cerón, José J; Fuentes-Rubio, María; Tecles, Fernando; Beeley, Josie A

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in salivary animal proteomics, with special reference to the porcine proteome. Until fairly recently, most studies on saliva as a diagnostic fluid have focused on humans, primates and rodents, and the development of salivary analysis in monitoring health in farm animals including pigs has received only limited consideration. The porcine salivary proteome has been characterised by 2D-electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Major and minor proteins have been identified. The use of saliva as a non-invasive biological fluid in monitoring health and disease in pigs will be reviewed, together with the potential use of proteomics for the development of biomarkers. In this review, methods of collection and the composition of porcine saliva will be considered, together with saliva handling and analysis. The overall findings indicate that there is considerable potential for the development of salivary analysis as a non-invasive diagnostic fluid in the pig, and that it offers advantages over other body fluids in this animal.

  16. Sepsis biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Prucha, Miroslav; Bellingan, Geoff; Zazula, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Sepsis is the most frequent cause of death in non-coronary intensive care units (ICUs). In the past 10 years, progress has been made in the early identification of septic patients and in their treatment and these improvements in support and therapy mean that the mortality is gradually decreasing but it still remains unacceptably high. Leaving clinical diagnosis aside, the laboratory diagnostics represent a complex range of investigations that can place significant demands on the system given the speed of response required. There are hundreds of biomarkers which could be potentially used for diagnosis and prognosis in septic patients. The main attributes of successful markers would be high sensitivity, specificity, possibility of bed-side monitoring, and financial accessibility. Only a fraction is used in routine clinical practice because many lack sufficient sensitivity or specificity. The following review gives a short overview of the current epidemiology of sepsis, its pathogenesis and state-of-the-art knowledge on the use of specific biochemical, hematological and immunological parameters in its diagnostics. Prospective approaches towards discovery of new diagnostic biomarkers have been shortly mentioned.

  17. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease: current practices and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Heba N; Ciorba, Matthew A

    2012-04-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis represent the two main forms of the idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Currently available blood and stool based biomarkers provide reproducible, quantitative tools that can complement clinical assessment to aid clinicians in IBD diagnosis and management. C-reactive protein and fecal based leukocyte markers can help the clinician distinguish IBD from noninflammatory diarrhea and assess disease activity. The ability to differentiate between forms of IBD and predict risk for disease complications is specific to serologic tests including antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic proteins. Advances in genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic array based technologies are facilitating the development of new biomarkers for IBD. The discovery of novel biomarkers, which can correlate with mucosal healing or predict long-term disease course has the potential to significantly improve patient care. This article reviews the uses and limitations of currently available biomarkers and highlights recent advances in IBD biomarker discovery. PMID:22424434

  18. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Discovery Based on Genomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Hee Seung; Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer presents at an advanced stage in more than 75% of patients. Early detection has great promise to improve clinical outcomes. Although the advancing proteomic technologies led to the discovery of numerous ovarian cancer biomarkers, no screening method has been recommended for early detection of ovarian cancer. Complexity and heterogeneity of ovarian carcinogenesis is a major obstacle to discover biomarkers. As cancer arises due to accumulation of genetic change, understanding the close connection between genetic changes and ovarian carcinogenesis would provide the opportunity to find novel gene-level ovarian cancer biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the various gene-based biomarkers by genomic technologies, including inherited gene mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential gene expression. In addition, we suggest the strategy to discover novel gene-based biomarkers with recently introduced next generation sequencing. PMID:25337559

  19. Skeletal muscle proteomics: current approaches, technical challenges and emerging techniques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle fibres represent one of the most abundant cell types in mammals. Their highly specialised contractile and metabolic functions depend on a large number of membrane-associated proteins with very high molecular masses, proteins with extensive posttranslational modifications and components that exist in highly complex supramolecular structures. This makes it extremely difficult to perform conventional biochemical studies of potential changes in protein clusters during physiological adaptations or pathological processes. Results Skeletal muscle proteomics attempts to establish the global identification and biochemical characterisation of all members of the muscle-associated protein complement. A considerable number of proteomic studies have employed large-scale separation techniques, such as high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or liquid chromatography, and combined them with mass spectrometry as the method of choice for high-throughput protein identification. Muscle proteomics has been applied to the comprehensive biochemical profiling of developing, maturing and aging muscle, as well as the analysis of contractile tissues undergoing physiological adaptations seen in disuse atrophy, physical exercise and chronic muscle transformation. Biomedical investigations into proteome-wide alterations in skeletal muscle tissues were also used to establish novel biomarker signatures of neuromuscular disorders. Importantly, mass spectrometric studies have confirmed the enormous complexity of posttranslational modifications in skeletal muscle proteins. Conclusions This review critically examines the scientific impact of modern muscle proteomics and discusses its successful application for a better understanding of muscle biology, but also outlines its technical limitations and emerging techniques to establish new biomarker candidates. PMID:21798084

  20. MAPU: Max-Planck Unified database of organellar, cellular, tissue and body fluid proteomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yong; Adachi, Jun; Olsen, Jesper V; Shi, Rong; de Souza, Gustavo; Pasini, Erica; Foster, Leonard J; Macek, Boris; Zougman, Alexandre; Kumar, Chanchal; Wisniewski, Jacek R; Jun, Wang; Mann, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology to map the protein composition of organelles, cell types and tissues. In our department, a large-scale effort to map these proteomes is complemented by the Max-Planck Unified (MAPU) proteome database. MAPU contains several body fluid proteomes; including plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Cell lines have been mapped to a depth of several thousand proteins and the red blood cell proteome has also been analyzed in depth. The liver proteome is represented with 3200 proteins. By employing high resolution MS and stringent validation criteria, false positive identification rates in MAPU are lower than 1:1000. Thus MAPU datasets can serve as reference proteomes in biomarker discovery. MAPU contains the peptides identifying each protein, measured masses, scores and intensities and is freely available at http://www.mapuproteome.com using a clickable interface of cell or body parts. Proteome data can be queried across proteomes by protein name, accession number, sequence similarity, peptide sequence and annotation information. More than 4500 mouse and 2500 human proteins have already been identified in at least one proteome. Basic annotation information and links to other public databases are provided in MAPU and we plan to add further analysis tools.

  1. MAPU: Max-Planck Unified database of organellar, cellular, tissue and body fluid proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yong; Adachi, Jun; Olsen, Jesper V.; Shi, Rong; de Souza, Gustavo; Pasini, Erica; Foster, Leonard J.; Macek, Boris; Zougman, Alexandre; Kumar, Chanchal; Wiśniewski, Jacek R.; Jun, Wang; Mann, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology to map the protein composition of organelles, cell types and tissues. In our department, a large-scale effort to map these proteomes is complemented by the Max-Planck Unified (MAPU) proteome database. MAPU contains several body fluid proteomes; including plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Cell lines have been mapped to a depth of several thousand proteins and the red blood cell proteome has also been analyzed in depth. The liver proteome is represented with 3200 proteins. By employing high resolution MS and stringent validation criteria, false positive identification rates in MAPU are lower than 1:1000. Thus MAPU datasets can serve as reference proteomes in biomarker discovery. MAPU contains the peptides identifying each protein, measured masses, scores and intensities and is freely available at using a clickable interface of cell or body parts. Proteome data can be queried across proteomes by protein name, accession number, sequence similarity, peptide sequence and annotation information. More than 4500 mouse and 2500 human proteins have already been identified in at least one proteome. Basic annotation information and links to other public databases are provided in MAPU and we plan to add further analysis tools. PMID:17090601

  2. Plasma proteome analysis of patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As part of a clinical proteomics program focused on diabetes and its complications we are looking for new and better protein biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. The search for new and better biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy has, with a few exceptions, previously focused on either hypothesis-driven studies or urinary based investigations. To date only two studies have investigated the proteome of blood in search for new biomarkers, and these studies were conducted in sera from patients with type 2 diabetes. This is the first reported in depth proteomic study where plasma from type 1 diabetic patients was investigated with the goal of finding improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. In order to reach lower concentration proteins in plasma a pre-fractionation step, either hexapeptide bead-based libraries or anion exchange chromatography, was performed prior to surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Results Proteomic analysis of plasma from a cross-sectional cohort of 123 type 1 diabetic patients previously diagnosed as normoalbuminuric, microalbuminuric or macroalbuminuric, gave rise to 290 peaks clusters of which 16 were selected as the most promising biomarker candidates based on statistical performance, including independent component analysis. Four of the peaks that were discovered have been identified as transthyretin, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein C1 and cystatin C. Several yet unidentified proteins discovered by this novel approach appear to have more potential as biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion These results demonstrate the capacity of proteomic analysis of plasma, by confirming the presence of known biomarkers as well as revealing new biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy in plasma in type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:20205888

  3. Drug-induced liver injury: the dawn of biomarkers?

    PubMed

    Weiler, Stefan; Merz, Michael; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a potentially fatal adverse event with significant medical and economic impact. Many drugs, especially anti-infective, neurologic or pain-modifying substances, act as hepatotoxins. With cardiovascular toxicity, liver toxicity is one of the two leading causes for drug withdrawal from the market. The liver can be affected directly, in a predictable and dose-dependent manner, or idiosyncratically, independent of the dose and therefore unpredictable. Currently DILI is a diagnosis of exclusion that physicians have to bear in mind in patients with an unexplained increase of liver enzymes. The type of injury is categorized into hepatocellular, cholestatic, or mixed by the respective enzyme pattern of injury. Symptoms of affected patients can mimic any other liver disease. Therefore, new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for early liver injury are currently being evaluated in multi-centre clinical trials that are conducted by international consortia and other initiatives. Pharmacogenetic testing, next-generation sequencing, proteomics, metabolomics and mechanistic markers can help to preselect susceptible patient populations and tailor drug therapy to individual patients. Proposed DILI indicators that are under investigation include microRNAs, cytokeratin-18 (CK18), high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB-1), and several other biomarkers. These developments can change clinical practice, and improve patients' safety and management. However, they have not been translated into clinical practice or approved for routine use yet. Management of DILI usually consists of initial withdrawal of the suspected drug and-if applicable-administration of specific antidotes, such as N-acetylcysteine. However, the overall management of DILI could change in the near future with the advent of novel diagnostic and prognostic DILI markers.

  4. Drug-induced liver injury: the dawn of biomarkers?

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Stefan; Merz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a potentially fatal adverse event with significant medical and economic impact. Many drugs, especially anti-infective, neurologic or pain-modifying substances, act as hepatotoxins. With cardiovascular toxicity, liver toxicity is one of the two leading causes for drug withdrawal from the market. The liver can be affected directly, in a predictable and dose-dependent manner, or idiosyncratically, independent of the dose and therefore unpredictable. Currently DILI is a diagnosis of exclusion that physicians have to bear in mind in patients with an unexplained increase of liver enzymes. The type of injury is categorized into hepatocellular, cholestatic, or mixed by the respective enzyme pattern of injury. Symptoms of affected patients can mimic any other liver disease. Therefore, new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for early liver injury are currently being evaluated in multi-centre clinical trials that are conducted by international consortia and other initiatives. Pharmacogenetic testing, next-generation sequencing, proteomics, metabolomics and mechanistic markers can help to preselect susceptible patient populations and tailor drug therapy to individual patients. Proposed DILI indicators that are under investigation include microRNAs, cytokeratin-18 (CK18), high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB-1), and several other biomarkers. These developments can change clinical practice, and improve patients' safety and management. However, they have not been translated into clinical practice or approved for routine use yet. Management of DILI usually consists of initial withdrawal of the suspected drug and—if applicable—administration of specific antidotes, such as N-acetylcysteine. However, the overall management of DILI could change in the near future with the advent of novel diagnostic and prognostic DILI markers. PMID:25926985

  5. Mass spectrometry in food proteomics: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Muccilli, Vera; Saletti, Rosaria; Foti, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    In the last decades, the continuous and rapid evolution of proteomic approaches has provided an efficient platform for the characterization of food-derived proteins. Particularly, the impressive increasing in performance and versatility of the MS instrumentation has contributed to the development of new analytical strategies for proteins, evidencing how MS arguably represents an indispensable tool in food proteomics. Investigation of protein composition in foodstuffs is helpful for understanding the relationship between the protein content and the nutritional and technological properties of foods, the production of methods for food traceability, the assessment of food quality and safety, including the detection of allergens and microbial contaminants in foods, or even the characterization of genetically modified products. Given the high variety of the food-derived proteins and considering their differences in chemical and physical properties, a single proteomic strategy for all purposes does not exist. Rather, proteomic approaches need to be adapted to each analytical problem, and development of new strategies is necessary in order to obtain always the best results. In this tutorial, the most relevant aspects of MS-based methodologies in food proteomics will be examined, and their advantages and drawbacks will be discussed.

  6. PROTEOMICS in aquaculture: applications and trends.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Pedro M; Silva, Tomé S; Dias, Jorge; Jessen, Flemming

    2012-07-19

    Over the last forty years global aquaculture presented a growth rate of 6.9% per annum with an amazing production of 52.5 million tonnes in 2008, and a contribution of 43% of aquatic animal food for human consumption. In order to meet the world's health requirements of fish protein, a continuous growth in production is still expected for decades to come. Aquaculture is, though, a very competitive market, and a global awareness regarding the use of scientific knowledge and emerging technologies to obtain a better farmed organism through a sustainable production has enhanced the importance of proteomics in seafood biology research. Proteomics, as a powerful comparative tool, has therefore been increasingly used over the last decade to address different questions in aquaculture, regarding welfare, nutrition, health, quality, and safety. In this paper we will give an overview of these biological questions and the role of proteomics in their investigation, outlining the advantages, disadvantages and future challenges. A brief description of the proteomics technical approaches will be presented. Special focus will be on the latest trends related to the aquaculture production of fish with defined nutritional, health or quality properties for functional foods and the integration of proteomics techniques in addressing this challenging issue.

  7. Fish metalloproteins as biomarkers of environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; Ziolli, Roberta Lourenço

    2012-01-01

    Fish are well-recognized bioindicators of environmental contamination. Several recent proteomic studies have demonstrated the validity and value of using fish in the search and discovery of new biomarkers. Certain analytical tools, such as comparative protein expression analyses, both in field and lab exposure studies, have been used to improve the understanding of the potential for chemical pollutants to cause harmful effects. The metallomic approach is in its early stages of development, but has already shown great potential for use in ecological and environmental monitoring contexts. Besides discovering new metalloproteins that may be used as biomarkers for environmental contamination, metallomics can be used to more comprehensively elucidate existing biomarkers, which may enhance their effectiveness. Unfortunately, metallomic profiling for fish has not been explored, because only a few fish metalloproteins have thus far been discovered and studied. Of those that have, some have shown ecological importance, and are now successfully used as biomarkers of environmental contamination. These biomarkers have been shown to respond to several types of environmental contamination, such as cyanotoxins, metals, and sewage effluents, although many do not yet possess any known function. Examples of successes include MMPs, superoxide dismutases, selenoproteins, and iron-bound proteins. Unfortunately, none of these have, as yet, been extensively studied. As data are developed for them, valuable new information on their roles in fish physiology and in inducing environmental effects should become available.

  8. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing.

  9. The current status of biomarkers for predicting toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah; Aubrecht, Jiri; Boekelheide, Kim; Brewster, David W; Vaidya, Vishal S; Anderson, Linnea; Burt, Deborah; Dere, Edward; Hwang, Kathleen; Pacheco, Sara; Saikumar, Janani; Schomaker, Shelli; Sigman, Mark; Goodsaid, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are significant rates of attrition in drug development. A number of compounds fail to progress past preclinical development due to limited tools that accurately monitor toxicity in preclinical studies and in the clinic. Research has focused on improving tools for the detection of organ-specific toxicity through the identification and characterization of biomarkers of toxicity. Areas covered This article reviews what we know about emerging biomarkers in toxicology, with a focus on the 2012 Northeast Society of Toxicology meeting titled ‘Translational Biomarkers in Toxicology.’ The areas covered in this meeting are summarized and include biomarkers of testicular injury and dysfunction, emerging biomarkers of kidney injury and translation of emerging biomarkers from preclinical species to human populations. The authors also provide a discussion about the biomarker qualification process and possible improvements to this process. Expert opinion There is currently a gap between the scientific work in the development and qualification of novel biomarkers for nonclinical drug safety assessment and how these biomarkers are actually used in drug safety assessment. A clear and efficient path to regulatory acceptance is needed so that breakthroughs in the biomarker toolkit for nonclinical drug safety assessment can be utilized to aid in the drug development process. PMID:23961847

  10. Significance of urinary proteome pattern in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Sufi M

    2014-01-01

    Urinary proteomics is developing as a platform of urinary biomarkers of immense potential in recent years. The definition of urinary proteome in the context of renal allograft and characterization of different proteome patterns in various graft dysfunctions have led to the development of a distinct science of this noninvasive tool. Substantial numbers of studies have shown that different renal allograft disease states, both acute and chronic, could portray unique urinary proteome pattern enabling early diagnosis of graft dysfunction and proper manipulation of immunosuppressive strategy that could impact graft prognosis. The methodology of the urinary proteome is nonetheless not more complex than that of other sophisticated assays of conventional urinary protein analysis. Moreover, the need for a centralized database is also felt by the researchers as more and more studies have been presenting their results from different corners and as systems of organizing these newly emerging data being developed at international and national levels. In this context concept of urinary proteomics in renal allograft recipients would be of significant importance in clinical transplantation.

  11. Significance of urinary proteome pattern in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Sufi M

    2014-01-01

    Urinary proteomics is developing as a platform of urinary biomarkers of immense potential in recent years. The definition of urinary proteome in the context of renal allograft and characterization of different proteome patterns in various graft dysfunctions have led to the development of a distinct science of this noninvasive tool. Substantial numbers of studies have shown that different renal allograft disease states, both acute and chronic, could portray unique urinary proteome pattern enabling early diagnosis of graft dysfunction and proper manipulation of immunosuppressive strategy that could impact graft prognosis. The methodology of the urinary proteome is nonetheless not more complex than that of other sophisticated assays of conventional urinary protein analysis. Moreover, the need for a centralized database is also felt by the researchers as more and more studies have been presenting their results from different corners and as systems of organizing these newly emerging data being developed at international and national levels. In this context concept of urinary proteomics in renal allograft recipients would be of significant importance in clinical transplantation. PMID:24757556

  12. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics: existing capabilities and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Aryal, Uma K.; Hengel, Shawna M.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Kelly, Ryan T.; Robinson, Errol W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-21

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a means for identification, characterization, and quantification of biomolecules that are integral components of the processes essential for life. Characterization of proteins present in a biological system at the proteome and sub-proteomes (e.g., the phosphoproteome, proteoglycome, or degradome/peptidome) levels provides a foundation for understanding fundamental aspects as well as potentially a range of translational applications. Emerging technologies such as ion mobility separations coupled with mass spectrometry and microchip-based - proteome measurements combined with continued enhancement of MS instrumentation and separation techniques, such as reversed phase liquid chromatography and potentially capillary electrophoresis, show great promise for both broad undirected as well as targeted measurements and will be critical for e.g., the proteome-wide characterization of post translational modifications and identification, or the verification, and validation of potential biomarkers of disease. MS-based proteomics is also increasingly demonstrating great potential for contributing to our understanding of the dynamics, reactions, and roles proteins and peptides play advancing our understanding of biology on a system wide level for a wide range of applications, from investigations of microbial communities, bioremediation, and human health and disease states alike.

  13. Proteomics in reproductive biology: beacon for unraveling the molecular complexities.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Rahul D; Balasinor, N H; Kumar, Anita V; Sachdeva, Geetanjali; Parte, Priyanka; Dumasia, Kushaan

    2013-01-01

    Proteomics, an interface of rapidly evolving advances in physics and biology, is rapidly developing and expanding its potential applications to molecular and cellular biology. Application of proteomics tools has contributed towards identification of relevant protein biomarkers that can potentially change the strategies for early diagnosis and treatment of several diseases. The emergence of powerful mass spectrometry-based proteomics technique has added a new dimension to the field of medical research in liver, heart diseases and certain forms of cancer. Most proteomics tools are also being used to study physiological and pathological events related to reproductive biology. There have been attempts to generate the proteomes of testes, sperm, seminal fluid, epididymis, oocyte, and endometrium from reproductive disease patients. Here, we have reviewed proteomics based investigations in humans over the last decade, which focus on delineating the mechanism underlying various reproductive events such as spermatogenesis, oogenesis, endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, embryo development. The challenge is to harness new technologies like 2-DE, DIGE, MALDI-MS, SELDI-MS, MUDPIT, LC-MS etc., to a greater extent to develop widely applicable clinical tools in understanding molecular aspects of reproduction both in health and disease.

  14. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  15. Proteomic research in bivalves: towards the identification of molecular markers of aquatic pollution.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alexandre; Tedesco, Sara; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Cristobal, Susana

    2012-07-19

    Biomonitoring of aquatic environment and assessment of ecosystem health play essential roles in the development of effective strategies for the protection of the environment, human health and sustainable development. Biomarkers of pollution exposure have been extensively utilized in the last few decades to monitor the health of organisms and hence assess environmental status. However, the use of single biomarkers against biotic or abiotic stressors may be limited by the lack of sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, more recently, the search for novel biomarkers has been focused on the application of OMICS methodologies. Environmental proteomics focuses on the analysis of an organism's proteome and the detection of changes in the level of individual proteins/peptides in response to environmental stressors. Proteomics can provide a more robust approach for the assessment of environmental stress and therefore exposure to pollutants. This review aims to summarize the proteomic research in bivalves, a group of sessile and filter feeding organisms that play an important function as "sentinels" of the aquatic environment. A description of the main proteomic methodologies is provided. The current knowledge in bivalves' toxicology, achieved with proteomics, is reported describing the main biochemical markers identified. A brief discussion regarding future challenges in this area of research emphasizing the development of more descriptive gene/protein databases that could support the OMICs approaches is presented.

  16. Translating metabolomics to cardiovascular biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Senn, Todd; Hazen, Stanley L; Tang, W H Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics is the systematic study of the unique chemical fingerprints of small molecules or metabolite profiles that are related to a variety of cellular metabolic processes in a cell, organ, or organism. Although messenger RNA gene expression data and proteomic analyses do not tell the whole story of what might be happening in a cell, metabolic profiling provides direct and indirect physiologic insights that can potentially be detectable in a wide range of biospecimens. Although not specific to cardiac conditions, translating metabolomics to cardiovascular biomarkers has followed the traditional path of biomarker discovery from identification and confirmation to clinical validation and bedside testing. With technological advances in metabolomic tools (such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry) and more sophisticated bioinformatics and analytical techniques, the ability to measure low-molecular-weight metabolites in biospecimens provides a unique insight into established and novel metabolic pathways. Systemic metabolomics may provide physiologic understanding of cardiovascular disease states beyond traditional profiling and may involve descriptions of metabolic responses of an individual or population to therapeutic interventions or environmental exposures.

  17. Proteomics Analysis of Bladder Cancer Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Joanne L.; Khanna, Sanjay; Giles, Peter J.; Brennan, Paul; Brewis, Ian A.; Staffurth, John; Mason, Malcolm D.; Clayton, Aled

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles, secreted by various cell types, present in biological fluids that are particularly rich in membrane proteins. Ex vivo analysis of exosomes may provide biomarker discovery platforms and form non-invasive tools for disease diagnosis and monitoring. These vesicles have never before been studied in the context of bladder cancer, a major malignancy of the urological tract. We present the first proteomics analysis of bladder cancer cell exosomes. Using ultracentrifugation on a sucrose cushion, exosomes were highly purified from cultured HT1376 bladder cancer cells and verified as low in contaminants by Western blotting and flow cytometry of exosome-coated beads. Solubilization in a buffer containing SDS and DTT was essential for achieving proteomics analysis using an LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS approach. We report 353 high quality identifications with 72 proteins not previously identified by other human exosome proteomics studies. Overrepresentation analysis to compare this data set with previous exosome proteomics studies (using the ExoCarta database) revealed that the proteome was consistent with that of various exosomes with particular overlap with exosomes of carcinoma origin. Interrogating the Gene Ontology database highlighted a strong association of this proteome with carcinoma of bladder and other sites. The data also highlighted how homology among human leukocyte antigen haplotypes may confound MASCOT designation of major histocompatability complex Class I nomenclature, requiring data from PCR-based human leukocyte antigen haplotyping to clarify anomalous identifications. Validation of 18 MS protein identifications (including basigin, galectin-3, trophoblast glycoprotein (5T4), and others) was performed by a combination of Western blotting, flotation on linear sucrose gradients, and flow cytometry, confirming their exosomal expression. Some were confirmed positive on urinary exosomes from a bladder cancer patient. In summary, the

  18. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-01-20

    Proteomics, and the larger field of systems biology, have recently demonstrated utility in both the understanding of cellular processes on the molecular level and the identification of potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents a challenge in data processing, analysis and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics analysis and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed in order to interpret and display the large volumes of data produced.

  19. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  20. The Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics Assembles the Largest Proteome Database Resource for Plant Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Weckwerth, Wolfram; Baginsky, Sacha; Van Wijk, Klass; Heazlewood, Joshua; Millar, Harvey

    2009-12-01

    resources, and raw data have been deposited in PRIDE and PRIDE BioMart. Included in this database is an Arabidopsis proteome map that provides evidence for the expression of {approx}50% of all predicted gene models, including several alternative gene models that are not represented in The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) protein database. A set of organ-specific biomarkers is provided, as well as organ-specific proteotypic peptides for 4105 proteins that can be used to facilitate targeted quantitative proteomic surveys. In the future, the AtProteome database will be linked to additional existing resources developed by MASCP members, such as PPDB, ProMEX, and SUBA. The most comprehensive study on the Arabidopsis chloroplast proteome, which includes information on chloroplast sorting signals, posttranslational modifications (PTMs), and protein abundances (analyzed by high-accuracy MS [Orbitrap]), was recently published by the van Wijk lab.2 These and previous data are available via the plant proteome database (PPDB; http://ppdb.tc.cornell.edu) for A. thaliana and maize. PPDB provides genome-wide experimental and functional characterization of the A. thaliana and maize proteomes, including PTMs and subcellular localization information, with an emphasis on leaf and plastid proteins. Maize and Arabidopsis proteome entries are directly linked via internal BLAST alignments within PPDB. Direct links for each protein to TAIR, SUBA, ProMEX, and other resources are also provided.

  1. Clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy: current overview and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Kui; Li, Qifu; Nice, Edouard C; Zhang, Haiyuan; Huang, Canhua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common disease that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently, early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for more effective management of cancer. Importantly, protein profiling using clinical proteomic strategies, with spectacular sensitivity and precision, offer excellent promise for the identification of potential biomarkers that would direct the development of targeted therapeutic anticancer drugs for precision medicine. In particular, clinical sample sources, including tumor tissues and body fluids (blood, feces, urine and saliva), have been widely investigated using modern high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analysis, to pursue the possibilities of precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy. Discussed in this review are the current advantages and limitations of clinical proteomics, the available strategies of clinical proteomics for the management of precision medicine, as well as the challenges and future perspectives of clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy.

  2. Current strategies and findings in clinically relevant post-translational modification-specific proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, Oliver; Loroch, Stefan; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has considerably extended our knowledge about the occurrence and dynamics of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). So far, quantitative proteomics has been mainly used to study PTM regulation in cell culture models, providing new insights into the role of aberrant PTM patterns in human disease. However, continuous technological and methodical developments have paved the way for an increasing number of PTM-specific proteomic studies using clinical samples, often limited in sample amount. Thus, quantitative proteomics holds a great potential to discover, validate and accurately quantify biomarkers in body fluids and primary tissues. A major effort will be to improve the complete integration of robust but sensitive proteomics technology to clinical environments. Here, we discuss PTMs that are relevant for clinical research, with a focus on phosphorylation, glycosylation and proteolytic cleavage; furthermore, we give an overview on the current developments and novel findings in mass spectrometry-based PTM research. PMID:25955281

  3. Human Urine Proteomics: Analytical Techniques and Clinical Applications in Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Shiva; Jafari, Ameneh; Moradpoor, Raheleh; Ghasemi, Elmira; Khalkhal, Ensieh

    2015-01-01

    Urine has been in the center of attention among scientists of clinical proteomics in the past decade, because it is valuable source of proteins and peptides with a relative stable composition and easy to collect in large and repeated quantities with a noninvasive procedure. In this review, we discuss technical aspects of urinary proteomics in detail, including sample preparation, proteomic technologies, and their advantage and disadvantages. Several recent experiments are presented which applied urinary proteome for biomarker discovery in renal diseases including diabetic nephropathy, immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, lupus nephritis, membranous nephropathy, and acute kidney injury. In addition, several available databases in urinary proteomics are also briefly introduced. PMID:26693351

  4. Tissue proteomics using capillary isoelectric focusing-based multidimensional separations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueju; Balgley, Brian M; Lee, Cheng S

    2005-10-01

    The capabilities of capillary isoelectric focusing-based multidimensional separations for performing proteome analysis from minute samples create new opportunities in the pursuit of biomarker discovery using enriched and selected cell populations procured from tissue specimens. In this article, recent advances in online integration of capillary isoelectric focusing with nano-reversed phase liquid chromatography for achieving high-resolution peptide and protein separations prior to mass spectrometry analysis are reviewed, along with its potential application to tissue proteomics. These proteome technological advances combined with recently developed tissue microdissection techniques, provide powerful tools for those seeking to gain a greater understanding at the global level of the cellular machinery associated with human diseases such as cancer.

  5. Large-scale proteomic analysis of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Mamoun; Springer, David L

    2004-10-01

    Proteomic analysis of membrane proteins is a promising approach for the identification of novel drug targets and/or disease biomarkers. Despite notable technological developments, obstacles related to extraction and solublization of membrane proteins are encountered. A critical discussion of the different preparative methods of membrane proteins is offered in relation to downstream proteomic applications, mainly gel-based analyses and mass spectrometry. Frequently, unknown proteins are identified by high-throughput profiling of membrane proteins. In search for novel membrane proteins, analysis of protein sequences using computational tools is performed to predict the presence of transmembrane domains. This review also presents these bioinformatic tools with the human proteome as a case study. Along with technological innovations, advancements in the areas of sample preparation and computational prediction of membrane proteins will lead to exciting discoveries.

  6. Rapid development of Proteomic applications with the AIBench framework.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Hugo; Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Glez-Peña, Daniel; Méndez Reboredo, José R; Santos, Hugo M; Carreira, Ricardo J; Capelo-Martínez, José L; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we present two case studies of Proteomics applications development using the AIBench framework, a Java desktop application framework mainly focused in scientific software development. The applications presented in this work are Decision Peptide-Driven, for rapid and accurate protein quantification, and Bacterial Identification, for Tuberculosis biomarker search and diagnosis. Both tools work with mass spectrometry data, specifically with MALDI-TOF spectra, minimizing the time required to process and analyze the experimental data.

  7. Biomarkers for mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

    PubMed

    Suomalainen, Anu

    2011-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies are a group of more than 100 disorders of adults and children, with highly variable phenotypes. Their diagnosis is a great challenge, in spite of the fact that knowledge on their molecular genetic background has increased considerably during the last 20 years. Muscle biopsy is the key diagnostic procedure, including histological and biochemical analysis of mitochondria. Less invasive, specific and sensitive diagnostic tools based on serum biomarkers are still lacking. Recent technological developments, especially in mass spectrometry, enable novel tools for identification of local and global molecular consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in patient samples. Furthermore, emerging disease models, especially genetically modified mice, offer unique materials to tackle pathophysiology with modern transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches. Identified molecular signals or metabolic fingerprints have the potential to be highly useful biomarkers for future diagnosis of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

  8. New serological biomarkers of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuhang; Conklin, Laurie; Alex, Philip

    2008-09-01

    Serological biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a rapidly expanding list of non-invasive tests for objective assessments of disease activity, early diagnosis, prognosis evaluation and surveillance. This review summarizes both old and new biomarkers in IBD, but focuses on the development and characterization of new serological biomarkers (identified since 2007). These include five new anti-glycan antibodies, anti-chitobioside IgA (ACCA), anti-laminaribioside IgG (ALCA), anti-manobioside IgG (AMCA), and antibodies against chemically synthesized (Sigma) two major oligomannose epitopes, Man alpha-1,3 Man alpha-1,2 Man (SigmaMan3) and Man alpha-1,3 Man alpha-1,2 Man alpha-1,2 Man (SigmaMan4). These new biomarkers serve as valuable complementary tools to existing biomarkers not only in differentiating Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), normal and other non-IBD gut diseases, but also in predicting disease involvement (ileum vs colon), IBD risk (as subclinical biomarkers), and disease course (risk of complication and surgery). Interestingly, the prevalence of the antiglycan antibodies, including anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), ALCA and AMCA, was found to be associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IBD susceptible genes such as NOD2/CARD15, NOD1/CARD4, toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4, and beta-defensin-1. Furthermore, a gene dosage effect was observed: anti-glycan positivity became more frequent as the number of NOD2/CARD15 SNPS increased. Other new serum/plasma IBD biomarkers reviewed include ubiquitination factor E4A (UBE4A), CXCL16 (a chemokine), resistin, and apolipoprotein A-IV. This review also discusses the most recent studies in IBD biomarker discovery by the application of new technologies such as proteomics, fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy, and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)'s (with an emphasis on cytokine/chemokine profiling). Finally, the prospects of developing more

  9. New serological biomarkers of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuhang; Conklin, Laurie; Alex, Philip

    2008-09-01

    Serological biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are a rapidly expanding list of non-invasive tests for objective assessments of disease activity, early diagnosis, prognosis evaluation and surveillance. This review summarizes both old and new biomarkers in IBD, but focuses on the development and characterization of new serological biomarkers (identified since 2007). These include five new anti-glycan antibodies, anti-chitobioside IgA (ACCA), anti-laminaribioside IgG (ALCA), anti-manobioside IgG (AMCA), and antibodies against chemically synthesized (Sigma) two major oligomannose epitopes, Man alpha-1,3 Man alpha-1,2 Man (SigmaMan3) and Man alpha-1,3 Man alpha-1,2 Man alpha-1,2 Man (SigmaMan4). These new biomarkers serve as valuable complementary tools to existing biomarkers not only in differentiating Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), normal and other non-IBD gut diseases, but also in predicting disease involvement (ileum vs colon), IBD risk (as subclinical biomarkers), and disease course (risk of complication and surgery). Interestingly, the prevalence of the antiglycan antibodies, including anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), ALCA and AMCA, was found to be associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IBD susceptible genes such as NOD2/CARD15, NOD1/CARD4, toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4, and beta-defensin-1. Furthermore, a gene dosage effect was observed: anti-glycan positivity became more frequent as the number of NOD2/CARD15 SNPS increased. Other new serum/plasma IBD biomarkers reviewed include ubiquitination factor E4A (UBE4A), CXCL16 (a chemokine), resistin, and apolipoprotein A-IV. This review also discusses the most recent studies in IBD biomarker discovery by the application of new technologies such as proteomics, fourier transform near-infrared spectroscopy, and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)'s (with an emphasis on cytokine/chemokine profiling). Finally, the prospects of developing more

  10. Proteomics in human Parkinson's disease research.

    PubMed

    Licker, Virginie; Kövari, Enikö; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Burkhard, Pierre R

    2009-11-01

    During the last decades, considerable advances in the understanding of specific mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease have been achieved, yet neither definite etiology nor unifying sequence of molecular events has been formally established. Current unmet needs in Parkinson's disease research include exploring new hypotheses regarding disease susceptibility, occurrence and progression, identifying reliable diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers, and translating basic research into appropriate disease-modifying strategies. The most popular view proposes that Parkinson's disease results from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors and mechanisms believed to be at work include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, iron deposition and inflammation. More recently, a plethora of data has accumulated pinpointing an abnormal processing of the neuronal protein alpha-synuclein as a pivotal mechanism leading to aggregation, inclusions formation and degeneration. This protein-oriented scenario logically opens the door to the application of proteomic strategies to this field of research. We here review the current literature on proteomics applied to Parkinson's disease research, with particular emphasis on pathogenesis of sporadic Parkinson's disease in humans. We propose the view that Parkinson's disease may be an acquired or genetically-determined brain proteinopathy involving an abnormal processing of several, rather than individual neuronal proteins, and discuss some pre-analytical and analytical developments in proteomics that may help in verifying this concept.

  11. Imaging proteomics for diagnosis, monitoring and prediction of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nazeri, Arash; Ganjgahi, Habib; Roostaei, Tina; Nichols, Thomas; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2014-11-15

    Proteomic and imaging markers have been widely studied as potential biomarkers for diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we used Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset and performed parallel independent component analysis on cross sectional and longitudinal proteomic and imaging data in order to identify the best proteomic model for diagnosis, monitoring and prediction of Alzheimer disease (AD). We used plasma proteins measurement and imaging data from AD and healthy controls (HC) at the baseline and 1 year follow-up. Group comparisons at baseline and changes over 1 year were calculated for proteomic and imaging data. The results were fed into parallel independent component analysis in order to identify proteins that were associated with structural brain changes cross sectionally and longitudinally. Regression model was used to find the best model that can discriminate AD from HC, monitor AD and to predict MCI converters from non-converters. We showed that five proteins are associated with structural brain changes in the brain. These proteins could discriminate AD from HC with 57% specificity and 89% sensitivity. Four proteins whose change over 1 year were associated with brain structural changes could discriminate AD from HC with sensitivity of 93%, and specificity of 92%. This model predicted MCI conversion to AD in 2 years with 94% accuracy. This model has the highest accuracy in prediction of MCI conversion to AD within the ADNI-1 dataset. This study shows that combination of selected plasma protein levels and MR imaging is a useful method in identifying potential biomarker.

  12. Detecting differential protein expression in large-scale population proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Soyoung; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2014-06-17

    Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput quantitative proteomics shows great potential in clinical biomarker studies, identifying and quantifying thousands of proteins in biological samples. However, methods are needed to appropriately handle issues/challenges unique to mass spectrometry data in order to detect as many biomarker proteins as possible. One issue is that different mass spectrometry experiments generate quite different total numbers of quantified peptides, which can result in more missing peptide abundances in an experiment with a smaller total number of quantified peptides. Another issue is that the quantification of peptides is sometimes absent, especially for less abundant peptides and such missing values contain the information about the peptide abundance. Here, we propose a Significance Analysis for Large-scale Proteomics Studies (SALPS) that handles missing peptide intensity values caused by the two mechanisms mentioned above. Our model has a robust performance in both simulated data and proteomics data from a large clinical study. Because varying patients’ sample qualities and deviating instrument performances are not avoidable for clinical studies performed over the course of several years, we believe that our approach will be useful to analyze large-scale clinical proteomics data.

  13. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    DOE PAGES

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification ofmore » aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.« less

  14. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.

  15. Statistical Analysis of Variation in the Human Plasma Proteome

    DOE PAGES

    Corzett, Todd H.; Fodor, Imola K.; Choi, Megan W.; Walsworth, Vicki L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.; Chromy, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the variation in the human plasma proteome is an essential prerequisite for disease-specific biomarker detection. We report here on the longitudinal and individual variation in human plasma characterized by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) using plasma samples from eleven healthy subjects collected three times over a two week period. Fixed-effects modeling was used to remove dye and gel variability. Mixed-effects modeling was then used to quantitate the sources of proteomic variation. The subject-to-subject variation represented the largest variance component, while the time-within-subject variation was comparable to the experimental variation found in a previous technical variability study where onemore » human plasma sample was processed eight times in parallel and each was then analyzed by 2-D DIGE in triplicate. Here, 21 protein spots had larger than 50% CV, suggesting that these proteins may not be appropriate as biomarkers and should be carefully scrutinized in future studies. Seventy-eight protein spots showing differential protein levels between different individuals or individual collections were identified by mass spectrometry and further characterized using hierarchical clustering. The results present a first step toward understanding the complexity of longitudinal and individual variation in the human plasma proteome, and provide a baseline for improved biomarker discovery.« less

  16. Quantitative analysis of gene expression in fixed colorectal carcinoma samples as a method for biomarker validation

    PubMed Central

    OSTASIEWICZ, BEATA; OSTASIEWICZ, PAWEŁ; DUŚ-SZACHNIEWICZ, KAMILA; OSTASIEWICZ, KATARZYNA; ZIÓŁKOWSKI, PIOTR

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers have been described as the future of oncology. Modern proteomics provide an invaluable tool for the near-whole proteome screening for proteins expressed differently in neoplastic vs. healthy tissues. However, in order to select the most promising biomarkers, an independent method of validation is required. The aim of the current study was to propose a methodology for the validation of biomarkers. Due to material availability the majority of large scale biomarker studies are performed using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, therefore these were selected for use in the current study. A total of 10 genes were selected from what have been previously described as the most promising candidate biomarkers, and the expression levels were analyzed with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) using calibrator normalized relative quantification with the efficiency correction. For 6/10 analyzed genes, the results were consistent with the proteomic data; for the remaining four genes, the results were inconclusive. The upregulation of karyopherin α 2 (KPNA2) and chromosome segregation 1-like (CSE1L) in colorectal carcinoma, in addition to downregulation of chloride channel accessory 1 (CLCA1), fatty acid binding protein 1 (FABP1), sodium channel, voltage gated, type VII α subunit (SCN7A) and solute carrier family 26 (anion exchanger), member 3 (SLC26A3) was confirmed. With the combined use of proteomic and genetic tools, it was reported, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, that SCN7A was downregulated in colorectal carcinoma at mRNA and protein levels. It had been previously suggested that the remaining five genes served an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, however the current study provided strong evidence to support their use as biomarkers. Thus, it was concluded that combination of RT-qPCR with proteomics offers a powerful methodology for biomarker identification, which can be used to analyze

  17. Proteomic Findings in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Deepanwita; Tackett, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Although the emergence of proteomics as an independent branch of science is fairly recent, within a short period of time it has contributed substantially in various disciplines. The tool of mass spectrometry has become indispensable in the analysis of complex biological samples. Clinical applications of proteomics include detection of predictive and diagnostic markers, understanding mechanism of action of drugs as well as resistance mechanisms against them and assessment of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patients. Here, we have summarized the major contributions of proteomics towards the study of melanoma, which is a deadly variety of skin cancer with a high mortality rate. PMID:27274624

  18. Determination of burn patient outcome by large-scale quantitative discovery proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Elson, Constance; Schoenfeld, David; Gamelli, Richard; Gibran, Nicole; Klein, Matthew; Arnoldo, Brett; Remick, Daniel; Smith, Richard D.; Davis, Ronald; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Emerging proteomics techniques can be used to establish proteomic outcome signatures and to identify candidate biomarkers for survival following traumatic injury. We applied high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and multiplex cytokine analysis to profile the plasma proteome of survivors and non-survivors of massive burn injury to determine the proteomic survival signature following a major burn injury. Design Proteomic discovery study. Setting Five burn hospitals across the U.S. Patients Thirty-two burn patients (16 non-survivors and 16 survivors), 19–89 years of age, were admitted within 96 h of injury to the participating hospitals with burns covering >20% of the total body surface area and required at least one surgical intervention. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results We found differences in circulating levels of 43 proteins involved in the acute phase response, hepatic signaling, the complement cascade, inflammation, and insulin resistance. Thirty-two of the proteins identified were not previously known to play a role in the response to burn. IL-4, IL-8, GM-CSF, MCP-1, and β2-microglobulin correlated well with survival and may serve as clinical biomarkers. Conclusions These results demonstrate the utility of these techniques for establishing proteomic survival signatures and for use as a discovery tool to identify candidate biomarkers for survival. This is the first clinical application of a high-throughput, large-scale LC-MS-based quantitative plasma proteomic approach for biomarker discovery for the prediction of patient outcome following burn, trauma or critical illness. PMID:23507713

  19. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Chikezie O.; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers) for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form. A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues. Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. The

  20. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Madu, Chikezie O; Lu, Yi

    2010-10-06

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers) for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form.A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues.Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. The

  1. Biomarker discovery: success as a function of risk mitigation.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Protein biomarker discovery is a fascinating enterprise; however, success in terms of products for in vitro diagnostic use is sparse. New developments in mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics as discovery technology have opened up new avenues for this endeavor. In addition to choice of technology, sample properties, study design and validation strategy are potent pillars required for project success. The challenge for successful biomarker discovery can be described by a series of risks that need to be mitigated. This article intends to describe the major risks along with possible solutions. PMID:27426622

  2. BIOMARKERS OF REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification and verification of anatomical, endocrine, cellular and molecular biomarkers is crucial for successful clinical diagnosis and treatment of toxicity and disease, as well as basic toxicological, epidemiological and other research. Various in situ biomarkers of repro...

  3. Biomarkers in Computational Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomarkers are a means to evaluate chemical exposure and/or the subsequent impacts on toxicity pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Computational toxicology can integrate biomarker data with knowledge of exposure, chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and e...

  4. The role of structural proteomics in vaccine development: recent advances and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Danilo; Faleri, Agnese; Costantino, Paolo; Rappuoli, Rino; Norais, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines are the most effective way to fight infectious diseases saving countless lives since their introduction. Their evolution during the last century made use of the best technologies available to continuously increase their efficacy and safety. Mass spectrometry (MS) and proteomics are already playing a central role in the identification and characterization of novel antigens. Over the last years, we have been witnessing the emergence of structural proteomics in vaccinology, as a major tool for vaccine candidate discovery, antigen design and life cycle management of existing products. In this review, we describe the MS techniques associated to structural proteomics and we illustrate the contribution of structural proteomics to vaccinology discussing potential applications.

  5. Proteomics data repositories

    PubMed Central

    Riffle, Michael; Eng, Jimmy K.

    2010-01-01

    The field of proteomics, particularly the application of mass spectrometry analysis to protein samples, is well-established and growing rapidly. Proteomics studies generate large volumes of raw experimental data and inferred biological results. To facilitate the dissemination of these data, centralized data repositories have been developed that make the data and results accessible to proteomics researchers and biologists alike. This review of proteomics data repositories focuses exclusively on freely-available, centralized data resources that disseminate or store experimental mass spectrometry data and results. The resources chosen reflect a current “snapshot” of the state of resources available with an emphasis placed on resources that may be of particular interest to yeast researchers. Resources are described in terms of their intended purpose and the features and functionality provided to users. PMID:19795424

  6. Cardiovascular Redox and Ox Stress Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikas; Calamaras, Timothy Dean; Haeussler, Dagmar; Colucci, Wilson Steven; Cohen, Richard Alan; McComb, Mark Errol; Pimentel, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative post-translational modifications (OPTMs) have been demonstrated as contributing to cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. These modifications have been identified using antibodies as well as advanced proteomic methods, and the functional importance of each is beginning to be understood using transgenic and gene deletion animal models. Given that OPTMs are involved in cardiovascular pathology, the use of these modifications as biomarkers and predictors of disease has significant therapeutic potential. Adequate understanding of the chemistry of the OPTMs is necessary to determine what may occur in vivo and which modifications would best serve as biomarkers. Recent Advances: By using mass spectrometry, advanced labeling techniques, and antibody identification, OPTMs have become accessible to a larger proportion of the scientific community. Advancements in instrumentation, database search algorithms, and processing speed have allowed MS to fully expand on the proteome of OPTMs. In addition, the role of enzymatically reversible OPTMs has been further clarified in preclinical models. Critical Issues: The identification of OPTMs suffers from limitations in analytic detection based on the methodology, instrumentation, sample complexity, and bioinformatics. Currently, each type of OPTM requires a specific strategy for identification, and generalized approaches result in an incomplete assessment. Future Directions: Novel types of highly sensitive MS instrumentation that allow for improved separation and detection of modified proteins and peptides have been crucial in the discovery of OPTMs and biomarkers. To further advance the identification of relevant OPTMs in advanced search algorithms, standardized methods for sample processing and depository of MS data will be required. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1528–1559. PMID:22607061

  7. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput. PMID:22840822

  8. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment. PMID:27136540

  9. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment. PMID:27136540

  10. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment.

  11. Nanoscaled Proteomic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Jia, Lee

    2013-09-01

    Global proteomics research is currently hampered by the extremely complexity of the proteome and the absence of techniques like the polymerase chain reaction in genomics which enables multiplication of a single protein molecule. Since all the existing analytical technologies cannot overcome the detection limit and the dynamic concentration barrier, development of improved analytical technologies at nanoscale, ideally those that could recognize single protein molecule in the presence of high abundant of others, is a high priority for proteomics. In this chapter, we will show the state-of-the-art of nanoproteomics, i.e., the application of nanotechnologies to proteomics. Various nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles, polymer and copolymer nanoparticles, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles have been used to improve sensitivity, specificity, and repeatability of proteomic analysis especially when the multidimensional separation system coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS is used. Among them, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the two most important nanomaterials: while GNPs are frequently utilized for enzyme immobilization, high throughput bioassay, selection of target-peptides and target-protein, CNTs including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and mutiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have wide applications to electronic sensor, sensitive immunodetection, nanobiocatalysis, affinity probes, MALDI matrices, protein digestion, peptides enrichment and analysis. In perspectives, a deep understanding of the structures and property of nanomaterials and interdisciplinary applications of nanotechnology to proteomics will certainly be revolutionary and intellectually rewarding.

  12. Proteomics of blood and derived products: what's next?

    PubMed

    Prudent, Michel; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Lion, Niels

    2011-12-01

    Proteomics has changed the way proteins are analyzed in living systems. This approach has been applied to blood products and protein profiling has evolved in parallel with the development of techniques. The identification of proteins belonging to red blood cell, platelets or plasma was achieved at the end of the last century. Then, the questions on the applications emerged. Hence, several studies have focused on problems related to blood banking and products, such as the aging of blood products, identification of biomarkers, related diseases and the protein-protein interactions. More recently, a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to quality control has been applied in order to offer solutions and improve the quality of blood products. The current challenge we face is developing a closer relationship between transfusion medicine and proteomics. In this article, these issues will be approached by focusing first on the proteome identification of blood products and then on the applications and future developments within the field of proteomics and blood products. PMID:22087657

  13. Advances in targeted proteomics and applications to biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Song, Ehwang; Nie, Song; Rodland, Karin D; Liu, Tao; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Targeted proteomics technique has emerged as a powerful protein quantification tool in systems biology, biomedical research, and increasing for clinical applications. The most widely used targeted proteomics approach, selected reaction monitoring (SRM), also known as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), can be used for quantification of cellular signaling networks and preclinical verification of candidate protein biomarkers. As an extension to our previous review on advances in SRM sensitivity (Shi et al., Proteomics, 12, 1074-1092, 2012) herein we review recent advances in the method and technology for further enhancing SRM sensitivity (from 2012 to present), and highlighting its broad biomedical applications in human bodily fluids, tissue and cell lines. Furthermore, we also review two recently introduced targeted proteomics approaches, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) and data-independent acquisition (DIA) with targeted data extraction on fast scanning high-resolution accurate-mass (HR/AM) instruments. Such HR/AM targeted quantification with monitoring all target product ions addresses SRM limitations effectively in specificity and multiplexing; whereas when compared to SRM, PRM and DIA are still in the infancy with a limited number of applications. Thus, for HR/AM targeted quantification we focus our discussion on method development, data processing and analysis, and its advantages and limitations in targeted proteomics. Finally, general perspectives on the potential of achieving both high sensitivity and high sample throughput for large-scale quantification of hundreds of target proteins are discussed.

  14. Platelet clinical proteomics: Facts, challenges, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    García, Ángel

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, proteomics has been applied to platelet clinical research. Platelets are small enucleated cells that play a fundamental role in hemostasis. In a pathological context, unwanted platelet activation is related to various diseases, primarily thrombosis, but also cancer metastasis, inflammation, immunity, and neurodegenerative diseases. The absence of a nucleus is one of the reasons why proteomics can be considered an ideal analytical tool for platelet research. Indeed, platelet proteomics has allowed the identification of many novel signaling proteins and receptors, several of which are being pursued as potential therapeutic targets. Encouraged by this success, several research groups have recently initiated clinical proteomics studies covering diseases where platelets are involved in some way, such as coronary artery disease, storage pool diseases, uremia, cystic fibrosis, and Alzheimer disease. The goal was to identify platelet biomarkers and drug targets that can help to improve the treatment/diagnosis of the disease and provide further mechanistic evidences of the role platelets play in the pathology. The present article will comment on the recent progress of clinical proteomics in the context of platelet research, challenges, and perspectives for the future ahead.

  15. Approaches for targeted proteomics and its potential applications in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sumit; Chourasia, Dipti; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-09-01

    An extensive guide on practicable and significant quantitative proteomic approaches in neuroscience research is important not only because of the existing overwhelming limitations but also for gaining valuable understanding into brain function and deciphering proteomics from the workbench to the bedside. Early methodologies to understand the functioning of biological systems are now improving with high-throughput technologies, which allow analysis of various samples concurrently, or of thousand of analytes in a particular sample. Quantitative proteomic approaches include both gel-based and non-gel-based methods that can be further divided into different labelling approaches. This review will emphasize the role of existing technologies, their advantages and disadvantages, as well as their applications in neuroscience. This review will also discuss advanced approaches for targeted proteomics using isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) coupled with laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. This technology can further be extended to single cell proteomics in other areas of biological sciences and can be combined with other 'omics' approaches to reveal the mechanism of a cellular alterations. This approach may lead to further investigation in basic biology, disease analysis and surveillance, as well as drug discovery. Although numerous challenges still exist, we are confident that this approach will increase the understanding of pathological mechanisms involved in neuroendocrinology, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders by delivering protein biomarker signatures for brain dysfunction. PMID:26333406

  16. Blood biomarkers in the early stage of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Maestrini, I; Ducroquet, A; Moulin, S; Leys, D; Cordonnier, C; Bordet, R

    2016-03-01

    In ischemic stroke patients, blood-based biomarkers may be applied for the diagnosis of ischemic origin and subtype, prediction of outcomes and targeted treatment in selected patients. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia has led to the evaluation of proteins, neurotransmitters, nucleic acids and lipids as potential biomarkers. The present report focuses on the role of blood-based biomarkers in the early stage of ischemic stroke-within 72h of its onset-as gleaned from studies published in English in such patients. Despite growing interest in their potential role in clinical practice, the application of biomarkers for the management of cerebral ischemia is not currently recommended by guidelines. However, there are some promising clinical biomarkers, as well as the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) peptide and NMDA-receptor (R) autoantibodies that appear to identify the ischemic nature of stroke, and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) that might be able to discriminate between acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Moreover, genomics and proteomics allow the characterization of differences in gene expression, and protein and metabolite production, in ischemic stroke patients compared with controls and, thus, may help to identify novel markers with sufficient sensitivity and specificity. Additional studies to validate promising biomarkers and to identify novel biomarkers are needed. PMID:26988891

  17. The State of Molecular Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hassanein, Mohamed; Callison, J. Clay; Callaway-Lane, Carol; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Grogan, Eric L.; Massion, Pierre P.

    2013-01-01

    Using biomarkers to select the most at-risk population, to detect the disease while measurable and yet not clinically apparent has been the goal of many investigations. Recent advances in molecular strategies and analytic platforms, including genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, have identified increasing numbers of potential biomarkers in the blood, urine, exhaled breath condensate, bronchial specimens, saliva, and sputum, but none have yet moved to the clinical setting. Therefore, there is a recognized gap between the promise and the product delivery in the cancer biomarker field. In this review, we define clinical contexts where risk and diagnostic biomarkers may have use in the management of lung cancer, identify the most relevant candidate biomarkers of early detection, provide their state of development, and finally discuss critical aspects of study design in molecular biomarkers for early detection of lung cancer. PMID:22689914

  18. Collaborations in Proteomics Research - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the sharing of proteomics reagents and protocols

  19. Biomarkers in DILI: One More Step Forward.

    PubMed

    Robles-Díaz, Mercedes; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Stephens, Camilla; Andrade, Raúl J; Lucena, M Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Despite being relatively rare, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a serious condition, both for the individual patient due to the risk of acute liver failure, and for the drug development industry and regulatory agencies due to associations with drug development attritions, black box warnings, and postmarketing withdrawals. A major limitation in DILI diagnosis and prediction is the current lack of specific biomarkers. Despite refined usage of traditional liver biomarkers in DILI, reliable disease outcome predictions are still difficult to make. These limitations have driven the growing interest in developing new more sensitive and specific DILI biomarkers, which can improve early DILI prediction, diagnosis, and course of action. Several promising DILI biomarker candidates have been discovered to date, including mechanistic-based biomarker candidates such as glutamate dehydrogenase, high-mobility group box 1 protein and keratin-18, which can also provide information on the injury mechanism of different causative agents. Furthermore, microRNAs have received much attention lately as potential non-invasive DILI biomarker candidates, in particular miR-122. Advances in "omics" technologies offer a new approach for biomarker exploration studies. The ability to screen a large number of molecules (e.g., metabolites, proteins, or DNA) simultaneously enables the identification of 'toxicity signatures,' which may be used to enhance preclinical safety assessments and disease diagnostics. Omics-based studies can also provide information on the underlying mechanisms of distinct forms of DILI that may further facilitate the identification of early diagnostic biomarkers and safer implementation of personalized medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the area of DILI biomarker studies. PMID:27597831

  20. Biomarkers in DILI: One More Step Forward

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Díaz, Mercedes; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Stephens, Camilla; Andrade, Raúl J.; Lucena, M. Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Despite being relatively rare, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a serious condition, both for the individual patient due to the risk of acute liver failure, and for the drug development industry and regulatory agencies due to associations with drug development attritions, black box warnings, and postmarketing withdrawals. A major limitation in DILI diagnosis and prediction is the current lack of specific biomarkers. Despite refined usage of traditional liver biomarkers in DILI, reliable disease outcome predictions are still difficult to make. These limitations have driven the growing interest in developing new more sensitive and specific DILI biomarkers, which can improve early DILI prediction, diagnosis, and course of action. Several promising DILI biomarker candidates have been discovered to date, including mechanistic-based biomarker candidates such as glutamate dehydrogenase, high-mobility group box 1 protein and keratin-18, which can also provide information on the injury mechanism of different causative agents. Furthermore, microRNAs have received much attention lately as potential non-invasive DILI biomarker candidates, in particular miR-122. Advances in “omics” technologies offer a new approach for biomarker exploration studies. The ability to screen a large number of molecules (e.g., metabolites, proteins, or DNA) simultaneously enables the identification of ‘toxicity signatures,’ which may be used to enhance preclinical safety assessments and disease diagnostics. Omics-based studies can also provide information on the underlying mechanisms of distinct forms of DILI that may further facilitate the identification of early diagnostic biomarkers and safer implementation of personalized medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the area of DILI biomarker studies. PMID:27597831

  1. Biomarkers in DILI: One More Step Forward

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Díaz, Mercedes; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Stephens, Camilla; Andrade, Raúl J.; Lucena, M. Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Despite being relatively rare, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a serious condition, both for the individual patient due to the risk of acute liver failure, and for the drug development industry and regulatory agencies due to associations with drug development attritions, black box warnings, and postmarketing withdrawals. A major limitation in DILI diagnosis and prediction is the current lack of specific biomarkers. Despite refined usage of traditional liver biomarkers in DILI, reliable disease outcome predictions are still difficult to make. These limitations have driven the growing interest in developing new more sensitive and specific DILI biomarkers, which can improve early DILI prediction, diagnosis, and course of action. Several promising DILI biomarker candidates have been discovered to date, including mechanistic-based biomarker candidates such as glutamate dehydrogenase, high-mobility group box 1 protein and keratin-18, which can also provide information on the injury mechanism of different causative agents. Furthermore, microRNAs have received much attention lately as potential non-invasive DILI biomarker candidates, in particular miR-122. Advances in “omics” technologies offer a new approach for biomarker exploration studies. The ability to screen a large number of molecules (e.g., metabolites, proteins, or DNA) simultaneously enables the identification of ‘toxicity signatures,’ which may be used to enhance preclinical safety assessments and disease diagnostics. Omics-based studies can also provide information on the underlying mechanisms of distinct forms of DILI that may further facilitate the identification of early diagnostic biomarkers and safer implementation of personalized medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the area of DILI biomarker studies.

  2. Ovarian cancer proteomics: Many technologies one goal.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Kothandaraman; Changqing, Zhao; Choolani, Mahesh

    2008-02-01

    The last decade has seen major changes in the technologies used to identify markers for diagnosing cancer. This review focuses on recent developments on the evolving field of biomarker discovery, and validation techniques using proteomics platforms for ovarian cancer. It is possible now to diagnose various disease conditions using microliter quantities of body fluids. Currently the major developments were made in three distinct areas: (i) protein profiling, (ii) high-throughput validation techniques, and (iii) solid and liquid phase protein microarray platforms for analyzing candidate markers across subclasses and stages of cancers. The recent addition to the long list of technologies is metabolomics using metabolite profiling and informatics-based filtering of information for biomarker discovery of ovarian cancer. Emerging technologies need to address ways to eliminate the limitations posed by the complex dynamic nature of body fluids as well as ways to enrich low-abundance tumor markers if they were to become a successful biomarker discovery tool. These new technologies hold significant promise in identifying more robust markers for ovarian cancer. Since the prevalence of this disease in the population is low, the test must have a high specificity. PMID:21136825

  3. Dried blood spot proteomics: surface extraction of endogenous proteins coupled with automated sample preparation and mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicholas J; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spots offer many advantages as a sample format including ease and safety of transport and handling. To date, the majority of mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots have focused on small molecules or hemoglobin. However, dried blood spots are a potentially rich source of protein biomarkers, an area that has been overlooked. To address this issue, we have applied an untargeted bottom-up proteomics approach to the analysis of dried blood spots. We present an automated and integrated method for extraction of endogenous proteins from the surface of dried blood spots and sample preparation via trypsin digestion by use of the Advion Biosciences Triversa Nanomate robotic platform. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the resulting digests enabled identification of 120 proteins from a single dried blood spot. The proteins identified cross a concentration range of four orders of magnitude. The method is evaluated and the results discussed in terms of the proteins identified and their potential use as biomarkers in screening programs.

  4. Dried Blood Spot Proteomics: Surface Extraction of Endogenous Proteins Coupled with Automated Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spots offer many advantages as a sample format including ease and safety of transport and handling. To date, the majority of mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots have focused on small molecules or hemoglobin. However, dried blood spots are a potentially rich source of protein biomarkers, an area that has been overlooked. To address this issue, we have applied an untargeted bottom-up proteomics approach to the analysis of dried blood spots. We present an automated and integrated method for extraction of endogenous proteins from the surface of dried blood spots and sample preparation via trypsin digestion by use of the Advion Biosciences Triversa Nanomate robotic platform. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the resulting digests enabled identification of 120 proteins from a single dried blood spot. The proteins identified cross a concentration range of four orders of magnitude. The method is evaluated and the results discussed in terms of the proteins identified and their potential use as biomarkers in screening programs.

  5. Proteomics analysis of human oligodendroglioma proteome.

    PubMed

    Khaghani-Razi-Abad, Solmaz; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Pooladi, Mehdi; Entezari, Maliheh; Kazemi, Elham

    2015-09-10

    Proteomics analyses enable the identification and quantitation of proteins. From a purely clinical perspective, the application of proteomics based on innovations, may greatly affect the future management of malignant brain tumors. This optimism is based on four main reasons: diagnosis, prognosis, selection of targeted therapy based on molecular profile of the brain tumor and monitoring therapeutic response, or resistance. We extracted the proteins of tumor and normal brain tissues, and then evaluated the protein purity by Bradford test. In this study, we separated the proteins by two-dimensional (2DG) gel electrophoresis methods. Then spots were analyzed, compared using statistical data and specific software and were identified by pH isoelectric, molecular weights and data banks. The protein profiles were determined using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry approaches. Simple statistical tests were used to establish a putative hierarchy in which the change in protein level was ranked according to a cut-off point with p<0.05. The 2D gel showed a total of 1328 spots among which 157 spots were under-expressed and 276 spots were overexpressed. Most proteins are subjects to post-translational modifications, where amino acid residues may be chemically modified or conjugated by small proteins like ubiquitin. Proteomics is a powerful way to identifying multiple proteins which are altered following a neuropharmacological intervention in a CNS disease. PMID:26002447

  6. What is a biomarker? Research investments and lack of clinical integration necessitate a review of biomarker terminology and validation schema.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, Adam S; Rifai, Nader

    2010-01-01

    A continual trend of annual growth can be seen within research devoted to the discovery and validation of disease biomarkers within both the natural and clinical sciences. This expansion of intellectual endeavours was quantified through database searches of (a) research grant awards provided by the various branches of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and (b) academic publications. A search of awards presented between 1986 and 2009 revealed a total of 28,856 grants awarded by the NIH containing the term "biomarker". The total funds for these awards in 2008 and 2009 alone were over $2.5 billion. During the same respective time frames, searches of "biomarker" and either "discovery", "genomics", "proteomics" or "metabolomics" yielded a total of 4,928 NIH grants whose combined funding exceeded $1.2 billion. The derived trend in NIH awards paralleled the annual expansion in "biomarker" literature. A PubMed search for the term, between 1990 and 2009, revealed a total of 441,510 published articles, with 38,457 published in 2008. These enormous investments and academic outputs however have not translated into the expected integration of new biomarkers for patient care. For example no proteomics derived biomarkers are currently being utilized in routine clinical management. This translational chasm necessitates a review of the previously proposed biomarker definitions and evaluation schema. A subsequent discussion of both the analytical and pre-analytical considerations for such research is also presented within. This required knowledge should aid scientists in their pursuit and validation of new biological markers of disease.

  7. What is a biomarker? Research investments and lack of clinical integration necessitate a review of biomarker terminology and validation schema.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, Adam S; Rifai, Nader

    2010-01-01

    A continual trend of annual growth can be seen within research devoted to the discovery and validation of disease biomarkers within both the natural and clinical sciences. This expansion of intellectual endeavours was quantified through database searches of (a) research grant awards provided by the various branches of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and (b) academic publications. A search of awards presented between 1986 and 2009 revealed a total of 28,856 grants awarded by the NIH containing the term "biomarker". The total funds for these awards in 2008 and 2009 alone were over $2.5 billion. During the same respective time frames, searches of "biomarker" and either "discovery", "genomics", "proteomics" or "metabolomics" yielded a total of 4,928 NIH grants whose combined funding exceeded $1.2 billion. The derived trend in NIH awards paralleled the annual expansion in "biomarker" literature. A PubMed search for the term, between 1990 and 2009, revealed a total of 441,510 published articles, with 38,457 published in 2008. These enormous investments and academic outputs however have not translated into the expected integration of new biomarkers for patient care. For example no proteomics derived biomarkers are currently being utilized in routine clinical management. This translational chasm necessitates a review of the previously proposed biomarker definitions and evaluation schema. A subsequent discussion of both the analytical and pre-analytical considerations for such research is also presented within. This required knowledge should aid scientists in their pursuit and validation of new biological markers of disease. PMID:20515269

  8. Proteomic Assessment of Poultry Spermatozoa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully characterizing the protein composition of spermatozoa is the first step in utilizing proteomics to delineate the function of sperm proteins. To date, sperm proteome maps have been partially developed for the human, mouse, rat, bull and several invertebrates. Here we report the first proteomic...

  9. Beer and wort proteomics.

    PubMed

    Iimure, Takashi; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Proteome analysis provides a way to identify proteins related to the quality traits of beer. A number of protein species in beer and wort have been identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with enzyme digestion such as trypsin, followed by mass spectrometry analyses and/or liquid chromatography mass/mass spectrometry. In addition, low molecular weight polypeptides in beer have been identified by the combination of non-enzyme digestion and mass analyses. These data sets of various molecular weight polypeptides (i.e., proteomes) provide a platform for analyzing protein functions in beer. Several novel proteins related to beer quality traits such as foam stability and haze formation have been identified by analyzing these proteomes. Some of the proteins have been applied to the development of efficient protein or DNA markers for trait selection in malting barley breeding. In this chapter, recent proteome studies of beer and wort are reviewed, and the methods and protocols of beer and wort proteome analysis are described.

  10. The Cysteine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Chandler, Joshua D.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine (Cys) proteome is a major component of the adaptive interface between the genome and the exposome. The thiol moiety of Cys undergoes a range of biologic modifications enabling biological switching of structure and reactivity. These biological modifications include sulfenylation and disulfide formation, formation of higher oxidation states, S-nitrosylation, persulfidation, metallation, and other modifications. Extensive knowledge about these systems and their compartmentalization now provides a foundation to develop advanced integrative models of Cys proteome regulation. In particular, detailed understanding of redox signaling pathways and sensing networks is becoming available to discriminate network structures. This research focuses attention on the need for atlases of Cys modifications to develop systems biology models. Such atlases will be especially useful for integrative studies linking the Cys proteome to imaging and other omics platforms, providing a basis for improved redox-based therapeutics. Thus, a framework is emerging to place the Cys proteome as a complement to the quantitative proteome in the omics continuum connecting the genome to the exposome. PMID:25843657

  11. Blood-related proteomics.

    PubMed

    Liumbruno, Giancarlo; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Grazzini, Giuliano; Zolla, Lello

    2010-01-01

    Blood-related proteomics is an emerging field, recently gaining momentum. Indeed, a wealth of data is now available and a plethora of groups has contributed to add pieces to the jigsaw puzzle of protein complexity within plasma and blood cells. In this review article we purported to sail across the mare magnum of the actual knowledge in this research endeavour. The main strides in proteomic investigations on red blood cells, platelets, plasma and white blood cells are hereby presented in a chronological order. Moreover, a glance is given at prospective studies which promise to shift the focus of attention from the end product to its provider, the donor, in a sort of Kantian "Copernican revolution". A well-rounded portrait of the usefulness of proteomics in blood-related research is accurately given. In particular, proteomic tools could be adopted to follow the main steps of the blood-banking production processes (a comparison of collection methods, pathogen inactivation techniques, storage protocols). Thus proteomics has been recently transformed from a mere basic-research extremely-expensive toy into a dramatically-sensitive and efficient eye-lens to either delve into the depths of the molecular mechanisms of blood and blood components or to establish quality parameters in the blood-banking production chain totally anew. PMID:19567275

  12. Proteomics in alcohol research.

    PubMed

    Anni, Helen; Israel, Yedy

    2002-01-01

    The proteome is the complete set of proteins in an organism. It is considerably larger and more complex than the genome--the collection of genes that encodes these proteins. Proteomics deals with the qualitative and quantitative study of the proteome under physiological and pathological conditions (e.g., after exposure to alcohol, which causes major changes in numerous proteins of different cell types). To map large proteomes such as the human proteome, proteins from discrete tissues, cells, cell components, or biological fluids are first separated by high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis and multidimensional liquid chromatography. Then, individual proteins are identified by mass spectrometry. The huge amount of data acquired using these techniques is analyzed and assembled by fast computers and bioinformatics tools. Using these methods, as well as other technological advances, alcohol researchers can gain a better understanding of how alcohol globally influences protein structure and function, protein-protein interactions, and protein networks. This knowledge ultimately will assist in the early diagnosis and prognosis of alcoholism and the discovery of new drug targets and medications for treatment.

  13. Urinary proteome alterations in HER2 enriched breast cancer revealed by multipronged quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Akshada; Dabhi, Raju; Taunk, Khushman; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; RoyChoudhury, Sourav; Adhav, Ragini; Seal, Shubhendu; Mane, Anupama; Bayatigeri, Santhakumari; Santra, Manas K; Chaudhury, Koel; Rapole, Srikanth

    2016-09-01

    Globally, breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women. Although biomarker discoveries through various proteomic approaches of tissue and serum samples have been studied in breast cancer, urinary proteome alterations in breast cancer are least studied. Urine being a noninvasive biofluid and a significant source of proteins, it has the potential in early diagnosis of breast cancer. This study used complementary quantitative gel-based and gel-free proteomic approaches to find a panel of urinary protein markers that could discriminate HER2 enriched (HE) subtype breast cancer from the healthy controls. A total of 183 differentially expressed proteins were identified using three complementary approaches, namely 2D-DIGE, iTRAQ, and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical mass spectra. The differentially expressed proteins were subjected to various bioinformatics analyses for deciphering the biological context of these proteins using protein analysis through evolutionary relationships, database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery, and STRING. Multivariate statistical analysis was undertaken to identify the set of most significant proteins, which could discriminate HE breast cancer from healthy controls. Immunoblotting and MRM-based validation in a separate cohort testified a panel of 21 proteins such as zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein, A2GL, retinol-binding protein 4, annexin A1, SAP3, SRC8, gelsolin, kininogen 1, CO9, clusterin, ceruloplasmin, and α1-antitrypsin could be a panel of candidate markers that could discriminate HE breast cancer from healthy controls. PMID:27324523

  14. Plasma Proteomics, The Human Proteome Project, and Cancer-Associated Alternative Splice Variant Proteins☆, ☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses three inter-related subjects: the development of the Human Plasma Proteome Peptide Atlas, the launch of the Human Proteome Project, and the emergence of alternative splice variant transcripts and proteins as important features of evolution and pathogenesis. The current Plasma Peptide Atlas provides evidence on which peptides have been detected for every protein confidently identified in plasma; there are links to their spectra and their estimated abundance, facilitating the planning of targeted proteomics for biomarker studies. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) combines a chromosome-centric C-HPP with a biology and disease-driven B/D-HPP, upon a foundation of mass spectrometry, antibody, and knowledgebase resource pillars. The HPP aims to identify the approximately 7000 “missing proteins” and to characterize all proteins and their many isoforms. Success will enable the larger research community to utilize newly-available peptides, spectra, informative MS transitions, and databases for targeted analyses of priority proteins for each organ and disease. Among the isoforms of proteins, splice variants have the special feature of greatly enlarging protein diversity without enlarging the genome; evidence is accumulating of striking differential expression of splice variants in cancers. In this era of RNA-sequencing and advanced mass spectrometry, it is no longer sufficient to speak simply of increased or decreased expression of genes or proteins without carefully examining the splice variants in the protein mixture produced from each multi-exon gene. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. PMID:24211518

  15. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  16. The proteomics quantification dilemma.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Peter R

    2014-07-31

    Proteomics is dominated today by the protein expression discourse, which favorites the bottom-up approach because of its high throughput and its high sensitivity. For quantification this proceeding is misleading, if a protein is present with more than one protein species in the sample to be analyzed. The protein speciation discourse considers this more realistic situation and affords the top-down procedures or at least a separation of the protein species in advance to identification and quantification. Today all of the top-down procedures are one order of magnitude less sensitive than the bottom-up ones. To increase sensitivity and to increase throughput are major challenges for proteomics of the next years. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 20years of Proteomics in memory of Viatliano Pallini. Guest Editors: Luca Bini, Juan J. Calvete, Natacha Turck, Denis Hochstrasser and Jean-Charles Sanchez. PMID:24681132

  17. High-Throughput Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaorui; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-06-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based high-throughput proteomics is the core technique for large-scale protein characterization. Due to the extreme complexity of proteomes, sophisticated separation techniques and advanced MS instrumentation have been developed to extend coverage and enhance dynamic range and sensitivity. In this review, we discuss the separation and prefractionation techniques applied for large-scale analysis in both bottom-up (i.e., peptide-level) and top-down (i.e., protein-level) proteomics. Different approaches for quantifying peptides or intact proteins, including label-free and stable-isotope-labeling strategies, are also discussed. In addition, we present a brief overview of different types of mass analyzers and fragmentation techniques as well as selected emerging techniques.

  18. Proteomics: capacity versus utility.

    PubMed

    Harry, J L; Wilkins, M R; Herbert, B R; Packer, N H; Gooley, A A; Williams, K L

    2000-04-01

    Until recently scientists studied genes or proteins one at a time. With improvements in technology, new tools have become available to study the complex interactions that occur in biological systems. Global studies are required to do this, and these will involve genomic and proteomic approaches. High-throughput methods are necessary in each case because the number of genes and proteins in even the simplest of organisms are immense. In the developmental phase of genomics, the emphasis was on the generation and assembly of large amounts of nucleic acid sequence data. Proteomics is currently in a phase of technological development and establishment, and demonstrating the capacity for high throughput is a major challenge. However, funding bodies (both in the public and private sector) are increasingly focused on the usefulness of this capacity. Here we review the current state of proteome research in terms of capacity and utility.

  19. Diving into the rat plasma proteome to get to the bottom of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Eftedal, Ingrid

    2016-07-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is the collective term for an array of signs and symptoms triggered by ambient pressure reduction. It is of particular concern to divers as they decompress on ascend from depth to sea surface, but despite a long history of studies the determinants of DCS risk are incompletely understood and there are no validated biomarkers. In this issue of Proteomics Clinical Applications, Lautridou et al. [8] report on their search for DCS biomarkers in rats exposed to simulated diving. By comparing the plasma proteomes from animals showing neurological symptoms to those emerging from dives unaffected, they identified several high-abundance proteins not previously associated with DCS. The most significant finding was a near depletion of thyroxine- and vitamin A transporter transthyretin in symptomatic rats. In addition to their potential role as diagnostic biomarkers, the proteins identified in Lautridou's study may offer new pieces in the yet incomplete puzzle of DCS etiology. PMID:27196271

  20. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  1. The 9th Siena meeting: from genome to proteome: open innovations.

    PubMed

    Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2012-12-01

    The Siena Meeting has been held biannually since 1994, when for the first time the concept of the proteome was introduced to a large scientific audience. Over the years, the meeting has grown to be a major international conference in the field of proteomics and has attracted excellent scientists from all corners of the world. The 9th Siena Meeting: 'from Genome to Proteome: Open Innovations' was attended by 300 scientists. There were four plenary and eight parallel sessions with 50 invited talks and three poster sessions with 94 posters covering wide range of functional proteomics, signaling, biomarkers, cancer, neuroscience, glycoproteomics, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. As in the past, this year's Siena Meeting maintained its tradition of placing science at centre stage, which generated a wide range of discussions of major importance for the future. PMID:23256669

  2. The 20th anniversary of proteomics and some of its origins.

    PubMed

    Humphery-Smith, Ian

    2015-06-01

    The term "proteome" was first introduced into the scientific literature in July 1995. Almost 20 years ago attempts to characterize the "total protein complement able to be encoded by a given genome" only became possible due to privileged access to what were then the world's most complete sets of genomic data. Today, proteomics has become an important pillar in the fields of disease diagnosis and drug research and development, while also playing a critical role in the much larger field of Healthcare Analytics and Biomarker Discovery and Detection. It is important to note that this industry originated mostly from building blocks in analytical science that predated the term "proteomics" by many decades. However, proteomics, as a discipline, has allowed protein scientists to more favorably compete in the face of highly fashionable Big Science and, more specifically, genomics.

  3. Use of proteomics in the study of microbial diseases of small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Katsafadou, A I; Tsangaris, G Th; Billinis, C; Fthenakis, G C

    2015-12-14

    Objective of the paper is to review potential applications of proteomics methodologies in the study of microbial diseases of small ruminants. Proteomics has been employed for the elucidation of pathogenesis of various diseases, i.e., in the study of determinants of microbial agents and the study of host-pathogen interactions, as well as in improved disease diagnosis by the identification of biomarkers. Extensive uses of proteomics in sheep and goat diseases have been applied primarily in mastitis, in reproductive infections, in paratuberculosis, in respiratory infections and in scrapie. Mining deeper into the various proteomes and application of new methodological strategies in clinical studies will provide information about disease processes. Improvement of diagnostic techniques, development of vaccines against diseases and establishment of tools for optimum animal production are key-areas for targeted research.

  4. The 9th Siena meeting: from genome to proteome: open innovations.

    PubMed

    Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2012-12-01

    The Siena Meeting has been held biannually since 1994, when for the first time the concept of the proteome was introduced to a large scientific audience. Over the years, the meeting has grown to be a major international conference in the field of proteomics and has attracted excellent scientists from all corners of the world. The 9th Siena Meeting: 'from Genome to Proteome: Open Innovations' was attended by 300 scientists. There were four plenary and eight parallel sessions with 50 invited talks and three poster sessions with 94 posters covering wide range of functional proteomics, signaling, biomarkers, cancer, neuroscience, glycoproteomics, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. As in the past, this year's Siena Meeting maintained its tradition of placing science at centre stage, which generated a wide range of discussions of major importance for the future.

  5. Biomarkers of An Autoimmune Skin Disease—Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shan; Hinchliffe, Taylor E.; Wu, Tianfu

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most prevalent autoimmune skin diseases. However, its etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear. Over the last decade, omics-based technologies have been extensively utilized for biomarker discovery. As a result, some promising markers for psoriasis have been identified at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome level. These discoveries have provided new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in psoriasis pathogenesis. M