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Sample records for proteomic safety biomarkers

  1. The discovery and development of proteomic safety biomarkers for the detection of drug-induced liver toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Amacher, David E.

    2010-05-15

    Biomarkers are biometric measurements that provide critical quantitative information about the biological condition of the animal or individual being tested. In drug safety studies, established toxicity biomarkers are used along with other conventional study data to determine dose-limiting organ toxicity, and to define species sensitivity for new chemical entities intended for possible use as human medicines. A continuing goal of drug safety scientists in the pharmaceutical industry is to discover and develop better trans-species biomarkers that can be used to determine target organ toxicities for preclinical species in short-term studies at dose levels that are some multiple of the intended human dose and again later in full development for monitoring clinical trials at lower therapeutic doses. Of particular value are early, predictive, noninvasive biomarkers that have in vitro, in vivo, and clinical transferability. Such translational biomarkers bridge animal testing used in preclinical science and human studies that are part of subsequent clinical testing. Although suitable for in vivo preclinical regulatory studies, conventional hepatic safety biomarkers are basically confirmatory markers because they signal organ toxicity after some pathological damage has occurred, and are therefore not well-suited for short-term, predictive screening assays early in the discovery-to-development progression of new chemical entities (NCEs) available in limited quantities. Efforts between regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry are underway for the coordinated discovery, qualification, verification and validation of early predictive toxicity biomarkers. Early predictive safety biomarkers are those that are detectable and quantifiable prior to the onset of irreversible tissue injury and which are associated with a mechanism of action relevant to a specific type of potential hepatic injury. Potential drug toxicity biomarkers are typically endogenous macromolecules in

  2. [Proteomics: biomarker research in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Hünnerkopf, R; Grassl, J; Thome, J

    2007-10-01

    Over the last decade, genomics research in psychiatry and neuroscience has provided important insights into genes expressed under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Contrary to the great expectations regarding a clinical use of these datasets, genomics failed to improve markedly the diagnostic and therapeutic options in brain disorders. Due to alternative splicing and posttranslational modifications, one single gene determines a multitude of gene products. Therefore, in order to understand molecular processes in neuropsychiatric disorders, it is necessary to unravel signal transduction pathways and complex interaction networks on the level of proteins, not only DNA and mRNA. Proteomics utilises high-throughput mass spectrometric protein identification that can reveal protein expression levels, posttranslational modifications and protein-protein interactions. Proteomic tools have the power to identify quantitative and qualitative protein patterns in postmortem brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or serum, thus increasing the knowledge about etiology and pathomechanisms of brain diseases. Comparing protein profiles in healthy and disease states provides an opportunity to establish specific diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, proteomic studies of the effects of medication - in vitro and in vivo - might help to design specific pharmaceutical agents with fewer side effects. In this overview, we present the most widely used proteomic techniques and illustrate the potential and limitations of this field of research. Furthermore, we provide insight into the contributions of proteomics to the study of psychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, drug addiction, schizophrenia and depression.

  3. [Proteomic biomarkers in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Bandrés, Sara; Durán, Raquel; Barrero, Francisco; Ramírez, Manuel; Vives, Francisco

    2014-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement and is caused by the death of the dopaminergic neurons in the compact part of the substantia nigra. Its diagnosis is essentially clinical, but although the signs and symptoms of PD are well known, the rate of diagnostic error is relatively high. It is estimated that 10-30% of patients initially diagnosed with PD are later reclassified. This disease has a high prevalence beyond the age of 60, and one of its biggest problems is that it is diagnosed when the degenerative process is already at a very advanced stage. Therefore, it is necessary to look for other biomarkers that make it possible to carry out an early diagnosis of PD, follow up its development, distinguish it from other related pathologies (parkinsonisms) and help monitor the effect of novel therapies. The fact that there are mutations that lead to PD, as well as polygenetic combinations that can act as risk factors, suggests the possibility of measuring the proteins resulting from the expression of these genes in peripheral tissues. And once their sensitivity and specificity have been proved they could be used as biomarkers for PD, even in the early phases of the disease. The aim of this work is to focus on a detailed review of the main candidate proteomic biomarkers researched to date by discussing the most recent literature.

  4. Statistical Aspects in Proteomic Biomarker Discovery.

    PubMed

    Jung, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In the pursuit of a personalized medicine, i.e., the individual treatment of a patient, many medical decision problems are desired to be supported by biomarkers that can help to make a diagnosis, prediction, or prognosis. Proteomic biomarkers are of special interest since they can not only be detected in tissue samples but can also often be easily detected in diverse body fluids. Statistical methods play an important role in the discovery and validation of proteomic biomarkers. They are necessary in the planning of experiments, in the processing of raw signals, and in the final data analysis. This review provides an overview on the most frequent experimental settings including sample size considerations, and focuses on exploratory data analysis and classifier development.

  5. Biomarker discovery in transplantation--proteomic adventure or mission impossible?

    PubMed

    Kienzl-Wagner, Katrin; Pratschke, Johann; Brandacher, Gerald

    2013-04-01

    Optimal management of transplanted organs requires specific and sensitive biomarkers for immunologic graft monitoring and subsequently patient tailored treatment. Proteomic science has emerged as an attractive tool in clinical biomarker research generating massive amounts of proteomic-driven data. However, critical interpretation of these data requires basic knowledge of proteomic principles and technology. This review provides an overview of proteomic approaches along with their advantages and limitations. Furthermore, this article summarizes the current status of biomarker achievements in the different areas of solid organ transplantation and discusses the hurdles that have precluded routine clinical application of these promising markers so far.

  6. Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Charles L.

    2011-12-31

    Research for the DOE Infectious Disease Proteome Biomarkers focused on Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). RVFV and VEEV are Category A and B pathogens respectively. Among the priority threats, RVFV and VEEV rank high in their potential for being weaponized and introduced to the United States, spreading quickly, and having a large health and economic impact. In addition, they both have live attenuated vaccine, which allows work to be performed at BSL-2. While the molecular biology of RVFV and VEEV are increasingly well-characterized, little is known about its host-pathogen interactions. Our research is aimed at determining critical alterations in host signaling pathways to identify therapeutics targeted against the host.

  7. Targeted proteomic strategy for clinical biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Ralph; Wollscheid, Bernd; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2009-02-01

    The high complexity and large dynamic range of blood plasma proteins currently prohibit the sensitive and high-throughput profiling of disease and control plasma proteome sample sets large enough to reliably detect disease indicating differences. To circumvent these technological limitations we describe here a new two-stage strategy for the mass spectrometry (MS) assisted discovery, verification and validation of disease biomarkers. In an initial discovery phase N-linked glycoproteins with distinguishable expression patterns in primary normal and diseased tissue are detected and identified. In the second step the proteins identified in the initial phase are subjected to targeted MS analysis in plasma samples, using the highly sensitive and specific selected reaction monitoring (SRM) technology. Since glycosylated proteins, such as those secreted or shed from the cell surface are likely to reside and persist in blood, the two-stage strategy is focused on the quantification of tissue derived glycoproteins in plasma. The focus on the N-glycoproteome not only reduces the complexity of the analytes, but also targets an information-rich subproteome which is relevant for remote sensing of diseases in the plasma. The N-glycoprotein based biomarker discovery and validation workflow reviewed here allows for the robust identification of protein candidate panels that can finally be selectively monitored in the blood plasma at high sensitivity in a reliable, non-invasive and quantitative fashion.

  8. Proteomic technologies for biomarker studies in psychiatry: advances and needs.

    PubMed

    Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Guest, Paul C; Vanattou-Saifoudine, Natacha; Harris, Laura W; Bahn, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    In the postgenome era, proteomics has arisen as a promising tool for more complete comprehension of diseases and for biomarker discovery. Some of these objectives have already been partly achieved for illnesses such as cancer. In the case of psychiatric conditions, however, proteomic advances have had a less profound impact. Here, we outline the necessity of improving and applying proteomic methods for biomarker discovery and validation in the field of psychiatric disorders. While proteomic-based applications in neurosciences have increased in accuracy and sensitivity over the past 10 years, the development of orthogonal validation technologies has fallen behind. These issues are discussed along with the importance of integrating systems biology approaches and combining proteomics with other research approaches. The future development of such technologies may put proteomics closer to clinical applications in psychiatry.

  9. Biomarker Discovery in Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Caudle, W. Michael; Zhang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Biomarkers for neurodegenerative disorders are essential to facilitate disease diagnosis, ideally at early stages, monitor disease progression, and assess response to existing and future treatments. Application of proteomics to the human brain, cerebrospinal fluid and plasma has greatly hastened the unbiased and high-throughput searches for novel biomarkers. There are many steps critical to biomarker discovery, whether for neurodegenerative or other diseases, including sample preparation, protein/peptide separation and identification, as well as independent confirmation and validation. In this review we have summarized current proteomics technologies involved in discovery of biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases, practical considerations and limitations of several major aspects, as well as the current status of candidate biomarkers revealed by proteomics for Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. PMID:18938247

  10. Molecular biology tools: proteomics techniques in biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef; Keidel, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Despite worldwide efforts biomarker discovery by plasma proteomics was not successful so far. Several reasons for this failure are obvious. Mainly, proteome diversity is remarkable between different individuals and is caused by genetic, environmental and life style parameters. To recognize disease related proteins that could serve as potential biomarkers is only feasible by investigating a non realizable large number of patients. Furthermore, plasma proteomics comprises enormous technical hurdles for quantitative analysis. High reproducibility of blood sampling in clinical routine is hard to achieve. Quantitative proteome analysis has to struggle with the complexity of millions of protein species comprising typical plasma proteins, cellular leakage proteins and antibodies and concentration differences of more than 1011 between high and low abundant proteins. Therefore, no successful quantitative and comprehensive plasma proteome analysis is reported so far. A novel proteomics strategy is proposed for biomarker discovery in plasma. Instead of comparing the plasma proteome of different individuals it is recommended to analyze the proteomes of different time points of a single individual during the development of a disease. This strategy is realized by the use of plasma of the Bavarian Red Cross Blood Bank, were three million samples are stored under standardized conditions. To achieve reliable data the isotope coded protein labelling proteomics technology was used.

  11. Proteomics approaches in the quest of kidney disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Frantzi, M; Bitsika, V; Charonis, A; Vlahou, A

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics refers to a group of analytical techniques for high throughput protein analysis, providing evidence for protein expression levels, subcellular localization, post-translational modifications and molecular interactions. As such, proteomics has contributed largely to our knowledge regarding molecular mechanisms underlying health and disease and pinpointed potential disease biomarkers. The scope of this review is to briefly introduce the principles of major proteomics techniques employed in biological research, including novel quantitative and molecular imaging mass spectrometry-based platforms. A few examples from the application of these techniques in biomarker discovery for kidney diseases are also provided.

  12. Human saliva proteome analysis and disease biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shen; Loo, Joseph A; Wong, David T

    2007-08-01

    Human saliva is an attractive body fluid for disease diagnosis and prognosis because saliva testing is simple, safe, low-cost and noninvasive. Comprehensive analysis and identification of the proteomic content in human whole and ductal saliva will not only contribute to the understanding of oral health and disease pathogenesis, but also form a foundation for the discovery of saliva protein biomarkers for human disease detection. In this article, we have summarized the proteomic technologies for comprehensive identification of proteins in human whole and ductal saliva. We have also discussed potential quantitative proteomic approaches to the discovery of saliva protein biomarkers for human oral and systemic diseases. With the fast development of mass spectrometry and proteomic technologies, we are enthusiastic that saliva protein biomarkers will be developed for clinical diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases in the future.

  13. The potential biomarkers of drug addiction: proteomic and metabolomics challenges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lv; Wu, Ning; Zhao, Tai-Yun; Li, Jin

    2016-07-28

    Drug addiction places a significant burden on society and individuals. Proteomics and metabolomics approaches pave the road for searching potential biomarkers to assist the diagnosis and treatment. This review summarized putative drug addiction-related biomarkers in proteomics and metabolomics studies and discussed challenges and prospects in future studies. Alterations of several hundred proteins and metabolites were reported when exposure to abused drug, which enriched in energy metabolism, oxidative stress response, protein modification and degradation, synaptic function and neurotrasmission, etc. Hsp70, peroxiredoxin-6 and α- and β-synuclein, as well as n-methylserotonin and purine metabolites, were promising as potential biomarker for drug addiction.

  14. Proteomics, biomarkers, and HIV‐1: A current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Maire Rose

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than three decades of extensive research, HIV‐1 infection although well controlled with cART, remains incurable. Multifactorial complexity of the viral life‐cycle poses great challenges in understanding molecular mechanisms underlying this infection and the development of biomarkers, which we hope will lead us to its eradication. For a more in‐depth understanding of how the virus interacts with host target cells, T cells and macrophages, proteomic profiling techniques that offer strategies to investigate the proteome in its entirety were employed. Here, we review proteomic studies related to HIV‐1 infection and discuss perspectives and limitations of proteomic and systems biology approaches in future studies. PMID:26033875

  15. Definition of Valid Proteomic Biomarkers: A Bayesian Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Keith; Girolami, Mark; Mischak, Harald

    Clinical proteomics is suffering from high hopes generated by reports on apparent biomarkers, most of which could not be later substantiated via validation. This has brought into focus the need for improved methods of finding a panel of clearly defined biomarkers. To examine this problem, urinary proteome data was collected from healthy adult males and females, and analysed to find biomarkers that differentiated between genders. We believe that models that incorporate sparsity in terms of variables are desirable for biomarker selection, as proteomics data typically contains a huge number of variables (peptides) and few samples making the selection process potentially unstable. This suggests the application of a two-level hierarchical Bayesian probit regression model for variable selection which assumes a prior that favours sparseness. The classification performance of this method is shown to improve that of the Probabilistic K-Nearest Neighbour model.

  16. A proteomics perspective: from animal welfare to food safety.

    PubMed

    Bassols, Anna; Turk, Romana; Roncada, Paola

    2014-03-01

    A fundamental issue of farm animal welfare is to keep animals clinically healthy, without disease or stress, particularly in intensive breeding, in order to produce safe and quality food. This issue is highly relevant for the food industry worldwide as they are directly linked to public health and welfare. The aim of this review is to explore how proteomics can assess and improve the knowledge useful for the strategic management of products of animal origin. Useful indications are provided about the latest proteomics tools for the development of novel biotechnologies serving the public health. The multivariate proteomics approach provides the bases for the discovery of biomarkers useful to investigate adaptation syndromes and oxidative stress. These two responses represent the milestones for the study of animal welfare. Moreover their implementation in the characterization and standardization of raw materials, process development, and quality and safety control of the final product of animal origin represents the current frontier in official surveillance and tests development.

  17. Computational biomarker pipeline from discovery to clinical implementation: plasma proteomic biomarkers for cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cohen Freue, Gabriela V; Meredith, Anna; Smith, Derek; Bergman, Axel; Sasaki, Mayu; Lam, Karen K Y; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Opushneva, Nina; Takhar, Mandeep; Lin, David; Wilson-McManus, Janet; Balshaw, Robert; Keown, Paul A; Borchers, Christoph H; McManus, Bruce; Ng, Raymond T; McMaster, W Robert

    2013-04-01

    Recent technical advances in the field of quantitative proteomics have stimulated a large number of biomarker discovery studies of various diseases, providing avenues for new treatments and diagnostics. However, inherent challenges have limited the successful translation of candidate biomarkers into clinical use, thus highlighting the need for a robust analytical methodology to transition from biomarker discovery to clinical implementation. We have developed an end-to-end computational proteomic pipeline for biomarkers studies. At the discovery stage, the pipeline emphasizes different aspects of experimental design, appropriate statistical methodologies, and quality assessment of results. At the validation stage, the pipeline focuses on the migration of the results to a platform appropriate for external validation, and the development of a classifier score based on corroborated protein biomarkers. At the last stage towards clinical implementation, the main aims are to develop and validate an assay suitable for clinical deployment, and to calibrate the biomarker classifier using the developed assay. The proposed pipeline was applied to a biomarker study in cardiac transplantation aimed at developing a minimally invasive clinical test to monitor acute rejection. Starting with an untargeted screening of the human plasma proteome, five candidate biomarker proteins were identified. Rejection-regulated proteins reflect cellular and humoral immune responses, acute phase inflammatory pathways, and lipid metabolism biological processes. A multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass-spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay was developed for the five candidate biomarkers and validated by enzyme-linked immune-sorbent (ELISA) and immunonephelometric assays (INA). A classifier score based on corroborated proteins demonstrated that the developed MRM-MS assay provides an appropriate methodology for an external validation, which is still in progress. Plasma proteomic biomarkers of acute cardiac

  18. Computational Biomarker Pipeline from Discovery to Clinical Implementation: Plasma Proteomic Biomarkers for Cardiac Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen Freue, Gabriela V.; Meredith, Anna; Smith, Derek; Bergman, Axel; Sasaki, Mayu; Lam, Karen K. Y.; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Opushneva, Nina; Takhar, Mandeep; Lin, David; Wilson-McManus, Janet; Balshaw, Robert; Keown, Paul A.; Borchers, Christoph H.; McManus, Bruce; Ng, Raymond T.; McMaster, W. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent technical advances in the field of quantitative proteomics have stimulated a large number of biomarker discovery studies of various diseases, providing avenues for new treatments and diagnostics. However, inherent challenges have limited the successful translation of candidate biomarkers into clinical use, thus highlighting the need for a robust analytical methodology to transition from biomarker discovery to clinical implementation. We have developed an end-to-end computational proteomic pipeline for biomarkers studies. At the discovery stage, the pipeline emphasizes different aspects of experimental design, appropriate statistical methodologies, and quality assessment of results. At the validation stage, the pipeline focuses on the migration of the results to a platform appropriate for external validation, and the development of a classifier score based on corroborated protein biomarkers. At the last stage towards clinical implementation, the main aims are to develop and validate an assay suitable for clinical deployment, and to calibrate the biomarker classifier using the developed assay. The proposed pipeline was applied to a biomarker study in cardiac transplantation aimed at developing a minimally invasive clinical test to monitor acute rejection. Starting with an untargeted screening of the human plasma proteome, five candidate biomarker proteins were identified. Rejection-regulated proteins reflect cellular and humoral immune responses, acute phase inflammatory pathways, and lipid metabolism biological processes. A multiplex multiple reaction monitoring mass-spectrometry (MRM-MS) assay was developed for the five candidate biomarkers and validated by enzyme-linked immune-sorbent (ELISA) and immunonephelometric assays (INA). A classifier score based on corroborated proteins demonstrated that the developed MRM-MS assay provides an appropriate methodology for an external validation, which is still in progress. Plasma proteomic biomarkers of acute cardiac

  19. Clinical proteomic biomarkers: relevant issues on study design & technical considerations in biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Frantzi, Maria; Bhat, Akshay; Latosinska, Agnieszka

    2014-03-29

    Biomarker research is continuously expanding in the field of clinical proteomics. A combination of different proteomic-based methodologies can be applied depending on the specific clinical context of use. Moreover, current advancements in proteomic analytical platforms are leading to an expansion of biomarker candidates that can be identified. Specifically, mass spectrometric techniques could provide highly valuable tools for biomarker research. Ideally, these advances could provide with biomarkers that are clinically applicable for disease diagnosis and/ or prognosis. Unfortunately, in general the biomarker candidates fail to be implemented in clinical decision making. To improve on this current situation, a well-defined study design has to be established driven by a clear clinical need, while several checkpoints between the different phases of discovery, verification and validation have to be passed in order to increase the probability of establishing valid biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the technical proteomic platforms that are available along the different stages in the biomarker discovery pipeline, exemplified by clinical applications in the field of bladder cancer biomarker research.

  20. Genomic and Proteomic Biomarkers for Cancer: A Multitude of Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tainsky, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Biomarkers are molecular indicators of a biological status, and as biochemical species can be assayed to evaluate the presence of cancer and therapeutic interventions. Through a variety of mechanisms cancer cells provide the biomarker material for their own detection. Biomarkers may be detectable in the blood, other body fluids, or tissues. The expectation is that the level of an informative biomarker is related to the specific type of disease present in the body. Biomarkers have potential both as diagnostic indicators and monitors of the effectiveness of clinical interventions. Biomarkers are also able to stratify cancer patients to the most appropriate treatment. Effective biomarkers for the early detection of cancer should provide a patient with a better outcome which in turn will translate into more efficient delivery of healthcare. Technologies for the early detection of cancer have resulted in reductions in disease-associated mortalities from cancers that are otherwise deadly if allowed to progress. Such screening technologies have proven that early detection will decrease the morbidity and mortality from cancer. An emerging theme in biomarker research is the expectation that panels of biomarker analytes rather than single markers will be needed to have sufficient sensitivity and specificity for the presymptomatic detection of cancer. Biomarkers may provide prognostic information of disease enabling interventions using targeted therapeutic agents as well as course-corrections in cancer treatment. Novel genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies are being used to discover and validate tumor biomarkers individually and in panels. PMID:19406210

  1. Schizophrenia proteomics: biomarkers on the path to laboratory medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    Over two million Americans are afflicted with schizophrenia, a debilitating mental health disorder with a unique symptomatic and epidemiological profile. Genomics studies have hinted towards candidate schizophrenia susceptibility chromosomal loci and genes. Modern proteomic tools, particularly mass spectrometry and expression scanning, aim to identify both pathogenic-revealing and diagnostically significant biomarkers. Only a few studies on basic proteomics have been conducted for psychiatric disorders relative to the plethora of cancer specific experiments. One such proteomic utility enables the discovery of proteins and biological marker fingerprinting profiling techniques (SELDI-TOF-MS), and then subjects them to tandem mass spectrometric fragmentation and de novo protein sequencing (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) for the accurate identification and characterization of the proteins. Such utilities can explain the pathogenesis of neuro-psychiatric disease, provide more objective testing methods, and further demonstrate a biological basis to mental illness. Although clinical proteomics in schizophrenia have yet to reveal a biomarker with diagnostic specificity, methods that better characterize the disorder using endophenotypes can advance findings. Schizophrenia biomarkers could potentially revolutionize its psychopharmacology, changing it into a more hypothesis and genomic/proteomic-driven science. PMID:16846510

  2. Clinical proteomic biomarkers: relevant issues on study design & technical considerations in biomarker development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biomarker research is continuously expanding in the field of clinical proteomics. A combination of different proteomic–based methodologies can be applied depending on the specific clinical context of use. Moreover, current advancements in proteomic analytical platforms are leading to an expansion of biomarker candidates that can be identified. Specifically, mass spectrometric techniques could provide highly valuable tools for biomarker research. Ideally, these advances could provide with biomarkers that are clinically applicable for disease diagnosis and/ or prognosis. Unfortunately, in general the biomarker candidates fail to be implemented in clinical decision making. To improve on this current situation, a well-defined study design has to be established driven by a clear clinical need, while several checkpoints between the different phases of discovery, verification and validation have to be passed in order to increase the probability of establishing valid biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the technical proteomic platforms that are available along the different stages in the biomarker discovery pipeline, exemplified by clinical applications in the field of bladder cancer biomarker research. PMID:24679154

  3. Proteomic Approaches in Biomarker Discovery: New Perspectives in Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kocevar, Nina; Komel, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in proteomic methods, including improved detection limits and sensitivity, these methods have not yet been established in routine clinical practice. The main limitations, which prevent their integration into clinics, are high cost of equipment, the need for highly trained personnel, and last, but not least, the establishment of reliable and accurate protein biomarkers or panels of protein biomarkers for detection of neoplasms. Furthermore, the complexity and heterogeneity of most solid tumours present obstacles in the discovery of specific protein signatures, which could be used for early detection of cancers, for prediction of disease outcome, and for determining the response to specific therapies. However, cancer proteome, as the end-point of pathological processes that underlie cancer development and progression, could represent an important source for the discovery of new biomarkers and molecular targets for tailored therapies. PMID:24550697

  4. Proteomics for discovery of candidate colorectal cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Chaver, Paula; Otero-Estévez, Olalla; Páez de la Cadena, María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco J; Martínez-Zorzano, Vicenta S

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe and other Western countries, mainly due to the lack of well-validated clinically useful biomarkers with enough sensitivity and specificity to detect this disease at early stages. Although it is well known that the pathogenesis of CRC is a progressive accumulation of mutations in multiple genes, much less is known at the proteome level. Therefore, in the last years many proteomic studies have been conducted to find new candidate protein biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and as therapeutic targets for this malignancy, as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of colorectal carcinogenesis. An important advantage of the proteomic approaches is the capacity to look for multiple differentially expressed proteins in a single study. This review provides an overview of the recent reports describing the different proteomic tools used for the discovery of new protein markers for CRC such as two-dimensional electrophoresis methods, quantitative mass spectrometry-based techniques or protein microarrays. Additionally, we will also focus on the diverse biological samples used for CRC biomarker discovery such as tissue, serum and faeces, besides cell lines and murine models, discussing their advantages and disadvantages, and summarize the most frequently identified candidate CRC markers. PMID:24744574

  5. Challenges for red blood cell biomarker discovery through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Benjamin; Slijper, Monique

    2014-05-01

    Red blood cells are rather unique body cells, since they have lost all organelles when mature, which results in lack of potential to replace proteins that have lost their function. They maintain only a few pathways for obtaining energy and reducing power for the key functions they need to fulfill. This makes RBCs highly sensitive to any aberration. If so, these RBCs are quickly removed from circulation, but if the RBC levels reduce extremely fast, this results in hemolytic anemia. Several causes of HA exist, and proteome analysis is the most straightforward way to obtain deeper insight into RBC functioning under the stress of disease. This should result in discovery of biomarkers, typical for each source of anemia. In this review, several challenges to generate in-depth RBC proteomes are described, like to obtain pure RBCs, to overcome the wide dynamic range in protein expression, and to establish which of the identified/quantified proteins are active in RBCs. The final challenge is to acquire and validate suited biomarkers unique for the changes that occur for each of the clinical questions; in red blood cell aging (also important for transfusion medicine), for thalassemias or sickle cell disease. Biomarkers for other hemolytic anemias that are caused by dysfunction of RBC membrane proteins (the RBC membrane defects) or RBC cytosolic proteins (the enzymopathies) are sometimes even harder to discover, in particular for the patients with RBC rare diseases with unknown cause. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  6. Proteomic identification of salivary biomarkers of type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Paturi V; Reddy, Ashok P; Lu, Xinfang; Dasari, Surendra; Krishnaprasad, Adiraju; Biggs, Evan; Roberts, Charles T; Nagalla, Srinivasa R

    2009-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers to noninvasively detect prediabetes/diabetes will facilitate interventions designed to prevent or delay progression to frank diabetes and its attendant complications. The purpose of this study was to characterize the human salivary proteome in type-2 diabetes to identify potential biomarkers of diabetes. Whole saliva from control and type-2 diabetic individuals was characterized by multidimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS). Label-free quantification was used to identify differentially abundant protein biomarkers. Selected potential biomarkers were then independently validated in saliva from control, diabetic, and prediabetic subjects by Western immunoblotting and ELISA. Characterization of the salivary proteome identified a total of 487 unique proteins. Approximately 33% of these have not been previously reported in human saliva. Of these, 65 demonstrated a greater than 2-fold difference in abundance between control and type-2 diabetes samples. A majority of the differentially abundant proteins belong to pathways regulating metabolism and immune response. Independent validation of a subset of potential biomarkers utilizing immunodetection confirmed their differential expression in type-2 diabetes, and analysis of prediabetic samples demonstrated a trend of relative increase in their abundance with progression from the prediabetic to the diabetic state. This comprehensive proteomic analysis of the human salivary proteome in type-2 diabetes provides the first global view of potential mechanisms perturbed in diabetic saliva and their utility in detection and monitoring of diabetes. Further characterization of these markers in a larger cohort of subjects may provide the basis for new, noninvasive tests for diabetes screening, detection, and monitoring.

  7. Aptamer-Based Multiplexed Proteomic Technology for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Larry; Ayers, Deborah; Bertino, Jennifer; Bock, Christopher; Bock, Ashley; Brody, Edward N.; Carter, Jeff; Dalby, Andrew B.; Eaton, Bruce E.; Fitzwater, Tim; Flather, Dylan; Forbes, Ashley; Foreman, Trudi; Fowler, Cate; Gawande, Bharat; Goss, Meredith; Gunn, Magda; Gupta, Shashi; Halladay, Dennis; Heil, Jim; Heilig, Joe; Hicke, Brian; Husar, Gregory; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale; Jennings, Susan; Katilius, Evaldas; Keeney, Tracy R.; Kim, Nancy; Koch, Tad H.; Kraemer, Stephan; Kroiss, Luke; Le, Ngan; Levine, Daniel; Lindsey, Wes; Lollo, Bridget; Mayfield, Wes; Mehan, Mike; Mehler, Robert; Nelson, Sally K.; Nelson, Michele; Nieuwlandt, Dan; Nikrad, Malti; Ochsner, Urs; Ostroff, Rachel M.; Otis, Matt; Parker, Thomas; Pietrasiewicz, Steve; Resnicow, Daniel I.; Rohloff, John; Sanders, Glenn; Sattin, Sarah; Schneider, Daniel; Singer, Britta; Stanton, Martin; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Alex; Stratford, Suzanne; Vaught, Jonathan D.; Vrkljan, Mike; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Watrobka, Mike; Waugh, Sheela; Weiss, Allison; Wilcox, Sheri K.; Wolfson, Alexey; Wolk, Steven K.; Zhang, Chi; Zichi, Dom

    2010-01-01

    Background The interrogation of proteomes (“proteomics”) in a highly multiplexed and efficient manner remains a coveted and challenging goal in biology and medicine. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a new aptamer-based proteomic technology for biomarker discovery capable of simultaneously measuring thousands of proteins from small sample volumes (15 µL of serum or plasma). Our current assay measures 813 proteins with low limits of detection (1 pM median), 7 logs of overall dynamic range (∼100 fM–1 µM), and 5% median coefficient of variation. This technology is enabled by a new generation of aptamers that contain chemically modified nucleotides, which greatly expand the physicochemical diversity of the large randomized nucleic acid libraries from which the aptamers are selected. Proteins in complex matrices such as plasma are measured with a process that transforms a signature of protein concentrations into a corresponding signature of DNA aptamer concentrations, which is quantified on a DNA microarray. Our assay takes advantage of the dual nature of aptamers as both folded protein-binding entities with defined shapes and unique nucleotide sequences recognizable by specific hybridization probes. To demonstrate the utility of our proteomics biomarker discovery technology, we applied it to a clinical study of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We identified two well known CKD biomarkers as well as an additional 58 potential CKD biomarkers. These results demonstrate the potential utility of our technology to rapidly discover unique protein signatures characteristic of various disease states. Conclusions/Significance We describe a versatile and powerful tool that allows large-scale comparison of proteome profiles among discrete populations. This unbiased and highly multiplexed search engine will enable the discovery of novel biomarkers in a manner that is unencumbered by our incomplete knowledge of biology, thereby helping to advance the next generation of

  8. iTRAQ-based proteomics reveals novel biomarkers of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Daiki; Ageta, Hiroshi; Tsuchida, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We performed comprehensive proteomic analyses of articular cartilage by using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) method, and searched for candidate biomarkers for osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Articular cartilage was collected from patients with OA or femoral neck fracture for the control group. Molecular variations were detected by the iTRAQ method, and quantitative analyses were performed by western blot. Results: Using the iTRAQ method, we identified 76 proteins with different expression levels in OA patients and the control group. Among these proteins, we selected LECT2 (leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin-2), BAALC (brain and acute leukemia, cytoplasmic), and PRDX6 (peroxiredoxin-6), which had not been reported as biomarkers for OA. Conclusions: Use of these proteins in combination with conventional OA biomarkers may better reflect the grade and prognosis of OA. PMID:23937207

  9. Highly multiplexed proteomic platform for biomarker discovery, diagnostics, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mehan, Michael R; Ostroff, Rachel; Wilcox, Sheri K; Steele, Fintan; Schneider, Daniel; Jarvis, Thale C; Baird, Geoffrey S; Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2013-01-01

    Progression from health to disease is accompanied by complex changes in protein expression in both the circulation and affected tissues. Large-scale comparative interrogation of the human proteome can offer insights into disease biology as well as lead to the discovery of new biomarkers for diagnostics, new targets for therapeutics, and can identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment. Although genomic studies provide an increasingly sharper understanding of basic biological and pathobiological processes, they ultimately only offer a prediction of relative disease risk, whereas proteins offer an immediate assessment of "real-time" health and disease status. We have recently developed a new proteomic technology, based on modified aptamers, for biomarker discovery that is capable of simultaneously measuring more than a thousand proteins from small volumes of biological samples such as plasma, tissues, or cells. Our technology is enabled by SOMAmers (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers), a new class of protein binding reagents that contain chemically modified nucleotides that greatly expand the physicochemical diversity of nucleic acid-based ligands. Such modifications introduce functional groups that are absent in natural nucleic acids but are often found in protein-protein, small molecule-protein, and antibody-antigen interactions. The use of these modifications expands the range of possible targets for SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment), results in improved binding properties, and facilitates selection of SOMAmers with slow dissociation rates. Our assay works by transforming protein concentrations in a mixture into a corresponding DNA signature, which is then quantified on current commercial DNA microarray platforms. In essence, we take advantage of the dual nature of SOMAmers as both folded binding entities with defined shapes and unique nucleic acid sequences recognizable by specific hybridization probes. Currently, our assay

  10. Fast proteomic protocol for biomarker fingerprinting in cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Jenny M; Perez, Milagros; Yang, Xu; Shapiro, Danielle; Reed, Debby; Tuli, Leepika; Finkielstein, Carla V; Lazar, Iulia M

    2010-04-23

    The advance of novel technologies that will enable the detection of large sets of biomarker proteins, to greatly improve the sensitivity and specificity of an assay, represents a major objective in biomedical research. To demonstrate the power of mass spectrometry (MS) detection for large-scale biomarker screening in cancer research, a simple, one-step approach for fast biomarker fingerprinting in complex cellular extracts is described. MCF-7 breast cancer cells were used as a model system. Fast proteomic profiling of whole cellular extracts was achieved on a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ) mass spectrometer by one of the following techniques: (a) data-dependent liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS of un-labeled cell extracts, (b) data-dependent LC-MS/MS with pulsed Q dissociation (PQD) detection of iTRAQ labeled samples, and (c) multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-MS of low abundant proteins that could not be detected with data-dependent MS/MS. The data-dependent LC-MS/MS analysis of MCF-7 cells enabled the identification of 796 proteins (p<0.001) and the simultaneous detection of 156 previously reported putative cancer biomarkers. PQD detection of iTRAQ labeled cells resulted in the detection of 389 proteins and 64 putative biomarkers. MRM-MS analysis enabled the successful monitoring of a panel of low-abundance proteins in one single experiment, highlighting the utility of this technique for targeted analysis in cancer investigations. These results demonstrate that MS-based technologies relying on a one-step separation protocol have the potential to revolutionize biomarker research and screening applications by enabling fast, sensitive and reliable detection of large panels of putative biomarkers. To further stimulate the exploration of proteins that have been previously reported in the literature to be differentially expressed in a variety of cancers, an extensive list of approximately 1100 candidate biomarkers has been compiled and included in the manuscript.

  11. The proteome of Hypobaric Induced Hypoxic Lung: Insights from Temporal Proteomic Profiling for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Srivastava, Mousami; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high altitude induces physiological responses due to hypoxia. Lungs being at the first level to face the alterations in oxygen levels are critical to counter and balance these changes. Studies have been done analysing pulmonary proteome alterations in response to exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. However, such studies have reported the alterations at specific time points and do not reflect the gradual proteomic changes. These studies also identify the various biochemical pathways and responses induced after immediate exposure and the resolution of these effects in challenge to hypobaric hypoxia. In the present study, using 2-DE/MS approach, we attempt to resolve these shortcomings by analysing the proteome alterations in lungs in response to different durations of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Our study thus highlights the gradual and dynamic changes in pulmonary proteome following hypobaric hypoxia. For the first time, we also report the possible consideration of SULT1A1, as a biomarker for the diagnosis of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Higher SULT1A1 levels were observed in rats as well as in humans exposed to high altitude, when compared to sea-level controls. This study can thus form the basis for identifying biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in responses to hypobaric hypoxia. PMID:26022216

  12. Proteomic Biomarkers Associated with Streptococcus agalactiae Invasive Genogroups

    PubMed Central

    Lanotte, Philippe; Perivier, Marylise; Haguenoer, Eve; Mereghetti, Laurent; Burucoa, Christophe; Claverol, Stéphane; Atanassov, Christo

    2013-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS, Streptococcus agalactiae) is a leading cause of meningitis and sepsis in newborns and an etiological agent of meningitis, endocarditis, osteoarticular and soft tissue infections in adults. GBS isolates are routinely clustered in serotypes and in genotypes. At present one GBS sequence type (i.e. ST17) is considered to be closely associated with bacterial invasiveness and novel proteomic biomarkers could make a valuable contribution to currently available GBS typing data. For that purpose we analyzed the protein profiles of 170 genotyped GBS isolates by Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI). Univariate statistical analysis of the SELDI profiles identified four protein biomarkers significantly discriminating ST17 isolates from those of the other sequence types. Two of these biomarkers (MW of 7878 Da and 12200 Da) were overexpressed and the other two (MW of 6258 Da and 10463 Da) were underexpressed in ST17. The four proteins were isolated by mass spectrometry-assisted purification and their tryptic peptides analyzed by LC-MS/MS. They were thereby identified as the small subunit of exodeoxyribonuclease VII, the 50S ribosomal protein L7/L12, a CsbD-like protein and thioredoxin, respectively. In conclusion, we identified four candidate biomarkers of ST17 by SELDI for high-throughput screening. These markers may serve as a basis for further studies on the pathophysiology of GBS infection, and for the development of novel vaccines. PMID:23372719

  13. Proteomic Technologies for the Discovery of Type 1 Diabetes Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Wenbo; Purohit, Sharad; Carey, Colleen; Wang, Meiyao; She, Jin-Xiong

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we discuss several important issues concerning the discovery of protein biomarkers for complex human diseases, with a focus on type 1 diabetes. Serum or plasma is the first choice of specimen due to its richness in biological information and relatively easy availability. It is a challenging task to comprehensively characterize the serum/plasma proteome because of the large dynamic range of protein concentration. Therefore, sample pretreatment is required in order to explore the low- to medium-abundance proteins contained in serum/plasma. In this regard, enrichment of low-abundance proteins using random hexapeptide library beads has distinct advantages over the traditional immune-depletion methods, including higher efficiency, higher binding capacity, and lower cost. In-depth mining of serum/plasma proteome using different separation techniques have also been evaluated and are discussed in this review. Overall, the shotgun proteomics—multidimensional separation of digested peptides followed by mass spectrometry analysis—is highly efficient and therefore has become a preferred method for protein biomarker discovery. PMID:20663466

  14. Microfluidic liquid chromatography system for proteomic applications and biomarker screening.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Iulia M; Trisiripisal, Phichet; Sarvaiya, Hetal A

    2006-08-01

    A microfluidic liquid chromatography (LC) system for proteomic investigations that integrates all the necessary components for stand-alone operation, i.e., pump, valve, separation column, and electrospray interface, is described in this paper. The overall size of the LC device is small enough to enable the integration of two fully functional separation systems on a 3 in. x 1 in. glass microchip. A multichannel architecture that uses electroosmotic pumping principles provides the necessary functionality for eluent propulsion and sample valving. The flow rates generated within these chips are fully consistent with the requirements of nano-LC platforms that are routinely used in proteomic applications. The microfluidic device was evaluated for the analysis of a protein digest obtained from the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. The cytosolic protein extract was processed according to a shotgun protocol, and after tryptic digestion and prefractionation using strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX), selected sample subfractions were analyzed with conventional and microfluidic LC platforms. Using similar experimental conditions, the performance of the microchip LC was comparable to that obtained with benchtop instrumentation, providing an overlap of 75% in proteins that were identified by more than two unique peptides. The microfluidic LC analysis of a protein-rich SCX fraction enabled the confident identification of 77 proteins by using conventional data filtering parameters, of 39 proteins with p < 0.001, and of 5 proteins that are known to be cancer-specific biomarkers, demonstrating thus the potential applicability of these chips for future high-throughput biomarker screening applications.

  15. Proteomics reveals potential biomarkers of seed vigor in sugarbeet.

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Meinhard, Juliane; Job, Claudette; Strub, Jean-Marc; Fischer, Uwe; Pestsova, Elena; Westhoff, Peter; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Job, Dominique

    2011-05-01

    To unravel biomarkers of seed vigor, an important trait conditioning crop yield, a comparative proteomic study was conducted with sugarbeet seed samples of varying vigor as generated by an invigoration treatment called hydropriming and an aging treatment called controlled deterioration. Comparative proteomics revealed proteins exhibiting contrasting behavior between seed samples. Thus, 18 proteins were up-regulated during priming and down-regulated during aging and further displayed an up-regulation upon priming of the aged seeds, meaning that down-regulation of these spot volumes during aging was reversible upon subsequent priming. Also, 11 proteins exhibited the converse behavior characterized by a decrease and an increase of the spot volumes during priming and aging of the control seeds, respectively, and a decrease in the spot volumes upon priming of the aged seeds. The results underpinned the role in seed vigor of several metabolic pathways involved in lipid and starch mobilization, protein synthesis or the methyl cycle. They also corroborate previous studies suggesting that the glyoxylate enzyme isocitrate lyase, the capacity of protein synthesis and components of abscisic acid signaling pathways are likely contributors of seed vigor.

  16. A generic operational strategy to qualify translational safety biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Matheis, Katja; Laurie, David; Andriamandroso, Christiane; Arber, Nadir; Badimon, Lina; Benain, Xavier; Bendjama, Kaïdre; Clavier, Isabelle; Colman, Peter; Firat, Hüseyin; Goepfert, Jens; Hall, Steve; Joos, Thomas; Kraus, Sarah; Kretschmer, Axel; Merz, Michael; Padro, Teresa; Planatscher, Hannes; Rossi, Annamaria; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Schuppe-Koistinen, Ina; Thomann, Peter; Vidal, Jean-Marc; Molac, Béatrice

    2011-07-01

    The importance of using translational safety biomarkers that can predict, detect and monitor drug-induced toxicity during human trials is becoming increasingly recognized. However, suitable processes to qualify biomarkers in clinical studies have not yet been established. There is a need to define clear scientific guidelines to link biomarkers to clinical processes and clinical endpoints. To help define the operational approach for the qualification of safety biomarkers the IMI SAFE-T consortium has established a generic qualification strategy for new translational safety biomarkers that will allow early identification, assessment and management of drug-induced injuries throughout R&D.

  17. Impact of biomarker development on drug safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Marrer, Estelle; Dieterle, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Drug safety has always been a key aspect of drug development. Recently, the Vioxx case and several cases of serious adverse events being linked to high-profile products have increased the importance of drug safety, especially in the eyes of drug development companies and global regulatory agencies. Safety biomarkers are increasingly being seen as helping to provide the clarity, predictability, and certainty needed to gain confidence in decision making: early-stage projects can be stopped quicker, late-stage projects become less risky. Public and private organizations are investing heavily in terms of time, money and manpower on safety biomarker development. An illustrative and 'door opening' safety biomarker success story is the recent recognition of kidney safety biomarkers for pre-clinical and limited translational contexts by FDA and EMEA. This milestone achieved for kidney biomarkers and the 'know how' acquired is being transferred to other organ toxicities, namely liver, heart, vascular system. New technologies and molecular-based approaches, i.e., molecular pathology as a complement to the classical toolbox, allow promising discoveries in the safety biomarker field. This review will focus on the utility and use of safety biomarkers all along drug development, highlighting the present gaps and opportunities identified in organ toxicity monitoring. A last part will be dedicated to safety biomarker development in general, from identification to diagnostic tests, using the kidney safety biomarkers success as an illustrative example.

  18. [Utilization of Genomic Biomarkers for Post-marketing Safety of Drugs].

    PubMed

    Kaniwa, Nahoko

    2015-01-01

    To prevent adverse drug reactions in the post-marketing phase, therapeutic drug monitoring and various laboratory tests have been used for decades. Recently, data on associations between drug adverse reactions and biomarkers based on "omics" technologies/studies have been increasing. Using genomic biomarkers, patients at high risk for developing side effects can be distinguished before initiating medical treatment, allowing the choice of an appropriate drug/initial dosage regimen. Biomarkers based on proteomics or metabolomics can detect the onset of adverse reactions at an earlier stage than can be accomplished with classical laboratory tests. However, the clinical use of drug safety-related biomarkers is still limited compared with biomarkers that predict drug efficacy of, for example, molecular-targeted drugs. In this symposium, genomic biomarkers associated with the safety of anticancer drugs and idiosyncratic adverse reactions are introduced and compared between Japan and other countries. Prospective studies evaluating the application of screening tests to prevent adverse drug reactions are also shown, and steps necessary to accelerate the use of drug safety-related biomarkers are discussed.

  19. Integration of Proteomics, Bioinformatics, and Systems Biology in Traumatic Brain Injury Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Guingab-Cagmat, J.D.; Cagmat, E.B.; Hayes, R.L.; Anagli, J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical crisis without any FDA-approved pharmacological therapies that have been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes. It has been argued that discovery of disease-relevant biomarkers might help to guide successful clinical trials for TBI. Major advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have revolutionized the field of proteomic biomarker discovery and facilitated the identification of several candidate markers that are being further evaluated for their efficacy as TBI biomarkers. However, several hurdles have to be overcome even during the discovery phase which is only the first step in the long process of biomarker development. The high-throughput nature of MS-based proteomic experiments generates a massive amount of mass spectral data presenting great challenges in downstream interpretation. Currently, different bioinformatics platforms are available for functional analysis and data mining of MS-generated proteomic data. These tools provide a way to convert data sets to biologically interpretable results and functional outcomes. A strategy that has promise in advancing biomarker development involves the triad of proteomics, bioinformatics, and systems biology. In this review, a brief overview of how bioinformatics and systems biology tools analyze, transform, and interpret complex MS datasets into biologically relevant results is discussed. In addition, challenges and limitations of proteomics, bioinformatics, and systems biology in TBI biomarker discovery are presented. A brief survey of researches that utilized these three overlapping disciplines in TBI biomarker discovery is also presented. Finally, examples of TBI biomarkers and their applications are discussed. PMID:23750150

  20. Biomarkers of systemic lupus erythematosus identified using mass spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Orthodoxia; Kousios, Andreas; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Lauwerys, Bernard; Sokratous, Kleitos; Kyriacou, Kyriacos

    2016-11-23

    Advances in mass spectrometry technologies have created new opportunities for discovering novel protein biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a systematic review of published reports on proteomic biomarkers identified in SLE patients using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and highlight their potential disease association and clinical utility. Two electronic databases, MEDLINE and EMBASE, were systematically searched up to July 2015. The methodological quality of studies included in the review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Twenty-five studies were included in the review, identifying 241 SLE candidate proteomic biomarkers related to various aspects of the disease including disease diagnosis and activity or pinpointing specific organ involvement. Furthermore, 13 of the 25 studies validated their results for a selected number of biomarkers in an independent cohort, resulting in the validation of 28 candidate biomarkers. It is noteworthy that 11 candidate biomarkers were identified in more than one study. A significant number of potential proteomic biomarkers that are related to a number of aspects of SLE have been identified using mass spectrometry proteomic approaches. However, further studies are required to assess the utility of these biomarkers in routine clinical practice.

  1. Urinary proteomics as a novel tool for biomarker discovery in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Yi-ding; Gu, Wei

    2010-04-01

    Urine has become one of the most attractive biofluids in clinical proteomics, for its procurement is easy and noninvasive and it contains sufficient proteins and peptides. Urinary proteomics has thus rapidly developed and has been extensively applied to biomarker discovery in clinical diseases, especially kidney diseases. In this review, we discuss two important aspects of urinary proteomics in detail, namely, sample preparation and proteomic technologies. In addition, data mining in urinary proteomics is also briefly introduced. At last, we present several successful examples on the application of urinary proteomics for biomarker discovery in kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis, renal Fanconi syndrome, acute kidney injury, and renal allograft rejection.

  2. Biomarker-based drug safety assessment in the age of systems pharmacology: from foundational to regulatory science.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Hong, Huixiao; Mendrick, Donna L; Tang, Yun; Cheng, Feixiong

    2015-01-01

    Improved biomarker-based assessment of drug safety is needed in drug discovery and development as well as regulatory evaluation. However, identifying drug safety-related biomarkers such as genes, proteins, miRNA and single-nucleotide polymorphisms remains a big challenge. The advances of 'omics' and computational technologies such as genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, systems biology, network biology and systems pharmacology enable us to explore drug actions at the organ and organismal levels. Computational and experimental systems pharmacology approaches could be utilized to facilitate biomarker-based drug safety assessment for drug discovery and development and to inform better regulatory decisions. In this article, we review the current status and advances of systems pharmacology approaches for the development of predictive models to identify biomarkers for drug safety assessment.

  3. Salivary Proteomic and microRNA Biomarkers Development for Lung Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    biomarker discovery and definitive validation of salivary proteomic and miRNA biomarkers for detection of lung cancer based on PRoBE design...principles (prospective-specimen- collection and retrospective-blinded-evaluation). The outcome of this three-year proposal will be a panel of definitively

  4. Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics and Peptidomics for Systems Biology and Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Robert; Ma, Di; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    The scientific community has shown great interest in the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics and peptidomics for its applications in biology. Proteomics technologies have evolved to produce large datasets of proteins or peptides involved in various biological and disease progression processes producing testable hypothesis for complex biological questions. This review provides an introduction and insight to relevant topics in proteomics and peptidomics including biological material selection, sample preparation, separation techniques, peptide fragmentation, post-translation modifications, quantification, bioinformatics, and biomarker discovery and validation. In addition, current literature and remaining challenges and emerging technologies for proteomics and peptidomics are presented. PMID:24504115

  5. Proteomics of Microparticles with SILAC Quantification (PROMIS-Quan): A Novel Proteomic Method for Plasma Biomarker Quantification*

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Michal; Oren-Giladi, Pazit; Kaidar-Person, Orit; Shaked, Yuval; Geiger, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased proteomic analysis of plasma samples holds the promise to reveal clinically invaluable disease biomarkers. However, the tremendous dynamic range of the plasma proteome has so far hampered the identification of such low abundant markers. To overcome this challenge we analyzed the plasma microparticle proteome, and reached an unprecedented depth of over 3000 plasma proteins in single runs. To add a quantitative dimension, we developed PROMIS-Quan—PROteomics of MIcroparticles with Super-Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) Quantification, a novel mass spectrometry-based technology for plasma microparticle proteome quantification. PROMIS-Quan enables a two-step relative and absolute SILAC quantification. First, plasma microparticle proteomes are quantified relative to a super-SILAC mix composed of cell lines from distinct origins. Next, the absolute amounts of selected proteins of interest are quantified relative to the super-SILAC mix. We applied PROMIS-Quan to prostate cancer and compared plasma microparticle samples of healthy individuals and prostate cancer patients. We identified in total 5374 plasma-microparticle proteins, and revealed a predictive signature of three proteins that were elevated in the patient-derived plasma microparticles. Finally, PROMIS-Quan enabled determination of the absolute quantitative changes in prostate specific antigen (PSA) upon treatment. We propose PROMIS-Quan as an innovative platform for biomarker discovery, validation, and quantification in both the biomedical research and in the clinical worlds. PMID:25624350

  6. A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ngounou Wetie, Armand G; Wormwood, Kelly L; Russell, Stefanie; Ryan, Jeanne P; Darie, Costel C; Woods, Alisa G

    2015-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prevalence is increasing, with current estimates at 1/68-1/50 individuals diagnosed with an ASD. Diagnosis is based on behavioral assessments. Early diagnosis and intervention is known to greatly improve functional outcomes in people with ASD. Diagnosis, treatment monitoring and prognosis of ASD symptoms could be facilitated with biomarkers to complement behavioral assessments. Mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics may help reveal biomarkers for ASD. In this pilot study, we have analyzed the salivary proteome in individuals with ASD compared to neurotypical control subjects, using MS-based proteomics. Our goal is to optimize methods for salivary proteomic biomarker discovery and to identify initial putative biomarkers in people with ASDs. The salivary proteome is virtually unstudied in ASD, and saliva could provide an easily accessible biomaterial for analysis. Using nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we found statistically significant differences in several salivary proteins, including elevated prolactin-inducible protein, lactotransferrin, Ig kappa chain C region, Ig gamma-1 chain C region, Ig lambda-2 chain C regions, neutrophil elastase, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1. Our results indicate that this is an effective method for identification of salivary protein biomarkers, support the concept that immune system and gastrointestinal disturbances may be present in individuals with ASDs and point toward the need for larger studies in behaviorally-characterized individuals.

  7. Proteomic Workflows for Biomarker Identification Using Mass Spectrometry — Technical and Statistical Considerations during Initial Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Dennis J.; Doucette, Alan A.

    2013-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers capable of differentiating between pathophysiological states of an individual is a laudable goal in the field of proteomics. Protein biomarker discovery generally employs high throughput sample characterization by mass spectrometry (MS), being capable of identifying and quantifying thousands of proteins per sample. While MS-based technologies have rapidly matured, the identification of truly informative biomarkers remains elusive, with only a handful of clinically applicable tests stemming from proteomic workflows. This underlying lack of progress is attributed in large part to erroneous experimental design, biased sample handling, as well as improper statistical analysis of the resulting data. This review will discuss in detail the importance of experimental design and provide some insight into the overall workflow required for biomarker identification experiments. Proper balance between the degree of biological vs. technical replication is required for confident biomarker identification. PMID:28250400

  8. Proteome Screening of Pleural Effusions Identifies Galectin 1 as a Diagnostic Biomarker and Highlights Several Prognostic Biomarkers for Malignant Mesothelioma*

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Filip; Johansson, Henrik J.; Forshed, Jenny; Arslan, Sertaç; Metintas, Muzaffer; Dobra, Katalin; Lehtiö, Janne; Hjerpe, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive asbestos-induced cancer, and affected patients have a median survival of approximately one year after diagnosis. It is often difficult to reach a conclusive diagnosis, and ancillary measurements of soluble biomarkers could increase diagnostic accuracy. Unfortunately, few soluble mesothelioma biomarkers are suitable for clinical application. Here we screened the effusion proteomes of mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinoma patients to identify novel soluble mesothelioma biomarkers. We performed quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomics using isobaric tags for quantification and used narrow-range immobilized pH gradient/high-resolution isoelectric focusing (pH 4–4.25) prior to analysis by means of nano liquid chromatography coupled to MS/MS. More than 1,300 proteins were identified in pleural effusions from patients with malignant mesothelioma (n = 6), lung adenocarcinoma (n = 6), or benign mesotheliosis (n = 7). Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000531. The identified proteins included a set of known mesothelioma markers and proteins that regulate hallmarks of cancer such as invasion, angiogenesis, and immune evasion, plus several new candidate proteins. Seven candidates (aldo-keto reductase 1B10, apolipoprotein C-I, galectin 1, myosin-VIIb, superoxide dismutase 2, tenascin C, and thrombospondin 1) were validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in a larger group of patients with mesothelioma (n = 37) or metastatic carcinomas (n = 25) and in effusions from patients with benign, reactive conditions (n = 16). Galectin 1 was identified as overexpressed in effusions from lung adenocarcinoma relative to mesothelioma and was validated as an excellent predictor for metastatic carcinomas against malignant mesothelioma. Galectin 1, aldo-keto reductase 1B10, and apolipoprotein C-I were all identified as potential prognostic biomarkers for malignant mesothelioma. This analysis of the effusion proteome

  9. The application of urinary proteomics for the detection of biomarkers of kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Song; Wang, Yu; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Urine is a biological material that can be easily obtained in the clinic. The identification of proteins excreted in urine provides useful biological information about the kidney as well as a unique opportunity to examine physiological and pathological changes in the kidney in a noninvasive manner. Recent technological advances in urinary proteomic profiling have provided the foundation for a number of urinary proteomic studies directed at identifying markers of kidney disease diagnosis, prognosis, or responsiveness to therapy. In this review, we describe the strengths of different urinary proteomic methods for the discovery of potential biomarkers of kidney diseases. We also highlight the limitations and future goals of these approaches.

  10. Capillary electrophoresis-based proteomic techniques for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xueping; Wang, Chenchen; Lee, Cheng S

    2013-01-01

    Besides proteome complexity, the greatest bioanalytical challenge facing comprehensive proteomic analysis, particularly in the identification of low abundance proteins, is related to the large variation of protein relative abundances. In contrast to universally enriching all analytes by a similar degree, the result of the capillary isotachophoresis (CITP) stacking process is that major components may be diluted, but trace compounds are concentrated. Such selective enhancement toward low abundance proteins drastically reduces the range of relative protein abundances within complex proteomes and greatly enhances the resulting proteome coverage. Furthermore, CITP offers seamless combination with nano-reversed phase liquid chromatography (nano-RPLC) as two highly resolving and completely orthogonal separation techniques critically needed for analyzing complex proteomes.

  11. The Proteomics Big Challenge for Biomarkers and New Drug-Targets Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Rocco; Paduano, Sergio; Preianò, Mariaimmacolata; Terracciano, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    In the modern process of drug discovery, clinical, functional and chemical proteomics can converge and integrate synergies. Functional proteomics explores and elucidates the components of pathways and their interactions which, when deregulated, lead to a disease condition. This knowledge allows the design of strategies to target multiple pathways with combinations of pathway-specific drugs, which might increase chances of success and reduce the occurrence of drug resistance. Chemical proteomics, by analyzing the drug interactome, strongly contributes to accelerate the process of new druggable targets discovery. In the research area of clinical proteomics, proteome and peptidome mass spectrometry-profiling of human bodily fluid (plasma, serum, urine and so on), as well as of tissue and of cells, represents a promising tool for novel biomarker and eventually new druggable targets discovery. In the present review we provide a survey of current strategies of functional, chemical and clinical proteomics. Major issues will be presented for proteomic technologies used for the discovery of biomarkers for early disease diagnosis and identification of new drug targets. PMID:23203042

  12. Novel alternative splicing isoform biomarkers identification from high-throughput plasma proteomics profiling of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the biopharmaceutical industry, biomarkers define molecular taxonomies of patients and diseases and serve as surrogate endpoints in early-phase drug trials. Molecular biomarkers can be much more sensitive than traditional lab tests. Discriminating disease biomarkers by traditional method such as DNA microarray has proved challenging. Alternative splicing isoform represents a new class of diagnostic biomarkers. Recent scientific evidence is demonstrating that the differentiation and quantification of individual alternative splicing isoforms could improve insights into disease diagnosis and management. Identifying and characterizing alternative splicing isoforms are essential to the study of molecular mechanisms and early detection of complex diseases such as breast cancer. However, there are limitations with traditional methods used for alternative splicing isoform determination such as transcriptome-level, low level of coverage and poor focus on alternative splicing. Results Therefore, we presented a peptidomics approach to searching novel alternative splicing isoforms in clinical proteomics. Our results showed that the approach has significant potential in enabling discovery of new types of high-quality alternative splicing isoform biomarkers. Conclusions We developed a peptidomics approach for the proteomics community to analyze, identify, and characterize alternative splicing isoforms from MS-based proteomics experiments with more coverage and exclusive focus on alternative splicing. The approach can help generate novel hypotheses on molecular risk factors and molecular mechanisms of cancer in early stage, leading to identification of potentially highly specific alternative splicing isoform biomarkers for early detection of cancer. PMID:24565027

  13. Biomarker discovery by proteomics-based approaches for early detection and personalized medicine in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Corbo, Claudia; Cevenini, Armando; Salvatore, Francesco

    2016-12-26

    About one million people per year develop colorectal cancer (CRC) and approximately half of them die. The extent of the disease (i.e. local invasion at the time of diagnosis) is a key prognostic factor. The 5-year survival rate is almost 90% in the case of delimited CRC and 10% in the case of metastasized CRC. Hence, one of the great challenges in the battle against CRC is to improve early diagnosis strategies. Large-scale proteomic approaches are widely used in cancer research to search for novel biomarkers. Such biomarkers can help in improving the accuracy of the diagnosis and in the optimization of personalized therapy. Herein, we provide an overview of studies published in the last 5 years on CRC that led to the identification of protein biomarkers suitable for clinical application by using proteomic approaches. We discussed these findings according to biomarker application, including also the role of protein phosphorylation and cancer stem cells in biomarker discovery. Our review provides a cross section of scientific approaches and can furnish suggestions for future experimental strategies to be used as reference by scientists, clinicians and researchers interested in proteomics for biomarker discovery.

  14. Proteomics-based identification of plasma biomarkers in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Lin, Szu-Ting; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Hwan-Chung; Tung, Chung-Liang; Huang, Kao-Jean; Chen, Yi-Ju; Lee, Ying-Ray; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2013-03-05

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is an aggressive cancer and its occurrence is closely related to betel nut chewing in Taiwan. However, there are few prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers for this disease especially for its association with betel nut chewing. Recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to discover plasma proteins as biomarkers for tracking the progression and for understanding the molecular mechanisms of OSCC. In present study, plasma samples from OSCC patients with at least 5-year history of betel nut chewing and healthy donors were analyzed by fluorescence 2D-DIGE-based proteomic analysis. Totally, 38 proteins have been firmly identified representing 13 unique gene products. These proteins mainly function in inflammatory responses (such as fibrinogen gamma chain) and transport (Apolipoprotein A-I). Additionally, the current quantitative proteomic approach has identified numerous OSCC biomarkers including fibrinogen (alpha/beta/gamma) chain, haptoglobin, leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein and ribosomal protein S6 kinase alpha-3 (RSK2) which have not been reported and may be associated with the progression and development of the disease. In summary, this study reports a comprehensive patient-based proteomic approach for the identification of potential plasma biomarkers in OSCC. The potential of utilizing these markers for screening and treating OSCC warrants further investigations.

  15. Urine Proteome Biomarkers in Kidney Diseases. I. Limits, Perspectives, and First Focus on Normal Urine

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, Laura; Bruschi, Maurizio; Candiano, Giovanni; Lugani, Francesca; Petretto, Andrea; Bonanni, Alice; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2016-01-01

    Urine proteome is a potential source of information in renal diseases, and it is considered a natural area of investigation for biomarkers. Technology developments have markedly increased the power analysis on urinary proteins, and it is time to confront methodologies and results of major studies on the topics. This is a first part of a series of reviews that will focus on the urine proteome as a site for detecting biomarkers of renal diseases; the theme of the first review concerns methodological aspects applied to normal urine. Main issues are techniques for urine pretreatment, separation of exosomes, use of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, mass spectrometry approaches, and analysis of data sets. Available studies show important differences, suggesting a major confounding effect of the technologies utilized for analysis. The objective is to obtain consensus about which approaches should be utilized for studying urine proteome in renal diseases. PMID:26997865

  16. Identification of longitudinally dynamic biomarkers in Alzheimer’s disease cerebrospinal fluid by targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia affecting greater than 26 million people worldwide. Although cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of Aβ42, tau, and p-tau181 are well established as diagnostic biomarkers of AD, there is a need for additional CSF biomarkers of neuronal function that continue to change during disease progression and could be used as pharmacodynamic measures in clinical trials. Multiple proteomic discovery experiments have reported a range of CSF biomarkers that differ between AD and control subjects. These potential biomarkers represent multiple aspects of the disease pathology. The performance of these markers has not been compared with each other, and their performance has not been evaluated longitudinally. Results We developed a targeted-proteomic, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assay for the absolute quantitation of 39 peptides corresponding to 30 proteins. We evaluated the candidate biomarkers in longitudinal CSF samples collected from aged, cognitively-normal control (n = 10), MCI (n = 5), and AD (n = 45) individuals (age > 60 years). We evaluated each biomarker for diagnostic sensitivity, longitudinal consistency, and compared with CSF Aβ42, tau, and p-tau181. Four of 28 quantifiable CSF proteins were significantly different between aged, cognitively-normal controls and AD subjects including chitinase-3-like protein 1, reproducing published results. Four CSF markers demonstrated significant longitudinal change in AD: Amyloid precursor protein, Neuronal pentraxin receptor, NrCAM and Chromogranin A. Robust correlations were observed within some subgroups of proteins including the potential disease progression markers. Conclusion Using a targeted proteomics approach, we confirmed previous findings for a subset of markers, defined longitudinal performance of our panel of markers, and established a flexible proteomics method for robust multiplexed analyses. PMID:24902845

  17. We are what we eat: food safety and proteomics.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Zolla, Lello

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we lead the reader through the evolution of proteomics application to the study of quality control in production processes of foods (including food of plant origin and transgenic plants in particular, but also meat, wine and beer, and milk) and food safety (screening for foodborne pathogens). These topics are attracting a great deal of attention, especially in recent years, when the international community has become increasingly aware of the central role of food quality and safety and their influence on the health of end-consumers. Early proteomics studies in the field of food research were mainly aimed at performing exploratory analyses of food (bovine, swine, chicken, or lamb meat, but also transgenic food such as genetically modified maize, for example) and beverages (wine), with the goal of improving the quality of the end-products. Recently, developments in the field of proteomics have also allowed the study of safety issues, as the technical advantages of sensitive techniques such as mass spectrometry have guaranteed a faster and improved individuation of food contaminating pathogens with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  19. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2016-10-18

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  20. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  1. High-Throughput Proteomic Approaches to the Elucidation of Potential Biomarkers of Chronic Allograft Injury (CAI)

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Hilary; Slyne, Jennifer; Frain, Helena; Slattery, Craig; Ryan, Michael P.; McMorrow, Tara

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of OMICs technologies, concentrating in particular on proteomics, in biomarker discovery in chronic allograft injury (CAI). CAI is the second most prevalent cause of allograft dysfunction and loss in the first decade post-transplantation, after death with functioning graft (DWFG). The term CAI, sometimes referred to as chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), describes the deterioration of renal allograft function and structure as a result of immunological processes (chronic antibody-mediated rejection), and other non-immunological factors such as calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) induced nephrotoxicity, hypertension and infection. Current methods for assessing allograft function are costly, insensitive and invasive; traditional kidney function measurements such as serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) display poor predictive abilities, while the current “gold-standard” involving histological diagnosis with a renal biopsy presents its own inherent risks to the overall health of the allograft. As early as two years post-transplantation, protocol biopsies have shown more than 50% of allograft recipients have mild CAN; ten years post-transplantation more than 50% of the allograft recipients have progressed to severe CAN which is associated with diminishing graft function. Thus, there is a growing medical requirement for minimally invasive biomarkers capable of identifying the early stages of the disease which would allow for timely intervention. Proteomics involves the study of the expression, localization, function and interaction of the proteome. Proteomic technologies may be powerful tools used to identify novel biomarkers which would predict CAI in susceptible individuals. In this paper we will review the use of proteomics in the elucidation of novel predictive biomarkers of CAI in clinical, animal and in vitro studies. PMID:28250402

  2. Quantitative proteomic analysis of microdissected oral epithelium for cancer biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua; Langerman, Alexander; Zhang, Yan; Khalid, Omar; Hu, Shen; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Lingen, Mark W; Wong, David T W

    2015-11-01

    Specific biomarkers are urgently needed for the detection and progression of oral cancer. The objective of this study was to discover cancer biomarkers from oral epithelium through utilizing high throughput quantitative proteomics approaches. Morphologically malignant, epithelial dysplasia, and adjacent normal epithelial tissues were laser capture microdissected (LCM) from 19 patients and used for proteomics analysis. Total proteins from each group were extracted, digested and then labelled with corresponding isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). Labelled peptides from each sample were combined and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for protein identification and quantification. In total, 500 proteins were identified and 425 of them were quantified. When compared with adjacent normal oral epithelium, 17 and 15 proteins were consistently up-regulated or down-regulated in malignant and epithelial dysplasia, respectively. Half of these candidate biomarkers were discovered for oral cancer for the first time. Cornulin was initially confirmed in tissue protein extracts and was further validated in tissue microarray. Its presence in the saliva of oral cancer patients was also explored. Myoglobin and S100A8 were pre-validated by tissue microarray. These data demonstrated that the proteomic biomarkers discovered through this strategy are potential targets for oral cancer detection and salivary diagnostics.

  3. Biomarkers for Bone Tumors: Discovery from Genomics and Proteomics Studies and Their Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Wan-Ibrahim, Wan I; Singh, Vivek A; Hashim, Onn H; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of bone tumor currently relies on imaging and biopsy, and hence, the need to find less invasive ways for its accurate detection. More recently, numerous promising deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein biomarkers with significant prognostic, diagnostic and/or predictive abilities for various types of bone tumors have been identified from genomics and proteomics studies. This article reviewed the putative biomarkers for the more common types of bone tumors (that is, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, chondrosarcoma [malignant] and giant cell tumor [benign]) that were unveiled from the studies. The benefits and drawbacks of these biomarkers, as well as the technology platforms involved in the research, were also discussed. Challenges faced in the biomarker discovery studies and the problems in their translation from the bench to the clinical settings were also addressed. PMID:26581086

  4. The Present and Future of Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer: Proteomics, Genomics, and Immunology Advancements

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreau, Pierre-Olivier; Stagg, John; Soulières, Denis; Saad, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second most common form of cancer in men worldwide. Biomarkers have emerged as essential tools for treatment and assessment since the variability of disease behavior, the cost and diversity of treatments, and the related impairment of quality of life have given rise to a need for a personalized approach. High-throughput technology platforms in proteomics and genomics have accelerated the development of biomarkers. Furthermore, recent successes of several new agents in PC, including immunotherapy, have stimulated the search for predictors of response and resistance and have improved the understanding of the biological mechanisms at work. This review provides an overview of currently established biomarkers in PC, as well as a selection of the most promising biomarkers within these particular fields of development. PMID:27168728

  5. CE-MS-based proteomics in biomarker discovery and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Pontillo, Claudia; Filip, Szymon; Borràs, Daniel M; Mullen, William; Vlahou, Antonia; Mischak, Harald

    2015-04-01

    CE-MS is applied in clinical proteomics for both the identification of biomarkers of disease and assessment of biomarkers in clinical diagnosis. The analysis is reproducible, fast, and requires only small sample volumes. However, successful CE-MS analysis depends on several critical steps that can be consolidated as follows: (i) proper sample preparation and fractionation, (ii) application of suitable capillary coating and appropriate CE-MS interfaces, to ensure the reproducibility and stability of the analysis, and (iii) an optimized clinical and statistical study design to increase the chances for obtaining clinically relevant results. In this review, we cover all these aspects, and present several examples of the application of CE-MS in clinical proteomics.

  6. Proteomic identification of potential prognostic biomarkers in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Iuga, Cristina; Seicean, Andrada; Iancu, Cornel; Buiga, Rareş; Sappa, Praveen K; Völker, Uwe; Hammer, Elke

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with a mortality rate almost identical with its incidence. In this context, the investigation of the pancreatic cancer proteome has gained considerable attention because profiles of proteins may be able to identify disease states and progression more accurately. Therefore, our objective was to investigate the changes in the proteome of patients suffering from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by a comprehensive quantitative approach. Comparative proteomic profiling by label-free LC-MS/MS analysis of nine matched pairs of tumor and nontumor pancreas samples was used to identify differences in protein levels characteristic for PDAC. In this analysis, 488 proteins were quantified by at least two peptides of which 99 proteins displayed altered levels in PDAC (p < 0.01, fold change >1.3). Screening of data revealed a number of molecules that had already been related to PDAC such as galectin-1 (LEG1), major vault protein, adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1), but also a potential new prognostic biomarker prolargin (PRELP). The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a significant correlation of protein abundance of PRELP with postoperative survival of patients with PDAC. For selected proteins the findings were verified by targeted proteomics (SRM), validated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and their value as candidate biomarkers is discussed.

  7. Proteomics in food: Quality, safety, microbes, and allergens.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristian; Roncada, Paola; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Bonizzi, Luigi; Soggiu, Alessio

    2016-03-01

    Food safety and quality and their associated risks pose a major concern worldwide regarding not only the relative economical losses but also the potential danger to consumer's health. Customer's confidence in the integrity of the food supply could be hampered by inappropriate food safety measures. A lack of measures and reliable assays to evaluate and maintain a good control of food characteristics may affect the food industry economy and shatter consumer confidence. It is imperative to create and to establish fast and reliable analytical methods that allow a good and rapid analysis of food products during the whole food chain. Proteomics can represent a powerful tool to address this issue, due to its proven excellent quantitative and qualitative drawbacks in protein analysis. This review illustrates the applications of proteomics in the past few years in food science focusing on food of animal origin with some brief hints on other types. Aim of this review is to highlight the importance of this science as a valuable tool to assess food quality and safety. Emphasis is also posed in food processing, allergies, and possible contaminants like bacteria, fungi, and other pathogens.

  8. Identification of CD44 as a Surface Biomarker for Drug Resistance by Surface Proteome Signature Technology

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Jason W.; Hauptschein, Robert S.; Stewart, Jean K.; Bagci, Tugba; Sahagian, Gary G.; Jay, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    We developed Surface Proteome Signatures (SPS) for identification of new biomarkers playing a role in cancer drug resistance. SPS compares surface antigen expression of different cell lines by immunocytochemistry of a phage display antibody library directed to surface antigens of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. We applied SPS to compare the surface proteomes of two epithelially derived cancer cell lines, MCF7 and NCI/ADR-RES, which is drug resistant due to overexpression of the P-glycoprotein drug efflux pump. Surface proteome profiling identified CD44 as an additional biomarker that distinguishes between these two cell lines. CD44 immunohistochemistry can distinguish between tumors derived from these lines and predict tumor response to doxorubicin in vivo. We further show CD44 acts in drug resistance independently of P-glycoprotein in NCI/ADR-RES cells and increases expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL. Our findings illustrate the utility of SPS to distinguish between cancer cell lines and their derived tumors and identify novel biomarkers involved in drug resistance. PMID:21357442

  9. Proteomics-based discovery of biomarkers for paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    López Villar, Elena; Wu, Duojiao; Cho, William C; Madero, Luis; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    There are important breakthroughs in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) since 1950, by which the prognosis of the child majority suffered from ALL has been improved. However, there are urgent needs to have disease-specific biomarkers to monitor the therapeutic efficacy and predict the patient prognosis. The present study overviewed proteomics-based research on paediatric ALL to discuss important advances to combat cancer cells and search novel and real protein biomarkers of resistance or sensitivity to drugs which target the signalling networks. We highlighted the importance and significance of a proper phospho-quantitative design and strategy for paediatric ALL between relapse and remission, when human body fluids from cerebrospinal, peripheral blood, or bone-marrow were applied. The present article also assessed the schedule for the analysis of body fluids from patients at different states, importance of proteomics-based tools to discover ALL-specific and sensitive biomarkers, to stimulate paediatric ALL research via proteomics to ‘build’ the reference map of the signalling networks from leukemic cells at relapse, and to monitor significant clinical therapies for ALL-relapse. PMID:24912534

  10. Proteomics-based discovery of biomarkers for paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    López Villar, Elena; Wu, Duojiao; Cho, William C; Madero, Luis; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-07-01

    There are important breakthroughs in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) since 1950, by which the prognosis of the child majority suffered from ALL has been improved. However, there are urgent needs to have disease-specific biomarkers to monitor the therapeutic efficacy and predict the patient prognosis. The present study overviewed proteomics-based research on paediatric ALL to discuss important advances to combat cancer cells and search novel and real protein biomarkers of resistance or sensitivity to drugs which target the signalling networks. We highlighted the importance and significance of a proper phospho-quantitative design and strategy for paediatric ALL between relapse and remission, when human body fluids from cerebrospinal, peripheral blood, or bone-marrow were applied. The present article also assessed the schedule for the analysis of body fluids from patients at different states, importance of proteomics-based tools to discover ALL-specific and sensitive biomarkers, to stimulate paediatric ALL research via proteomics to 'build' the reference map of the signalling networks from leukemic cells at relapse, and to monitor significant clinical therapies for ALL-relapse.

  11. Targeted proteomics for biomarker discovery and validation of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis C infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Gul M; Larry, Denner; Petersen, John R; Elferink, Cornelis J

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related mortality is high because early detection modalities are hampered by inaccuracy, expense and inherent procedural risks. Thus there is an urgent need for minimally invasive, highly specific and sensitive biomarkers that enable early disease detection when therapeutic intervention remains practical. Successful therapeutic intervention is predicated on the ability to detect the cancer early. Similar unmet medical needs abound in most fields of medicine and require novel methodological approaches. Proteomic profiling of body fluids presents a sensitive diagnostic tool for early cancer detection. Here we describe such a strategy of comparative proteomics to identify potential serum-based biomarkers to distinguish high-risk chronic hepatitis C virus infected patients from HCC patients. In order to compensate for the extraordinary dynamic range in serum proteins, enrichment methods that compress the dynamic range without surrendering proteome complexity can help minimize the problems associated with many depletion methods. The enriched serum can be resolved using 2D-difference in-gel electrophoresis and the spots showing statistically significant changes selected for identification by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Subsequent quantitative verification and validation of these candidate biomarkers represent an obligatory and rate-limiting process that is greatly enabled by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). SRM is a tandem mass spectrometry method suitable for identification and quantitation of target peptides within complex mixtures independent on peptide-specific antibodies. Ultimately, multiplexed SRM and dynamic multiple reaction monitoring can be utilized for the simultaneous analysis of a biomarker panel derived from support vector machine learning approaches, which allows monitoring a specific disease state such as early HCC. Overall, this approach yields high probability biomarkers for clinical validation in

  12. Proteomics pipeline for biomarker discovery of laser capture microdissected breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning Qing; Braakman, René B H; Stingl, Christoph; Luider, Theo M; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Umar, Arzu

    2012-06-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based label-free proteomics offers an unbiased approach to screen biomarkers related to disease progression and therapy-resistance of breast cancer on the global scale. However, multi-step sample preparation can introduce large variation in generated data, while inappropriate statistical methods will lead to false positive hits. All these issues have hampered the identification of reliable protein markers. A workflow, which integrates reproducible and robust sample preparation and data handling methods, is highly desirable in clinical proteomics investigations. Here we describe a label-free tissue proteomics pipeline, which encompasses laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by nanoscale liquid chromatography and high resolution MS. This pipeline routinely identifies on average ∼10,000 peptides corresponding to ∼1,800 proteins from sub-microgram amounts of protein extracted from ∼4,000 LCM breast cancer epithelial cells. Highly reproducible abundance data were generated from different technical and biological replicates. As a proof-of-principle, comparative proteome analysis was performed on estrogen receptor α positive or negative (ER+/-) samples, and commonly known differentially expressed proteins related to ER expression in breast cancer were identified. Therefore, we show that our tissue proteomics pipeline is robust and applicable for the identification of breast cancer specific protein markers.

  13. UPLC-MS(E) application in disease biomarker discovery: the discoveries in proteomics to metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Yong; Lin, Rui-Chao

    2014-05-25

    In the last decade, proteomics and metabolomics have contributed substantially to our understanding of different diseases. Proteomics and metabolomics aims to comprehensively identify proteins and metabolites to gain insight into the cellular signaling pathways underlying disease and to discover novel biomarkers for screening, early detection and diagnosis, as well as for determining prognoses and predicting responses to specific treatments. For comprehensive analysis of cellular proteins and metabolites, analytical methods of wider dynamic range higher resolution and good sensitivity are required. Ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry(Elevated Energy) (UPLC-MS(E)) is currently one of the most versatile techniques. UPLC-MS(E) is an established technology in proteomics studies and is now expanding into metabolite research. MS(E) was used for simultaneous acquisition of precursor ion information and fragment ion data at low and high collision energy in one analytical run, providing similar information to conventional MS(2). In this review, UPLC-MS(E) application in proteomics and metabolomics was highlighted to assess protein and metabolite changes in different diseases, including cancer, neuropsychiatric pharmacology studies from clinical trials and animal models. In addition, the future prospects for complete proteomics and metabolomics are discussed.

  14. Biomarker discovery for ovine paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) by proteomic serum profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Taylor, D; Begg, D J; Whittington, R J

    2011-07-01

    Paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) is a chronic granulomatous enteritis affecting ruminants and other species. It is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). In this study, surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI TOF-MS) was used as a platform to identify candidate biomarkers from sheep serum. Multivariate biomarker models which aimed to differentiate sheep with paratuberculosis and vaccinated-exposed sheep from unexposed animals were proposed based on classification and regression tree (CART) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) algorithms from two array types. The accuracy of classification of sheep into unexposed or exposed groups ranged from 75 to 100% among models. SELDI was used to monitor protein profile changes over time during an experimental infection trial by examining sera collected at 4-, 8- and 13-months post infection. Although three different SELDI instruments were used, nine consistent proteomic features were observed associated with exposure to MAP. Two of the putative serum biomarkers were purified from serum using chromatographic methods and were identified as transthyretin and alpha haemoglobin by tandem mass spectrometry. They belong to highly abundant, acute phase reactants in the serum proteome and have also been discovered as serum biomarkers in human inflammatory conditions and cancer. Their relationship to the pathogenesis of Johne's disease remains to be elucidated.

  15. Plasma Proteome Biomarkers of Inflammation in School Aged Children in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Eun; West, Keith P.; Cole, Robert N.; Schulze, Kerry J.; Christian, Parul; Wu, Lee Shu-Fune; Yager, James D.; Groopman, John; Ruczinski, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a condition stemming from complex host defense and tissue repair mechanisms, often simply characterized by plasma levels of a single acute reactant. We attempted to identify candidate biomarkers of systemic inflammation within the plasma proteome. We applied quantitative proteomics using isobaric mass tags (iTRAQ) tandem mass spectrometry to quantify proteins in plasma of 500 Nepalese children 6–8 years of age. We evaluated those that co-vary with inflammation, indexed by α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), a conventional biomarker of inflammation in population studies. Among 982 proteins quantified in >10% of samples, 99 were strongly associated with AGP at a family-wise error rate of 0.1%. Magnitude and significance of association varied more among proteins positively (n = 41) than negatively associated (n = 58) with AGP. The former included known positive acute phase proteins including C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, complement components, protease inhibitors, transport proteins with anti-oxidative activity, and numerous unexpected intracellular signaling molecules. Negatively associated proteins exhibited distinct differences in abundance between secretory hepatic proteins involved in transporting or binding lipids, micronutrients (vitamin A and calcium), growth factors and sex hormones, and proteins of largely extra-hepatic origin involved in the formation and metabolic regulation of extracellular matrix. With the same analytical approach and the significance threshold, seventy-two out of the 99 proteins were commonly associated with CRP, an established biomarker of inflammation, suggesting the validity of the identified proteins. Our findings have revealed a vast plasma proteome within a free-living population of children that comprise functional biomarkers of homeostatic and induced host defense, nutrient metabolism and tissue repair, representing a set of plasma proteins that may be used to assess dynamics and extent of inflammation for

  16. Urine Proteomics to Detect Biomarkers for Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luís F.; Solé-Gonzalez, Amanda; Kalko, Susana G.; Bañon-Maneus, Elisenda; Solé, Manel; Diekmann, Fritz; Gutierrez-Dalmau, Alex; Abian, Joaquin; Campistol, Josep M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite optimal immunosuppressive therapy, more than 50% of kidney transplants fail because of chronic allograft dysfunction. A noninvasive means to diagnose chronic allograft dysfunction may allow earlier interventions that could improve graft half-life. In this proof-of-concept study, we used mass spectrometry to analyze differences in the urinary polypeptide patterns of 32 patients with chronic allograft dysfunction (14 with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 18 with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection) and 18 control subjects (eight stable recipients and 10 healthy control subjects). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed good segregation of samples in groups corresponding mainly to the four biomedical conditions. Moreover, the composition of the proteome of the pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy group differed from that of the chronic active antibody-mediated rejection group, and an independent validation set confirmed these results. The 14 protein ions that best discriminated between these two groups correctly identified 100% of the patients with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 100% of the patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection. In summary, this study establishes a pattern for two histologic lesions associated with distinct graft outcomes and constitutes a first step to designing a specific, noninvasive diagnostic tool for chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:19056874

  17. Epigenetics and Proteomics Join Transcriptomics in the Quest for Tuberculosis Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Esterhuyse, Maria M.; Weiner, January; Caron, Etienne; Loxton, Andre G.; Iannaccone, Marco; Wagman, Chandre; Saikali, Philippe; Stanley, Kim; Wolski, Witold E.; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Schick, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Linhart, Heinz; Walzl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An estimated one-third of the world’s population is currently latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Latent M. tuberculosis infection (LTBI) progresses into active tuberculosis (TB) disease in ~5 to 10% of infected individuals. Diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to monitor disease progression are urgently needed to ensure better care for TB patients and to decrease the spread of TB. Biomarker development is primarily based on transcriptomics. Our understanding of biology combined with evolving technical advances in high-throughput techniques led us to investigate the possibility of additional platforms (epigenetics and proteomics) in the quest to (i) understand the biology of the TB host response and (ii) search for multiplatform biosignatures in TB. We engaged in a pilot study to interrogate the DNA methylome, transcriptome, and proteome in selected monocytes and granulocytes from TB patients and healthy LTBI participants. Our study provides first insights into the levels and sources of diversity in the epigenome and proteome among TB patients and LTBI controls, despite limitations due to small sample size. Functionally the differences between the infection phenotypes (LTBI versus active TB) observed in the different platforms were congruent, thereby suggesting regulation of function not only at the transcriptional level but also by DNA methylation and microRNA. Thus, our data argue for the development of a large-scale study of the DNA methylome, with particular attention to study design in accounting for variation based on gender, age, and cell type. PMID:26374119

  18. Quantitative HDL Proteomics Identifies Peroxiredoxin-6 as a Biomarker of Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Burillo, Elena; Jorge, Inmaculada; Martínez-López, Diego; Camafeita, Emilio; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Trevisan-Herraz, Marco; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Egido, Jesús; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier; Vázquez, Jesús; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are complex protein and lipid assemblies whose composition is known to change in diverse pathological situations. Analysis of the HDL proteome can thus provide insight into the main mechanisms underlying abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and potentially detect novel systemic biomarkers. We performed a multiplexed quantitative proteomics analysis of HDLs isolated from plasma of AAA patients (N = 14) and control study participants (N = 7). Validation was performed by western-blot (HDL), immunohistochemistry (tissue), and ELISA (plasma). HDL from AAA patients showed elevated expression of peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6), HLA class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA-I), retinol-binding protein 4, and paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON1), whereas α-2 macroglobulin and C4b-binding protein were decreased. The main pathways associated with HDL alterations in AAA were oxidative stress and immune-inflammatory responses. In AAA tissue, PRDX6 colocalized with neutrophils, vascular smooth muscle cells, and lipid oxidation. Moreover, plasma PRDX6 was higher in AAA (N = 47) than in controls (N = 27), reflecting increased systemic oxidative stress. Finally, a positive correlation was recorded between PRDX6 and AAA diameter. The analysis of the HDL proteome demonstrates that redox imbalance is a major mechanism in AAA, identifying the antioxidant PRDX6 as a novel systemic biomarker of AAA. PMID:27934969

  19. Quantitative HDL Proteomics Identifies Peroxiredoxin-6 as a Biomarker of Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Burillo, Elena; Jorge, Inmaculada; Martínez-López, Diego; Camafeita, Emilio; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Trevisan-Herraz, Marco; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Egido, Jesús; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier; Vázquez, Jesús; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis

    2016-12-09

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are complex protein and lipid assemblies whose composition is known to change in diverse pathological situations. Analysis of the HDL proteome can thus provide insight into the main mechanisms underlying abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and potentially detect novel systemic biomarkers. We performed a multiplexed quantitative proteomics analysis of HDLs isolated from plasma of AAA patients (N = 14) and control study participants (N = 7). Validation was performed by western-blot (HDL), immunohistochemistry (tissue), and ELISA (plasma). HDL from AAA patients showed elevated expression of peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6), HLA class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA-I), retinol-binding protein 4, and paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON1), whereas α-2 macroglobulin and C4b-binding protein were decreased. The main pathways associated with HDL alterations in AAA were oxidative stress and immune-inflammatory responses. In AAA tissue, PRDX6 colocalized with neutrophils, vascular smooth muscle cells, and lipid oxidation. Moreover, plasma PRDX6 was higher in AAA (N = 47) than in controls (N = 27), reflecting increased systemic oxidative stress. Finally, a positive correlation was recorded between PRDX6 and AAA diameter. The analysis of the HDL proteome demonstrates that redox imbalance is a major mechanism in AAA, identifying the antioxidant PRDX6 as a novel systemic biomarker of AAA.

  20. Proteomics-based safety evaluation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Haniu, Hisao; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Kenji; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluated the biological responses to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Human monoblastic leukemia cells (U937) were exposed to As-grown MWCNTs and MWCNTs that were thermally treated at 1800 deg. C (HTT1800) and 2800 deg. C (HTT2800). Cell proliferation was highly inhibited by As-grown but not HTT2800. However, both As-grown and HTT1800, which include some impurities, were cytotoxic. Proteomics analysis of MWCNT-exposed cells revealed 37 protein spots on 2-dimensional electrophoresis gels that significantly changed (p < 0.05) after exposure to HTT1800 with a little iron and 20 spots that changed after exposure to HTT2800. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified 45 proteins that included heat shock protein beta-1, neutral alpha-glucosidase AB, and DNA mismatch repair protein Msh2. These altered proteins play roles in metabolism, biosynthesis, response to stress, and cell differentiation. Although HTT2800 did not inhibit cell proliferation or cause cytotoxicity in vitro, some proteins related to the response to stress were changed. Moreover, DJ-1 protein, which is a biomarker of Parkinson's disease and is related to cancer, was identified after exposure to both MWCNTs. These results show that the cytotoxicity of MWCNTs depends on their impurities, such as iron, while MWCNTs themselves cause some biological responses directly and/or indirectly in vitro. Our proteomics-based approach for detecting biological responses to nanomaterials is a promising new method for detailed safety evaluations.

  1. Identification of Novel Biomarkers in Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis by Combining Proteomic, Multivariate and Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Gottfries, Johan; Barrenäs, Fredrik; Benson, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids (GCs) play a key role in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR). However, some patients show a low response to GC treatment. We hypothesized that proteins that correlated to discrimination between symptomatic high and low responders (HR and LR) to GC treatment might be regulated by GCs and therefore suitable as biomarkers for GC treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 953 nasal fluid proteins in symptomatic HR and LR with a LC MS/MS based-quantitative proteomics analysis and performed multivariate analysis to identify a combination of proteins that best separated symptomatic HR and LR. Pathway analysis showed that those proteins were most enriched in the acute phase response pathway. We prioritized candidate biomarkers for GC treatment based on the multivariate and pathway analysis. Next, we tested if those candidate biomarkers differed before and after GC treatment in nasal fluids from 40 patients with SAR using ELISA. Several proteins including ORM (P<0.0001), APOH (P<0.0001), FGA (P<0.01), CTSD (P<0.05) and SERPINB3 (P<0.05) differed significantly before and after GC treatment. Particularly, ORM (P<0.01), FGA (P<0.05) and APOH (P<0.01) that belonged to the acute phase response pathway decreased significantly in HR but not LR before and after GC treatment. Conclusions/Significance We identified several novel biomarkers for GC treatment response in SAR with combined proteomics, multivariate and pathway analysis. The analytical principles may be generally applicable to identify biomarkers in clinical studies of complex diseases. PMID:21887273

  2. Serological proteome analysis of dogs with breast cancer unveils common serum biomarkers with human counterparts.

    PubMed

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Canine mammary tumor is being touted as a model for investigating the human breast cancer. Breast cancer of the both species has similar biological behavior, histopathologic characteristics, and metastatic pattern. In this study, we used the serological proteome analysis to detect autoantigens that elicit a humoral response in dogs with mammary tumor in order to identify serum biomarkers with potential usefulness as diagnostic markers and to better understand molecular mechanisms underlying canine breast cancer development. Protein extract from a cell line was subject to 2DE followed by Western blotting using sera from 15 dogs with mammary tumor and sera from 15 healthy control dogs. Immunoreactive autoantigens were subsequently identified by the MALDI-TOF MS. Four autoantigens, including manganese-superoxide dismutase, triose phosphate isomerase, alpha-enolase, and phosphoglycerate mutase1, with significantly higher immunoreactivity in the tumor samples than in the normal samples were identified as biomarker candidates. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting revealed higher expression of these biomarkers in the malignant tumors than in the normal or benign tumors. The autoantigens found in this study have been reported to elicit autoantibody response in the human breast cancer, indicating the similarity of breast cancer proteome profile in dogs with that in human beings.

  3. SWATH-based proteomics identified carbonic anhydrase 2 as a potential diagnosis biomarker for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanzhang; Mok, Tin Seak; Lin, Xiuxian; Zhang, Wanling; Cui, Yizhi; Guo, Jiahui; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Tong

    2017-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a serious threat to public health, and the biomarker discovery is of urgent needs. The data-independent mode (DIA) based sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) mass spectrometry (MS) has been proved to be precise in protein quantitation and efficient for cancer biomarker researches. In this study, we performed the first SWATH-MS analysis comparing the NPC and normal tissues. Spike-in stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (super-SILAC) MS was used as a shotgun reference. We identified and quantified 1414 proteins across all SWATH-MS analyses. We found that SWATH-MS had a unique feature to preferentially detect proteins with smaller molecular weights than either super-SILAC MS or human proteome background. With SWATH-MS, 29 significant differentially express proteins (DEPs) were identified. Among them, carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2) was selected for further validation per novelty, MS quality and other supporting rationale. With the tissue microarray analysis, we found that CA2 had an AUC of 0.94 in differentiating NPC from normal tissue samples. In conclusion, SWATH-MS has unique features in proteome analysis, and it leads to the identification of CA2 as a potentially new diagnostic biomarker for NPC. PMID:28117408

  4. Saliva proteome profiling reveals potential salivary biomarkers for detection of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Ching; Chu, Hao-Wei; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Kai-Ping; Liu, Hao-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), which is frequently associated with poor prognosis and mortality, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Discovery of body fluid accessible biomarkers is needed to improve OSCC screening. To this end, we profiled proteomes of saliva from the healthy volunteers, the individuals with oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD), and the OSCC patients by means of SDS-PAGE coupled with LC-MS/MS. In the control, the OPMD, and the OSCC groups, 958, 845, and 1030 salivary proteins were detected, respectively. With spectral counting-based label-free quantification, 22 overexpressed salivary proteins were identified in the OSCC group compared with the healthy controls and the OPMD individuals. Among them, resistin (RETN) was subjected to further validation with an independent cohort using ELISA. The data confirmed that the salivary RETN levels in the OSCC patients were significantly higher than that in the healthy or in the OPMD group. Moreover, the elevated levels of salivary RETN were highly correlated with late-stage primary tumors, advanced overall stage, and lymph-node metastasis. Our results not only reveal that profiling of saliva proteome is feasible for discovery of OSCC biomarkers, but also identify RETN as a potential salivary biomarker for OSCC detection.

  5. Identification of Tengfu Jiangya Tablet Target Biomarkers with Quantitative Proteomic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingwen; Zhang, Shijun; Jiang, Haiqiang; Wang, Nan; Lin, Haiqing

    2017-01-01

    Tengfu Jiangya Tablet (TJT) is a well accepted antihypertension drug in China and its major active components were Uncaria total alkaloids and Semen Raphani soluble alkaloid. To further explore treatment effects mechanism of TJT on essential hypertension, a serum proteomic study was performed. Potential biomarkers were quantified in serum of hypertension individuals before and after taking TJT with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled two-dimensional liquid chromatography followed electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC-MS/MS) proteomics technique. Among 391 identified proteins with high confidence, 70 proteins were differentially expressed (fold variation criteria, >1.2 or <0.83) between two groups (39 upregulated and 31 downregulated). Combining with Gene Ontology annotation, KEGG pathway analysis, and literature retrieval, 5 proteins were chosen as key target biomarkers during TJT therapeutic process. And the alteration profiles of these 5 proteins were verified by ELISA and Western Blot. Proteins Kininogen 1 and Keratin 1 are members of Kallikrein system, while Myeloperoxidase, Serum Amyloid protein A, and Retinol binding protein 4 had been reported closely related to vascular endothelial injury. Our study discovered 5 target biomarkers of the compound Chinese medicine TJT. Secondly, this research initially revealed the antihypertension therapeutic mechanism of this drug from a brand-new aspect.

  6. Data from human salivary proteome - A resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, Priya; Kumar Gupta, Manoj; Sathe, Gajanan J; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Palit, Priyanka; Gowda, Harsha; Suresh, Amritha; Abraham Kuriakose, Moni; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    Salivary proteins are an important source for developing marker-based assays for oral cancers. To get an insight into the proteins present in human saliva, we applied multiple strategies involving affinity-based depletion of abundant proteins, fractionation of the resulting proteins or their tryptic peptides followed by LC-MS/MS analysis, using high resolution mass spectrometry. By integrating the protein identifications observed by us with those from similar workflows employed in earlier investigations, we compiled an updated salivary proteome. We have mapped the salivary proteome to the published data on differentially expressed proteins from oral cancer tissues and also for their secretory features using prediction tools, SignalP 4.1, TMHMM 2c and Exocarta. Proteotypic peptides for the subset of proteins implicated in oral cancer and mapped to any two of the prediction tools for secretory potential have been listed. The data here are related to the research article "Human saliva proteome - a resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer" in the Journal of Proteomics [1].

  7. Data from human salivary proteome – A resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sivadasan, Priya; Kumar Gupta, Manoj; Sathe, Gajanan J.; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Palit, Priyanka; Gowda, Harsha; Suresh, Amritha; Abraham Kuriakose, Moni; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Salivary proteins are an important source for developing marker-based assays for oral cancers. To get an insight into the proteins present in human saliva, we applied multiple strategies involving affinity-based depletion of abundant proteins, fractionation of the resulting proteins or their tryptic peptides followed by LC–MS/MS analysis, using high resolution mass spectrometry. By integrating the protein identifications observed by us with those from similar workflows employed in earlier investigations, we compiled an updated salivary proteome. We have mapped the salivary proteome to the published data on differentially expressed proteins from oral cancer tissues and also for their secretory features using prediction tools, SignalP 4.1, TMHMM 2c and Exocarta. Proteotypic peptides for the subset of proteins implicated in oral cancer and mapped to any two of the prediction tools for secretory potential have been listed. The data here are related to the research article “Human saliva proteome – a resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer” in the Journal of Proteomics [1]. PMID:26217819

  8. Differential Secreted Proteome Approach in Murine Model for Candidate Biomarker Discovery in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rangiah, Kannan; Tippornwong, Montri; Sangar, Vineet; Austin, David; Tétreault, Marie-Pier; Rustgi, Anil K.; Blair, Ian A.; Yu, Kenneth H.

    2009-01-01

    The complexity and heterogeneity of the plasma proteome have presented significant challenges in the identification of protein changes associated with tumor development. We used cell culture as a model system and identified differentially expressed, secreted proteins which may constitute serological biomarkers. A stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) approach was used to label the entire secreted proteomes of the CT26 murine colon cancer cell line and normal young adult mouse colon (YAMC) cell line, thereby creating a stable isotope labeled proteome (SILAP) standard. This SILAP standard was added to unlabeled murine CT26 colon cancer cell or normal murine YAMC colon epithelial cell secreted proteome samples. A multidimensional approach combining isoelectric focusing (IEF), strong cation exchange (SCX) followed by reversed phase liquid chromatography was used for extensive protein and peptide separation. A total of 614 and 929 proteins were identified from the YAMC and CT26 cell lines, with 418 proteins common to both cell lines. Twenty highly abundant differentially expressed proteins from these groups were selected for liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry (LC-MRM/MS) analysis in sera. Differential secretion into the serum was observed for several proteins when Apcmin mice were compared with control mice. These findings were then confirmed by Western blot analysis. PMID:19769411

  9. Blood-Based Proteomic Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Alison L.; Westwood, Sarah; Lovestone, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and its long prodromal phase poses challenges for early diagnosis and yet allows for the possibility of the development of disease modifying treatments for secondary prevention. It is, therefore, of importance to develop biomarkers, in particular, in the preclinical or early phases that reflect the pathological characteristics of the disease and, moreover, could be of utility in triaging subjects for preventative therapeutic clinical trials. Much research has sought biomarkers for diagnostic purposes by comparing affected people to unaffected controls. However, given that AD pathology precedes disease onset, a pathology endophenotype design for biomarker discovery creates the opportunity for detection of much earlier markers of disease. Blood-based biomarkers potentially provide a minimally invasive option for this purpose and research in the field has adopted various “omics” approaches in order to achieve this. This review will, therefore, examine the current literature regarding blood-based proteomic biomarkers of AD and its associated pathology. PMID:26635716

  10. Proteomics and metabolomics for mechanistic insights and biomarker discovery in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Chung, Yuen-Li; Mayr, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    In the last decade, proteomics and metabolomics have contributed substantially to our understanding of cardiovascular diseases. The unbiased assessment of pathophysiological processes without a priori assumptions complements other molecular biology techniques that are currently used in a reductionist approach. In this review, we highlight some of the "omics" methods used to assess protein and metabolite changes in cardiovascular disease. A discrete biological function is very rarely attributed to a single molecule; more often it is the combined input of many proteins. In contrast to the reductionist approach, in which molecules are studied individually, "omics" platforms allow the study of more complex interactions in biological systems. Combining proteomics and metabolomics to quantify changes in metabolites and their corresponding enzymes will advance our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms and aid the identification of novel biomarkers for cardiovascular disease.

  11. Research progress in applying proteomics technology to explore early diagnosis biomarkers of breast cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lu; Dong, Li-You; Yan, Qi-Gui; Cao, San-Jie; Wen, Xin-Tian; Huang, Yong; Huang, Xiao-Bo; Wu, Rui; Ma, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    According to the China tumor registry 2013 annual report , breast cancer, lung cancer, and ovarian cancer are three common cancers in China nowadays, with high mortality due to the absence of early diagnosis technology. However, proteomics has been widespreadly implanted into every field of life science and medicine as an important part of post-genomics era research. The development of theory and technology in proteomics has provided new ideas and research fields for cancer research. Proteomics can be used not only for elucidating the mechanisms of carcinogenesis focussing on whole proteins of the tissue or cell, but also seeking the biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy of cancer. In this review, we introduce proteomics principles, covering current technology used in exploring early diagnosis biomarkers of breast cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer.

  12. A targeted proteomic strategy for the measurement of oral cancer candidate biomarkers in human saliva

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Bollinger, James G.; Rivera, César; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P.; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Paes Leme, Adriana F.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), are the sixth most common malignancy in the world and are characterized by poor prognosis and a low survival rate. Saliva is oral fluid with intimate contact with OSCC. Besides non-invasive, simple, and rapid to collect, saliva is a potential source of biomarkers. In this study, we build an SRM assay that targets fourteen OSCC candidate biomarker proteins, which were evaluated in a set of clinically-derived saliva samples. Using Skyline software package, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher abundance of the C1R, LCN2, SLPI, FAM49B, TAGLN2, CFB, C3, C4B, LRG1, SERPINA1 candidate biomarkers in the saliva of OSCC patients. Furthermore, our study also demonstrated that CFB, C3, C4B, SERPINA1 and LRG1 are associated with the risk of developing OSCC. Overall, this study successfully used targeted proteomics to measure in saliva a panel of biomarker candidates for OSCC. PMID:26552850

  13. A targeted proteomic strategy for the measurement of oral cancer candidate biomarkers in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Bollinger, James G; Rivera, César; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Paes Leme, Adriana F; MacCoss, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), are the sixth most common malignancy in the world and are characterized by poor prognosis and a low survival rate. Saliva is oral fluid with intimate contact with OSCC. Besides non-invasive, simple, and rapid to collect, saliva is a potential source of biomarkers. In this study, we build an SRM assay that targets fourteen OSCC candidate biomarker proteins, which were evaluated in a set of clinically-derived saliva samples. Using Skyline software package, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher abundance of the C1R, LCN2, SLPI, FAM49B, TAGLN2, CFB, C3, C4B, LRG1, SERPINA1 candidate biomarkers in the saliva of OSCC patients. Furthermore, our study also demonstrated that CFB, C3, C4B, SERPINA1 and LRG1 are associated with the risk of developing OSCC. Overall, this study successfully used targeted proteomics to measure in saliva a panel of biomarker candidates for OSCC.

  14. Application of machine learning to proteomics data: classification and biomarker identification in postgenomics biology.

    PubMed

    Swan, Anna Louise; Mobasheri, Ali; Allaway, David; Liddell, Susan; Bacardit, Jaume

    2013-12-01

    Mass spectrometry is an analytical technique for the characterization of biological samples and is increasingly used in omics studies because of its targeted, nontargeted, and high throughput abilities. However, due to the large datasets generated, it requires informatics approaches such as machine learning techniques to analyze and interpret relevant data. Machine learning can be applied to MS-derived proteomics data in two ways. First, directly to mass spectral peaks and second, to proteins identified by sequence database searching, although relative protein quantification is required for the latter. Machine learning has been applied to mass spectrometry data from different biological disciplines, particularly for various cancers. The aims of such investigations have been to identify biomarkers and to aid in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of specific diseases. This review describes how machine learning has been applied to proteomics tandem mass spectrometry data. This includes how it can be used to identify proteins suitable for use as biomarkers of disease and for classification of samples into disease or treatment groups, which may be applicable for diagnostics. It also includes the challenges faced by such investigations, such as prediction of proteins present, protein quantification, planning for the use of machine learning, and small sample sizes.

  15. Identification of Abiotic Stress Protein Biomarkers by Proteomic Screening of Crop Cultivar Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Barkla, Bronwyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Modern day agriculture practice is narrowing the genetic diversity in our food supply. This may compromise the ability to obtain high yield under extreme climactic conditions, threatening food security for a rapidly growing world population. To identify genetic diversity, tolerance mechanisms of cultivars, landraces and wild relatives of major crops can be identified and ultimately exploited for yield improvement. Quantitative proteomics allows for the identification of proteins that may contribute to tolerance mechanisms by directly comparing protein abundance under stress conditions between genotypes differing in their stress responses. In this review, a summary is provided of the data accumulated from quantitative proteomic comparisons of crop genotypes/cultivars which present different stress tolerance responses when exposed to various abiotic stress conditions, including drought, salinity, high/low temperature, nutrient deficiency and UV-B irradiation. This field of research aims to identify molecular features that can be developed as biomarkers for crop improvement, however without accurate phenotyping, careful experimental design, statistical robustness and appropriate biomarker validation and verification it will be challenging to deliver what is promised. PMID:28248236

  16. Proteomic analysis of eccrine sweat: implications for the discovery of schizophrenia biomarker proteins.

    PubMed

    Raiszadeh, Michelle M; Ross, Mark M; Russo, Paul S; Schaepper, Mary Ann; Zhou, Weidong; Deng, Jianghong; Ng, Daniel; Dickson, April; Dickson, Cindy; Strom, Monica; Osorio, Carolina; Soeprono, Thomas; Wulfkuhle, Julia D; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A; Kirsch, Wolff M

    2012-04-06

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) proteomics analyses were performed on eccrine sweat of healthy controls, and the results were compared with those from individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia (SZ). This is the first large scale study of the sweat proteome. First, we performed LC-MS/MS on pooled SZ samples and pooled control samples for global proteomics analysis. Results revealed a high abundance of diverse proteins and peptides in eccrine sweat. Most of the proteins identified from sweat samples were found to be different than the most abundant proteins from serum, which indicates that eccrine sweat is not simply a plasma transudate and may thereby be a source of unique disease-associated biomolecules. A second independent set of patient and control sweat samples were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and spectral counting to determine qualitative protein differential abundances between the control and disease groups. Differential abundances of selected proteins, initially determined by spectral counting, were verified by MRM-MS analyses. Seventeen proteins showed a differential abundance of approximately 2-fold or greater between the SZ pooled sample and the control pooled sample. This study demonstrates the utility of LC-MS/MS and MRM-MS as a viable strategy for the discovery and verification of potential sweat protein disease biomarkers.

  17. Applying bioinformatics to proteomics: is machine learning the answer to biomarker discovery for PD and MSA?

    PubMed

    Mattison, Hayley A; Stewart, Tessandra; Zhang, Jing

    2012-11-01

    Bioinformatics tools are increasingly being applied to proteomic data to facilitate the identification of biomarkers and classification of patients. In the June, 2012 issue, Ishigami et al. used principal component analysis (PCA) to extract features and support vector machine (SVM) to differentiate and classify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from two small cohorts of patients diagnosed with either Parkinson's disease (PD) or multiple system atrophy (MSA) based on differences in the patterns of peaks generated with matrix-assisted desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). PCA accurately segregated patients with PD and MSA from controls when the cohorts were combined, but did not perform well when segregating PD from MSA. On the other hand, SVM, a machine learning classification model, correctly classified the samples from patients with early PD or MSA, and the peak at m/z 6250 was identified as a strong contributor to the ability of SVM to distinguish the proteomic profiles of either cohort when trained on one cohort. This study, while preliminary, provides promising results for the application of bioinformatics tools to proteomic data, an approach that may eventually facilitate the ability of clinicians to differentiate and diagnose closely related parkinsonian disorders.

  18. Global Cell Proteome Profiling, Phospho-signaling and Quantitative 
Proteomics for Identification of New Biomarkers in Acute Myeloid 
Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aasebø, Elise; Forthun, Rakel B.; Berven, Frode; Selheim, Frode; Hernandez-Valladares, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The identification of protein biomarkers for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that could find applications in AML diagnosis and prognosis, treatment and the selection for bone marrow transplant requires substantial comparative analyses of the proteomes from AML patients. In the past years, several studies have suggested some biomarkers for AML diagnosis or AML classification using methods for sample preparation with low proteome coverage and low resolution mass spectrometers. However, most of the studies did not follow up, confirm or validate their candidates with more patient samples. Current proteomics methods, new high resolution and fast mass spectrometers allow the identification and quantification of several thousands of proteins obtained from few tens of μg of AML cell lysate. Enrichment methods for posttranslational modifications (PTM), such as phosphorylation, can isolate several thousands of site-specific phosphorylated peptides from AML patient samples, which subsequently can be quantified with high confidence in new mass spectrometers. While recent reports aiming to propose proteomic or phosphoproteomic biomarkers on the studied AML patient samples have taken advantage of the technological progress, the access to large cohorts of AML patients to sample from and the availability of appropriate control samples still remain challenging.

  19. Protein corona as a proteome fingerprint: The example of hidden biomarkers for cow mastitis.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Giovanni; Magro, Massimiliano; Terzo, Milo; Zaccarin, Mattia; Da Dalt, Laura; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Baratella, Davide; Gabai, Gianfranco; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Proteome modifications in a biological fluid can potentially indicate the occurrence of pathologies, even if the identification of a proteome fingerprint correlated to a specific disease represents a very difficult task. When a nanomaterial is introduced into a biological fluid, macromolecules compete to form a protein corona on the nanoparticle surface, and depending on the specific proteome, different patterns of proteins will form the final protein corona shell depending on their affinity for the nanoparticle surface. Novel surface active maghemite nanoparticles (SAMNs) display a remarkable selectivity toward protein corona formation, and they are able to concentrate proteins and peptides presenting high affinities for their surface even if they are present in very low amounts. Thus, SAMNs may confer visibility to hidden biomarkers correlated to the occurrence of a pathology. In the present report, SAMNs were introduced into milk samples from healthy cows and from animals affected by mastitis, and the selectively bound protein corona shell was easily analyzed and quantified by gel electrophoresis and characterized by mass spectrometry. Upon incubation in mastitic milk, SAMNs were able to selectively bind αs2-casein fragments containing the FALPQYLK sequence, as part of the larger casocidin-1 peptide with strong antibacterial activity, which were not present in healthy samples. Thus, SAMNs can be used as a future candidate for the rapid diagnosis of mastitis in bovine milk. The present report proposes protein competition for SAMN protein corona formation as a means of mirroring proteome modifications. Thus, the selected protein shell on the nanoparticles results in a fingerprint of the specific pathology.

  20. Potential protein biomarkers for burning mouth syndrome discovered by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eoon Hye; Diep, Cynthia; Liu, Tong; Li, Hong; Merrill, Robert; Messadi, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by severe burning sensation in normal looking oral mucosa. Diagnosis of BMS remains to be a challenge to oral healthcare professionals because the method for definite diagnosis is still uncertain. In this study, a quantitative saliva proteomic analysis was performed in order to identify target proteins in BMS patients’ saliva that may be used as biomarkers for simple, non-invasive detection of the disease. By using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to quantify 1130 saliva proteins between BMS patients and healthy control subjects, we found that 50 proteins were significantly changed in the BMS patients when compared to the healthy control subjects (p ≤ 0.05, 39 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated). Four candidates, alpha-enolase, interleukin-18 (IL-18), kallikrein-13 (KLK13), and cathepsin G, were selected for further validation. Based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, three potential biomarkers, alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13, were successfully validated. The fold changes for alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13 were determined as 3.6, 2.9, and 2.2 (burning mouth syndrome vs. control), and corresponding receiver operating characteristic values were determined as 0.78, 0.83, and 0.68, respectively. Our findings indicate that testing of the identified protein biomarkers in saliva might be a valuable clinical tool for BMS detection. Further validation studies of the identified biomarkers or additional candidate biomarkers are needed to achieve a multi-marker prediction model for improved detection of BMS with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:28326926

  1. Potential protein biomarkers for burning mouth syndrome discovered by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Eoon Hye; Diep, Cynthia; Liu, Tong; Li, Hong; Merrill, Robert; Messadi, Diana; Hu, Shen

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by severe burning sensation in normal looking oral mucosa. Diagnosis of BMS remains to be a challenge to oral healthcare professionals because the method for definite diagnosis is still uncertain. In this study, a quantitative saliva proteomic analysis was performed in order to identify target proteins in BMS patients' saliva that may be used as biomarkers for simple, non-invasive detection of the disease. By using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to quantify 1130 saliva proteins between BMS patients and healthy control subjects, we found that 50 proteins were significantly changed in the BMS patients when compared to the healthy control subjects ( p ≤ 0.05, 39 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated). Four candidates, alpha-enolase, interleukin-18 (IL-18), kallikrein-13 (KLK13), and cathepsin G, were selected for further validation. Based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, three potential biomarkers, alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13, were successfully validated. The fold changes for alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13 were determined as 3.6, 2.9, and 2.2 (burning mouth syndrome vs. control), and corresponding receiver operating characteristic values were determined as 0.78, 0.83, and 0.68, respectively. Our findings indicate that testing of the identified protein biomarkers in saliva might be a valuable clinical tool for BMS detection. Further validation studies of the identified biomarkers or additional candidate biomarkers are needed to achieve a multi-marker prediction model for improved detection of BMS with high sensitivity and specificity.

  2. Mass spectrometry based translational proteomics for biomarker discovery and application in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong; Chen, Guilin; Guo, Mingquan

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Clinically, early detection of the disease is the most effective approach to tackle this tough challenge. Discovery and development of reliable and effective diagnostic tools for the assessment of prognosis and prediction of response to drug therapy are urgently needed for personalized therapies and better treatment outcomes. Among many ongoing efforts in search for potential CRC biomarkers, MS-based translational proteomics provides a unique opportunity for the discovery and application of protein biomarkers toward better CRC early detection and treatment. This review updates most recent studies that use preclinical models and clinical materials for the identification of CRC-related protein markers. Some new advances in the development of CRC protein markers such as CRC stem cell related protein markers, SRM/MRM-MS and MS cytometry approaches are also discussed in order to address future directions and challenges from bench translational research to bedside clinical application of CRC biomarkers.

  3. Identification of candidate diagnostic serum biomarkers for Kawasaki disease using proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yayoi; Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Ino, Yoko; Aketagawa, Mao; Matsuo, Michie; Okayama, Akiko; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Oba, Kunihiro; Morioka, Ichiro; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Yokota, Shumpei; Hirano, Hisashi; Mori, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis and childhood febrile disease that can lead to cardiovascular complications. The diagnosis of KD depends on its clinical features, and thus it is sometimes difficult to make a definitive diagnosis. In order to identify diagnostic serum biomarkers for KD, we explored serum KD-related proteins, which differentially expressed during the acute and recovery phases of two patients by mass spectrometry (MS). We identified a total of 1,879 proteins by MS-based proteomic analysis. The levels of three of these proteins, namely lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1), and angiotensinogen (AGT), were higher in acute phase patients. In contrast, the level of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) was decreased. To confirm the usefulness of these proteins as biomarkers, we analyzed a total of 270 samples, including those collected from 55 patients with acute phase KD, by using western blot analysis and microarray enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Over the course of this experiment, we determined that the expression level of these proteins changes specifically in the acute phase of KD, rather than the recovery phase of KD or other febrile illness. Thus, LRG1 could be used as biomarkers to facilitate KD diagnosis based on clinical features. PMID:28262744

  4. Schizophrenia genomics and proteomics: are we any closer to biomarker discovery?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The field of proteomics has made leaps and bounds in the last 10 years particularly in the fields of oncology and cardiovascular medicine. In comparison, neuroproteomics is still playing catch up mainly due to the relative complexity of neurological disorders. Schizophrenia is one such disorder, believed to be the results of multiple factors both genetic and environmental. Affecting over 2 million people in the US alone, it has become a major clinical and public health concern worldwide. This paper gives an update of schizophrenia biomarker research as reviewed by Lakhan in 2006 and gives us a rundown of the progress made during the last two years. Several studies demonstrate the potential of cerebrospinal fluid as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers. Genetic association studies are making headway in identifying candidate genes for schizophrenia. In addition, metabonomics, bioinformatics, and neuroimaging techniques are aiming to complete the picture by filling in knowledge gaps. International cooperation in the form of genomics and protein databases and brain banks is facilitating research efforts. While none of the recent developments described here in qualifies as biomarker discovery, many are likely to be stepping stones towards that goal. PMID:19128481

  5. Exploring the Human Seminal Plasma Proteome: An Unexplored Gold Mine of Biomarker for Male Infertility and Male Reproduction Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gilany, Kambiz; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Savadi-Shiraz, Elham; Rezadoost, Hassan; Lakpour, Niknam

    2015-01-01

    Background The human seminal fluid is a complex body fluid. It is not known how many proteins are expressed in the seminal plasma; however in analog with the blood it is possible up to 10,000 proteins are expressed in the seminal plasma. The human seminal fluid is a rich source of potential biomarkers for male infertility and reproduction disorder. Methods In this review, the ongoing list of proteins identified from the human seminal fluid was collected. To date, 4188 redundant proteins of the seminal fluid are identified using different proteomics technology, including 2-DE, SDS-PAGE-LC-MS/MS, MudPIT. However, this was reduced to a database of 2168 non-redundant protein using UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot reviewed database. Results The core concept of proteome were analyzed including pI, MW, Amino Acids, Chromosome and PTM distribution in the human seminal plasma proteome. Additionally, the biological process, molecular function and KEGG pathway were investigated using DAVID software. Finally, the biomarker identified in different male reproductive system disorder was investigated using proteomics platforms so far. Conclusion In this study, an attempt was made to update the human seminal plasma proteome database. Our finding showed that human seminal plasma studies used to date seem to have converged on a set of proteins that are repeatedly identified in many studies and that represent only a small fraction of the entire human seminal plasma proteome. PMID:25927022

  6. A Hypothesis-Directed Approach to the Targeted Development of a Multiplexed Proteomic Biomarker Assay for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Emily M; Koppel, Jennifer; Das, Pooja; Woo, Joanna; Schriemer, David C; Bathe, Oliver F

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, hundreds of candidate protein biomarkers have been identified using discovery-based proteomics. Despite the large number of candidate biomarkers, few proteins advance to clinical validation. We propose a hypothesis-driven approach to identify candidate biomarkers, previously characterized in the literature, with the highest probability of clinical applicability. A ranking method, called the “hypothesis-directed biomarker ranking” (HDBR) system, was developed to score candidate biomarkers based on seven criteria deemed important in the selection of clinically useful biomarkers. To demonstrate its application, we applied the HDBR system to identify candidate biomarkers for the development of a diagnostic test for the early detection of colorectal cancer. One-hundred and fifty-one candidate biomarkers were identified from the literature and ranked based on the specified criteria. The top-ranked candidates represent a group of biomarkers whose further study and validation would be justified in order to expedite the development of biomarkers that could be used in a clinical setting. PMID:26023280

  7. Differential proteomic and tissue expression analyses identify valuable diagnostic biomarkers of hepatocellular differentiation and hepatoid adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Reis, Henning; Padden, Juliet; Ahrens, Maike; Pütter, Carolin; Bertram, Stefanie; Pott, Leona L; Reis, Anna-Carinna; Weber, Frank; Juntermanns, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Andreas-C; Eisenacher, Martin; Schlaak, Joörg F; Canbay, Ali; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara; Baba, Hideo A

    2015-10-01

    The exact discrimination of lesions with true hepatocellular differentiation from secondary tumours and neoplasms with hepatocellular histomorphology like hepatoid adenocarcinomas (HAC) is crucial. Therefore, we aimed to identify ancillary protein biomarkers by using complementary proteomic techniques (2D-DIGE, label-free MS). The identified candidates were immunohistochemically validated in 14 paired samples of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and non-tumourous liver tissue (NT). The candidates and HepPar1/Arginase1 were afterwards tested for consistency in a large cohort of hepatocellular lesions and NT (n = 290), non-hepatocellular malignancies (n = 383) and HAC (n = 13). Eight non-redundant, differentially expressed proteins were suitable for further immunohistochemical validation and four (ABAT, BHMT, FABP1, HAOX1) for further evaluation. Sensitivity and specificity rates for HCC/HAC were as follows: HepPar1 80.2%, 94.3% / 80.2%, 46.2%; Arginase1 82%, 99.4% / 82%, 69.2%; BHMT 61.4%, 93.8% / 61.4%, 100%; ABAT 84.4%, 33.7% / 84.4%, 30.8%; FABP1 87.2%, 95% / 87.2%, 69.2%; HAOX1 95.5%, 36.3% / 95.5%, 46.2%. The best 2×/3× biomarker panels for the diagnosis of HCC consisted of Arginase1/HAOX1 and BHMT/Arginase1/HAOX1 and for HAC consisted of Arginase1/FABP1 and BHMT/Arginase1/FABP1. In summary, we successfully identified, validated and benchmarked protein biomarker candidates of hepatocellular differentiation. BHMT in particular exhibited superior diagnostic characteristics in hepatocellular lesions and specifically in HAC. BHMT is therefore a promising (panel based) biomarker candidate in the differential diagnostic process of lesions with hepatocellular aspect.

  8. Label-free proteomics identifies Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin as peripherally accessible protein biomarkers for spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease resulting from mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Recent breakthroughs in preclinical research have highlighted several potential novel therapies for SMA, increasing the need for robust and sensitive clinical trial platforms for evaluating their effectiveness in human patient cohorts. Given that most clinical trials for SMA are likely to involve young children, there is a need for validated molecular biomarkers to assist with monitoring disease progression and establishing the effectiveness of therapies being tested. Proteomics technologies have recently been highlighted as a potentially powerful tool for such biomarker discovery. Methods We utilized label-free proteomics to identify individual proteins in pathologically-affected skeletal muscle from SMA mice that report directly on disease status. Quantitative fluorescent western blotting was then used to assess whether protein biomarkers were robustly changed in muscle, skin and blood from another mouse model of SMA, as well as in a small cohort of human SMA patient muscle biopsies. Results By comparing the protein composition of skeletal muscle in SMA mice at a pre-symptomatic time-point with the muscle proteome at a late-symptomatic time-point we identified increased expression of both Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin as robust indicators of disease progression in SMA mice. We report that these protein biomarkers were consistently modified in different mouse models of SMA, as well as across multiple skeletal muscles, and were also measurable in skin biopsies. Furthermore, Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin were measurable in muscle biopsy samples from human SMA patients. Conclusions We conclude that label-free proteomics technology provides a powerful platform for biomarker identification in SMA, revealing Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin as peripherally accessible protein biomarkers capable of reporting on disease progression in

  9. Identification of Novel Serological Biomarkers for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Escherichia coli Proteome Chip*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Sheng; Sullivan, Sean; Anderson, Troy; Tan, Aik Choon; Alex, Philip J.; Brant, Steven R.; Cuffari, Carmen; Bayless, Theodore M.; Talor, Monica V.; Burek, C. Lynne; Wang, Huan; Li, Richard; Datta, Lisa Wu; Wu, Yuqiong; Winslow, Raimond L.; Zhu, Heng; Li, Xuhang

    2009-01-01

    Specific antimicrobial antibodies present in the sera of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been proven to be valuable serological biomarkers for diagnosis/prognosis of the disease. Herein we describe the use of a whole Escherichia coli proteome microarray as a novel high throughput proteomics approach to screen and identify new serological biomarkers for IBD. Each protein array, which contains 4,256 E. coli K12 proteins, was screened using individual serum from healthy controls (n = 39) and clinically well characterized patients with IBD (66 Crohn disease (CD) and 29 ulcerative colitis (UC)). Proteins that could be recognized by serum antibodies were visualized and quantified using Cy3-labeled goat anti-human antibodies. Surprisingly significance analysis of microarrays identified a total of 417 E. coli proteins that were differentially recognized by serum antibodies between healthy controls and CD or UC. Among those, 169 proteins were identified as highly immunogenic in healthy controls, 186 proteins were identified as highly immunogenic in CD, and only 19 were identified as highly immunogenic in UC. Using a supervised learning algorithm (k-top scoring pairs), we identified two sets of serum antibodies that were novel biomarkers for specifically distinguishing CD from healthy controls (accuracy, 86 ± 4%; p < 0.01) and CD from UC (accuracy, 80 ± 2%; p < 0.01), respectively. The Set 1 antibodies recognized three pairs of E. coli proteins: Era versus YbaN, YhgN versus FocA, and GabT versus YcdG, and the Set 2 antibodies recognized YidX versus FrvX. The specificity and sensitivity of Set 1 antibodies were 81 ± 5 and 89 ± 3%, respectively, whereas those of Set 2 antibodies were 84 ± 1 and 70 ± 6%, respectively. Serum antibodies identified for distinguishing healthy controls versus UC were only marginal because their accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity were 66 ± 5, 69 ± 5, and 61 ± 7%, respectively (p < 0.04). Taken together, we identified

  10. Proteomic Profiling of Exosomes Leads to the Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duijvesz, Diederick; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hoogland, Marije; Vredenbregt-van den Berg, Mirella S.; Willemsen, Rob; Luider, Theo N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Jenster, Guido

    2013-12-31

    Introduction: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, biomarker discovery from body fluids is often hampered by the high abundance of many proteins unrelated to disease. An attractive alternative biomarker discovery approach is the isolation of small vesicles (exosomes, ~100 nm). They contain proteins that are specific to the tissue from which they are derived and therefore can be considered as treasure chests for disease-specific marker discovery. Profiling prostate cancer-derived exosomes could reveal new markers for this malignancy. Materials and Methods: Exosomes were isolated from 2 immortalized primary prostate epithelial cells (PNT2C2 and RWPE-1) and 2 PCa cell lines (PC346C and VCaP) by ultracentrifugation. Proteomic analyses utilized a nanoLC coupled with an LTQ-Orbitrap operated in tandem MS (MS/MS) mode, followed by the Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag approach. Exosomal proteins were validated by Western blotting. A Tissue Micro Array, containing 481 different PCa samples (radical prostatectomy), was used to correlate candidate markers with several clinical-pathological parameters such as PSA, Gleason score, biochemical recurrence, and (PCa-related) death. Results: Proteomic characterization resulted in the identification of 263 proteins by at least 2 peptides. Specifically analysis of exosomes from PNT2C2, RWPE-1, PC346C, and VCaP identified 248, 233, 169, and 216 proteins, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed 52 proteins differently expressed between PCa and control cells, 9 of which were more abundant in PCa. Validation by Western blotting confirmed a higher abundance of FASN, XPO1 and PDCD6IP (ALIX) in PCa exosomes. The Tissue Micro 4 Array showed strong correlation of higher Gleason scores and local recurrence with increased cytoplasmic XPO1 (P<0.001). Conclusions: Differentially abundant proteins of cell line-derived exosomes make a clear subdivision between

  11. Comparative Tissue Proteomics of Microdissected Specimens Reveals Novel Candidate Biomarkers of Bladder Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Lun; Chung, Ting; Wu, Chih-Ching; Ng, Kwai-Fong; Yu, Jau-Song; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Chang, Yu-Sun; Liang, Ying; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chen, Yi-Ting

    2015-01-01

    More than 380,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed worldwide, accounting for ∼150,200 deaths each year. To discover potential biomarkers of bladder cancer, we employed a strategy combining laser microdissection, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling, and liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) analysis to profile proteomic changes in fresh-frozen bladder tumor specimens. Cellular proteins from four pairs of surgically resected primary bladder cancer tumor and adjacent nontumorous tissue were extracted for use in two batches of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation experiments, which identified a total of 3220 proteins. A DAVID (database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery) analysis of dysregulated proteins revealed that the three top-ranking biological processes were extracellular matrix organization, extracellular structure organization, and oxidation-reduction. Biological processes including response to organic substances, response to metal ions, and response to inorganic substances were highlighted by up-expressed proteins in bladder cancer. Seven differentially expressed proteins were selected as potential bladder cancer biomarkers for further verification. Immunohistochemical analyses showed significantly elevated levels of three proteins—SLC3A2, STMN1, and TAGLN2—in tumor cells compared with noncancerous bladder epithelial cells, and suggested that TAGLN2 could be a useful tumor tissue marker for diagnosis (AUC = 0.999) and evaluating lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer patients. ELISA results revealed significantly increased urinary levels of both STMN1 and TAGLN2 in bladder cancer subgroups compared with control groups. In comparisons with age-matched hernia urine specimens, urinary TAGLN2 in bladder cancer samples showed the largest fold change (7.13-fold), with an area-under-the-curve value of 0.70 (p < 0.001, n = 205). Overall, TAGLN2 showed the most significant

  12. Proinflammatory and lipid biomarkers mediate metabolically healthy obesity: A proteomics study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Ming; Prieto, DaRue; Rotimi, Charles N.; Adeyemo, Adebowale

    2016-01-01

    Objective The metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) phenotype is an important obesity subtype in which obesity is not accompanied by any metabolic comorbidity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, a shotgun proteomics approach to identify circulating biomolecules and pathways associated with MHO was used. Methods The subjects were 20 African‐American women: 10 MHO cases and 10 metabolically abnormal individuals with obesity (MAO) controls. Serum proteins were detected and quantified using label‐free proteomics. Differential expression of proteins between the two groups was analyzed, and the list of differentially expressed proteins was analyzed to determine enriched biological pathways. Results Twenty proteins were differentially expressed between MHO and controls. These proteins included: hemoglobin subunits (HBA1, P = 6.00 × 10−18), haptoglobin‐related protein (HPR, P = 1.2 × 10−15), apolipoproteins (APOB‐100, P = 1.50 × 10−40; APOA4, P = 1.1 × 10−14), retinol‐binding protein 4 (RBP4, P = 7.1 × 10−08), and CRP (P = 2.0 × 10−04). MHO was associated with lower levels of proinflammatory and higher levels of anti‐inflammatory biomarkers when compared with MAO. Pathway analysis showed enrichment of lipids and inflammatory pathways, including LXR/RXR and FXR/RXR activation, and acute phase response signaling. Conclusions These findings suggested that protection from dysregulated inflammatory and lipid processes were primary molecular hallmarks of MHO. The candidate biomarkers (AHSG, RBP4, and APOA4) identified in this study are potential prognostic markers for MHO. PMID:27106679

  13. Secretome proteomics reveals candidate non-invasive biomarkers of BRCA1 deficiency in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    van der Groep, Petra; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Smolders, Yvonne H.C.M.; de Boer, Leon; Pham, Thang V.; Piersma, Sander R.; Rottenberg, Sven; Boven, Epie; Jonkers, Jos; van Diest, Paul J.; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer arising in female BRCA1 mutation carriers is characterized by an aggressive phenotype and early age of onset. We performed tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics of secretomes and exosome-like extracellular vesicles from BRCA1-deficient and BRCA1-proficient murine breast tumor models to identify extracellular protein biomarkers, which can be used as an adjunct to current diagnostic modalities in patients with BRCA1-deficient breast cancer. We identified 2,107 proteins, of which 215 were highly enriched in the BRCA1-deficient secretome. We demonstrated that BRCA1-deficient secretome proteins could cluster most human BRCA1- and BRCA2-related breast carcinomas at the transcriptome level. Topoisomerase I (TOP1) and P-cadherin (CDH3) expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays of a large panel of 253 human breast carcinomas with and without BRCA1/2 mutations. We showed that expression of TOP1 and CDH3 was significantly increased in human BRCA1-related breast carcinomas relative to sporadic cases (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). Multiple logistic regression showed that TOP1 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 3.75; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.85 - 7.71, p < 0.001) as well as CDH3 positivity (adjusted OR 2.45; 95% CI, 1.08 - 5.49, p = 0.032) were associated with BRCA1/2-related breast carcinomas after adjustment for triple-negative phenotype and age. In conclusion, proteome profiling of secretome using murine breast tumor models is a powerful strategy to identify non-invasive candidate biomarkers of BRCA1-deficient breast cancer. We demonstrate that TOP1 and CDH3 are closely associated to BRCA1-deficient breast cancer. These data merit further investigation for early detection of tumors arising in BRCA1 mutation carriers. PMID:27566577

  14. Proteomics profiling of urine reveals specific titin fragments as biomarkers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rouillon, Jeremy; Zocevic, Aleksandar; Leger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Udd, Bjarne; Wong, Brenda; Servais, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Svinartchouk, Fedor

    2014-07-01

    Diagnosis of muscular dystrophies is currently based on invasive methods requiring muscle biopsies or blood tests. The aim of the present study was to identify urinary biomarkers as a diagnostic tool for muscular dystrophies. Here, the urinary proteomes of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and healthy donors were compared with a bottom-up proteomic approach. Label-free analysis of more than 1100 identified proteins revealed that 32 of them were differentially expressed between healthy controls and DMD patients. Among these 32 proteins, titin showed the highest fold change between healthy subjects and DMD patients. Interestingly, most of the sequenced peptides belong to the N-terminal and C-terminal parts of titin, and the presence of the corresponding fragments in the urine of DMD patients was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Analysis of a large cohort of DMD patients and age-matched controls (a total of 104 individuals aged from 3 to 20 years) confirmed presence of the N-ter fragment in all but two patients. In two DMD patients aged 16 and 20 years this fragment was undetectable and two healthy controls of 16 and 19 years with serum CK >800 IU/L demonstrated a low level of the fragment. N- and C-terminal titin fragments were also detected in urine from patients with other muscular dystrophies such as Becker muscular dystrophy and Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (type 1D, 2D and 2J) but not in neurogenic spinal muscular atrophy. They were also present in urine of dystrophin-deficient animal models (GRMD dogs and mdx mice). Titin is the first urinary biomarker that offers the possibility to develop a simple, non-invasive and easy-to-use test for pre-screening of muscular dystrophies, and may also prove to be useful for the non-invasive follow up of DMD patients under treatment.

  15. Targeted proteomics in urinary extracellular vesicles identifies biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sequeiros, Tamara; Rigau, Marina; Chiva, Cristina; Montes, Melania; Garcia-Grau, Iolanda; Garcia, Marta; Diaz, Sherley; Celma, Ana; Bijnsdorp, Irene; Campos, Alex; Di Mauro, Primiano; Borrós, Salvador; Reventós, Jaume; Doll, Andreas; Paciucci, Rosanna; Pegtel, Michiel; de Torres, Inés; Sabidó, Eduard; Morote, Juan; Olivan, Mireia

    2017-01-17

    Rapid and reliable diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) is highly desirable as current used methods lack specificity. In addition, identification of PCa biomarkers that can classify patients into high- and low-risk groups for disease progression at early stage will improve treatment decision-making. Here, we describe a set of protein-combination panels in urinary extracellular vesicles (EVs), defined by targeted proteomics and immunoblotting techniques that improve early non-invasive detection and stratification of PCa patients.We report a two-protein combination in urinary EVs that classifies benign and PCa patients (ADSV-TGM4), and a combination of five proteins able to significantly distinguish between high- and low-grade PCa patients (CD63-GLPK5-SPHM-PSA-PAPP). Proteins composing the panels were validated by immunohistochemistry assays in tissue microarrays (TMAs) confirming a strong link between the urinary EVs proteome and alterations in PCa tissues. Moreover, ADSV and TGM4 abundance yielded a high diagnostic potential in tissue and promising TGM4 prognostic power. These results suggest that the proteins identified in urinary EVs distinguishing high- and low grade PCa are a reflection of histological changes that may be a consequence of their functional involvement in PCa development. In conclusion, our study resulted in the identification of protein-combination panels present in urinary EVs that exhibit high sensitivity and specificity for PCa detection and patient stratification. Moreover, our study highlights the potential of targeted proteomic approaches-such as selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-as diagnostic assay for liquid biopsies via urinary EVs to improve diagnosis and prognosis of suspected PCa patients.

  16. Proteomic Biomarkers for Acute Interstitial Lung Disease in Gefitinib-Treated Japanese Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takao; Nagasaka, Keiko; Takami, Sachiko; Wada, Kazuya; Tu, Hsiao-Kun; Otsuji, Makiko; Kyono, Yutaka; Dobashi, Tae; Komatsu, Yasuhiko; Kihara, Makoto; Akimoto, Shingo; Peers, Ian S.; South, Marie C.; Higenbottam, Tim; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakata, Koichiro; Ohe, Yuichiro; Kudoh, Shoji; Clausen, Ib Groth; Nishimura, Toshihide; Marko-Varga, György; Kato, Harubumi

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) events have been reported in Japanese non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We investigated proteomic biomarkers for mechanistic insights and improved prediction of ILD. Blood plasma was collected from 43 gefitinib-treated NSCLC patients developing acute ILD (confirmed by blinded diagnostic review) and 123 randomly selected controls in a nested case-control study within a pharmacoepidemiological cohort study in Japan. We generated ∼7 million tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) measurements with extensive quality control and validation, producing one of the largest proteomic lung cancer datasets to date, incorporating rigorous study design, phenotype definition, and evaluation of sample processing. After alignment, scaling, and measurement batch adjustment, we identified 41 peptide peaks representing 29 proteins best predicting ILD. Multivariate peptide, protein, and pathway modeling achieved ILD prediction comparable to previously identified clinical variables; combining the two provided some improvement. The acute phase response pathway was strongly represented (17 of 29 proteins, p = 1.0×10−25), suggesting a key role with potential utility as a marker for increased risk of acute ILD events. Validation by Western blotting showed correlation for identified proteins, confirming that robust results can be generated from an MS/MS platform implementing strict quality control. PMID:21799770

  17. A targeted proteomic multiplex CSF assay identifies increased malate dehydrogenase and other neurodegenerative biomarkers in individuals with Alzheimer's disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R W; Heywood, W E; Heslegrave, A J; Magdalinou, N K; Andreasson, U; Sirka, E; Bliss, E; Slattery, C F; Toombs, J; Svensson, J; Johansson, P; Fox, N C; Zetterberg, H; Mills, K; Schott, J M

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Biomarkers are required to identify individuals in the preclinical phase, explain phenotypic diversity, measure progression and estimate prognosis. The development of assays to validate candidate biomarkers is costly and time-consuming. Targeted proteomics is an attractive means of quantifying novel proteins in cerebrospinal and other fluids, and has potential to help overcome this bottleneck in biomarker development. We used a previously validated multiplexed 10-min, targeted proteomic assay to assess 54 candidate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in two independent cohorts comprising individuals with neurodegenerative dementias and healthy controls. Individuals were classified as ‘AD' or ‘non-AD' on the basis of their CSF T-tau and amyloid Aβ1–42 profile measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; biomarkers of interest were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. In all, 35/31 individuals in Cohort 1 and 46/36 in Cohort 2 fulfilled criteria for AD/non-AD profile CSF, respectively. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, five proteins were elevated significantly in AD CSF compared with non-AD CSF in both cohorts: malate dehydrogenase; total APOE; chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40); osteopontin and cystatin C. In an independent multivariate orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), these proteins were also identified as major contributors to the separation between AD and non-AD in both cohorts. Independent of CSF Aβ1–42 and tau, a combination of these biomarkers differentiated AD and non-AD with an area under curve (AUC)=0.88. This targeted proteomic multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based assay can simultaneously and rapidly measure multiple candidate CSF biomarkers. Applying this technique to AD we demonstrate differences in proteins involved in glucose metabolism and neuroinflammation that collectively have potential clinical

  18. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Investigation of HSP90A as a Potential Biomarker for HCC

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Deng, Xiaofang; Zang, Ning; Li, Hongtao; Li, Gang; Li, Cuiping; He, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death in adults. Despite recent advances in the clinical technologies, the screening and diagnostic efficacy for HCC remains poor. Discovering novel and reliable HCC biomarkers is urgently needed. Material/Methods We performed a transcriptome-proteome integrated assay to track the possible HCC biomarkers from the process of HCC-derived gene expression in malignant cells to its protein product released into serum. Results Our screening results demonstrated that heat shock protein 90A (HSP90A), which participates in the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway and many other cancer-related pathways, warrants further investigation. The expression of HSP90A was increased in the HCC cells, serum, and tissues. Immunohistochemistry analysis on 76 clinical tissue samples also suggested the relevance between HSP90A expression and HCC metastatic behavior. Conclusions These findings suggest a role for HSP90A in HCC pathogenesis and the potential use of HSP90A for the screening and diagnosis of this malignancy. PMID:26704341

  19. Proteomics in Parkinson's disease: An unbiased approach towards peripheral biomarkers and new therapies.

    PubMed

    Alberio, Tiziana; Fasano, Mauro

    2011-12-20

    Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, affecting about 6 million people worldwide with a slow progression of the symptoms. Its prevalence is expected to double in the most populated areas within the next two decades, according to increasing aged population. Consequently, Parkinson's disease is a socio-economic trouble and a major challenge for the public health system. Parkinson's disease treatment is merely symptomatic, as clinical symptoms appear when about 70% of the involved neurons are lost and potential disease-modifying/neuroprotective therapies would have no effect. In turn, the availability of an objective measure that allows early diagnosis would strongly impact on the costs that biotech- and pharma-companies will sustain in order to develop disease-modifying therapies. The establishment of suitable models to investigate the mechanisms of Parkinson's disease progression and, on the other hand, the discovery and validation of selective and specific molecular biomarkers for early and differential diagnosis are indeed two important goals for a better management of the disease. In this review, we focus on cellular and animal models of Parkinson's disease by describing their advantages and limitations as useful tools to identify pathogenetic pathways that deserve further exploitation. In parallel, we discuss how proteomics may provide a potent tool to observe altered pathways in models or altered biomarkers in patients with an unbiased, hypothesis-free approach.

  20. Detection of biomarkers of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri through mass spectrometry and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Moura, Hercules; Izquierdo, Fernando; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Wagner, Glauber; Pinto, Tatiana; del Aguila, Carmen; Barr, John R

    2015-01-01

    Emerging methods based on mass spectrometry (MS) can be used in the rapid identification of microorganisms. Thus far, these practical and rapidly evolving methods have mainly been applied to characterize prokaryotes. We applied matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF MS in the analysis of whole cells of 18 N. fowleri isolates belonging to three genotypes. Fourteen originated from the cerebrospinal fluid or brain tissue of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis patients and four originated from water samples of hot springs, rivers, lakes or municipal water supplies. Whole Naegleria trophozoites grown in axenic cultures were washed and mixed with MALDI matrix. Mass spectra were acquired with a 4700 TOF-TOF instrument. MALDI-TOF MS yielded consistent patterns for all isolates examined. Using a combination of novel data processing methods for visual peak comparison, statistical analysis and proteomics database searching we were able to detect several biomarkers that can differentiate all species and isolates studied, along with common biomarkers for all N. fowleri isolates. Naegleria fowleri could be easily separated from other species within the genus Naegleria. A number of peaks detected were tentatively identified. MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is a rapid, reproducible, high-throughput alternative method for identifying Naegleria isolates. This method has potential for studying eukaryotic agents.

  1. In-depth proteomic analysis of six types of exudative pleural effusions for nonsmall cell lung cancer biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Jun; Chen, Chi-De; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Lee, Chien-Wei; Huang, Lien-Hung; Yu, Jau-Song; Chang, Yu-Sun; Wu, Chih-Ching; Yu, Chia-Jung

    2015-04-01

    Pleural effusion (PE), a tumor-proximal body fluid, may be a promising source for biomarker discovery in human cancers. Because a variety of pathological conditions can lead to PE, characterization of the relative PE proteomic profiles from different types of PEs would accelerate discovery of potential PE biomarkers specifically used to diagnose pulmonary disorders. Using quantitative proteomic approaches, we identified 772 nonredundant proteins from six types of exudative PEs, including three malignant PEs (MPE, from lung, breast, and gastric cancers), one lung cancer paramalignant PE, and two benign diseases (tuberculosis and pneumonia). Spectral counting was utilized to semiquantify PE protein levels. Principal component analysis, hierarchical clustering, and Gene Ontology of cellular process analyses revealed differential levels and functional profiling of proteins in each type of PE. We identified 30 candidate proteins with twofold higher levels (q<0.05) in lung cancer MPEs than in the two benign PEs. Three potential markers, MET, DPP4, and PTPRF, were further verified by ELISA using 345 PE samples. The protein levels of these potential biomarkers were significantly higher in lung cancer MPE than in benign diseases or lung cancer paramalignant PE. The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve for three combined biomarkers in discriminating lung cancer MPE from benign diseases was 0.903. We also observed that the PE protein levels were more clearly discriminated in effusions in which the cytological examination was positive and that they would be useful in rescuing the false negative of cytological examination in diagnosis of nonsmall cell lung cancer-MPE. Western blotting analysis further demonstrated that MET overexpression in lung cancer cells would contribute to the elevation of soluble MET in MPE. Our results collectively demonstrate the utility of label-free quantitative proteomic approaches in establishing differential PE proteomes and

  2. Proteomic analysis of temporally stimulated ovarian cancer cells for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Marzinke, Mark A; Choi, Caitlin H; Chen, Li; Shih, Ie-Ming; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    While ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the United States, there are no biomarkers available that are able to predict therapeutic responses to ovarian malignancies. One major hurdle in the identification of useful biomarkers has been the ability to obtain enough ovarian cancer cells from primary tissues diagnosed in the early stages of serous carcinomas, the most deadly subtype of ovarian tumor. In order to detect ovarian cancer in a state of hyperproliferation, we analyzed the implications of molecular signaling cascades in the ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR3 in a temporal manner, using a mass-spectrometry-based proteomics approach. OVCAR3 cells were treated with EGF(1), and the time course of cell progression was monitored based on Akt phosphorylation and growth dynamics. EGF-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was detected at 12 h post-treatment, but an effect on proliferation was not observed until 48 h post-exposure. Growth-stimulated cellular lysates were analyzed for protein profiles between treatment groups and across time points using iTRAQ labeling and mass spectrometry. The protein response to EGF treatment was identified via iTRAQ analysis in EGF-stimulated lysates relative to vehicle-treated specimens across the treatment time course. Validation studies were performed on one of the differentially regulated proteins, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), in human tissue lysates and ovarian tumor tissue sections. Further, tissue microarray analysis was performed to demarcate LAMP-1 expression across different stages of epithelial ovarian cancers. These data support the use of this approach for the efficient identification of tissue-based markers in tumor development related to specific signaling pathways. LAMP-1 is a promising biomarker for studies of the progression of EGF-stimulated ovarian cancers and might be useful in predicting treatment responses involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors or EGF receptor

  3. Renal biomarker qualification submission: a dialog between the FDA-EMEA and Predictive Safety Testing Consortium.

    PubMed

    Dieterle, Frank; Sistare, Frank; Goodsaid, Federico; Papaluca, Marisa; Ozer, Josef S; Webb, Craig P; Baer, William; Senagore, Anthony; Schipper, Matthew J; Vonderscher, Jacky; Sultana, Stefan; Gerhold, David L; Phillips, Jonathan A; Maurer, Gérard; Carl, Kevin; Laurie, David; Harpur, Ernie; Sonee, Manisha; Ennulat, Daniela; Holder, Dan; Andrews-Cleavenger, Dina; Gu, Yi-Zhong; Thompson, Karol L; Goering, Peter L; Vidal, Jean-Marc; Abadie, Eric; Maciulaitis, Romaldas; Jacobson-Kram, David; Defelice, Albert F; Hausner, Elizabeth A; Blank, Melanie; Thompson, Aliza; Harlow, Patricia; Throckmorton, Douglas; Xiao, Shen; Xu, Nancy; Taylor, William; Vamvakas, Spiros; Flamion, Bruno; Lima, Beatriz Silva; Kasper, Peter; Pasanen, Markku; Prasad, Krishna; Troth, Sean; Bounous, Denise; Robinson-Gravatt, Denise; Betton, Graham; Davis, Myrtle A; Akunda, Jackie; McDuffie, James Eric; Suter, Laura; Obert, Leslie; Guffroy, Magalie; Pinches, Mark; Jayadev, Supriya; Blomme, Eric A; Beushausen, Sven A; Barlow, Valérie G; Collins, Nathaniel; Waring, Jeff; Honor, David; Snook, Sandra; Lee, Jinhe; Rossi, Phil; Walker, Elizabeth; Mattes, William

    2010-05-01

    The first formal qualification of safety biomarkers for regulatory decision making marks a milestone in the application of biomarkers to drug development. Following submission of drug toxicity studies and analyses of biomarker performance to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMEA) by the Predictive Safety Testing Consortium's (PSTC) Nephrotoxicity Working Group, seven renal safety biomarkers have been qualified for limited use in nonclinical and clinical drug development to help guide safety assessments. This was a pilot process, and the experience gained will both facilitate better understanding of how the qualification process will probably evolve and clarify the minimal requirements necessary to evaluate the performance of biomarkers of organ injury within specific contexts.

  4. Deep proteome profiling of circulating granulocytes reveals bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein as a biomarker for severe atherosclerotic coronary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bleijerveld, Onno B; Wijten, Patrick; Cappadona, Salvatore; McClellan, Elizabeth A; Polat, Ayse N; Raijmakers, Reinout; Sels, Jan-Willem; Colle, Loes; Grasso, Simona; van den Toorn, Henk W; van Breukelen, Bas; Stubbs, Andrew; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Heck, Albert J R; Hoefer, Imo E; Scholten, Arjen

    2012-11-02

    Coronary atherosclerosis represents the major cause of death in Western societies. As atherosclerosis typically progresses over years without giving rise to clinical symptoms, biomarkers are urgently needed to identify patients at risk. Over the past decade, evidence has accumulated suggesting cross-talk between the diseased vasculature and cells of the innate immune system. We therefore employed proteomics to search for biomarkers associated with severe atherosclerotic coronary lumen stenosis in circulating leukocytes. In a two-phase approach, we first performed in-depth quantitative profiling of the granulocyte proteome on a small pooled cohort of patients suffering from chronic (sub)total coronary occlusion and matched control patients using stable isotope peptide labeling, two-dimensional LC-MS/MS and data-dependent decision tree fragmentation. Over 3000 proteins were quantified, among which 57 candidate biomarker proteins remained after stringent filtering. The most promising biomarker candidates were subsequently verified in the individual samples of the discovery cohort using label-free, single-run LC-MS/MS analysis, as well as in an independent verification cohort of 25 patients with total coronary occlusion (CTO) and 19 matched controls. Our data reveal bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) as a promising biomarker for severe atherosclerotic coronary stenosis, being down-regulated in circulating granulocytes of CTO patients.

  5. Proteomics analysis of dendritic cell activation by contact allergens reveals possible biomarkers regulated by Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Mussotter, Franz; Tomm, Janina Melanie; El Ali, Zeina; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Götz, Mario; von Bergen, Martin; Haase, Andrea; Luch, Andreas

    2016-12-15

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a widespread disease with high clinical relevance affecting approximately 20% of the general population. Typically, contact allergens are low molecular weight electrophilic compounds which can activate the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. We performed a proteomics study to reveal possible biomarkers for dendritic cell (DC) activation by contact allergens and to further elucidate the role of Keap1/Nrf2 signaling in this process. We used bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) of wild-type (nrf2(+/+)) and Nrf2 knockout (nrf2(-/-)) mice and studied their response against the model contact sensitizers 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), cinnamaldehyde (CA) and nickel(II) sulfate by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) in combination with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, 100μM) served as irritant control. While treatment with nickel(II) sulfate and SDS had only little effects, CA and DNCB led to significant changes in protein expression. We found 18 and 30 protein spots up-regulated in wild-type cells treated with 50 and 100μM CA, respectively. For 5 and 10μM DNCB, 32 and 37 spots were up-regulated, respectively. Almost all of these proteins were not differentially expressed in nrf2(-/-) BMDCs, indicating an Nrf2-dependent regulation. Among them proteins were detected which are involved in oxidative stress and heat shock responses, as well as in signal transduction or basic cellular pathways. The applied approach allowed us to differentiate between Nrf2-dependent and Nrf2-independent cellular biomarkers differentially regulated upon allergen-induced DC activation. The data presented might contribute to the further development of suitable in vitro testing methods for chemical-mediated sensitization.

  6. Proteome analysis of acute kidney injury - Discovery of new predominantly renal candidates for biomarker of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Malagrino, Pamella Araujo; Venturini, Gabriela; Yogi, Patrícia Schneider; Dariolli, Rafael; Padilha, Kallyandra; Kiers, Bianca; Gois, Tamiris Carneiro; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Salgueiro, Jéssica Silva; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Titan, Silvia Maria de Oliveira; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2017-01-16

    The main bottleneck in studies aiming to identify novel biomarkers in acute kidney injury (AKI) has been the identification of markers that are organ and process specific. Here, we have used different tissues from a controlled porcine renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) model to identify new, predominantly renal biomarker candidates for kidney disease. Urine and serum samples were analyzed in pre-ischemia, ischemia (60min) and 4, 11 and 16h post-reperfusion, and renal cortex samples after 24h of reperfusion. Peptides were analyzed on the Q-Exactive™. In renal cortex proteome, we observed an increase in the synthesis of proteins in the ischemic kidney compared to the contralateral, highlighted by transcription factors and epithelial adherens junction proteins. Intersecting the set of proteins up- or down-regulated in the ischemic tissue with both serum and urine proteomes, we identified 6 proteins in the serum that may provide a set of targets for kidney injury. Additionally, we identified 49, being 4 predominantly renal, proteins in urine. As prove of concept, we validated one of the identified biomarkers, dipeptidyl peptidase IV, in a set of patients with diabetic nephropathy. In conclusion, we identified 55 systemic proteins, some of them predominantly renal, candidates for biomarkers of renal disease.

  7. Application of proteomics in the discovery of candidate protein biomarkers in a Diabetes Autoantibody Standardization Program (DASP) sample subset

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Mueller, Patricia W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Novel biomarkers of type 1 diabetes must be identified and validated in initial, exploratory studies before they can be assessed in proficiency evaluations. Currently, untargeted “-omics” approaches are under-utilized in profiling studies of clinical samples. This report describes the evaluation of capillary liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) in a pilot proteomic analysis of human plasma and serum from a subset of control and type 1 diabetic individuals enrolled in the Diabetes Autoantibody Standardization Program with the goal of identifying candidate biomarkers of type 1 diabetes. Initial high-resolution capillary LC-MS/MS experiments were performed to augment an existing plasma peptide database, while subsequent LC-FTICR studies identified quantitative differences in the abundance of plasma proteins. Analysis of LC-FTICR proteomic data identified five candidate protein biomarkers of type 1 diabetes. Alpha-2-glycoprotein 1 (zinc), corticosteroid-binding globulin, and lumican were 2-fold up-regulated in type 1 diabetic samples relative to control samples, whereas clusterin and serotransferrin were 2-fold up-regulated in control samples relative to type 1 diabetic samples. Observed perturbations in the levels of all five proteins are consistent with the metabolic aberrations found in type 1 diabetes. While the discovery of these candidate protein biomarkers of type 1 diabetes is encouraging, follow up studies are required for validation in a larger population of individuals and for determination of laboratory-defined sensitivity and specificity values using blinded samples. PMID:18092746

  8. An approach to remove alpha amylase for proteomic analysis of low abundance biomarkers in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Omer; Fleissig, Yoram; Zaks, Batia; Krief, Guy; Aframian, Doron J; Palmon, Aaron

    2008-11-01

    Proteomic characterization of human whole saliva for the identification of disease-specific biomarkers is guaranteed to be an easy-to-use and powerful diagnostic tool for defining the onset, progression and prognosis of human systemic diseases and, in particular, oral diseases. The high abundance of proteins, mainly alpha amylase, hampers the detection of low abundant proteins appearing in the disease state and therefore should be removed. In the present study a 2-DE was used to analyze human whole saliva following the removal of alpha amylase by affinity adsorption to potato starch. After alpha amylase removal whole saliva was analyzed by SDS-PAGE showing at least sixfold removal efficiency and by an alpha amylase activity assay showing 97% reduced activity. MS identification of the captured alpha amylase after elution demonstrated specific removal; 2-DE analysis showed the selective removal of alpha amylase and consequently increased gel resolution. MS identification of protein spots in the 60 kDa area revealed 15 proteins, which were masked before alpha amylase removal. In conclusion, treatment of human whole saliva with an alpha amylase removal device increases gel resolution and enables a higher protein sample for analysis.

  9. The use of time-resolved fluorescence in gel-based proteomics for improved biomarker discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, AnnSofi; Buschmann, Volker; Kapusta, Peter; Erdmann, Rainer; Wheelock, Åsa M.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a new platform for quantitative intact proteomics, entitled Cumulative Time-resolved Emission 2-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis (CuTEDGE). The CuTEDGE technology utilizes differences in fluorescent lifetimes to subtract the confounding background fluorescence during in-gel detection and quantification of proteins, resulting in a drastic improvement in both sensitivity and dynamic range compared to existing technology. The platform is primarily designed for image acquisition in 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), but is also applicable to 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1-DE), and proteins electroblotted to membranes. In a set of proof-of-principle measurements, we have evaluated the performance of the novel technology using the MicroTime 100 instrument (PicoQuant GmbH) in conjunction with the CyDye minimal labeling fluorochromes (GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden) to perform differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analyses. The results indicate that the CuTEDGE technology provides an improvement in the dynamic range and sensitivity of detection of 3 orders of magnitude as compared to current state-of-the-art image acquisition instrumentation available for 2-DE (Typhoon 9410, GE Healthcare). Given the potential dynamic range of 7-8 orders of magnitude and sensitivities in the attomol range, the described invention represents a technological leap in detection of low abundance cellular proteins, which is desperately needed in the field of biomarker discovery.

  10. Gene Expression and Proteome Analysis as Sources of Biomarkers in Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, Mihaela Adriana; Voiculescu, Suzana; Rosca, Adrian E.; Moraru, Liliana; Greabu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the world's leading skin cancer in terms of frequency at the moment and its incidence continues to rise each year, leading to profound negative psychosocial and economic consequences. UV exposure is the most important environmental factor in the development of BCC in genetically predisposed individuals, this being reflected by the anatomical distribution of lesions mainly on sun-exposed skin areas. Early diagnosis and prompt management are of crucial importance in order to prevent local tissue destruction and subsequent disfigurement. Although various noninvasive or minimal invasive techniques have demonstrated their utility in increasing diagnostic accuracy of BCC and progress has been made in its treatment options, recurrent, aggressive, and metastatic variants of BCC still pose significant challenge for the healthcare system. Analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiling of tumor cells and of tumoral microenvironment in various tissues strongly suggests that certain molecules involved in skin cancer pathogenic pathways might represent novel predictive and prognostic biomarkers in BCC. PMID:27578920

  11. Targeted proteomic approach in prostatic tissue: a panel of potential biomarkers for cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Rosa; Damiano, Rocco; Savino, Rocco; Sindona, Giovanni; Napoli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the sixth highest causes of cancer-related deaths in men. The molecular events underlying its behavior and evolution are not completely understood. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the only approved Food and Drug Administration biomarker. A panel of ten stage-specific tumoral and adjacent non tumoral tissues from patients affected by PCa (Gleason score 6, 3+3; PSA 10 ÷19 ng/ml) was investigated by MS-based proteomics approach. The proposed method was based on identifying the base-soluble proteins from tissue, established an efficient study, which lead to a deeper molecular perspective understanding of the PCa. A total of 164 proteins were found and 132 of these were evaluated differentially expressed in tumoral tissues. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) showed that among all dataset obtained, 105 molecules were involved in epithelial neoplasia with a p-value of 3.62E-05, whereas, only 11 molecules detected were ascribed to sentinel tissue and bodily fluids. PMID:27713912

  12. Proteomic identification of cyclophilin A as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Gong, Wang; Deng, Jing; Sun, Chongkui; Gao, Yijun; Peng, Jieying; Wu, Yingfang; Li, Jiang; Fang, Changyun; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a pre-cancerous lesion, which is characterized by fibrosis of the oral submucosa. Despite large body of studies focusing on this disease, the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of OSF remained unclear. In this study, 2-DE-based proteomic approaches were employed to identify the differently expressed proteins between OSF and normal tissues. In total, 88 proteins were identified with altered expression levels, including CypA. Upregulation of CypA was further validated through immunohistochemistry staining combined with Q-PCR and western blot by using clinical samples. Statistical analyses reveal that CypA expression level is correlated to the progression of OSF. Finally, functional study reveals a pro-proliferative property of CypA in fibroblast cells by using multiple in vitro models. The present data suggest that CypA might be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for OSF, and will lead to a better understanding of OSF pathogenesis. PMID:27533088

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva Identifies Potential Biomarkers for Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Ellias, Mohd Faiz; Zainal Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Abdul Rahman, Mariati; Senafi, Shahidan; Megat Abdul Wahab, Rohaya

    2012-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment has been shown to induce inflammation, followed by bone remodelling in the periodontium. These processes trigger the secretion of various proteins and enzymes into the saliva. This study aims to identify salivary proteins that change in expression during orthodontic tooth movement. These differentially expressed proteins can potentially serve as protein biomarkers for the monitoring of orthodontic treatment and tooth movement. Whole saliva from three healthy female subjects were collected before force application using fixed appliance and at 14 days after 0.014′′ Niti wire was applied. Salivary proteins were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) over a pH range of 3–10, and the resulting proteome profiles were compared. Differentially expressed protein spots were then identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Nine proteins were found to be differentially expressed; however, only eight were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Four of these proteins—Protein S100-A9, immunoglobulin J chain, Ig alpha-1 chain C region, and CRISP-3—have known roles in inflammation and bone resorption. PMID:22919344

  14. Proteomic Approaches to Biomarker Discovery in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Papagheorghe, Laura Maria Lucia; Lisievici, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is the most frequently encountered type of skin lymphoma in humans. CTCL encompasses multiple variants, but the most common types are mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary syndrome (SS). While most cases of MF run a mild course over a period of many years, other subtypes of CTCL are very aggressive. The rapidly expanding fields of proteomics and genomics have not only helped increase knowledge concerning the carcinogenesis and tumor biology of CTCL but also led to the discovery of novel markers for targeted therapy. Although multiple biomarkers linked to CTCL have been known for a relatively long time (e.g., CD25, CD45, CD45RA, and CD45R0), compared to other cancers (lymphoma, melanoma, colon carcinoma, head and neck cancer, renal cancer, and cutaneous B-cell lymphoma), information about the antigenicity of CTCL remains relatively limited and no dependable protein marker for CTCL has been discovered. Considering the aggressive nature of some types of CTCL, it is necessary to identify circulating molecules that can help in the early diagnosis, differentiation from inflammatory skin diseases (psoriasis, nummular eczema), and aid in predicting the prognosis and evolution of this pathology. This review aims to bring together some of the information concerning protein markers linked to CTCL, in an effort to further the understanding of the convolute processes involved in this complex pathology. PMID:27821903

  15. The Discovery of Novel Genomic, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Biomarkers in Cardiovascular and Peripheral Vascular Disease: The State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Stefano; Metzinger, Laurent; Serra, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in western countries and also responsible of a huge burden in terms of disability, functional decline, and healthcare costs. Biomarkers are measurable biological elements that reflect particular physiological or pathological states or predisposition towards diseases and they are currently widely studied in medicine and especially in CD. In this context, biomarkers can also be used to assess the severity or the evolution of several diseases, as well as the effectiveness of particular therapies. Genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics have opened new windows on disease phenomena and may permit in the next future an effective development of novel diagnostic and prognostic medicine in order to better prevent or treat CD. This review will consider the current evidence of novel biomarkers with clear implications in the improvement of risk assessment, prevention strategies, and medical decision making in the field of CD. PMID:27298828

  16. Identification of haptoglobin peptide as a novel serum biomarker for lung squamous cell carcinoma by serum proteome and peptidome profiling.

    PubMed

    Okano, Tetsuya; Seike, Masahiro; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Soeno, Chie; Ishii, Takeo; Kida, Kozui; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    To date, a number of potential biomarkers for lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) have been identified; however, sensitive biomarkers are currently lacking to detect early stage SCC due to low sensitivity and specificity. In the present study, we compared the 7 serum proteomic profiles of 11 SCC patients, 7 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and 7 healthy smokers as controls to identify potential serum biomarkers associated with SCC and COPD. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass-spectrometric analysis (MS) using an affinity column revealed two candidate proteins, haptoglobin (HP) and apolipoprotein 4, as biomarkers of SCC, and α-1-antichymotrypsin as a marker of COPD. The iTRAQ technique was also used to identify SCC-specific peptides. HP protein expression was significantly higher in SCC patients than in COPD patients. Furthermore, two HP protein peptides showed significantly higher serum levels in SCC patients than in COPD patients. We established novel polyclonal antibodies for the two HP peptides and subsequently a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of these specific peptides in patient and control sera. The sensitivity of detection by ELISA of one HP peptide (HP216) was 70% of SCC patients, 40% of COPDs patients and 13% of healthy controls. We also measured CYFRA, a cytokeratin fragment clinically used as an SCC tumor marker, in all the 28 cases and found CYFRA was detected in only seven SCC cases. However, when the measurement of HP216 was combined with that of CYFRA, 100% (10 of 10 patients) of SCC cases were detected. Our proteomic profiling demonstrates that the SCC-specific HP peptide HP216 may potentially be used as a diagnostic biomarker for SCC.

  17. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identified HSC71 as a Novel Serum Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushi; Cai, Yi; Yu, Hongyan; Li, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most lethal urologic cancers and about 80% of RCC are of the clear-cell type (ccRCC). However, there are no serum biomarkers for the accurate diagnosis of RCC. In this study, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis on serum samples from ccRCC patients and control group by using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis to access differentially expressed proteins. Overall, 16 proteins were significantly upregulated (ratio > 1.5) and 14 proteins were significantly downregulated (ratio < 0.67) in early-stage ccRCC compared to control group. HSC71 was selected and subsequently validated by Western blot in six independent sets of patients. ELISA subsequently confirmed HSC71 as a potential serum biomarker for distinguishing RCC from benign urologic disease with an operating characteristic curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76~0.96), achieving sensitivity of 87% (95% CI 69%~96%) at a specificity of 80% (95% CI 61~92%) with a threshold of 15 ng/mL. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis led to identification of serum HSC71 as a novel serum biomarker of RCC, particularly useful in early diagnosis of ccRCC. PMID:26425554

  18. Evaluation of Multi-Protein Immunoaffinity Subtraction for Plasma Proteomics and Candidate Biomarker Discovery Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Wei-Jun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Strategies for removal of high-abundance proteins have been increasingly utilized in proteomic studies of serum/plasma and other body fluids to enhance the detection of low-abundance proteins and achieve broader proteome coverage; however, both the reproducibility and specificity of the high-abundance protein depletion process still represent common concerns. Here, we report a detailed evaluation of immunoaffinity subtraction performed applying the ProteomeLab IgY-12 system which is commonly used in human serum/plasma proteome characterization in combination with high resolution LC-MS/MS. Plasma samples were repeatedly processed implementing this system, and the resulting flow-through fractions and bound fractions were individually analyzed for comparison. The removal of target proteins by the immunoaffinity subtraction system and the overall process was highly reproducible. Non-target proteins, including one spiked protein standard (rabbit glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), were also observed to bind to the column at different levels, but in a reproducible manner. The results suggest that multi-protein immunoaffinity subtraction systems can be readily integrated into quantitative strategies to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins in biomarker discovery studies. PMID:16854842

  19. Identification of serum proteomic biomarkers for early porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most significant swine diseases worldwide. Despite its relevance, serum biomarkers associated with early-onset viral infection, when clinical signs are not detectable and the disease is characterized by a weak anti-viral response and persistent infection, have not yet been identified. Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) is a reproducible, accurate, and simple method for the identification of biomarker proteins related to disease in serum. This work describes the SELDI-TOF MS analyses of sera of 60 PRRSV-positive and 60 PRRSV-negative, as measured by PCR, asymptomatic Large White piglets at weaning. Sera with comparable and low content of hemoglobin (< 4.52 μg/mL) were fractionated in 6 different fractions by anion-exchange chromatography and protein profiles in the mass range 1–200 kDa were obtained with the CM10, IMAC30, and H50 surfaces. Results A total of 200 significant peaks (p < 0.05) were identified in the initial discovery phase of the study and 47 of them were confirmed in the validation phase. The majority of peaks (42) were up-regulated in PRRSV-positive piglets, while 5 were down-regulated. A panel of 14 discriminatory peaks identified in fraction 1 (pH = 9), on the surface CM10, and acquired at low focus mass provided a serum protein profile diagnostic pattern that enabled to discriminate between PRRSV-positive and -negative piglets with a sensitivity and specificity of 77% and 73%, respectively. Conclusions SELDI-TOF MS profiling of sera from PRRSV-positive and PRRSV-negative asymptomatic piglets provided a proteomic signature with large scale diagnostic potential for early identification of PRRSV infection in weaning piglets. Furthermore, SELDI-TOF protein markers represent a refined phenotype of PRRSV infection that might be useful for whole genome association studies. PMID:22873815

  20. High-throughput proteomics integrated with gene microarray for discovery of colorectal cancer potential biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chenhan; Li, Dan; Zhai, Xiaohui; Hu, Wangxiong; Guo, Cheng; Yuan, Ying; Zheng, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Proteins, as executives of genes' instructions, are responsible for cellular phenotypes. Integrating proteomics with gene microarray, we conducted this study to identify potential protein biomarkers of colorectal cancer (CRC). Isobaric tags with related and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling mass spectrometry (MS) was applied to screen and identify differentially expressed proteins between paired CRC and adjacent normal mucosa. Meanwhile, Affymetrix U133plus2.0 microarrays were used to perform gene microarray analysis. Verification experiments included immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of selected proteins. Overall, 5469 differentially expressed proteins were detected with iTRAQ-MS from 24 matched CRC and adjacent normal tissues. And gene microarray identified 39859 differential genes from 52 patients. Of these, 3083 differential proteins had corresponding differentially expressed genes, with 245 proteins and their genes showed >1.5-fold change in expression level. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that up-regulated proteins were more involved in cell adhesion and motion than down-regulated proteins. In addition, up-regulated proteins were more likely to be located in nucleus and vesicles. Further verification experiments with IHC confirmed differential expression levels of 5 proteins (S100 calcium-binding protein A9, annexin A3, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, carboxylesterase 2 and calcium activated chloride channel A1) between CRC and normal tissues. Besides, western blot showed a stepwise increase of annexin A3 abundance in normal colorectal mucosa, adenoma and CRC tissues. ELISA results revealed significantly higher serum levels of S100 calcium-binding protein A9 and annexin A3 in CRC patients than healthy controls, validating diagnostic value of these proteins. Cell experiments showed that inhibition of annexin A3 could suppress CRC cell proliferation and aggressiveness. S100 calcium

  1. An approach to remove albumin for the proteomic analysis of low abundance biomarkers in human serum.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nuzhat; Barker, Gillian; Oliva, Karen; Garfin, David; Talmadge, Kenneth; Georgiou, Harry; Quinn, Michael; Rice, Greg

    2003-10-01

    Proteomic technologies are being used to discover and identify disease-associated biomarkers. The application of these technologies in the search for potential diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in the serum of patients has been limited by the presence of highly abundant albumin and immunoglobulins that constitute approximately 60-97% of the total serum proteins. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether treatment of human serum with Affi-Gel Blue alone or in combination with Protein A (Aurum serum protein mini kit, Bio-Rad) before two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis removed high abundance proteins to allow the visualization of low abundant proteins. Serum samples were treated with either Affi-Gel Blue or Aurum kit and then subjected to 2-DE using 11 cm, pH 4-7 isoelectric focussing strips for the first dimension and 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for second dimension. Protein spots were visualized using a fluorescent protein dye (SYPRO Ruby, Bio-Rad). Comparison between treatment methods showed significant removal of albumin by both Affi-Gel Blue and Aurum kit and considerable differences in the protein profile of the gels after each treatment. Direct comparison between treatments revealed twenty-eight protein spots unique to Affi-Gel Blue while only two spots were unique after Aurum kit treatment. Unique spots in Affi-Gel Blue and Aurum kit treated serum were not visualized in untreated serum. Sixteen hours of Affi-Gel Blue treatment resulted in enhanced visualization of fifty-three protein spots by two-fold, thirty-one by five-fold, twelve by ten-fold and six by twenty-fold. In parallel after Aurum kit treatment two-, five-, ten- and twenty-fold enhancements of thirty, thirteen, eight and five protein spots, respectively, were observed. The pattern of increased visualization of protein spots with both treatment methods was similar. In conclusion, treatment of serum samples with Affi-Gel Blue or Aurum kit before

  2. Assessment of Metabolomic and Proteomic Biomarkers in Detection and Prognosis of Progression of Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Duranton, Flore; Gayrard, Nathalie; Argilés, Àngel; Lundin, Ulrika; Weinberger, Klaus M.; Dakna, Mohammed; Delles, Christian; Mullen, William; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Koeck, Thomas; Zürbig, Petra; Mischak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is part of a number of systemic and renal diseases and may reach epidemic proportions over the next decade. Efforts have been made to improve diagnosis and management of CKD. We hypothesised that combining metabolomic and proteomic approaches could generate a more systemic and complete view of the disease mechanisms. To test this approach, we examined samples from a cohort of 49 patients representing different stages of CKD. Urine samples were analysed for proteomic changes using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and urine and plasma samples for metabolomic changes using different mass spectrometry-based techniques. The training set included 20 CKD patients selected according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at mild (59.9±16.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) or advanced (8.9±4.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) CKD and the remaining 29 patients left for the test set. We identified a panel of 76 statistically significant metabolites and peptides that correlated with CKD in the training set. We combined these biomarkers in different classifiers and then performed correlation analyses with eGFR at baseline and follow-up after 2.8±0.8 years in the test set. A solely plasma metabolite biomarker-based classifier significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function in the test set at baseline and follow-up (ρ = −0.8031; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.6009; p = 0.0019, respectively). Similarly, a urinary metabolite biomarker-based classifier did reveal significant association to kidney function (ρ = −0.6557; p = 0.0001 and ρ = −0.6574; p = 0.0005). A classifier utilising 46 identified urinary peptide biomarkers performed statistically equivalent to the urinary and plasma metabolite classifier (ρ = −0.7752; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.8400; p<0.0001). The combination of both urinary proteomic and urinary and plasma metabolic biomarkers did not improve the correlation with eGFR. In

  3. Proteomic analysis of synovial fluid as an analytical tool to detect candidate biomarkers for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Weixiong; Li, Zhongli; Zhang, Hao; Li, Ji; Wang, Ketao; Yang, Yimeng

    2015-01-01

    We conducted research to detect the proteomic profiles in synovial fluid (SF) from knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients to better understand the pathogenesis and aetiology of OA. Our long-term goal is to identify reliable candidate biomarkers for OA in SF. The SF proteins obtained from 10 knee OA patients and 10 non-OA patients (9 of whom were patients with a meniscus injury in the knee; 1 had a discoid meniscus in the knee, and all exhibited intact articular cartilage) were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). The repeatability of the obtained protein spots regarding their intensity was tested via triplicate 2-DE of selected samples. The observed protein expression patterns were subjected to statistical analysis, and differentially expressed protein spots were identified via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Our analyses showed low intrasample variability and clear intersample variation. Among the protein spots observed on the gels, there were 29 significant differences, of which 22 corresponded to upregulation and 7 to downregulation in the OA group. One of the upregulated protein spots was confirmed to be haptoglobin by mass spectrometry, and the levels of haptoglobin in SF are positively correlated with the severity of OA (r = 0.89, P < 0.001). This study showed that 2-DE could be used under standard conditions to screen SF samples and identify a small subset of proteins in SF that are potential markers associated with OA. Spots of interest identified by mass spectrometry, such as haptoglobin, may be associated with OA severity.

  4. Identification of Potential Plasma Biomarkers for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by Integrating Transcriptomics and Proteomics in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Tsz; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Han, Chia-Li; Chen, Yu-Ju; Mersmann, Harry J; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2017-03-01

    Background: Prevalent worldwide obesity is associated with increased incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome. The identification of noninvasive biomarkers for NAFLD is of recent interest. Because primary de novo lipogenesis occurs in chicken liver as in human liver, adult chickens with age-associated steatosis resembling human NAFLD is an appealing animal model.Objective: The objective of this study was to screen potential biomarkers in the chicken model for NAFLD by transcriptomic and proteomic analysis.Methods: Hy-Line W-36 laying hens were fed standard feed from 25 to 45 wk of age to induce fatty liver. They were killed every 4 wk, and liver and plasma were collected at each time point to assess fatty liver development and for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Next, selected biomarkers were confirmed in additional experiments by providing supplements of the hepatoprotective nutrients betaine [300, 600, or 900 parts per million (ppm) in vivo; 2 mM in vitro] or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 1% in vivo; 100 μM in vitro) to 30-wk-old Hy-Line W-36 laying hens for 4 mo and to Hy-Line W-36 chicken primary hepatocytes with oleic acid-induced steatosis. Liver or hepatocyte lipid contents and the expression of biomarkers were then examined.Results: Plasma acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AACS), dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4), glutamine synthetase (GLUL), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) concentrations are well-established biomarkers for NAFLD. Selected biomarkers had significant positive associations with hepatic lipid deposition (P < 0.001). Betaine (900 ppm in vivo; 2 mM in vitro) and DHA (1% in vivo; 100 μM in vitro) supplementation both resulted in lower steatosis accompanied by the reduced expression of selected biomarkers in vivo and in vitro (P < 0.05).Conclusion: This study used adult laying hens to identify biomarkers for NAFLD and indicated that AACS, DPP4, GLUL, and GST could be considered to be potential diagnostic

  5. Evaluation of Multi-Protein Immunoaffinity Subtraction for Plasma Proteomics and Candidate Biomarker Discovery Using Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    The detection of low-abundance protein disease biomarkers from human blood poses significant challenges due to the high dynamic range of protein concentrations that span more than 10 orders of magnitude, as well as the extreme complexity of the serum/plasma proteome. Therefore, experimental strategies that include the removal of high-abundance proteins have been increasingly utilized in proteomic studies of serum, plasma, and other body fluids to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins and achieve broader proteome coverage. However, both the specificity and reproducibility of the high-abundance protein depletion process represent common concerns. Here, we report a detailed evaluation of the performance of two commercially available immunoaffinity subtraction systems commonly used in human serum/plasma proteome characterization by high resolution LC-MS/MS. One system uses mammalian IgG antibodies to remove six of the most abundant plasma proteins, and the other uses chicken immunoglobulin yolk (IgY) antibodies to remove twelve of the most abundant plasma proteins. Plasma samples were repeatedly processed using these two systems, and the resulting flow-through fractions and bound fractions were individually analyzed for comparison. Removal of target proteins by both immunoaffinity subtraction systems proved reproducible and efficient. Nontarget proteins, including spiked protein standards, were also observed to bind to the columns, but in a fairly reproducible manner. The results suggest that these multi-protein immunoaffinity subtraction systems are both highly effective and reproducible for removing high-abundance proteins and therefore, can be readily integrated into quantitative strategies to enhance detection of low-abundance proteins in biomarker discovery studies.

  6. Serum Proteomic Signature of Human Chagasic Patients for the Identification of Novel Potential Protein Biomarkers of Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jian-Jun; Zago, M. Paola; Nuñez, Sonia; Gupta, Shivali; Burgos, Federico Nuñez; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is initiated upon infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. Among the health consequences is a decline in heart function, and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this manifestation are not well understood. To explore the possible mechanisms, we employed IgY LC10 affinity chromatography in conjunction with ProteomeLab PF2D and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to resolve the proteome signature of high and low abundance serum proteins in chagasic patients. MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis yielded 80 and 14 differentially expressed proteins associated with cardiomyopathy of chagasic and other etiologies, respectively. The extent of oxidative stress-induced carbonyl modifications of the differentially expressed proteins (n = 26) was increased and coupled with a depression of antioxidant proteins. Functional annotation of the top networks developed by ingenuity pathway analysis of proteome database identified dysregulation of inflammation/acute phase response signaling and lipid metabolism relevant to production of prostaglandins and arachidonic acid in chagasic patients. Overlay of the major networks identified prothrombin and plasminogen at a nodal position with connectivity to proteome signature indicative of heart disease (i.e., thrombosis, angiogenesis, vasodilatation of blood vessels or the aorta, and increased permeability of blood vessel and endothelial tubes), and inflammatory responses (e.g., platelet aggregation, complement activation, and phagocyte activation and migration). The detection of cardiac proteins (myosin light chain 2 and myosin heavy chain 11) and increased levels of vinculin and plasminogen provided a comprehensive set of biomarkers of cardiac muscle injury and development of clinical Chagas disease in human patients. These results provide an impetus for biomarker validation in large cohorts of clinically characterized chagasic patients. PMID:22543060

  7. [Search for potential gastric cancer biomarkers using low molecular weight blood plasma proteome profiling by mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, V E; Arnotskaia, N E; Ogorodnikova, E V; Davydov, M M; Ibraev, M A; Turkin, I N; Davydov, M I

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer, one of the most widespread malignant tumors, still lacks reliable serum/plasma biomarkers of its early detection. In this study we have developed, unified, and tested a new methodology for search of gastric cancer biomarkers based on profiling of low molecular weight proteome (LMWP) (1-17 kDa). This approach included three main components: sample pre-fractionation, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), data analysis by a bioinformatics software package. Applicability and perspectives of the developed approach for detection of potential gastric cancer markers during LMWP analysis have been demonstrated using 69 plasma samples from patients with gastric cancer (stages I-IV) and 238 control samples. The study revealed peptides/polypeptides, which may be potentially used for detection of this pathology.

  8. From SOMAmer-Based Biomarker Discovery to Diagnostic and Clinical Applications: A SOMAmer-Based, Streamlined Multiplex Proteomic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Stephan; Vaught, Jonathan D.; Bock, Christopher; Gold, Larry; Katilius, Evaldas; Keeney, Tracy R.; Kim, Nancy; Saccomano, Nicholas A.; Wilcox, Sheri K.; Zichi, Dom; Sanders, Glenn M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we reported a SOMAmer-based, highly multiplexed assay for the purpose of biomarker identification. To enable seamless transition from highly multiplexed biomarker discovery assays to a format suitable and convenient for diagnostic and life-science applications, we developed a streamlined, plate-based version of the assay. The plate-based version of the assay is robust, sensitive (sub-picomolar), rapid, can be highly multiplexed (upwards of 60 analytes), and fully automated. We demonstrate that quantification by microarray-based hybridization, Luminex bead-based methods, and qPCR are each compatible with our platform, further expanding the breadth of proteomic applications for a wide user community. PMID:22022604

  9. Potential for proteomic approaches in determining efficacy biomarkers following administration of fish oils rich in omega-3 fatty acids: application in pancreatic cancers.

    PubMed

    Runau, Franscois; Arshad, Ali; Isherwood, John; Norris, Leonie; Howells, Lynne; Metcalfe, Matthew; Dennison, Ashley

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease with a significantly poor prognosis. Despite modern advances in other medical, surgical, and oncologic therapy, the outcome from pancreatic cancer has improved little over the last 40 years. To improve the management of this difficult disease, trials investigating the use of dietary and parenteral fish oils rich in omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids, exhibiting proven anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties, have revealed favorable results in pancreatic cancers. Proteomics is the large-scale study of proteins that attempts to characterize the complete set of proteins encoded by the genome of an organism and that, with the use of sensitive mass spectrometric-based techniques, has allowed high-throughput analysis of the proteome to aid identification of putative biomarkers pertinent to given disease states. These biomarkers provide useful insight into potentially discovering new markers for early detection or elucidating the efficacy of treatment on pancreatic cancers. Here, our review identifies potential proteomic-based biomarkers in pancreatic cancer relating to apoptosis, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metabolic regulation in clinical studies. We also reviewed proteomic biomarkers from the administration of ω-3 fatty acids that act on similar anticarcinogenic pathways as above and reflect that proteomic studies on the effect of ω-3 fatty acids in pancreatic cancer will yield favorable results.

  10. Initial development and validation of a novel extraction method for quantitative mining of the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue proteome for biomarker investigations.

    PubMed

    Nirmalan, Niroshini J; Hughes, Christopher; Peng, Jianhe; McKenna, Therese; Langridge, James; Cairns, David A; Harnden, Patricia; Selby, Peter J; Banks, Rosamonde E

    2011-02-04

    Annotated formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue archives constitute a valuable resource for retrospective biomarker discovery. However, proteomic exploration of archival tissue is impeded by extensive formalin-induced covalent cross-linking. Robust methodology enabling proteomic profiling of archival resources is urgently needed. Recent work is beginning to support the feasibility of biomarker discovery in archival tissues, but further developments in extraction methods which are compatible with quantitative approaches are urgently needed. We report a cost-effective extraction methodology permitting quantitative proteomic analyses of small amounts of FFPE tissue for biomarker investigation. This surfactant/heat-based approach results in effective and reproducible protein extraction in FFPE tissue blocks. In combination with a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics methodology, the protocol enables the robust representative and quantitative analyses of the archival proteome. Preliminary validation studies in renal cancer tissues have identified typically 250-300 proteins per 500 ng of tissue with 1D LC-MS/MS with comparable extraction in FFPE and fresh frozen tissue blocks and preservation of tumor/normal differential expression patterns (205 proteins, r = 0.682; p < 10(-15)). The initial methodology presented here provides a quantitative approach for assessing the potential suitability of the vast FFPE tissue archives as an alternate resource for biomarker discovery and will allow exploration of methods to increase depth of coverage and investigate the impact of preanalytical factors.

  11. Initial Development and Validation of a Novel Extraction Method for Quantitative Mining of the Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Proteome for Biomarker Investigations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Annotated formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue archives constitute a valuable resource for retrospective biomarker discovery. However, proteomic exploration of archival tissue is impeded by extensive formalin-induced covalent cross-linking. Robust methodology enabling proteomic profiling of archival resources is urgently needed. Recent work is beginning to support the feasibility of biomarker discovery in archival tissues, but further developments in extraction methods which are compatible with quantitative approaches are urgently needed. We report a cost-effective extraction methodology permitting quantitative proteomic analyses of small amounts of FFPE tissue for biomarker investigation. This surfactant/heat-based approach results in effective and reproducible protein extraction in FFPE tissue blocks. In combination with a liquid chromatography−mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics methodology, the protocol enables the robust representative and quantitative analyses of the archival proteome. Preliminary validation studies in renal cancer tissues have identified typically 250−300 proteins per 500 ng of tissue with 1D LC−MS/MS with comparable extraction in FFPE and fresh frozen tissue blocks and preservation of tumor/normal differential expression patterns (205 proteins, r = 0.682; p < 10−15). The initial methodology presented here provides a quantitative approach for assessing the potential suitability of the vast FFPE tissue archives as an alternate resource for biomarker discovery and will allow exploration of methods to increase depth of coverage and investigate the impact of preanalytical factors. PMID:21117664

  12. Randomized Trial of Glucosamine and Chondroitin Supplementation on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Plasma Proteomics Profiles in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Sandi L.; White, Emily; Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Zhang, Yuzheng; Rho, Junghyun; Song, Xiaoling; Milne, Ginger L.; Lampe, Paul D.; Lampe, Johanna W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucosamine and chondroitin are popular non-vitamin dietary supplements used for osteoarthritis. Long-term use is associated with lower incidence of colorectal and lung cancers and with lower mortality; however, the mechanism underlying these observations is unknown. In vitro and animal studies show that glucosamine and chondroitin inhibit NF-kB, a central mediator of inflammation, but no definitive trials have been done in healthy humans. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to assess the effects of glucosamine hydrochloride (1500 mg/d) plus chondroitin sulfate (1200 mg/d) for 28 days compared to placebo in 18 (9 men, 9 women) healthy, overweight (body mass index 25.0–32.5 kg/m2) adults, aged 20–55 y. We examined 4 serum inflammatory biomarkers: C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors I and II; a urinary inflammation biomarker: prostaglandin E2-metabolite; and a urinary oxidative stress biomarker: F2-isoprostane. Plasma proteomics on an antibody array was performed to explore other pathways modulated by glucosamine and chondroitin. Results Serum CRP concentrations were 23% lower after glucosamine and chondroitin compared to placebo (P = 0.048). There were no significant differences in other biomarkers. In the proteomics analyses, several pathways were significantly different between the interventions after Bonferroni correction, the most significant being a reduction in the “cytokine activity” pathway (P = 2.6 x 10-16), after glucosamine and chondroitin compared to placebo. Conclusion Glucosamine and chondroitin supplementation may lower systemic inflammation and alter other pathways in healthy, overweight individuals. This study adds evidence for potential mechanisms supporting epidemiologic findings that glucosamine and chondroitin are associated with reduced risk of lung and colorectal cancer. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01682694 PMID

  13. Comparative Proteomics of Activated THP-1 Cells Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Identifies Putative Clearance Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaewseekhao, Benjawan; Naranbhai, Vivek; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Namwat, Wises; Paemanee, Atchara; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Faksri, Kiatichai

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for determining clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection during anti-tuberculosis therapy or following exposure could facilitate enhanced monitoring and treatment. We screened for biomarkers indicating clearance of Mtb infection in vitro. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using GeLC MSI/MS. Intracellular and secreted proteomes from activated THP-1 cells infected with the Mtb H37Rv strain (MOI = 1) and treated with isoniazid and rifampicin for 1 day (infection stage) and 5 days (clearance stage) were analyzed. Host proteins associated with early infection (n = 82), clearance (n = 121), sustained in both conditions (n = 34) and suppressed by infection (n = 46) were elucidated. Of the potential clearance markers, SSFA2 and CAECAM18 showed the highest and lowest protein intensities, respectively. A western blot of CAECAM18 validated the LC MS/MS result. For three clearance markers (SSFA2, PARP14 and PSME4), in vivo clinical validation was concordantly reported in previous patient cohorts. A network analysis revealed that clearance markers were enriched amongst four protein interaction networks centered on: (i) CD44/CCND1, (ii) IFN-β1/NF-κB, (iii) TP53/TGF-β and (iv) IFN-γ/CCL2. After infection, proteins associated with proliferation, and recruitment of immune cells appeared to be enriched possibly reflecting recruitment of defense mechanisms. Counteracting proteins (CASP3 vs. Akt and NF-κB vs. TP53) associated with apoptosis regulation and its networks were enriched among the early and sustained infection biomarkers, indicating host-pathogen competition. The BRCA1/2 network was suppressed during infection, suggesting that cell proliferation suppression is a feature of Mtb survival. Our study provides insights into the mechanisms of host-Mtb interaction by comparing the stages of infection clearance. The identified clearance biomarkers may be useful in monitoring tuberculosis treatment.

  14. Promise of new translational safety biomarkers in drug development and challenges to regulatory qualification.

    PubMed

    Sistare, Frank D; DeGeorge, Joseph J

    2011-08-01

    One promise of new translational safety biomarkers (TSBs) is their ability to demonstrate that toxicities in animal studies are monitorable at an early stage, such that human relevance of potential adverse effects of drugs can be safely and definitively evaluated in clinical trials. Another is that they would provide an earlier, more definitive and deeper insight to patient prognosis compared with conventional biomarkers. Recent experience with regulatory authorities indicates that resource demands for new TSB qualifications under the current framework are daunting and the rate of their expansion will be slow, particularly in light of mounting financial pressures on the pharmaceutical industry. Sponsors face a dilemma over engaging in safety biomarker qualification consortia. While it is clear new TSBs could be considered catalysts to drug development and that patient health, business and scientific benefits, described here using examples, should outweigh qualification costs, concerns exist that early ambiguities in biomarker interpretations at the introduction of such new TSBs might hinder drug development.

  15. New perspectives on bioactivity of olive oil: evidence from animal models, human interventions and the use of urinary proteomic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Silva, S; Combet, E; Figueira, M E; Koeck, T; Mullen, W; Bronze, M R

    2015-08-01

    Olive oil (OO) is the primary source of fat in the Mediterranean diet and has been associated with longevity and a lower incidence of chronic diseases, particularly CHD. Cardioprotective effects of OO consumption have been widely related with improved lipoprotein profile, endothelial function and inflammation, linked to health claims of oleic acid and phenolic content of OO. With CVD being a leading cause of death worldwide, a review of the potential mechanisms underpinning the impact of OO in the prevention of disease is warranted. The current body of evidence relies on mechanistic studies involving animal and cell-based models, epidemiological studies of OO intake and risk factor, small- and large-scale human interventions, and the emerging use of novel biomarker techniques associated with disease risk. Although model systems are important for mechanistic research nutrition, methodologies and experimental designs with strong translational value are still lacking. The present review critically appraises the available evidence to date, with particular focus on emerging novel biomarkers for disease risk assessment. New perspectives on OO research are outlined, especially those with scope to clarify key mechanisms by which OO consumption exerts health benefits. The use of urinary proteomic biomarkers, as highly specific disease biomarkers, is highlighted towards a higher translational approach involving OO in nutritional recommendations.

  16. Innovations in Proteomic Profiling of Cancers: Alternative Splice Variants as a New Class of Cancer Biomarker Candidates and Bridging of Proteomics with Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Omenn, Gilbert S.; Menon, Rajasree; Zhang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing allows a single gene to generate multiple RNA transcripts which can be translated into functionally diverse protein isoforms. Current knowledge of splicing is derived mainly from RNA transcripts, with very little known about the expression level, 3D structures, and functional differences of the proteins. Splicing is a remarkable phenomenon of molecular and biological evolution. Studies which simply report up-regulation or down-regulation of protein or mRNA expression are confounded by the effects of mixtures of these isoforms. Besides understanding the net biological effects of the mixtures, we may be able to develop biomarker tests based on the observable differential expression of particular splice variants or combinations of splice variants in specific disease states. Here we review our work on differential expression of splice variant proteins in cancers and the feasibility of integrating proteomic analysis with structure-based conformational predictions of the differences between such isoforms. PMID:23603631

  17. Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, Kim K.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-02-01

    Proteomics aims to characterize the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of proteins in biological systems, the protein response to environmental stimuli, and the differences in protein states between diseased and control biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) plays a crucial role in enabling the analysis of proteomes and typically is the method of choice for identifying proteins present in biological systems. Peptide (and consequently protein) identifications are made by comparing measured masses to calculated values obtained from genome data. Several methodologies based on MS have been developed for the analysis of proteomes. The complexity of the biological systems requires that the proteome be separated prior to analysis. Both gel based and liquid chromatography based separations have proven very useful in this regard. Typically, separated proteins are analyzed with MS either intact (top-down proteomics) or are digested into peptides (bottom-up) prior to MS analysis. Additionally, several procedures, with and without stable isotopic labeling, have been introduced to facilitate protein quantitation (e.g. characterize changes in protein abundances between given biological states).

  18. Quantitative proteomic analysis by iTRAQ for identification of candidate biomarkers in plasma from acute respiratory distress syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Shan, Qiang; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Bo; Xi, Xiuming

    2013-11-08

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critical patients. Proteomic analysis of plasma from individuals with ARDS could elucidate new biomarkers for diagnosis and pathophysiology and identify potential ARDS treatment targets. In this study, we recruited 26 patients (15 controls, 11 ARDS). The ARDS group was subdivided into two groups depending on the type of injury: (1) direct lung injury (AD) and (2) indirect lung injury (AI). Using iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) analysis, we identified 2429 peptides representing 132 plasma proteins. Among these, 16 were differentially expressed in ARDS patients, including 11 overlapping proteins between the AI and AD group and 5 AI-specific proteins. Protein annotation revealed that lipid transport and complement activation were significantly enriched in the biological process category, and lipid transporter, transporter, and serine-type peptidase activities were significantly enriched in the molecular function category. IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) signaling pathways revealed that the overlapping proteins were involved in a variety of signaling pathways, including those underlying acute phase response; liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor (LXR/RXR) and farnesoid X (FXR)/RXR activation; clathrin-mediated endocytosis; atherosclerosis; interleukin (IL)-12; complement system; and cytokine, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species production in macrophages. We present the first proteomic analysis of ARDS plasma using the iTRAQ approach. Our data provide new biomarker candidates and shed light on potential pathological mechanisms underlying ARDS.

  19. Comparative proteomic profiling of refractory/relapsed multiple myeloma reveals biomarkers involved in resistance to bortezomib-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Tomasz; Usnarska-Zubkiewicz, Lidia; Brzezniakiewicz, Katarzyna; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof; Przybylowicz-Chalecka, Anna; Ratajczak, Blazej; Czerwinska-Rybak, Joanna; Nowicki, Adam; Joks, Monika; Czechowska, Elzbieta; Zawartko, Magdalena; Szczepaniak, Tomasz; Grzasko, Norbert; Morawska, Marta; Bochenek, Maciej; Kubicki, Tadeusz; Morawska, Michalina; Tusznio, Katarzyna; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biomarkers of the resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) is a key research challenge. We aimed to identify proteins that differentiate plasma cells in patients with refractory/relapsed MM (RRMM) who achieved at least very good partial response (VGPR) and in those with reduced response to PAD chemotherapy (bortezomib, doxorubicin and dexamethasone). Comparative proteomic analysis was conducted on pretreatment plasma cells from 77 proteasome inhibitor naïve patients treated subsequently with PAD due to RRMM. To increase data confidence we used two independent proteomic platforms: isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) and label free (LF). Proteins were considered as differentially expressed when their accumulation between groups differed by at least 50% in iTRAQ and LF. The proteomic signature revealed 118 proteins (35 up-regulated and 83 down-regulated in ≥ VGPR group). Proteins were classified into four classes: (1) involved in proteasome function; (2) involved in the response to oxidative stress; (3) related to defense response; and (4) regulating the apoptotic process. We confirmed the differential expression of proteasome activator complex subunit 1 (PSME1) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Increased expression of proteasomes and proteins involved in protection from oxidative stress (eg., TXN, TXNDC5) plays a major role in bortezomib resistance. PMID:27527861

  20. Proteomic profiling of NCI-60 extracellular vesicles uncovers common protein cargo and cancer type-specific biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Singh, Rakesh K.; Meckes, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Packed with biological information, extracellular vesicles (EVs) offer exciting promise for biomarker discovery and applications in therapeutics and non-invasive diagnostics. Currently, our understanding of EV contents is confined by the limited cells from which vesicles have been characterized utilizing the same enrichment method. Using sixty cell lines from the National Cancer Institute (NCI-60), here we provide the largest proteomic profile of EVs in a single study, identifying 6,071 proteins with 213 common to all isolates. Proteins included established EV markers, and vesicular trafficking proteins such as Rab GTPases and tetraspanins. Differentially-expressed proteins offer potential for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Network analysis of vesicle quantity and proteomes identified EV components associated with vesicle secretion, including CD81, CD63, syntenin-1, VAMP3, Rab GTPases, and integrins. Integration of vesicle proteomes with whole-cell molecular profiles revealed similarities, suggesting EVs provide a reliable reflection of their progenitor cell content, and are therefore excellent indicators of disease. PMID:27894104

  1. Metabolomic and proteomic biomarkers for III-V semiconductors: chemical-specific porphyrinurias and proteinurias.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Bruce A; Conner, Elizabeth A; Yamauchi, Hiroshi

    2005-08-07

    A pressing need exists to develop and validate molecular biomarkers to assess the early effects of chemical agents, both individually and in mixtures. This is particularly true for new and chemically intensive industries such as the semiconductor industry. Previous studies from this laboratory and others have demonstrated element-specific alterations of the heme biosynthetic pathway for the III-V semiconductors gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium arsenide (InAs) with attendant increased urinary excretion of specific heme precursors. These data represent an example of a metabolomic biomarker to assess chemical effects early, before clinical disease develops. Previous studies have demonstrated that the intratracheal or subcutaneous administration of GaAs and InAs particles to hamsters produces the induction of the major stress protein gene families in renal proximal tubule cells. This was monitored by 35-S methionine labeling of gene products followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis after exposure to InAs particles. The present studies examined whether these effects were associated with the development of compound-specific proteinuria after 10 or 30 days following subcutaneous injection of GaAs or InAs particles in hamsters. The results of these studies demonstrated the development of GaAs- and InAs-specific alterations in renal tubule cell protein expression patterns that varied at 10 and 30 days. At the 30-day point, cells in hamsters that received InAs particles showed marked attenuation of protein expression, suggesting inhibition of the stress protein response. These changes were associated with GaAs and InAs proteinuria patterns as monitored by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The intensity of the protein excretion patterns increased between the 10- and 30-day points and was most pronounced for animals in the 30-day InAs treatment group. No overt morphologic signs of cell death were seen in renal tubule cells of these animals

  2. Metabolomic and proteomic biomarkers for III-V semiconductors: Chemical-specific porphyrinurias and proteinurias

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Bruce A. . E-mail: bxf9@cdc.gov; Conner, Elizabeth A.; Yamauchi, Hiroshi

    2005-08-07

    A pressing need exists to develop and validate molecular biomarkers to assess the early effects of chemical agents, both individually and in mixtures. This is particularly true for new and chemically intensive industries such as the semiconductor industry. Previous studies from this laboratory and others have demonstrated element-specific alterations of the heme biosynthetic pathway for the III-V semiconductors gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium arsenide (InAs) with attendant increased urinary excretion of specific heme precursors. These data represent an example of a metabolomic biomarker to assess chemical effects early, before clinical disease develops. Previous studies have demonstrated that the intratracheal or subcutaneous administration of GaAs and InAs particles to hamsters produces the induction of the major stress protein gene families in renal proximal tubule cells. This was monitored by 35-S methionine labeling of gene products followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis after exposure to InAs particles. The present studies examined whether these effects were associated with the development of compound-specific proteinuria after 10 or 30 days following subcutaneous injection of GaAs or InAs particles in hamsters. The results of these studies demonstrated the development of GaAs- and InAs-specific alterations in renal tubule cell protein expression patterns that varied at 10 and 30 days. At the 30-day point, cells in hamsters that received InAs particles showed marked attenuation of protein expression, suggesting inhibition of the stress protein response. These changes were associated with GaAs and InAs proteinuria patterns as monitored by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The intensity of the protein excretion patterns increased between the 10- and 30-day points and was most pronounced for animals in the 30-day InAs treatment group. No overt morphologic signs of cell death were seen in renal tubule cells of these animals

  3. Discovery by a proteomic approach of possible early biomarkers of drug-induced nephrotoxicity in medication-overuse headache

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a chronic headache condition that results from the overuse of analgesics drugs, triptans, or other antimigraine compounds. The epidemiology of drug-induced disorders suggests that medication overuse could lead to nephrotoxicity, particularly in chronic patients. The aim of this work was to confirm and extend the results obtained from a previous study, in which we analyzed the urinary proteome of 3 MOH patients groups: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), triptans and mixtures abusers, in comparison with non-abusers individuals (controls). Methods In the present work we employed specialized proteomic techniques, namely two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), and the innovative Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS), to discover characteristic proteomic profiles associated with MOH condition. Results By 2-DE and MS analysis we identified 21 over-excreted proteins in MOH patients, particularly in NSAIDs abusers, and the majority of these proteins were involved in a variety of renal impairments, as resulted from a literature search. Urine protein profiles generated by SELDI-TOF-MS analysis showed different spectra among groups. Moreover, significantly higher number of total protein spots and protein peaks were detected in NSAIDs and mixtures abusers. Conclusions These findings confirm the presence of alterations in proteins excretion in MOH patients. Analysis of urinary proteins by powerful proteomic technologies could lead to the discovery of early candidate biomarkers, that might allow to identify MOH patients prone to develop potential drug overuse-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:23565828

  4. Identification of Cardiac Myosin-binding Protein C as a Candidate Biomarker of Myocardial Infarction by Proteomics Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Sebastien; Yin, Xiaoke; Sicard, Pierre; Clark, James; Kanaganayagam, Gajen S.; Mayr, Manuel; Marber, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common cause of death for which effective treatments are available provided that diagnosis is rapid. The current diagnostic gold standards are circulating cardiac troponins I and T. However, their slow release delays diagnosis, and their persistence limits their utility in the identification of reinfarction. The aim was to identify candidate biomarkers of AMI. Isolated mouse hearts were perfused with oxygenated protein-free buffer, and coronary effluent was collected after ischemia or during matched normoxic perfusion. Effluents were analyzed using proteomics approaches based on one- or two-dimensional initial separation. Of the 459 proteins identified after ischemia with one-dimensional separation, 320 were not detected in the control coronary effluent. Among these were all classic existing biomarkers of AMI. We also identified the cardiac isoform of myosin-binding protein C in its full-length form and as a 40-kDa degradation product. This protein was not detected in the other murine organs examined, increased markedly with even trivial myocardial infarction, and could be detected in the plasma after myocardial infarction in vivo, a profile compatible with a biomarker of AMI. Two-dimensional fluorescence DIGE of ischemic and control coronary effluents identified more than 200 asymmetric spots verified by swapping dyes. Once again existing biomarkers of injury were confirmed as well as posttranslational modifications of antioxidant proteins such as peroxiredoxins. Perfusing hearts with protein-free buffers provides a platform of graded ischemic injury that allows detailed analysis of protein release and identification of candidate cardiac biomarkers like myosin-binding protein C. PMID:19721077

  5. Proteomic analysis of lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms: there's more than biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Zamò, Alberto; Cecconi, Daniela

    2010-01-03

    Lymphoid and haematopoietic neoplasms comprise a broad spectrum of different tumours, classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) on the basis of a combination of morphology, immunophenotypic, genetic and clinical features. Up to date for many of these neoplasms no single feature is regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The application of proteomics to the study of neoplastic haematological diseases could help in the search for new diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as in the development of new therapeutic strategies. In this review, we focus on the actual role of proteomics technologies in the study of neoplastic haematology. In particular, we analyse the results obtained in the field of body fluid, cell lines, and tissues proteomics, and discuss the improvement allowed by the new developed proteomic strategies, such as nanofluidic systems, analysis of formalin-fixed tissues, and quantitative high throughput techniques (SILAC, ICAT, iTRAQ).

  6. Rapid Identification of Protein Biomarkers of E. coli O157:H7 by MALDI-TOF-TOF Mass Spectrometry and Top-Down Proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified six protein biomarkers from two strains of E. coli O157:H7 and one non-pathogenic E. coli strain by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and top-down proteomics. Mature, intact proteins were ext...

  7. Time- and radiation-dose dependent changes in the plasma proteome after total body irradiation of non-human primates: Implications for biomarker selection

    PubMed Central

    Burdine, Marie S.; Orr, Lisa; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Authier, Simon; Pouliot, Mylene; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Tackett, Alan J.

    2017-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is a complex multi-organ disease resulting from total body exposure to high doses of radiation. Individuals can be exposed to total body irradiation (TBI) in a number of ways, including terrorist radiological weapons or nuclear accidents. In order to determine whether an individual has been exposed to high doses of radiation and needs countermeasure treatment, robust biomarkers are needed to estimate radiation exposure from biospecimens such as blood or urine. In order to identity such candidate biomarkers of radiation exposure, high-resolution proteomics was used to analyze plasma from non-human primates following whole body irradiation (Co-60 at 6.7 Gy and 7.4 Gy) with a twelve day observation period. A total of 663 proteins were evaluated from the plasma proteome analysis. A panel of plasma proteins with characteristic time- and dose-dependent changes was identified. In addition to the plasma proteomics study reported here, we recently identified candidate biomarkers using urine from these same non-human primates. From the proteomic analysis of both plasma and urine, we identified ten overlapping proteins that significantly differentiate both time and dose variables. These shared plasma and urine proteins represent optimal candidate biomarkers of radiation exposure. PMID:28350824

  8. Time- and radiation-dose dependent changes in the plasma proteome after total body irradiation of non-human primates: Implications for biomarker selection.

    PubMed

    Byrum, Stephanie D; Burdine, Marie S; Orr, Lisa; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Authier, Simon; Pouliot, Mylene; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Tackett, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) is a complex multi-organ disease resulting from total body exposure to high doses of radiation. Individuals can be exposed to total body irradiation (TBI) in a number of ways, including terrorist radiological weapons or nuclear accidents. In order to determine whether an individual has been exposed to high doses of radiation and needs countermeasure treatment, robust biomarkers are needed to estimate radiation exposure from biospecimens such as blood or urine. In order to identity such candidate biomarkers of radiation exposure, high-resolution proteomics was used to analyze plasma from non-human primates following whole body irradiation (Co-60 at 6.7 Gy and 7.4 Gy) with a twelve day observation period. A total of 663 proteins were evaluated from the plasma proteome analysis. A panel of plasma proteins with characteristic time- and dose-dependent changes was identified. In addition to the plasma proteomics study reported here, we recently identified candidate biomarkers using urine from these same non-human primates. From the proteomic analysis of both plasma and urine, we identified ten overlapping proteins that significantly differentiate both time and dose variables. These shared plasma and urine proteins represent optimal candidate biomarkers of radiation exposure.

  9. Identification of EBP50 as a Specific Biomarker for Carcinogens Via the Analysis of Mouse Lymphoma Cellular Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoen Jung; Choi, In-Kwon; Sheen, Yhun Yhong; Park, Sue Nie; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-01-01

    To identify specific biomarkers generated upon exposure of L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells to carcinogens, 2-DE and MALDI-TOF MS analysis were conducted using the cellular proteome of L5178Y cells that had been treated with the known carcinogens, 1,2-dibromoethane and O-nitrotoluene and the noncarcinogens, emodin and D-mannitol. Eight protein spots that showed a greater than 1.5-fold increase or decrease in intensity following carcinogen treatment compared with treatment with noncarcinogens were selected. Of the identified proteins, we focused on the candidate biomarker ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), the expression of which was specifically increased in response to treatment with the carcinogens. The expression level of EBP50 was determined by western analysis using polyclonal rabbit anti-EBP50 antibody. Further, the expression level of EBP50 was increased in cells treated with seven additional carcinogens, verifying that EBP50 could serve as a specific biomarker for carcinogens. PMID:22434383

  10. IgY14 and SuperMix immunoaffinity separations coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for human plasma proteomic biomarker discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Zhou, Jianying; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hossain, Mahmud; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-02-01

    Interest in the application of advanced proteomics technologies to human blood plasma- or serum-based clinical samples for the purpose of discovering disease biomarkers continues to grow; however, the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in these types of samples (often >10 orders of magnitude) represents a significant analytical challenge, particularly for detecting low-abundance candidate biomarkers. In response, immunoaffinity separation methods for depleting multiple high- and moderate-abundance proteins have become key tools for enriching low-abundance proteins and enhancing detection of these proteins in plasma proteomics. Herein, we describe IgY14 and tandem IgY14-Supermix separation methods for removing 14 high-abundance and up to 60 moderate-abundance proteins, respectively, from human blood plasma and highlight their utility when combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for interrogating the human plasma proteome.

  11. Fetal Inflammatory Response in Women with Proteomic Biomarkers Characteristic of Intra-Amniotic Inflammation and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Dulay, Antonette T.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya; Zhao, Guomao; Lee, Sarah; Hodgson, Eric J.; Bhandari, Vineet; Buhimschi, Irina A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between presence of amniotic fluid (AF) biomarkers characteristic of inflammation (defensins 2 and 1, calgranulins C and A) and fetal inflammatory status at birth. Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Tertiary referral University hospital Population 132 consecutive mothers (gestational age, median [interquartile range]: 29.6 [24.1-33.6] weeks), who had a clinically indicated amniocentesis to rule-out infection and their newborns. Methods Intra-amniotic inflammation was diagnosed by mass spectrometry SELDI-TOF. The AF proteomic fingerprint [Mass Restricted (MR) score] ranges from 0-4 (none to all biomarkers present). The intensity of intra-amniotic inflammation was graded based on the number of proteomic biomarkers: MR score 0: “no” inflammation; MR score 1-2: “minimal” inflammation; MR score 3-4: “severe” inflammation. At birth, cord blood was obtained for all cases. Severity of histological chorioamnionitis (HCA) and early onset neonatal sepsis (EONS) was based on established histological and hematological criteria. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured by sensitive immunoassays. The cord blood-to-AF IL-6 ratio was used as an indicator of the differential inflammatory response in the fetal versus the AF compartment. Main Outcome Measures to relate proteomic biomarkers of intra-amniotic infection to cord blood IL-6 and to use the latter as the primary marker of fetal inflammatory response. Results Women with intra-amniotic inflammation delivered at an earlier gestational age (ANOVA, P<0.001) and had higher AF IL-6 levels (P<0.001). At birth, neonates of women with “severe” intra-amniotic inflammation had higher cord blood IL-6 levels (P=0.002) and a higher frequency of EONS (P=0.002). EONS was characterized by significantly elevated cord blood IL-6 levels (P<0.001). Out of the 39 neonates delivered by mothers with “minimal” intra-amniotic inflammation, 15 (39%) had umbilical cord blood IL-6

  12. Searching for the noninvasive biomarker Holy Grail: Are urine proteomics the answer?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, biobehavioral nursing scientists have focused their attention on the search for biomarkers or biological signatures to identify patients at risk for various health problems and poor disease outcomes. In response to the national impetus for biomarker discovery, the measurement of biological...

  13. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Identification of Serum Biomarkers of Two Chronic Hepatitis B Subtypes Diagnosed by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weilong; Zhong, Sen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. By traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) pattern classification, damp heat stasis in the middle-jiao (DHSM) and liver Qi stagnation and spleen deficiency (LSSD) are two most common subtypes of CHB. Results. In this study, we employed iTRAQ proteomics technology to identify potential serum protein biomarkers in 30 LSSD-CHB and 30 DHSM-CHB patients. Of the total 842 detected proteins, 273 and 345 were differentially expressed in LSSD-CHB and DHSM-CHB patients compared to healthy controls, respectively. LSSD-CHB and DHSM-CHB shared 142 upregulated and 84 downregulated proteins, of which several proteins have been reported to be candidate biomarkers, including immunoglobulin (Ig) related proteins, complement components, apolipoproteins, heat shock proteins, insulin-like growth factor binding protein, and alpha-2-macroglobulin. In addition, we identified that proteins might be potential biomarkers to distinguish LSSD-CHB from DHSM-CHB, such as A0A0A0MS51_HUMAN (gelsolin), PON3_HUMAN, Q96K68_HUMAN, and TRPM8_HUMAN that were differentially expressed exclusively in LSSD-CHB patients and A0A087WT59_HUMAN (transthyretin), ITIH1_HUMAN, TSP1_HUMAN, CO5_HUMAN, and ALBU_HUMAN that were differentially expressed specifically in DHSM-CHB patients. Conclusion. This is the first time to report serum proteins in CHB subtype patients. Our findings provide potential biomarkers can be used for LSSD-CHB and DHSM-CHB. PMID:28025641

  14. Nonclinical safety biomarkers of drug-induced vascular injury: current status and blueprint for the future.

    PubMed

    Mikaelian, Igor; Cameron, Mark; Dalmas, Deidre A; Enerson, Bradley E; Gonzalez, Raymond J; Guionaud, Silvia; Hoffmann, Peter K; King, Nicholas M P; Lawton, Michael P; Scicchitano, Marshall S; Smith, Holly W; Thomas, Roberta A; Weaver, James L; Zabka, Tanja S

    2014-06-01

    Better biomarkers are needed to identify, characterize, and/or monitor drug-induced vascular injury (DIVI) in nonclinical species and patients. The Predictive Safety Testing Consortium (PSTC), a precompetitive collaboration of pharmaceutical companies and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), formed the Vascular Injury Working Group (VIWG) to develop and qualify translatable biomarkers of DIVI. The VIWG focused its research on acute DIVI because early detection for clinical and nonclinical safety monitoring is desirable. The VIWG developed a strategy based on the premise that biomarkers of DIVI in rat would be translatable to humans due to the morphologic similarity of vascular injury between species regardless of mechanism. The histomorphologic lexicon for DIVI in rat defines degenerative and adaptive findings of the vascular endothelium and smooth muscles, and characterizes inflammatory components. We describe the mechanisms of these changes and their associations with candidate biomarkers for which advanced analytical method validation was completed. Further development is recommended for circulating microRNAs, endothelial microparticles, and imaging techniques. Recommendations for sample collection and processing, analytical methods, and confirmation of target localization using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization are described. The methods described are anticipated to aid in the identification and qualification of translational biomarkers for DIVI.

  15. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of bovine spermatozoa of varying fertility rates and identification of biomarkers associated with fertility

    PubMed Central

    Peddinti, Divyaswetha; Nanduri, Bindu; Kaya, Abdullah; Feugang, Jean M; Burgess, Shane C; Memili, Erdogan

    2008-01-01

    Background Male infertility is a major problem for mammalian reproduction. However, molecular details including the underlying mechanisms of male fertility are still not known. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms is essential for obtaining consistently high reproductive efficiency and to ensure lower cost and time-loss by breeder. Results Using high and low fertility bull spermatozoa, here we employed differential detergent fractionation multidimensional protein identification technology (DDF-Mud PIT) and identified 125 putative biomarkers of fertility. We next used quantitative Systems Biology modeling and canonical protein interaction pathways and networks to show that high fertility spermatozoa differ from low fertility spermatozoa in four main ways. Compared to sperm from low fertility bulls, sperm from high fertility bulls have higher expression of proteins involved in: energy metabolism, cell communication, spermatogenesis, and cell motility. Our data also suggests a hypothesis that low fertility sperm DNA integrity may be compromised because cell cycle: G2/M DNA damage checkpoint regulation was most significant signaling pathway identified in low fertility spermatozoa. Conclusion This is the first comprehensive description of the bovine spermatozoa proteome. Comparative proteomic analysis of high fertility and low fertility bulls, in the context of protein interaction networks identified putative molecular markers associated with high fertility phenotype. PMID:18294385

  16. Recommendations for the evaluation of pathology data in nonclinical safety biomarker qualification studies.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, John E; Pandher, Karamjeet; Solter, Phillip F; Troth, Sean P; Boyce, Rogely Waite; Zabka, Tanja S; Ennulat, Daniela

    2011-12-01

    A set of best practices for the conduct of histopathology evaluation in nonclinical safety studies was endorsed by the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) in 2004. These best practices indicate that the study pathologist should have knowledge of the treatment group and access to all available study-related data for the animal from which the tissue was obtained. A new set of best practices for the conduct of histopathology review for safety biomarker qualification for nonclinical studies has been endorsed by the STP and is summarized in this document. These best practices are generally similar to those for nonclinical safety studies, specifically that the pathologist be "unblinded" or have access to study data. Although histopathology evaluation in biomarker qualification studies must be performed without knowledge of novel biomarker data, the study pathologist(s) should be involved in the attendant meta-analyses of these data. Blinded evaluation is an experimental tool in biomarker qualification studies that is appropriate only when well-defined criteria for specific histopathologic findings are identified prior to blinded review. Additionally, this paper also considers the management of bias, the use of a tiered evaluation approach, the importance of using qualified pathologists and standard reporting, and the management of spontaneous findings.

  17. Fusion of metabolomics and proteomics data for biomarkers discovery: case study on the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) samples holds great promise to diagnose neurological pathologies and gain insight into the molecular background of these pathologies. Proteomics and metabolomics methods provide invaluable information on the biomolecular content of CSF and thereby on the possible status of the central nervous system, including neurological pathologies. The combined information provides a more complete description of CSF content. Extracting the full combined information requires a combined analysis of different datasets i.e. fusion of the data. Results A novel fusion method is presented and applied to proteomics and metabolomics data from a pre-clinical model of multiple sclerosis: an Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in rats. The method follows a mid-level fusion architecture. The relevant information is extracted per platform using extended canonical variates analysis. The results are subsequently merged in order to be analyzed jointly. We find that the combined proteome and metabolome data allow for the efficient and reliable discrimination between healthy, peripherally inflamed rats, and rats at the onset of the EAE. The predicted accuracy reaches 89% on a test set. The important variables (metabolites and proteins) in this model are known to be linked to EAE and/or multiple sclerosis. Conclusions Fusion of proteomics and metabolomics data is possible. The main issues of high-dimensionality and missing values are overcome. The outcome leads to higher accuracy in prediction and more exhaustive description of the disease profile. The biological interpretation of the involved variables validates our fusion approach. PMID:21696593

  18. Proteomics Analysis to Identify and Characterize the Biomarkers and Physical Activities of Non-Frail and Frail Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Liao, Chen-Chung; Huang, Chi-Huang; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hsu, Mei-Chich; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Globally, the proportion of older adults is increasing. Older people face chronic conditions such as sarcopenia and functional decline, which are often associated with disability and frailty. Proteomics assay of potential serum biomarkers of frailty in older adults. Older adults were divided into non-frail and frail groups (n = 6 each; 3 males in each group) in accordance with the Chinese-Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale. Adults were measured for grip power and the 6-min walk test for physical activity, and venous blood was sampled after adults fasted for 8 h. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used for proteomics assay. The groups were compared for levels of biomarkers by t test and Pearson correlation analysis. Non-frail and frail subjects had mean age 77.5±0.4 and 77.7±1.6 years, mean height 160.5±1.3 and 156.6±2.9 cm and mean weight 62.5±1.2 and 62.8±2.9 kg, respectively. Physical activity level was lower for frail than non-frail subjects (grip power: 13.8±0.4 vs 26.1±1.2 kg; 6-min walk test: 215.2±17.2 vs 438.3±17.2 m). Among 226 proteins detected, for 31, serum levels were significantly higher for frail than non-frail subjects; serum levels of Ig kappa chain V-III region WOL, COX7A2, and albumin were lower. The serum levels of ANGT, KG and AT were 2.05-, 1.76- and 2.22-fold lower (all p < 0.05; Figure 1A, 2A and 3A) for non-frail than frail subjects and were highly correlated with grip power (Figure 1B, 2B and 3B). Our study found that ANGT, KG and AT levels are known to increase with aging, so degenerated vascular function might be associated with frailty. In total, 226 proteins were revealed proteomics assay; levels of angiotensinogen (ANGT), kininogen-1 (KG) and antithrombin III (AT) were higher in frail than non-frail subjects (11.26±2.21 vs 5.09±0.74; 18.42±1.36 vs 11.64±1.36; 22.23±1.64 vs 9.52±0.95, respectively, p < 0.05). These 3 factors were highly correlated with grip

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Urine to Identify Breast Cancer Biomarker Candidates Using a Label-Free LC-MS/MS Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beretov, Julia; Wasinger, Valerie C.; Millar, Ewan K. A.; Schwartz, Peter; Graham, Peter H.; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease and is a leading cause of death in women. Early diagnosis and monitoring progression of breast cancer are important for improving prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify protein biomarkers in urine for early screening detection and monitoring invasive breast cancer progression. Method We performed a comparative proteomic analysis using ion count relative quantification label free LC-MS/MS analysis of urine from breast cancer patients (n = 20) and healthy control women (n = 20). Results Unbiased label free LC-MS/MS-based proteomics was used to provide a profile of abundant proteins in the biological system of breast cancer patients. Data analysis revealed 59 urinary proteins that were significantly different in breast cancer patients compared to the normal control subjects (p<0.05, fold change >3). Thirty-six urinary proteins were exclusively found in specific breast cancer stages, with 24 increasing and 12 decreasing in their abundance. Amongst the 59 significant urinary proteins identified, a list of 13 novel up-regulated proteins were revealed that may be used to detect breast cancer. These include stage specific markers associated with pre-invasive breast cancer in the ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) samples (Leucine LRC36, MAST4 and Uncharacterized protein CI131), early invasive breast cancer (DYH8, HBA, PEPA, uncharacterized protein C4orf14 (CD014), filaggrin and MMRN2) and metastatic breast cancer (AGRIN, NEGR1, FIBA and Keratin KIC10). Preliminary validation of 3 potential markers (ECM1, MAST4 and filaggrin) identified was performed in breast cancer cell lines by Western blotting. One potential marker MAST4 was further validated in human breast cancer tissues as well as individual human breast cancer urine samples with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. Conclusions Our results indicate that urine is a useful non-invasive source of biomarkers and the profile patterns

  20. Human salivary proteome--a resource of potential biomarkers for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, Priya; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Sathe, Gajanan J; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Palit, Priyanka; Gowda, Harsha; Suresh, Amritha; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2015-09-08

    Proteins present in human saliva offer an immense potential for clinical applications. However, exploring salivary proteome is technically challenged due to the presence of amylase and albumin in high abundance. In this study, we used four workflows to analyze human saliva from healthy individuals which involved depletion of abundant proteins using affinity-based separation methods followed by protein or peptide fractionation and high resolution mass spectrometry analysis. We identified a total of 1256 human salivary proteins, 292 of them being reported for the first time. All identifications were verified for any shared proteins/peptides from the salivary microbiome that may conflict with the human protein identifications. On integration of our results with the analyses reported earlier, we arrived at an updated human salivary proteome containing 3449 proteins, 808 of them have been reported as differentially expressed proteins in oral cancer tissues. The secretory nature of 598 of the 808 proteins has also been supported on the basis of the presence of signal sequence, transmembrane domain or association with exosomes. From this subset, we provide a priority list of 139 proteins along with their proteotypic peptides, which may serve as a reference for targeted investigations as secretory markers for clinical applications in oral malignancies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  1. Challenges and opportunities for discovery of disease biomarkers using urine proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kentsis, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Modern medicine has experienced a tremendous explosion in knowledge about disease pathophysiology, gained largely from understanding the molecular biology of human disease. Recent advances in mass spectrometry and proteomics now allow for simultaneous identification and quantification of thousands of unique proteins and peptides in complex biological tissues and fluids. In particular, proteomic studies of urine benefit from urine’s less complex composition as compared to serum and tissues, and have been used successfully to discover novel markers of a variety of infectious, autoimmune, oncological, and surgical conditions. This perspective discusses the challenges of such studies that stem from the compositional variability and complexity of human urine, as well as instrumental sampling limitations and the effects of noise and selection bias. Strategies for the design of observational clinical trials, physical and chemical fractionation of urine specimens, mass spectrometry analysis, and functional data annotation are outlined. Rigorous translational investigations using urine proteomics are likely to discover novel and accurate markers of both rare and common diseases. This should aid the diagnosis, improve stratification of therapy, and identify novel therapeutic targets for a variety of childhood and adult diseases, all of which will be essential for the development of personalized and predictive medicine of the future. PMID:20840485

  2. Proteomic biomarkers for ageing the mosquito Aedes aegypti to determine risk of pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Leon E; Monkman, James; Dave, Keyur A; Wockner, Leesa F; Birrell, Geoff W; Norris, Emma L; Kienzle, Vivian J; Sikulu, Maggy T; Ryan, Peter A; Gorman, Jeffery J; Kay, Brian H

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers of the age of mosquitoes are required to determine the risk of transmission of various pathogens as each pathogen undergoes a period of extrinsic incubation in the mosquito host. Using the 2-D Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) procedure, we investigated the abundance of up to 898 proteins from the Yellow Fever and dengue virus vector, Aedes aegypti, during ageing. By applying a mixed-effects model of protein expression, we identified five common patterns of abundance change during ageing and demonstrated an age-related decrease in variance for four of these. This supported a search for specific proteins with abundance changes that remain tightly associated with ageing for use as ageing biomarkers. Using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry we identified ten candidate proteins that satisfied strict biomarker discovery criteria (identified in two out of three multivariate analysis procedures and in two cohorts of mosquitoes). We validated the abundances of the four most suitable candidates (Actin depolymerising factor; ADF, Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A; eIF5A, insect cuticle protein Q17LN8, and Anterior fat body protein; AFP) using semi-quantitative Western analysis of individual mosquitoes of six ages. The redox-response protein Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) and electron shuttling protein Electron transfer oxidoreductase (ETO) were subject to post-translational modifications affecting their charge states with potential effects on function. For the four candidates we show remarkably consistent decreases in abundance during ageing, validating initial selections. In particular, the abundance of AFP is an ideal biomarker candidate for whether a female mosquito has lived long enough to be capable of dengue virus transmission. We have demonstrated proteins to be a suitable class of ageing biomarkers in mosquitoes and have identified candidates for epidemiological studies of dengue and the evaluation of new disease reduction projects targeting

  3. Multidimensional system biology: genetic markers and proteomic biomarkers of adverse pregnancy outcome in preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Buhimschi, Catalin S; Rosenberg, Victor A; Dulay, Antonette T; Thung, Stephen; Sfakianaki, Anna K; Bahtiyar, Mert-Ozan; Buhimschi, Irina A

    2008-03-01

    Premature birth before 37 weeks of gestation is a significant public health problem. Each year, 4.5 million premature infants are born worldwide. Despite extensive research and a variety of interventions, the rate of preterm birth has steadily increased over the past 20 years and reached a high of 12.8% in 2006. The etiology of most preterm births remains elusive and is likely multifactorial, with many pathophysiological pathways involved, such as excessive stretching, oxidative stress, decidual hemorrhage, and infection. Genomics and proteomics have emerged to provide a better comprehension of the pathophysiological conditions leading to preterm birth, thereby providing a perspective for improving neonatal outcome.

  4. Label-Free LC-MS/MS Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Protein/Pathway Alterations and Candidate Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mahlon A; An, Jiyan; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Bowser, Robert P

    2015-11-06

    Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome has proven valuable to the study of neurodegenerative disorders. To identify new protein/pathway alterations and candidate biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we performed comparative proteomic profiling of CSF from sporadic ALS (sALS), healthy control (HC), and other neurological disease (OND) subjects using label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 1712 CSF proteins were detected and relatively quantified by spectral counting. Levels of several proteins with diverse biological functions were significantly altered in sALS samples. Enrichment analysis was used to link these alterations to biological pathways, which were predominantly related to inflammation, neuronal activity, and extracellular matrix regulation. We then used our CSF proteomic profiles to create a support vector machines classifier capable of discriminating training set ALS from non-ALS (HC and OND) samples. Four classifier proteins, WD repeat-containing protein 63, amyloid-like protein 1, SPARC-like protein 1, and cell adhesion molecule 3, were identified by feature selection and externally validated. The resultant classifier distinguished ALS from non-ALS samples with 83% sensitivity and 100% specificity in an independent test set. Collectively, our results illustrate the utility of CSF proteomic profiling for identifying ALS protein/pathway alterations and candidate disease biomarkers.

  5. Proteomic-Based Detection of a Protein Cluster Dysregulated during Cardiovascular Development Identifies Biomarkers of Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Anjali K.; Krauthammer, Michael; Li, Puyao; Davidov, Eugene; Butler, Lucas C.; Copel, Joshua; Katajamaa, Mikko; Oresic, Matej; Buhimschi, Irina; Buhimschi, Catalin; Snyder, Michael; Madri, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular development is vital for embryonic survival and growth. Early gestation embryo loss or malformation has been linked to yolk sac vasculopathy and congenital heart defects (CHDs). However, the molecular pathways that underlie these structural defects in humans remain largely unknown hindering the development of molecular-based diagnostic tools and novel therapies. Methodology/Principal Findings Murine embryos were exposed to high glucose, a condition known to induce cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. We further employed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in embryos with defects from those with normal cardiovascular development. The proteins detected by mass spectrometry (WNT16, ST14, Pcsk1, Jumonji, Morca2a, TRPC5, and others) were validated by Western blotting and immunoflorescent staining of the yolk sac and heart. The proteins within the proteomic dataset clustered to adhesion/migration, differentiation, transport, and insulin signaling pathways. A functional role for several proteins (WNT16, ADAM15 and NOGO-A/B) was demonstrated in an ex vivo model of heart development. Additionally, a successful application of a cluster of protein biomarkers (WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1) as a prenatal screen for CHDs was confirmed in a study of human amniotic fluid (AF) samples from women carrying normal fetuses and those with CHDs. Conclusions/Significance The novel finding that WNT16, ST14 and Pcsk1 protein levels increase in fetuses with CHDs suggests that these proteins may play a role in the etiology of human CHDs. The information gained through this bed-side to bench translational approach contributes to a more complete understanding of the protein pathways dysregulated during cardiovascular development and provides novel avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, beneficial to fetuses at risk for CHDs. PMID:19156209

  6. A lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform for identification of multiple liver cancer biomarkers in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Oh, Na Ree; Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Hoguen; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-09-18

    Aberrantly glycosylated proteins related to liver cancer progression were captured with specific lectin and identified from human plasma by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry as multiple biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The lectin fractionation for fucosylated protein glycoforms in human plasma was conducted with a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL). Following tryptic digestion of the lectin-captured fraction, plasma samples from 30 control cases (including 10 healthy, 10 hepatitis B virus [HBV], and 10 cirrhosis cases) and 10 HCC cases were quantitatively analyzed by MRM to identify which glycoproteins are viable HCC biomarkers. A1AG1, AACT, A1AT, and CERU were found to be potent biomarkers to differentiate HCC plasma from control plasmas. The AUROC generated independently from these four biomarker candidates ranged from 0.73 to 0.92. However, the lectin-coupled MRM assay with multiple combinations of biomarker candidates is superior statistically to those generated from the individual candidates with AUROC more than 0.95, which can be an alternative to the immunoassay inevitably requiring tedious development of multiple antibodies against biomarker candidates to be verified. Eventually the lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform was found to be efficient to identify multiple biomarkers from human plasma according to cancer progression.

  7. Solvent interaction analysis as a proteomic approach to structure-based biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Zaslavsky, Boris Y; Uversky, Vladimir N; Chait, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Proteins have several measurable features in biological fluids that may change under pathological conditions. The current disease biomarker discovery is mostly based on protein concentration in the sample as the measurable feature. Changes in protein structures, such as post-translational modifications and in protein-partner interactions are known to accompany pathological processes. Changes in glycosylation profiles are well-established for many plasma proteins in various types of cancer and other diseases. The solvent interaction analysis method is based on protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems and is highly sensitive to changes in protein structure and protein-protein- and protein-partner interactions while independent of the protein concentration in the biological sample. It provides quantitative index: partition coefficient representing changes in protein structure and interactions with partners. The fundamentals of the method are presented with multiple examples of applications of the method to discover and monitor structural protein biomarkers as disease-specific diagnostic indicators.

  8. A proteomic approach for plasma biomarker discovery with iTRAQ labelling and OFFGEL fractionation.

    PubMed

    Ernoult, Emilie; Bourreau, Anthony; Gamelin, Erick; Guette, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Human blood plasma contains a plethora of proteins, encompassing not only proteins that have plasma-based functionalities, but also possibly every other form of low concentrated human proteins. As it circulates through the tissues, the plasma picks up proteins that are released from their origin due to physiological events such as tissue remodeling and cell death. Specific disease processes or tumors are often characterized by plasma "signatures," which may become obvious via changes in the plasma proteome profile, for example, through over expression of proteins. However, the wide dynamic range of proteins present in plasma makes their analysis very challenging, because high-abundance proteins tend to mask those of lower abundance. In the present study, we used a strategy combining iTRAQ as a reagent which improved the peptide ionization and peptide OFFGEL fractionation that has already been shown, in our previous research, to improve the proteome coverage of cellular extracts. Two prefractioning methods were compared: immunodepletion and a bead-based library of combinatorial hexapeptide technology. Our data suggested that both methods were complementary, with regard to the number of identified proteins. iTRAQ labelling, in association with OFFGEL fractionation, allowed more than 300 different proteins to be characterized from 400 microg of plasma proteins.

  9. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Reveals Novel Biomarkers for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Rui; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Yongbin; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a gradual lung disease with a survival of less than 5 years post-diagnosis for most patients. Poor molecular description of IPF has led to unsatisfactory interpretation of the pathogenesis of this disease, resulting in the lack of successful treatments. The objective of this study was to discover novel noninvasive biomarkers for the diagnosis of IPF. We employed a coupled isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) approach to examine protein expression in patients with IPF. A total of 97 differentially expressed proteins (38 upregulated proteins and 59 downregulated proteins) were identified in the serum of IPF patients. Using String software, a regulatory network containing 87 nodes and 244 edges was built, and the functional enrichment showed that differentially expressed proteins were predominantly involved in protein activation cascade, regulation of response to wounding and extracellular components. A set of three most significantly upregulated proteins (HBB, CRP and SERPINA1) and four most significantly downregulated proteins (APOA2, AHSG, KNG1 and AMBP) were selected for validation in an independent cohort of IPF and other lung diseases using ELISA test. The results confirmed the iTRAQ profiling results and AHSG, AMBP, CRP and KNG1 were found as specific IPF biomarkers. ROC analysis indicated the diagnosis potential of the validated biomarkers. The findings of this study will contribute in understanding the pathogenesis of IPF and facilitate the development of therapeutic targets. PMID:28122020

  10. Identification and Validation of Loa loa Microfilaria-Specific Biomarkers: a Rational Design Approach Using Proteomics and Novel Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Drame, Papa M.; Meng, Zhaojing; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Herrick, Jesica A.; Veenstra, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunoassays are currently needed to quantify Loa loa microfilariae (mf). To address this need, we have conducted proteomic and bioinformatic analyses of proteins present in the urine of a Loa mf-infected patient and used this information to identify putative biomarkers produced by L. loa mf. In total, 70 of the 15,444 described putative L. loa proteins were identified. Of these 70, 18 were L. loa mf specific, and 2 of these 18 (LOAG_16297 and LOAG_17808) were biologically immunogenic. We developed novel reverse luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) immunoassays to quantify these 2 proteins in individual plasma samples. Levels of these 2 proteins in microfilaremic L. loa-infected patients were positively correlated to mf densities in the corresponding blood samples (r = 0.71 and P < 0.0001 for LOAG_16297 and r = 0.61 and P = 0.0002 for LOAG_17808). For LOAG_16297, the levels in plasma were significantly higher in Loa-infected (geometric mean [GM], 0.045 µg/ml) than in uninfected (P < 0.0001), Wuchereria bancrofti-infected (P = 0.0005), and Onchocerca volvulus-infected (P < 0.0001) individuals, whereas for LOAG_17808 protein, they were not significantly different between Loa-infected (GM, 0.123 µg/ml) and uninfected (P = 0.06) and W. bancrofti-infected (P = 0.32) individuals. Moreover, only LOAG_16297 showed clear discriminative ability between L. loa and the other potentially coendemic filariae. Indeed, the specificity of the LOAG_16297 reverse LIPS assay was 96% (with a sensitivity of 77%). Thus, LOAG_16297 is a very promising biomarker that will be exploited in a quantitative point-of-care immunoassay for determination of L. loa mf densities. PMID:26884435

  11. Clinical Proteomics Identifies Urinary CD14 as a Potential Biomarker for Diagnosis of Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Yi; Huang, Chun-Hao; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Lin, Chen-Lung Steve; Lai, Wen-Ter; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays a key role in coronary artery disease (CAD) and other manifestations of atherosclerosis. Recently, urinary proteins were found to be useful markers for reflecting inflammation status of different organs. To identify potential biomarker for diagnosis of CAD, we performed one-dimensional SDS-gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Among the proteins differentially expressed in urine samples, monocyte antigen CD14 was found to be consistently expressed in higher amounts in the CAD patients as compared to normal controls. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to analyze the concentrations of CD14 in urine and serum, we confirmed that urinary CD14 levels were significantly higher in patients (n = 73) with multi-vessel and single vessel CAD than in normal control (n = 35) (P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis further showed that urinary CD14 concentration level is associated with severity or number of diseased vessels and SYNTAX score after adjustment for potential confounders. Concomitantly, the proportion of CD14+ monocytes was significantly increased in CAD patients (59.7 ± 3.6%) as compared with healthy controls (14.9 ± 2.1%) (P < 0.001), implicating that a high level of urinary CD14 may be potentially involved in mechanism(s) leading to CAD pathogenesis. By performing shotgun proteomics, we further revealed that CD14-associated inflammatory response networks may play an essential role in CAD. In conclusion, the current study has demonstrated that release of CD14 in urine coupled with more CD14+ monocytes in CAD patients is significantly correlated with severity of CAD, pointing to the potential application of urinary CD14 as a novel noninvasive biomarker for large-scale diagnostic screening of susceptible CAD patients. PMID:25668619

  12. Development of micro immunosensors to study genomic and proteomic biomarkers related to cancer and Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha

    A report from the National Institutes of Health defines a disease biomarker as a "characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention." Early diagnosis is a crucial factor for incurable disease such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD). During the last decade researchers have discovered that biochemical changes caused by a disease can be detected considerably earlier as compared to physical manifestations/symptoms. In this dissertation electrochemical detection was utilized as the detection strategy as it offers high sensitivity/specificity, ease of operation, and capability of miniaturization and multiplexed detection. Electrochemical detection of biological analytes is an established field, and has matured at a rapid pace during the last 50 years and adapted itself to advances in micro/nanofabrication procedures. Carbon fiber microelectrodes were utilized as the platform sensor due to their high signal to noise ratio, ease and low-cost of fabrication, biocompatibility, and active carbon surface which allows conjugation with biorecognition moieties. This dissertation specifically focuses on the detection of 3 extensively validated biomarkers for cancer and AD. Firstly, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) a cancer biomarker was detected using a one-step, reagentless immunosensing strategy. The immunosensing strategy allowed a rapid and sensitive means of VEGF detection with a detection limit of about 38 pg/mL with a linear dynamic range of 0--100 pg/mL. Direct detection of AD-related biomarker amyloid beta (Abeta) was achieved by exploiting its inherent electroactivity. The quantification of the ratio of Abeta1-40/42 (or Abeta ratio) has been established as a reliable test to diagnose AD through human clinical trials. Triple barrel carbon fiber microelectrodes were used to simultaneously detect Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 in

  13. Identification of novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by aptamer-based serum proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; McClorey, Graham; Manzano, Raquel; Betts, Corinne A.; Blain, Alison; Saleh, Amer F.; Gait, Michael J.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wood, Matthew J. A.; Roberts, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used to monitor the efficacy of experimental therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in clinical trials. Identification of novel protein biomarkers has been limited due to the massive complexity of the serum proteome and the presence of a small number of very highly abundant proteins. Here we have utilised an aptamer-based proteomics approach to profile 1,129 proteins in the serum of wild-type and mdx (dystrophin deficient) mice. The serum levels of 96 proteins were found to be significantly altered (P < 0.001, q < 0.01) in mdx mice. Additionally, systemic treatment with a peptide-antisense oligonucleotide conjugate designed to induce Dmd exon skipping and recover dystrophin protein expression caused many of the differentially abundant serum proteins to be restored towards wild-type levels. Results for five leading candidate protein biomarkers (Pgam1, Tnni3, Camk2b, Cycs and Adamts5) were validated by ELISA in the mouse samples. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was found to be significantly elevated in human DMD patient serum. This study has identified multiple novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in the serum of the mdx mouse with potential utility in DMD patients. PMID:26594036

  14. Identification of novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by aptamer-based serum proteomics.

    PubMed

    Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; McClorey, Graham; Manzano, Raquel; Betts, Corinne A; Blain, Alison; Saleh, Amer F; Gait, Michael J; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wood, Matthew J A; Roberts, Thomas C

    2015-11-23

    There is currently an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used to monitor the efficacy of experimental therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in clinical trials. Identification of novel protein biomarkers has been limited due to the massive complexity of the serum proteome and the presence of a small number of very highly abundant proteins. Here we have utilised an aptamer-based proteomics approach to profile 1,129 proteins in the serum of wild-type and mdx (dystrophin deficient) mice. The serum levels of 96 proteins were found to be significantly altered (P < 0.001, q < 0.01) in mdx mice. Additionally, systemic treatment with a peptide-antisense oligonucleotide conjugate designed to induce Dmd exon skipping and recover dystrophin protein expression caused many of the differentially abundant serum proteins to be restored towards wild-type levels. Results for five leading candidate protein biomarkers (Pgam1, Tnni3, Camk2b, Cycs and Adamts5) were validated by ELISA in the mouse samples. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was found to be significantly elevated in human DMD patient serum. This study has identified multiple novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in the serum of the mdx mouse with potential utility in DMD patients.

  15. Identifying Biomarkers and Mechanisms of Toxic Metal Stress with Global Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Susan M.

    2012-04-16

    Hg is a wide-spread contaminant in the environment and is toxic in all of its various forms. Data suggest that RHg+ and Hg2+ are toxic in two ways. At low levels, Hg species appear to disrupt membrane-bound respiration causing a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that further damage the cell. At higher Hg concentrations, RHg+ and Hg2+ may form adducts with cysteine- and selenocysteine-containing proteins in all cellular compartments resulting in their inactivation. Although these mechansims for toxicity are generally accepted, the most sensitive targets associated with these mechanisms are not well understood. In this collaborative project involving three laboratories at three institutions, the overall goal was to develop of a mass spectrometry-based global proteomics methodology that could be used to identify Hg-adducted (and ideally, ROS-damaged) proteins in order to address these types of questions. The two objectives of this overall collaborative project were (1) to identify, quantify, and compare ROS- and Hg-damaged proteins in cells treated with various Hg species and concentrations to test this model for two mechanisms of Hg toxicity, and (2) to define the cellular roles of the ubiquitous bacterial mercury resistance (mer) locus with regards to how the proteins of this pathway interact to protect other cell proteins from Hg damage. The specific objectives and accomplishments of the Miller lab in this project included: (1) Development of algorithms for analysis of the Hg-proteomic mass spectrometry data to identify mercury adducted peptides and other trends in the data. (2) Investigation of the role of mer operon proteins in scavenging Hg(II) from other mer pathway proteins as a means of protecting cellular proteins from damage.

  16. Top-Down Proteomics with Mass Spectrometry Imaging: A Pilot Study towards Discovery of Biomarkers for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Mandal, Rakesh; Catherman, Adam; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    In the developing mammalian brain, inhibition of NMDA receptor can induce widespread neuroapoptosis, inhibit neurogenesis and cause impairment of learning and memory. Although some mechanistic insights into adverse neurological actions of these NMDA receptor antagonists exist, our understanding of the full spectrum of developmental events affected by early exposure to these chemical agents in the brain is still limited. Here we attempt to gain insights into the impact of pharmacologically induced excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in infancy on the brain proteome using mass spectrometric imaging (MSI). Our goal was to study changes in protein expression in postnatal day 10 (P10) rat brains following neonatal exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK801). Analysis of rat brains exposed to vehicle or MK801 and comparison of their MALDI MS images revealed differential relative abundances of several proteins. We then identified these markers such as ubiquitin, purkinje cell protein 4 (PEP-19), cytochrome c oxidase subunits and calmodulin, by a combination of reversed-phase (RP) HPLC fractionation and top-down tandem MS platform. More in-depth large scale study along with validation experiments will be carried out in the future. Overall, our findings indicate that a brief neonatal exposure to a compound that alters excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain has a long term effect on protein expression patterns during subsequent development, highlighting the utility of MALDI-MSI as a discovery tool for potential biomarkers. PMID:24710523

  17. Discovery Proteomics And Nonparametric Modeling Pipeline In The Development Of A Candidate Biomarker Panel For Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Brasier, Allan R; Garcia, Josefina; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Spratt, Heidi M.; Comach, Guillermo; Ju, Hyunsu; Recinos, Adrian; Soman, Kizhake; Forshey, Brett M.; Halsey, Eric S.; Blair, Patrick J.; Rocha, Claudio; Bazan, Isabel; Victor, Sundar S; Wu, Zheng; Stafford, Susan; Watts, Douglas; Morrison, Amy C.; Scott, Thomas W.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary Dengue viral infection can produce capillary leakage associated with increased mortality known as Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF). Because the mortality of DHF can be reduced by early detection and intensive support, improved methods for its detection are needed. We applied multidimensional protein profiling to predict outcomes in a prospective Dengue surveillance study in South America. Plasma samples taken from initial clinical presentation of acute Dengue infection were subjected to proteomics analyses using ELISA and a recently developed biofluid analysis platform. Demographics, clinical laboratory measurements, 9 cytokines and 419 plasma proteins collected at the time of initial presentation were compared between the DF and DHF outcomes. Here, the subject’s gender, clinical parameters, 2 cytokines and 42 proteins discriminated between the outcomes. These factors were reduced by multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) that a highly accurate classification model based on 8 discriminant features with an AUC of 0.999. Model analysis indicated that the feature-outcome relationship were non-linear. Although this DHF risk model will need validation in a larger cohort, we conclude that approaches to develop predictive biomarker models for disease outcome will need to incorporate nonparametric modeling approaches. PMID:22376251

  18. Application of quantitative proteomic analysis using tandem mass tags for discovery and identification of novel biomarkers in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Sachio; Satoh, Mamoru; Kawashima, Yusuke; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Kado, Sayaka; Sawai, Setsu; Nishimura, Motoi; Ogita, Mayumi; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Kobyashi, Hiroaki; Aoki, Akira; Kodera, Yoshio; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Izumi, Yuichi; Nomura, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    Periodontal disease is a bacterial infection that destroys the gingiva and surrounding tissues of the oral cavity. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) is extracted from the gingival sulcus and pocket. Analysis of biochemical markers in GCF, which predict the progression of periodontal disease, may facilitate disease diagnosis. However, no useful GCF biochemical markers with high sensitivity for detecting periodontal disease have been identified. Thus, the search for biochemical markers of periodontal disease is of continued interest in experimental and clinical periodontal disease research. Using tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, we analyzed GCF samples from healthy subjects and patients with periodontal disease, and identified a total of 619 GCF proteins based on proteomic analysis. Of these, we focused on two proteins, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (LCN2), which are involved in the progression of periodontal disease. Western blot analysis revealed that the levels of MMP-9 and LCN2 were significantly higher in patients with periodontal disease than in healthy subjects. In addition, ELISA also detected significantly higher levels of LCN2 in patients with periodontal disease than in healthy subjects. Thus, LC-MS/MS analyses of GCF using TMT labeling led to the identification of LCN2, which may be a promising GCF biomarker for the detection of periodontal disease.

  19. A Proteomic Approach Identifies Candidate Early Biomarkers to Predict Severe Dengue in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nhi, Dang My; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Ohyama, Kaname; Kimura, Daisuke; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Uchida, Leo; Thuong, Nguyen Van; Nhon, Cao Thi My; Phuc, Le Hong; Mai, Nguyen Thi; Mizukami, Shusaku; Bao, Lam Quoc; Doan, Nguyen Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Van Thanh; Quang, Luong Chan; Karbwang, Juntra; Yui, Katsuyuki; Morita, Kouichi; Huong, Vu Thi Que; Hirayama, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe dengue with severe plasma leakage (SD-SPL) is the most frequent of dengue severe form. Plasma biomarkers for early predictive diagnosis of SD-SPL are required in the primary clinics for the prevention of dengue death. Methodology Among 63 confirmed dengue pediatric patients recruited, hospital based longitudinal study detected six SD-SPL and ten dengue with warning sign (DWS). To identify the specific proteins increased or decreased in the SD-SPL plasma obtained 6–48 hours before the shock compared with the DWS, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology was performed using four patients each group. Validation was undertaken in 6 SD-SPL and 10 DWS patients. Principal findings Nineteen plasma proteins exhibited significantly different relative concentrations (p<0.05), with five over-expressed and fourteen under-expressed in SD-SPL compared with DWS. The individual protein was classified to either blood coagulation, vascular regulation, cellular transport-related processes or immune response. The immunoblot quantification showed angiotensinogen and antithrombin III significantly increased in SD-SPL whole plasma of early stage compared with DWS subjects. Even using this small number of samples, antithrombin III predicted SD-SPL before shock occurrence with accuracy. Conclusion Proteins identified here may serve as candidate predictive markers to diagnose SD-SPL for timely clinical management. Since the number of subjects are small, so further studies are needed to confirm all these biomarkers. PMID:26895439

  20. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics discovering potential serum biomarkers in locoweed poisoned rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jifeng; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Ruishi; Ma, Zhiyan; Du, Guofeng; Chen, Xiaolu; Tao, Dayong; Zhao, Jinxiang

    2017-03-08

    Locoism threatens the sustainable development of animal husbandry in areas around the world with intensified desertification, especially in the western United States, western China, Canada, and Mexico, among other countries. This study was conducted to discover potential serum biomarkers in locoweed-poisoned rabbits and lay a foundation for early diagnosis of locoism. We performed iTRAQ labeling coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC-MS/MS), comparing locoweed-poisoned rabbits and healthy controls. A total of 78 differentially-expressed proteins (fold change > 1.5 or < 0.67) were identified in the locoweed-poisoned rabbits compared to healthy controls. We found that 57.70% of differentially-expressed proteins were functionally related, and through bioinformatics analysis, we were able to construct a network mainly in complement and coagulation cascades. Significant differences in thrombospondin 4 (THBS4), kininogen 1 (KNG1), hemoglobin (HBB), and complement factor I (CFI) between locoweed poisoned animals and controls were found (P < 0.05) and validated by western blotting. These results suggested that locoweed could damage neurocytes, lower immunity, and form thrombi in rabbits. Our study proposes potential biomarkers for locoism diagnosis and also provides a new experimental basis to understand the pathogenesis of locoism.

  1. Proteomic identification of prognostic tumour biomarkers, using chemotherapy-induced cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Smith, Duncan L.; Győrffy, Balázs; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells grow in highly complex stromal microenvironments, which through metabolic remodelling, catabolism, autophagy and inflammation nurture them and are able to facilitate metastasis and resistance to therapy. However, these changes in the metabolic profile of stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts and their impact on cancer initiation, progression and metastasis are not well-known. This is the first study to provide a comprehensive proteomic portrait of the azathioprine and taxol-induced catabolic state on human stromal fibroblasts, which comprises changes in the expression of metabolic enzymes, myofibroblastic differentiation markers, antioxidants, proteins involved in autophagy, senescence, vesicle trafficking and protein degradation, and inducers of inflammation. Interestingly, many of these features are major contributors to the aging process. A catabolic stroma signature, generated with proteins found differentially up-regulated in taxol-treated fibroblasts, strikingly correlates with recurrence, metastasis and poor patient survival in several solid malignancies. We therefore suggest the inhibition of the catabolic state in healthy cells as a novel approach to improve current chemotherapy efficacies and possibly avoid future carcinogenic processes. PMID:26539730

  2. Differential diagnosis of azoospermia with proteomic biomarkers ECM1 and TEX101 quantified in seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Drabovich, Andrei P; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Saraon, Punit; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Batruch, Ihor; Mullen, Brendan; Jarvi, Keith; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2013-11-20

    Male fertility problems range from diminished production of sperm, or oligozoospermia, to nonmeasurable levels of sperm in semen, or azoospermia, which is diagnosed in nearly 2% of men in the general population. Testicular biopsy is the only definitive diagnostic method to distinguish between obstructive (OA) and nonobstructive (NOA) azoospermia and to identify the NOA subtypes of hypospermatogenesis, maturation arrest and Sertoli cell-only syndrome. We measured by selected reaction monitoring assay 18 biomarker candidates in 119 seminal plasma samples from men with normal spermatogenesis and azoospermia, and identified two proteins, epididymis-expressed ECM1 and testis-expressed TEX101, which differentiated OA and NOA with high specificities and sensitivities. The performance of ECM1 was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. On the basis of a cutoff level of 2.3 μg/ml derived from the current data, we could distinguish OA from normal spermatogenesis with 100% specificity, and OA from NOA with 73% specificity, at 100% sensitivity. Immunohistochemistry and an immunoenrichment mass spectrometry-based assay revealed the differential expression of TEX101 in distinct NOA subtypes. TEX101 semen concentrations differentiated Sertoli cell-only syndrome from the other categories of NOA. As a result, we propose a simple two-biomarker decision tree for the differential diagnosis of OA and NOA and, in addition, for the differentiation of NOA subtypes. Clinical assays for ECM1 and TEX101 have the potential to replace most of the diagnostic testicular biopsies and facilitate the prediction of outcome of sperm retrieval procedures, thus increasing the reliability and success of assisted reproduction techniques.

  3. A decade of plant proteomics and mass spectrometry: translation of technical advancements to food security and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Pedreschi, Romina; Carpentier, Sebastien; Wang, Tai; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Kohli, Ajay; Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser; Bykova, Natalia V; Rampitsch, Christof; Zolla, Lello; Rafudeen, Mohamed Suhail; Cramer, Rainer; Bindschedler, Laurence Veronique; Tsakirpaloglou, Nikolaos; Ndimba, Roya Janeen; Farrant, Jill M; Renaut, Jenny; Job, Dominique; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Rakwal, Randeep

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous progress in plant proteomics driven by mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has been made since 2000 when few proteomics reports were published and plant proteomics was in its infancy. These achievements include the refinement of existing techniques and the search for new techniques to address food security, safety, and health issues. It is projected that in 2050, the world's population will reach 9-12 billion people demanding a food production increase of 34-70% (FAO, 2009) from today's food production. Provision of food in a sustainable and environmentally committed manner for such a demand without threatening natural resources, requires that agricultural production increases significantly and that postharvest handling and food manufacturing systems become more efficient requiring lower energy expenditure, a decrease in postharvest losses, less waste generation and food with longer shelf life. There is also a need to look for alternative protein sources to animal based (i.e., plant based) to be able to fulfill the increase in protein demands by 2050. Thus, plant biology has a critical role to play as a science capable of addressing such challenges. In this review, we discuss proteomics especially MS, as a platform, being utilized in plant biology research for the past 10 years having the potential to expedite the process of understanding plant biology for human benefits. The increasing application of proteomics technologies in food security, analysis, and safety is emphasized in this review. But, we are aware that no unique approach/technology is capable to address the global food issues. Proteomics-generated information/resources must be integrated and correlated with other omics-based approaches, information, and conventional programs to ensure sufficient food and resources for human development now and in the future.

  4. Proteomic Profiling in Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Courses Reveals Potential Biomarkers of Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Maria; Qualtieri, Antonio; Tortorella, Carla; Direnzo, Vita; Bagalà, Angelo; Mastrapasqua, Mariangela; Spadafora, Patrizia; Trojano, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our project was to perform an exploratory analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteomic profiles of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, collected in different phases of their clinical course, in order to investigate the existence of peculiar profiles characterizing the different MS phenotypes. The study was carried out on 24 Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS), 16 Relapsing Remitting (RR) MS, 11 Progressive (Pr) MS patients. The CSF samples were analysed using the Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer in linear mode geometry and in delayed extraction mode (m/z range: 1000–25000 Da). Peak lists were imported for normalization and statistical analysis. CSF data were correlated with demographic, clinical and MRI parameters. The evaluation of MALDI-TOF spectra revealed 348 peak signals with relative intensity ≥1% in the study range. The peak intensity of the signals corresponding to Secretogranin II and Protein 7B2 were significantly upregulated in RRMS patients compared to PrMS (p<0.05), whereas the signals of Fibrinogen and Fibrinopeptide A were significantly downregulated in CIS compared to PrMS patients (p<0.04). Additionally, the intensity of the Tymosin β4 peak was the only signal to be significantly discriminated between the CIS and RRMS patients (p = 0.013). Although with caution due to the relatively small size of the study populations, and considering that not all the findings remained significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, in our opinion this mass spectrometry evaluation confirms that this technique may provide useful and important information to improve our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of MS. PMID:25098164

  5. Proteomic profiling in multiple sclerosis clinical courses reveals potential biomarkers of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Maria; Qualtieri, Antonio; Tortorella, Carla; Direnzo, Vita; Bagalà, Angelo; Mastrapasqua, Mariangela; Spadafora, Patrizia; Trojano, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our project was to perform an exploratory analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteomic profiles of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, collected in different phases of their clinical course, in order to investigate the existence of peculiar profiles characterizing the different MS phenotypes. The study was carried out on 24 Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS), 16 Relapsing Remitting (RR) MS, 11 Progressive (Pr) MS patients. The CSF samples were analysed using the Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer in linear mode geometry and in delayed extraction mode (m/z range: 1000-25000 Da). Peak lists were imported for normalization and statistical analysis. CSF data were correlated with demographic, clinical and MRI parameters. The evaluation of MALDI-TOF spectra revealed 348 peak signals with relative intensity ≥ 1% in the study range. The peak intensity of the signals corresponding to Secretogranin II and Protein 7B2 were significantly upregulated in RRMS patients compared to PrMS (p<0.05), whereas the signals of Fibrinogen and Fibrinopeptide A were significantly downregulated in CIS compared to PrMS patients (p<0.04). Additionally, the intensity of the Tymosin β4 peak was the only signal to be significantly discriminated between the CIS and RRMS patients (p = 0.013). Although with caution due to the relatively small size of the study populations, and considering that not all the findings remained significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, in our opinion this mass spectrometry evaluation confirms that this technique may provide useful and important information to improve our understanding of the complex pathogenesis of MS.

  6. Highly Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis of Quantiferon Supernatants To Identify Biomarkers of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Mary Ann; Higgins, Michael; Hraha, Thomas; Wall, Kirsten; Wilson, Michael L.; Sterling, David G.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Reves, Randall

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tests for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are limited by a poor predictive value for identifying people at the highest risk for progressing to active tuberculosis (TB) and have various sensitivities and specificities in different populations. Identifying a more robust signature for LTBI is important for TB prevention and elimination. A pilot study was conducted with samples from immigrants to the United States that were screened for LTBI by the three commercially approved tests, namely, the tuberculin skin test (TST), the Quantiferon-TB Gold in-tube (QFT-GIT), and the T-SPOT.TB (T-SPOT). QFT-GIT supernatants from 13 people with concordant positive results and 26 people with concordant negative results were analyzed via the highly multiplexed SOMAscan proteomic assay. The proteins in the stimulated supernatants that distinguished LTBI from controls included interleukin-2 (IL-2), monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP-2), interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14, also known as LIGHT), monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), and granzyme B (P <0.00001). In addition, antigen stimulation increased the expression of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and activin AB in LTBI samples. In nil tubes, LIGHT was the most significant marker (P <0.0001) and was elevated in LTBI subjects. Other prominent markers in nonstimulated QFT-GIT supernatants were the complement-3 components C3b, iC3b, and C3d, which were upregulated in LTBI and markedly decreased upon stimulation. We found known and novel proteins that warrant further studies for developing improved tests for LTBI, for predicting progression to active disease, and for discriminating LTBI from active TB. PMID:27852671

  7. The Path to Clinical Proteomics Research: Integration of Proteomics, Genomics, Clinical Laboratory and Regulatory Science

    PubMed Central

    Boja, Emily S.

    2011-01-01

    Better biomarkers are urgently needed to cancer detection, diagnosis, and prognosis. While the genomics community is making significant advances in understanding the molecular basis of disease, proteomics will delineate the functional units of a cell, proteins and their intricate interaction network and signaling pathways for the underlying disease. Great progress has been made to characterize thousands of proteins qualitatively and quantitatively in complex biological systems by utilizing multi-dimensional sample fractionation strategies, mass spectrometry and protein microarrays. Comparative/quantitative analysis of high-quality clinical biospecimen (e.g., tissue and biofluids) of human cancer proteome landscape has the potential to reveal protein/peptide biomarkers responsible for this disease by means of their altered levels of expression, post-translational modifications as well as different forms of protein variants. Despite technological advances in proteomics, major hurdles still exist in every step of the biomarker development pipeline. The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative (NCI-CPTC) has taken a critical step to close the gap between biomarker discovery and qualification by introducing a pre-clinical "verification" stage in the pipeline, partnering with clinical laboratory organizations to develop and implement common standards, and developing regulatory science documents with the US Food and Drug Administration to educate the proteomics community on analytical evaluation requirements for multiplex assays in order to ensure the safety and effectiveness of these tests for their intended use. PMID:21474978

  8. The path to clinical proteomics research: integration of proteomics, genomics, clinical laboratory and regulatory science.

    PubMed

    Boja, Emily S; Rodriguez, Henry

    2011-04-01

    Better biomarkers are urgently needed to cancer detection, diagnosis, and prognosis. While the genomics community is making significant advances in understanding the molecular basis of disease, proteomics will delineate the functional units of a cell, proteins and their intricate interaction network and signaling pathways for the underlying disease. Great progress has been made to characterize thousands of proteins qualitatively and quantitatively in complex biological systems by utilizing multi-dimensional sample fractionation strategies, mass spectrometry and protein microarrays. Comparative/quantitative analysis of high-quality clinical biospecimen (e.g., tissue and biofluids) of human cancer proteome landscape has the potential to reveal protein/peptide biomarkers responsible for this disease by means of their altered levels of expression, post-translational modifications as well as different forms of protein variants. Despite technological advances in proteomics, major hurdles still exist in every step of the biomarker development pipeline. The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative (NCI-CPTC) has taken a critical step to close the gap between biomarker discovery and qualification by introducing a pre-clinical "verification" stage in the pipeline, partnering with clinical laboratory organizations to develop and implement common standards, and developing regulatory science documents with the US Food and Drug Administration to educate the proteomics community on analytical evaluation requirements for multiplex assays in order to ensure the safety and effectiveness of these tests for their intended use.

  9. 2D-DIGE as a proteomic biomarker discovery tool in environmental studies with Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cisnal, Ricardo; García-Sevillano, Miguel A; Gómez-Ariza, José L; Pueyo, Carmen; López-Barea, Juan; Abril, Nieves

    2017-04-15

    A 2D-DIGE/MS approach was used to assess protein abundance differences in the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii from polluted aquatic ecosystems of Doñana National Park and surrounding areas with different pollution loads. Procambarus clarkii accumulated metals in the digestive glands and gills reflecting sediment concentrations. We first stated that, probably related to elements accumulation, pollution increased oxidative damage in P. clarkii tissues, as shown by the thiol oxidation status of proteins and MDA levels. In these animals, the altered redox status might be responsible for the deregulated abundance of proteins involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress including protein folding, mitochondrial imbalance and inflammatory processes. Interestingly, polluted P. clarkii crayfish also displayed a metabolic shift to enhanced aerobic glycolysis, most likely aimed at generating ATP and reduction equivalents in an oxidative stress situation that alters mitochondrial integrity. The deregulated proteins define the physiological processes affected by pollutants in DNP and its surrounding areas and may help us to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity of environmental pollutants. In addition, these proteins might be used as exposure biomarkers in environmental risk assessment. The results obtained might be extrapolated to many other locations all over the world and have the added value of providing information about the molecular responses of this environmentally and economically interesting animal.

  10. Pathway Analysis of Proteomics Profiles in Rabies Infection: Towards Future Biomarkers?

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shraddha; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi; Banerjee, Shefali; Mukherjee, Sandeepan; Prasad, Keshava; Chowdhary, Abhay

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic viral disease that invariably leads to fatal encephalitis, which can be prevented provided post-exposure prophylaxis is initiated timely. Ante-mortem diagnostic tests are inconclusive, and rabies is nontreatable once the clinical signs appear. A large number of host factors are responsible for the altered neuronal functions observed in rabies; however their precise role remains uninvestigated. We therefore used two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis to identify differentially expressed host proteins in an experimental murine model of rabies. We identified 143 proteins corresponding to 45 differentially expressed spots (p < 0.05) in neuronal tissues of Swiss albino mice in response to infection with neurovirulent rabies strains. Time series analyses revealed that a majority of the alterations occur at 4 to 6 days post infection, in particular affecting the host's cytoskeletal architecture. Extensive pathway analysis and protein interaction studies using the bioinformatic tools such as Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and STRING revealed novel pathways and molecules (e.g., protein ubiquitination) unexplored hitherto. Further activation/inhibition studies of these pathway molecular leads would be relevant to identify novel biomarkers and mechanism-based therapeutics for rabies, a disease that continues to severely impact global health.

  11. Serum proteomic analysis reveals potential serum biomarkers for occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis caused by trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peiwu; Ren, Xiaohu; Huang, Zhijun; Yang, Xifei; Hong, Wenxu; Zhang, Yanfang; Zhang, Hang; Liu, Wei; Huang, Haiyan; Huang, Xinfeng; Wu, Desheng; Yang, Linqing; Tang, Haiyan; Zhou, Li; Li, Xuan; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-08-17

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent with widespread occupational exposure and also a major environmental contaminant. Occupational medicamentosa-like dermatitis induced by trichloroethylene (OMLDT) is an autoimmune disease and it has become one major hazard in China. In this study, sera from 3 healthy controls and 3 OMLDT patients at different disease stages were used for a screening study by 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. Eight proteins including transthyretin (TTR), retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), haptoglobin, clusterin, serum amyloid A protein (SAA), apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein C-III and apolipoprotein C-II were found to be significantly altered among the healthy, acute-stage, healing-stage and healed-stage groups. Specifically, the altered expression of TTR, RBP4 and haptoglobin were further validated by Western blot analysis and ELISA. Our data not only suggested that TTR, RBP4 and haptoglobin could serve as potential serum biomarkers of OMLDT, but also indicated that measurement of TTR, RBP4 and haptoglobin or their combination could help aid in the diagnosis, monitoring the progression and therapy of the disease.

  12. Identification of specific biomarkers for gastric adenocarcinoma by ITRAQ proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhi, Qiaoming; Liu, Songbai; Xue, Sheng-Li; Shen, Congcong; Li, Yangxin; Wu, Chaofan; Tang, Zaixiang; Chen, Weichang; Song, Jenny Lee; Bao, Meiyu; Song, Yao-Hua; Zhou, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers for gastric cancer (GC) by iTRAQ. Using proteins extracted from a panel of 4 pairs of gastric adenocarcinoma samples (stage III-IV, Her-2 negative), we identified 10 up regulated and 9 down regulated proteins in all four pairs of GC samples compared to adjacent normal gastric tissue. The up regulated proteins are mainly involved in cell motility, while the down regulated proteins are mitochondrial enzymes involved in energy metabolism. The expression of three up regulated proteins (ANXA1, NNMT, fibulin-5) and one of the down regulated proteins (UQCRC1) was validated by Western Blot in 97 GC samples. ANXA1 was up regulated in 61.36% of stage I/II GC samples compared to matched adjacent normal gastric tissue, and its expression increased further in stage III/IV samples. Knockdown of ANXA1 by siRNA significantly inhibited GC cell migration and invasion, whereas over expression of ANXA1 promoted migration and invasion. We found decreased expression of UQCRC1 in all stages of GC samples. Our data suggest that increased cell motility and decreased mitochondrial energy metabolism are important hallmarks during the development of GC. PMID:27941907

  13. Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Chaouch, Amina; Lochmüller, Hanns; Politano, Luisa; Bertini, Enrico; Spitali, Pietro; Hiller, Monika; Niks, Eric H; Gualandi, Francesca; Pontén, Fredrik; Bushby, Kate; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Schwartz, Elena; Le Priol, Yannick; Straub, Volker; Uhlén, Mathias; Cirak, Sebahattin; ‘t Hoen, Peter A C; Muntoni, Francesco; Ferlini, Alessandra; Schwenk, Jochen M; Nilsson, Peter; Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavoprotein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies. PMID:24920607

  14. Biomarker Candidate Identification in Yersinia Pestis Using Organism-Wide Semiquantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, Kim K.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Baker, Scott E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-11-03

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, is listed by the CDC as a level A select pathogen. To better enable detection, intervention and treatment of Y. pestis infections, it is necessary to understand its protein expression under conditions that promote or inhibit virulence. To this end, we have utilized a novel combination of the accurate mass and time tag methodology of mass spectrometry and clustering analysis using OmniViz™ to compare the protein abundance changes of 992 identified proteins under four growth conditions. Temperature and Ca2+ concentration were used to trigger virulence associated protein expression fundamental to the low calcium response. High-resolution liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were utilized to determine protein identity and abundance on the genome-wide level. The cluster analyses revealed, in a rapid visual platform, the reproducibility of the current method as well as relevant protein abundance changes of expected and novel proteins relating to a specific growth condition and sub-cellular location. Using this method, 89 proteins were identified as having a similar abundance change profile to 29 known virulence associated proteins, providing additional biomarker candidates for future detection and vaccine development strategies.

  15. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Myosin and Actin as Promising Saliva Biomarkers for Distinguishing Pre-Malignant and Malignant Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Onsongo, Getiria; Stone, Matthew D.; Chen, Xiao-Bing; Kooren, Joel A.; Refsland, Eric W.; Griffin, Robert J.; Ondrey, Frank G.; Wu, Baolin; Le, Chap T.; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Carlis, John V.; Griffin, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Oral cancer survival rates increase significantly when it is detected and treated early. Unfortunately, clinicians now lack tests which easily and reliably distinguish pre-malignant oral lesions from those already transitioned to malignancy. A test for proteins, ones found in non-invasively-collected whole saliva and whose abundances distinguish these lesion types, would meet this critical need. Methodology/Principal Findings To discover such proteins, in a first-of-its-kind study we used advanced mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics analysis of the pooled soluble fraction of whole saliva from four subjects with pre-malignant lesions and four with malignant lesions. We prioritized candidate biomarkers via bioinformatics and validated selected proteins by western blotting. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially abundant proteins and initial western blotting revealed increased abundance of myosin and actin in patients with malignant lesions. We validated those results by additional western blotting of individual whole saliva samples from twelve other subjects with pre-malignant oral lesions and twelve with malignant oral lesions. Sensitivity/specificity values for distinguishing between different lesion types were 100%/75% (p = 0.002) for actin, and 67%/83% (p<0.00001) for myosin in soluble saliva. Exfoliated epithelial cells from subjects' saliva also showed increased myosin and actin abundance in those with malignant lesions, linking our observations in soluble saliva to abundance differences between pre-malignant and malignant cells. Conclusions/Significance Salivary actin and myosin abundances distinguish oral lesion types with sensitivity and specificity rivaling other non-invasive oral cancer tests. Our findings provide a promising starting point for the development of non-invasive and inexpensive salivary tests to reliably detect oral cancer early. PMID:20567502

  16. Possible Biomarkers for the Early Detection of HIV-associated Heart Diseases: A Proteomics and Bioinformatics Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Suraiya; Hashim, Rahim; Yan, Jasper S.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of cardiovascular disorders is increasing in HIV-infected individuals despite a significant reduction in the viral load by antiretroviral therapies (ART). Since the CD4 + T-cells are responsible for the viral load as well as immunological responses, we hypothesized that chronic HIV-infection of T-cells produces novel proteins/enzymes that cause cardiac dysfunctions. To identify specific factors that might cause cardiac disorders without the influence of numerous cofactors produced by other pathogenic microorganisms that co-inhabit most HIV-infected individuals, we analyzed genome-wide proteomes of a CD4 + T-cell line at different stages of HIV replication and cell growth over > 6 months. Subtractive analyses of several hundred differentially regulated proteins from HIV-infected and uninfected counterpart cells and comparisons with proteins expressed from the same cells after treating with the antiviral drug Zidovudine/AZT and inhibiting virus replication, identified a well-coordinated network of 12 soluble/diffusible proteins in HIV-infected cells. Functional categorization, bioinformatics and statistical analyses of each protein predicted that the expression of cardiac-specific Ca2 + kinase together with multiple Ca2 + release channels causes a sustained overload of Ca2 + in the heart which induces fetal/cardiac myosin heavy chains (MYH6 and MYH7) and a myosin light-chain kinase. Each of these proteins has been shown to cause cardiac stress, arrhythmia, hypertrophic signaling, cardiomyopathy and heart failure (p = 8 × 10− 11). Translational studies using the newly discovered proteins produced by HIV infection alone would provide additional biomarkers that could be added to the conventional markers for an early diagnosis and/or development of specific therapeutic interventions for heart diseases in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:25750702

  17. SRM targeted proteomics in search for biomarkers of HCV-induced progression of fibrosis to cirrhosis in HALT-C patients.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shizhen; Zhou, Yong; Lok, Anna S; Tsodikov, Alex; Yan, Xiaowei; Gray, Li; Yuan, Min; Moritz, Robert L; Galas, David; Omenn, Gilbert S; Hood, Leroy

    2012-04-01

    The current gold standard for diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis is the traditional invasive liver biopsy. It is desirable to assess hepatic fibrosis with noninvasive means. Targeted proteomic techniques allow an unbiased assessment of proteins and might be useful to identify proteins related to hepatic fibrosis. We utilized selected reaction monitoring (SRM) targeted proteomics combined with an organ-specific blood protein strategy to identify and quantify 38 liver-specific proteins. A combination of protein C and retinol-binding protein 4 in serum gave promising preliminary results as candidate biomarkers to distinguish patients at different stages of hepatic fibrosis due to chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Also, alpha-1-B glycoprotein, complement factor H and insulin-like growth factor binding protein acid labile subunit performed well in distinguishing patients from healthy controls.

  18. Proteomic analysis in Daphnia magna exposed to As(III), As(V) and Cd heavy metals and their binary mixtures for screening potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Le, Thai-Hoang; Lim, Eun-Suk; Hong, Nam-Hui; Lee, Sung-Kyu; Shim, Yon Sik; Hwang, Jin Rae; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the effects of three widespread heavy metals, As(III), As(V) and Cd, and their binary mixtures on the proteomic profile in D. magna were examined to screen novel protein biomarkers using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis method (2DE). Ten 20d daphnia were exposed to the LC20 concentrations for each of a total of 8 treatments, including the control, As(III), As(V), Cd, [As(III)+As(V)], [As(III)+Cd], [As(V)+Cd], and [As(III), As(V), Cd], for 24h before protein isolation. Three replicates were performed for each treatment. These protein samples were employed for 2DE experiments with a pH gradient gel strip from pH 3 to pH 10. The protein spots were detected by a silver staining process and their intensities were analyzed by Progenesis software to discover the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in response to each heavy metal. A total of 117 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were found in daphnia responding to the 8 treatments and mapped onto a 2D proteome map, which provides some information of the molecular weight (MW) and pI value for each protein. All of these DEPs are considered as potential candidates for protein biomarkers in D. magna for detecting heavy metals in the aquatic ecosystem. Comparing the proteomic results among these treatments suggested that exposing D. magna to binary mixtures of heavy metals may result in some complex interactive molecular responses within them, rather than just the simple sum of the proteomic profiles of the individual chemicals, (As(III), As(V), and Cd).

  19. Detection of candidate biomarkers of prostate cancer progression in serum: a depletion-free 3D LC/MS quantitative proteomics pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, S E T; Johnston, H E; Jackson, T R; Jamieson, D G; Roumeliotis, T I; Mockridge, C I; Michael, A; Manousopoulou, A; Papachristou, E K; Brown, M D; Clarke, N W; Pandha, H; Aukim-Hastie, C L; Cragg, M S; Garbis, S D; Townsend, P A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common male cancer in the United Kingdom and we aimed to identify clinically relevant biomarkers corresponding to stage progression of the disease. Methods: We used enhanced proteomic profiling of PCa progression using iTRAQ 3D LC mass spectrometry on high-quality serum samples to identify biomarkers of PCa. Results: We identified >1000 proteins. Following specific inclusion/exclusion criteria we targeted seven proteins of which two were validated by ELISA and six potentially interacted forming an ‘interactome' with only a single protein linking each marker. This network also includes accepted cancer markers, such as TNF, STAT3, NF-κB and IL6. Conclusions: Our linked and interrelated biomarker network highlights the potential utility of six of our seven markers as a panel for diagnosing PCa and, critically, in determining the stage of the disease. Our validation analysis of the MS-identified proteins found that SAA alongside KLK3 may improve categorisation of PCa than by KLK3 alone, and that TSR1, although not significant in this model, might also be a clinically relevant biomarker. PMID:27685442

  20. A comparative proteomic study of plasma in feline pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis to identify diagnostic biomarkers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Meachem, Melissa D.; Snead, Elisabeth R.; Kidney, Beverly A.; Jackson, Marion L.; Dickinson, Ryan; Larson, Victoria; Simko, Elemir

    2015-01-01

    While pancreatitis is now recognized as a common ailment in cats, the diagnosis remains challenging due to discordant results and suboptimal sensitivity of ultrasound and specific feline pancreatic lipase (Spec fPL) assay. Pancreatitis also shares similar clinical features with pancreatic carcinoma, a rare but aggressive disease with a grave prognosis. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the plasma proteomes of normal healthy cats (n = 6), cats with pancreatitis (n = 6), and cats with pancreatic carcinoma (n = 6) in order to identify potential new biomarkers of feline pancreatic disease. After plasma protein separation by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein spots were detected by Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 staining and identified by mass spectrometry. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1), and apolipoprotein-A1 precursor (Pre Apo-A1) appeared to be differentially expressed, which suggests the presence of a systemic acute-phase response and alteration of lipid metabolism in cats with pancreatic disease. Future studies involving greater case numbers are needed in order to assess the utility of these proteins as potential biomarkers. More sensitive proteomic techniques may also be helpful in detecting significant but low-abundance proteins. PMID:26130850

  1. Proteomic analysis of breast cancer tissues to identify biomarker candidates by gel-assisted digestion and label-free quantification methods using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi-Na; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Na, MinKyun; Kang, Wonku; Chae, Yee Soo; Park, Ji-Young; Park, Hoyong; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2012-10-01

    This study presents a proteomic method that differentiates between matched normal and breast tumor tissues from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive carcinoma from Korean women, to identify biomarker candidates and to understand pathogenesis of breast cancer in protein level. Proteins from tissues obtained by biopsy were extracted by RIPA buffer, digested by the gel-assisted method, and analyzed by nano-UPLC-MS/MS. From proteomic analysis based on label-free quantitation strategy, a non-redundant list of 298 proteins was identified from the normal and tumor tissues, and 244 proteins were quantified using IDEAL-Q software. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed two patterns classified as two groups, invasive carcinoma and DCIS, suggesting a difference between two carcinoma at the protein expression level as expected. Differentially expressed proteins in tumor tissues compared to the corresponding normal tissues were related to three biological pathways: antigen-processing and presentation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, and complement and coagulation cascades. Among them, the up-regulation of calreticulin (CRT) and protein disulfide isomerase A3 (PDIA3) was confirmed by Western blot analysis. In conclusion, this study showed the possibility of identifying biomarker candidates for breast cancer using tissues and might help to understand the pathophysiology of this cancer at the protein level.

  2. PGRMC1 Is a Novel Potential Tumor Biomarker of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Based on Quantitative Proteomic and Integrative Biological Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xixi; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Weiliang; Yu, Yamei; Deng, Shi; Yang, Hanshuo; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi; Liang, Shufang

    2017-01-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is widely observed with an elevated level in multiple human cancers. However, the roles of PGRMC1 in renal cancer are not clear and merit further study. In this report, we made a systematic, integrative biological assessment for PGRMC1 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) by a quantitative proteomic identification, immunohistochemical detection, and its clinic pathologic significance analysis. We found that PGRMC1 abundance is increased by 3.91-fold in RCC tissues compared with its autologous para-cancerous tissues by a quantitative proteome identification. To validate the proteomic result with more confidence, 135 clinic RCC tissues were recruited to measure PGRMC1 abundance by immunohistochemical staining, and 63.7% RCC samples (n = 86) showed a higher abundance of PGRMC1 than the noncancerous counterparts. And the elevated PGRMC1 level was related to the tumor malignancy degree and overall survival of RCC patients. Meanwhile the average serum PGRMC1 concentration for RCC patients (n = 18) was significantly increased by 1.67 fold compared with healthy persons. Moreover an exogenous elevated abundance of PGRMC1 by plasmid transfections significantly enhanced cell proliferation of renal cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate PGRMC1, which promotes RCC progression phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, is a novel potential biomarker and therapeutic target for RCC. PMID:28107520

  3. Proteomic-based research strategy identified laminin subunit alpha 2 as a potential urinary-specific biomarker for the medullary sponge kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Antonia; Bruschi, Maurizio; Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Granata, Simona; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Antonucci, Nadia; Petretto, Andrea; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Gambaro, Giovanni; Lupo, Antonio; Zaza, Gianluigi

    2017-02-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) disease, a rare kidney malformation featuring recurrent renal stones and nephrocalcinosis, continues to be diagnosed using expensive and time-consuming clinical/instrumental tests (mainly urography). Currently, no molecular diagnostic biomarkers are available. To identify such we employed a proteomic-based research strategy utilizing urine from 22 patients with MSK and 22 patients affected by idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis (ICN) as controls. Notably, two patients with ICN presented cysts. In the discovery phase, the urine of 11 MSK and 10 controls, were randomly selected, processed, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Subsequently, several statistical algorithms were undertaken to select the most discriminative proteins between the two study groups. ELISA, performed on the entire patients' cohort, was used to validate the proteomic results. After an initial statistical analysis, 249 and 396 proteins were identified exclusive for ICN and MSK, respectively. A Volcano plot and ROC analysis, performed to restrict the number of MSK-associated proteins, indicated that 328 and 44 proteins, respectively, were specific for MSK. Interestingly, 119 proteins were found to differentiate patients with cysts (all patients with MSK and the two ICN with renal cysts) from ICN without cysts. Eventually, 16 proteins were found to be common to three statistical methods with laminin subunit alpha 2 (LAMA-2) reaching the higher rank by a Support Vector Machine, a binary classification/prediction scheme. ELISA for LAMA-2 validated proteomic results. Thus, using high-throughput technology, our study identified a candidate MSK biomarker possibly employable in future for the early diagnosis of this disease.

  4. CD5 molecule-like and transthyretin as putative biomarkers of chronic myeloid leukemia - an insight from the proteomic analysis of human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Iram; Sadaf, Saima; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Hashmi, Naghma; Akhtar, Muhammad Waheed

    2017-01-01

    Better and sensitive biomarkers are needed to help understand the mechanism of disease onset, progression, prognosis and monitoring of the therapeutic response. Aim of this study was to identify the candidate circulating markers of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) manifestations, having potential to develop into predictive- or monitoring-biomarkers. A proteomic approach, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in conjunction with mass spectrometry (2DE-MS), was employed for this purpose. Based on the spot intensity measurements, six proteins were found to be consistently dysregulated in CP-CML subjects compared to the healthy controls [false discovery rate (FDR) threshold ≤0.05]. These were identified as α-1-antichymotrypsin, α-1-antitrypsin, CD5 molecule-like, stress-induced phosphoprotein 1, vitamin D binding protein isoform 1 and transthyretin by MS analysis [PMF score ≥79; data accessible via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002757]. Quantitative ELISA, used for validation of candidate proteins both in the pre-treated and nilotinib-treated CP-CML cases, demonstrate that CD5 molecule-like, transthyretin and alpha-1-antitrypsin may serve as useful predictive markers and aid in monitoring the response of TKI-based therapy (ANOVA p < 0.0001). Two of the circulating marker proteins, identified in this study, had not previously been associated with chronic- or acute-phase myeloid leukemia. Exploration of their probable association with CP-CML, in a larger study cohort, may add to our understanding of the disease mechanism besides developing clinically useful biomarkers in future. PMID:28117336

  5. Association of potential salivary biomarkers with diabetic retinopathy and its severity in type-2 diabetes mellitus: a proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Subrayan, Visvaraja

    2016-01-01

    Aim/hypothesis: The aim of our study was to characterize the human salivary proteome and determine the changes in protein expression in two different stages of diabetic retinopathy with type-2 diabetes mellitus: (1) with non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and (2) with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Type-2 diabetes mellitus without diabetic retinopathy (XDR) was designated as control. Method: In this study, 45 saliva samples were collected (15 samples from XDR control group, 15 samples from NPDR disease group and 15 samples from PDR disease group). Salivary proteins were extracted, reduced, alkylated, trypsin digested and labeled with an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) before being analyzed by an Orbitrap fusion tribrid mass spectrometer. Protein annotation, fold change calculation and statistical analysis were interrogated by Proteome Discoverer. Biological pathway analysis was performed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD003723–PX003725. Results: A total of 315 proteins were identified from the salivary proteome and 119 proteins were found to be differentially expressed. The differentially expressed proteins from the NPDR disease group and the PDR disease group were assigned to respective canonical pathways indicating increased Liver X receptor/Retinoid X receptor (LXR/RXR) activation, Farnesoid X receptor/Retinoid X receptor (FXR/RXR) activation, acute phase response signaling, sucrose degradation V and regulation of actin-based motility by Rho in the PDR disease group compared to the NPDR disease group. Conclusions/Interpretation: Progression from non-proliferative to proliferative retinopathy in type-2 diabetic patients is a complex multi-mechanism and systemic process. Furthermore, saliva was shown to be a feasible alternative sample source for diabetic retinopathy biomarkers. PMID:27280065

  6. Application of proteomics in the discovery of candidate protein biomarkers in a Diabetes Autoantibody Standardization Program sample subset

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Weijun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; mueller, Patricia W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-02-01

    Objective. Before biomarkers predictive of type 1 diabetes can be evaluated in proficiency evaluations, they must be identified and validated in initial, exploratory studies. Hypothesis-driven comparative studies may be performed to identify candidate biomarkers but are limited to the current knowledge of metabolic, signaling, and inflammatory pathways in the context of type 1 diabetes. Alternatively, untargeted “-omics” approaches may be employed in profiling studies to identify candidate biomarkers of type 1 diabetes.

  7. Marine proteomics: a critical assessment of an emerging technology.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Marc; Ankisetty, Sridevi; Corrales, Jone; Marsh-Hunkin, K Erica; Gochfeld, Deborah J; Willett, Kristine L; Rimoldi, John M

    2012-10-26

    The application of proteomics to marine sciences has increased in recent years because the proteome represents the interface between genotypic and phenotypic variability and, thus, corresponds to the broadest possible biomarker for eco-physiological responses and adaptations. Likewise, proteomics can provide important functional information regarding biosynthetic pathways, as well as insights into mechanism of action, of novel marine natural products. The goal of this review is to (1) explore the application of proteomics methodologies to marine systems, (2) assess the technical approaches that have been used, and (3) evaluate the pros and cons of this proteomic research, with the intent of providing a critical analysis of its future roles in marine sciences. To date, proteomics techniques have been utilized to investigate marine microbe, plant, invertebrate, and vertebrate physiology, developmental biology, seafood safety, susceptibility to disease, and responses to environmental change. However, marine proteomics studies often suffer from poor experimental design, sample processing/optimization difficulties, and data analysis/interpretation issues. Moreover, a major limitation is the lack of available annotated genomes and proteomes for most marine organisms, including several "model species". Even with these challenges in mind, there is no doubt that marine proteomics is a rapidly expanding and powerful integrative molecular research tool from which our knowledge of the marine environment, and the natural products from this resource, will be significantly expanded.

  8. Biomarker Candidates of Chlamydophila pneumoniae Proteins and Protein Fragments Identified by Affinity-Proteomics Using FTICR-MS and LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susnea, Iuliana; Bunk, Sebastian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hermann, Corinna; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-04-01

    We report here an affinity-proteomics approach that combines 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with high performance mass spectrometry to the identification of both full length protein antigens and antigenic fragments of Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae). The present affinity-mass spectrometry approach effectively utilized high resolution FTICR mass spectrometry and LC-tandem-MS for protein identification, and enabled the identification of several new highly antigenic C. pneumoniae proteins that were not hitherto reported or previously detected only in other Chlamydia species, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. Moreover, high resolution affinity-MS provided the identification of several neo-antigenic protein fragments containing N- and C-terminal, and central domains such as fragments of the membrane protein Pmp21 and the secreted chlamydial proteasome-like factor (Cpaf), representing specific biomarker candidates.

  9. Label-free proteomic analysis of the hydrophobic membrane protein complement in articular chondrocytes: a technique for identification of membrane biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Zhang, Xiaofei; Liddell, Susan; Smith, Julia R.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: There is insufficient knowledge about the chondrocyte membranome and its molecular composition. Objective: To develop a Triton X-114 based separation technique using nanoLC-MS/MS combined with shotgun proteomics to identify chondrocyte membrane proteins. Materials and methods: Articular chondrocytes from equine metacarpophalangeal joints were separated into hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions; trypsin-digested proteins were analysed by nanoLC-MS/MS. Results: A total of 315 proteins were identified. The phase extraction method yielded a high proportion of membrane proteins (56%) including CD276, S100-A6 and three VDAC isoforms. Discussion: Defining the chondrocyte membranome is likely to reveal new biomarker targets for conventional and biological drug discovery. PMID:26864288

  10. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Analysis of Serum Proteins in Wistar Rats Treated with Sodium Fluoride: Insight into the Potential Mechanism and Candidate Biomarkers of Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yan; Zeng, Beibei; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Yanli; Wang, Nanlan; Wu, Yanqiu; Shen, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Fluorosis induced by exposure to high level fluoride is quite widespread in the world. The manifestations of fluorosis include dental mottling, bone damage, and impaired malfunction of soft tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of fluorosis has not been clarified until now. To explore the underlying mechanisms of fluorosis and screen out serum biomarkers, we carried out a quantitative proteomics study to identify differentially expressed serum proteins in Wistar rats treated with sodium fluoride (NaF) by using a proteomics approach of isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). We fed Wistar rats drinking water that had 50, 150, and 250 mg/L of dissolved NaF for 24 weeks. For the experimental duration, each rat was given an examination of the lower incisors to check for the condition of dental fluorosis (DF). By the end of the treatment, fluoride ion concentration in serum and lower incisors were detected. The results showed that NaF treatment can induce rat fluorosis. By iTRAQ analysis, a total of 37 differentially expressed serum proteins were identified between NaF-treated and control rats. These proteins were further analyzed by bioinformatics, out of which two proteins were validated by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assays (ELISA). The major proteins were involved in complement and coagulation cascade, inflammatory response, complement activation, defense response, and wound response, suggesting that inflammation and immune reactions may play a key role in fluorosis pathogenesis. These proteins may contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of fluoride toxicity, and may serve as potential biomarkers for fluorosis. PMID:27690006

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Oral Brush Biopsies Identifies Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor as a Promising, Mechanism-Based Oral Cancer Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ya; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Ondrey, Frank G.; Wuertz, Beverly R. K.; Chen, Xiaobing; Zhu, Yaqin; Griffin, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    A decrease in the almost fifty percent mortality rate from oral cancer is needed urgently. Improvements in early diagnosis and more effective preventive treatments could affect such a decrease. Towards this end, we undertook for the first time an in-depth mass spectrometry-based quantitative shotgun proteomics study of non-invasively collected oral brush biopsies. Proteins isolated from brush biopsies from healthy normal tissue, oral premalignant lesion tissue (OPMLs), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and matched control tissue were compared. In replicated proteomic datasets, the secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) protein stood out based on its decrease in abundance in both OPML and OSCC lesion tissues compared to healthy normal tissue. Western blotting in additional brushed biopsy samples confirmed a trend of gradual decreasing SLPI abundance between healthy normal and OPML tissue, with a larger decrease in OSCC lesion tissue. A similar SLPI decrease was observed in-vitro comparing model OPML and OSCC cell lines. In addition, exfoliated oral cells in patients’ whole saliva showed a loss of SLPI correlated with oral cancer progression. These results, combined with proteomics data indicating a decrease in SLPI in matched healthy control tissue from OSCC patients compared to tissue from healthy normal tissue, suggested a systemic decrease of SLPI in oral cells correlated with oral cancer development. Finally, in-vitro experiments showed that treatment with SLPI significantly decreased NF-kB activity in an OPML cell line. The findings indicate anti-inflammatory activity in OPML, supporting a mechanistic role of SLPI in OSCC progression and suggesting its potential for preventative treatment of at-risk oral lesions. Collectively, our results show for the first time the potential for SLPI as a mechanism-based, non-invasive biomarker of oral cancer progression with potential in preventive treatment. PMID:24748380

  12. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tonry, Claire L.; Leacy, Emma; Raso, Cinzia; Finn, Stephen P.; Armstrong, John; Pennington, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i) might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease); (ii) would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii) those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i) provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii) address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii) make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making. PMID:27438858

  13. Proteomic study of serum using gel chromatography and MALDI-TOF MS reveals diagnostic biomarkers in male patients with liver-cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xin-Hua; Huang, He-Qing; Chen, Dong-Shi; Jin, Hong-Wei; Huang, Hui-Ying

    2007-03-01

    Human serum has been widely employed clinically for diagnosing various fatal diseases. However, the concentration of most proteins in human serum is too low to be directly measured using normal analytical methods. In order to obtain reliable analytical results from proteomic analysis of human serum, appropriate sample preparation is essential. A combined off-line analytical technique of gel chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been successfully established to separate proteins for MS analysis. Using these combined techniques, 176 mass signal peaks of proteins/peptides were found in 6 of 18 fractions from normal male serum (NMS) in the presence of buffer consisting of NH4HCO3 and acetonitrile. A simple gel chromatography column packed with Sephadex G-50 removed most signal-suppressing compounds such as salts and high abundance proteins (HAP). The molecular mass to charge (m/z) ratios of differential peptides revealed in serum of male patient with liver-cancer (LCMPS) compared to NMS were 5365, 5644 and 6462, and these peptides can be used as biomarkers to clinically diagnose liver-cancer. The simple and convenient chromatographic method described here is not only superior to recently described HPLC separation for MS analysis, but also reveals many novel and significant serum biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases.

  14. Novel Bioinformatics–Based Approach for Proteomic Biomarkers Prediction of Calpain-2 & Caspase-3 Protease Fragmentation: Application to βII-Spectrin Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges; Kobeissy, Firas

    2017-01-01

    The crucial biological role of proteases has been visible with the development of degradomics discipline involved in the determination of the proteases/substrates resulting in breakdown-products (BDPs) that can be utilized as putative biomarkers associated with different biological-clinical significance. In the field of cancer biology, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have shown to result in MMPs-generated protein BDPs that are indicative of malignant growth in cancer, while in the field of neural injury, calpain-2 and caspase-3 proteases generate BDPs fragments that are indicative of different neural cell death mechanisms in different injury scenarios. Advanced proteomic techniques have shown a remarkable progress in identifying these BDPs experimentally. In this work, we present a bioinformatics-based prediction method that identifies protease-associated BDPs with high precision and efficiency. The method utilizes state-of-the-art sequence matching and alignment algorithms. It starts by locating consensus sequence occurrences and their variants in any set of protein substrates, generating all fragments resulting from cleavage. The complexity exists in space O(mn) as well as in O(Nmn) time, where N, m, and n are the number of protein sequences, length of the consensus sequence, and length per protein sequence, respectively. Finally, the proposed methodology is validated against βII-spectrin protein, a brain injury validated biomarker.

  15. Novel Bioinformatics–Based Approach for Proteomic Biomarkers Prediction of Calpain-2 & Caspase-3 Protease Fragmentation: Application to βII-Spectrin Protein

    PubMed Central

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges; Kobeissy, Firas

    2017-01-01

    The crucial biological role of proteases has been visible with the development of degradomics discipline involved in the determination of the proteases/substrates resulting in breakdown-products (BDPs) that can be utilized as putative biomarkers associated with different biological-clinical significance. In the field of cancer biology, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have shown to result in MMPs-generated protein BDPs that are indicative of malignant growth in cancer, while in the field of neural injury, calpain-2 and caspase-3 proteases generate BDPs fragments that are indicative of different neural cell death mechanisms in different injury scenarios. Advanced proteomic techniques have shown a remarkable progress in identifying these BDPs experimentally. In this work, we present a bioinformatics-based prediction method that identifies protease-associated BDPs with high precision and efficiency. The method utilizes state-of-the-art sequence matching and alignment algorithms. It starts by locating consensus sequence occurrences and their variants in any set of protein substrates, generating all fragments resulting from cleavage. The complexity exists in space O(mn) as well as in O(Nmn) time, where N, m, and n are the number of protein sequences, length of the consensus sequence, and length per protein sequence, respectively. Finally, the proposed methodology is validated against βII-spectrin protein, a brain injury validated biomarker. PMID:28112201

  16. Proteomic profiling of a mouse model of acute intestinal Apc deletion leads to identification of potential novel biomarkers of human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, Abeer; Song, Fei; Reed, Karen R; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Meniel, Valerie S; Watson, Alastair J M; Pritchard, D Mark; Clarke, Alan R; Jenkins, John R

    2013-10-25

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Accurate non-invasive screening for CRC would greatly enhance a population's health. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene mutations commonly occur in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, leading to Wnt signalling pathway activation. Acute conditional transgenic deletion of Apc in murine intestinal epithelium (AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl)) causes phenotypic changes similar to those found during colorectal tumourigenesis. This study comprised a proteomic analysis of murine small intestinal epithelial cells following acute Apc deletion to identify proteins that show altered expression during human colorectal carcinogenesis, thus identifying proteins that may prove clinically useful as blood/serum biomarkers of colorectal neoplasia. Eighty-one proteins showed significantly increased expression following iTRAQ analysis, and validation of nine of these by Ingenuity Pathaway Analysis showed they could be detected in blood or serum. Expression was assessed in AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) small intestinal epithelium by immunohistochemistry, western blot and quantitative real-time PCR; increased nucelolin concentrations were also detected in the serum of AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) and Apc(Min)(/)(+) mice by ELISA. Six proteins; heat shock 60kDa protein 1, Nucleolin, Prohibitin, Cytokeratin 18, Ribosomal protein L6 and DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 5,were selected for further investigation. Increased expression of 4 of these was confirmed in human CRC by qPCR. In conclusion, several novel candidate biomarkers have been identified from analysis of transgenic mice in which the Apc gene was deleted in the intestinal epithelium that also showed increased expression in human CRC. Some of these warrant further investigation as potential serum-based biomarkers of human CRC.

  17. Toward early safety alert endpoints: exploring biomarkers suggestive of microbicide failure.

    PubMed

    Mauck, Christine K; Lai, Jaim Jou; Weiner, Debra H; Chandra, Neelima; Fichorova, Raina N; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Hillier, Sharon L; Archer, David F; Creinin, Mitchell D; Schwartz, Jill L; Callahan, Marianne M; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2013-11-01

    Several microbicides, including nonoxynol-9 (N-9) and cellulose sulfate (CS), looked promising during early trials but failed in efficacy trials. We aimed to identify Phase I mucosal safety endpoints that might explain that failure. In a blinded, randomized, parallel trial, 60 healthy premenopausal sexually abstinent women applied Universal HEC placebo, 6% CS or 4% N-9 gel twice daily for 13½ days. Endpoints included immune biomarkers in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) and endocervical cytobrushes, inflammatory infiltrates in vaginal biopsies, epithelial integrity by naked eye, colposcopy, and histology, CVL anti-HIV activity, vaginal microflora, pH, and adverse events. Twenty women enrolled per group. Soluble/cellular markers were similar with CS and placebo, except secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) levels decreased in CVL, and CD3(+) and CD45(+) cells increased in biopsies after CS use. Increases in interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1, IL-1RA, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) and decreases in SLPI were significant with N-9. CVL anti-HIV activity was significantly higher during CS use compared to N-9 or placebo. CS users tended to have a higher prevalence of intermediate Nugent score, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus and fewer gram-negative rods. Most Nugent scores diagnostic for bacterial vaginosis were in N-9 users. All cases of histological inflammation or deep epithelial disruption occurred in N-9 users. While the surfactant N-9 showed obvious biochemical and histological signs of inflammation, more subtle changes, including depression of SLPI, tissue influx of CD45(+) and CD3(+) cells, and subclinical microflora shifts were associated with CS use and may help to explain the clinical failure of nonsurfactant microbicides.

  18. Proteomics and the search for welfare and stress biomarkers in animal production in the one-health context.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ramell, A; de Almeida, A M; Cristobal, S; Rodrigues, P; Roncada, P; Bassols, A

    2016-06-21

    Stress and welfare are important factors in animal production in the context of growing production optimization and scrutiny by the general public. In a context in which animal and human health are intertwined aspects of the one-health concept it is of utmost importance to define the markers of stress and welfare. These are important tools for producers, retailers, regulatory agents and ultimately consumers to effectively monitor and assess the welfare state of production animals. Proteomics is the science that studies the proteins existing in a given tissue or fluid. In this review we address this topic by showing clear examples where proteomics has been used to study stress-induced changes at various levels. We adopt a multi-species (cattle, swine, small ruminants, poultry, fish and shellfish) approach under the effect of various stress inducers (handling, transport, management, nutritional, thermal and exposure to pollutants) clearly demonstrating how proteomics and systems biology are key elements to the study of stress and welfare in farm animals and powerful tools for animal welfare, health and productivity.

  19. Web-based software for rapid "top-down" proteomic identification of protein biomarkers with implications for bacterial identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed web-based software for the rapid identification of protein biomarkers of bacterial microorganisms. Proteins from bacterial cell lysates were ionized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), mass-isolated and fragmented using a time-of-flight/time-of-flight (TOF-TOF)...

  20. Profilin-1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells is associated with alterations in proteomics biomarkers of cell proliferation, survival, and motility as revealed by global proteomics analyses.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Joëlle V F; Gau, David; Poljak, Anne; Wasinger, Valerie; Roy, Partha; Moens, Pierre D J

    2014-12-01

    Despite early screening programs and new therapeutic strategies, metastatic breast cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in women in industrialized countries and regions. There is a need for novel biomarkers of susceptibility, progression, and therapeutic response. Global analyses or systems science approaches with omics technologies offer concrete ways forward in biomarker discovery for breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that expression of profilin-1 (PFN1), a ubiquitously expressed actin-binding protein, is downregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer. It has also been reported that PFN1 overexpression can suppress tumorigenic ability and motility/invasiveness of breast cancer cells. To obtain insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of how elevating PFN1 level induces these phenotypic changes in breast cancer cells, we investigated the alteration in global protein expression profiles of breast cancer cells upon stable overexpression of PFN1 by a combination of three different proteome analysis methods (2-DE, iTRAQ, label-free). Using MDA-MB-231 as a model breast cancer cell line, we provide evidence that PFN1 overexpression is associated with alterations in the expression of proteins that have been functionally linked to cell proliferation (FKPB1A, HDGF, MIF, PRDX1, TXNRD1, LGALS1, STMN1, LASP1, S100A11, S100A6), survival (HSPE1, HSPB1, HSPD1, HSPA5 and PPIA, YWHAZ, CFL1, NME1) and motility (CFL1, CORO1B, PFN2, PLS3, FLNA, FLNB, NME2, ARHGDIB). In view of the pleotropic effects of PFN1 overexpression in breast cancer cells as suggested by these new findings, we propose that PFN1-induced phenotypic changes in cancer cells involve multiple mechanisms. Our data reported here might also offer innovative strategies for identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and companion diagnostics for persons with, or susceptibility to, breast cancer.

  1. Proteomics Mapping of Cord Blood Identifies Haptoglobin “Switch-On” Pattern as Biomarker of Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Bhandari, Vineet; Dulay, Antonette T.; Nayeri, Unzila A.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S.; Pettker, Christian M.; Thung, Stephen; Zhao, Guomao; Han, Yiping W.; Bizzarro, Matthew; Buhimschi, Irina A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation (IAI) are important causes of preterm birth and early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). A prompt and accurate diagnosis of EONS is critical for improved neonatal outcomes. We sought to explore the cord blood proteome and identify biomarkers and functional protein networks characterizing EONS in preterm newborns. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied a prospective cohort of 180 premature newborns delivered May 2004-September 2009. A proteomics discovery phase employing two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry identified 19 differentially-expressed proteins in cord blood of newborns with culture-confirmed EONS (n = 3) versus GA-matched controls (n = 3). Ontological classifications of the proteins included transfer/carrier, immunity/defense, protease/extracellular matrix. The 1st-level external validation conducted in the remaining 174 samples confirmed elevated haptoglobin and haptoglobin-related protein immunoreactivity (Hp&HpRP) in newborns with EONS (presumed and culture-confirmed) independent of GA at birth and birthweight (P<0.001). Western blot concurred in determining that EONS babies had conspicuous Hp&HpRP bands in cord blood (“switch-on pattern”) as opposed to non-EONS newborns who had near-absent “switch-off pattern” (P<0.001). Fetal Hp phenotype independently impacted Hp&HpRP. A Bayesian latent-class analysis (LCA) was further used for unbiased classification of all 180 cases based on probability of “antenatal IAI exposure” as latent variable. This was then subjected to 2nd-level validation against indicators of adverse short-term neonatal outcome. The optimal LCA algorithm combined Hp&HpRP switch pattern (most input), interleukin-6 and neonatal hematological indices yielding two non-overlapping newborn clusters with low (≤20%) versus high (≥70%) probability of IAI exposure. This approach reclassified ∼30% of clinical EONS diagnoses

  2. Identification of GlcNAcylated alpha-1-antichymotrypsin as an early biomarker in human non-small-cell lung cancer by quantitative proteomic analysis with two lectins

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yanxia; Wang, Jie; Ye, Xiangdong; Su, Yanting; Yu, Guojun; Yang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Yu, Wenhui; Cai, Jie; Chen, Xi; Liang, Yi; Chen, Yijie; Wong, Barry Hon Cheung; Fu, Xiangning; Sun, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the main type of lung cancer with high mortality rates in worldwide. There is a need to identify better biomarkers to detect NSCLC at an early stage as this will improve therapeutic effect and patient survival rates. Methods: Two lectins (AAL/AAGL and AAL2/AANL), which specifically bind to tumour-related glycan antigens, were first used to enrich serum glycoproteins from the serum of early NSCLC patients, benign lung diseases subjects and healthy individuals. The samples were investigated by using iTRAQ labelling and LC-MS/MS. Results: A total of 53 differentially expressed proteins were identified by quantitative proteomics and four glycoproteins (AACT, AGP1, CFB and HPX) were selected for further verification by western blotting. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed AACT was the best candidate for early NSCLC diagnosis of the four proteins, with 94.1% sensitivity in distinguishing early tumour Stage (IA+IB) from tumour-free samples (healthy and benign samples, HB). The GlcNAcylated AACT was further detected by lectin-based ELISA and has better advantage in clinical application than total AACT. The GlcNAcylated AACT can effectively differentiate Stage I from HB samples with an AUC of 0.908 and 90.9% sensitivity at a specificity of 86.2%. A combination of GlcNAcylated AACT and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was able to effectively differing Stage I from HB samples (AUC=0.914), which significantly improve the specificity of CEA. The combination application also has the better clinical diagnostic efficacy in distinguishing cancer (NSCLC) from HB samples than CEA or GlcNAcylated AACT used alone, and yielded an AUC of 0.817 with 93.1% specificity. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the GlcNAcylated AACT will be a promising clinical biomarker in diagnosis of early NSCLC. PMID:26908325

  3. Proteomic analysis of apoplastic fluid of Coffea arabica leaves highlights novel biomarkers for resistance against Hemileia vastatrix

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Tenente, Rita; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Silva, Maria do Céu; Cardoso, Fernando M. H.; Planchon, Sébastien; Barros, Danielle R.; Renaut, Jenny; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2015-01-01

    A proteomic analysis of the apoplastic fluid (APF) of coffee leaves was conducted to investigate the cellular processes associated with incompatible (resistant) and compatible (susceptible) Coffea arabica-Hemileia vastatrix interactions, during the 24–96 hai period. The APF proteins were extracted by leaf vacuum infiltration and protein profiles were obtained by 2-DE. The comparative analysis of the gels revealed 210 polypeptide spots whose volume changed in abundance between samples (control, resistant and susceptible) during the 24–96 hai period. The proteins identified were involved mainly in protein degradation, cell wall metabolism and stress/defense responses, most of them being hydrolases (around 70%), particularly sugar hydrolases and peptidases/proteases. The changes in the APF proteome along the infection process revealed two distinct phases of defense responses, an initial/basal one (24–48 hai) and a late/specific one (72–96 hai). Compared to susceptibility, resistance was associated with a higher number of proteins, which was more evident in the late/specific phase. Proteins involved in the resistance response were mainly, glycohydrolases of the cell wall, serine proteases and pathogen related-like proteins (PR-proteins), suggesting that some of these proteins could be putative candidates for resistant markers of coffee to H. vastatrix. Antibodies were produced against chitinase, pectin methylesterase, serine carboxypeptidase, reticuline oxidase and subtilase and by an immunodetection assay it was observed an increase of these proteins in the resistant sample. With this methodology we have identified proteins that are candidate markers of resistance and that will be useful in coffee breeding programs to assist in the selection of cultivars with resistance to H. vastatrix. PMID:26175744

  4. Proteomic analysis of apoplastic fluid of Coffea arabica leaves highlights novel biomarkers for resistance against Hemileia vastatrix.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Tenente, Rita; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Silva, Maria do Céu; Cardoso, Fernando M H; Planchon, Sébastien; Barros, Danielle R; Renaut, Jenny; Ricardo, Cândido P

    2015-01-01

    A proteomic analysis of the apoplastic fluid (APF) of coffee leaves was conducted to investigate the cellular processes associated with incompatible (resistant) and compatible (susceptible) Coffea arabica-Hemileia vastatrix interactions, during the 24-96 hai period. The APF proteins were extracted by leaf vacuum infiltration and protein profiles were obtained by 2-DE. The comparative analysis of the gels revealed 210 polypeptide spots whose volume changed in abundance between samples (control, resistant and susceptible) during the 24-96 hai period. The proteins identified were involved mainly in protein degradation, cell wall metabolism and stress/defense responses, most of them being hydrolases (around 70%), particularly sugar hydrolases and peptidases/proteases. The changes in the APF proteome along the infection process revealed two distinct phases of defense responses, an initial/basal one (24-48 hai) and a late/specific one (72-96 hai). Compared to susceptibility, resistance was associated with a higher number of proteins, which was more evident in the late/specific phase. Proteins involved in the resistance response were mainly, glycohydrolases of the cell wall, serine proteases and pathogen related-like proteins (PR-proteins), suggesting that some of these proteins could be putative candidates for resistant markers of coffee to H. vastatrix. Antibodies were produced against chitinase, pectin methylesterase, serine carboxypeptidase, reticuline oxidase and subtilase and by an immunodetection assay it was observed an increase of these proteins in the resistant sample. With this methodology we have identified proteins that are candidate markers of resistance and that will be useful in coffee breeding programs to assist in the selection of cultivars with resistance to H. vastatrix.

  5. Identification of protein biomarkers and signaling pathways associated with prostate cancer radioresistance using label-free LC-MS/MS proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Lei; Ni, Jie; Beretov, Julia; Wasinger, Valerie C.; Hao, Jingli; Bucci, Joseph; Malouf, David; Gillatt, David; Graham, Peter H.; Li, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Identifying biomarkers and signaling pathways are important for the management of prostate cancer (CaP) radioresistance. In this study, we identified differential proteins and signaling pathways from parental CaP cell lines and CaP radioresistant (RR) sublines using a label-free LC-MS/MS proteomics approach. A total of 309 signaling pathway proteins were identified to be significantly altered between CaP and CaP-RR cells (p ≤ 0.05, fold differences >1.5, ≥80% power). Among these proteins, nineteen are common among three paired CaP cell lines and associated with metastasis, progression and radioresistance. The PI3K/Akt, VEGF and glucose metabolism pathways were identified as the main pathways associated with CaP radioresistance. In addition, the identified potential protein markers were further validated in CaP-RR cell lines and subcutaneous (s.c) animal xenografts by western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively and protein aldolase A (ALDOA) was selected for a radiosensitivity study. We found the depletion of ALDOA combined with radiotherapy effectively reduced colony formation, induced more apoptosis and increased radiosensitivity in CaP-RR cells. Our findings indicate that CaP radioresistance is caused by multifactorial traits and downregulation of ALDOA increases radiosensitivity in CaP-RR cells, suggesting that controlling these identified proteins or signaling pathways in combination with radiotherapy may hold promise to overcome CaP radioresistance. PMID:28225015

  6. Respiratory Toxicity Biomarkers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advancement in high throughput genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques have accelerated pace of lung biomarker discovery. A recent growth in the discovery of new lung toxicity/disease biomarkers have led to significant advances in our understanding of pathological proce...

  7. Identification of Potential Biomarkers for Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Associated with Choroidal Detachment by Vitreous iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhifeng; Ding, Nannan; Yu, Mengxi; Wang, Ke; Luo, Shasha; Zou, Wenjun; Zhou, Ying; Yan, Biao; Jiang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment (RRDCD) is a complicated and serious type of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). In this study, we identified differentially expressed proteins in the vitreous humors of RRDCD and RRD using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) combined with nano-liquid chromatography-electrospray ion trap-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS) and bioinformatic analysis. Our result shows that 103 differentially expressed proteins, including 54 up-regulated and 49 down-regulated proteins were identified in RRDCD. Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggested that most of the differentially expressed proteins were extracellular.The Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis suggested that proteins related to complement and coagulation cascades were significantly enriched. iTRAQ-based proteomic profiling reveals that complement and coagulation cascades and inflammation may play important roles in the pathogenesis of RRDCD. This study may provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of RRDCD and offer potential opportunities for the diagnosis and treatment of RRDCD. PMID:27941623

  8. The Application of a Three-Step Proteome Analysis for Identification of New Biomarkers of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abulaizi, Mayinuer; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Satoh, Mamoru; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Kodera, Yoshio; Obul, Jurat; Takano, Shigetsugu; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Miyazaki, Masaru; Nomura, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    We searched for novel tumor markers of pancreatic cancer by three-step serum proteome analysis. Twelve serum abundant proteins were depleted using immunoaffinity columns followed by fractionation by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Proteins in each fraction were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Then the gel was stained by Coomassie Brilliant Blue. Protein spots in which the expression levels were significantly different between cancer and normal control were identified by LC-MS/MS. One hundred and two spots were upregulated, and 84 spots were downregulated in serum samples obtained from patients with pancreatic cancers, and 58 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. These candidate proteins were validated using western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). As a result of these validation process, we could confirm that the serum levels of apolipoprotein A-IV, vitamin D-binding protein, plasma retinol-binding protein 4, and tetranectin were significantly decreased in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:22091389

  9. Proteomic response of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to CuO NPs and Cu²⁺: an exploratory biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Tânia; Chora, Suze; Pereira, Catarina G; Cardoso, Cátia; Bebianno, Maria João

    2014-10-01

    absence of the mussel genome precluded the identification of other proteins relevant to clarify the effects of CuO NPs in mussels' tissues, proteomics analysis provided additional knowledge of their potential effects at the protein level that after confirmation and validation can be used as putative new biomarkers in nanotoxicology.

  10. Proteomic analysis of serum of workers occupationally exposed to arsenic, cadmium, and lead for biomarker research: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kossowska, Barbara; Dudka, Ilona; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela; Szymańska-Chabowska, Anna; Doroszkiewicz, Włodzimierz; Gancarz, Roman; Andrzejak, Ryszard; Antonowicz-Juchniewicz, Jolanta

    2010-10-15

    The main factor of environmental contamination is the presence of the heavy metals lead, cadmium, and arsenic. The aim of serum protein profile analysis of people chronically exposed to heavy metals is to find protein markers of early pathological changes. The study was conducted in a group of 389 healthy men working in copper foundry and 45 age-matched non-exposed healthy men. Toxicological test samples included whole blood, serum, and urine. Thirty-seven clinical parameters were measured. Based on the parameters values of the healthy volunteers, the centroid in 37-dimensional space was calculated. The individuals in the metal-exposed and control groups were ordered based on the Euclidean distance from the centroid defined by the first component according to Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Serum samples of two individuals, one from the control and one from the metal-exposed group, were chosen for proteomic analysis. In optimized conditions of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), two protein maps were obtained representing both groups. Twenty-eight corresponding protein spots from both protein maps were chosen and identified based on PDQuest analysis and the SWISS-2DPAGE database. From a panel of six proteins with differences in expression greater than a factor of two, three potential markers with the highest differences were selected: hemoglobin-spot 26 (pI 7.05, Mw 10.53), unidentified protein-spot 27 (pI 6.73, Mw 10.17), and unidentified protein-spot 25 (pI 5.75, Mw 12.07). Further studies are required to prove so far obtained results. Identified proteins could serve as potential markers of preclinical changes and could be in the future included in biomonitoring of people exposed to heavy metals.

  11. Proteomic Profiling for Identification of Novel Biomarkers Differentially Expressed in Human Ovaries from Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Zhang, Jiangyu; Deng, Qingshan; Li, Jieming; Li, Zhengfen; Xiao, Yao; Hu, Shuiwang; Li, Tiantian; Tan, Qiuxiao; Li, Xiaofang; Luo, Bingshu; Mo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify differential protein expression pattern associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods Twenty women were recruited for the study, ten with PCOS as a test group and ten without PCOS as a control group. Differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analysis and mass spectroscopy were employed to identify proteins that were differentially expressed between the PCOS and normal ovaries. The differentially expressed proteins were further validated by western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results DIGE analysis revealed eighteen differentially expressed proteins in the PCOS ovaries of which thirteen were upregulated, and five downregulated. WB and IHC confirmed the differential expression of membrane-associated progesterone receptor component 1 (PGRMC1), retinol-binding protein 1 (RBP1), heat shock protein 90B1, calmodulin 1, annexin A6, and tropomyosin 2. Also, WB analysis revealed significantly (P<0.05) higher expression of PGRMC1 and RBP1 in PCOS ovaries as compared to the normal ovaries. The differential expression of the proteins was also validated by IHC. Conclusions The present study identified novel differentially expressed proteins in the ovarian tissues of women with PCOS that can serve as potential biomarkers for the diagnosis and development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of PCOS using molecular interventions. PMID:27846214

  12. From proteomic multimarker profiling to interesting proteins: thymosin-β4 and kininogen-1 as new potential biomarkers for inflammatory hepatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Corinna; Schwamborn, Kristina; Zimmermann, Henning W; Tacke, Frank; Kühnen, Elisabeth; Odenthal, Margarete; Groseclose, M Reid; Caprioli, Richard M; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Despite tremendous efforts in disclosing the pathophysiological and epidemiological factors associated with liver fibrogenesis, non-invasive diagnostic measures to estimate the clinical outcome and progression of liver fibrogenesis are presently limited. Therefore, there is a mandatory need for methodologies allowing the reasonable and reliable assessment of the severity and/or progression of hepatic fibrogenesis. We here performed proteomic serum profiling by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in 179 samples of patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus and 195 control sera. Multidimensional analysis of spectra allowed the definition of algorithms capable to distinguish class-specific protein expression profiles in serum samples. Overall about 100 peaks could be detected per single spectrum. Different algorithms including protein peaks in the range of 2000 and 10,000 Da were generated after pre-fractionation on a weak cation exchange surface. A specificity of 93% with a sensitivity of 86% as mean of the test set results was found, respectively. The nature of three of these protein peaks that belonged to kininogen-1 and thymosin-β4 was further analysed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS)/MS. We further found that kininogen-1 mRNA was significantly down-regulated in cirrhotic livers. We have identified kininogen-1 and thymosin-β4 as potential new biomarkers for human chronic hepatitis C and conclude that serum profiling is a reliable technique to identify hepatitis-associated expression patterns. Based on the high throughput capability, the identified differential protein panel may serve as a diagnostic marker and warrants further validation in larger cohorts. PMID:21496200

  13. Spatiotemporal proteomic analyses during pancreas cancer progression identifies serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) as a novel candidate biomarker for early stage disease.

    PubMed

    Mirus, Justin E; Zhang, Yuzheng; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Solan, Joell L; Lampe, Paul D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-12-01

    Pancreas cancer, or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, is the deadliest of solid tumors, with a five-year survival rate of <5%. Detection of resectable disease improves survival rates, but access to tissue and other biospecimens that could be used to develop early detection markers is confounded by the insidious nature of pancreas cancer. Mouse models that accurately recapitulate the human condition allow disease tracking from inception to invasion and can therefore be useful for studying early disease stages in which surgical resection is possible. Using a highly faithful mouse model of pancreas cancer in conjunction with a high-density antibody microarray containing ∼2500 antibodies, we interrogated the pancreatic tissue proteome at preinvasive and invasive stages of disease. The goal was to discover early stage tissue markers of pancreas cancer and follow them through histologically defined stages of disease using cohorts of mice lacking overt clinical signs and symptoms and those with end-stage metastatic disease, respectively. A panel of seven up-regulated proteins distinguishing pancreas cancer from normal pancreas was validated, and their levels were assessed in tissues collected at preinvasive, early invasive, and moribund stages of disease. Six of the seven markers also differentiated pancreas cancer from an experimental model of chronic pancreatitis. The levels of serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) increased between preinvasive and invasive stages, suggesting its potential as a tissue biomarker, and perhaps its involvement in progression from precursor pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry of STK4 at different stages of disease revealed a dynamic expression pattern further implicating it in early tumorigenic events. Immunohistochemistry of a panel of human pancreas cancers confirmed that STK4 levels were increased in tumor epithelia relative to normal tissue. Overall, this integrated approach

  14. Identification of IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 As Compensatory Biomarkers for CA19-9 in Early-Stage Pancreatic Cancer Using a Combination of Antibody-Based and LC-MS/MS-Based Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Toshihiro; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Honda, Kazufumi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Iwasaki, Motoki; Uchida, Yasuo; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakamori, Shoji; Shimahara, Masashi; Ueno, Takaaki; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Sata, Naohiro; Ioka, Tatsuya; Yasunami, Yohichi; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kaneda, Takashi; Kato, Takao; Yagihara, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Shigeyuki; Huang, Wilber; Yamada, Tesshi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal tumors, and reliable detection of early-stage pancreatic cancer and risk diseases for pancreatic cancer is essential to improve the prognosis. As 260 genes were previously reported to be upregulated in invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of pancreas (IDACP) cells, quantification of the corresponding proteins in plasma might be useful for IDACP diagnosis. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to identify plasma biomarkers for early detection of IDACP by using two proteomics strategies: antibody-based proteomics and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomics. Among the 260 genes, we focused on 130 encoded proteins with known function for which antibodies were available. Twenty-three proteins showed values of the area under the curve (AUC) of more than 0.8 in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) data of IDACP patients compared with healthy controls, and these proteins were selected as biomarker candidates. We then used our high-throughput selected reaction monitoring or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) methodology, together with an automated sample preparation system, micro LC and auto analysis system, to quantify these candidate proteins in plasma from healthy controls and IDACP patients on a large scale. The results revealed that insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)2 and IGFBP3 have the ability to discriminate IDACP patients at an early stage from healthy controls, and IGFBP2 appeared to be increased in risk diseases of pancreatic malignancy, such as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). Furthermore, diagnosis of IDACP using the combination of carbohydrate antigen 19–9 (CA19-9), IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 is significantly more effective than CA19-9 alone. This suggests that IGFBP2 and IGFBP3 may serve as compensatory biomarkers for CA19-9. Early diagnosis with this marker combination may improve the prognosis of

  15. Multi-Scale Genomic, Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines to Identify Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Briffa, Romina; Um, Inhwa; Faratian, Dana; Zhou, Ying; Turnbull, Arran K.; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Selecting colorectal cancer (CRC) patients likely to respond to therapy remains a clinical challenge. The objectives of this study were to establish which genes were differentially expressed with respect to treatment sensitivity and relate this to copy number in a panel of 15 CRC cell lines. Copy number variations of the identified genes were assessed in a cohort of CRCs. IC50’s were measured for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ-235, a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Cell lines were profiled using array comparative genomic hybridisation, Illumina gene expression analysis, reverse phase protein arrays, and targeted sequencing of KRAS hotspot mutations. Frequent gains were observed at 2p, 3q, 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, 13q, 14q, and 17q and losses at 2q, 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 14q, 18q, and 20p. Frequently gained regions contained EGFR, PIK3CA, MYC, SMO, TRIB1, FZD1, and BRCA2, while frequently lost regions contained FHIT and MACROD2. TRIB1 was selected for further study. Gene enrichment analysis showed that differentially expressed genes with respect to treatment response were involved in Wnt signalling, EGF receptor signalling, apoptosis, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Stepwise integration of copy number and gene expression data yielded 47 candidate genes that were significantly correlated. PDCD6 was differentially expressed in all three treatment responses. Tissue microarrays were constructed for a cohort of 118 CRC patients and TRIB1 and MYC amplifications were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. TRIB1 and MYC were amplified in 14.5% and 7.4% of the cohort, respectively, and these amplifications were significantly correlated (p≤0.0001). TRIB1 protein expression in the patient cohort was significantly correlated with pERK, Akt, and Caspase 3 expression. In conclusion, a set of candidate predictive biomarkers for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ235 are described that warrant further study. Amplification of the putative oncogene TRIB1 has been described for

  16. The EFFECT trial: evaluating exacerbations, biomarkers, and safety outcomes with two dose levels of fluticasone propionate/formoterol in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Alberto; Jones, Paul W; Dalvi, Prashant S; McAulay, Kirsten; McIver, Tammy; Dissanayake, Sanjeeva

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist combination therapy is recommended in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients at high risk of exacerbations. The EFFECT (Efficacy of Fluticasone propionate/FormotErol in COPD Treatment) trial is a Phase III, 52-week, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of two doses of fluticasone propionate/formoterol compared to formoterol monotherapy in COPD patients with FEV1 ≥50% predicted and a history of exacerbations. The primary endpoint is the annualized rate of moderate and severe exacerbations. Secondary endpoints include pre-dose FEV1, EXACT-PRO (EXAcerbations of Chronic pulmonary disease Tool – Patient-Reported Outcome)-defined exacerbations, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire for COPD, COPD Assessment Test, and EXACT-Respiratory Symptoms total score. Lung-specific biomarkers (surfactant protein D and CC chemokine ligand-18) will be measured in a subset of patients to explore their relationship to other clinical indices in COPD and their predictive utility. Pneumonia will be diagnosed per criteria defined by the British Thoracic Society community acquired pneumonia guideline, primarily by radiological confirmation and, additionally, using clinical criteria when a chest radiograph cannot be obtained. Serial measurements of serum potassium, vital signs and electrocardiograms, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and 24-hour urinary cortisol measurement will be performed in a subset of patients in addition to conventional safety assessments. PMID:26648706

  17. Efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and biomarkers of cediranib monotherapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Andrew X.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Abrams, Thomas A.; McCleary, Nadine Jackson; Bhargava, Pankaj; Muzikansky, Alona; Sheehan, Susan; Regan, Eileen; Vasudev, Eamala; Knowles, Michelle; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ryan, David P.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Duda, Dan G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We performed a single-arm phase II study of cediranib, a pan-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed measurable advanced HCC and adequate hematologic, hepatic, and renal functions received cediranib 30-mg orally once daily (4 weeks/cycle). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 3 months. Other endpoints included response rates, overall survival (OS), pharmacokinetics (PK) and biomarkers for cediranib. Results Cediranib treatment resulted in an estimated 3-month-PFS rate of 77% [60%, 99%]. Median PFS was 5.3 [3.5,9.7] months, stable disease was seen in 5/17 patients (29%), and median OS was 11.7 [7.5–13.6] months. Grade 3 toxicities included hypertension (29%), hyponatremia (29%) and hyperbilirubinemia (18%). Cediranib PK were comparable to those seen in cancer patients with normal hepatic function. Plasma levels of VEGF and PlGF increased and sVEGFR1, sVEGFR2 and Ang-2 decreased after cediranib treatment. PFS was inversely correlated with baseline levels of VEGF, sVEGFR2, and bFGF and with on-treatment levels of bFGF and IGF-1, and directly associated with on-treatment levels of IFN-γ. OS was inversely correlated with baseline levels of sVEGFR1, Ang-2, TNF-α, CAIX and CD34+CD133+CD45dim circulating progenitor cells and on-treatment levels of sVEGFR2. Conclusions Despite the limitations of primary endpoint selection, cediranib at 30-mg daily showed a high incidence of toxicity and preliminary evidence of antitumor activity in advanced HCC. Hepatic dysfunction did not appear to affect the steady-state PK of cediranib. Exploratory studies suggested pro-angiogenic and inflammatory factors as potential biomarkers of anti-VEGF therapy in HCC. PMID:23362324

  18. Biomarkers intersect with the exposome.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Stephen M

    2012-09-01

    The exposome concept promotes use of omic tools for discovering biomarkers of exposure and biomarkers of disease in studies of diseased and healthy populations. A two-stage scheme is presented for profiling omic features in serum to discover molecular biomarkers and then for applying these biomarkers in follow-up studies. The initial component, referred to as an exposome-wide-association study (EWAS), employs metabolomics and proteomics to interrogate the serum exposome and, ultimately, to identify, validate and differentiate biomarkers of exposure and biomarkers of disease. Follow-up studies employ knowledge-driven designs to explore disease causality, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  19. Respiratory Proteomics Today: Are Technological Advances for the Identification of Biomarker Signatures Catching up with Their Promise? A Critical Review of the Literature in the Decade 2004–2013

    PubMed Central

    Viglio, Simona; Stolk, Jan; Iadarola, Paolo; Giuliano, Serena; Luisetti, Maurizio; Salvini, Roberta; Fumagalli, Marco; Bardoni, Anna

    2014-01-01

    To improve the knowledge on a variety of severe disorders, research has moved from the analysis of individual proteins to the investigation of all proteins expressed by a tissue/organism. This global proteomic approach could prove very useful: (i) for investigating the biochemical pathways involved in disease; (ii) for generating hypotheses; or (iii) as a tool for the identification of proteins differentially expressed in response to the disease state. Proteomics has not been used yet in the field of respiratory research as extensively as in other fields, only a few reproducible and clinically applicable molecular markers, which can assist in diagnosis, having been currently identified. The continuous advances in both instrumentation and methodology, which enable sensitive and quantitative proteomic analyses in much smaller amounts of biological material than before, will hopefully promote the identification of new candidate biomarkers in this area. The aim of this report is to critically review the application over the decade 2004–2013 of very sophisticated technologies to the study of respiratory disorders. The observed changes in protein expression profiles from tissues/fluids of patients affected by pulmonary disorders opens the route for the identification of novel pathological mediators of these disorders. PMID:28250368

  20. System Vaccinology for the Evaluation of Influenza Vaccine Safety by Multiplex Gene Detection of Novel Biomarkers in a Preclinical Study and Batch Release Test

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Takuo; Momose, Haruka; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Araki, Kumiko; Furuhata, Keiko; Ishii, Ken J.; Hamaguchi, Isao; Yamaguchi, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines are beneficial and universal tools to prevent infectious disease. Thus, safety of vaccines is strictly evaluated in the preclinical phase of trials and every vaccine batch must be tested by the National Control Laboratories according to the guidelines published by each country. Despite many vaccine production platforms and methods, animal testing for safety evaluation is unchanged thus far. We recently developed a systems biological approach to vaccine safety evaluation where identification of specific biomarkers in a rat pre-clinical study evaluated the safety of vaccines for pandemic H5N1 influenza including Irf7, Lgals9, Lgalsbp3, Cxcl11, Timp1, Tap2, Psmb9, Psme1, Tapbp, C2, Csf1, Mx2, Zbp1, Ifrd1, Trafd1, Cxcl9, β2m, Npc1, Ngfr and Ifi47. The current study evaluated whether these 20 biomarkers could evaluate the safety, batch-to-batch and manufacturer-to-manufacturer consistency of seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine using a multiplex gene detection system. When we evaluated the influenza HA vaccine (HAv) from four different manufactures, the biomarker analysis correlated to findings from conventional animal use tests, such as abnormal toxicity test. In addition, sensitivity of toxicity detection and differences in HAvs were higher and more accurate than with conventional methods. Despite a slight decrease in body weight caused by HAv from manufacturer B that was not statistically significant, our results suggest that HAv from manufacturer B is significantly different than the other HAvs tested with regard to Lgals3bp, Tapbp, Lgals9, Irf7 and C2 gene expression in rat lungs. Using the biomarkers confirmed in this study, we predicted batch-to-batch consistency and safety of influenza vaccines within 2 days compared with the conventional safety test, which takes longer. These biomarkers will facilitate the future development of new influenza vaccines and provide an opportunity to develop in vitro methods of evaluating batch-to-batch consistency and

  1. Clinical proteomics in obstetrics and neonatology.

    PubMed

    Klein, Julie; Buffin-Meyer, Benedicte; Mullen, William; Carty, David M; Delles, Christian; Vlahou, Antonia; Mischak, Harald; Decramer, Stéphane; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P

    2014-02-01

    Clinical proteomics has been applied to the identification of biomarkers of obstetric and neonatal disease. We will discuss a number of encouraging studies that have led to potentially valid biomarkers in the context of Down's syndrome, preterm birth, amniotic infections, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction and obstructive uropathies. Obtaining noninvasive biomarkers (e.g., from the maternal circulation, urine or cervicovaginal fluid) may be more feasible for obstetric diseases than for diseases of the fetus, for which invasive methods are required (e.g., amniotic fluid, fetal urine). However, studies providing validated proteomics-identified biomarkers are limited. Efforts should be made to save well-characterized samples of these invasive body fluids so that many valid biomarkers of pregnancy-related diseases will be identified in the coming years using proteomics based analysis upon adoption of 'clinical proteomics guidelines'.

  2. The Platelet Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Senzel, Lisa; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Bahou, Wadie F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The proteome is the pool of proteins expressed at a given time and circumstance. The word “proteomics” summarizes several technologies for visualization, quantitation and identification of these proteins. Recent advances in these techniques are helping to elucidate platelet processes which are relevant to bleeding and clotting disorders, transfusion medicine and regulation of angiogenesis. Recent findings Over 1100 platelet proteins have been identified using proteomic techniques. Various subproteomes have been characterized, including platelet releasates (the “secretome”), alpha and dense granules, membrane and cytoskeletal proteins, platelet-derived microparticles, and the platelet “phosphoproteome”. Proteomic data about platelets have become increasingly available in integrated databases. Summary Proteomic experiments in resting and activated platelets have identified novel signaling pathways and secreted proteins which may represent therapeutic targets, as well as potential cancer biomarkers. PMID:19550320

  3. A proteomic glimpse into human ureter proteome

    PubMed Central

    Hirao, Yoshitoshi; Elguoshy, Amr; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yates, John R.; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Urine has evolved as one of the most important biofluids in clinical proteomics due to its noninvasive sampling and its stability. Yet, it is used in clinical diagnostics of several disorders by detecting changes in its components including urinary protein/polypeptide profile. Despite the fact that majority of proteins detected in urine are primarily originated from the urogenital (UG) tract, determining its precise source within the UG tract remains elusive. In this article, we performed a comprehensive analysis of ureter proteome to assemble the first unbiased ureter dataset. Next, we compared these data to urine, urinary exosome, and kidney mass spectrometric datasets. Our result concluded that among 2217 nonredundant ureter proteins, 751 protein candidates (33.8%) were detected in urine as urinary protein/polypeptide or exosomal protein. On the other hand, comparing ureter protein hits (48) that are not shown in corresponding databases to urinary bladder and prostate human protein atlas databases pinpointed 21 proteins that might be unique to ureter tissue. In conclusion, this finding offers future perspectives for possible identification of ureter disease‐associated biomarkers such as ureter carcinoma. In addition, the ureter proteomic dataset published in this article will provide a valuable resource for researchers working in the field of urology and urine biomarker discovery. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002620 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002620). PMID:26442468

  4. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis - discovery and implications.

    PubMed

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Avishek, Kumar; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-01-01

    Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood-borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, subunit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in Leishmania donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters, and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines, e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen(-/-) in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated in normal

  5. Environmental proteomics and metallomics.

    PubMed

    López-Barea, Juan; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2006-04-01

    Monitoring environmental pollution using biomarkers requires detailed knowledge about the markers, and many only allow a partial assessment of pollution. New proteomic methods (environmental proteomics) can identify proteins that, after validation, might be useful as alternative biomarkers, although this approach also has its limitations, derived mainly from their application to non-model organisms. Initial studies using environmental proteomics were carried out in animals exposed to model pollutants, and led to the concept of protein expression signatures. Experiments have been carried out in model organisms (yeast, Arabidopsis, rat cells, or mice) exposed to model contaminants. Over the last few years, proteomics has been applied to organisms from ecosystems with different pollution levels, forming the basis of an environmental branch in proteomics. Another focus is connected with the presence of metals bound to biomolecules, which adds an additional dimension to metal-biomolecule and metalloprotein characterization - the field of metallomics. The metallomic approach considers the metallome: a whole individual metal or metalloid species within a cell or tissue. A metallomic analytical approach (MAA) is proposed as a new tool to study and identify metalloproteins.

  6. Utility of specific biomarkers to assess safety of swine manure for biofertilizing purposes.

    PubMed

    Fongaro, G; Viancelli, A; Magri, M E; Elmahdy, E M; Biesus, L L; Kich, J D; Kunz, A; Barardi, C R M

    2014-05-01

    Swine production is an important economic activity in Brazil, and there is interest in the development of clean production mechanisms to support sustainable agro-industrial activities. The biomass derived from swine manure has good potential to be used as a biofertilizer due to its high nutrient concentration. However, the land application of manure should be based on safety parameters such as the presence of pathogens that can potentially infect animals and people. This study was designed to assess the presence of porcine circovirus-2 (PCV2), porcine adenovirus (PAdV), rotavirus-A (RV-A) and Salmonella spp. in liquid manure, as well the infectivity of two genotypes of circovirus-2 (PCV2a and PCV2b) present in liquid manure. Three swine farms were evaluated: 1) a nursery production farm (manure analyzed before and after anaerobic biodigestion), 2) a grow-finish production farm (analyzed before and after anaerobic biodigestion), and 3) a second grow-finish production farm (raw manure-affluent). PCV2, PAdV and RV-A were present before and after anaerobic biodigestion (either affluent or effluent) at all farms. Salmonella spp. were detected at farm 1 (affluent and effluent) and farm 3 (raw manure-affluent) but not farm 2 (affluent and effluent). When the ability of the anaerobic biodigestion process to reduce viral concentration was evaluated, no significant reduction was observed (P>0.05). Both the PCV2a and PCV2b genotypes were detected, suggesting viral co-infection in swine production. The results revealed infectious PCV2 even after anaerobic biodigestion treatment. The presence of Salmonella spp. and enteric viruses, especially infectious PCV2, in the final effluent from the anaerobic biodigester system suggests that the process is inefficient for pathogen inactivation. Due to the prevalence and infectivity of PCV2 and considering the successful use of molecular methods coupled to cell culture for detecting infectious PCV2, we suggest that this virus can be used

  7. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed. PMID:27187379

  8. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-05-13

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed.

  9. Proteomics of Human Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Keene, C. Dirk; Pan, Catherine; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The technology, experimental approaches, and bioinformatics that support proteomic research are evolving rapidly. The application of these new capabilities to the study of neurodegenerative diseases is providing insight into the biochemical pathogenesis of neurodegeneration as well as fueling major efforts in biomarker discovery. Here, we review the fundamentals of commonly used proteomic approaches and the outcomes of these investigations with autopsy and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18800015

  10. Nanoparticles: potential biomarker harvesters.

    PubMed

    Geho, David H; Jones, Clinton D; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A

    2006-02-01

    A previously untapped bank of information resides within the low molecular weight proteomic fraction of blood. Intensive efforts are underway to harness this information so that it can be used for early diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. The physicochemical malleability and high surface areas of nanoparticle surfaces make them ideal candidates for developing biomarker harvesting platforms. Given the variety of engineering strategies afforded through nanoparticle technologies, a significant goal is to tailor nanoparticle surfaces to selectively bind a subset of biomarkers, sequestering them for later study using high sensitivity proteomic tests. To date, applications of nanoparticles have largely focused on imaging systems and drug delivery vectors. As such, biomarker harvesting is an underutilized application of nanoparticle technology and is an area of nanotechnology research that will likely undergo substantial growth.

  11. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Morgan, John C; Mehta, Shyamal H; Sethi, Kapil D

    2010-11-01

    Biomarkers are objectively measured characteristics that are indicators of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or responses to therapeutic interventions. To date, clinical assessment remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and clinical rating scales are well established as the gold standard for tracking progression of PD. Researchers have identified numerous potential biomarkers that may aid in the differential diagnosis of PD and/or tracking disease progression. Clinical, genetic, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics), and neuroimaging biomarkers may provide useful tools in the diagnosis of PD and in measuring disease progression and response to therapies. Some potential biomarkers are inexpensive and do not require much technical expertise, whereas others are expensive or require specialized equipment and technical skills. Many potential biomarkers in PD show great promise; however, they need to be assessed for their sensitivity and specificity over time in large and varied samples of patients with and without PD.

  12. Proteomic research in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Taurines, Regina; Dudley, Edward; Grassl, Julia; Warnke, Andreas; Gerlach, Manfred; Coogan, Andrew N; Thome, Johannes

    2011-02-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and mood disorders are severe and disabling conditions of largely unknown origin and poorly understood pathophysiology. An accurate diagnosis and treatment of these disorders is often complicated by their aetiological and clinical heterogeneity. In recent years proteomic technologies based on mass spectrometry have been increasingly used, especially in the search for diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in neuropsychiatric disorders. Proteomics enable an automated high-throughput protein determination revealing expression levels, post-translational modifications and complex protein-interaction networks. In contrast to other methods such as molecular genetics, proteomics provide the opportunity to determine modifications at the protein level thereby possibly being more closely related to pathophysiological processes underlying the clinical phenomenology of specific psychiatric conditions. In this article we review the theoretical background of proteomics and its most commonly utilized techniques. Furthermore the current impact of proteomic research on diverse psychiatric diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders, drug abuse and autism, is discussed. Proteomic methods are expected to gain crucial significance in psychiatric research and neuropharmacology over the coming decade.

  13. Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Despite great strides in proteomics and the growing number of articles citing the discovery of potential biomarkers, the actual rate of introduction of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved protein analytes has been relatively unchanged over the past 10 years. One of reasons for the lack of new protein-based biomarkers approved has been a lack of information and understanding by the proteomics research community to the regulatory process used by the FDA.

  14. The Human Eye Proteome Project: perspectives on an emerging proteome.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; Enghild, Jan J; Venkatraman, Vidya; Dyrlund, Thomas F; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2013-08-01

    There are an estimated 285 million people with visual impairment worldwide, of whom 39 million are blind. The pathogenesis of many eye diseases remains poorly understood. The human eye is currently an emerging proteome that may provide key insight into the biological pathways of disease. We review proteomic investigations of the human eye and present a catalogue of 4842 nonredundant proteins identified in human eye tissues and biofluids to date. We highlight the need to identify new biomarkers for eye diseases using proteomics. Recent advances in proteomics do now allow the identification of hundreds to thousands of proteins in tissues and fluids, characterization of various PTMs and simultaneous quantification of multiple proteins. To facilitate proteomic studies of the eye, the Human Eye Proteome Project (HEPP) was organized in September 2012. The HEPP is one of the most recent components of the Biology/Disease-driven Human Proteome Project (B/D-HPP) whose overarching goal is to support the broad application of state-of-the-art measurements of proteins and proteomes by life scientists studying the molecular mechanisms of biological processes and human disease. The large repertoire of investigative proteomic tools has great potential to transform vision science and enhance understanding of physiology and disease processes that affect sight.

  15. Salivary proteomics in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xijun

    2013-01-16

    Proteins that are important indicators of physiological or pathological states, can provide information for the identification of early and differential markers for disease. Saliva, contains an abundance of proteins, offers an easy, inexpensive, safe, and non-invasive approach for disease detection, and possesses a high potential to revolutionize the diagnostics. Discovery of salivary biomarkers could be used to scrutinize health and disease surveillance. The impact of human saliva proteome analysis in the search for clinically relevant disease biomarkers will be realized through advances made using proteomic technologies. The advancements of emerging proteomic techniques have benefited biomarker research to the point where saliva is now recognized as an excellent diagnostic medium for the detection of disease. This review presents an overview of the value of saliva as a credible diagnostic tool and we aim to summarize the proteomic technologies currently used for global analysis of saliva proteins and to elaborate on the application of saliva proteomics to the discovery of disease biomarkers, and discuss some of the critical challenges and perspectives in this field.

  16. Immunocapture strategies in translational proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Fredolini, Claudia; Byström, Sanna; Pin, Elisa; Edfors, Fredrik; Tamburro, Davide; Iglesias, Maria Jesus; Häggmark, Anna; Hong, Mun-Gwan; Uhlen, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at clinical studies of human diseases, antibody-assisted assays have been applied to biomarker discovery and toward a streamlined translation from patient profiling to assays supporting personalized treatments. In recent years, integrated strategies to couple and combine antibodies with mass spectrometry-based proteomic efforts have emerged, allowing for novel possibilities in basic and clinical research. Described in this review are some of the field’s current and emerging immunocapture approaches from an affinity proteomics perspective. Discussed are some of their advantages, pitfalls and opportunities for the next phase in clinical and translational proteomics. PMID:26558424

  17. Proteomic analysis in cardiovascular research.

    PubMed

    Oda, Teiji; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2016-03-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry technology and bioinformatics using clinical human samples have expanded quantitative proteomics in cardiovascular research. There are two major proteomic strategies: namely, "gel-based" or "gel-free" proteomics coupled with either "top-down" or "bottom-up" mass spectrometry. Both are introduced into the proteomic analysis using plasma or serum sample targeting 'biomarker" searches of aortic aneurysm and tissue samples, such as from the aneurysmal wall, calcific aortic valve, or myocardial tissue, investigating pathophysiological protein interactions and post-translational modifications. We summarize the proteomic studies that analyzed human samples taken during cardiovascular surgery to investigate disease processes, in order to better understand the system-wide changes behind known molecular factors and specific signaling pathways.

  18. Model-based analysis of thromboxane B{sub 2} and prostaglandin E{sub 2} as biomarkers in the safety evaluation of naproxen

    SciTech Connect

    Sahota, Tarjinder; Sanderson, Ian; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2014-08-01

    The assessment of safety in traditional toxicology protocols relies on evidence arising from observed adverse events (AEs) in animals and on establishing their correlation with different measures of drug exposure (e.g., C{sub max} and AUC). Such correlations, however, ignore the role of biomarkers, which can provide further insight into the underlying pharmacological mechanisms. Here we use naproxen as a paradigm drug to explore the feasibility of a biomarker-guided approach for the prediction of AEs in humans. A standard toxicology protocol was set up for the evaluation of effects of naproxen in rat, in which four doses were tested (7.5, 15, 40 and 80 mg/kg). In addition to sparse blood sampling for the assessment of exposure, thromboxane B{sub 2} and prostaglandin E{sub 2} were also collected in satellite groups. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling was used to evaluate the predictive performance of the approach. A one-compartmental model with first order absorption was found to best describe the pharmacokinetics of naproxen. A nonlinear relationship between dose and bioavailability was observed which leads to a less than proportional increase in naproxen concentrations with increasing doses. The pharmacodynamics of TXB{sub 2} and PGE{sub 2} was described by direct inhibition models with maximum pharmacological effects achieved at doses > 7.5 mg/kg. The predicted PKPD relationship in humans was within 10-fold of the values previously published. Moreover, our results indicate that biomarkers can be used to assess interspecies differences in PKPD and extrapolated data from animals to humans. Biomarker sampling should be used systematically in general toxicity studies. - Highlights: • Prediction of a drug's safety profile from preclinical protocols remains challenging. • Pharmacokinetic measures of safe exposure (e.g., AUC) ignore the role of biomarkers. • PKPD relationships enable the evaluation of adverse events in a mechanistic manner. • Major differences

  19. Proteomics Research in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Davalieva, Katarina; Maleva Kostovska, Ivana; Dwork, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite intense scientific efforts, the neuropathology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia are poorly understood. Proteomic studies, by testing large numbers of proteins for associations with disease, may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of schizophrenia. They may also indicate the types and locations of cells most likely to harbor pathological alterations. Investigations using proteomic approaches have already provided much information on quantitative and qualitative protein patterns in postmortem brain tissue, peripheral tissues and body fluids. Different proteomic technologies such as 2-D PAGE, 2-D DIGE, SELDI-TOF, shotgun proteomics with label-based (ICAT), and label-free (MSE) quantification have been applied to the study of schizophrenia for the past 15 years. This review summarizes the results, mostly from brain but also from other tissues and bodily fluids, of proteomics studies in schizophrenia. Emphasis is given to proteomics platforms, varying sources of material, proposed candidate biomarkers emerging from comparative proteomics studies, and the specificity of the putative markers in terms of other mental illnesses. We also compare proteins altered in schizophrenia with reports of protein or mRNA sequences that are relatively enriched in specific cell types. While proteomic studies of schizophrenia find abnormalities in the expression of many proteins that are not cell type-specific, there appears to be a disproportionate representation of proteins whose synthesis and localization are highly enriched in one or more brain cell type compared with other types of brain cells. Two of the three proteins most commonly altered in schizophrenia are aldolase C and glial fibrillary acidic protein, astrocytic proteins with entirely different functions, but the studies are approximately evenly divided with regard to the direction of the differences and the concordance or discordance between the two proteins. Alterations of common myelin

  20. Determination of Serum Lost Goodwill Target Proteome in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongming; Hu, Changchen; Zhang, Gangli; Ren, Jinrui; Tan, Yihu; Sun, Wenxiao; Wang, Junwen; Li, Jun; Liu, Hongchao; Xie, Ruifan; Hao, Zhipeng; Guo, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the biokinetics of LGT proteome, a potential biomarker of severe TBI, in serum of severe TBI patients. The LGT proteome presents in the serum of severe TBI patients. The abundance diversity of LGT proteome is closely associated with pathologic condition of TBI patients. Serum LGT proteome may be used as a promising marker for evaluating severity of severe TBI.

  1. Di-22:6-bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate: A clinical biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis for drug development and safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Nanjun; Tengstrand, Elizabeth A.; Chourb, Lisa; Hsieh, Frank Y.

    2014-09-15

    The inability to routinely monitor drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) presents a challenge in pharmaceutical drug development and in the clinic. Several nonclinical studies have shown di-docosahexaenoyl (22:6) bis(monoacylglycerol) phosphate (di-22:6-BMP) to be a reliable biomarker of tissue DIPL that can be monitored in the plasma/serum and urine. The aim of this study was to show the relevance of di-22:6-BMP as a DIPL biomarker for drug development and safety assessment in humans. DIPL shares many similarities with the inherited lysosomal storage disorder Niemann–Pick type C (NPC) disease. DIPL and NPC result in similar changes in lysosomal function and cholesterol status that lead to the accumulation of multi-lamellar bodies (myeloid bodies) in cells and tissues. To validate di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for clinical studies, NPC patients and healthy donors were classified by receiver operator curve analysis based on urinary di-22:6-BMP concentrations. By showing 96.7-specificity and 100-sensitivity to identify NPC disease, di-22:6-BMP can be used to assess DIPL in human studies. The mean concentration of di-22:6-BMP in the urine of NPC patients was 51.4-fold (p ≤ 0.05) above the healthy baseline range. Additionally, baseline levels of di-22:6-BMP were assessed in healthy non-medicated laboratory animals (rats, mice, dogs, and monkeys) and human subjects to define normal reference ranges for nonclinical/clinical studies. The baseline ranges of di-22:6-BMP in the plasma, serum, and urine of humans and laboratory animals were species dependent. The results of this study support the role of di-22:6-BMP as a biomarker of DIPL for pharmaceutical drug development and health care settings. - Highlights: • A reliable biomarker of drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is needed for humans. • Di-22:6-BMP is specific/sensitive for DIPL in animals as published in literatures. • The di-22:6-BMP biomarker can be validated for humans via NPC patients. • DIPL

  2. BluePen Biomarkers LLC: integrated biomarker solutions.

    PubMed

    Blair, Ian A; Mesaros, Clementina; Lilley, Patrick; Nunez, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    BluePen Biomarkers provides a unique comprehensive multi-omics biomarker discovery and validation platform. We can quantify, integrate and analyze genomics, proteomics, metabolomics and lipidomics biomarkers, alongside clinical data, demographics and other phenotypic data. A unique bio-inspired signal processing analytic approach is used that has the proven ability to identify biomarkers in a wide variety of diseases. The resulting biomarkers can be used for diagnosis, prognosis, mechanistic studies and predicting treatment response, in contexts from core research through clinical trials. BluePen Biomarkers provides an additional groundbreaking research goal: identifying surrogate biomarkers from different modalities. This not only provides new biological insights, but enables least invasive, least-cost tests that meet or exceed the predictive quality of current tests.

  3. Role of Proteomics in the Development of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kewal K

    2016-01-01

    Advances in proteomic technologies have made import contribution to the development of personalized medicine by facilitating detection of protein biomarkers, proteomics-based molecular diagnostics, as well as protein biochips and pharmacoproteomics. Application of nanobiotechnology in proteomics, nanoproteomics, has further enhanced applications in personalized medicine. Proteomics-based molecular diagnostics will have an important role in the diagnosis of certain conditions and understanding the pathomechanism of disease. Proteomics will be a good bridge between diagnostics and therapeutics; the integration of these will be important for advancing personalized medicine. Use of proteomic biomarkers and combination of pharmacoproteomics with pharmacogenomics will enable stratification of clinical trials and improve monitoring of patients for development of personalized therapies. Proteomics is an important component of several interacting technologies used for development of personalized medicine, which is depicted graphically. Finally, cancer is a good example of applications of proteomic technologies for personalized management of cancer.

  4. Serum pharmacodynamic biomarkers for chronic corticosteroid treatment of children

    PubMed Central

    Hathout, Yetrib; Conklin, Laurie S.; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Brown, Kristy J.; Morgenroth, Lauren P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Heier, Christopher R.; Damsker, Jesse M.; van den Anker, John N.; Henricson, Erik; Clemens, Paula R.; Mah, Jean K.; McDonald, Craig; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids are extensively used in pediatrics, yet the burden of side effects is significant. Availability of a simple, fast, and reliable biochemical read out of steroidal drug pharmacodynamics could enable a rapid and objective assessment of safety and efficacy of corticosteroids and aid development of corticosteroid replacement drugs. To identify potential corticosteroid responsive biomarkers we performed proteome profiling of serum samples from DMD and IBD patients with and without corticosteroid treatment using SOMAscan aptamer panel testing 1,129 proteins in <0.1 cc of sera. Ten pro-inflammatory proteins were elevated in untreated patients and suppressed by corticosteroids (MMP12, IL22RA2, CCL22, IGFBP2, FCER2, LY9, ITGa1/b1, LTa1/b2, ANGPT2 and FGG). These are candidate biomarkers for anti-inflammatory efficacy of corticosteroids. Known safety concerns were validated, including elevated non-fasting insulin (insulin resistance), and elevated angiotensinogen (salt retention). These were extended by new candidates for metabolism disturbances (leptin, afamin), stunting of growth (growth hormone binding protein), and connective tissue remodeling (MMP3). Significant suppression of multiple adrenal steroid hormones was also seen in treated children (reductions of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol and testosterone). A panel of new pharmacodynamic biomarkers for corticosteroids in children was defined. Future studies will need to bridge specific biomarkers to mechanism of drug action, and specific clinical outcomes. PMID:27530235

  5. Serum pharmacodynamic biomarkers for chronic corticosteroid treatment of children.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Yetrib; Conklin, Laurie S; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Brown, Kristy J; Morgenroth, Lauren P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Heier, Christopher R; Damsker, Jesse M; van den Anker, John N; Henricson, Erik; Clemens, Paula R; Mah, Jean K; McDonald, Craig; Hoffman, Eric P

    2016-08-17

    Corticosteroids are extensively used in pediatrics, yet the burden of side effects is significant. Availability of a simple, fast, and reliable biochemical read out of steroidal drug pharmacodynamics could enable a rapid and objective assessment of safety and efficacy of corticosteroids and aid development of corticosteroid replacement drugs. To identify potential corticosteroid responsive biomarkers we performed proteome profiling of serum samples from DMD and IBD patients with and without corticosteroid treatment using SOMAscan aptamer panel testing 1,129 proteins in <0.1 cc of sera. Ten pro-inflammatory proteins were elevated in untreated patients and suppressed by corticosteroids (MMP12, IL22RA2, CCL22, IGFBP2, FCER2, LY9, ITGa1/b1, LTa1/b2, ANGPT2 and FGG). These are candidate biomarkers for anti-inflammatory efficacy of corticosteroids. Known safety concerns were validated, including elevated non-fasting insulin (insulin resistance), and elevated angiotensinogen (salt retention). These were extended by new candidates for metabolism disturbances (leptin, afamin), stunting of growth (growth hormone binding protein), and connective tissue remodeling (MMP3). Significant suppression of multiple adrenal steroid hormones was also seen in treated children (reductions of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol and testosterone). A panel of new pharmacodynamic biomarkers for corticosteroids in children was defined. Future studies will need to bridge specific biomarkers to mechanism of drug action, and specific clinical outcomes.

  6. Proteomics studies of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Pan, Sheng; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with 4% survival 5 years after diagnosis. Biomarkers are desperately needed to improve earlier, more curable cancer diagnosis and to develop new effective therapeutic targets. The development of quantitative proteomics technologies in recent years offers great promise for understanding the complex molecular events of tumorigenesis at the protein level, and has stimulated great interest in applying the technology for pancreatic cancer studies. Proteomic studies of pancreatic tissues, juice, serum/plasma, and cell lines have recently attempted to identify differentially expressed proteins in pancreatic cancer to dissect the abnormal signaling pathways underlying oncogenesis, and to detect new biomarkers. It can be expected that the continuing evolution of proteomics technology with better resolution and sensitivity will greatly enhance our capability in combating pancreatic cancer. PMID:18633454

  7. Integrated Proteomic and Transcriptomic-Based Approaches to Identifying Signature Biomarkers and Pathways for Elucidation of Daoy and UW228 Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Higdon, Roger; Kala, Jessie; Wilkins, Devan; Yan, Julia Fangfei; Sethi, Manveen K; Lin, Liang; Liu, Siqi; Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Choiniere, John; Kolker, Natali; Hancock, William S; Kolker, Eugene; Fanayan, Susan

    2017-02-03

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Patient survival has remained largely the same for the past 20 years, with therapies causing significant health, cognitive, behavioral and developmental complications for those who survive the tumor. In this study, we profiled the total transcriptome and proteome of two established MB cell lines, Daoy and UW228, using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and label-free nano-LC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomics, coupled with advanced pathway analysis. While Daoy has been suggested to belong to the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subtype, the exact UW228 subtype is not yet clearly established. Thus, a goal of this study was to identify protein markers and pathways that would help elucidate their subtype classification. A number of differentially expressed genes and proteins, including a number of adhesion, cytoskeletal and signaling molecules, were observed between the two cell lines. While several cancer-associated genes/proteins exhibited similar expression across the two cell lines, upregulation of a number of signature proteins and enrichment of key components of SHH and WNT signaling pathways were uniquely observed in Daoy and UW228, respectively. The novel information on differentially expressed genes/proteins and enriched pathways provide insights into the biology of MB, which could help elucidate their subtype classification.

  8. Integrated Proteomic and Transcriptomic-Based Approaches to Identifying Signature Biomarkers and Pathways for Elucidation of Daoy and UW228 Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Higdon, Roger; Kala, Jessie; Wilkins, Devan; Yan, Julia Fangfei; Sethi, Manveen K.; Lin, Liang; Liu, Siqi; Montague, Elizabeth; Janko, Imre; Choiniere, John; Kolker, Natali; Hancock, William S.; Kolker, Eugene; Fanayan, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Patient survival has remained largely the same for the past 20 years, with therapies causing significant health, cognitive, behavioral and developmental complications for those who survive the tumor. In this study, we profiled the total transcriptome and proteome of two established MB cell lines, Daoy and UW228, using high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and label-free nano-LC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteomics, coupled with advanced pathway analysis. While Daoy has been suggested to belong to the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subtype, the exact UW228 subtype is not yet clearly established. Thus, a goal of this study was to identify protein markers and pathways that would help elucidate their subtype classification. A number of differentially expressed genes and proteins, including a number of adhesion, cytoskeletal and signaling molecules, were observed between the two cell lines. While several cancer-associated genes/proteins exhibited similar expression across the two cell lines, upregulation of a number of signature proteins and enrichment of key components of SHH and WNT signaling pathways were uniquely observed in Daoy and UW228, respectively. The novel information on differentially expressed genes/proteins and enriched pathways provide insights into the biology of MB, which could help elucidate their subtype classification. PMID:28248256

  9. Haptoglobin is a serological biomarker for adenocarcinoma lung cancer by using the ProteomeLab PF2D combined with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chang, You-Kang; Lai, Yu-Heng; Chu, Yen; Lee, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Chun-Yao; Wu, Semon

    2016-01-01

    Identification of serological biomarker is urgently needed for cancer screening, monitoring cancer progression, treatment response, and surveillance for recurrence in lung cancer. Therefore, we try to find new serological biomarker that has more specificity and sensitivity for lung cancer diagnostics. In this study, the 2-D liquid phase fractionation system (PF2D) and mass spectrometry approach has been used for comparison the serum profiles between lung cancer patients and healthy individuals. Eight proteins were identified form PF2D and subsequently by mass spectrometry. Among these proteins, haptoglobin (HP) and apolipoprotein AI (APOA1) were chosen and validated with turbidimetric assay. We found that HP levels were significantly higher and APOA1 levels were significantly lower in lung cancer patients. However, after the participants were stratified by gender, the expression trends of HP and APOA1 in lung cancer patients existed only in men, which is gender specific phenomenon. HP, APOA1 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), used for distinguishing lung adenocarcinoma, had a sensitivity of 64%, 64% and 79%, respectively. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) of HP, APOA1 and CEA were 0.768, 0.761 and 0.884, respectively. When restricted to male subjects, HP, APOA1 and CEA showed sensitivity of 89%, 73% and 100%, respectively. AUC of HP, APOA1 and CEA were 0.929, 0.840 and 0.877, respectively. Therefore, our results showed that combined with PF2D system and mass spectrometry, this is a promising novel approach to identify new serological biomarkers for lung cancer research. In addition, HP may be a potential serological biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma diagnostics, especially in male subjects. PMID:27648369

  10. Proteome Profiling of Urinary Exosomes Identifies Alpha 1-Antitrypsin and H2B1K as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers for Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yi; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Wu, His-Chin; Lin, Ching-Chan; Chang, Kai-Po; Yang, Chi-Rei; Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Chen, Chao-Jung

    2016-01-01

    MALDI-TOF spectrometry has not been used for urinary exosome analysis. We used it for determining UC biomarkers. From 2012 to 2015, we enrolled 129 consecutive patients with UC and 62 participants without UC. Exosomes from their urine were isolated, and analyzed through MALDI-TOF spectrometry. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of another 122 UC and 26 non-UC tissues was conducted to verify the discovered biomarkers. Two peaks at m/z 5593 (fragmented peptide of alpha-1-antitrypsin; sensitivity, 50.4%; specificity, 96.9%) and m/z 5947 (fragmented peptide of histone H2B1K sensitivity, 62.0%; specificity, 92.3%) were identified as UC diagnosis exosome biomarkers. UC patients with detectable histone H2B1K showed 2.29- and 3.11-fold increased risks of recurrence and progression, respectively, compared with those with nondetectable histone H2B1K. Verification results of IHC staining revealed significantly higher expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin (p = 0.038) and H2B1K (p = 0.005) in UC tissues than in normal tissues. The expression of alpha 1-antitrypsin and H2B1K in UC tissues was significantly correlated with UC grades (p < 0.05). Urinary exosome proteins alpha 1-antitrypsin and histone H2B1K, which are identified through MALDI-TOF analysis, could facilitate rapid diagnosis and prognosis of UC. PMID:27686150

  11. Proteomics in diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Davalieva, K; Polenakovic, M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men worldwide. The introduction of prostate specific antigen (PSA) has greatly increased the number of men diagnosed with PCa but at the same time, as a result of the low specificity, led to overdiagnosis, resulting to unnecessary biopsies and high medical cost treatments. The primary goal in PCa research today is to find a biomarker or biomarker set for clear and effecttive diagnosis of PCa as well as for distinction between aggressive and indolent cancers. Different proteomic technologies such as 2-D PAGE, 2-D DIGE, MALDI MS profiling, shotgun proteomics with label-based (ICAT, iTRAQ) and label-free (SWATH) quantification, MudPIT, CE-MS have been applied to the study of PCa in the past 15 years. Various biological samples, including tumor tissue, serum, plasma, urine, seminal plasma, prostatic secretions and prostatic-derived exosomes were analyzed with the aim of identifying diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and developing a deeper understanding of the disease at the molecular level. This review is focused on the overall analysis of expression proteomics studies in the PCa field investigating all types of human samples in the search for diagnostics biomarkers. Emphasis is given on proteomics platforms used in biomarker discovery and characterization, explored sources for PCa biomarkers, proposed candidate biomarkers by comparative proteomics studies and the possible future clinical application of those candidate biomarkers in PCa screening and diagnosis. In addition, we review the specificity of the putative markers and existing challenges in the proteomics research of PCa.

  12. Improvements in the search for potential biomarkers by proteomics: application of principal component and discriminant analyses for two-dimensional maps evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Piñeiro, Ana María; Rodríguez-Berrocal, Francisco Javier; Páez de la Cadena, María

    2007-04-15

    In this study, we evaluated if the application of multivariate analysis on the data obtained from two-dimensional protein maps could mean an improvement in the search for protein markers. First, we performed a classical proteomic study of the differential expression of serum N-glycoproteins in colorectal cancer patients. Then, applying principal component analysis (PCA) we assessed the utility of the 2-D protein pattern and certain subsets of spots as a tool to distinguish control and case samples, and tested the accuracy of the classification model by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). On the other hand we looked for altered spots by univariate statistics and then analysed them as a cluster by PCA and LDA. We found that those proteins combined presented a theoretical sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Finally, the spots with known protein identity were analysed by multivariate methods, finding a subgroup that behaved as the most obvious candidates for further validation trials.

  13. Drug safety evaluation through biomarker analysis-A toxicity study in the cynomolgus monkey using an antibody-cytotoxic conjugate against ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Frank Y. Tengstrand, Elizabeth; Lee, J.-W.; Li, Lily Y.; Silverman, Lee; Riordan, Bill; Miwa, Gerald; Milton, Mark; Alden, Carl; Lee, Frank

    2007-10-01

    Antibody-cytotoxin conjugates are complex novel therapeutic agents whose toxicological properties are not presently well understood. The objective of this study was to identify serum biomarkers that correlate with MLN8866 (an Antibody-Cytotoxic Conjugate, mAb8866-CT) pathological events in monkeys and to predict the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) level using biomarkers. Cynomolgus monkeys were administered a single dose MLN8666 (5, 15 or 30 mg/kg) by intravenous infusion and evaluated over a 7-day period. Exposure levels were determined by quantifying MLN8866 levels (C{sub max} and AUC{sub 0-96h}) in serum. The increase in MLN8866 C{sub max} and AUC{sub 0-96h} was approximately dose proportional. Two biomarkers in serum (m/z 316 and m/z 368) were identified to be correlated with MLN8866 toxicological outcomes. The predicted MTD, 11.4 mg/kg, was within the MTD range set by pathology results (5-15 mg/kg). Administration of MLN8866 at 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg dose levels resulted in changes in hematology parameters associated with impaired hematopoiesis and bone marrow toxicity. The projected MLN8866 MTD exposure level was integrated with toxicokinetic analysis and showed C{sub max} = 236 {mu}g/mL and AUC{sub 0-96h} = 7246 h mg/mL. The safety of three different MLN8866 dosing regimens with three dosing schedules was explored with pharmacokinetic modeling.

  14. Natriuretic Peptides as Cardiovascular Safety Biomarkers in Rats: Comparison With Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Heart Weight.

    PubMed

    Engle, Steven K; Watson, David E

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is an important cause of failure during drug development. Blood-based biomarkers can be used to detect CV toxicity during preclinical development and prioritize compounds at lower risk of causing such toxicities. Evidence of myocardial degeneration can be detected by measuring concentrations of biomarkers such as cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase in blood; however, detection of functional changes in the CV system, such as blood pressure, generally requires studies in animals with surgically implanted pressure transducers. This is a significant limitation because sustained changes in blood pressure are often accompanied by changes in heart rate and together can lead to cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial degeneration in animals, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in humans. Increased concentrations of NPs in blood correlate with higher risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and MACE in humans. Their utility as biomarkers of CV function and toxicity in rodents was investigated by exploring the relationships between plasma concentrations of NTproANP and NTproBNP, blood pressure, heart rate, and heart weight in Sprague Dawley rats administered compounds that caused hypotension or hypertension, including nifedipine, fluprostenol, minoxidil, L-NAME, L-thyroxine, or sunitinib for 1-2 weeks. Changes in NTproANP and/or NTproBNP concentrations were inversely correlated with changes in blood pressure. NTproANP and NTproBNP concentrations were inconsistently correlated with relative heart weights. In addition, increased heart rate was associated with increased heart weights. These studies support the use of natriuretic peptides and heart rate to detect changes in blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in short-duration rat studies.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma from California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) Reveals Apolipoprotein E as a Candidate Biomarker of Chronic Domoic Acid Toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Ferrante, Jason A; Chaves, J Mauro; Soper, Jennifer L; Almeida, Jonas S; Arthur, John M; Gulland, Frances M D; Janech, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is caused by exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid and has been linked to massive stranding events and mortality. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs in addition to the presence of domoic acid in body fluids. Chronic DAT further is characterized by reoccurring seizures progressing to status epilepticus. Diagnosis of chronic DAT is often slow and problematic, and minimally invasive tests for DAT have been the focus of numerous recent biomarker studies. The goal of this study was to retrospectively profile plasma proteins in a population of sea lions with chronic DAT and those without DAT using two dimensional gel electrophoresis to discover whether individual, multiple, or combinations of protein and clinical data could be utilized to identify sea lions with DAT. Using a training set of 32 sea lion sera, 20 proteins and their isoforms were identified that were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). Interestingly, 11 apolipoprotein E (ApoE) charge forms were decreased in DAT samples, indicating that ApoE charge form distributions may be important in the progression of DAT. In order to develop a classifier of chronic DAT, an independent blinded test set of 20 sea lions, seven with chronic DAT, was used to validate models utilizing ApoE charge forms and eosinophil counts. The resulting support vector machine had high sensitivity (85.7% with 92.3% negative predictive value) and high specificity (92.3% with 85.7% positive predictive value). These results suggest that ApoE and eosinophil counts along with machine learning can perform as a robust and accurate tool to diagnose chronic DAT. Although this analysis is specifically focused on blood biomarkers and routine clinical data, the results demonstrate promise for future studies combining additional variables in multidimensional space to create robust classifiers.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma from California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus) Reveals Apolipoprotein E as a Candidate Biomarker of Chronic Domoic Acid Toxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Benjamin A.; Ferrante, Jason A.; Chaves, J. Mauro; Soper, Jennifer L.; Almeida, Jonas S.; Arthur, John M.; Gulland, Frances M. D.; Janech, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) is caused by exposure to the marine biotoxin domoic acid and has been linked to massive stranding events and mortality. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs in addition to the presence of domoic acid in body fluids. Chronic DAT further is characterized by reoccurring seizures progressing to status epilepticus. Diagnosis of chronic DAT is often slow and problematic, and minimally invasive tests for DAT have been the focus of numerous recent biomarker studies. The goal of this study was to retrospectively profile plasma proteins in a population of sea lions with chronic DAT and those without DAT using two dimensional gel electrophoresis to discover whether individual, multiple, or combinations of protein and clinical data could be utilized to identify sea lions with DAT. Using a training set of 32 sea lion sera, 20 proteins and their isoforms were identified that were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). Interestingly, 11 apolipoprotein E (ApoE) charge forms were decreased in DAT samples, indicating that ApoE charge form distributions may be important in the progression of DAT. In order to develop a classifier of chronic DAT, an independent blinded test set of 20 sea lions, seven with chronic DAT, was used to validate models utilizing ApoE charge forms and eosinophil counts. The resulting support vector machine had high sensitivity (85.7% with 92.3% negative predictive value) and high specificity (92.3% with 85.7% positive predictive value). These results suggest that ApoE and eosinophil counts along with machine learning can perform as a robust and accurate tool to diagnose chronic DAT. Although this analysis is specifically focused on blood biomarkers and routine clinical data, the results demonstrate promise for future studies combining additional variables in multidimensional space to create robust classifiers. PMID:25919366

  17. Current advances in esophageal cancer proteomics.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Norihisa; Kondo, Tadashi

    2015-06-01

    We review the current status of proteomics for esophageal cancer (EC) from a clinician's viewpoint. The ultimate goal of cancer proteomics is the improvement of clinical outcome. The proteome as a functional translation of the genome is a straightforward representation of genomic mechanisms that trigger carcinogenesis. Cancer proteomics has identified the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor progression, detected biomarker candidates for early diagnosis, and provided novel therapeutic targets for personalized treatments. Our review focuses on three major topics in EC proteomics: diagnostics, treatment, and molecular mechanisms. We discuss the major histological differences between EC types, i.e., esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, and evaluate the clinical significance of published proteomics studies, including promising diagnostic biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets, which should be further validated prior to launching clinical trials. Multi-disciplinary collaborations between basic scientists, clinicians, and pathologists should be established for inter-institutional validation. In conclusion, EC proteomics has provided significant results, which after thorough validation, should lead to the development of novel clinical tools and improvement of the clinical outcome for esophageal cancer patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics.

  18. Perspective: A Program to Improve Protein Biomarker Discovery for Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aebersold, Ruedi; Anderson, Leigh N.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Druker, Brian; Hartwell, L D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-06-01

    Biomarkers for cancer risk, early detection, prognosis, and therapeutic response promise to revolutionize cancer management. Protein biomarkers offer tremendous potential in this regard due to their great diversity and intimate involvement in physiology. An effective program to discover protein biomarkers using existing technology will require team science, an integrated informatics platform, identification and quantitation of candidate biomarkers in disease tissue, mouse models of disease, standardized reagents for analyzing candidate biomarkers in bodily fluids, and implementation of automation. Technology improvements for better fractionation of the proteome, selection of specific biomarkers from complex mixtures, and multiplexed assay of biomarkers would greatly enhance progress.

  19. Combined Proteomics and Transcriptomics Identifies Carboxypeptidase B1 and Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Associated Proteins as Putative Biomarkers of Metastasis in Low Grade Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Bouchal, Pavel; Dvořáková, Monika; Roumeliotis, Theodoros; Bortlíček, Zbyněk; Ihnatová, Ivana; Procházková, Iva; Ho, Jenny T. C.; Maryáš, Josef; Imrichová, Hana; Budinská, Eva; Vyzula, Rostislav; Garbis, Spiros D.; Vojtěšek, Bořivoj; Nenutil, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Current prognostic factors are insufficient for precise risk-discrimination in breast cancer patients with low grade breast tumors, which, in disagreement with theoretical prognosis, occasionally form early lymph node metastasis. To identify markers for this group of patients, we employed iTRAQ-2DLC-MS/MS proteomics to 24 lymph node positive and 24 lymph node negative grade 1 luminal A primary breast tumors. Another group of 48 high-grade tumors (luminal B, triple negative, Her-2 subtypes) was also analyzed to investigate marker specificity for grade 1 luminal A tumors. From the total of 4405 proteins identified (FDR<5%), the top 65 differentially expressed together with 30 previously identified and control markers were analyzed also at transcript level. Increased levels of carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1), PDZ and LIM domain protein 2 (PDLIM2), and ring finger protein 25 (RNF25) were associated specifically with lymph node positive grade 1 tumors, whereas stathmin 1 (STMN1) and thymosin beta 10 (TMSB10) associated with aggressive tumor phenotype also in high grade tumors at both protein and transcript level. For CPB1, these differences were also observed by immunohistochemical analysis on tissue microarrays. Up-regulation of putative biomarkers in lymph node positive (versus negative) luminal A tumors was validated by gene expression analysis of an independent published data set (n = 343) for CPB1 (p = 0.00155), PDLIM2 (p = 0.02027) and RELA (p = 0.00015). Moreover, statistically significant connections with patient survival were identified in another public data set (n = 1678). Our findings indicate unique pro-metastatic mechanisms in grade 1 tumors that can include up-regulation of CPB1, activation of NF-κB pathway and changes in cell survival and cytoskeleton. These putative biomarkers have potential to identify the specific minor subpopulation of breast cancer patients with low grade tumors who are at higher than expected risk of recurrence and who would benefit

  20. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Advanced Ovarian Cancer Tissue to Identify Potential Biomarkers of Responders and Nonresponders to First-Line Chemotherapy of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Urmila; Pokhriyal, Ruchika; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Hariprasad, Roopa; Khan, Mohd Imran; Gupta, Divya; Naru, Jasmine; Singh, Sundararajan Baskar; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Vanamail, Perumal; Kumar, Lalit; Kumar, Sunesh; Hariprasad, Gururao

    2016-01-01

    Conventional treatment for advanced ovarian cancer is an initial debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel. Despite initial high response, three-fourths of these women experience disease recurrence with a dismal prognosis. Patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer who underwent cytoreductive surgery were enrolled and tissue samples were collected. Post surgery, these patients were started on chemotherapy and followed up till the end of the cycle. Fluorescence-based differential in-gel expression coupled with mass spectrometric analysis was used for discovery phase of experiments, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and pathway analysis were performed for expression and functional validation of differentially expressed proteins. While aldehyde reductase, hnRNP, cyclophilin A, heat shock protein-27, and actin are upregulated in responders, prohibitin, enoyl-coA hydratase, peroxiredoxin, and fibrin-β are upregulated in the nonresponders. The expressions of some of these proteins correlated with increased apoptotic activity in responders and decreased apoptotic activity in nonresponders. Therefore, the proteins qualify as potential biomarkers to predict chemotherapy response. PMID:26997873

  1. Serum proteomic profiling reveals fragments of MYOM3 as potential biomarkers for monitoring the outcome of therapeutic interventions in muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Rouillon, Jérémy; Poupiot, Jérôme; Zocevic, Aleksandar; Amor, Fatima; Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Wong, Brenda; Pinilla, Robin; Cosette, Jérémie; Coenen-Stass, Anna M.L.; Mcclorey, Graham; Roberts, Thomas C.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Servais, Laurent; Udd, Bjarne; Voit, Thomas; Richard, Isabelle; Svinartchouk, Fedor

    2015-01-01

    Therapy-responsive biomarkers are an important and unmet need in the muscular dystrophy field where new treatments are currently in clinical trials. By using a comprehensive high-resolution mass spectrometry approach and western blot validation, we found that two fragments of the myofibrillar structural protein myomesin-3 (MYOM3) are abnormally present in sera of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D) and their respective animal models. Levels of MYOM3 fragments were assayed in therapeutic model systems: (1) restoration of dystrophin expression by antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon-skipping in mdx mice and (2) stable restoration of α-sarcoglycan expression in KO-SGCA mice by systemic injection of a viral vector. Following administration of the therapeutic agents MYOM3 was restored toward wild-type levels. In the LGMD model, where different doses of vector were used, MYOM3 restoration was dose-dependent. MYOM3 fragments showed lower inter-individual variability compared with the commonly used creatine kinase assay, and correlated better with the restoration of the dystrophin-associated protein complex and muscle force. These data suggest that the MYOM3 fragments hold promise for minimally invasive assessment of experimental therapies for DMD and other neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26060189

  2. Serum proteomic profiling reveals fragments of MYOM3 as potential biomarkers for monitoring the outcome of therapeutic interventions in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Rouillon, Jérémy; Poupiot, Jérôme; Zocevic, Aleksandar; Amor, Fatima; Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Wong, Brenda; Pinilla, Robin; Cosette, Jérémie; Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; Mcclorey, Graham; Roberts, Thomas C; Wood, Matthew J A; Servais, Laurent; Udd, Bjarne; Voit, Thomas; Richard, Isabelle; Svinartchouk, Fedor

    2015-09-01

    Therapy-responsive biomarkers are an important and unmet need in the muscular dystrophy field where new treatments are currently in clinical trials. By using a comprehensive high-resolution mass spectrometry approach and western blot validation, we found that two fragments of the myofibrillar structural protein myomesin-3 (MYOM3) are abnormally present in sera of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D) and their respective animal models. Levels of MYOM3 fragments were assayed in therapeutic model systems: (1) restoration of dystrophin expression by antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon-skipping in mdx mice and (2) stable restoration of α-sarcoglycan expression in KO-SGCA mice by systemic injection of a viral vector. Following administration of the therapeutic agents MYOM3 was restored toward wild-type levels. In the LGMD model, where different doses of vector were used, MYOM3 restoration was dose-dependent. MYOM3 fragments showed lower inter-individual variability compared with the commonly used creatine kinase assay, and correlated better with the restoration of the dystrophin-associated protein complex and muscle force. These data suggest that the MYOM3 fragments hold promise for minimally invasive assessment of experimental therapies for DMD and other neuromuscular disorders.

  3. Proteomic analysis of differentiating neuroblastoma cells treated with sub-lethal neurite inhibitory concentrations of diazinon: Identification of novel biomarkers of effect

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.; Sachana, M.; Flaskos, J.; Hargreaves, A.J.

    2009-10-15

    In previous work we showed that sub-lethal levels of diazinon inhibited neurite outgrowth in differentiating N2a neuroblastoma cells. Western blotting analysis targeted at proteins involved in axon growth and stress responses, revealed that such exposure led to a reduction in the levels of neurofilament heavy chain, microtubule associated protein 1 B (MAP 1B) and HSP-70. The aim of this study was to apply the approach of 2 dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify novel biomarkers of effect. A number of proteins were found to be up-regulated compared to the control on silver-stained gels. These were classified in to 3 main groups of proteins: cytosolic factors, chaperones and the actin-binding protein cofilin, all of which are involved in cell differentiation, survival or metabolism. The changes observed for cofilin were further confirmed by quantitative Western blotting analysis with anti-actin and anti-cofilin antibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence staining with the same antibodies indicated that the microfilament network was disrupted in diazinon-treated cells. Our data suggest that microfilament organisation is disrupted by diazinon exposure, which may be related to increased cofilin expression.

  4. Hypoxia integration in the serological proteome analysis unmasks tumor antigens and fosters the identification of anti-phospho-eEF2 antibodies as potential cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Marie; Sermeus, Alexandra; Branders, Samuel; Defresne, Florence; Dieu, Marc; Dupont, Pierre; Raes, Martine; De Ridder, Mark; Feron, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The expression by tumor cells of proteins with aberrant structure, expression or distribution accounts for the development of a humoral immune response. Autoantibodies (aAb) directed against tumor-associated antigens (TAA) may thus be particularly relevant for early detection of cancer. Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) aims to identify such circulating aAb through the immunoblotting of 2D-separated tumor cell proteins with cancer patient serum and the consecutive MS identification of proteins in reactive spots. This method has the advantage to use post-translationally modified proteins as a source of potential TAA. Here, we applied this strategy by using colorectal tumor cells pre-exposed to hypoxia in order to promote the expression of a pattern of TAA more likely to represent in vivo conditions. We used two human HCT116 and HT29 colorectal cancer cell lines exposed for 48 hours to 1% O2. Spots positive after immunoblotting of 2D-separated lysates of hypoxic cells with the sera of tumor-bearing mice, were collected and analysed by MS for protein identification. Among the hypoxia-specific immunogenic proteins, we identified a phosphorylated form of eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (phospho-Thr56 eEF2). We confirmed the increased phosphorylation of this protein in hypoxic colorectal tumor cells as well as in mouse tumors. Using a specific immunoassay, we could detect the presence of corresponding anti-phospho-Thr56 eEF2 aAb in the serum of tumor-bearing mice (vs healthy mice). We further documented that the detection of these aAb preceded the detection of a palpable tumor mass in mice and validated the presence of anti-phospho-Thr56 eEF2 aAb in the serum of patients with adenomatous polyps and colorectal carcinoma. In conclusion, this study validates a phosphorylated form of eEF2 as a new TAA and more generally, provides evidence that integrating hypoxia upstream of SERPA offers a more relevant repertoire of TAA able to unmask the presence of

  5. Challenges and Solutions in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Hongzhan, Huang; Shukla, Hem D; Cathy, Wu; Satya, Saxena

    2007-01-01

    The accelerated growth of proteomics data presents both opportunities and challenges. Large-scale proteomic profiling of biological samples such as cells, organelles or biological fluids has led to discovery of numerous key and novel proteins involved in many biological/disease processes including cancers, as well as to the identification of novel disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets. While proteomic data analysis has been greatly assisted by the many bioinformatics tools developed in recent years, a careful analysis of the major steps and flow of data in a typical highthroughput analysis reveals a few gaps that still need to be filled to fully realize the value of the data. To facilitate functional and pathway discovery for large-scale proteomic data, we have developed an integrated proteomic expression analysis system, iProXpress, which facilitates protein identification using a comprehensive sequence library and functional interpretation using integrated data. With its modular design, iProXpress complements and can be integrated with other software in a proteomic data analysis pipeline. This novel approach to complex biological questions involves the interrogation of multiple data sources, thereby facilitating hypothesis generation and knowledge discovery from the genomic-scale studies and fostering disease diagnosis and drug development. PMID:18645629

  6. The proteome of human saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2013-05-01

    Human saliva holds tremendous potential for transforming disease and health diagnostics given its richness of molecular information and non-invasive collection. Enumerating its molecular constituents is an important first step towards reaching this potential. Among the molecules in saliva, proteins and peptides arguably have the most value: they can directly indicate biochemical functions linked to a health condition/disease state, and they are attractive targets for biomarker assay development. However, cataloging and defining the human salivary proteome is challenging given the dynamic, chemically heterogeneous and complex nature of the system. In addition, the overall human saliva proteome is composed of several "sub-proteomes" which include: intact full length proteins, proteins carrying post-translational modifications (PTMs), low molecular weight peptides, and the metaproteome, derived from protein products from nonhuman organisms (e.g. microbes) present in the oral cavity. Presented here will be a summary of communal efforts to meet the challenge of characterizing the multifaceted saliva proteome, focusing on the use of mass spectrometry as the proteomic technology of choice. Implications of these efforts to characterize the salivary proteome in the context of disease diagnostics will also be discussed.

  7. Translational Research and Plasma Proteomic in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Santini, Annamaria Chiara; Giovane, Giancarlo; Auletta, Adelaide; Di Carlo, Angelina; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Cito, Letizia; Astarita, Carlo; Giordano, Antonio; Alfano, Roberto; Feola, Antonia; Di Domenico, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Proteomics is a recent field of research in molecular biology that can help in the fight against cancer through the search for biomarkers that can detect this disease in the early stages of its development. Proteomic is a speedily growing technology, also thanks to the development of even more sensitive and fast mass spectrometry analysis. Although this technique is the most widespread for the discovery of new cancer biomarkers, it still suffers of a poor sensitivity and insufficient reproducibility, essentially due to the tumor heterogeneity. Common technical shortcomings include limitations in the sensitivity of detecting low abundant biomarkers and possible systematic biases in the observed data. Current research attempts are trying to develop high-resolution proteomic instrumentation for high-throughput monitoring of protein changes that occur in cancer. In this review, we describe the basic features of the proteomic tools which have proven to be useful in cancer research, showing their advantages and disadvantages. The application of these proteomic tools could provide early biomarkers detection in various cancer types and could improve the understanding the mechanisms of tumor growth and dissemination.

  8. A systems biology and proteomics-based approach identifies SRC and VEGFA as biomarkers in risk factor mediated coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    V, Alexandar; Nayar, Pradeep G; Murugesan, R; S, Shajahan; Krishnan, Jayalakshmi; Ahmed, Shiek S S J

    2016-07-19

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of death worldwide. The burden of CHD increases with risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, obesity and diabetes. Several studies have demonstrated the association of these classical risk factors with CHD. However, the mechanisms of these associations remain largely unclear due to the complexity of disease pathophysiology and the lack of an integrative approach that fails to provide a definite understanding of molecular linkage. To overcome these problems, we propose a novel systems biology approach that relates causative genes, interactomes and pathways to elucidate the risk factors mediating the molecular mechanisms and biomarkers for feasible diagnosis. The literature was mined to retrieve the causative genes of each risk factor and CHD to construct protein interactomes. The interactomes were examined to identify 298 common molecular signatures. The common signatures were mapped to the tissue network to synthesize a sub-network consisting of 82 proteins. Further, the dissection of the sub-network provides functional modules representing a diverse range of molecular functions, including the AKT/p13k, MAPK and wnt pathways. Also, the prioritization of functional modules identifies SRC, VEGFA and HIF1A as potential candidate markers. Further, we validate these candidates with the existing markers CRP, NOS3 and VCAM1 in the serum of 63 individuals, 33 with CHD and 30 controls, using ELISA. SRC, VEGFA, H1F1A, CRP and NOS3 were significantly altered in patients compared to controls. These results support the utility of these candidate markers for the diagnosis of CHD. Overall, our molecular observations indicate the influence of risk factors in the pathophysiology of CHD and identify serum markers for diagnosis.

  9. Identification of novel biomarkers of brain damage in patients with hemorrhagic stroke by integrating bioinformatics and mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morillo, Eduardo; García Hernández, Pablo; Begcevic, Ilijana; Kosanam, Hari; Prieto García, Belén; Alvarez Menéndez, Francisco V; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2014-02-07

    Hemorrhagic stroke (HS) is a significant cause of mortality that requires rapid diagnosis and prompt medical attention. A time-efficient diagnostic test to assist in the early classification of patients with stroke would be of great value. The aims here were to (a) select "brain-specific" proteins using a bioinformatics approach, (b) develop selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assays for candidate proteins, and (c) quantify these proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). "The Human Protein Atlas" and the "Peptide Atlas" were used to select proteins specifically and abundantly expressed in brain tissue, excluding high-abundance plasma proteins. Protein extracts from brain tissue were used for SRM assay development of proteins of interest. The levels of 68 "brain-specific" proteins were measured by SRM in 36 age-matched patients, including individuals with HS (n = 15), ischemic stroke (n = 11), and controls (n = 10). Additionally, S100B was measured using an electrochemoluminometric immunoassay. CSF levels of S100B and eight of the "brain-specific" proteins (NSE, GFAP, α-Inx, MBP, MT3, NFM, β-Syn, and γ-Syn) were increased in a subset of samples from HS patients, especially in those individuals with intraventricular hemorrhage and poor outcome. Seven of these proteins (S100B, NSE, GFAP, α-Inx, MBP, NFM, and β-Syn) showed significant differences between patients with and without brain hemorrhage. Novel biomarkers of brain injury (α-Inx, NFM, and β-Syn) were identified in the CSF of patients with HS. Investigating the role of these proteins in blood with more sensitive methods is warranted.

  10. Integrative proteomic and gene expression analysis identify potential biomarkers for adjuvant trastuzumab resistance: analysis from the Fin-her phase III randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Debora; Rothé, Françoise; Vincent, Delphine; Ignatiadis, Michael; Desmedt, Christine; Salgado, Roberto; Sirtaine, Nicolas; Loi, Sherene; Neven, Patrick; Loibl, Sibylle; Denkert, Carsten; Joensuu, Heikki; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Trastuzumab is a remarkably effective therapy for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) - positive breast cancer (BC). However, not all women with high levels of HER2 benefit from trastuzumab. By integrating mRNA and protein expression data from Reverse-Phase Protein Array Analysis (RPPA) in HER2-positive BC, we developed gene expression metagenes that reflect pathway activation levels. Next we assessed the ability of these metagenes to predict resistance to adjuvant trastuzumab using gene expression data from two independent datasets. 10 metagenes passed external validation (false discovery rate [fdr] < 0.05) and showed biological relevance with their pathway of origin. These metagenes were further screened for their association with trastuzumab resistance. An association with trastuzumab resistance was observed and validated only for the AnnexinA1 metagene (ANXA1). In the randomised phase III Fin-her study, tumours with low levels of the ANXA1 metagene showed a benefit from trastuzumab (multivariate: hazard ratio [HR] for distant recurrence = 0.16[95%CI 0.05–0.5]; p = 0.002; fdr = 0.03), while high expression levels of the ANXA1 metagene were associated with a lack of benefit to trastuzmab (HR = 1.29[95%CI 0.55–3.02]; p = 0.56). The association of ANXA1 with trastuzumab resistance was successfully validated in an independent series of subjects who had received trastuzumab with chemotherapy (Log Rank; p = 0.01). In conclusion, in HER2-positive BC, some proteins are associated with distinct gene expression profiles. Our findings identify the ANXA1metagene as a novel biomarker for trastuzumab resistance. PMID:26358523

  11. Integrative proteomic and gene expression analysis identify potential biomarkers for adjuvant trastuzumab resistance: analysis from the Fin-her phase III randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sonnenblick, Amir; Brohée, Sylvain; Fumagalli, Debora; Rothé, Françoise; Vincent, Delphine; Ignatiadis, Michael; Desmedt, Christine; Salgado, Roberto; Sirtaine, Nicolas; Loi, Sherene; Neven, Patrick; Loibl, Sibylle; Denkert, Carsten; Joensuu, Heikki; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos

    2015-10-06

    Trastuzumab is a remarkably effective therapy for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)--positive breast cancer (BC). However, not all women with high levels of HER2 benefit from trastuzumab. By integrating mRNA and protein expression data from Reverse-Phase Protein Array Analysis (RPPA) in HER2-positive BC, we developed gene expression metagenes that reflect pathway activation levels. Next we assessed the ability of these metagenes to predict resistance to adjuvant trastuzumab using gene expression data from two independent datasets.10 metagenes passed external validation (false discovery rate [fdr] < 0.05) and showed biological relevance with their pathway of origin. These metagenes were further screened for their association with trastuzumab resistance. An association with trastuzumab resistance was observed and validated only for the AnnexinA1 metagene (ANXA1). In the randomised phase III Fin-her study, tumours with low levels of the ANXA1 metagene showed a benefit from trastuzumab (multivariate: hazard ratio [HR] for distant recurrence = 0.16[95%CI 0.05-0.5]; p = 0.002; fdr = 0.03), while high expression levels of the ANXA1 metagene were associated with a lack of benefit to trastuzmab (HR = 1.29[95%CI 0.55-3.02]; p = 0.56). The association of ANXA1 with trastuzumab resistance was successfully validated in an independent series of subjects who had received trastuzumab with chemotherapy (Log Rank; p = 0.01).In conclusion, in HER2-positive BC, some proteins are associated with distinct gene expression profiles. Our findings identify the ANXA1metagene as a novel biomarker for trastuzumab resistance.

  12. Farm animal serum proteomics and impact on human health.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Francesco; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Lante, Isabella; Signore, Fabrizio; Muraca, Marta; Putignani, Lorenza

    2014-09-01

    Due to the incompleteness of animal genome sequencing, the analysis and characterization of serum proteomes of most farm animals are still in their infancy, compared to the already well-documented human serum proteome. This review focuses on the implications of the farm animal serum proteomics in order to identify novel biomarkers for animal welfare, early diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of infectious disease treatment, and develop new vaccines, aiming at determining the reciprocal benefits for humans and animals.

  13. Farm Animal Serum Proteomics and Impact on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Girolamo, Francesco Di; D’Amato, Alfonsina; Lante, Isabella; Signore, Fabrizio; Muraca, Marta; Putignani, Lorenza

    2014-01-01

    Due to the incompleteness of animal genome sequencing, the analysis and characterization of serum proteomes of most farm animals are still in their infancy, compared to the already well-documented human serum proteome. This review focuses on the implications of the farm animal serum proteomics in order to identify novel biomarkers for animal welfare, early diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of infectious disease treatment, and develop new vaccines, aiming at determining the reciprocal benefits for humans and animals. PMID:25257521

  14. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics: principles, perspectives, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R

    2008-10-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a modern and rapidly developing methodology for qualitative and quantitative characterization of proteins and their posttranslational modification, subcellular localization, and interaction partners. It enables characterization of entire proteomes with unprecedented sensitivity and precision, providing platforms for identification of biomarkers and drug targets.

  15. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  16. Proteomics, nanotechnology and molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher J; Zhukovsky, Nikolay; Cass, Anthony E G; Nagy, Judit M

    2008-02-01

    Sequencing of the human genome opened the way to the exploration of the proteome and this has lead to the identification of large numbers of proteins in complex biological samples. The identification of diagnostic patterns in samples taken from patients to aid diagnosis is in the early stages of development. The solution to many of the technical challenges in proteomics and protein based molecular diagnostics will be found in new applications of nanomaterials. This review describes some of the physical and chemical principles underlying nanomaterials and devices and outlines how they can be used in proteomics; developments which are establishing nanoproteomics as a new field. Nanoproteomics will provide the platform for the discovery of next generation biomarkers. The field of molecular diagnostics will then come of age.

  17. Proteomics characterization of exosome cargo.

    PubMed

    Schey, Kevin L; Luther, J Matthew; Rose, Kristie L

    2015-10-01

    Characterization of exosomal cargo is of significant interest because this cargo can provide clues to exosome biogenesis, targeting, and cellular effects and may be a source of biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. With recent improvements in proteomics technologies, both qualitative and quantitative characterization of exosomal proteins is possible. Here we provide a brief review of exosome proteomics studies and provide detailed protocols for global qualitative, global quantitative, and targeted quantitative analysis of exosomal proteins. In addition, we provide an example application of a standard global quantitative analysis followed by validation via a targeted quantitative analysis of urine exosome samples from human patients. Advantages and limitations of each method are discussed as well as future directions for exosome proteomics analysis.

  18. Proteome analysis in thyroid pathology.

    PubMed

    Pagni, Fabio; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Bono, Francesca; Garancini, Mattia; Roversi, Gaia; De Sio, Gabriele; Galli, Manuel; Smith, Andrew James; Chinello, Clizia; Magni, Fulvio

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has continuously increased due to its detection in the preclinical stage. Clinical research in thyroid pathology is focusing on the development of new diagnostic tools to improve the stratification of nodules that have biological, practical and economic consequences on the management of patients. Several clinical questions related to thyroid carcinoma remain open and the use of proteomic research in the hunt for new targets with potential diagnostic applications has an important role in the solutions. Many different proteomic approaches are used to investigate thyroid lesions, including mass spectrometry profiling and imaging technologies. These approaches have been applied to different human tissues (cytological specimens, frozen sections, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue or Tissue Micro Arrays). Moreover, other specimens are used for biomarker discovery, such as cell lines and the secretome. Alternative approaches, such as metabolomics and lipidomics, are also used and integrated within proteomics.

  19. Proteomics Characterization of Exosome Cargo

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Kevin L.; Luther, J. Matthew; Rose, Kristie L.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of exosomal cargo is of significant interest because this cargo can provide clues to exosome biogenesis, targeting, and cellular effects and may be a source of biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. With recent improvements in proteomics technologies, both qualitative and quantitative characterization of exosomal proteins is possible. Here we provide a brief review of exosome proteomics studies and provide detailed protocols for global qualitative, global quantitative, and targeted quantitative analysis of exosomal proteins. In addition, we provide an example application of a standard global quantitative analysis followed by validation via a targeted quantitative analysis of urine exosome samples from human patients. Advantages and limitations of each method are discussed as well as future directions for exosome proteomics analysis. PMID:25837312

  20. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  1. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, Tore; Amundson, Sally A,; Blakely, William F.; Burns, Frederic J.; Chen, Allen; Dainiak, Nicholas; Franklin, Stephen; Leary, Julie A.; Loftus, David J.; Morgan, William F.; Pellmar, Terry C.; Stolc, Viktor; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-05-01

    A summary is provided of presentations and discussions from the NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop held September 27-28, 2007, at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Invited speakers were distinguished scientists representing key sectors of the radiation research community. Speakers addressed recent developments in the biomarker and biotechnology fields that may provide new opportunities for health-related assessment of radiation-exposed individuals, including for long-duration space travel. Topics discussed include the space radiation environment, biomarkers of radiation sensitivity and individual susceptibility, molecular signatures of low-dose responses, multivariate analysis of gene expression, biomarkers in biodefense, biomarkers in radiation oncology, biomarkers and triage following large-scale radiological incidents, integrated and multiple biomarker approaches, advances in whole-genome tiling arrays, advances in mass-spectrometry proteomics, radiation biodosimetry for estimation of cancer risk in a rat skin model, and confounding factors. Summary conclusions are provided at the end of the report.

  2. Blood-based biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Lama M; Stern, Matthew B; Chen-Plotkin, Alice

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for biomarkers to diagnose Parkinson's disease (PD), assess disease severity, and prognosticate course. Various types of biologic specimens are potential candidates for identifying biomarkers--defined here as surrogate indicators of physiological or pathophysiological states--but blood has the advantage of being minimally invasive to obtain. There are, however, several challenges to identifying biomarkers in blood. Several candidate biomarkers identified in other diseases or in other types of biological fluids are being pursued as blood-based biomarkers in PD. In addition, unbiased discovery is underway using techniques including metabolomics, proteomics, and gene expression profiling. In this review, we summarize these techniques and discuss the challenges and successes of blood-based biomarker discovery in PD. Blood-based biomarkers that are discussed include α-synuclein, DJ-1, uric acid, epidermal growth factor, apolipoprotein-A1, and peripheral inflammatory markers.

  3. Discovery of safety biomarkers for realgar in rat urine using UFLC-IT-TOF/MS and 1H NMR based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yin; Tian, Yuan; Li, Geng; Li, Yuanyuan; Yin, Xinjuan; Peng, Can; Xu, Fengguo; Zhang, Zunjian

    2013-05-01

    As an arsenical, realgar (As4S4) is known as a poison and paradoxically as a therapeutic agent. However, a complete understanding of the precise biochemical alterations accompanying the toxicity and therapy effects of realgar is lacking. Using a combined ultrafast liquid chromatography (UFLC) coupled with ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IT-TOF/MS) and (1)H NMR spectroscopy based metabolomics approach, we were able to delineate significantly altered metabolites in the urine samples of realgar-treated rats. The platform stability of the liquid chromatography LC/MS and NMR techniques was systematically investigated, and the data processing method was carefully optimized. Our results indicate significant perturbations in amino acid metabolism, citric acid cycle, choline metabolism, and porphyrin metabolism. Thirty-six metabolites were proposed as potential safety biomarkers related to disturbances caused by realgar, and glycine and serine are expected to serve as the central contacts in the metabolic pathways related to realgar-induced disturbance. The LC/MS and NMR based metabolomics approach established provided a systematic and holistic view of the biochemical effects of realgar on rats, and might be employed to investigate other drugs or xenobiotics in the future.

  4. Consolidation of proteomics data in the Cancer Proteomics database.

    PubMed

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Boddie, Paul; Frick, Rahel; Koehler, Christian J; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by abnormal cell growth and one of the major reasons for human deaths. Proteins are involved in the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer, furthermore they are affected by anti-cancer drugs, and protein biomarkers can be used to diagnose certain cancer types. Therefore, it is important to explore the proteomics background of cancer. In this report, we developed the Cancer Proteomics database to re-interrogate published proteome studies investigating cancer. The database is divided in three sections related to cancer processes, cancer types, and anti-cancer drugs. Currently, the Cancer Proteomics database contains 9778 entries of 4118 proteins extracted from 143 scientific articles covering all three sections: cell death (cancer process), prostate cancer (cancer type) and platinum-based anti-cancer drugs including carboplatin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin (anti-cancer drugs). The detailed information extracted from the literature includes basic information about the articles (e.g., PubMed ID, authors, journal name, publication year), information about the samples (type, study/reference, prognosis factor), and the proteomics workflow (Subcellular fractionation, protein, and peptide separation, mass spectrometry, quantification). Useful annotations such as hyperlinks to UniProt and PubMed were included. In addition, many filtering options were established as well as export functions. The database is freely available at http://cancerproteomics.uio.no.

  5. UniPep - a database for human N-linked glycosites: a resource for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Loriaux, Paul; Eng, Jimmy; Campbell, David; Keller, Andrew; Moss, Pat; Bonneau, Richard; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yong; Wollscheid, Bernd; Cooke, Kelly; Yi, Eugene C; Lee, Hookeun; Peskind, Elaine R; Zhang, Jing; Smith, Richard D; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2006-01-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in proteomic analyses of plasma for the purpose of discovering biomarkers. Profiling N-linked glycopeptides is a particularly promising method because the population of N-linked glycosites represents the proteomes of plasma, the cell surface, and secreted proteins at very low redundancy and provides a compelling link between the tissue and plasma proteomes. Here, we describe UniPep - a database of human N-linked glycosites - as a resource for biomarker discovery. PMID:16901351

  6. Toward an integrated pipeline for protein biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Drabovich, Andrei P; Martínez-Morillo, Eduardo; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-06-01

    Protein biomarker development is a multidisciplinary task involving basic, translational and clinical research. Integration of multidisciplinary efforts in a single pipeline is challenging, but crucial to facilitate rational discovery of protein biomarkers and alleviate existing disappointments in the field. In this review, we discuss in detail individual phases of biomarker development pipeline, such as biomarker candidate identification, verification and validation. We focus on mass spectrometry as a principal technique for protein identification and quantification, and discuss complementary -omics approaches for selection of biomarker candidates. Proteomic samples, protein-based clinical laboratory tests and limitations of biomarker development are reviewed in detail, and critical assessment of all phases of biomarker development pipeline is provided. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics.

  7. Urinary Biomarkers of Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    An, Manxia; Gao, Youhe

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are the measurable changes associated with a physiological or pathophysiological process. Unlike blood, urine is not subject to homeostatic mechanisms. Therefore, greater fluctuations could occur in urine than in blood, better reflecting the changes in human body. The roadmap of urine biomarker era was proposed. Although urine analysis has been attempted for clinical diagnosis, and urine has been monitored during the progression of many diseases, particularly urinary system diseases, whether urine can reflect brain disease status remains uncertain. As some biomarkers of brain diseases can be detected in the body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and blood, there is a possibility that urine also contain biomarkers of brain diseases. This review summarizes the clues of brain diseases reflected in the urine proteome and metabolome. PMID:26751805

  8. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer.

  9. Proteomics of saliva: personal experience.

    PubMed

    Scarano, E; Fiorita, A; Picciotti, P M; Passali, G C; Calò, L; Cabras, T; Inzitari, R; Fanali, C; Messana, I; Castagnola, M; Paludetti, G

    2010-06-01

    The salivary proteome is a complex protein mixture resulting from the activity of salivary glands with the contribution of other components that form the oral environment such as oral tissues and micro-organisms. For diagnosis purposes, saliva collection has the great advantage of being an easy and non-invasive technique. Human saliva proteomics have proven to be a novel approach in the search for protein biomarkers for detection of different local and systemic diseases. Currently, more than 1400 salivary proteins have been identified. In the last few years, our research group has extensively studied the salivary proteomics in order to analyse the salivary composition, investigating the major families of proteins present in human and mammalian saliva, the post-translational modifications, the different contributions of glands, the physiological and pathological modifications of saliva. The aim of this report is to present our personal experience in salivary proteomics. In conclusion, salivary proteome analysis represents an important field both for diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases and could be considered a novel approach to prevention of various pathological conditions.

  10. Effects of a pre-workout supplement on lean mass, muscular performance, subjective workout experience and biomarkers of safety.

    PubMed

    Kedia, A William; Hofheins, Jennifer E; Habowski, Scott M; Ferrando, Arny A; Gothard, M David; Lopez, Hector L

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, trial conducted in two parts, we examined the effects of a multi-ingredient pre-exercise workout supplement blend of creatine, betaine and a dendrobium extract (MMP) on safety, performance, and body composition in healthy men and women undergoing a supervised program of resistance exercise. Part 1 was an acute hemodynamic safety study wherein forty young, healthy men and women (26.2 ± 5.3 years, 70.4 ± 3.3 inches, 83.7 ± 14.9 kg, 26.0 ± 3.2 kg●m(-2)) ingest one dose of either the MMP or comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator controlled, crossover fashion before having their resting heart rate, blood, ECG and comprehensive blood chemistry and blood counts completed. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures were generally raised (3.0-5.4 mm Hg, p<0.01) following supplementation with MPP whereas in the comparator group SBP was marginally reduced by 0.3 to 1.2 mm Hg, p>0.05 at all time points) and DBP was increased (3.0 - 3.9 mm Hg, p<0.05 at all time points). No changes in EKG-corrected QT interval were observed, and no serious adverse events were reported. Part 2 was a six-week training study wherein forty-three young, healthy men and women (24.3 ± 2.9 years, 70.5 ± 3.1 inches, 83.8 ± 9.6 kg, 26.1 ± 2.7 kg●m(-2)) supplemented with daily pre-workout doses of either the MPP or a comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator-controlled fashion while following a standardized resistance training program for six weeks. MPP and the comparator were isocaloric and delivered the same amount of caffeine. Significant improvements in visual analog scale (VAS) scores for energy (p<0.024) and concentration (p<0.041) were found along with consistently higher levels of focus accompanied by less fatigue when MPP was consumed in comparison to comparator during upper body muscular strength-endurance tests at weeks 3 and 6. MPP supplementation for 6 weeks did not improve dual-energy x

  11. Effects of a Pre-workout Supplement on Lean Mass, Muscular Performance, Subjective Workout Experience and Biomarkers of Safety

    PubMed Central

    Kedia, A. William; Hofheins, Jennifer E.; Habowski, Scott M.; Ferrando, Arny A.; Gothard, M. David; Lopez, Hector L.

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, trial conducted in two parts, we examined the effects of a multi-ingredient pre-exercise workout supplement blend of creatine, betaine and a dendrobium extract (MMP) on safety, performance, and body composition in healthy men and women undergoing a supervised program of resistance exercise. Part 1 was an acute hemodynamic safety study wherein forty young, healthy men and women (26.2 ± 5.3 years, 70.4 ± 3.3 inches, 83.7 ± 14.9 kg, 26.0 ± 3.2 kg●m-2) ingest one dose of either the MMP or comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator controlled, crossover fashion before having their resting heart rate, blood, ECG and comprehensive blood chemistry and blood counts completed. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures were generally raised (3.0-5.4 mm Hg, p<0.01) following supplementation with MPP whereas in the comparator group SBP was marginally reduced by 0.3 to 1.2 mm Hg, p>0.05 at all time points) and DBP was increased (3.0 - 3.9 mm Hg, p<0.05 at all time points). No changes in EKG-corrected QT interval were observed, and no serious adverse events were reported. Part 2 was a six-week training study wherein forty-three young, healthy men and women (24.3 ± 2.9 years, 70.5 ± 3.1 inches, 83.8 ± 9.6 kg, 26.1 ± 2.7 kg●m-2) supplemented with daily pre-workout doses of either the MPP or a comparator in a randomized, double-blind, comparator-controlled fashion while following a standardized resistance training program for six weeks. MPP and the comparator were isocaloric and delivered the same amount of caffeine. Significant improvements in visual analog scale (VAS) scores for energy (p<0.024) and concentration (p<0.041) were found along with consistently higher levels of focus accompanied by less fatigue when MPP was consumed in comparison to comparator during upper body muscular strength-endurance tests at weeks 3 and 6. MPP supplementation for 6 weeks did not improve dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry

  12. A Review: Proteomics in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ze-Tan; Liang, Zhong-Guo; Zhu, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is generally effective in the treatment of major nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), this treatment still makes approximately 20% of patients radioresistant. Therefore, the identification of blood or biopsy biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to radioresistance and that can diagnosis early stages of NPC would be highly useful to improve this situation. Proteomics is widely used in NPC for searching biomarkers and comparing differentially expressed proteins. In this review, an overview of proteomics with different samples related to NPC and common proteomics methods was made. In conclusion, identical proteins are sorted as follows: Keratin is ranked the highest followed by such proteins as annexin, heat shock protein, 14-3-3σ, nm-23 protein, cathepsin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, enolase, triosephosphate isomerase, stathmin, prohibitin, and vimentin. This ranking indicates that these proteins may be NPC-related proteins and have potential value for further studies. PMID:26184160

  13. Targeted proteomics identifies liquid-biopsy signatures for extracapsular prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunee; Jeon, Jouhyun; Mejia, Salvador; Yao, Cindy Q; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Gramolini, Anthony O; Lance, Raymond S; Troyer, Dean A; Drake, Richard R; Boutros, Paul C; Semmes, O. John; Kislinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are rapidly gaining importance in personalized medicine. Although numerous molecular signatures have been developed over the past decade, there is a lack of overlap and many biomarkers fail to validate in independent patient cohorts and hence are not useful for clinical application. For these reasons, identification of novel and robust biomarkers remains a formidable challenge. We combine targeted proteomics with computational biology to discover robust proteomic signatures for prostate cancer. Quantitative proteomics conducted in expressed prostatic secretions from men with extraprostatic and organ-confined prostate cancers identified 133 differentially expressed proteins. Using synthetic peptides, we evaluate them by targeted proteomics in a 74-patient cohort of expressed prostatic secretions in urine. We quantify a panel of 34 candidates in an independent 207-patient cohort. We apply machine-learning approaches to develop clinical predictive models for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Our results demonstrate that computationally guided proteomics can discover highly accurate non-invasive biomarkers. PMID:27350604

  14. Nanoscale Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Masselon, Christophe D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes efforts to develop a liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) technology for ultra-sensitive proteomics studies, i.e. nanoscale proteomics. The approach combines high-efficiency nano-scale LC with advanced MS, including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS, to perform both single-stage MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) proteomic analyses. The technology developed enables large-scale protein identification from nanogram size proteomic samples and characterization of more abundant proteins from sub-picogram size complex samples. Protein identification in such studies using MS is feasible from <75 zeptomole of a protein, and the average proteome measurement throughput is >200 proteins/h and ~3 h/sample. Higher throughput (>1000 proteins/h) and more sensitive detection limits can be obtained using a “accurate mass and time” tag approach developed at our laboratory. These capabilities lay the foundation for studies from single or limited numbers of cells.

  15. Circulating Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Spitali, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. Genetic and biochemical research over the years has characterized the cause, pathophysiology and development of the disease providing several potential therapeutic targets and/or biomarkers. High throughput – omic technologies have provided a comprehensive understanding of the changes occurring in dystrophic muscles. Murine and canine animal models have been a valuable source to profile muscles and body fluids, thus providing candidate biomarkers that can be evaluated in patients. This review will illustrate known circulating biomarkers that could track disease progression and response to therapy in patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We present an overview of the transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics and lipidomic biomarkers described in literature. We show how studies in muscle tissue have led to the identification of serum and urine biomarkers and we highlight the importance of evaluating biomarkers as possible surrogate endpoints to facilitate regulatory processes for new medicinal products. PMID:27858763

  16. Highlights of the Third Annual Biomarker World Congress: biomarkers for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Burczynski, Michael E

    2007-09-01

    With the proliferation of high-content profiling technologies available for analyzing genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic markers in tissues, both novel analytes and increasingly complex signatures are emerging as biomarkers supporting drug development. If prospective studies during the course of clinical development support the clinical utility of a biomarker, consideration may eventually be given to converting such research-use only biomarker assays into medical diagnostics. The present report briefly summarizes a selected set of presentations geared towards the issues and principles involved in the validation of biomarkers for use as molecular diagnostics, as presented at the Third Annual Biomarker World Congress held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 15 - 18 May 2007. More than 400 delegates attended the Third Annual Biomarker World Congress to discuss the role of biomarkers in all phases of drug discovery and development. The main conference consisted of four tracks addressing issues involving: i) biomarkers in early drug development; ii) biomarkers in clinical development; iii) biomarkers for molecular diagnostics; and iv) biomarker assay development. The present review focuses on selected presentations of relevance to the third track. Topics covered by the speakers included biomarker assays that seem to have diagnostic and/or theranostic potential in a variety of therapeutic settings and disease indications. Themes included both the general and specific issues that can be encountered when attempting to convert a biomarker assay into a molecular diagnostic for use in the clinical setting.

  17. Functional Proteomics-Based Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    tissue , then incubating the samples at various time points to see the effect on RPPA –determined protein levels had already been done using breast tissue ...1985): 131. 27  Cao, Liyun, et al. " Tissue transglutaminase protects epithelial ovarian cancer cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis by promoting...Dabholkar, Meenakshi, et al. "ERCC1 and ERCC2 expression in malignant tissues from ovarian cancer patients." Journal of the National Cancer Institute

  18. Personalized medicine beyond genomics: alternative futures in big data-proteomics, environtome and the social proteome.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Vural; Dove, Edward S; Gürsoy, Ulvi K; Şardaş, Semra; Yıldırım, Arif; Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Ömer Barlas, I; Güngör, Kıvanç; Mete, Alper; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2017-01-01

    No field in science and medicine today remains untouched by Big Data, and psychiatry is no exception. Proteomics is a Big Data technology and a next generation biomarker, supporting novel system diagnostics and therapeutics in psychiatry. Proteomics technology is, in fact, much older than genomics and dates to the 1970s, well before the launch of the international Human Genome Project. While the genome has long been framed as the master or "elite" executive molecule in cell biology, the proteome by contrast is humble. Yet the proteome is critical for life-it ensures the daily functioning of cells and whole organisms. In short, proteins are the blue-collar workers of biology, the down-to-earth molecules that we cannot live without. Since 2010, proteomics has found renewed meaning and international attention with the launch of the Human Proteome Project and the growing interest in Big Data technologies such as proteomics. This article presents an interdisciplinary technology foresight analysis and conceptualizes the terms "environtome" and "social proteome". We define "environtome" as the entire complement of elements external to the human host, from microbiome, ambient temperature and weather conditions to government innovation policies, stock market dynamics, human values, political power and social norms that collectively shape the human host spatially and temporally. The "social proteome" is the subset of the environtome that influences the transition of proteomics technology to innovative applications in society. The social proteome encompasses, for example, new reimbursement schemes and business innovation models for proteomics diagnostics that depart from the "once-a-life-time" genotypic tests and the anticipated hype attendant to context and time sensitive proteomics tests. Building on the "nesting principle" for governance of complex systems as discussed by Elinor Ostrom, we propose here a 3-tiered organizational architecture for Big Data science such as

  19. Human saliva proteome: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2014-06-01

    Human saliva contains a rich mixture of biomolecules. Proteins are a major component of this mixture. Given their role as the molecular effectors within biological systems, ranging from catalysis to transport to structure, proteins have great potential as biomarkers of health and disease. The ability to collect these salivary biomarkers easily using non-invasive means makes saliva proteins even more attractive for diagnostic applications. Thousands of proteins are now to be known to be present in human saliva - discovered using proteomic technologies. Emerging technologies are now making it possible to go beyond large-scale cataloging of salivary proteins. These include approaches to catalog protein contributions from the community of microorganisms residing in the oral cavity (metaproteomics) that may reflect the health state of the human host. New mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods are also emerging, shifting the emphasis from large-scale discovery experiments to hypothesis-driven assays for profiling proteins of interest within saliva, enabling validation of their association with specific health conditions. This paper provides a brief overview of efforts to catalog the proteome of human saliva. Recent developments making possible characterization of the metaproteome of human saliva will be discussed, and technologies driving new mass spectrometry-based assays for targeted analysis of proteins within complex samples, such as saliva.

  20. Proteomics quality and standard: from a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiang; Yu, Li-Rong

    2014-01-16

    Proteomics has emerged as a rapidly expanding field dealing with large-scale protein analyses. It is anticipated that proteomics data will be increasingly submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for biomarker qualification or in conjunction with applications for the approval of drugs, medical devices, and other FDA-regulated consumer products. To date, however, no established guideline has been available regarding the generation, submission and assessment of the quality of proteomics data that will be reviewed by regulatory agencies for decision making. Therefore, this commentary is aimed at provoking some thoughts and debates towards developing a framework which can guide future proteomics data submission. The ultimate goal is to establish quality control standards for proteomics data generation and evaluation, and to prepare government agencies such as the FDA to meet future obligations utilizing proteomics data to support regulatory decision.

  1. Biomarker Discovery by Novel Sensors Based on Nanoproteomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Dasilva, Noelia; Díez, Paula; Matarraz, Sergio; González-González, María; Paradinas, Sara; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    During the last years, proteomics has facilitated biomarker discovery by coupling high-throughput techniques with novel nanosensors. In the present review, we focus on the study of label-based and label-free detection systems, as well as nanotechnology approaches, indicating their advantages and applications in biomarker discovery. In addition, several disease biomarkers are shown in order to display the clinical importance of the improvement of sensitivity and selectivity by using nanoproteomics approaches as novel sensors. PMID:22438764

  2. Saliva proteome research: current status and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Benjamin L; Cooper-White, Justin; Punyadeera, Chamindie K

    2013-09-01

    Human saliva harbours proteins of clinical relevance and about 30% of blood proteins are also present in saliva. This highlights that saliva can be used for clinical applications just as urine or blood. However, the translation of salivary biomarker discoveries into clinical settings is hampered by the dynamics and complexity of the salivary proteome. This review focuses on the current status of technological developments and achievements relating to approaches for unravelling the human salivary proteome. We discuss the dynamics of the salivary proteome, as well as the importance of sample preparation and processing techniques and their influence on downstream protein applications; post-translational modifications of salivary proteome and protein: protein interactions. In addition, we describe possible enrichment strategies for discerning post-translational modifications of salivary proteins, the potential utility of selected-reaction-monitoring techniques for biomarker discovery and validation, limitations to proteomics and the biomarker challenge and future perspectives. In summary, we provide recommendations for practical saliva sampling, processing and storage conditions to increase the quality of future studies in an emerging field of saliva clinical proteomics. We propose that the advent of technologies allowing sensitive and high throughput proteome-wide analyses, coupled to well-controlled study design, will allow saliva to enter clinical practice as an alternative to blood-based methods due to its simplistic nature of sampling, non-invasiveness, easy of collection and multiple collections by untrained professionals and cost-effective advantages.

  3. Quantitative proteomics in cardiovascular research: global and targeted strategies

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaomeng; Young, Rebeccah; Canty, John M.; Qu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Extensive technical advances in the past decade have substantially expanded quantitative proteomics in cardiovascular research. This has great promise for elucidating the mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and the discovery of cardiac biomarkers used for diagnosis and treatment evaluation. Global and targeted proteomics are the two major avenues of quantitative proteomics. While global approaches enable unbiased discovery of altered proteins via relative quantification at the proteome level, targeted techniques provide higher sensitivity and accuracy, and are capable of multiplexed absolute quantification in numerous clinical/biological samples. While promising, technical challenges need to be overcome to enable full utilization of these techniques in cardiovascular medicine. Here we discuss recent advances in quantitative proteomics and summarize applications in cardiovascular research with an emphasis on biomarker discovery and elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease. We propose the integration of global and targeted strategies as a high-throughput pipeline for cardiovascular proteomics. Targeted approaches enable rapid, extensive validation of biomarker candidates discovered by global proteomics. These approaches provide a promising alternative to immunoassays and other low-throughput means currently used for limited validation. PMID:24920501

  4. Quantitative proteomics in cardiovascular research: global and targeted strategies.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaomeng; Young, Rebeccah; Canty, John M; Qu, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Extensive technical advances in the past decade have substantially expanded quantitative proteomics in cardiovascular research. This has great promise for elucidating the mechanisms of cardiovascular diseases and the discovery of cardiac biomarkers used for diagnosis and treatment evaluation. Global and targeted proteomics are the two major avenues of quantitative proteomics. While global approaches enable unbiased discovery of altered proteins via relative quantification at the proteome level, targeted techniques provide higher sensitivity and accuracy, and are capable of multiplexed absolute quantification in numerous clinical/biological samples. While promising, technical challenges need to be overcome to enable full utilization of these techniques in cardiovascular medicine. Here, we discuss recent advances in quantitative proteomics and summarize applications in cardiovascular research with an emphasis on biomarker discovery and elucidating molecular mechanisms of disease. We propose the integration of global and targeted strategies as a high-throughput pipeline for cardiovascular proteomics. Targeted approaches enable rapid, extensive validation of biomarker candidates discovered by global proteomics. These approaches provide a promising alternative to immunoassays and other low-throughput means currently used for limited validation.

  5. Investigating pathogen biology at the level of the proteome.

    PubMed

    Cash, Phillip

    2011-08-01

    Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. By extending our understanding of the process of bacterial pathogenesis at the molecular level new strategies for their treatment and prevention can be developed. Proteomic technologies, along with other methods for global gene expression analysis, play an important role in understanding the mechanism(s) of bacterial pathogenesis. This review highlights the use of proteomics to identify protein biomarkers for virulent bacterial isolates and how these biomarkers can be correlated with the outcome of bacterial infection. Biomarker identification typically looks at the proteomes of bacteria grown under laboratory conditions. It is, however, the characterisation of the bacterial proteome during in vivo infection of its host that will eventually provide the most significant insights into bacterial pathogenesis. Although this area of research has significant technical challenges, a number of complementary proteome analytical approaches are being developed to identify and characterise the bacterial genes specifically expressed in vivo. Ultimately, the development of newly targeted therapies and vaccines using specific protein targets identified through proteomic analyses will be one of the major practical benefits arising from the proteomic analysis of bacterial pathogens.

  6. Circulating Biomarkers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nandagopal, Lakshminarayanan; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease characterized by multiple unmet needs in the realm of diagnosis, clinical staging, monitoring and therapy. There is an urgent need to develop precision medicine for advanced urothelial carcinoma. Given the difficulty of serial analyses of metastatic tumor tissue to identify resistance and new therapeutic targets, development of non-invasive monitoring using circulating molecular biomarkers is critically important. Although the development of circulating biomarkers for the management of bladder cancer is in its infancy and may currently suffer from lower sensitivity of detection, they have inherent advantages owing to non-invasiveness. Additionally, circulating molecular alterations may capture tumor heterogeneity without the sampling bias of tissue biopsy. This review describes the accumulating data to support further development of circulating biomarkers including circulating tumor cells, cell-free circulating tumor (ct)-DNA, RNA, micro-RNA and proteomics to improve the management of bladder cancer. PMID:28035318

  7. Integrated and Quantitative Proteomics of Human Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yakkioui, Y; Temel, Y; Chevet, E; Negroni, L

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics represents a powerful approach for the comprehensive analysis of proteins expressed under defined conditions. These properties have been used to investigate the proteome of disease states, including cancer. It has become a major subject of studies to apply proteomics for biomarker and therapeutic target identification. In the last decades, technical advances in mass spectrometry have increased the capacity of protein identification and quantification. Moreover, the analysis of posttranslational modification (PTM), especially phosphorylation, has allowed large-scale identification of biological mechanisms. Even so, increasing evidence indicates that global protein quantification is often insufficient for the explanation of biology and has shown to pose challenges in identifying new and robust biomarkers. As a consequence, to improve the accuracy of the discoveries made using proteomics in human tumors, it is necessary to combine (i) robust and reproducible methods for sample preparation allowing statistical comparison, (ii) PTM analyses in addition to global proteomics for additional levels of knowledge, and (iii) use of bioinformatics for decrypting protein list. Herein, we present technical specificities for samples preparation involving isobaric tag labeling, TiO2-based phosphopeptides enrichment and hydrazyde-based glycopeptides purification as well as the key points for the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the protein lists. The method is based on our experience with tumors analysis derived from hepatocellular carcinoma, chondrosarcoma, human embryonic intervertebral disk, and chordoma experiments.

  8. Comparative profiling of the sperm proteome.

    PubMed

    Holland, Ashling; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-02-01

    The highly complex and species-selective mechanism of fertilization is a central theme of developmental biology. Gametogenesis, sperm activation, and egg-sperm recognition are fundamental biological processes, warranting detailed studies into the molecular composition of gametes. Biological MS has been instrumental for the comprehensive itemizing of gamete proteomes. The protein constellation of sperm cells and its subcellular structures has been established for a variety of animal species. Spermatogenesis and the crucial activation of sperm cells as a prerequisite of successful fertilization and physiological adaptations to external stressors was investigated using proteomics, as well as the underlying mechanisms of male infertility with respect to proteome-wide alterations. This review outlines recent achievements of sperm proteomics and exemplifies the usefulness of gel-based surveys by outlining the comparative analysis of abnormal spermatozoa in globozoospermia. Besides label-free MS techniques and cell-based labeling methodology, high-resolution fluorescence 2DE has been shown to be highly suitable as a proteomic biomarker discovery tool in sperm protein research. The appropriateness of novel protein markers for improving our understanding of normal spermatogenesis and sperm activation versus the molecular pathogenesis of male infertility will be discussed. New biomarker candidates might be useful to improve diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic aspects of infertility.

  9. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. Methods A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. Conclusions With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:26790878

  10. Human Pituitary Adenoma Proteomics: New Progresses and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xianquan; Wang, Xiaowei; Cheng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a common intracranial neoplasm that impacts on human health through interfering hypothalamus–pituitary–target organ axis systems. The development of proteomics gives great promises in the clarification of molecular mechanisms of a PA and discovery of effective biomarkers for prediction, prevention, early-stage diagnosis, and treatment for a PA. A great progress in the field of PA proteomics has been made in the past 10 years, including (i) the use of laser-capture microdissection, (ii) proteomics analyses of functional PAs (such as prolactinoma), invasive and non-invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, NFPA heterogeneity, and hormone isoforms, (iii) the use of protein antibody array, (iv) serum proteomics and peptidomics, (v) the integration of proteomics and other omics data, and (vi) the proposal of multi-parameter systematic strategy for a PA. This review will summarize these progresses of proteomics in PAs, point out the existing drawbacks, propose the future research directions, and address the clinical relevance of PA proteomics data, in order to achieve our long-term goal that is use of proteomics to clarify molecular mechanisms, construct molecular networks, and discover effective biomarkers. PMID:27303365

  11. Cross-study and cross-omics comparisons of three nephrotoxic compounds reveal mechanistic insights and new candidate biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Matheis, Katja A.; Com, Emmanuelle; Gautier, Jean-Charles; Guerreiro, Nelson; Brandenburg, Arnd; Gmuender, Hans; Sposny, Alexandra; Hewitt, Philip; Amberg, Alexander; Boernsen, Olaf; Riefke, Bjoern; Hoffmann, Dana; Mally, Angela; Kalkuhl, Arno; Suter, Laura; Dieterle, Frank; Staedtler, Frank

    2011-04-15

    The European InnoMed-PredTox project was a collaborative effort between 15 pharmaceutical companies, 2 small and mid-sized enterprises, and 3 universities with the goal of delivering deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms of kidney and liver toxicity and to identify mechanism-linked diagnostic or prognostic safety biomarker candidates by combining conventional toxicological parameters with 'omics' data. Mechanistic toxicity studies with 16 different compounds, 2 dose levels, and 3 time points were performed in male Crl: WI(Han) rats. Three of the 16 investigated compounds, BI-3 (FP007SE), Gentamicin (FP009SF), and IMM125 (FP013NO), induced kidney proximal tubule damage (PTD). In addition to histopathology and clinical chemistry, transcriptomics microarray and proteomics 2D-DIGE analysis were performed. Data from the three PTD studies were combined for a cross-study and cross-omics meta-analysis of the target organ. The mechanistic interpretation of kidney PTD-associated deregulated transcripts revealed, in addition to previously described kidney damage transcript biomarkers such as KIM-1, CLU and TIMP-1, a number of additional deregulated pathways congruent with histopathology observations on a single animal basis, including a specific effect on the complement system. The identification of new, more specific biomarker candidates for PTD was most successful when transcriptomics data were used. Combining transcriptomics data with proteomics data added extra value.

  12. Serum proteomics of glioma: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Kumaravel; Nijaguna, Mamatha B; Kumar, Durairaj Mohan

    2009-10-01

    The prognosis of patients with glioblastoma, the most malignant adult glial brain tumor, remains poor in spite of advances in treatment procedures, including surgical resection, irradiation and chemotherapy. Genetic heterogeneity of glioblastoma warrants extensive studies in order to gain a thorough understanding of the biology of this tumor. While there have been several studies of global transcript profiling of glioma with the identification of gene signatures for diagnosis and disease management, translation into clinics is yet to happen. Serum biomarkers have the potential to revolutionize the process of cancer diagnosis, grading, prognostication and treatment response monitoring. Besides having the advantage that serum can be obtained through a less invasive procedure, it contains molecules at an extraordinary dynamic range of ten orders of magnitude in terms of their concentrations. While the conventional methods, such as 2DE, have been in use for many years, the ability to identify the proteins through mass spectrometry techniques such as MALDI-TOF led to an explosion of interest in proteomics. Relatively new high-throughput proteomics methods such as SELDI-TOF and protein microarrays are expected to hasten the process of serum biomarker discovery. This review will highlight the recent advances in the proteomics platform in discovering serum biomarkers and the current status of glioma serum markers. We aim to provide the principles and potential of the latest proteomic approaches and their applications in the biomarker discovery process. Besides providing a comprehensive list of available serum biomarkers of glioma, we will also propose how these markers will revolutionize the clinical management of glioma patients.

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Lauren M; Wild, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is enriched in brain-derived components and represents an accessible and appealing means of interrogating the CNS milieu to study neurodegenerative diseases and identify biomarkers to facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. Many such CSF biomarkers have been proposed for Huntington's disease (HD) but none has been validated for clinical trial use. Across many studies proposing dozens of biomarker candidates, there is a notable lack of statistical power, consistency, rigor and validation. Here we review proposed CSF biomarkers including neurotransmitters, transglutaminase activity, kynurenine pathway metabolites, oxidative stress markers, inflammatory markers, neuroendocrine markers, protein markers of neuronal death, proteomic approaches and mutant huntingtin protein itself. We reflect on the need for large-scale, standardized CSF collections with detailed phenotypic data to validate and qualify much-needed CSF biomarkers for clinical trial use in HD.

  14. Proteomics in veterinary medicine: applications and trends in disease pathogenesis and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ceciliani, F; Eckersall, D; Burchmore, R; Lecchi, C

    2014-03-01

    Advancement in electrophoresis and mass spectrometry techniques along with the recent progresses in genomics, culminating in bovine and pig genome sequencing, widened the potential application of proteomics in the field of veterinary medicine. The aim of the present review is to provide an in-depth perspective about the application of proteomics to animal disease pathogenesis, as well as its utilization in veterinary diagnostics. After an overview on the various proteomic techniques that are currently applied to veterinary sciences, the article focuses on proteomic approaches to animal disease pathogenesis. Included as well are recent achievements in immunoproteomics (ie, the identifications through proteomic techniques of antigen involved in immune response) and histoproteomics (ie, the application of proteomics in tissue processed for immunohistochemistry). Finally, the article focuses on clinical proteomics (ie, the application of proteomics to the identification of new biomarkers of animal diseases).

  15. Linkage of exposure and effects using genomics, proteomics and metabolomics in small fish models (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project combines the use of whole organism endpoints, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches, and computational modeling in a systems biology approach to 1) identify molecular indicators of exposure and biomarkers of effect to EDCs representing several modes/...

  16. Upcoming biomarkers for the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Pavithra; Agarwal, Arnav; Chawla, Karan; Tofighi, Taraneh; Mondal, Tapas K

    2015-11-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a major cause of acquired heart disease among children and increases the risk of myocardial infarction. While the biochemical basis of the disease is unclear, the evidence suggests interplay between a microbial infection and a genetic predisposition in the development of the disease. Diagnosis of KD based on clinical observation is not completely reliable and is problematic due to the time-sensitive nature of the disease. Hence, identification of inflammatory, proteomic, and genetic biomarkers may assist in earlier and more effective diagnosis and treatment. This review of observational studies and clinical trials analyzes biomarkers in recent research that may be used to establish a gold standard test for KD diagnosis. 65 articles in the literature are assessed to investigate these new biomarkers in addition to biomarkers presently in use. ESR≥40mm/h, leukocyte count ≥16∗10(9)/L and increased WBC count are together suggestive of the presence of KD. Among proteomic biomarkers, elevated NT-proBNP and differing levels of several other proteomic biomarkers such as iNOS in monocytes and neutrophils have been observed in KD patients. Genetic polymorphisms of six HLA class I genes have also been linked with the disease, alongside MICA alleles A4 and A5.1. The results suggest that NT-proBNP is currently a very promising biomarker for future investigation; further research is warranted to allow for accurate and early detection of the disease using this biomarker.

  17. CSF proteomic fingerprints for HIV- associated cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Laspiur, Juliana Pérez; Anderson, Eric R.; Ciborowski, Pawel; Wojna, Valerie; Rozek, Wojciech; Duan, Fenghai; Mayo, Raul; Rodríguez, Elaine; Plaud-Valentín, Marinés; Rodríguez-Orengo, José; Gendelman, Howard E.; Meléndez, Loyda M.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive impairment remains a major complication of advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection despite the wide spread use of anti-retroviral therapy. Diagnosis is made by exclusion making biomarkers of great potential use. Thus, we used an integrated proteomics platform to assess cerebrospinal fluid protein profiles from 50 HIV-1 seropositive Hispanic women. Nine of 38 proteins identified were unique in those patients with cognitive impairment. These proteins were linked to cell signaling, structural function, and antioxidant activities. This work highlights, in a preliminary manner, the utility of proteomic profiling for biomarker discovery for HIV-1 associated cognitive dysfunction. PMID:17950469

  18. Quantitative body fluid proteomics in medicine - A focus on minimal invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő; Márkus, Bernadett; Deák, Eszter; Csutak, Adrienne; Tőzsér, József

    2017-02-05

    Identification of new biomarkers specific for various pathological conditions is an important field in medical sciences. Body fluids have emerging potential in biomarker studies especially those which are continuously available and can be collected by non-invasive means. Changes in the protein composition of body fluids such as tears, saliva, sweat, etc. may provide information on both local and systemic conditions of medical relevance. In this review, our aim is to discuss the quantitative proteomics techniques used in biomarker studies, and to present advances in quantitative body fluid proteomics of non-invasively collectable body fluids with relevance to biomarker identification. The advantages and limitations of the widely used quantitative proteomics techniques are also presented. Based on the reviewed literature, we suggest an ideal pipeline for body fluid analyses aiming at biomarkers discoveries: starting from identification of biomarker candidates by shotgun quantitative proteomics or protein arrays, through verification of potential biomarkers by targeted mass spectrometry, to the antibody-based validation of biomarkers. The importance of body fluids as a rich source of biomarkers is discussed.

  19. Comprehensive data analysis of human ureter proteome

    PubMed Central

    Magdeldin, Sameh; Hirao, Yoshitoshi; El Guoshy, Amr; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yates, John R.; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive human ureter proteome dataset was generated from OFFGel fractionated ureter samples. Our result showed that among 2217 non-redundant ureter proteins, 751 protein candidates (33.8%) were detected in urine as urinary protein/polypeptide or exosomal protein. On the other hand, comparing ureter protein hits (48) that are not shown in corresponding databases to urinary bladder and prostate human protein atlas databases pinpointed 21 proteins that might be unique to ureter tissue. In conclusion, this finding offers future perspectives for possible identification of ureter disease-associated biomarkers such as ureter carcinoma. In addition, Cytoscape GO annotation was examined on the final ureter dataset to better understand proteins molecular function, biological processes, and cellular component. The ureter proteomic dataset published in this article will provide a valuable resource for researchers working in the field of urology and urine biomarker discovery. PMID:26937461

  20. Proteomic approaches in biological and medical sciences: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Conrotto, P; Souchelnytskyi, S

    2008-09-01

    After the first introduction of the concept of "proteome" more than 10 years ago, large-scale studies of protein expression, localization, activities and interactions have gained an exponential increase of interest, leading to extensive research and technology development. Proteomics is expansively applied in many areas, ranging from basic research, various disease and malignant tumors diagnostic and biomarker discovery to therapeutic applications. Several proteomics approaches have been developed for protein separation and identification, and for the characterization of protein function and structure. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, chromatography, capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry have become the most used proteomics methods. These techniques are also under constant development. This review provides an overview of the main techniques and their combinations, used in proteomics. The emphasis is made on description of advantages and disadvantages of each technique, to navigate in selection of the best application for solving a specific problem.

  1. The proteomics of formalin-fixed wax-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, David Cilia; Murray, Graeme I

    2013-04-01

    Proteomics, which is the global analysis of protein expression in cells and tissues, has emerged over the last ten to fifteen years as a key set of technologies to improve our understanding of disease processes and to identify new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive disease biomarkers. Whilst most proteomic studies have been conducted on fresh frozen tissue, the continuous improvements in technical procedures for protein extraction and separation, coupled with increasingly powerful bioinformatics, have provided the opportunity for proteomic analysis to be conducted on formalin-fixed wax-embedded tissue. This potential advance should allow proteomic analysis to be performed on the extensive archives of clinically annotated formalin fixed wax embedded tissue blocks stored in pathology departments worldwide. In this review the main techniques and their limitations involved in proteomic analysis of formalin fixed wax embedded tissue will be outlined and examples of their successful application will be indicated.

  2. Anthelmintic metabolism in parasitic helminths: proteomic insights.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Peter M; MacKintosh, Neil; Morphew, Russell M

    2012-08-01

    Anthelmintics are the cornerstone of parasitic helminth control. Surprisingly, understanding of the biochemical pathways used by parasitic helminths to detoxify anthelmintics is fragmented, despite the increasing global threat of anthelmintic resistance within the ruminant and equine industries. Reductionist biochemistry has likely over-estimated the enzymatic role of glutathione transferases in anthelmintic metabolism and neglected the potential role of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily (CYPs). Proteomic technologies offers the opportunity to support genomics, reverse genetics and pharmacokinetics, and provide an integrated insight into both the cellular mechanisms underpinning response to anthelmintics and also the identification of biomarker panels for monitoring the development of anthelmintic resistance. To date, there have been limited attempts to include proteomics in anthelmintic metabolism studies. Optimisations of membrane, post-translational modification and interaction proteomic technologies in helminths are needed to especially study Phase I CYPs and Phase III ABC transporter pumps for anthelmintics and their metabolites.

  3. Proteomic profiling of skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ohlendieck, Kay

    2011-10-01

    One of the most striking physiological features of skeletal muscle tissues are their enormous capacity to adapt to changed functional demands. Muscle plasticity has been extensively studied by histological, biochemical, physiological and genetic methods over the last few decades. With the recent emergence of high-throughput and large-scale proteomic techniques, mass spectrometry-based surveys have also been applied to the global analysis of the skeletal muscle protein complement during physiological modifications and pathophysiological alterations. This review outlines and discusses the impact of recent proteomic profiling studies of skeletal muscle transitions, including the effects of chronic electro-stimulation, physical exercise, denervation, disuse atrophy, hypoxia, myotonia, motor neuron disease and age-related fibre type shifting. This includes studies on the human skeletal muscle proteome, animal models of muscle plasticity and major neuromuscular pathologies. The biomedical importance of establishing reliable biomarker signatures for the various molecular and cellular transition phases involved in muscle transformation is critically examined.

  4. Acute Phase Response and Metabolic Syndrome Biomarkers of Libby Asbestos Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the disease diagnosis and environmental health risk assessment. Exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that rats exposed to LA would present a unique serum proteomic pro...

  5. Acute Phase Response, Inflammation and Metabolic Syndrome Biomarkers of Libby Asbestos Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. Objective: We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help ...

  6. The Succinated Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  7. Plasma proteomics, the Human Proteome Project, and cancer-associated alternative splice variant proteins.

    PubMed

    Omenn, Gilbert S

    2014-05-01

    This article addresses three inter-related subjects: the development of the Human Plasma Proteome Peptide Atlas, the launch of the Human Proteome Project, and the emergence of alternative splice variant transcripts and proteins as important features of evolution and pathogenesis. The current Plasma Peptide Atlas provides evidence on which peptides have been detected for every protein confidently identified in plasma; there are links to their spectra and their estimated abundance, facilitating the planning of targeted proteomics for biomarker studies. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) combines a chromosome-centric C-HPP with a biology and disease-driven B/D-HPP, upon a foundation of mass spectrometry, antibody, and knowledgebase resource pillars. The HPP aims to identify the approximately 7000 "missing proteins" and to characterize all proteins and their many isoforms. Success will enable the larger research community to utilize newly-available peptides, spectra, informative MS transitions, and databases for targeted analyses of priority proteins for each organ and disease. Among the isoforms of proteins, splice variants have the special feature of greatly enlarging protein diversity without enlarging the genome; evidence is accumulating of striking differential expression of splice variants in cancers. In this era of RNA-sequencing and advanced mass spectrometry, it is no longer sufficient to speak simply of increased or decreased expression of genes or proteins without carefully examining the splice variants in the protein mixture produced from each multi-exon gene. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  8. Blood-Based Biomarkers for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, LM; Stern, MB; Chen-Plotkin, A

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for biomarkers to diagnose Parkinson’s disease (PD), assess disease severity, and prognosticate course. Various types of biologic specimens are potential candidates for identifying biomarkers – defined here as surrogate indicators of physiological or pathophysiological states – but blood has the advantage of being minimally invasive to obtain. There are, however, several challenges to identifying biomarkers in blood. Several candidate biomarkers identified in other diseases or in other types of biological fluids are being pursued as blood-based biomarkers in PD. In addition, unbiased discovery is underway using techniques including metabolomics, proteomics, and gene expression profiling. In this review, we summarize these techniques and discuss the challenges and successes of blood-based biomarker discovery in PD. Blood-based biomarkers that are discussed include α-synuclein, DJ-1, uric acid, epidermal growth factor, apolipoprotein-A1, and peripheral inflammatory markers. PMID:24262199

  9. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  10. New Developments in Biomarkers for Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Judith L; van Seggelen, Wouter; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; de Bruin-Weller, Marjolein; Hijnen, DirkJan

    2015-03-16

    The application of biomarkers in medicine is evolving. Biomarkers do not only give us a better understanding of pathogenesis, but also increase treatment efficacy and safety, further enabling more precise clinical care. This paper focuses on the current use of biomarkers in atopic dermatitis, new developments and future perspectives. Biomarkers can be used for many different purposes, including the objective determination of disease severity, confirmation of clinical diagnosis, and to predict response to treatment. In atopic dermatitis, many biomarkers have been investigated as a marker for disease severity. Currently serum thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is the superior biomarker for assessing disease severity. However, we have recently shown that the use of a panel of serum biomarkers is more suitable for assessing disease severity than an individual biomarker. In this overview, we will discuss alternative sources for biomarkers, such as saliva and capillary blood, which can increase the user friendliness of biomarkers in atopic dermatitis (AD). Both methods offer simple, non-invasive and cost effective alternatives to venous blood. This provides great translational and clinical potential. Biomarkers will play an increasingly important role in AD research and personalized medicine. The use of biomarkers will enhance the efficacy of AD treatment by facilitating the individualization of therapy targeting the patients' specific biological signature and also by providing tools for predicting and monitoring of therapeutic response.

  11. Effect of consuming a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage on health-related biomarkers and safety parameters in Caucasian subjects with elevated levels of blood pressure and liver function biomarkers: a 4-week, open-label, non-comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    OKI, Tomoyuki; KANO, Mitsuyoshi; WATANABE, Osamu; GOTO, Kazuhisa; BOELSMA, Esther; ISHIKAWA, Fumiyasu; SUDA, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    An open-label study with one treatment arm was conducted to investigate changes in health-related biomarkers (blood pressure and liver enzyme activity) and the safety of 4 weeks of consuming a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage in Caucasian subjects. Twenty healthy adults, 18–70 years of age, with a body mass index >25 kg/m2, elevated blood pressure and elevated levels of liver function biomarkers consumed two cartons of purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage (125 ml, including 117 mg anthocyanin per carton) daily for 4 weeks. Hematology, serum clinical profile, dipstick urinalysis and blood pressure were determined before consumption, at 2 and 4 weeks of consumption and after a 2-week washout period. A trend was found toward lowering systolic blood pressure during the treatment period (p=0.0590). No significant changes were found in diastolic blood pressure throughout the study period. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower after 4 weeks of consumption compared with before consumption (p=0.0125) and was significantly higher after the 2-week washout period compared with after consumption (p=0.0496). The serum alanine aminotransferase level significantly increased over time, but aspartate aminotransferase and γ-glutamyltransferase levels stayed within the normal range of reference values. Safety parameters of the blood and urine showed no clinically relevant changes. The consumption of a purple-fleshed sweet potato beverage for 4 weeks resulted in no clinically relevant changes in safety parameters of the blood and urine and showed a trend toward lowering systolic blood pressure. PMID:27508114

  12. Suction blister fluid as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins.

    PubMed

    Kool, Jeroen; Reubsaet, Léon; Wesseldijk, Feikje; Maravilha, Raquel T; Pinkse, Martijn W; D'Santos, Clive S; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Zijlstra, Freek J; Heck, Albert J R

    2007-10-01

    Early diagnosis is important for effective disease management. Measurement of biomarkers present at the local level of the skin could be advantageous in facilitating the diagnostic process. The analysis of the proteome of suction blister fluid, representative for the interstitial fluid of the skin, is therefore a desirable first step in the search for potential biomarkers involved in biological pathways of particular diseases. Here, we describe a global analysis of the suction blister fluid proteome as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins. The suction blister fluid proteome was compared with a serum proteome analyzed using identical protocols. By using stringent criteria allowing less than 1% false positive identifications, we were able to detect, using identical experimental conditions and amount of starting material, 401 proteins in suction blister fluid and 240 proteins in serum. As a major result of our analysis we construct a prejudiced list of 34 proteins, relatively highly and uniquely detected in suction blister fluid as compared to serum, with established and putative characteristics as biomarkers. We conclude that suction blister fluid might potentially serve as a good alternative biomarker body fluid for diseases that involve the skin.

  13. The Specific α1-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Prazosin Influences the Urine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mindi; Wu, Jianqiang; Gao, Youhe

    2016-01-01

    Urine, reflecting many changes in the body, is a better source than blood for biomarker discovery. However, even under physiological conditions, the urine proteome often varies. Understanding how various regulating factors affect urine proteome helps link changes to urine proteome with urinary biomarkers of physiological conditions as well as corresponding diseases. To evaluate the possible impact of α1-adrenergic receptor on urine proteome, this study investigated effects of the specific inhibitor prazosin on the urine proteome in a rat model by using tandem mass tagging and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 775 proteins were identified, approximately half of which were influenced by prazosin treatment, indicating that the sympathetic nervous system exerts a significant impact on urine proteome. Eight significantly changed proteins were previously annotated as urinary candidate biomarkers. Angiotensinogen, haptoglobin, and beta-2 microglobulin, which were reported to be associated with blood pressure, were validated via Western blot. Prazosin is widely used in clinical practice; thus, these protein changes should be considered when studying corresponding diseases such as hypertension, post-traumatic stress disorder and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The related physiological activities of α1-receptors, controlling blood pressure and fear response might significantly affect the urine proteome and warrant further biomarker studies. PMID:27780262

  14. Effects of three commonly-used diuretics on the urinary proteome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xundou; Zhao, Mindi; Li, Menglin; Jia, Lulu; Gao, Youhe

    2014-06-01

    Biomarker is the measurable change associated with a physiological or pathophysiological process. Unlike blood which has mechanisms to keep the internal environment homeostatic, urine is more likely to reflect changes of the body. As a result, urine is likely to be a better biomarker source than blood. However, since the urinary proteome is affected by many factors, including diuretics, careful evaluation of those effects is necessary if urinary proteomics is used for biomarker discovery. Here, we evaluated the effects of three commonly-used diuretics (furosemide, F; hydrochlorothiazide, H; and spirolactone, S) on the urinary proteome in rats. Urine samples were collected before and after intragastric administration of diuretics at therapeutic doses and the proteomes were analyzed using label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Based on the criteria of P≤0.05, a fold change ≥2, a spectral count ≥5, and false positive rate (FDR) ≤1%, 14 proteins (seven for F, five for H, and two for S) were identified by Progenesis LC-MS. The human orthologs of most of these 14 proteins are stable in the healthy human urinary proteome, and ten of them are reported as disease biomarkers. Thus, our results suggest that the effects of diuretics deserve more attention in future urinary protein biomarker studies. Moreover, the distinct effects of diuretics on the urinary proteome may provide clues to the mechanisms of diuretics.

  15. Biomarkers of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tin C; Wood, Christopher G; Karam, Jose A

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has increased steadily in past few decades and is partially attributable to the increased utilization of cross-sectional imaging. Many of these carcinomas are small incidental discoveries, although a subset leads to locally advanced or distant disease. Although its molecular pathophysiology is not completely understood, knowledge of hereditary RCCs has shed light on some of the pathways involved. More recently, the rapid advances in genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics have allowed for a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the genetic aberrations that lead up to and result from the transformation of a renal tubular epithelial cell into a carcinoma. These discoveries have allowed for the development of novel therapeutics that target these pathways. They have also led to the development of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers that could radically change the way RCC is diagnosed and treated. Although some of the current investigations are nascent and it remains to be seen which biomarkers will become clinically available, many candidate biomarkers show promise and require external validation. Ultimately, biomarkers may allow for cost-effective screening of high-risk patients, the identification of aggressive cancers among small renal masses, the identification of high-risk patients, the detection of recurrences postoperatively with minimal imaging, and the ability to choose appropriate targeted therapies for patients with metastatic disease.

  16. Recent technological developments in proteomics shed new light on translational research on diabetic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhang; Yang, Cheng; Tao, Yimin; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Yufan

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has become a heavy social burden worldwide, but at present it is still difficult to predict and diagnose this ailment at an early stage. Various proteomics approaches have been applied to the pathophysiological study of diabetic microangiopathy. Conventional proteomics methods, including gel-based methods, exhibit limited sensitivity and robustness and have typically been used in high- or middle-abundance biomarker discovery. Clinical samples from patients with diabetic microangiopathy, such as biopsy samples, are minute in size. Therefore sample preparation, quantitative labelling and mass spectrometry technologies need to be optimized for low-abundance protein detection, multiple-sample processing and precision quantitation. In this review, we briefly introduce the recent technological developments in proteomics methods and summarize current proteomics-based, translational research on diabetic microangiopathy. Recent technological developments in proteomics tools may shed new light on the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy and biomarkers and therapeutic targets related to this condition.

  17. Sepsis Through the Eyes of Proteomics: The Progress in the Last Decade.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Narendra Kumar; Salomao, Reinaldo

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response caused by infection whose molecular mechanisms are still not completely understood. The early detection of sepsis remains a great challenge for clinicians because no single biomarker capable of its reliable prediction, hence, delayed diagnosis frequently undermines treatment efforts, thereby contributing to high mortality. There are several experimental approaches used to reveal the molecular mechanism of sepsis progression. Proteomics coupled with mass spectrometry made possible to identify differentially expressed proteins in clinical samples. Recent advancement in liquid chromatography-based separation methods and mass spectrometers resolution and sensitivity with absolute quantitation methods, made possible to use proteomics as a powerful tool for study of clinical samples with higher coverage proteome profiles. In recent years, number of proteomic studies have been done under sepsis and/or in response to endotoxin and showed various signaling pathways, functions, and biomarkers. This review enlightened the proteomic progress in the last decade in sepsis.

  18. Biomarker qualification via public-private partnerships.

    PubMed

    Eck, S L; Paul, S M

    2010-01-01

    Biomarkers linked to patient outcomes (safety and efficacy) have an increasingly important role in drug development. Consequently, validation and qualification of such biomarkers are essential, often requiring large data sets from well-controlled randomized clinical trials. In the December 2009 issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, investigators utilizing data from four pharmaceutical companies and working under the auspices of the Biomarkers Consortium described the utility of adiponectin as an early predictor of glycemic control in diabetic patients taking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists. This work illustrates the advantages of large public-private partnerships for biomarker qualification.

  19. Ten Years of Proteomics in Bladder Cancer: Progress and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Frantzi, Maria; Vlahou, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    Research efforts targeting the identification of bladder cancer biomarkers have been extensive during the past decade. Investigations have been performed at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome levels and outputs have started appearing including the sketching of disease molecular subtypes. Proteins are directly linked to cell phenotype hence they accumulate special interest as both biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Multiple technical challenges exist, of the main, being the protein concentration vast dynamic range and presence of proteins in modified forms. The scope of this review is to summarize the contribution of proteomics research in this quest of bladder cancer biomarkers. To obtain an unbiased and comprehensive overview, the scientific literature was searched for manuscripts describing proteomic studies on urothelial cancer from the last ten years and those including independent verification studies in urine, tissue and blood are briefly presented. General observations include: a) in most cases, suboptimal experimental design including healthy controls in biomarker discovery and frequently biomarker verification, is followed; b) variability in protein findings between studies can be observed, to some extent reflecting complexity of experimental approaches and proteome itself; c) consistently reported biomarkers include mainly plasma proteins and d) compilation of protein markers into diagnostic panels appears the most promising way forward. Two main avenues of research can now be foreseen: targeting integration of the existing disparate data with proteomic findings being placed in the context of existing knowledge on bladder cancer subtypes and in parallel, accumulation of clinical samples to support proper validation studies of promising marker combinations. PMID:28149930

  20. Biomarkers in pediatrics: children as biomarker orphans.

    PubMed

    Savage, William J; Everett, Allen D

    2010-12-01

    Biomarkers have enormous potential to improve patient care by establishing tests of diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment effects. Successfully translating a biomarker from discovery to clinical application demands high-quality discovery research and high-quality clinical studies for biomarker validation; however, there are additional challenges that face biomarker research in pediatrics. There are also additional characteristics of pediatric medicine that make biomarker research especially needed. This review focuses on the fundamentals of biomarkers, the additional considerations needed for applying biomarker research to children, and recommendations for advancing pediatric biomarker research.

  1. Development of a Targeted Urine Proteome Assay for Kidney Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cantley, Lloyd G.; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Stone, Kathryn L.; Chung, Lisa; Belcher, Justin; Abbott, Thomas; Cantley, Jennifer L.; Williams, Kenneth R.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Human urine is the least invasive and most readily available bio fluid whose proteome has been shown to change in response to disease or drug treatment. Urine is thus very amenable to quantitative proteomics and is a logical sample choice for identifying protein biomarkers for kidney diseases. In this study potential biomarkers were identified initially by using a multi-proteomics workflow to compare urine proteomes of kidney transplant patients who exhibited immediate versus delayed graft function. To comprehensively interrogate the urine proteome two “bottom up”, mass spectrometric-based discovery approaches, iTRAQ and Label Free Quantitation (LFQ), were complemented by Differential Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE) analyses of intact urine proteins from kidney transplant recipients who received a deceased donor kidney. Differentially expressed proteins in the two patient groups were identified, and corresponding stable isotope–labeled internal peptide standard (SIS) peptides were synthesized for scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The Targeted Urine Proteome Assay (TUPA) was then developed by identifying those peptides for which there were at least 2 transitions for which interference in a urine matrix across 156 MRM runs was less than 30%. This resulted in a final assay that monitors 224 peptides corresponding to 167 quantifiable proteins. PMID:26220717

  2. Coupling enrichment methods with proteomics for understanding and treating disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Shiloach, Joseph; Bowen, Michael A; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Owing to recent advances in proteomics analytical methods and bioinformatics capabilities there is a growing trend toward using these capabilities for the development of drugs to treat human disease, including target and drug evaluation, understanding mechanisms of drug action, and biomarker discovery. Currently, the genetic sequences of many major organisms are available, which have helped greatly in characterizing proteomes in model animal systems and humans. Through proteomics, global profiles of different disease states can be characterized (e.g. changes in types and relative levels as well as changes in PTMs such as glycosylation or phosphorylation). Although intracellular proteomics can provide a broad overview of physiology of cells and tissues, it has been difficult to quantify the low abundance proteins which can be important for understanding the diseased states and treatment progression. For this reason, there is increasing interest in coupling comparative proteomics methods with subcellular fractionation and enrichment techniques for membranes, nucleus, phosphoproteome, glycoproteome as well as low abundance serum proteins. In this review, we will provide examples of where the utilization of different proteomics-coupled enrichment techniques has aided target and biomarker discovery, understanding the drug targeting mechanism, and mAb discovery. Taken together, these improvements will help to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of various diseases including cancer, autoimmunity, inflammation, cardiovascular disease, and neurological conditions, and in the design and development of better medicines for treating these afflictions.

  3. Biomarker discovery for neuroendocrine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Hsun; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Hu, Ren-Yu; Lin, Meng-Wei; Lin, Szu-Ting; Huang, Shun-Hong; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Lai, Zih-Yin; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2014-07-01

    Neuroendocrine cervical cancer is an aggressive but rare form of cervical cancer. The majority of neuroendocrine cervical cancer patients present with advanced-stage diseases. However, the limited numbers of neuroendocrine tumor markers are insufficient for clinical purposes. Thus, we used a proteomic approach combining lysine labeling 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF MS to investigate the biomarkers for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. By analyzing the global proteome alteration between the neuroendocrine cervical cancer line (HM-1) and non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer lines (CaSki cells, ME-180 cells, and Hela cells), we identified 82 proteins exhibiting marked changes between HM-1 and CaSki cells, and between ME-180 and Hela cells. Several proteins involved in protein folding, cytoskeleton, transcription control, signal transduction, glycolysis, and redox regulation exhibited significant changes in abundance. Proteomic and immunoblot analyses indicated respective 49.88-fold and 25-fold increased levels of transgelin in HM-1 cells compared with that in other non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer cell lines, implying that transgelin is a biomarker for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. In summary, we used a comprehensive neuroendocrine/non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer model based proteomic approach for identifying neuroendocrine cervical cancer markers, which might contribute to the prognosis and diagnosis of neuroendocrine cervical cancer.

  4. Network-Based Protein Biomarker Discovery Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minhyung

    2016-01-01

    The advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies have enabled the generation of global proteome data from tissue or body fluid samples collected from a broad spectrum of human diseases. Comparative proteomic analysis of global proteome data identifies and prioritizes the proteins showing altered abundances, called differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), in disease samples, compared to control samples. Protein biomarker candidates that can serve as indicators of disease states are then selected as key molecules among these proteins. Recently, it has been addressed that cellular pathways can provide better indications of disease states than individual molecules and also network analysis of the DEPs enables effective identification of cellular pathways altered in disease conditions and key molecules representing the altered cellular pathways. Accordingly, a number of network-based approaches to identify disease-related pathways and representative molecules of such pathways have been developed. In this review, we summarize analytical platforms for network-based protein biomarker discovery and key components in the platforms. PMID:27103885

  5. Circulating biomarker panels for targeted therapy in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Codrici, Elena; Popescu, Ionela Daniela; Mihai, Simona; Enciu, Ana Maria; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Popa, Adrian Claudiu; Neagu, Ana Iulia; Necula, Laura Georgiana; Mambet, Cristina; Neagu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    An important goal of oncology is the development of cancer risk-identifier biomarkers that aid early detection and target therapy. High-throughput profiling represents a major concern for cancer research, including brain tumors. A promising approach for efficacious monitoring of disease progression and therapy could be circulating biomarker panels using molecular proteomic patterns. Tailoring treatment by targeting specific protein-protein interactions and signaling networks, microRNA and cancer stem cell signaling in accordance with tumor phenotype or patient clustering based on biomarker panels represents the future of personalized medicine for brain tumors. Gathering current data regarding biomarker candidates, we address the major challenges surrounding the biomarker field of this devastating tumor type, exploring potential perspectives for the development of more effective predictive biomarker panels.

  6. Proteomic-Based Approaches for the Study of Cytokines in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marrugal, Ángela; Ojeda, Laura; Paz-Ares, Luis; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Ferrer, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic techniques are currently used to understand the biology of different human diseases, including studies of the cell signaling pathways implicated in cancer progression, which is important in knowing the roles of different proteins in tumor development. Due to its poor prognosis, proteomic approaches are focused on the identification of new biomarkers for the early diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted treatment of lung cancer. Cytokines are proteins involved in inflammatory processes and have been proposed as lung cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets because it has been reported that some cytokines play important roles in tumor development, invasion, and metastasis. In this review, we aim to summarize the different proteomic techniques used to discover new lung cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Several cytokines have been identified as important players in lung cancer using these techniques. We underline the most important cytokines that are useful as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. We also summarize some of the therapeutic strategies targeted for these cytokines in lung cancer.

  7. Imaging Biomarkers or Biomarker Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Since biomarker imaging is traditionally understood as imaging of molecular probes, we highly recommend to avoid any confusion with the previously defined term “imaging biomarkers” and, therefore, only use “molecular probe imaging (MPI)” in that context. Molecular probes (MPs) comprise all kinds of molecules administered to an organism which inherently carry a signalling moiety. This review highlights the basic concepts and differences of molecular probe imaging using specific biomarkers. In particular, PET radiopharmaceuticals are discussed in more detail. Specific radiochemical and radiopharmacological aspects as well as some legal issues are presented. PMID:24967536

  8. Biomarkers in major depressive disorder: the role of mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Woods, Alisa G; Iosifescu, Dan V; Darie, Costel C

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is common. Despite numerous available treatments, many individuals fail to improve clinically. MDD continues to be diagnosed exclusively via behavioral rather than biological methods. Biomarkers-which include measurements of genes, proteins, and patterns of brain activity-may provide an important objective tool for the diagnosis of MDD or in the rational selection of treatments. Proteomic analysis and validation of its results as biomarkers is less explored than other areas of biomarker research in MDD. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a comprehensive, unbiased means of proteomic analysis, which can be complemented by directed protein measurements, such as Western Blotting. Prior studies have focused on MS analysis of several human biomaterials in MDD, including human post-mortem brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood components, and urine. Further studies utilizing MS and proteomic analysis in MDD may help solidify and establish biomarkers for use in diagnosis, identification of new treatment targets, and understanding of the disorder. The ultimate goal is the validation of a biomarker or a biomarker signature that facilitates a convenient and inexpensive predictive test for depression treatment response and helps clinicians in the rational selection of next-step treatments.

  9. Biomarkers: background, classification and guidelines for applications in nutritional epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Corella, Dolores; Ordovás, José M

    2015-02-26

    One of the main problems in nutritional epidemiology is to assess food intake as well as nutrient/food component intake to a high level of validity and reliability. To help in this process, the need to have good biomarkers that more objectively allow us to evaluate the diet consumed in a more standardized, valid and precise way has often been commented upon. There are various definitions of biomarkers and also different classifications of the same. In general a biomarker can be defined as a characteristic that can objectively measure different biological samples and that can be evaluated as an exposure marker of normal or pathogenic biological processes or of responses to a certain intervention. The biological samples most commonly used in nutritional epidemiology are blood, red blood cells, plasma, serum, urine, nails, saliva, faeces and samples of different tissues. Exposure biomarkers (dietary intake), biomarkers of effects and biomarkers of disease status can be determined from these samples. In turn, exposure biomarkers can be temporarily categorized into markers of acute, medium term or chronic effects. Many difficulties arise in identifying good biomarkers. Currently, advances in omics are opening up new possibilities for obtaining new biomarkers of various kinds, using genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, lipidomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We shall review the present situation of biomarkers in nutritional epidemiology as well as the future trends of the new omic biomarkers.

  10. Use of cervicovaginal fluid for the identification of biomarkers for pathologies of the female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Zegels, Geert; Van Raemdonck, Geert Aa; Tjalma, Wiebren Aa; Van Ostade, Xaveer Wm

    2010-12-08

    Cervicovaginal fluid has an important function in the homeostasis and immunity of the lower female genital tract. Analysis of the cervicovaginal fluid proteome may therefore yield important information about the pathogenesis of numerous gynecological pathologies. Additionally, cervicovaginal fluid has great potential as a source of biomarkers for these conditions.This review provides a detailed discussion about the human cervicovaginal proteome and the proteomics studies performed to characterize this biological fluid. Furthermore, infection-correlated pathological conditions of the female genital tract are discussed for which cervicovaginal fluid has been used in order to identify potential biomarkers. Recent years, numerous studies have analyzed cervicovaginal fluid samples utilizing antibody-based technologies, such as ELISA or Western blotting, to identify biomarkers for preterm birth, premature preterm rupture of membranes, bacterial vaginosis and cervical cancer. The present article will discuss the importance of proteomic technologies as alternative techniques to gain additional meaningful information about these conditions. In addition, the review focuses on recent proteomic studies on cervicovaginal fluid samples for the identification of potential biomarkers. We conclude that the use of proteomic technology for analysis of human cervicovaginal fluid samples is promising and may lead to the discovery of new biomarkers which can improve disease prevention and therapy development.

  11. Proteomics and peptidomics: moving toward precision medicine in urological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Ashley Di; Pasic, Maria D.; Yousef, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Urological malignancies are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances in early detection, diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of treatment response can significantly improve patient care. Proteomic and peptidomic profiling studies are at the centre of kidney, prostate and bladder cancer biomarker discovery and have shown great promise for improved clinical assessment. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most widely employed method for proteomic and peptidomic analyses. A number of MS platforms have been developed to facilitate accurate identification of clinically relevant markers in various complex biological samples including tissue, urine and blood. Furthermore, protein profiling studies have been instrumental in the successful introduction of several diagnostic multimarker tests into the clinic. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of high-throughput technologies for protein and peptide based biomarker discovery. We will also examine the current state of kidney, prostate and bladder cancer biomarker research as well as review the journey toward successful clinical implementation. PMID:27119500

  12. Respiratory proteomics: from descriptive studies to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Teran, Luis M; Montes-Vizuet, Rosalia; Li, Xinping; Franz, Thomas

    2015-01-02

    Respiratory diseases are highly prevalent and affect humankind worldwide, causing extensive morbidity and mortality with the environment playing an important role. Given the complex structure of the airways, sophisticated tools are required for early diagnosis; initial symptoms are nonspecific, and the clinical diagnosis is made frequently late. Over the past few years, proteomics has made high technological progress in mass-spectrometry-based protein identification and has allowed us to gain new insights into disease mechanisms and identify potential novel therapeutic targets. This review will highlight the contributions of proteomics toward the understanding of the respiratory proteome listing potential biomarkers and its potential application to the clinic. We also outline the contributions of proteomics to creating a personalized approach in respiratory medicine.

  13. Proteomics analysis of bodily fluids in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A.; Chen, Ru

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics study of pancreatic cancer using bodily fluids emphasizes biomarker discovery and clinical application, presenting unique prospect and challenges. Depending on the physiological nature of the bodily fluid and its proximity to pancreatic cancer, the proteomes of bodily fluids, such as pancreatic juice, pancreatic cyst fluid, blood, bile and urine, can be substantially different in terms of protein constitution and the dynamic range of protein concentration. Thus, a comprehensive discovery and specific detection of cancer-associated proteins within these varied fluids is a complex task, requiring rigorous experiment design and a concerted approach. While major challenges still remain, fluid proteomics studies in pancreatic cancer to date have provided a wealth of information in revealing proteome alterations associated with pancreatic cancer in various bodily fluids. PMID:25780901

  14. Update on the Serum Biomarkers and Genetic Factors Associated with Safety and Efficacy of rt-PA Treatment in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nafría, C.; Fernández-Cadenas, I.; Mendioroz, M.; Domingues-Montanari, S.; Hernández-Guillamón, M.; Fernández-Morales, J.; del Río-Espínola, A.; Giralt, D.; Deu, L.; Delgado, P.; Rosell, A.; Montaner, J.

    2011-01-01

    An accurate understanding of the mechanisms underlying an individual's response to rt-PA treatment is critical to improve stroke patients' management. We thus reviewed the literature in order to identify biochemical and genetic factors that have been associated with safety and efficacy of rt-PA administration after stroke. PMID:21772966

  15. Proteomic evaluation of sheep serum proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The applications of proteomic strategies to ovine medicine remain limited. The definition of serum proteome may be a good tool to identify useful protein biomarkers for recognising sub-clinical conditions and overt disease in sheep. Findings from bovine species are often directly translated for use in ovine medicine. In order to characterize normal protein patterns and improve knowledge of molecular species-specific characteristics, we generated a two-dimensional reference map of sheep serum. The possible application of this approach was tested by analysing serum protein patterns in ewes with mild broncho-pulmonary disease, which is very common in sheep and in the peripartum period which is a stressful time, with a high incidence of infectious and parasitic diseases. Results This study generated the first reference 2-DE maps of sheep serum. Overall, 250 protein spots were analyzed, and 138 identified. Compared with healthy sheep, serum protein profiles of animals with rhino-tracheo-bronchitis showed a significant decrease in protein spots identified as transthyretin, apolipoprotein A1 and a significant increase in spots identified as haptoglobin, endopin 1b and alpha1B glycoprotein. In the peripartum period, haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, apolipoprotein A1 levels rose, while transthyretin content dropped. Conclusions This study describes applications of proteomics in putative biomarker discovery for early diagnosis as well as for monitoring the physiological and metabolic situations critical for ovine welfare. PMID:22630135

  16. Proteomic Contributions to Personalized Cancer Care*

    PubMed Central

    Koomen, John M.; Haura, Eric B.; Bepler, Gerold; Sutphen, Rebecca; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Benson, Kaaron; Hussein, Mohamad; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Yeatman, Timothy J.; Hildreth, Lynne T.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Fenstermacher, David A.; Dalton, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer impacts each patient and family differently. Our current understanding of the disease is primarily limited to clinical hallmarks of cancer, but many specific molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Genetic markers can be used to determine predisposition to tumor development, but molecularly targeted treatment strategies that improve patient prognosis are not widely available for most cancers. Individualized care plans, also described as personalized medicine, still must be developed by understanding and implementing basic science research into clinical treatment. Proteomics holds great promise in contributing to the prevention and cure of cancer because it provides unique tools for discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. As such, proteomics can help translate basic science discoveries into the clinical practice of personalized medicine. Here we describe how biological mass spectrometry and proteome analysis interact with other major patient care and research initiatives and present vignettes illustrating efforts in discovery of diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, development of treatment strategies in lung cancer, and monitoring prognosis and relapse in multiple myeloma patients. PMID:18664563

  17. Biomarker Development for Brain-Based Disorders: Recent Progress in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Enaw, James O Ebot; Smith, Alicia K.

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers are biological measures that are indicative of a specific disorder, its severity or response to treatment. They are widely used in many areas of medicine, but biomarker development for brain-based disorders lags behind. Using examples from the field of psychiatry, this article reviews the concepts of biomarkers, challenges to their development and the recent progress along those lines. In addition to discussing historical biomarker candidates such as cortisol or catecholamine levels, we include progress from recent genetic, epigenetic, proteomic, neuroimaging and EEG studies. Successful identification of biomarkers will advance the field of psychiatry towards the goal of biological tests for diagnosis, symptom management and treatment response. PMID:25110721

  18. SELDI PROTEINCHIP-BASED LIVER BIOMARKERS IN FUNGICIDE EXPOSED ZEBRAFISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here is part of a three-phased small fish computational toxicology project using a combination of 1) whole organism endpoints, 2) genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic approaches, and 3) computational modeling to (a) identify new molecular biomarkers of expos...

  19. Tissue and Metabolomic Biomarkers of Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    project. The cumulative data is currently being analyzed with the clinical data in the partnering PIs facility. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Kidney cancer ...American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, April 2013. Conclusions: We have developed a combined proteomics, metabolomics ...1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0173 TITLE: Tissue and Metabolomic Biomarkers of

  20. The chromosome-centric human proteome project at FEBS Congress.

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, Elena; Baranova, Ancha; Lisitsa, Andrey; Albar, Juan Pablo; Archakov, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    In the summer of 2013, distinguished global representatives of proteome science gathered to discuss the futuristic visions of the chromosome-centric human proteome project (C-HPP) (Cochairs: Y. K. Paik, G. Omenn; hosted by A. Archakov, Institute of Biomedical Chemistry, Russia) that was broadcast to the annual Federation of European Biochemical Societies Congress (St. Petersburg, Russia, July 10-11, 2013). Technology breakthroughs presented included a new ultra-sensitive Tribrid mass-spectrometer from Thermo and SOMAmers-Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers (SOMAlogic, USA), a new type of protein capture reagents. Professor Archakov's group introduced the "rectangle" concept of proteome size as a product of proteome width and depth. The discussion on proteome width culminated with the introduction of digital biomarkers-low-copied aberrant proteins that differ from their typical forms by PTMs, alternative splicing, or single amino acid polymorphisms. The aberrant proteoforms, a complement to whole-genome proteomic surveys, were presented as an ultimate goal for the proteomic community.

  1. Radiation proteomics: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2014-03-01

    Acute biological effects caused by the exposure to high doses of radiation, either ionizing or nonionizing, are relatively well-known but the delayed effects, occurring decades after exposure, are difficult to predict. The knowledge of the acute and delayed effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation (e.g. bystander effect) or nonionizing radiation (e.g. radiation emitted by wireless communication devices) is not yet reliably established. Often the acute effects of low doses are small and difficult to discover and replicate in scientific studies. Chronic effects of prolonged exposures to low-dose radiation for decades are virtually unknown and often not possible to predict on the basis of the knowledge gained from acute exposures to high doses of radiation. Physiological significance of the biological effects induced by low doses of radiation is not known. The same lack of predictability of outcomes applies to the delayed effects of high-dose radiation exposures. Proteomics, supplemented with other "omics" techniques, might be the best way forward to find out the target molecules of radiation, the biomarkers of radiation exposure and the physiological and health significance of the acute and delayed biological effects caused by the exposures to high- and low-dose radiation. However, the currently available database of radiation effects on proteomes is far too small to be useful in formulation of new hypotheses concerning health consequences of radiation exposures.

  2. Advances in biomarkers of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tiao-Lai; Lin, Chin-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by mood, vegetative, cognitive, and even psychotic symptoms and signs that can cause substantial impairments in quality of life and functioning. Biomarkers are measurable indicators that could help diagnosing MDD or predicting treatment response. In this chapter, lipid profiles, immune/inflammation, and neurotrophic factor pathways that have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD are discussed. Then, pharmacogenetics and epigenetics of serotonin transport and its metabolism pathway, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and abnormality of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis also revealed new biomarkers. Lastly, new techniques, such as proteomics and metabolomics, which allow researchers to approach the studying of MDD with new directions and make new discoveries are addressed. In the future, more data are needed regarding pathophysiology of MDD, including protein levels, single nucleotide polymorphism, epigenetic regulation, and clinical data in order to better identify reliable and consistent biomarkers for diagnosis, treatment choice, and outcome prediction.

  3. Biomarkers in Alzheimer's Disease-Recent Update.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil; Lipincott, Walter

    2017-02-20

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by loss of memory and cognitive function. It is the common cause of dementia in elderly and is a global health concern as the population of people aged 85 and older, is growing alarmingly. Although pharmacotherapy for the treatment of AD has improved, lot of work remains to treat this devastating disease. AD pathology begins even before the onset of clinical symptoms. Because therapies could be more effective if implemented early in the disease progression, it is highly prudent to discover reliable biomarkers, to detect its exact pathophysiology during pre-symptomatic stage. Biomarker(s) with high sensitivity and specificity would facilitate AD diagnosis at early stages. Currently, CSF amyloid β 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau181 are used as AD biomarkers. This report describes conventional and potential in-vitro and in-vivo biomarkers of AD. Particularly, in-vitro transcriptomic, proteomic, lipidomic, and metabolomic; body fluid biomarkers (C-reactive proteins, homocysteine, α-sunuclein index, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate) from blood, serum, plasma, CSF, and saliva; and neuronal, platelets, and lymphocyte microRNA, mtDNA, and Charnoly body are detected. In-vivo physiological and neurobehavioral biomarkers are evaluated by analyzing computerized EEG, event-related potentials, circadian rhythm, and multimodality fusion imaging including: CT, MRI, SPECT, and PET. More specifically, PET imaging biomarkers representing reduced fronto-temporal 18FdG uptake, increased 11C or 18F-PIB uptake, 11C-PBR28 to measure 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), a biomarker for inflammation; and 3-D MRI (ventriculomegaly)/MRS are performed for early and effective clinical management of AD.

  4. Urinary proteomic analysis of chronic allograft nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Edmond; Orlova, Tatyana N.; Mendelev, Natalia; Patschan, Daniel; Kemp, Rowena; Chander, Praveen N.; Hu, Rena; Hao, Gang; Gross, Steven S.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Delaney, Veronica; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of progressive renal allograft injury, which is termed chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), remains obscure and is currently defined by histology. Prospective protocolbiopsy trials have demonstrated that clinical and standard laboratory tests are insufficiently sensitive indicators of the development and progression of CAN. The study aim was to determine if CAN could be characterized by urinary proteomic data and identify the proteins associated with disease. The urinary proteome of 75 renal transplant recipients and 20 healthy volunteers was analyzed using surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization MS. Patients could be classified into subgroups with normal histology and Banff CAN grades 2-3 with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 92% by applying the classification algorithm Adaboost to urinary proteomic data. Several urinary proteins associated with advanced CAN were identified including α1-micro-globulin, β2-micro-globulin, prealbumin, and endorepellin, the antiangiogenic C-terminal fragment of perlecan. Increased urinary endorepellin was confirmed by ELISA and increased tissue expression of the endorepellin/perlecan ratio by immunofluoresence analysis of renal biopsies. In conclusion, analysis of urinary proteomic data has further characterized the more severe CAN grades and identified urinary endorepellin, as a potential biomarker of advanced CAN. PMID:21136903

  5. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Phase II Study of Onartuzumab Plus Bevacizumab Versus Placebo Plus Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma: Efficacy, Safety, and Hepatocyte Growth Factor and O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase Biomarker Analyses.

    PubMed

    Cloughesy, Timothy; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Recht, Lawrence; Brandes, Alba A; Pineda, Estela; Mikkelsen, Tom; Chinot, Olivier L; Balana, Carmen; Macdonald, David R; Westphal, Manfred; Hopkins, Kirsten; Weller, Michael; Bais, Carlos; Sandmann, Thomas; Bruey, Jean-Marie; Koeppen, Hartmut; Liu, Bo; Verret, Wendy; Phan, See-Chun; Shames, David S

    2017-01-20

    Purpose Bevacizumab regimens are approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma in many countries. Aberrant mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) expression has been reported in glioblastoma and may contribute to bevacizumab resistance. The phase II study GO27819 investigated the monovalent MET inhibitor onartuzumab plus bevacizumab (Ona + Bev) versus placebo plus bevacizumab (Pla + Bev) in recurrent glioblastoma. Methods At first recurrence after chemoradiation, bevacizumab-naïve patients with glioblastoma were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive Ona (15 mg/kg, once every 3 weeks) + Bev (15 mg/kg, once every 3 weeks) or Pla + Bev until disease progression. The primary end point was progression-free survival by response assessment in neuro-oncology criteria. Secondary end points were overall survival, objective response rate, duration of response, and safety. Exploratory biomarker analyses correlated efficacy with expression levels of MET ligand hepatocyte growth factor, O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation, and glioblastoma subtype. Results Among 129 patients enrolled (Ona + Bev, n = 64; Pla + Bev, n = 65), baseline characteristics were balanced. The median progression-free survival was 3.9 months for Ona + Bev versus 2.9 months for Pla + Bev (hazard ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.56; P = .7444). The median overall survival was 8.8 months for Ona + Bev and 12.6 months for Pla + Bev (hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.88 to 2.37; P = .1389). Grade ≥ 3 adverse events were reported in 38.5% of patients who received Ona + Bev and 35.9% of patients who received Pla + Bev. Exploratory biomarker analyses suggested that patients with high expression of hepatocyte growth factor or unmethylated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase may benefit from Ona + Bev. Conclusion There was no evidence of further clinical benefit with the addition of onartuzumab to bevacizumab compared with bevacizumab plus placebo in unselected patients with

  6. Proteomics as a Tool for Understanding Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is likely to be a multifactorial disorder, consequence of alterations in gene and protein expression since the neurodevelopment that together to environmental factors will trigger the establishment of the disease. In the post-genomic era, proteomics has emerged as a promising strategy for revealing disease and treatment biomarkers as well as a tool for the comprehension of the mechanisms of schizophrenia pathobiology. Here, there is a discussion of the potential pathways and structures that are compromised in schizophrenia according to proteomic findings while studying five distinct brain regions of post-mortem tissue from schizophrenia patients and controls. Proteins involved in energy metabolism, calcium homeostasis, myelinization, and cytoskeleton have been recurrently found to be differentially expressed in schizophrenia brains. These findings may encourage new studies on the understanding of schizophrenia biochemical pathways and even new potential drug targets. PMID:23430140

  7. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R; Granato, Daniela C; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R; Winck, Flavia V; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Cruz, Karen S P; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W; Santos-Silva, Alan R; Coletta, Ricardo D; Sherman, Nicholas E; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2015-12-22

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS.

  8. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation

    PubMed Central

    Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R.; Granato, Daniela C.; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R.; Winck, Flavia V.; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P.; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R.; Cruz, Karen S. P.; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J.; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P.; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W.; Santos-Silva, Alan R.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS. PMID:26540631

  9. Influence of diet on the proteome of Drosophila melanogaster as assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: the hamburger effect revisited.

    PubMed

    Culwell, Thomas F; Thulin, Craig D; Merrell, Karen J; Graves, Steven W

    2008-09-01

    Proteomic biomarker discovery has been called into question. Diamandis hypothesized that seemingly trivial factors, such as eating a hamburger, may cause sufficient proteomic change as to confound proteomic differences. This has been termed the hamburger effect. Little is known about the variability of complex proteomes in response to the environment. Two methods-two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) and capillary liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LCMS)-were used to study the hamburger effect in two cross-sections of the soluble fruit fly proteome. 2DGE measured abundant proteins, whereas LCMS measured small proteins and peptides. Proteomic differences between males and females were first evaluated to assess the discriminatory capability of the methods. Likewise, wild-type and white-eyed flies were analyzed as a further demonstration that genetically based proteomic differences could be observed above the background analytical variation. Then dietary interventions were imposed. Ethanol was added to the diet of some populations without significant proteomic effect. However, after a 24-h fast, proteomic differences were found using LCMS but not 2DGE. Even so, only three of approximately 1000 molecular species were altered significantly, suggesting that the influence of even an extreme diet change produced only modest proteomic variability, and that much of the fruit fly proteome remains relatively constant in response to diet. These experiments suggest that proteomics can be a viable approach to biomarker discovery.

  10. Proteomics of lung cell biology and pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, Stewart J

    2007-10-01

    Proteomics has the goal of defining the complete protein complement of biological systems, which can then be analyzed in a comparative fashion to generate informative data regarding protein expression and function. Proteomic analyses can also facilitate the discovery of biomarkers that can be used to diagnose and monitor disease severity, activity and therapeutic response, as well as to identify new targets for drug development. A major challenge for proteomics, however, has been detecting low-abundance proteins in complex biological fluids. This review summarizes how proteomic analyses have advanced lung cell biology and facilitated the identification of new mechanisms of disease pathogenesis in respiratory disorders, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, acute lung injury and sarcoidosis. The impact of nanotechnology and microfluidics, as well as studies of post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions (the interactome), are considered. Furthermore, the application of systems-biology approaches to organize and analyze data regarding the lung proteome, interactome, genome, transcriptome, metabolome, glycome and small RNAome (regulatory RNAs), should facilitate future conceptual advances regarding lung cell biology, disease pathogenesis, biomarker discovery and drug development.

  11. Assessment of Serum Biomarkers in Rats After Exposure to Pesticides of Different Chemical Classes

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing emphasis on the use of biomarkers of adverse outcomes in safety assessment and translational research. We evaluated serum biomarkers and targeted metabolite profiles after exposure to pesticides (permethrin, deltamethrin, imidacloprid, carbaryl, triadimefon...

  12. Soybean seed proteome rebalancing

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Eliot M.

    2014-01-01

    The soybean seed’s protein content and composition are regulated by both genetics and physiology. Overt seed protein content is specified by the genotype’s genetic framework and is selectable as a breeding trait. Within the genotype-specified protein content phenotype soybeans have the capacity to rebalance protein composition to create differing proteomes. Soybeans possess a relatively standardized proteome, but mutation or targeted engineering can induce large-scale proteome rebalancing. Proteome rebalancing shows that the output traits of seed content and composition result from two major types of regulation: genotype and post-transcriptional control of the proteome composition. Understanding the underlying mechanisms that specifies the seed proteome can enable engineering new phenotypes for the production of a high-quality plant protein source for food, feed, and industrial proteins. PMID:25232359

  13. From "clinical proteomics" to "clinical chemistry proteomics": considerations using quantitative mass-spectrometry as a model approach.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Sylvain; Poinot, Pauline; Tiers, Laurent; Junot, Christophe; Becher, François; Hirtz, Christophe

    2011-10-08

    Clinical Proteomics biomarker discovery programs lead to the selection of putative new biomarkers of human pathologies. Following an initial discovery phase, validation of these candidates in larger populations is a major task that recently started relying upon the use of mass spectrometry approaches, especially in cases where classical immune-detection methods were lacking. Thanks to highly sensitive spectrometers, adapted measurement methods like selective reaction monitoring (SRM) and various pre-fractionation methods, the quantitative detection of protein/peptide biomarkers in low concentrations is now feasible from complex biological fluids. This possibility leads to the use of similar methodologies in clinical biology laboratories, within a new proteomic field that we shall name "Clinical Chemistry Proteomics" (CCP). Such evolution of Clinical Proteomics adds important constraints with regards to the in vitro diagnostic (IVD) application. As measured values of analytes will be used to diagnose, follow-up and adapt patient treatment on a routine basis; medical utility, robustness, reference materials and clinical feasibility are among the new issues of CCP to consider.

  14. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (recent update).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil; Moon, Carolyn Seungyoun; Khogali, Azza; Haidous, Ali; Chabenne, Anthony; Ojo, Comfort; Jelebinkov, Miriana; Kurdi, Yousef; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder mostly affecting the aging population over sixty. Cardinal symptoms including, tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooling, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are already destroyed. Hence we need early, sensitive, specific, and economical peripheral and/or central biomarker(s) for the differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. These can be classified as clinical, biochemical, genetic, proteomic, and neuroimaging biomarkers. Novel discoveries of genetic as well as nongenetic biomarkers may be utilized for the personalized treatment of PD during preclinical (premotor) and clinical (motor) stages. Premotor biomarkers including hyper-echogenicity of substantia nigra, olfactory and autonomic dysfunction, depression, hyposmia, deafness, REM sleep disorder, and impulsive behavior may be noticed during preclinical stage. Neuroimaging biomarkers (PET, SPECT, MRI), and neuropsychological deficits can facilitate differential diagnosis. Single-cell profiling of dopaminergic neurons has identified pyridoxal kinase and lysosomal ATPase as biomarker genes for PD prognosis. Promising biomarkers include: fluid biomarkers, neuromelanin antibodies, pathological forms of α-Syn, DJ-1, amyloid β and tau in the CSF, patterns of gene expression, metabolomics, urate, as well as protein profiling in the blood and CSF samples. Reduced brain regional N-acetyl-aspartate is a biomarker for the in vivo assessment of neuronal loss using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T2 relaxation time with MRI. To confirm PD diagnosis, the PET biomarkers include [(18)F]-DOPA for estimating dopaminergic neurotransmission, [(18)F]dG for mitochondrial bioenergetics, [(18)F]BMS for mitochondrial complex-1, [(11)C](R)-PK11195 for microglial activation, SPECT imaging with (123)Iflupane and βCIT for dopamine transporter, and urinary

  15. Positional proteomics in the era of the human proteome project on the doorstep of precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Marino, Giada; Butler, Georgina S; Overall, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    Proteolytic processing is a pervasive and irreversible post-translational modification that expands the protein universe by generating new proteoforms (protein isoforms). Unlike signal peptide or prodomain removal, protease-generated proteoforms can rarely be predicted from gene sequences. Positional proteomic techniques that enrich for N- or C-terminal peptides from proteomes are indispensable for a comprehensive understanding of a protein's function in biological environments since protease cleavage frequently results in altered protein activity and localization. Proteases often process other proteases and protease inhibitors which perturbs proteolytic networks and potentiates the initial cleavage event to affect other molecular networks and cellular processes in physiological and pathological conditions. This review is aimed at researchers with a keen interest in state of the art systems level positional proteomic approaches that: (i) enable the study of complex protease-protease, protease-inhibitor and protease-substrate crosstalk and networks; (ii) allow the identification of proteolytic signatures as candidate disease biomarkers; and (iii) are expected to fill the Human Proteome Project missing proteins gap. We predict that these methodologies will be an integral part of emerging precision medicine initiatives that aim to customize healthcare, converting reactive medicine into a personalized and proactive approach, improving clinical care and maximizing patient health and wellbeing, while decreasing health costs by eliminating ineffective therapies, trial-and-error prescribing, and adverse drug effects. Such initiatives require quantitative and functional proteome profiling and dynamic disease biomarkers in addition to current pharmacogenomics approaches. With proteases at the pathogenic center of many diseases, high-throughput protein termini identification techniques such as TAILS (Terminal Amine Isotopic Labeling of Substrates) and COFRADIC (COmbined

  16. Proteomics/diagnosis of chorioamnionitis and of relationships with the fetal exposome

    PubMed Central

    Buhimschi, Irina A.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Proteomics, a relatively young science, originally emerged as a complement to genomics research. By definition, the goal of proteomics is to provide a snapshot of all the proteins within an organism, tissue or biological sample at a given moment. Proteomics has the ability to single out one or more proteins (biomarkers) that change consistently in affected subjects as compared to those disease-free. From a proteomics perspective, chorioamnionitis poses both challenges and opportunities. Challenges relate to the dynamic course of the inflammatory process, and compartmentalization of the gestational sac in relation to the maternal compartment. An inability to evaluate the amniotic fluid non-invasively and repeatedly for meaningful changes in its proteome, and lack of a true gold standard for diagnosis of inflammation and/or infection, represent additional challenges. On the other hand, the unbiased and holistic nature of proteomics offers a real opportunity to improve the current diagnostic and prognostic algorithms for chorioamnionitis. Even at this current stage there are reasons to believe that proteomic biomarkers will improve the understanding of how chorioamnionitis programs or affects the fetus in utero, thus defining its exposome (sum of interactions between genetic makeup of the fetus and the intrauterine environment) of pregnancies affected by infection and/or inflammation. This review summarizes the results of proteomics studies that have aimed or reached these goals. PMID:22100864

  17. Biomarkers in neonatology: the next generation of tests.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pak C; Lam, Hugh S

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, neonatal clinicians have commonly used host response biomarkers to diagnose and assess the severity of systemic infection. Most of these biomarkers, such as acute-phase proteins or cytokines, are non-specific immunomodulating mediators of the inflammatory cascade. With advances in biochemical/genetic research, it is anticipated that future biomarkers will be 'organ and/or disease specific'. There is also the quest for discovery of 'novel' biomarkers to assist diagnosis and prognosis of neonatal diseases using powerful mass-screening techniques, e.g. the next-generation sequencing, proteomics and arrays. This article aims to introduce the concept of the next generation of biomarkers to practising neonatal clinicians, and, hopefully, to integrate basic science research into day-to-day clinical practice in the future.

  18. PROTEOMICS in aquaculture: applications and trends.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Pedro M; Silva, Tomé S; Dias, Jorge; Jessen, Flemming

    2012-07-19

    Over the last forty years global aquaculture presented a growth rate of 6.9% per annum with an amazing production of 52.5 million tonnes in 2008, and a contribution of 43% of aquatic animal food for human consumption. In order to meet the world's health requirements of fish protein, a continuous growth in production is still expected for decades to come. Aquaculture is, though, a very competitive market, and a global awareness regarding the use of scientific knowledge and emerging technologies to obtain a better farmed organism through a sustainable production has enhanced the importance of proteomics in seafood biology research. Proteomics, as a powerful comparative tool, has therefore been increasingly used over the last decade to address different questions in aquaculture, regarding welfare, nutrition, health, quality, and safety. In this paper we will give an overview of these biological questions and the role of proteomics in their investigation, outlining the advantages, disadvantages and future challenges. A brief description of the proteomics technical approaches will be presented. Special focus will be on the latest trends related to the aquaculture production of fish with defined nutritional, health or quality properties for functional foods and the integration of proteomics techniques in addressing this challenging issue.

  19. Plasma proteome analysis of patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As part of a clinical proteomics program focused on diabetes and its complications we are looking for new and better protein biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. The search for new and better biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy has, with a few exceptions, previously focused on either hypothesis-driven studies or urinary based investigations. To date only two studies have investigated the proteome of blood in search for new biomarkers, and these studies were conducted in sera from patients with type 2 diabetes. This is the first reported in depth proteomic study where plasma from type 1 diabetic patients was investigated with the goal of finding improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. In order to reach lower concentration proteins in plasma a pre-fractionation step, either hexapeptide bead-based libraries or anion exchange chromatography, was performed prior to surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Results Proteomic analysis of plasma from a cross-sectional cohort of 123 type 1 diabetic patients previously diagnosed as normoalbuminuric, microalbuminuric or macroalbuminuric, gave rise to 290 peaks clusters of which 16 were selected as the most promising biomarker candidates based on statistical performance, including independent component analysis. Four of the peaks that were discovered have been identified as transthyretin, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein C1 and cystatin C. Several yet unidentified proteins discovered by this novel approach appear to have more potential as biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion These results demonstrate the capacity of proteomic analysis of plasma, by confirming the presence of known biomarkers as well as revealing new biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy in plasma in type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:20205888

  20. Yeast Proteome Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matros, Andrea; Mock, Hans-Peter

    Yeast organisms, and specifically Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have become model systems for many aspects in fundamental and applied research. Consistently, many papers have been published applying proteome techniques to study these organisms. The review will give an overview on the proteome research performed on yeast systems so far; however, due to the large number of publications, only selected reports can be cited neglecting many more interesting ones in the interest of space. The review will focus on research involving mass spectrom-etry as a basic proteome technique, although many more approaches are relevant for the functional characterization of proteins in the cell, e.g. the yeast two-hybrid system. We will provide an overview on yeasts as models in the context of pro-teome analysis, and explain the basic techniques currently applied in proteome approaches. The main part of the review will deal with a survey on the current status of proteomic studies in yeasts. In a first part of this chapter, we will deal with the currently available proteome maps of yeasts, and in the following part we will discuss studies dealing with fundamental aspects, but also mention proteome studies related to applied microbiology. Finally, we will envisage future perspectives of the proteome technology for studying yeasts, and draw major conclusion on the current status reached in this field of functional genomics.

  1. Temporal profiles of plasma proteome during childhood development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Bramer, Lisa; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Waugh, Kathleen; Rewers, Marian J; Zhang, Qibin

    2017-01-30

    Human blood plasma proteome reflects physiological changes associated with a child's development as well as development of disease states. While age-specific normative values are available for proteins routinely measured in clinical practice, there is paucity of comprehensive longitudinal data regarding changes in human plasma proteome during childhood. We applied TMT-10plex isobaric labeling-based quantitative proteomics to longitudinally profile the plasma proteome in 10 healthy children during their development, each with 9 serial time points from 9months to 15years of age. In total, 1828 protein groups were identified at peptide and protein level false discovery rate of 1% and with at least two razor and unique peptides. The longitudinal expression profiles of 1747 protein groups were statistically modeled and their temporal changes were categorized into 7 different patterns. The patterns and relative abundance of proteins obtained by LC-MS were also verified with ELISA. To our knowledge, this study represents the most comprehensive longitudinal profiling of human plasma proteome to date. The temporal profiles of plasma proteome obtained in this study provide a comprehensive resource and reference for biomarker studies in childhood diseases. Biological significance: A pediatric plasma proteome database with longitudinal expression patterns of 1747 proteins from neonate to adolescence was provided to the research community. 970 plasma proteins had age-dependent expression trends, which demonstrated the importance of longitudinal profiling study to identify the potential biomarkers specific to childhood diseases, and the requirement of strictly age-matched clinical samples in a cross-sectional study in pediatric population.

  2. Novel methodologies for biomarker discovery in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoefer, Imo E; Steffens, Sabine; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Bäck, Magnus; Badimon, Lina; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Boulanger, Chantal M; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Egido, Jesus; Evans, Paul C; Guzik, Tomasz; Kwak, Brenda R; Landmesser, Ulf; Mayr, Manuel; Monaco, Claudia; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Tuñón, Jose; Weber, Christian

    2015-10-14

    Identification of subjects at increased risk for cardiovascular events plays a central role in the worldwide efforts to improve prevention, prediction, diagnosis, and prognosis of cardiovascular disease and to decrease the related costs. Despite their high predictive value on population level, traditional risk factors fail to fully predict individual risk. This position paper provides a summary of current vascular biomarkers other than the traditional risk factors with a special focus on the emerging -omics technologies. The definition of biomarkers and the identification and use of classical biomarkers are introduced, and we discuss the limitations of current biomarkers such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). This is complemented by circulating plasma biomarkers, including high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and the conceptual shift from HDL cholesterol levels to HDL composition/function for cardiovascular risk assessment. Novel sources for plasma-derived markers include microparticles, microvesicles, and exosomes and their use for current omics-based analytics. Measurement of circulating micro-RNAs, short RNA sequences regulating gene expression, has attracted major interest in the search for novel biomarkers. Also, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have become key complementary technologies in the search for new biomarkers, such as proteomic searches or identification and quantification of small metabolites including lipids (metabolomics and lipidomics). In particular, pro-inflammatory lipid metabolites have gained much interest in the cardiovascular field. Our consensus statement concludes on leads and needs in biomarker research for the near future to improve individual cardiovascular risk prediction.

  3. Biomarker qualification pilot process at the US Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Goodsaid, Federico; Frueh, Felix

    2007-03-23

    New biomarkers of safety and efficacy are becoming powerful tools in drug development. Their application can be accelerated if a consensus can be reached about their qualification for regulatory applications. This consensus requires a review structure within the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that can evaluate qualification data for these biomarkers and determine whether these biomarkers can be qualified. A pilot process and corresponding Biomarker Qualification Review Team have been developed to test how the FDA can work on biomarker qualification.

  4. Differential proteomics of human seminal plasma: A potential target for searching male infertility marker proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2012-04-01

    The clinical fertility tests, available in the market, fail to define the exact cause of male infertility in almost half of the cases and point toward a crucial need of developing better ways of infertility investigations. The protein biomarkers may help us toward better understanding of unknown cases of male infertility that, in turn, can guide us to find better therapeutic solutions. Many clinical attempts have been made to identify biomarkers of male infertility in sperm proteome but only few studies have targeted seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma is a rich source of proteins that are essentially required for development of sperm and successful fertilization. This viewpoint article highlights the importance of human seminal plasma proteome in reproductive physiology and suggests that differential proteomics integrated with functional analysis may help us in searching potential biomarkers of male infertility.

  5. Ionizing radiation effects on cells, organelles and tissues on proteome level.

    PubMed

    Tapio, Soile

    2013-01-01

    This chapter will review the proteome alterations induced by ionizing radiation in cellular systems or using animal models with whole body or localised exposure. The recent developments in qualitative and quantitative proteome analysis using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material from radiobiology archives will be illustrated. The development of promising protein targets to be used as radiation biomarkers in future molecular epidemiology studies is described.

  6. The current status of biomarkers for predicting toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Sarah; Aubrecht, Jiri; Boekelheide, Kim; Brewster, David W; Vaidya, Vishal S; Anderson, Linnea; Burt, Deborah; Dere, Edward; Hwang, Kathleen; Pacheco, Sara; Saikumar, Janani; Schomaker, Shelli; Sigman, Mark; Goodsaid, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are significant rates of attrition in drug development. A number of compounds fail to progress past preclinical development due to limited tools that accurately monitor toxicity in preclinical studies and in the clinic. Research has focused on improving tools for the detection of organ-specific toxicity through the identification and characterization of biomarkers of toxicity. Areas covered This article reviews what we know about emerging biomarkers in toxicology, with a focus on the 2012 Northeast Society of Toxicology meeting titled ‘Translational Biomarkers in Toxicology.’ The areas covered in this meeting are summarized and include biomarkers of testicular injury and dysfunction, emerging biomarkers of kidney injury and translation of emerging biomarkers from preclinical species to human populations. The authors also provide a discussion about the biomarker qualification process and possible improvements to this process. Expert opinion There is currently a gap between the scientific work in the development and qualification of novel biomarkers for nonclinical drug safety assessment and how these biomarkers are actually used in drug safety assessment. A clear and efficient path to regulatory acceptance is needed so that breakthroughs in the biomarker toolkit for nonclinical drug safety assessment can be utilized to aid in the drug development process. PMID:23961847

  7. IFN-γ/TNF-α ratio in response to immuno proteomically identified human T-cell antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis - The most suitable surrogate biomarker for latent TB infection.

    PubMed

    Prabhavathi, Maddineni; Pathakumari, Balaji; Raja, Alamelu

    2015-08-01

    The enormous reservoir of latent TB infection (LTBI) poses a major hurdle for global TB control. The existing Tuberculin skin test (TST) and IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are found to be suboptimal for LTBI diagnosis. Previously we had taken an immunoproteomic approach and identified 10 protein fractions (contains 16 proteins), which are solely recognized by LTBI. In a cohort of 40 pulmonary TB patients (PTB) and 35 healthy household contacts (HHC), IFN-γ and TNF-α response were measured against 16 antigens by using 1:10 diluted whole blood assay. Among all the antigens, IFN-γ response to Rv2626c has shown positivity of 88.57% in HHC and 7.5% in PTB group. IFN-γ response to combination of Rv2626c + Rv3716c has demonstrated 100% positivity in HHC and 17.5% positivity in PTB respectively. Compared to individual cytokines (i.e. IFN-γ and TNF-α), ratio of IFN-γ/TNF-α has shown promising results for diagnosis of LTBI. IFN-γ/TNF-α ratio against Rv3716c and TrxC has exhibited a positivity of 94.29% in HHC and 5% in PTB group. Accession of Rv2626c and Rv3716c may improve the diagnostic performance of existing QFT-GIT. Independent of QFT-GIT assay, ratio of IFN-γ/TNF-α in response to either Rv3716c or TrxC may acts as suitable surrogate biomarker for LTBI.

  8. Proteomics of the Human Placenta: Promises and Realities

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J.M.; Ackerman, W.E.; Kniss, D.A.; Takizawa, T.; Vandré, D.D.

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics is an area of study that sets as its ultimate goal the global analysis of all of the proteins expressed in a biological system of interest. However, technical limitations currently hamper proteome-wide analyses of complex systems. In a more practical sense, a desired outcome of proteomics research is the translation of large protein data sets into formats that provide meaningful information regarding clinical conditions (e.g., biomarkers to serve as diagnostic and/or prognostic indicators of disease). Herein, we discuss placental proteomics by describing existing studies, pointing out their strengths and weaknesses. In so doing, we strive to inform investigators interested in this area of research about the current gap between hyperbolic promises and realities. Additionally, we discuss the utility of proteomics in discovery-based research, particularly as regards the capacity to unearth novel insights into placental biology. Importantly, when considering under studied systems such as the human placenta and diseases associated with abnormalities in placental function, proteomics can serve as a robust ‘shortcut’ to obtaining information unlikely to be garnered using traditional approaches. PMID:18222537

  9. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics: existing capabilities and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Aryal, Uma K.; Hengel, Shawna M.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Kelly, Ryan T.; Robinson, Errol W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-05-21

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a means for identification, characterization, and quantification of biomolecules that are integral components of the processes essential for life. Characterization of proteins present in a biological system at the proteome and sub-proteomes (e.g., the phosphoproteome, proteoglycome, or degradome/peptidome) levels provides a foundation for understanding fundamental aspects as well as potentially a range of translational applications. Emerging technologies such as ion mobility separations coupled with mass spectrometry and microchip-based - proteome measurements combined with continued enhancement of MS instrumentation and separation techniques, such as reversed phase liquid chromatography and potentially capillary electrophoresis, show great promise for both broad undirected as well as targeted measurements and will be critical for e.g., the proteome-wide characterization of post translational modifications and identification, or the verification, and validation of potential biomarkers of disease. MS-based proteomics is also increasingly demonstrating great potential for contributing to our understanding of the dynamics, reactions, and roles proteins and peptides play advancing our understanding of biology on a system wide level for a wide range of applications, from investigations of microbial communities, bioremediation, and human health and disease states alike.

  10. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  11. Quantitative plant proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Cramer, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    Quantitation is an inherent requirement in comparative proteomics and there is no exception to this for plant proteomics. Quantitative proteomics has high demands on the experimental workflow, requiring a thorough design and often a complex multi-step structure. It has to include sufficient numbers of biological and technical replicates and methods that are able to facilitate a quantitative signal read-out. Quantitative plant proteomics in particular poses many additional challenges but because of the nature of plants it also offers some potential advantages. In general, analysis of plants has been less prominent in proteomics. Low protein concentration, difficulties in protein extraction, genome multiploidy, high Rubisco abundance in green tissue, and an absence of well-annotated and completed genome sequences are some of the main challenges in plant proteomics. However, the latter is now changing with several genomes emerging for model plants and crops such as potato, tomato, soybean, rice, maize and barley. This review discusses the current status in quantitative plant proteomics (MS-based and non-MS-based) and its challenges and potentials. Both relative and absolute quantitation methods in plant proteomics from DIGE to MS-based analysis after isotope labeling and label-free quantitation are described and illustrated by published studies. In particular, we describe plant-specific quantitative methods such as metabolic labeling methods that can take full advantage of plant metabolism and culture practices, and discuss other potential advantages and challenges that may arise from the unique properties of plants.

  12. Prediction of acute coronary syndromes by urinary proteome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Nay M.; Magliano, Dianna J.; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Lyons, Jasmine; Petit, Thibault; Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Ramirez-Torres, Adela; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Maahs, David; Schanstra, Joost P.; Pontillo, Claudia; Pejchinovski, Martin; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Delles, Christian; Mischak, Harald; Staessen, Jan A.; Shaw, Jonathan E.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of individuals who are at risk of suffering from acute coronary syndromes (ACS) may allow to introduce preventative measures. We aimed to identify ACS-related urinary peptides, that combined as a pattern can be used as prognostic biomarker. Proteomic data of 252 individuals enrolled in four prospective studies from Australia, Europe and North America were analyzed. 126 of these had suffered from ACS within a period of up to 5 years post urine sampling (cases). Proteomic analysis of 84 cases and 84 matched controls resulted in the discovery of 75 ACS-related urinary peptides. Combining these to a peptide pattern, we established a prognostic biomarker named Acute Coronary Syndrome Predictor 75 (ACSP75). ACSP75 demonstrated reasonable prognostic discrimination (c-statistic = 0.664), which was similar to Framingham risk scoring (c-statistics = 0.644) in a validation cohort of 42 cases and 42 controls. However, generating by a composite algorithm named Acute Coronary Syndrome Composite Predictor (ACSCP), combining the biomarker pattern ACSP75 with the previously established urinary proteomic biomarker CAD238 characterizing coronary artery disease as the underlying aetiology, and age as a risk factor, further improved discrimination (c-statistic = 0.751) resulting in an added prognostic value over Framingham risk scoring expressed by an integrated discrimination improvement of 0.273 ± 0.048 (P < 0.0001) and net reclassification improvement of 0.405 ± 0.113 (P = 0.0007). In conclusion, we demonstrate that urinary peptide biomarkers have the potential to predict future ACS events in asymptomatic patients. Further large scale studies are warranted to determine the role of urinary biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:28273075

  13. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing.

  14. Proteomic research in bivalves: towards the identification of molecular markers of aquatic pollution.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alexandre; Tedesco, Sara; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Cristobal, Susana

    2012-07-19

    Biomonitoring of aquatic environment and assessment of ecosystem health play essential roles in the development of effective strategies for the protection of the environment, human health and sustainable development. Biomarkers of pollution exposure have been extensively utilized in the last few decades to monitor the health of organisms and hence assess environmental status. However, the use of single biomarkers against biotic or abiotic stressors may be limited by the lack of sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, more recently, the search for novel biomarkers has been focused on the application of OMICS methodologies. Environmental proteomics focuses on the analysis of an organism's proteome and the detection of changes in the level of individual proteins/peptides in response to environmental stressors. Proteomics can provide a more robust approach for the assessment of environmental stress and therefore exposure to pollutants. This review aims to summarize the proteomic research in bivalves, a group of sessile and filter feeding organisms that play an important function as "sentinels" of the aquatic environment. A description of the main proteomic methodologies is provided. The current knowledge in bivalves' toxicology, achieved with proteomics, is reported describing the main biochemical markers identified. A brief discussion regarding future challenges in this area of research emphasizing the development of more descriptive gene/protein databases that could support the OMICs approaches is presented.

  15. The Role of Clinical Proteomics, Lipidomics, and Genomics in the Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ian James

    2016-01-01

    The early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has become important to the reversal and treatment of neurodegeneration, which may be relevant to premature brain aging that is associated with chronic disease progression. Clinical proteomics allows the detection of various proteins in fluids such as the urine, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid for the diagnosis of AD. Interest in lipidomics has accelerated with plasma testing for various lipid biomarkers that may with clinical proteomics provide a more reproducible diagnosis for early brain aging that is connected to other chronic diseases. The combination of proteomics with lipidomics may decrease the biological variability between studies and provide reproducible results that detect a community’s susceptibility to AD. The diagnosis of chronic disease associated with AD that now involves genomics may provide increased sensitivity to avoid inadvertent errors related to plasma versus cerebrospinal fluid testing by proteomics and lipidomics that identify new disease biomarkers in body fluids, cells, and tissues. The diagnosis of AD by various plasma biomarkers with clinical proteomics may now require the involvement of lipidomics and genomics to provide interpretation of proteomic results from various laboratories around the world. PMID:28248224

  16. Exploring salivary proteomes in edentulous patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Border, Michael B; Schwartz, Sarah; Carlson, Jim; Dibble, Christopher F; Kohltfarber, Heidi; Offenbacher, Steven; Buse, John B; Bencharit, Sompop

    2012-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes and tooth loss are linked both epidemiologically and pathophysiologically. We applied label-free differential protein expression analysis using multidimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) to explore the proteomic profile of saliva samples collected from selected type 2 diabetic edentulous patients and non-diabetic controls. Ninety-six peptides corresponding to 52 proteins were differentially expressed between the diabetic edentulous patients and controls (p < 0.05). Some diabetes-related inflammatory biomarkers including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and serum amyloid A were detected with levels increased in diabetic samples. Other biomarkers including amylase, palate, lung and nasal epithelium associated protein (PLUNC), and serotransferrin levels were decreased in diabetic samples. In contrast with previous findings, salivary carbonic anhydrase 6 and alpha-2 macroglobulin levels, however, were decreased in this diabetic patient population. Cluster analysis and principle component analysis demonstrated a differential pattern of protein biomarker expression between diabetic and control subjects. Western blot analysis was completed to confirm the relatively lower expression level of two biomarkers, including PLUNC and amylase in the diabetic group compared to control subjects. The presence of salivary biomarkers specific for diabetes in edentulous subjects mimics those in serum, especially those related to inflammatory/lipid metabolism. While this exploratory study requires further validation with a larger population, it provides proof-of-principle for salivary proteomics for edentulous subjects with diabetes.

  17. Hand Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ...

  18. The Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics Assembles the Largest Proteome Database Resource for Plant Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Weckwerth, Wolfram; Baginsky, Sacha; Van Wijk, Klass; Heazlewood, Joshua; Millar, Harvey

    2009-12-01

    resources, and raw data have been deposited in PRIDE and PRIDE BioMart. Included in this database is an Arabidopsis proteome map that provides evidence for the expression of {approx}50% of all predicted gene models, including several alternative gene models that are not represented in The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) protein database. A set of organ-specific biomarkers is provided, as well as organ-specific proteotypic peptides for 4105 proteins that can be used to facilitate targeted quantitative proteomic surveys. In the future, the AtProteome database will be linked to additional existing resources developed by MASCP members, such as PPDB, ProMEX, and SUBA. The most comprehensive study on the Arabidopsis chloroplast proteome, which includes information on chloroplast sorting signals, posttranslational modifications (PTMs), and protein abundances (analyzed by high-accuracy MS [Orbitrap]), was recently published by the van Wijk lab.2 These and previous data are available via the plant proteome database (PPDB; http://ppdb.tc.cornell.edu) for A. thaliana and maize. PPDB provides genome-wide experimental and functional characterization of the A. thaliana and maize proteomes, including PTMs and subcellular localization information, with an emphasis on leaf and plastid proteins. Maize and Arabidopsis proteome entries are directly linked via internal BLAST alignments within PPDB. Direct links for each protein to TAIR, SUBA, ProMEX, and other resources are also provided.

  19. Top-down analytical platforms for the characterization of the human salivary proteome.

    PubMed

    Cabras, Tiziana; Iavarone, Federica; Manconi, Barbara; Olianas, Alessandra; Sanna, Maria Teresa; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene

    2014-02-01

    Comprehensive analysis and characterization of the human salivary proteome is an important step towards the possible use of saliva for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. The contribution of the different sources to whole saliva, and the evaluation of individual variability and physiological modifications have been investigated by top-down proteomic approaches, disclosing the faceted and complex profile of the human salivary proteome. All this information is essential to develop saliva protein biomarkers. In this Review the major results obtained in the field by top-down platforms, and the improvements required to allow a more complete picture, will be discussed.

  20. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  1. Intact-Protein Analysis System for Discovery of Serum-Based Disease Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Profiling of serum and plasma proteins has substantial relevance to the discovery of circulating disease biomarkers. However, the extreme complexity and vast dynamic range of protein abundance in serum and plasma present a formidable challenge for protein analysis. Thus, integration of multiple technologies is required to achieve high-resolution and high-sensitivity proteomic analysis of serum or plasma. In this chapter, we describe an orthogonal multidimensional intact-protein analysis system (IPAS) (Wang et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 4:618–625, 2005) coupled with protein tagging (Faca et al., J Proteome Res 5:2009–2018, 2006) to profile the serum and plasma proteomes quantitatively, which we have applied in our biomarker discovery studies (Katayama et al., Genome Med 1:47, 2009; Faca et al., PLoS Med 5:e123, 2008; Zhang et al. Genome Biol 9:R93, 2008). PMID:21468941

  2. Intact-protein analysis system for discovery of serum-based disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Samir

    2011-01-01

    Profiling of serum and plasma proteins has substantial relevance to the discovery of circulating disease biomarkers. However, the extreme complexity and vast dynamic range of protein abundance in serum and plasma present a formidable challenge for protein analysis. Thus, integration of multiple technologies is required to achieve high-resolution and high-sensitivity proteomic analysis of serum or plasma. In this chapter, we describe an orthogonal multidimensional intact-protein analysis system (IPAS) (Wang et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 4:618-625, 2005) coupled with protein tagging (Faca et al., J Proteome Res 5:2009-2018, 2006) to profile the serum and plasma proteomes quantitatively, which we have applied in our biomarker discovery studies (Katayama et al., Genome Med 1:47, 2009; Faca et al., PLoS Med 5:e123, 2008; Zhang et al. Genome Biol 9:R93, 2008).

  3. Current strategies and findings in clinically relevant post-translational modification-specific proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, Oliver; Loroch, Stefan; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has considerably extended our knowledge about the occurrence and dynamics of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). So far, quantitative proteomics has been mainly used to study PTM regulation in cell culture models, providing new insights into the role of aberrant PTM patterns in human disease. However, continuous technological and methodical developments have paved the way for an increasing number of PTM-specific proteomic studies using clinical samples, often limited in sample amount. Thus, quantitative proteomics holds a great potential to discover, validate and accurately quantify biomarkers in body fluids and primary tissues. A major effort will be to improve the complete integration of robust but sensitive proteomics technology to clinical environments. Here, we discuss PTMs that are relevant for clinical research, with a focus on phosphorylation, glycosylation and proteolytic cleavage; furthermore, we give an overview on the current developments and novel findings in mass spectrometry-based PTM research. PMID:25955281

  4. Human Urine Proteomics: Analytical Techniques and Clinical Applications in Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Shiva; Jafari, Ameneh; Moradpoor, Raheleh; Ghasemi, Elmira; Khalkhal, Ensieh

    2015-01-01

    Urine has been in the center of attention among scientists of clinical proteomics in the past decade, because it is valuable source of proteins and peptides with a relative stable composition and easy to collect in large and repeated quantities with a noninvasive procedure. In this review, we discuss technical aspects of urinary proteomics in detail, including sample preparation, proteomic technologies, and their advantage and disadvantages. Several recent experiments are presented which applied urinary proteome for biomarker discovery in renal diseases including diabetic nephropathy, immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, lupus nephritis, membranous nephropathy, and acute kidney injury. In addition, several available databases in urinary proteomics are also briefly introduced. PMID:26693351

  5. Clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy: current overview and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Kui; Li, Qifu; Nice, Edouard C; Zhang, Haiyuan; Huang, Canhua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common disease that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently, early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for more effective management of cancer. Importantly, protein profiling using clinical proteomic strategies, with spectacular sensitivity and precision, offer excellent promise for the identification of potential biomarkers that would direct the development of targeted therapeutic anticancer drugs for precision medicine. In particular, clinical sample sources, including tumor tissues and body fluids (blood, feces, urine and saliva), have been widely investigated using modern high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analysis, to pursue the possibilities of precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy. Discussed in this review are the current advantages and limitations of clinical proteomics, the available strategies of clinical proteomics for the management of precision medicine, as well as the challenges and future perspectives of clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy.

  6. Advances and challenges in biomarker development for type 1 diabetes prediction and prevention using omic technologies

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Colleen; Purohit, Sharad; She, Jin-Xiong

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Biomarkers are essential for the identification of high risk children as well as monitoring of prevention outcomes for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Areas covered in this review This review discusses progress, opportunities and challenges in biomarker discovery and validation using high throughput genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies. The authors also suggest potential solutions to deal with the current challenges. What the reader will gain Readers will gain an overview of the current status on T1D biomarkers, an integrated review of three omic technologies, their applications and limitations for biomarker discovery and validation, and a critical discussion of the major issues encountered in biomarker development. Take home message Better biomarkers are still urgently needed for T1D prediction and prevention. The high throughput omic technologies offer great opportunities but also face significant challenges that have to be solved before their potential for biomarker development is fully realized. PMID:20885991

  7. The application of biomarkers in clinical trials for motor neuron disease

    PubMed Central

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; Bowser, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The interest and research into disease-related biomarkers has greatly accelerated over the last 10 years. The potential clinical benefits for disease-specific biomarkers include a more rapid and accurate disease diagnosis, and potential reduction in size and duration of clinical drug trials, which would speed up drug development. The application of biomarkers into the clinical arena of motor neuron disease should both determine if a drug hits its proposed target and whether the drug alters the course of disease. This article will highlight the progress made in discovering suitable biomarker candidates from a variety of sources, including imaging, neurophysiology and proteomics. For biomarkers to have clinical utility, specific criteria must be satisfied. While there has been tremendous effort to discover biomarkers, very few have been translated to the clinic. The bottlenecks in the biomarker pipeline will be highlighted as well as lessons that can be learned from other disciplines, such as oncology. PMID:20406070

  8. A systematic model of the LC-MS proteomics pipeline

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Motivation Mass spectrometry is a complex technique used for large-scale protein profiling with clinical and pharmaceutical applications. While individual components in the system have been studied extensively, little work has been done to integrate various modules and evaluate them from a systems point of view. Results In this work, we investigate this problem by putting together the different modules in a typical proteomics work flow, in order to capture and analyze key factors that impact the number of identified peptides and quantified proteins, protein quantification error, differential expression results, and classification performance. The proposed proteomics pipeline model can be used to optimize the work flow as well as to pinpoint critical bottlenecks worth investing time and resources into for improving performance. Using the model-based approach proposed here, one can study systematically the critical problem of proteomic biomarker discovery, by means of simulation using ground-truthed synthetic MS data. PMID:23134670

  9. Proteomics in epigenetics: new perspectives for cancer research.

    PubMed

    Bartke, Till; Borgel, Julie; DiMaggio, Peter A

    2013-05-01

    The involvement of epigenetic processes in the origin and progression of cancer is now widely appreciated. Consequently, targeting the enzymatic machinery that controls the epigenetic regulation of the genome has emerged as an attractive new strategy for therapeutic intervention. The development of epigenetic drugs requires a detailed knowledge of the processes that govern chromatin regulation. Over the recent years, mass spectrometry (MS) has become an indispensable tool in epigenetics research. In this review, we will give an overview of the applications of MS-based proteomics in studying various aspects of chromatin biology. We will focus on the use of MS in the discovery and mapping of histone modifications and how novel proteomic approaches are being utilized to identify and study chromatin-associated proteins and multi-subunit complexes. Finally, we will discuss the application of proteomic methods in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer based on epigenetic biomarkers and comment on their future impact on cancer epigenetics.

  10. The proteomic landscape of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Robert T; Perez, Elizabeth M; Hernández, Daniel; Miller, Chris P; Haas, Kelsey M; Irie, Hanna Y; Lee, Su-In; Blau, C Anthony; Villén, Judit

    2015-04-28

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease characterized by poor clinical outcomes and a shortage of targeted treatment options. To discover molecular features of triple-negative breast cancer, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis of twenty human-derived breast cell lines and four primary breast tumors to a depth of more than 12,000 distinct proteins. We used this data to identify breast cancer subtypes at the protein level and demonstrate the precise quantification of biomarkers, signaling proteins, and biological pathways by mass spectrometry. We integrated proteomics data with exome sequence resources to identify genomic aberrations that affect protein expression. We performed a high-throughput drug screen to identify protein markers of drug sensitivity and understand the mechanisms of drug resistance. The genome and proteome provide complementary information that, when combined, yield a powerful engine for therapeutic discovery. This resource is available to the cancer research community to catalyze further analysis and investigation.

  11. Proteomic analysis of tissue samples in translational breast cancer research.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Pavel; Moreira, José M A; Gromova, Irina

    2014-06-01

    In the last decade, many proteomic technologies have been applied, with varying success, to the study of tissue samples of breast carcinoma for protein expression profiling in order to discover protein biomarkers/signatures suitable for: characterization and subtyping of tumors; early diagnosis, and both prognosis and prediction of outcome of chemotherapy. The purpose of this review is to critically appraise what has been achieved to date using proteomic technologies and to bring forward novel strategies - based on the analysis of clinically relevant samples - that promise to accelerate the translation of basic discoveries into the daily breast cancer clinical practice. In particular, we address major issues in experimental design by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of current proteomic strategies in the context of the analysis of human breast tissue specimens.

  12. Proteomics as a Systems Approach to Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteomics is an approach to looking at the identity, amount, proteolysis, compartmentalization and post-translational modification of a large number of proteins simultaneously in a cell or tissue. Recently, proteomics has begun to be applied to the study of pancreatitis to ascertain mechanisms of disease and search for biomarkers of disease. Most mechanistic work has been carried out in animal models of acute pancreatitis. In eight studies, 97 proteins have been reported to increase, 55 to decrease and 23 to undergo proteolysis. Proteins showing increases are most often related to stress, inflammation or the cytoskeleton while decreases are seen in digestive enzymes and proteins related to metabolism. Many protein changes however, are not consistent between studies and only the most recent studies are rigorous and quantitative. By contrast, biomarker studies have focused on pancreatic juice and plasma of humans with disease and often are directed at distinguishing chronic pancreatitis from cancer. Chronic pancreatitis has also been investigated in tissue sections of histological samples. In this review the results of studies to date are described as well as coverage of the methods used and special issues that must be considered. Areas are pointed out that are worthy of future study. PMID:23851428

  13. Proteomics for systems toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Titz, Bjoern; Elamin, Ashraf; Martin, Florian; Schneider, Thomas; Dijon, Sophie; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Current toxicology studies frequently lack measurements at molecular resolution to enable a more mechanism-based and predictive toxicological assessment. Recently, a systems toxicology assessment framework has been proposed, which combines conventional toxicological assessment strategies with system-wide measurement methods and computational analysis approaches from the field of systems biology. Proteomic measurements are an integral component of this integrative strategy because protein alterations closely mirror biological effects, such as biological stress responses or global tissue alterations. Here, we provide an overview of the technical foundations and highlight select applications of proteomics for systems toxicology studies. With a focus on mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we summarize the experimental methods for quantitative proteomics and describe the computational approaches used to derive biological/mechanistic insights from these datasets. To illustrate how proteomics has been successfully employed to address mechanistic questions in toxicology, we summarized several case studies. Overall, we provide the technical and conceptual foundation for the integration of proteomic measurements in a more comprehensive systems toxicology assessment framework. We conclude that, owing to the critical importance of protein-level measurements and recent technological advances, proteomics will be an integral part of integrative systems toxicology approaches in the future. PMID:25379146

  14. Proteomics in medical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Cash, P

    2000-04-01

    The techniques of proteomics (high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein characterisation) are widely used for microbiological research to analyse global protein synthesis as an indicator of gene expression. The rapid progress in microbial proteomics has been achieved through the wide availability of whole genome sequences for a number of bacterial groups. Beyond providing a basic understanding of microbial gene expression, proteomics has also played a role in medical areas of microbiology. Progress has been made in the use of the techniques for investigating the epidemiology and taxonomy of human microbial pathogens, the identification of novel pathogenic mechanisms and the analysis of drug resistance. In each of these areas, proteomics has provided new insights that complement genomic-based investigations. This review describes the current progress in these research fields and highlights some of the technical challenges existing for the application of proteomics in medical microbiology. The latter concern the analysis of genetically heterogeneous bacterial populations and the integration of the proteomic and genomic data for these bacteria. The characterisation of the proteomes of bacterial pathogens growing in their natural hosts remains a future challenge.

  15. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.

  16. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    DOE PAGES

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification ofmore » aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.« less

  17. Imaging proteomics for diagnosis, monitoring and prediction of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nazeri, Arash; Ganjgahi, Habib; Roostaei, Tina; Nichols, Thomas; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2014-11-15

    Proteomic and imaging markers have been widely studied as potential biomarkers for diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we used Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative dataset and performed parallel independent component analysis on cross sectional and longitudinal proteomic and imaging data in order to identify the best proteomic model for diagnosis, monitoring and prediction of Alzheimer disease (AD). We used plasma proteins measurement and imaging data from AD and healthy controls (HC) at the baseline and 1 year follow-up. Group comparisons at baseline and changes over 1 year were calculated for proteomic and imaging data. The results were fed into parallel independent component analysis in order to identify proteins that were associated with structural brain changes cross sectionally and longitudinally. Regression model was used to find the best model that can discriminate AD from HC, monitor AD and to predict MCI converters from non-converters. We showed that five proteins are associated with structural brain changes in the brain. These proteins could discriminate AD from HC with 57% specificity and 89% sensitivity. Four proteins whose change over 1 year were associated with brain structural changes could discriminate AD from HC with sensitivity of 93%, and specificity of 92%. This model predicted MCI conversion to AD in 2 years with 94% accuracy. This model has the highest accuracy in prediction of MCI conversion to AD within the ADNI-1 dataset. This study shows that combination of selected plasma protein levels and MR imaging is a useful method in identifying potential biomarker.

  18. Detecting differential protein expression in large-scale population proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Soyoung; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2014-06-17

    Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput quantitative proteomics shows great potential in clinical biomarker studies, identifying and quantifying thousands of proteins in biological samples. However, methods are needed to appropriately handle issues/challenges unique to mass spectrometry data in order to detect as many biomarker proteins as possible. One issue is that different mass spectrometry experiments generate quite different total numbers of quantified peptides, which can result in more missing peptide abundances in an experiment with a smaller total number of quantified peptides. Another issue is that the quantification of peptides is sometimes absent, especially for less abundant peptides and such missing values contain the information about the peptide abundance. Here, we propose a Significance Analysis for Large-scale Proteomics Studies (SALPS) that handles missing peptide intensity values caused by the two mechanisms mentioned above. Our model has a robust performance in both simulated data and proteomics data from a large clinical study. Because varying patients’ sample qualities and deviating instrument performances are not avoidable for clinical studies performed over the course of several years, we believe that our approach will be useful to analyze large-scale clinical proteomics data.

  19. Proteomic Findings in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Deepanwita; Tackett, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Although the emergence of proteomics as an independent branch of science is fairly recent, within a short period of time it has contributed substantially in various disciplines. The tool of mass spectrometry has become indispensable in the analysis of complex biological samples. Clinical applications of proteomics include detection of predictive and diagnostic markers, understanding mechanism of action of drugs as well as resistance mechanisms against them and assessment of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patients. Here, we have summarized the major contributions of proteomics towards the study of melanoma, which is a deadly variety of skin cancer with a high mortality rate. PMID:27274624

  20. Proteome sequencing goes deep

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alicia L.; Merrill, Anna E.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry have transformed the scope and impact of protein characterization efforts. Identifying hundreds of proteins from rather simple biological matrices, such as yeast, was a daunting task just a few decades ago. Now, expression of more than half of the estimated ~20,000 human protein coding genes can be confirmed in record time and from minute sample quantities. Access to proteomic information at such unprecedented depths has been fueled by strides in every stage of the shotgun proteomics workflow – from sample processing to data analysis – and promises to revolutionize our understanding of the causes and consequences of proteome variation. PMID:25461719

  1. Proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aimed to facilitate candidate biomarkers selection and improve network-based multi-target therapy, we perform comparative proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma. Laser capture microdissection was used to harvest purified muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells from 4 paired samples. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteome expression profile. The differential proteins were further analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared with the published literature. Results A total of 885/890 proteins commonly appeared in 4 paired samples. 295/337 of the 488/493 proteins that specific expressed in tumor/normal cells own gene ontology (GO) cellular component annotation. Compared with the entire list of the international protein index (IPI), there are 42/45 GO terms exhibited as enriched and 9/5 exhibited as depleted, respectively. Several pathways exhibit significantly changes between cancer and normal cells, mainly including spliceosome, endocytosis, oxidative phosphorylation, etc. Finally, descriptive statistics show that the PI Distribution of candidate biomarkers have certain regularity. Conclusions The present study identified the proteome expression profile of muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells, providing information for subcellular pattern research of cancer and offer candidate proteins for biomarker panel and network-based multi-target therapy. PMID:21645413

  2. Statistical Analysis of Variation in the Human Plasma Proteome

    DOE PAGES

    Corzett, Todd H.; Fodor, Imola K.; Choi, Megan W.; ...

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the variation in the human plasma proteome is an essential prerequisite for disease-specific biomarker detection. We report here on the longitudinal and individual variation in human plasma characterized by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) using plasma samples from eleven healthy subjects collected three times over a two week period. Fixed-effects modeling was used to remove dye and gel variability. Mixed-effects modeling was then used to quantitate the sources of proteomic variation. The subject-to-subject variation represented the largest variance component, while the time-within-subject variation was comparable to the experimental variation found in a previous technical variability study where onemore » human plasma sample was processed eight times in parallel and each was then analyzed by 2-D DIGE in triplicate. Here, 21 protein spots had larger than 50% CV, suggesting that these proteins may not be appropriate as biomarkers and should be carefully scrutinized in future studies. Seventy-eight protein spots showing differential protein levels between different individuals or individual collections were identified by mass spectrometry and further characterized using hierarchical clustering. The results present a first step toward understanding the complexity of longitudinal and individual variation in the human plasma proteome, and provide a baseline for improved biomarker discovery.« less

  3. Integrative system biology strategies for disease biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Hu, Hao; Deng, Cao; Chun, Yeona; Zhou, Shengtao; Huang, Fuqiang; Zhou, Qin

    2012-05-01

    Biomarkers are currently widely used to diagnose diseases, monitor treatments, and evaluate potential drug candidates. Research of differential Omics accelerate the advancements of biomarkers' discovery. By extracting biological knowledge from the 'omics' through integration, integrative system biology creates predictive models of cells, organs, biochemical processes and complete organisms, in addition to identifying human disease biomarkers. Recent development in high-throughput methods enables analysis of genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome at an unprecedented scale, thus contributing to the deluge of experimental data in numerous public databases. Several integrative system biology approaches have been developed and applied to the discovery of disease biomarkers from databases. In this review, we highlight several of these approaches and identify future steps in the context of the field of integrative system biology.

  4. Novel droplet platforms for the detection of disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zec, Helena; Shin, Dong Jin; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2014-09-01

    Personalized medicine - healthcare based on individual genetic variation - has the potential to transform the way healthcare is delivered to patients. The promise of personalized medicine has been predicated on the predictive and diagnostic power of genomic and proteomic biomarkers. Biomarker screening may help improve health outcomes, for example, by identifying individuals' susceptibility to diseases and predicting how patients will respond to drugs. Microfluidic droplet technology offers an exciting opportunity to revolutionize the accessibility of personalized medicine. A framework for the role of droplet microfluidics in biomarker detection can be based on two main themes. Emulsion-based microdroplet platforms can provide new ways to measure and detect biomolecules. In addition, microdroplet platforms facilitate high-throughput screening of biomarkers. Meanwhile, surface-based droplet platforms provide an opportunity to develop miniatu