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Sample records for proteus

  1. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift Matching Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome ... approved by the Proteus Syndrome Foundation Assessment and management of the orthopedic and other complications of Proteus ...

  2. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  3. [Proteus penneri].

    PubMed

    Cantón, Rafael; Sánchez-Moreno, M Paz; Morosini Reilly, María Isabel

    2006-10-01

    Proteus penneri, formerly P. vulgaris biogroup 1, was recognized as a new species in 1982. This species is associated with clinical processes similar to those involving P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris and expresses similar pathogenic determinants. In clinical samples, P. penneri is mainly isolated from urine (50%), wound and soft tissue exudates (25%), and blood cultures (15%), mostly of nosocomial origin. Although P. penneri is easy to identify, it can be misidentified as P. vulgaris by automatic systems that do not include the indol test result in the identification process. This species has a characteristic susceptibility profile, essentially due to the production of the chromosomal inducible beta-lactamase HugA, which presents a high homology (86%) with CumA from P. vulgaris. HugA is inhibited by clavulanic acid and determines resistance to aminopenicillins and first- and second-generation cephalosporins, including cefuroxime, but does not affect cephamycins or carbapenems, and is inhibited by clavulanic acid. HugA is derepressed due to mutational processes in gene regulators, affecting the activity of cefotaxime and, to a much lesser extent, that of ceftazidime and aztreonam. This phenotype resembles the production of an extended spectrum beta-lactamase. Like other Proteus species, P. penneri is resistant to tetracyclines and should be considered resistant to nitrofurantoin.

  4. Proteus at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  5. Bacteriophage typing of Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Proteus morganii.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W C; Jeffries, C D

    1974-01-01

    A bacteriphage typing scheme for differentiating Proteus isolated from clinical specimens was developed. Twenty-one distinct patterns of lysis were seen when 15 bacteriophages isolated on 8 Proteus mirabilis, 1 P. vulgaris, and 1 P. morganii were used to type 162 of 189 (85.7%) P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris isolates. Seven phages isolated on 3 P. morganii were used to type 13 of 19 (68.4%) P. morganii isolates. Overall, 84.1% of the 208 isolates were lysed by at least 1 phage at routine test dilution (RTD) or 1,000 x RTD. Fifty isolates, retyped several weeks after the initial testing, showed no changes in lytic patterns. The phages retained their titers after storage at 4 C for several months. A computer analysis of the data showed that there was no relationship between the source of the isolate and bacteriophage type. This bacteriophage typing system may provide epidemiological information on strains involved in human infections.

  6. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  7. Proteus Syndrome with Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Asilian, Ali; Kamali, Atefeh Sadat; Riahi, Nabet Tajmir; Adibi, Neda; Mokhtari, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare sporadic disorder that appears with localized macrosomia, congenital lipomatosis, and slow flow vascular malformations, connective tissue nevus, and epidermal nevus. There are usually some manifestations at birth. The vascular abnormalities that have been reported in Proteus syndrome are capillary and slow flow venous malformation. We report a case of a 10-year-old boy with confirmed Proteus syndrome characterized by high flow vascular malformation (arteriovenous [AV] malformation) unlike the usual vascular malformations seen in this syndrome. This case adds a new perspective to the established clinical findings of the Proteus syndrome. PMID:28401074

  8. Antibiotic sensitivity of Proteus species

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Mary; Waterworth, Pamela M.

    1964-01-01

    A study has been made of the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of 96 strains of Proteus isolated from clinical material and a further 29 strains kindly supplied by Dr. Patricia Carpenter. The results have been analysed in relation to the different species. The effect of electrolytes on the penicillin sensitivity of Proteus species has also been examined. PMID:14100008

  9. Proteus front view in flight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-27

    Scaled Composites' unique tandem-wing Proteus was the testbed for a series of UAV collision-avoidance flight demonstrations. An Amphitech 35GHz radar unit installed below Proteus' nose was the primary sensor for the Detect, See and Avoid tests.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Proteus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 95. Review. Citation on PubMed Cohen MM Jr, Turner JT, Biesecker LG. Proteus syndrome: misdiagnosis with PTEN mutations. Am J Med Genet ... on PubMed or Free article on PubMed ... of the Proteus syndrome literature: application of diagnostic criteria to published cases. ...

  11. Production of superoxide dismutases from Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Dayton, T M; Diefenbach, K A; Fuller, M L; Valtos, J; Niederhoffer, E C

    1996-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris expressed a combination of superoxide dismutase (Sod) activities, which was assigned to FeSod1, FeSod2 and MnSod for P. mirabilis, and FeSod, MnSod and CuZnSod for P. vulgaris. Production of the Sod proteins was dependent on the availability of iron, whether cells were grown under anaerobiosis or aerobiosis and growth phase. Nalidixic acid and chloramphenicol inhibited cell growth and the iron- and dioxygen-dependent production of Sod. These results support the involvement of metal ions and redox status in the production of Proteus Sods.

  12. Proteus: Mythology to modern times.

    PubMed

    Sellaturay, Senthy V; Nair, Raj; Dickinson, Ian K; Sriprasad, Seshadri

    2012-10-01

    It is common knowledge that proteus bacteria are associated with urinary tract infections and urinary stones. Far more interesting however, is the derivation of the word proteus. This study examines the origin of the word proteus, its mythological, historical and literary connections and evolution to present-day usage. A detailed search for primary and secondary sources was undertaken using the library and internet. Greek mythology describes Proteus as an early sea-god, noted for being versatile and capable of assuming many different forms. In the 8(th) century BC, the ancient Greek poet, Homer, famous for his epic poems the Iliad and Odyssey, describes Proteus as a prophetic old sea-god, and herdsman of the seals of Poseidon, God of the Sea. Shakespeare re-introduced Proteus into English literature, in the 15(th) century AD, in the comedy The Two Gentleman of Verona, as one of his main characters who is inconstant with his affections. The 'elephant man' was afflicted by a severely disfiguring disease, described as 'Proteus syndrome'. It is particularly difficult to distinguish from neurofibromatosis, due to its various forms in different individuals. The Oxford English Dictionary defines the word 'protean' as to mean changeable, variable, and existing in multiple forms. Proteus bacteria directly derive their name from the Sea God, due to their rapid swarming growth and motility on agar plates. They demonstrate versatility by secreting enzymes, which allow them to evade the host's defense systems. Thus proteus, true to its name, has had a myriad of connotations over the centuries.

  13. Proteus: Mythology to modern times

    PubMed Central

    Sellaturay, Senthy V.; Nair, Raj; Dickinson, Ian K.; Sriprasad, Seshadri

    2012-01-01

    Aims: It is common knowledge that proteus bacteria are associated with urinary tract infections and urinary stones. Far more interesting however, is the derivation of the word proteus. This study examines the origin of the word proteus, its mythological, historical and literary connections and evolution to present-day usage. Materials and Methods: A detailed search for primary and secondary sources was undertaken using the library and internet. Results: Greek mythology describes Proteus as an early sea-god, noted for being versatile and capable of assuming many different forms. In the 8th century BC, the ancient Greek poet, Homer, famous for his epic poems the Iliad and Odyssey, describes Proteus as a prophetic old sea-god, and herdsman of the seals of Poseidon, God of the Sea. Shakespeare re-introduced Proteus into English literature, in the 15th century AD, in the comedy The Two Gentleman of Verona, as one of his main characters who is inconstant with his affections. The ‘elephant man’ was afflicted by a severely disfiguring disease, described as ‘Proteus syndrome’. It is particularly difficult to distinguish from neurofibromatosis, due to its various forms in different individuals. The Oxford English Dictionary defines the word ‘protean’ as to mean changeable, variable, and existing in multiple forms. Proteus bacteria directly derive their name from the Sea God, due to their rapid swarming growth and motility on agar plates. They demonstrate versatility by secreting enzymes, which allow them to evade the host's defense systems. Conclusions: Thus proteus, true to its name, has had a myriad of connotations over the centuries. PMID:23450503

  14. Cell invasiveness of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris strains.

    PubMed

    Rózalski, A; Długońska, H; Kotełko, K

    1986-01-01

    Cell penetration ability of haemolytic and non haemolytic Proteus rods was compared. Among four Proteus strains all were able to invade the tested cells (Vero 135, HeLa, L-929 and human blood lymphocytes) but the expression of this feature by haemolytic strains was markedly higher. The survival and multiplication of intracellular bacteria, especially in the case of fresh human blood lymphocytes may be of importance for the development of infection in higher organisms.

  15. PROTEUS-SN User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Shemon, Emily R.; Smith, Micheal A.; Lee, Changho

    2016-02-16

    PROTEUS-SN is a three-dimensional, highly scalable, high-fidelity neutron transport code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The code is applicable to all spectrum reactor transport calculations, particularly those in which a high degree of fidelity is needed either to represent spatial detail or to resolve solution gradients. PROTEUS-SN solves the second order formulation of the transport equation using the continuous Galerkin finite element method in space, the discrete ordinates approximation in angle, and the multigroup approximation in energy. PROTEUS-SN’s parallel methodology permits the efficient decomposition of the problem by both space and angle, permitting large problems to run efficiently on hundreds of thousands of cores. PROTEUS-SN can also be used in serial or on smaller compute clusters (10’s to 100’s of cores) for smaller homogenized problems, although it is generally more computationally expensive than traditional homogenized methodology codes. PROTEUS-SN has been used to model partially homogenized systems, where regions of interest are represented explicitly and other regions are homogenized to reduce the problem size and required computational resources. PROTEUS-SN solves forward and adjoint eigenvalue problems and permits both neutron upscattering and downscattering. An adiabatic kinetics option has recently been included for performing simple time-dependent calculations in addition to standard steady state calculations. PROTEUS-SN handles void and reflective boundary conditions. Multigroup cross sections can be generated externally using the MC2-3 fast reactor multigroup cross section generation code or internally using the cross section application programming interface (API) which can treat the subgroup or resonance table libraries. PROTEUS-SN is written in Fortran 90 and also includes C preprocessor definitions. The code links against the PETSc, METIS, HDF5, and MPICH libraries. It optionally links against the MOAB library and

  16. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A; Varma, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings.

  17. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A.; Varma, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings. PMID:27186241

  18. Uropathogenic properties of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Peerbooms, P G; Verweij, A M; MacLaren, D M

    1985-02-01

    A group of faecal isolates of Proteus vulgaris and P. mirabilis was studied for the presence of possible virulence factors such as growth rates in urine and broth, haemolysin production, hydrophobicity, sensitivity to the bactericidal activity of human serum and cell invasiveness. Differences were found in haemolysin production, cell invasiveness and experimental virulence in a mouse model. These differences might explain why P. mirabilis is much more common in human urinary-tract infections than P. vulgaris.

  19. Treatment of endocarditis due to Proteus species: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Ankur; Cooley, Christine; Tsigrelis, Constantine

    2011-04-01

    Endocarditis due to Proteus species is very rare. We report a case of endocarditis due to Proteus mirabilis that was successfully treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and review the treatment regimens of previously published cases of Proteus endocarditis.

  20. Proteus - Geology, shape, and catastrophic destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1992-01-01

    Least-squares fits to the two available limb profiles of Proteus yield a sphericity close to unity; the visual irregularity is due to a degree of surface roughness comparable to that of Hyperion and the smaller icy satellites. A network of streaks that can be interpreted as tectonic troughs cuts the surface of Proteus, and is organized concentrically around either one of the two nearly-coincident Proteus-Neptune of Pharos axes of symmetry. If the streaks are tectonic, they may be due to tidal stresses generated by a past change in Proteus' equilibrium orientation. The streaks may also be disruptive-stress fractures.

  1. Arthrite septique à Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    L'arthrite septique aigue est une pathologie peu fréquente mais grevée d'un pronostic lourd en termes de mortalité et morbidité. Nous rapportons un cas d'arthrite septique à Proteus mirabilis survenue de façon spontanée chez un patient de 61 ansprésentant un diabète compliqué,associée à des hémoculturespositives et des cultures positives du liquide articulaire. L'évolution était favorable grâce au diagnostic précoce et à l'institution d'une antibiothérapie adéquate. L'arthrite septique à Proteus Mirabilis est rare, ce qui nous a incité à revoir dans la littérature des séries d'arthrites à pyogènes incluant Proteus mirabilis portant sur les facteurs de risque, la pathogénie, le traitement et l'évolution de ces pathologies. Le diagnostic est avant tout microbiologique, la ponction articulaire précoce est réalisée avant toute antibiothérapie, l'examen direct, la culture et l'antibiogramme qui va guider le choix d'une antibiothérapie. L'arthrite septique est une urgence diagnostique et thérapeutique, la prise en charge précoce de cette pathologie permet une guérison sans séquelles. PMID:28674590

  2. Proteus in flight over Southern California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-27

    Scaled Composites' unique tandem-wing Proteus was the testbed for a series of UAV collision-avoidance flight demonstrations. An Amphitech 35GHz radar unit installed below Proteus' nose was the primary sensor for the Detect, See and Avoid tests.

  3. Proteus in flight over Rosamond Dry lakebed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-27

    Scaled Composites' unique tandem-wing Proteus was the testbed for a series of UAV collision-avoidance flight demonstrations. An Amphitech 35GHz radar unit installed below Proteus' nose was the primary sensor for the Detect, See and Avoid tests.

  4. Proteus DSA control room in Mojave, CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-03

    Proteus DSA control room in Mojave, CA (L to R) Jean-Pierre Soucy; Amphitech International Software engineer Craig Bomben; NASA Dryden Test Pilot Pete Siebold; (with headset, at computer controls) Scaled Composites pilot Bob Roehm; New Mexico State University (NMSU) UAV Technical Analysis Application Center (TAAC) Chuck Coleman; Scaled Composites Pilot Kari Sortland; NMSU TAAC Russell Wolfe; Modern Technology Solutions, Inc. Scaled Composites' unique tandem-wing Proteus was the testbed for a series of UAV collision-avoidance flight demonstrations. An Amphitech 35GHz radar unit installed below Proteus' nose was the primary sensor for the Detect, See and Avoid tests.

  5. Draft Genome Assemblies of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 and Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Chertkov, O; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-10-23

    The pleomorphic swarming bacilli of the genus Proteus are common human gut commensal organisms but also the causative agents of recurrent urinary tract infections and bacteremia. We sequenced and assembled the 3.99-Mbp genome of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 (accession no. JOVJ00000000) and the 3.97-Mbp genome of Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132 (accession no. JPIX00000000), both of which are commonly used reference strains.

  6. [Black nails caused by Proteus mirabilis].

    PubMed

    Qadripur, S A; Schauder, S; Schwartz, P

    2001-07-01

    Black nails caused by Proteus mirabilis were seen in a motor mechanic and in a petrol pump attendant. Proteus mirabilis is a gram-negative bacillus that generates hydrogen sulfide. This compound reacts with traces of metals in the nail plate such as zinc, nickel, cobalt, iron, manganese, tin, copper and lead. Metal sulfides blacken the nail plate. The protracted course of the discoloration over months corresponds to the slow reactions of metals with hydrogen sulfide. The disappearance of the blackening after topical treatment with chinosol, tincture of iodine and chloramphenicol solution supports the etiologic connection between black nails and Proteus mirabilis. Wet and dirty work encourages the colonisation of Proteus mirabilis between nail fold and nail plate.

  7. Brain abscesses during Proteus vulgaris bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Jennifer; Lemaire, Xavier; Legout, Laurence; Ferriby, Didier; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Senneville, Eric

    2011-08-01

    Proteus vulgaris is only rarely the cause of multiple septic metastases. We describe multiple brain abscesses due to P. vulgaris in an immunocompetent patient successfully treated by antibiotic therapy and colonectomy.

  8. Potential virulence factors of Proteus bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rózalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z; Kotełko, K

    1997-01-01

    The object of this review is the genus Proteus, which contains bacteria considered now to belong to the opportunistic pathogens. Widely distributed in nature (in soil, water, and sewage), Proteus species play a significant ecological role. When present in the niches of higher macroorganisms, these species are able to evoke pathological events in different regions of the human body. The invaders (Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris, and P. penneri) have numerous factors including fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, capsule antigen, urease, immunoglobulin A proteases, hemolysins, amino acid deaminases, and, finally, the most characteristic attribute of Proteus, swarming growth, enabling them to colonize and survive in higher organisms. All these features and factors are described and commented on in detail. The questions important for future investigation of these facultatively pathogenic microorganisms are also discussed. PMID:9106365

  9. Proteus species isolated from human eyes.

    PubMed

    Okumoto, M; Smolin, G; Belfort, R; Kim, H B; Siverio, C E

    1976-04-01

    Of 34 species of Proteus isolated from human eyes, 29 (85%) were P. mirabilis and five (15%) were P. morganii. In vitro antibiotic sensitivity studies showed that gentamicin best controlled both P. mirabilis and P. morganii of all the antibiotics tested. In vivo tests on experimental Proteus infections of rabbit coreas, treated with gentamicin and tobramycin, yielded comparable clinical results, but gentamicin was more effective in eliminating the organism from the experimental lesions.

  10. [Proteus bacilli: features and virulence factors].

    PubMed

    Rózalski, Antoni; Kwil, Iwona; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Baranowska, Magdalena; Staczek, Paweł

    2007-01-01

    In this article, different aspects of virulence factors of Proteus bacilii (P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris, P. penneri i P. hauseri) are presented. These are opportunistic pathogens that cause different kinds of infections, most frequently of the urinary tract. These bacteria have developed several virulence factors, such as adherence due to the presence of fimbriae or afimbrial adhesins, invasiveness, swarming phenomenon, hemolytic activity, urea hydrolysis, proteolysis, and endotoxicity. Below we focus on data concerning the molecular basis of the pathogenicity of Proteus bacilli.

  11. Experimental Proteus mirabilis Burn Surface Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Reprinted from the Achie of Surgery ECTE February 1982, Volume 117 Copyright 19 2. American Medical Association MAY 2 8 1982 V0A Experimental Proteus ... mirabilis Burn Surface Infection Albert T. McManus, PhD; Charles G. McLeod, Jr, DVM; Arthur D. Mason, Jr, MD * We established a human burn Isolate of... Proteus mirabills as have examined human burn isolates from the genera an experimental pathogen. Infliction of a nonfatal scald injury Enterobacter

  12. Proteus mirabilis RMS 203 as a new representative of the O13 Proteus serogroup.

    PubMed

    Palusiak, Agata; Siwińska, Małgorzata; Zabłotni, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The unique feature of some Proteus O-polysaccharides is occurrence of an amide of galacturonic acid with N(ε)-[(S/R)-1-Carboxyethyl]-L-lysine, GalA6(2S,8S/R-AlaLys). The results of the serological studies presented here, with reference to known O-antigens structures suggest that GalA6(2S,8S/R-AlaLys) or 2S,8R-AlaLys contribute to cross-reactions of O13 Proteus antisera, and Proteeae LPSs. It was also revealed that the Proteus mirabilis RMS 203 strain can be classified into the O13 serogroup, represented so far by two strains: Proteus mirabilis 26/57 and Proteus vulgaris 8344. The O13 LPS is a serologically important antigen with a fragment common to LPSs of different species in the Proteeae tribe.

  13. User Manual for the PROTEUS Mesh Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Micheal A.; Shemon, Emily R

    2016-09-19

    PROTEUS is built around a finite element representation of the geometry for visualization. In addition, the PROTEUS-SN solver was built to solve the even-parity transport equation on a finite element mesh provided as input. Similarly, PROTEUS-MOC and PROTEUS-NEMO were built to apply the method of characteristics on unstructured finite element meshes. Given the complexity of real world problems, experience has shown that using commercial mesh generator to create rather simple input geometries is overly complex and slow. As a consequence, significant effort has been put into place to create multiple codes that help assist in the mesh generation and manipulation. There are three input means to create a mesh in PROTEUS: UFMESH, GRID, and NEMESH. At present, the UFMESH is a simple way to generate two-dimensional Cartesian and hexagonal fuel assembly geometries. The UFmesh input allows for simple assembly mesh generation while the GRID input allows the generation of Cartesian, hexagonal, and regular triangular structured grid geometry options. The NEMESH is a way for the user to create their own mesh or convert another mesh file format into a PROTEUS input format. Given that one has an input mesh format acceptable for PROTEUS, we have constructed several tools which allow further mesh and geometry construction (i.e. mesh extrusion and merging). This report describes the various mesh tools that are provided with the PROTEUS code giving both descriptions of the input and output. In many cases the examples are provided with a regression test of the mesh tools. The most important mesh tools for any user to consider using are the MT_MeshToMesh.x and the MT_RadialLattice.x codes. The former allows the conversion between most mesh types handled by PROTEUS while the second allows the merging of multiple (assembly) meshes into a radial structured grid. Note that the mesh generation process is recursive in nature and that each input specific for a given mesh tool (such as .axial

  14. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Bui, Trong T.; Cavicchi, Richard H.; Conley, Julianne M.; Molls, Frank B.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two- and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. The emphasis in the development of Proteus is not algorithm development or research on numerical methods, but rather the development of the code itself. The objective is to develop codes that are user-oriented, easily-modified, and well-documented. Well-proven, state-of-the-art solution algorithms are being used. Code readability, documentation (both internal and external), and validation are being emphasized. This paper is a status report on the Proteus development effort. The analysis and solution procedure are described briefly, and the various features in the code are summarized. The results from some of the validation cases that have been run are presented for both the two- and three-dimensional codes.

  15. Proteus endocarditis in an intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Goel, Rohan; Sekar, Baskar; Payne, Mark N

    2015-11-26

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening condition with adverse consequences and increased mortality, despite improvements in treatment options. Diagnosed patients usually require a prolonged course of antibiotics, with up to 40-50% requiring surgery during initial hospital admission. We report a case of a 42-year-old intravenous drug user who presented feeling generally unwell, with lethargy, rigours, confusion and a painful swollen right leg. He was subsequently diagnosed with Proteus mirabilis endocarditis (fulfilling modified Duke criteria for possible IE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). He was successfully treated with single antibiotic therapy without needing surgical intervention or requiring anticoagulation for his DVT. Proteus endocarditis is extremely uncommon, with a limited number of case reports available in the literature. This case illustrates how blood cultures are invaluable in the diagnosis of IE, especially that due to unusual microorganisms. Our case also highlights how single antibiotic therapy can be effective in treating Proteus endocarditis.

  16. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  17. [Synergism of colistin and sulfonamide in proteus species (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kunz, H H

    1975-11-01

    In agar diffusion testing of Proteus mirabilis strains sensitive to sulfonamide a synergistic effect of colistine (C) and sulfonamide (S) was demonstrated. By quantitative evaluation these results were confirmed in 100 strains of Proteus mirabilis and 100 strains of indol-positive Proteus spp. using broth dilution method. Combining 1 part C with 10 parts S the mean increase in sulfonamide sensitivity was enhanced fourfold. Increasing the inoculum sensitivity of Proteus against the combination of C and S was still found to range within therapeutic blood levels. Therefore in treatment of Proteus infection the positive synergistic effect of C+S should be taken into consideration.

  18. Using optoelectronic sensors in the system PROTEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Piszczek, M.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of optoelectronic devices for human protection in rescue activity. The system consists of an ground robots with predicted sensor. The multisensor construction of the system ensures significant improvement of security of using on-situ like chemical or explosive sensors. The article show a various scenario of use for individual sensor in system PROTEUS.

  19. Classification of Proteus vulgaris biogroup 3 with recognition of Proteus hauseri sp. nov., nom. rev. and unnamed Proteus genomospecies 4, 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, C M; Brenner, F W; Steigerwalt, A G; Hill, B C; Holmes, B; Grimont, P A; Hawkey, P M; Penner, J L; Miller, J M; Brenner, D J

    2000-09-01

    Strains traditionally identified as Proteus vulgaris formed three biogroups. Biogroup 1, characterized by negative reactions for indole production, salicin fermentation and aesculin hydrolysis, is now known as Proteus penneri. Biogroup 2, characterized by positive reactions for indole, salicin and aesculin, was shown by DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite method) to be a genetic species separate from biogroup 1 and from biogroup 3 which is positive for indole production and negative for salicin and aesculin. In this study, 52 strains were examined, of which 36 strains were Proteus vulgaris biogroup 3, which included the current type strain of the species P. vulgaris (ATCC 29905T), and compared to seven strains of Proteus vulgaris biogroup 2 and nine type strains of other species in the genera Proteus, Providencia and Morganella. By DNA hybridization, these 36 strains were separated into four distinct groups, designated as Proteus genomospecies 3, 4, 5 and 6. DNAs within each separate Proteus genomospecies were 74-99% related to each other in 60 degrees C hybridization reactions with < or = 4.5% divergence between related sequences. Proteus genomospecies 3 contained the former P. vulgaris type strain and one other strain and was negative in reactions for salicin fermentation, aesculin hydrolysis and deoxyribonuclease, unlike the reactions associated with strains considered as typical P. vulgaris which are positive in reactions for salicin, aesculin and DNase. Genomospecies 3 can be distinguished from Proteus genomospecies 4, 5 and 6 because it is negative for Jordan's tartrate. Proteus genomospecies 4, containing five strains, was differentiated from Proteus penneri, genomospecies 3 and 6 and most, but not all, strains of genomospecies 5, by its ability to ferment L-rhamnose. Proteus genomospecies 5 and 6, containing 18 and 11 strains, respectively, could not be separated from each other by traditional biochemical tests, by carbon source utilization tests or SDS

  20. User Manual for the PROTEUS Mesh Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Micheal A.; Shemon, Emily R.

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the various mesh tools that are provided with the PROTEUS code giving both descriptions of the input and output. In many cases the examples are provided with a regression test of the mesh tools. The most important mesh tools for any user to consider using are the MT_MeshToMesh.x and the MT_RadialLattice.x codes. The former allows the conversion between most mesh types handled by PROTEUS while the second allows the merging of multiple (assembly) meshes into a radial structured grid. Note that the mesh generation process is recursive in nature and that each input specific for a given mesh tool (such as .axial or .merge) can be used as “mesh” input for any of the mesh tools discussed in this manual.

  1. HST BVI Photometry of Triton and Proteus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-15

    rights reserved. Keywords: Triton ; Satellites, surfaces; Neptune , magnetosphere1. Introduction Triton is an enigmatic satellite—seemingly without a...2003. The BVRI and methane lightcurve of Triton in 2003. Bull. Am. As- tron. Soc. 35, 1483. Smith, B., and 64 colleagues, 1989. Voyager 2 at Neptune ...Icarus 185 (2006) 487–491 www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus HST BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus Dan Pascu a,∗, Alex D. Storrs b, Eddie N. Wells c,1

  2. HST BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Dan; Storrs, Alex D.; Wells, Eddie N.; Hershey, John L.; Rohde, James R.; Seidelmann, P. Kenneth; Currie, Douglas G.

    2006-12-01

    BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus was derived from HST images taken in 1997. The VEGAMAG photometric technique was used. Triton was found to be brighter by a few percent than observations of the 1970's and 1980's, as expected due to the increasingly greater exposure of the bright south polar region. The leading side was also found to be brighter than the trailing side by 0.09 mag in all filters—50% larger than reported by Franz [Franz, O.G., 1981. Icarus 45, 602-606]. Contrary to our previous results [Pascu, D., et al., 1998. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 30, 1101], we found no episodic reddening. Our previous conclusions were based on an inaccurate early version of the Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) correction. The present result limits the start of the reddening event reported by Hicks and Buratti [Hicks, M.D., Buratti, B.J., 2004. Icarus 171, 210-218]. Our ( B- V) result of 0.70±0.01 supports the global blueing described by Buratti et al. [Buratti, B.J., Goguen, J.D., Gibson, J., Mosher, J., 1994. Icarus 110, 303-314]. Our observations of July 1997 agree with the Voyager results and are among the bluest colors seen. We found Proteus somewhat brighter than earlier studies, but in good agreement with the recent value given by Karkoschka [Karkoschka, E., 2003. Icarus 162, 400-407]. A leading/trailing brightness asymmetry was detected for Proteus, with the leading side 0.1 mag brighter. The unique differences in action of the endogenic and exogenic processes on Triton and Proteus provides an opportunity to separate the endogenic and exogenic effects on Triton.

  3. Significance and Roles of Proteus spp. Bacteria in Natural Environments.

    PubMed

    Drzewiecka, Dominika

    2016-11-01

    Proteus spp. bacteria were first described in 1885 by Gustav Hauser, who had revealed their feature of intensive swarming growth. Currently, the genus is divided into Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus penneri, Proteus hauseri, and three unnamed genomospecies 4, 5, and 6 and consists of 80 O-antigenic serogroups. The bacteria are known to be human opportunistic pathogens, isolated from urine, wounds, and other clinical sources. It is postulated that intestines are a reservoir of these proteolytic organisms. Many wild and domestic animals may be hosts of Proteus spp. bacteria, which are commonly known to play a role of parasites or commensals. However, interesting examples of their symbiotic relationships with higher organisms have also been described. Proteus spp. bacteria present in soil or water habitats are often regarded as indicators of fecal pollution, posing a threat of poisoning when the contaminated water or seafood is consumed. The health risk may also be connected with drug-resistant strains sourcing from intestines. Positive aspects of the bacteria presence in water and soil are connected with exceptional features displayed by autochthonic Proteus spp. strains detected in these environments. These rods acquire various metabolic abilities allowing their adaptation to different environmental conditions, such as high concentrations of heavy metals or toxic substances, which may be exploited as sources of energy and nutrition by the bacteria. The Proteus spp. abilities to tolerate or utilize polluting compounds as well as promote plant growth provide a possibility of employing these microorganisms in bioremediation and environmental protection.

  4. O antigens of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris strains isolated from patients with bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P

    1980-10-01

    During the period of 1971 to 1979, 172 Proteus mirabilis and 17 Proteus vulgaris strains were collected from blood cultures. Of these strains, 144 could be grouped into 25 O antigens. The most common antigens were O3, O23, O10, O30, and O24, which represented 46.1% of all strains. The O antigen distribution of strains isolated from blood cultures did not differ significantly from that of fecal and urinary strains. No particular O antigen could thus be defined as a virulence factor in bacteremia.

  5. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer

  6. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer

  7. Proteus mirabilis and its role in dacryocystitis.

    PubMed

    Borgman, Christopher J

    2014-09-01

    Dacryocystitis is a common inflammation of the lacrimal sac, usually from an underlying bacterial infection. Most cases can be attributed to common ocular flora such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pneumoniae; however, uncommon bacterial causes such as Proteus mirabilis can still occur. P. mirabilis is a gram-negative bacillus that is found abundantly in people who have undergone long-term catheterization and is uncommonly found in or around the eyes except in people who have undergone long-term catheterization. Proteus species can cause conjunctivitis, canaliculitis, and dacryocystitis and have the ability to manifest into preseptal cellulitis; therefore, timely recognition and treatment are important to prevent potential further complications. An 84-year-old white man had several recurrences of acute dacryocystitis that had marginal improvement with empiric antibiotic treatment. Resultant culture of the ocular discharge revealed an uncommon bacterium, P. mirabilis. Successful dosing of oral antibiotics resolved the infection but ultimately the patient required an external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) procedure to maintain patency of the nasolacrimal lacrimal system and prevent recurrence. At 3 months after external DCR, the patient was symptom free with no recurrences. Dacryocystitis has a distinctive clinical presentation and is usually easily treated when appropriate oral antibiotics are directed at the underlying pathogen. In nonresponsive cases, culturing of the ocular discharge should be performed to identify the underlying pathogen. Cases of dacryocystitis caused by Proteus species are usually responsive to several standard antibiotics used orally in eye care; however, culturing and susceptibility testing can streamline the diagnostic and management sequence considerably in unclear or unresponsive cases. Typically, patients with dacryocystitis return to normal after appropriate treatment, but chronic recurrences and epiphora are potential sequelae

  8. The Proteus Cabinet, or "We Are Here but Not Here"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nield, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    In the early nineteenth century, there were three stage illusions in which a magician could cause a person to disappear. In one of these, the Proteus Cabinet, participants would enter a box, and simply vanish. As the designers of the Proteus Cabinet said of them, they were "Here, but not Here." My essay explores this concept in relation to…

  9. The Proteus Cabinet, or "We Are Here but Not Here"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nield, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    In the early nineteenth century, there were three stage illusions in which a magician could cause a person to disappear. In one of these, the Proteus Cabinet, participants would enter a box, and simply vanish. As the designers of the Proteus Cabinet said of them, they were "Here, but not Here." My essay explores this concept in relation to…

  10. Collective motion in Proteus mirabilis swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haoran, Xu

    Proteus mirabilisis a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium. It is widely distributed in soil and water, and it is well known for exhibiting swarming motility on nutrient agar surfaces. In our study, we focused on the collective motility of P. mirabilis and uncovered a range of interesting phenomena. Here we will present our efforts to understand these phenomena through experiments and simulation. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail:xhrphx@gmail.com.

  11. Proteus aircraft over Las Cruces International Airport in New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a Proteus urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha

    2014-05-01

    Genetic, molecular and biological studies indicate that rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a severe arthritic disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population in developed countries, is caused by an upper urinary tract infection by the microbe, Proteus mirabilis. Elevated levels of specific antibodies against Proteus bacteria have been reported from 16 different countries. The pathogenetic mechanism involves six stages triggered by cross-reactive autoantibodies evoked by Proteus infection. The causative amino acid sequences of Proteus namely, ESRRAL and IRRET, contain arginine doublets which can be acted upon by peptidyl arginine deiminase thereby explaining the early appearance of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in patients with RA. Consequently, RA patients should be treated early with anti-Proteus antibiotics as well as biological agents to avoid irreversible joint damages.

  13. Proteus aircraft low-level flyby at Las Cruces Airport.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  14. Proteus in flight over mountains near Las Cruces, New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  15. Structures of the O-polysaccharides and classification of Proteus genomospecies 4, 5 and 6 into respective Proteus serogroups.

    PubMed

    Zych, Krystyna; Perepelov, Andrei V; Siwinska, Małgorzata; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2005-11-01

    An acidic branched O-polysaccharide was isolated by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Proteus genomospecies 4 and studied by sugar and methylation analyses along with 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, ROESY and H-detected 1H, 13C HSQC experiments. The following structure of the pentasaccharide repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide was established, which is unique among Proteus polysaccharide structures: [structure: see text] where Qui3NAc stands for 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxyglucose. Based on the O-polysaccharide structure and serological data, we propose classifying Proteus genomospecies 4 into a new, separate Proteus serogroup, O56. A weak cross-reactivity of Proteus genomospecies 4 antiserum with LPS of Providencia stuartii O18 and Proteus vulgaris OX2 was observed and is discussed in view of a similarity of the O-polysaccharide structures. Structural and serological investigations showed that Proteus genomospecies 5 and 6 should be classified into the existing Proteus serogroups O8 and O69, respectively.

  16. MrpB Functions as the Terminator for Assembly of Proteus mirabilis Mannose-Resistant Proteus-Like Fimbriae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    1998-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis studies of mrpB, a putative pilin-encoding open reading frame of the mrp gene cluster, which encodes mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae of Proteus mirabilis, indicate that MrpB functions as the terminator for fimbrial assembly. PMID:9529110

  17. Quantifying survival in patients with Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sapp, Julie C; Hu, Lian; Zhao, Jean; Gruber, Ashlyn; Schwartz, Brian; Ferrari, Dora; Biesecker Md, Leslie G

    2017-06-29

    PurposeProteus syndrome is a rare mosaic overgrowth disorder that is associated with severe complications. While anecdotal data have suggested that the life span of affected patients is reduced, this has not been measured. Mortality data on rare diseases is critical for assessing treatments and other interventions.MethodsTo address this we used the clinical research records of 64 patients in a longitudinal natural history cohort at the National Institutes of Health to ascertain the data in an organized manner and estimate survival using a Kaplan-Meier approach.ResultsThe median age of diagnosis was 19 months. Based on this analysis, there was 25% probability of death by 22 years of age. Ten of the 11 patients who died were younger than 22 years of age, and there was only a single death after this age.ConclusionThese data quantify the risk of premature death in Proteus syndrome, which can be used to support interventions and trials. Although the risk of death is substantial, the fact that only one patient died after 22 years of age supports anecdotal evidence that the disease process moderates after the end of adolescence. Interventions to reduce mortality should be targeted to the pediatric age range.GENETICS in MEDICINE advance online publication, 29 June 2017; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.65.

  18. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis, Proteus, anti-CCP antibodies and Karl Popper.

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha; Wilson, Clyde

    2010-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a crippling joint disease affecting over 20 million people worldwide. The cause of RA is most probably linked to the triad of microbial trigger, genetic association and autoimmunity and can be explained using the philosophical method of Karl Popper or Popperian sequences. Ten "Popper sequences" have been identified which point to the urinary microbe Proteus mirabilis as the cause of RA: Popper sequence 1 establishes that HLA-DR4 lymphocytes injected into a rabbit evoke specific antibodies against Proteus bacteria. Popper sequence 2 establishes that antibodies to Proteus bacteria are present in RA patients from 14 different countries. Popper sequence 3 establishes that antibodies to Proteus bacteria in RA patients are disease specific since no such antibodies are found in other conditions. Popper sequence 4 establishes that when RA patients have high titres of antibodies to Proteus such bacteria are found in urinary cultures. Popper sequence 5 establishes that only Proteus bacteria and no other microbes evoke significantly elevated antibodies in RA patients. Popper sequence 6 establishes that the "shared epitope" EQR(K)RAA shows "molecular mimicry" with the sequence ESRRAL found in Proteus haemolysin. Popper sequence 7 establishes that Proteus urease contains a sequence IRRET which has "molecular mimicry" with LRREI found in collagen XI of hyaline cartilage. Popper sequence 8 establishes that sera obtained from RA patients have cytopathic properties against sheep red cells coated with the cross-reacting EQR(K)RAA and LRREI self-antigen peptides. Popper sequence 9 establishes that Proteus sequences in haemolysin and urease as well as the self antigens, HLA-DR1/4 and collagen XI, each contain an arginine doublet, thereby providing a substrate for peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) to give rise to citrulline, which is the main antigenic component of CCP, antibodies to which are found in early cases of RA. Popper sequence 10 establishes that

  20. Impact of Morphological Changes on the Motility of Amoeba proteus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroff N, Sunitha

    2016-11-01

    Bio-mechanical properties of cell membrane, actin and cytoskeleton have influence on the cell locomotion. To explore, morphological changes were induced in Amoeba proteus by depriving nutrition, also either through ATP mediated or through KCl mediated membrane depolarization. We observed that, membrane depolarization leads to complete loss/reduction of pseudopodia in a dose dependent manner, gradually A. proteus becomes globular. We also report that with depravation of its nutrition (Chilomonas) A. proteus transforms them into tube/filament like structure and this transformation is reversible with the supply of Chilomonas. Results indicate that the structural and locomotion variation of A. proteus through nucleotides may not be just a membrane phenomenon, but may involve signaling mechanisms. Further, we carried out immunostaining of A. proteus with P2X2 and P2Y2 antibodies to analyze their localization and the extent of expression. The result indicated that in normal A. proteus receptors are dispersed uniformly, whereas in filament shaped A. proteus P2X2-receptor was found to be localized, unlike P2Y2 receptor. As nucleotides are known to cause structural changes in the organism, we report corresponding changes in their locomotion. Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology. Mount Carmel College, Bangalore 560 052.

  1. [Biochemical differentiation of proteus strains from various clinical materials].

    PubMed

    Józefowicz-Piatkowska, H; Woch, G

    1993-01-01

    The material consisted of 729 strain of Proteus isolated from clinical samples in three microbiological laboratories of city of Lódź region. Our of these strains, 466 were Proteus mirabilis, and remaining represented: P. penneri-13 strains, P. vulgaris (II biogroup)-56 and 54 strains which were not classifiable on the basis of biochemical properties and scheme elaborated by Hickman et al. for biogroups of P. vulgaris. The authors indicate feasibility of differentiation of P. vulgaris basing on biochemical tests as a supplementary method to other tests of intracellular differentiation of Proteus.

  2. Convergence acceleration of the Proteus computer code with multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is the first part of a study to implement convergence acceleration techniques based on the multigrid concept in the Proteus computer code. A review is given of previous studies on the implementation of multigrid methods in computer codes for compressible flow analysis. Also presented is a detailed stability analysis of upwind and central-difference based numerical schemes for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Results are given of a convergence study of the Proteus code on computational grids of different sizes. The results presented here form the foundation for the implementation of multigrid methods in the Proteus code.

  3. Capsule structure of Proteus mirabilis (ATCC 49565).

    PubMed Central

    Beynon, L M; Dumanski, A J; McLean, R J; MacLean, L L; Richards, J C; Perry, M B

    1992-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis 2573 (ATCC 49565) produces an acidic capsular polysaccharide which was shown from glycose analysis, carboxyl reduction, methylation, periodate oxidation, and the application of one dimensional and two-dimensional high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to be a high-molecular-weight polymer of branched trisaccharide units composed of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose (N-acetyl-D-glucosamine), 2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-L-galactose (N-acetyl-L-fucosamine), and D-glucuronic acid, having the structure: [formula: see text] P. mirabilis 2573 also produces an O:6 serotype lipopolysaccharide in which the O-chain component has the same structure as the homologous capsular polysaccharide. This is the first report of a defined capsular polysaccharide in this bacterial genus. PMID:1551839

  4. The Proteus syndrome: the Elephant Man diagnosed.

    PubMed

    Tibbles, J A; Cohen, M M

    1986-09-13

    Sir Frederick Treves first showed Joseph Merrick, the famous Elephant Man, to the Pathological Society of London in 1884. A diagnosis of neurofibromatosis was suggested in 1909 and was widely accepted. There is no evidence, however, of café au lait spots or histological proof of neurofibromas. It is also clear that Joseph Merrick's manifestations were much more bizarre than those commonly seen in neurofibromatosis. Evidence indicates that Merrick suffered from the Proteus syndrome and had the following features compatible with this diagnosis: macrocephaly; hyperostosis of the skull; hypertrophy of long bones; and thickened skin and subcutaneous tissues, particularly of the hands and feet, including plantar hyperplasia, lipomas, and other unspecified subcutaneous masses.

  5. Characterization of Amoeba proteus myosin VI immunoanalog.

    PubMed

    Dominik, Magdalena; Kłopocka, Wanda; Pomorski, Paweł; Kocik, Elzbieta; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2005-07-01

    Amoeba proteus, the highly motile free-living unicellular organism, has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion and intracellular actin-based-only trafficking remain poorly understood. A search for myosin motors responsible for vesicular transport in these giant cells resulted in detection of 130-kDa protein interacting with several polyclonal antibodies against different tail regions of human and chicken myosin VI. This protein was binding to actin in the ATP-dependent manner, and immunoprecipitated with anti-myosin VI antibodies. In order to characterize its possible functions in vivo, its cellular distribution and colocalization with actin filaments and dynamin II during migration and pinocytosis were examined. In migrating amoebae, myosin VI immunoanalog localized to vesicular structures, particularly within the perinuclear and sub-plasma membrane areas, and colocalized with dynamin II immunoanalog and actin filaments. The colocalization was even more evident in pinocytotic cells as proteins concentrated within pinocytotic pseudopodia. Moreover, dynamin II and myosin VI immunoanalogs cosedimented with actin filaments, and were found on the same isolated vesicles. Blocking endogenous myosin VI immunoanalog with anti-myosin VI antibodies inhibited the rate of pseudopodia protrusion (about 19% decrease) and uroidal retraction (about 28% decrease) but did not affect cell morphology and the manner of cell migration. Treatment with anti-human dynamin II antibodies led to changes in directionality of amebae migration and affected the rate of only uroidal translocation (about 30% inhibition). These results indicate that myosin VI immunoanalog is expressed in protist Amoeba proteus and may be involved in vesicle translocation and cell locomotion.

  6. THE ANTIGENIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROTEUS X-19 AND TYPHUS RICKETTSIA

    PubMed Central

    Castaneda, M. Ruiz

    1934-01-01

    A soluble specific substance was isolated from Mexican typhus Rickettsia which gave, with Proteus X-19 antiserum and typhus human serum, the same precipitation reactions as the polysaccharides extracted from B. proteus OX-19. The soluble specific substance extracted from Rickettsia and Proteus OX-19 is likely to be of a polysaccharide nature owing to the strong Molisch reactions obtained with such extracts, the heat stability and the negative protein reactions (biuret). Since, however, it still contains 7 per cent nitrogen, this is not certain. In the antigenic composition of both Proteus X-19 and typhus Rickettsia there is a common soluble specific factor which is responsible for the Weil-Felix reaction. PMID:19870282

  7. Is the cervical fascia an anatomical proteus?

    PubMed

    Natale, Gianfranco; Condino, Sara; Stecco, Antonio; Soldani, Paola; Belmonte, Monica Mattioli; Gesi, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The cervical fasciae have always represented a matter of debate. Indeed, in the literature, it is quite impossible to find two authors reporting the same description of the neck fascia. In the present review, a historical background was outlined, confirming that the Malgaigne's definition of the cervical fascia as an anatomical Proteus is widely justified. In an attempt to provide an essential and a more comprehensive classification, a fixed pattern of description of cervical fasciae is proposed. Based on the morphogenetic criteria, two fascial groups have been recognized: (1) fasciae which derive from primitive fibro-muscular laminae (muscular fasciae or myofasciae); (2) fasciae which derive from connective thickening (visceral fasciae). Topographic and comparative approaches allowed to distinguish three different types of fasciae in the neck: the superficial, the deep and the visceral fasciae. The first is most connected to the skin, the second to the muscles and the third to the viscera. The muscular fascia could be further divided into three layers according to the relationship with the different muscles.

  8. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  9. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium and is well known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls'-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition, which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis.

  10. Separate O-grouping schemes for serotyping clinical isolates of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Penner, J L; Hennessy, J N

    1980-09-01

    Antisera were prepared against type strains of the original scheme of B. Perch (Acta Pathol. Microbiol. Scand. 25:703-714, 1948) and against newly defined types to produce separate schemes for O-grouping Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis. In assessing the schemes for their effectiveness it was found that 82% of 208 P. vulgaris isolates and 88% of 194 P. mirabilis isolates from two hospitals were typable. Only 3.4% of the P. vulgaris isolates agglutinated in P. mirabilis antisera, and 1.5% of the P. mirabilis agglutinated in P. vulgaris antisera, indicating that separation of the schemes would be more advantageous in routine typing. P. mirabilis of groups O3, O6, O10, O29, and O30 were most frequently isolated. Of the P. vulgaris isolates, 25% belonged to newly defined O-groups, and one of these was the largest with 14% of all isolates of this species. The application of serotyping using separate schemes for each species was advocated in epidemiological studies.

  11. Immunochemical properties of Proteus penneri lipopolysaccharides--one of the major Proteus sp. virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Palusiak, Agata

    2013-10-18

    Proteus penneri, like the other seven species from the genus, are Gram-negative, peritrichously flagellated rods capable of swarming growth on humid solid media. These bacteria are human opportunistic pathogens involved in many infections but they mainly affect the urinary tract of hospitalized, long-term catheterized patients. P. penneri rods produce a lot of virulence factors, among which the lipopolysaccharide seems to be the most interesting due to its structural and serological diversity. From the three LPS regions of P. penneri strains only the core region and O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) were structurally and serologically examined. P. penneri LPS core region is characterized by a common inner part representing the III glycoform and a diverse distal part (12 different structures). The P. penneri O-antigens contain sugar and non-sugar compounds and some of them rarely occur in nature. In both P. penneri LPS regions putative epitopes have been pointed out. Serospecificity of OPS allowed classifying many P. penneri isolates to different Proteus sp. O-serogroups, among which 12 contain P. penneri strains only.

  12. [Etiological and molecular characteristics of diarrhea caused Proteus mirabilis].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaolu; Hu, Qinghua; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Li, Yinghui; Jiang, Min; Chen, Qiongcheng

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the etiological characteristics, virulence genes and plasmids that carrying diarrhea-causing Proteus mirabilis and to assess their relationship with drug resistance and pathogenicity. Proteus mirabilis coming from six different sources (food poisoning, external environment and healthy people) were analyzed biochemically, on related susceptibility and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Virulence genes were detected by PCR. Plasmids were extracted and sequenced after gel electrophoresis purification. The biochemical characteristics of Proteus mirabilis from different sources seemed basically the same, and each of them showed having common virulence genes, as ureC, rsmA, hpmA and zapA. However, the PFGE patterns and susceptibility of these strains were different, so as the plasmids that they carried. Plasmid that presented in the sequenced strain showed that the 2 683 bp length plasmid encodes qnrD gene was associated with the quinolone resistance. Etiological characteristics and molecular characteristics of Proteus mirabilis gathered from different sources, were analyzed. Results indicated that traditional biochemical analysis and common virulence gene identification might be able to distinguish the strains with different sources. However, PFGE and plasmids analysis could distinguish the sources of strains and to identify those plasmids that commonly carried by the drug-resistant strains. These findings also provided theoretical basis for further study on the nature of resistance and pathogenicity in Proteus mirabilis.

  13. The Location GNSS Modules for the Components of Proteus System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostowski, K.; Darakchiev, R.; Foks-Ryznar, A.; Sitek, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Proteus system - the Integrated Mobile System for Counterterrorism and Rescue Operations is a complex innovative project. To assure the best possible localization of mobile components of the system, many different Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) modules were taken into account. In order to chose the best solution many types of tests were done. Full results and conclusions are presented in this paper. The idea of measurements was to test modules in GPS Standard Positioning Service (SPS) with EGNOS system specification according to certain algorithms. The tests had to answer the question: what type of GNSS modules should be used on different components with respect to specific usage of Proteus system. The second goal of tests was to check the solution quality of integrated GNSS/INS (Inertial Navigation System) and its possible usage in some Proteus system components.

  14. Structure and serology of O-antigens as the basis for classification of Proteus strains.

    PubMed

    Knirel, Yuriy A; Perepelov, Andrei V; Kondakova, Anna N; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt; Rozalski, Antoni; Kaca, Wieslaw

    2011-02-01

    This review is devoted to structural and serological characteristics of the O-antigens (O-polysaccharides) of the lipopolysaccharides of various Proteus species, which provide the basis for classifying Proteus strains to O-serogroups. The antigenic relationships of Proteus strains within and beyond the genus as well as their O-antigen-related bioactivities are also discussed.

  15. A new bacteriophage typing scheme for Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris strains. 3. Analysis of lytic properties.

    PubMed

    Sekaninová, G; Rychlík, I; Kolárová, M; Pillich, J; Seménka, J; Zajícová, V

    1998-01-01

    The lytic properties of 21 bacteriophages constituting a new typing set for Proteus were examined in 507 Proteus mirabilis and 29 P. vulgaris strains isolated from patients and healthy subjects. Comparison of their morphological, serological, genetic and lytic properties showed that, in the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families, some phages were so closely related that the presence of all of them in the set was redundant. Analysis of the lytic properties revealed that some of the bacteriophages were not active enough to facilitate the differentiation of Proteus strains. The size of the final typing set was reduced from 21 to 12 phages but it was suggested that, in order to improve the differentiation capacity of the set, new phages should be included.

  16. Warthog: Progress on Coupling BISON and PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Shane W.D.

    2016-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program from the Office of Nuclear Energy at the Department of Energy (DOE) provides a robust toolkit for modeling and simulation of current and future advanced nuclear reactor designs. This toolkit provides these technologies organized across product lines, with two divisions targeted at fuels and end-to-end reactor modeling, and a third for integration, coupling, and high-level workflow management. The Fuels Product Line (FPL) and the Reactor Product Line (RPL) provide advanced computational technologies that serve each respective field effectively. There is currently a lack of integration between the product lines, impeding future improvements of simulation solution fidelity. In order to mix and match tools across the product lines, a new application called Warthog was produced. Warthog is built on the Multi-physics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This report details the continuing efforts to provide the Integration Product Line (IPL) with interoperability using the Warthog code. Currently, this application strives to couple the BISON fuel performance application from the FPL using the PROTEUS Core Neutronics application from the RPL. Warthog leverages as much prior work from the NEAMS program as possible, enabling interoperability between the independently developed MOOSE and SHARP frameworks, and the libMesh and MOAB mesh data formats. Previous work performed on Warthog allowed it to couple a pin cell between the two codes. However, as the temperature changed due to the BISON calculation, the cross sections were not recalculated, leading to errors as the temperature got further away from the initial conditions. XSProc from the SCALE code suite was used to calculate the cross sections as needed. The remainder of this report discusses the changes to Warthog to allow for the implementation of XSProc as an external code. It also

  17. Proteus - An experimenter's view. [of spacecraft carrying exchangable Explorer scientific experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The scientific experiments package to be carried by the Proteus system takes the form of an Instrument Load carried into orbit by a Space Shuttle, and there mated to a Proteus spacecraft with the Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System. The Proteus system extends to ground support equipment, development tools, and communications, as well as the orbiting satellites. It is expected that Proteus will be able to triple the number of Explorer missions while staying within the current budgetary allocation for such missions. The Proteus spacecraft encompasses a system interface assembly plug, a data handling module, remote interface units, and a power distribution module.

  18. Structure of the O-polysaccharide of Proteus penneri 28 and Proteus vulgaris O31 and classification of P. penneri 26 and 28 in Proteus serogroup O31.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, Anna N; Zych, Krystyna; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Bartodziejska, Beata; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Rozalski, Antoni A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2003-10-24

    The lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of Proteus penneri 28 and Proteus vulgaris O31 (PrK 55/57) were degraded with dilute acetic acid and structurally identical high-molecular-mass O-polysaccharides were isolated by gel-permeation chromatography. Sugar analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies showed that both polysaccharides contain D-GlcNAc, 2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-L-glucose (L-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxyglucose (N-acetylquinovosamine)) and 2-acetamido-3-O-[(S)-1-carboxyethyl]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (N-acetylisomuramic acid) and have the following structure: [carbohydrate structure: see text] where (S)-1-carboxyethyl [a residue of (S)-lactic acid] (S-Lac) is an ether-linked residue of (S)-lactic acid. The O-polysaccharide studied is structurally similar to that of P. penneri 26, which differs only in the absence of S-Lac from the GlcNAc residue. Based on the O-polysaccharide structures and serological data of the LPS, it was suggested classifying these strains in one Proteus serogroup, O31, as two subgroups: O(31a), 31b for P. penneri 28 and P. vulgaris PrK 55/57 and O31a for P. penneri 26. A serological relatedness of the LPS of Proteus O(31a), 31b and P. penneri 62 was revealed and substantiated by sharing epitope O31b, which is associated with N-acetylisomuramic acid. It was suggested that a cross-reactivity of P. penneri 28 O-antiserum with the LPS of several other P. penneri strains is due to a common epitope(s) on the LPS core.

  19. Wave Features of the Neptune's Satellites: Triton, Proteus, Nereid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2014-07-01

    Fastly orbiting Triton shows Mars-like tectonic dichotomy and very fine granulation 18 km across. Observed Proteus' granules are due to wave modulation. Nereid's fr.is close to that of Earth, thus their relatively sized granules are quite similar.

  20. Proteus mirabilis interkingdom swarming signals attract blow flies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flies transport specific bacteria with their larvae which provides a wider range of nutrients for those bacteria. Our hypothesis was that this symbiotic interaction may depend on interkingdom signaling. We obtained Proteus mirabilis from the salivary glands of the blow fly Lucilia sericat. This s...

  1. Expression of a nonagglutinating fimbria by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Tolson, D L; Barrigar, D L; McLean, R J; Altman, E

    1995-03-01

    We have clarified growth conditions and isolation strategies for the nonagglutinating fimbriae from Proteus mirabilis. Nonagglutinating fimbriae were expressed by all P. mirabilis strains we examined, and the major subunit proteins, which ranged from 23 to 29 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had highly conserved N-terminal sequences.

  2. Expression of a nonagglutinating fimbria by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Tolson, D L; Barrigar, D L; McLean, R J; Altman, E

    1995-01-01

    We have clarified growth conditions and isolation strategies for the nonagglutinating fimbriae from Proteus mirabilis. Nonagglutinating fimbriae were expressed by all P. mirabilis strains we examined, and the major subunit proteins, which ranged from 23 to 29 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had highly conserved N-terminal sequences. PMID:7868237

  3. Molecular and genetic analyses of the putative Proteus O antigen gene locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Ruan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoting; Rozalski, Antoni; Shao, Zhujun; Guo, Xi; Zhou, Haijian; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Proteus species are well-characterized opportunistic pathogens primarily associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) of humans. The Proteus O antigen is one of the most variable constituents of the cell surface, and O antigen heterogeneity is used for serological classification of Proteus isolates. Even though most Proteus O antigen structures have been identified, the O antigen locus has not been well characterized. In this study, we identified the putative Proteus O antigen locus and demonstrated this region's high degree of heterogeneity by comparing sequences of 40 Proteus isolates using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). This analysis identified five putative Proteus O antigen gene clusters, and the probable functions of these O antigen-related genes were proposed, based on their similarity to genes in the available databases. Finally, Proteus-specific genes from these five serogroups were identified by screening 79 strains belonging to the 68 Proteus O antigen serogroups. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of the putative Proteus O antigen locus, and we describe a novel molecular classification method for the identification of different Proteus serogroups.

  4. Molecular and Genetic Analyses of the Putative Proteus O Antigen Gene Locus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quan; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Ruan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoting; Rozalski, Antoni; Shao, Zhujun; Guo, Xi; Zhou, Haijian; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Proteus species are well-characterized opportunistic pathogens primarily associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) of humans. The Proteus O antigen is one of the most variable constituents of the cell surface, and O antigen heterogeneity is used for serological classification of Proteus isolates. Even though most Proteus O antigen structures have been identified, the O antigen locus has not been well characterized. In this study, we identified the putative Proteus O antigen locus and demonstrated this region's high degree of heterogeneity by comparing sequences of 40 Proteus isolates using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). This analysis identified five putative Proteus O antigen gene clusters, and the probable functions of these O antigen-related genes were proposed, based on their similarity to genes in the available databases. Finally, Proteus-specific genes from these five serogroups were identified by screening 79 strains belonging to the 68 Proteus O antigen serogroups. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of the putative Proteus O antigen locus, and we describe a novel molecular classification method for the identification of different Proteus serogroups. PMID:20581173

  5. [Comparison of different methods in order to identify Proteus spp].

    PubMed

    Castro, S T; Rodríguez, C R; Perazzi, B E; Radice, M; Paz Sticott, M; Muzio, H; Juárez, J; Gutkind, G; Famiglietti, A M R; Santini, P I; Vay, C A

    2006-01-01

    Comparison of different methods in order to identify Proteus spp. The objectives were: (a) to identify Proteus strains to species level, following Farmer's and O'Hara's conventional biochemical reactions; b) to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of both the API 20E method and a schema of reduced reactions (TSI and MIO agar: motility, indole and ornithine) comparing them with conventional methodology, and c) to evaluate the utility of SDS-PAGE (total proteins) in order to identify Proteus strains to species level. Two hundred and five Proteus spp. clinical isolates, were collected between January 1998 and September 2004, from inpatients and outpatients at Hospital de Clinicas. Strains were identified by means of conventional methodology, the API 20E method, and a schema of reduced reactions. SDS-PAGE (total proteins) was used in 48 out of the 205 strains. The API 20E method identified 79 out of 87 (90.8%) strains of P. mirabilis, 103 out of 103 P. vulgaris complex, and 15 out of 15 P. penneri. Eight strains of P. mirabilis were identified as Proteus spp., the acid production from maltose being necessary to identify them to species level. The schema of reduced reactions identified 205 out of 205 (100%) strains, that is, this schema of reduced reactions identified all the strains to species level without any additional tests, in marked contrast to the API 20E method. The SDS-PAGE (total proteins) identified the three species of the genus, even if the strains of P. mirabilis showed different biochemical reactions.

  6. Structure of the O-polysaccharide leads to classification of Proteus penneri 31 in Proteus serogroup O19.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, Anna N; Zych, Krystyna; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Zabłotni, Agnieszka; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2003-10-24

    O-polysaccharide was obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Proteus penneri strain 31. Sugar and methylation analyses along with NMR spectroscopic studies, including 2D 1H,1H COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, 1H,13C and 1H,31P HMQC experiments, demonstrated the following structure of the polysaccharide: [carbohydrate structure: see text] where FucNAc is 2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxygalactose and EtnP is 2-aminoethyl phosphate. The polysaccharide studied has the same carbohydrate backbone as the O-polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O19. Based on this finding and close serological relatedness of the LPS of the two strains, it is proposed to classify P. penneri 31 in Proteus serogroup O19 as an additional subgroup. In contrast, D-GlcNAc6PEtn and alpha-L-FucNAc-(1-->3)-D-GlcNAc shared with a number of other Proteus O-polysaccharides could not provide any significant cross-reactivity of the corresponding LPS with rabbit polyclonal O-antiserum against P. penneri 31.

  7. [Species-specific detection of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis by the polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Limanskiĭ, A; Minukhin, V; Limanskaia, O; Pavlenko, N; Mishina, M; Tsygenenko, A

    2005-01-01

    Sets of primers for the species-specific detection of P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were developed. As targets for these primers beta-lactamase and 16S rRNA gene fragments were chosen on the basis of the multiple leveling of the sequences of the DNA of all known P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris isolates. For differential detection oligonucleotides were selected in such a way that primers, specific for P. vulgaris, contained the non-paired nucleotide for P. mirabilis isolate at the 3'-end, and all other nucleotides were complementary to the beta-lactamase gene fragment. Primers, specific for gene 16S rRNA of P. mirabilis, contained the non-paired nucleotide for P. vulgaris isolates at the 3'-end. Standard PCR was carried out for 6 P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris strains. The use of PCR species-specific primers to P. vulgaris DNA made it possible to amplify the DNA fragment of the expected length only for P. vulgaris isolates, while the result of PCR for P. mirabilis was negative. PCR with primers specific to P. mirabilis permitted the detection of amplicon sized 101 nucleotides pairs only for P. mirabilis strains. These primers were optimized so as to use them in the specific differentiation of closely related P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris species by multiplex PCR. Genus-specific primers permitted the detection of bacterial gyrB gene of the genus Proteus were developed also.

  8. In vitro sensitivity of Proteus organisms to gentamicin and sisomicin.

    PubMed

    Legakis, N J; Sakellaropoulos, R; Papavassiliou, J

    1979-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of gentamicin and sisomicin was studied in 148 recent clinical isolates of Proteus obtained from patients hospitalized in Athens. Both gentamicin and sisomicin were found to be active with sisomicin generally being the more active of the two; P. mirabilis strains were less susceptible than the indole-positive strains, but P. mirabilis organisms isolated from the respiratory tract were more sensitive to sisomicin than those isolated from the urine. Susceptibility testing with the two aminoglycoside antibiotics was affected by inoculum size and by the test broth used. Sisomicin sensitivity testing with the disc-agar diffusion method and broth dilution method was reliable for the indole-positive strains of Proteus but did not separate all sensitive from resistant strains of P. mirabilis. An in vitro synergism was demonstrated between sisomicin and the semisynthetic penicillin, ticarcillin.

  9. Status Report on NEAMS PROTEUS/ORIGEN Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Wieselquist, William A

    2016-02-18

    The US Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program has contributed significantly to the development of the PROTEUS neutron transport code at Argonne National Laboratory and to the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation and Depletion Code (ORIGEN) depletion/decay code at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PROTEUS’s key capability is the efficient and scalable (up to hundreds of thousands of cores) neutron transport solver on general, unstructured, three-dimensional finite-element-type meshes. The scalability and mesh generality enable the transfer of neutron and power distributions to other codes in the NEAMS toolkit for advanced multiphysics analysis. Recently, ORIGEN has received considerable modernization to provide the high-performance depletion/decay capability within the NEAMS toolkit. This work presents a description of the initial integration of ORIGEN in PROTEUS, mainly performed during FY 2015, with minor updates in FY 2016.

  10. Isolation and characterisation of dog uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis strains.

    PubMed

    Gaastra, W; van Oosterom, R A; Pieters, E W; Bergmans, H E; van Dijk, L; Agnes, A; ter Huurne, H M

    1996-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis strains isolated from the urine of dogs with urinary tract infections, were characterised with respect to the production of haemolysin and fimbriae. In contrast to healthy dogs, P. mirabilis was also isolated in high numbers from the faeces of dogs suffering from recurrent urinary tract infections. Production of fimbriae was demonstrated by electron microscopy and the presence of genes for two different types of major fimbrial subunits (MR/P-like or UCA-like) was demonstrated by Southern hybridisation. These genes were absent in the Proteus vulgaris, Providentia rettgeri and Morganella morganii strains tested. All but one P. mirabilis strains were haemolytic and most strains produced fimbriae albeit in different amounts. The UCA fimbrial subunits from dog and human isolates have identical molecular weights and N-terminal sequences and are immunologically cross reactive. It was concluded that dog uropathogenic P. mirabilis strains are very similar to human uropathogenic P. mirabilis strains.

  11. Neonatal Meningoventriculitis Due to Proteus Mirabilis – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Juyal, Deepak; Rathaur, Vyas Kumar; Sharma, Neelam

    2013-01-01

    A five day old full term born baby was admitted to our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with seizures, opisthotonous posture and was icteric upto thigh. Baby had a three day history of poor feeding, lethargy and abnormal body movements. Mother was a 29 years old primigravida and had a normal vaginal delivery at home. Sepsis profile of the patient was requested, lumbar puncture and ventricular tap was performed. Patient was put on third generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and phenobarbitone. Culture and sensitivity report of blood, Cerebro spinal fluid and ventricular fluid showed Proteus mirabilis. Computerized Tomography scan showed a large parenchymal lesion in the right frontal lobe and diffuse ependymal enhancement along both the lateral ventricles suggestive of meningoventriculitis. We hereby present a fatal case of neonatal meningoventriculitis due to Proteus mirabilis. PMID:23543669

  12. Structure of the glycerol phosphate-containing O-polysaccharides and serological studies of the lipopolysaccharides of Proteus mirabilis CCUG 10704 (OE) and Proteus vulgaris TG 103 classified into a new Proteus serogroup, O54.

    PubMed

    Kołodziejska, Katarzyna; Perepelov, Andrei V; Zabłotni, Agnieszka; Drzewiecka, Dominika; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Zych, Krystyna; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2006-07-01

    O-Polysaccharides were obtained from the lipopolysaccharides of Proteus mirabilis CCUG 10704 (OE) and Proteus vulgaris TG 103 and studied by chemical analyses and one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, H-detected (1)H,(13)C heteronuclear single-quantum spectroscopy and (1)H,(31)P heteronuclear multiple-quantum spectroscopy experiments. The Proteus mirabilis OE polysaccharide was found to have a trisaccharide repeating unit with a lateral glycerol phosphate group. The Proteus vulgaris TG 103 produces a similar O-polysaccharide, which differs in incomplete substitution with glycerol phosphate (c. 50% of the stoichiometric amount) and the presence of an O-acetyl group at position 6 of the 2-acetamido-2-deoxygalactose (GalNAc) residue. These structures are unique among the known bacterial polysaccharide structures. Based on the structural and serological data of the lipopolysaccharides, it is proposed to classify both strains studied into a new Proteus serogroup, O54, as two subgroups, O54a,54b and O54a,54c. The serological relatedness of the Proteus O54 and some other Proteus lipopolysaccharides is discussed.

  13. Transduction of a Proteus vulgaris strain by a Proteus mirabilis bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, J N

    1975-08-01

    Only Proteus vulgaris strain PV127 out of many P. vulgaris, P. morganii and Providence strains was transduced to kanamycin resistance by high-frequency transducing variants, 5006MHFTk and 5006MHFTak, of phage 5006M, a general transducing phage for P. mirabilis strain PM5006. The phages adsorbed poorly to strain PV127 and did not form plaques. The transduction frequency of PV127 by these phages was 5 x 10(-8)/p.f.u. adsorbed. Phage 5006M increased the transduction frequencies. Abortive transductants were not detected. Transductants segregated kanamycin-sensitive clones at high frequency and this, together with data from the inactivation of transducing activity of lysates by ultraviolet irradiation, indicated that transduction was by lysogenization. The general transducing property of the phages was not expressed in transductions to auxotrophs of PV127. Transductants (type I) resulting from low multiplicities of phage input adsorbed phage to the same extent as PV127. This suggested a defect in the transducing particles (or host) because single phage 5006M infection converted strain PM5006 to non-adsorption of homologous phage. Type I transductants did not liberate phage, suggesting a defective phage maturation function. Transductants (type II) which arose from higher multiplicities of phage input did not adsorb phage, indicating possible heterogeneity among transducing particles. Phage derived from type II transductants adsorbed poorly to PV127 and transduced it to kanamycin resistance at frequencies similar to those of phages 5006MHFTk and 5006MHFTak, ruling out host-controlled modification as a cause of the low transduction frequencies. This phage transduced PM5006 to antibiotic resistance at high frequencies but generalized transduction was again not detected. It was suggested that general transduction could be performed by particles which, due to a different composition and/or mode of chromosomal integration, made material they carried susceptible to host

  14. Typing of Proteus strains by proticine production and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W

    1977-02-01

    A simple, reliable and highly discriminating scheme for the bacteriocine typing of Proteus has been developed. Strains are typed on MacConkey's agar according to their ability to produce a proticine active against one of 14 indicator strains having a single and specific proticine sensitivity and also according to their sensitivity to the different proticines of 13 proticine-producing strains. This new scheme of combined production and sensitivity typing was formulated after 250 strains of Proteus from clinical material had been examined for the production of proticines active against the 24 indicator strains of Cradock-Watson's proticine typing scheme and for proticine activity and sensitivity towards each other. Three new types of proticinogenic strains were discovered and defined. Strains producing proticines of types 1, 2 and 3 were isolated frequently. These common proticines could be subtyped by their different actions on newly characterised indicator strains. By means of this production/sensitivity (P/S) typing scheme, 250 Proteus strains were differentiated into 90 distinct types, whereas typing by sensitivity alone distinguished only 40 types and typing by production alone distinguished only 20 types (including subtypes).

  15. Oriented thick and thin filaments in amoeba proteus

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, RA; Hrebenda, B

    1975-01-01

    Actin and myosin filaments as a foundation of contractile systems are well established from ameba to man (3). Wolpert et al. (19) isolated by differential centrifugation from Amoeba proteus a motile fraction composed of filaments which moved upon the addition of ATP. Actin filaments are found in amebas (1, 12, 13) which react with vertebrate heavy meromyosin (HMM), forming arrowhead complexes as vertebrate actin (3, 9), and are prominent within the ectoplasmic tube where some of them are attached to the plasmalemma (1, 12). Thick and thin filaments possessing the morphological characteristics of myosin and actin have been obtained from isolated ameba cytoplasm (18, 19). In addition, there are filaments exhibiting ATPase activity in amebas which react with actin (12, 16, 17). However, giant ameba (Chaos-proteus) shapes are difficult to preserve, and the excellent contributions referred to above are limited by visible distortions occurring in the amebas (rounding up, pseudopods disappearing, and cellular organelles swelling) upon fixation. Achievement of normal ameboid shape in recent glycerination work (15) led us to attempt other electron microscope fixation techniques, resulting in a surprising preservation of A. proteus with a unique orientation of thick and thin filaments in the ectoplasmic region. PMID:1141376

  16. [The Proteus syndrome: a rare cause of pulmonary emphysema].

    PubMed

    Launois, C; Vallerand, H; Perotin, J-M; Nardi, J; Dury, S; Toubas, O; Lebargy, F; Deslée, G

    2013-11-01

    The Proteus syndrome is a rare genetic disease which is characterized by the overgrowth of tissues, especially bone, connective and adipose tissue. This condition is related to a somatic mosaic activating mutation in the AKT1 oncogene. We report the case of a 25-year-old man, diagnosed with the Proteus syndrome at the age of 6 months. He exhibited an asymmetric overgrowth of the extremities leading to bilateral amputation of the legs at the age of 10 years. He was hospitalized for acute respiratory failure due to a bronchopulmonary infection. Severe bullous pulmonary emphysema, predominantly on the left, with mediastinal deviation, was diagnosed. The patient recovered with antibiotics. An assessment 2 months later revealed mild hypoxaemia (PaO2=75 mmHg) and severe airflow limitation (FEV1=1260 mL [28% th.], FEV1/V C=69%) with hyperinflation (TLC=7840 mL [107% th.], RV=6010 mL [253% th.]). The Proteus syndrome is a very rare cause of pulmonary emphysema. The pathophysiology of emphysema in this syndrome is unknown. It can be hypothesized that the development of pulmonary cysts leading to emphysema may share the same AKT1 activation pathway with lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteus bacteriuria is associated with significant morbidity in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hung, EW; Darouiche, RO; Trautner, BW

    2007-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective chart review. Objectives We investigated the morbidity associated with Proteus bacteriuria in a spinal cord injured (SCI) population. Setting Michael E DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston, Texas, USA. Methods We reviewed the medical records of all veterans with SCI who received care in our medical center during the past 3 years. Proteus bacteriuria was defined as the growth of Proteus species in any urine culture during the study period. Urinary stones were defined as either renal or bladder calculi. Results During the study period, 71 of the 501 subjects (14%) had Proteus and 90 (18%) had urinary stones. Twenty-seven percent of the subjects with Proteus had stones, and the association of Proteus with stones was significant (P<0.05). Proteus bacteriuria was likewise associated with complete injury, hospitalization, decubitus ulcers, and history of stones (P<0.001). Subjects using indwelling catheters, either transurethral or suprapubic, were significantly more likely to have Proteus, whereas subjects practising spontaneous voiding and clean intermittent catheterization were significantly less likely to have Proteus. In the 90 patients with stones, Proteus was associated with requiring treatment for stones and having multiple stones (P<0.01). Twenty-five of the 90 patients with stones (28%) required treatment, most often with lithotripsy, and 6 (7%) developed urosepsis. Conclusions In persons with SCI, Proteus was found in subjects with a greater degree of impairment who were more likely to be hospitalized, to have decubiti, and to use indwelling catheters. Bacteriuria with Proteus predicted urologic complications in persons with SCI. Statement of Ethics All applicable institutional and governmental regulations concerning the ethical use of human volunteers were followed during the course of this research. Sponsorship This work was supported by USPHS grant HD42014. PMID:17179975

  18. Extended spectrum beta lactamase producing Proteus penneri: a rare missed pathogen?

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anita; Verma, Himani; Asthana, Ashish K; Madan, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Indole negative Proteus species are invariably incorrectly identified as Proteus mirabilis, often missing out isolates of Proteus penneri. We report a case of extended spectrum beta lactamase producing and multidrug-resistant P. penneri isolated from pus from pressure sore of a patient of road traffic accident. Correct and rapid isolation and identification of such resistant pathogen are important as they are significant nosocomial threat.

  19. Immunochemical studies on the O-antigens of Proteus mirabilis O23 and Proteus vulgaris O23.

    PubMed

    Rózalski, Antoni; Perepelov, Andrei V; Bartodziejska, Beata; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Babicka, Dorota; Kaca, Wiesław; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2003-01-01

    Analysis by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy demonstrated that the O-specific polysaccharides of Proteus mirabilis PrK 42/57 and P. vulgaris PrK 43/57 are structurally similar to that of P. vulgaris PrK 44/57 and different from the polysaccharide of P. mirabilis PrK 41/57 studied earlier. The lipopolysaccharides of these strains were tested using enzyme immunosorbent assay, passive hemolysis and Western blot with O-antisera against P. mirabilis 42/57 and P. vulgaris 43/57 and 44/57, as well as with cross-absorbed O-antisera. The chemical and serological data revealed the basis for combining the four strains into Proteus serogroup O23 and division of this serogroup to three subgroups, one for P. vulgaris 43/57 and 44/57 and two others for P. mirabilis 41/57 and 42/57.

  20. Outer membrane protein profiles and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis for differentiation of clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kappos, T; John, M A; Hussain, Z; Valvano, M A

    1992-10-01

    Outer membrane protein (MP) profiles and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE) analysis were used as tools for differentiating clinical isolates of Proteus spp. Fourteen distinct MP profiles were established by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 54 clinical isolates of Proteus spp. (44 strains identified as P. mirabilis and 10 strains identified as P. vulgaris). Forty-one isolates of P. mirabilis and eight isolates of P. vulgaris were grouped within six and three MP profiles, respectively. The remaining P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris isolates had unique profiles. MEE analysis was used to further discriminate among the strains belonging to the same MP groups. Thirty-five distinct electrophoretic types (ETs) were identified among P. mirabilis isolates. The isolates of P. mirabilis from the four most common MP groups were subgrouped into 30 ETs. All of the P. vulgaris strains had unique ETs. The results suggest that upon biochemical classification of Proteus isolates as P. mirabilis or P. vulgaris, further differentiation among strains of the same species can be obtained by the initial determination of MP profiles followed by MEE analysis of strains with identical MPs.

  1. Proteus cibarius sp. nov., a swarming bacterium from Jeotgal, a traditional Korean fermented seafood, and emended description of the genus Proteus.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Jung, Mi-Ja; Kim, Min-Soo; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-06-01

    A novel Proteus-like, Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain JS9T, was isolated from Korean fermented seafood, Jeotgal. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain JS9T belonged to the genus Proteus in the family Enterobacteriaceae. The highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of strain JS9T was to Proteus vulgaris KCTC 2579T (98.98 %) and the genomic DNA G+C content is 39.0 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization values were measured and strain JS9T showed <20.8 % genomic relatedness with closely-related members of the genus Proteus. The isolate showed bacterial motility and swarming activity similar to those of pathogenic Proteus mirabilis but distinct from those of other species of the genus Proteus. The isolate grows optimally at 30 °C, at pH 7, and in the presence of 2 % (w/v) NaCl. The main respiratory quinones are ubiquinone Q-8 and Q-10, and the major cellular fatty acids are C16 : 0, summed feature 3 and summed feature 8. The polar lipids comprise phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified amino lipid, two unidentified amino-phospholipids, and three unidentified lipids. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic analyses, strain JS9T represents a novel species of the genus Proteus, for which the name Proteus cibarius sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JS9T (=KACC 18404T=JCM 30699T). An emended description of the genus Proteus is also provided.

  2. [Effect of the proteolytic enzymes of Bacillus licheniformis and the lysoamidase of Lysobacter sp. XL1 on Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis].

    PubMed

    Riazanova, L P; Ledova, L A; Tsurikova, N V; Stepnaia, O A; Sinitsyn, A P; Kulaev, I S

    2005-01-01

    Preparations of culture liquid of three Bacullus licheniformis strains (S, 103, and 60.4) and the enzymatic preparation lysoamidase from culture liquid of Lysobacter sp. strain XL1 actively lysed preliminarily autoclaved cells of gram-negative bacteria Proteus vulgaris and P. mirabilis. Living Proteus cells treated with these enzymatic preparations were lysed during their subsequent autoclaving. Inoculation of enzyme-treated Proteus cells, taken either separately or in combination with one another and polymyxin B, into a rich medium led to cell repair and restoration of viability of culture.

  3. An inducible tellurite-resistance operon in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Toptchieva, Anna; Sisson, Gary; Bryden, Louis J; Taylor, Diane E; Hoffman, Paul S

    2003-05-01

    Tellurite resistance (Te(r)) is widespread in nature and it is shown here that the natural resistance of Proteus mirabilis to tellurite is due to a chromosomally located orthologue of plasmid-borne ter genes found in enteric bacteria. The P. mirabilis ter locus (terZABCDE) was identified in a screen of Tn5lacZ-generated mutants of which one contained an insertion in terC. The P. mirabilis terC mutant displayed increased susceptibility to tellurite (Te(s)) and complementation with terC carried on a multicopy plasmid restored high-level Te(r). Primer extension analysis revealed a single transcriptional start site upstream of terZ, but only with RNA harvested from bacteria grown in the presence of tellurite. Northern blotting and reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses confirmed that the ter operon was inducible by tellurite and to a lesser extent by oxidative stress inducers such as hydrogen peroxide and methyl viologen (paraquat). Direct and inverted repeat sequences were identified in the ter promoter region as well as motifs upstream of the -35 hexamer that resembled OxyR-binding sequences. Finally, the 390 bp intergenic promoter region located between orf3 and terZ showed no DNA sequence identity with any other published ter sequences, whereas terZABCDE genes exhibited 73-85 % DNA sequence identity. The ter operon was present in all clinical isolates of P. mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris tested and is inferred for Morganella and Providencia spp. based on screening for high level Te(r) and preliminary PCR analysis. Thus, a chromosomally located inducible tellurite resistance operon appears to be a common feature of the genus Proteus.

  4. Confirmation of presumptive Salmonella colonies contaminated with Proteus swarming using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Rojo, Rosalba; Torres Chavolla, Edith

    2007-01-01

    In Mexico, zero tolerance regulation is practiced regarding Salmonella in food products. the presence of which is verified by the procedure described in NOM 114-SSA-1994. During the period between August 2002 and March 2003, 245 food samples were tested using this procedure in the Central Laboratories of the Department of Health for the State of Jalisco (CEESLAB). Of these 245 samples, 35 showed presumptive colonies contaminated with Proteus swarm cells even after selective isolation. These swarm cells make Salmonella recovery and biochemical identification difficult due to the occurance of atypical biochemical profiles which generally correspond to that of Proteus. Out of the 35 samples contaminated with Proteus, 65 presumptive colonies were isolated. These colonies were analyzed using both normative microbiological method and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The PCR method detected two positive samples while normative microbiological method was not able to identify. In order to determine the extent of interference of Proteus swarming on the Salmonella-specific PCR band amplification, Salmonella ser. Typhimurium was grown in the presence of Proteus swarming. These results show that Proteus swarming did not interfere with Salmonella PCR-amplification, although the appearance of Sanlmonella was altered such that the black precipitate was no observed in the presence of Proteus swarming. Ours result indicate that the PCR method used in this study may be successfully applied to confirm presumptive Salmnonella colonies contaminated with Proteus swarming.

  5. The rtn gene of Proteus vulgaris is actually from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hall, B G

    1997-04-01

    The rtn gene, identified as coming from Proteus vulgaris ATCC 13315, is present in Escherichia coli K-12, and over a 440-bp region of rtn is identical to the published Proteus sequence, with the exception of a single G insertion. It was not possible to verify the presence of rtn in P. vulgaris.

  6. PROTEUS2: a web server for comprehensive protein structure prediction and structure-based annotation.

    PubMed

    Montgomerie, Scott; Cruz, Joseph A; Shrivastava, Savita; Arndt, David; Berjanskii, Mark; Wishart, David S

    2008-07-01

    PROTEUS2 is a web server designed to support comprehensive protein structure prediction and structure-based annotation. PROTEUS2 accepts either single sequences (for directed studies) or multiple sequences (for whole proteome annotation) and predicts the secondary and, if possible, tertiary structure of the query protein(s). Unlike most other tools or servers, PROTEUS2 bundles signal peptide identification, transmembrane helix prediction, transmembrane beta-strand prediction, secondary structure prediction (for soluble proteins) and homology modeling (i.e. 3D structure generation) into a single prediction pipeline. Using a combination of progressive multi-sequence alignment, structure-based mapping, hidden Markov models, multi-component neural nets and up-to-date databases of known secondary structure assignments, PROTEUS is able to achieve among the highest reported levels of predictive accuracy for signal peptides (Q2 = 94%), membrane spanning helices (Q2 = 87%) and secondary structure (Q3 score of 81.3%). PROTEUS2's homology modeling services also provide high quality 3D models that compare favorably with those generated by SWISS-MODEL and 3D JigSaw (within 0.2 A RMSD). The average PROTEUS2 prediction takes approximately 3 min per query sequence. The PROTEUS2 server along with source code for many of its modules is accessible a http://wishart.biology.ualberta.ca/proteus2.

  7. [Investigation of hydrophobicity of Proteus vulgaris strains and ability of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus penneri strains to penetrate bladder membrane HCV T-29 cells ].

    PubMed

    Bartodziejska, Beata; Błaszczyk, Aleksandra; Wykrota, Marianna; Kwil, Iwona; Babicka, Dorota; Rózalski, Antoni

    2002-01-01

    Proteus bacilli play a particularly important role in urinary tract infections (UTI). Fimbriae and adherence ability and hemolysins production (HpmA, HlyA) are one of the factors of pathogenicity of these bacteria. In this paper we describe the invasion of HCV T-29 transitional bladder urothelial cells carcinoma strains of P. penneri, as well as P. vulgaris strains belonging to different serogroups. The cytotoxic effect was observed at 8 hour of incubation of the tested cells with P. vulgaris O21 and the same effect (complete lysis) at 6 hours by P. vulgaris O4 (this strain manifests maximal activity in the production of HlyA hemolysin). P. penneri strains, produce different types of fimbriae, expressed similar bacterial invasiveness. The hydrophobic properties of 25 P. vulgaris strains were also tested and only 3 strains occur to have hydrophobic cell surface.

  8. Bronchoscopic concerns in Proteus syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung-Min; Kim, Eun Soo; Kim, Hae-Kyu; Jeon, Soeun; Kim, Hyae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is a rare congenital hamartomatous disorder with multisystem involvement. PS shows highly clinical variability due to overgrowth of the affected areas, and several features can make anesthetic management challenging. Little is known about the airway problem associated with anesthesia in PS patients. An 11-year-old girl with PS was scheduled for ear surgery under general anesthesia. She had features complicating intubation including facial asymmetry and disproportion, abnormal teeth, limitation of neck movement due to torticollis, and thoracolumbar scoliosis. This study reports on a case of deformed airway of a PS patient under fiberoptic bronchoscopy. PMID:27703636

  9. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Nandini; Chattopadhyay, Chandan; Bhuban, Majhi; Pal, Salil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome. PMID:24860761

  10. Effects of trifluoromethyl ketones on the motility of Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wolfart, Krisztina; Molnar, Annamaria; Kawase, Masami; Motohashi, Noboru; Molnar, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    In the present study, we showed the inhibition of motility by trifluoromethyl ketone (TF) derivatives (1-8) in Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris) cultures. Among them, 1-(2-benzoxazoyl)-3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanone (1) showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on the motility of P. vulgaris than other TF compounds at 10% MIC. Our results suggest the possibility of an inhibitory action of TF compounds on the proton motive forces by affecting the action of biological motor and proton efflux in the membranes, resulting in a reduction of the ratio of running and the increased number of tumbling and non-motile cells.

  11. Mechanics and control of the cytoskeleton in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, M

    1989-01-01

    Many models of the cytoskeletal motility of Amoeba proteus can be formulated in terms of the theory of reactive interpenetrating flow (Dembo and Harlow, 1986). We have devised numerical methodology for testing such models against the phenomenon of steady axisymmetric fountain flow. The simplest workable scheme revealed by such tests (the minimal model) is the main preoccupation of this study. All parameters of the minimal model are determined from available data. Using these parameters the model quantitatively accounts for the self assembly of the cytoskeleton of A. proteus: for the formation and detailed morphology of the endoplasmic channel, the ectoplasmic tube, the uropod, the plasma gel sheet, and the hyaline cap. The model accounts for the kinematics of the cytoskeleton: the detailed velocity field of the forward flow of the endoplasm, the contraction of the ectoplasmic tube, and the inversion of the flow in the fountain zone. The model also gives a satisfactory account of measurements of pressure gradients, measurements of heat dissipation, and measurements of the output of useful work by amoeba. Finally, the model suggests a very promising (but still hypothetical) continuum formulation of the free boundary problem of amoeboid motion. by balancing normal forces on the plasma membrane as closely as possible, the minimal model is able to predict the turgor pressure and surface tension of A. proteus. Several dynamical factors are crucial to the success of the minimal model and are likely to be general features of cytoskeletal mechanics and control in amoeboid cells. These are: a constitutive law for the viscosity of the contractile network that includes an automatic process of gelation as the network density gets large; a very vigorous cycle of network polymerization and depolymerization (in the case of A. proteus, the time constant for this reaction is approximately 12 s); control of network contractility by a diffusible factor (probably calcium ion); and

  12. Morphological Diversity of the Colony Produced by Bacteria Proteus mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Akio; Shimada, Yuji; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Matsushita, Mitsugu; Matsuyama, Tohey

    1996-08-01

    Morphological changes of colonies have been investigatedfor a bacterial strain of Proteus mirabilis, which is a famous speciesfor producing concentric-ring-like colonies. It was found that colony patterns can be classified into three types,i.e., cyclic spreading, diffusion-limited growth (DLA-like)and three-dimensional growth (inside the agar medium) patterns. Cyclic spreading patterns can further be classifiedinto three subgroups, i.e., concentric-ring, homogeneous and spatiotemporal patterns. These subgroups were classified by examining the development of colony structure after colonies spread all over petri-dishes. Comparison of the results with thoseof another bacterial species Bacillus subtilis is also discussed.

  13. Vaccines for Proteus mirabilis in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a documented cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the complicated urinary tract. Urease-mediated urea hydrolysis is responsible for both virulence of the organism and the ability to cause urolithiasis. A urease-negative mutant of P. mirabilis is unable to initiate stone formation and colonizes the kidney at a significantly lower rate. The considerable pathology caused by P. mirabilis warrants the development of a vaccine. We have initiated the advancement of vaccine studies and have determined that the MR/P fimbria, a surface adhesin of P. mirabilis, is a promising vaccine candidate. Successful vaccination would be expected both to prevent colonization by P. mirabilis and urolithiasis.

  14. Proteus Syndrome with Neurological Manifestations: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Pallavi; Minocha, Priyanka; Jain, Rohit; Sitaraman, Sadasivan; Goyal, Manisha

    2017-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is an extremely rare and complex disorder. Approximately 200 cases have been reported, and it seems to affect people of all ethnic and racial groups. PS is characterized by segmental overgrowth of multiple tissues and organs including vascular malformations, lipomatous overgrowth, hyperpigmentation, and various types of nevi. We hereby present a 7-year-old boy who presented with seizures and overgrowth of one-half of the body. Although classical physical features have been described, epilepsy and other neurological manifestations are rarely reported features of PS. Early detection of association of epilepsy and hemimegalencephaly with PS can prevent/minimize the neurological complications, disability, morbidity, and mortality. PMID:28553400

  15. The Proteus aircraft and NASA Dryden's T-34 in flight over Las Cruces, New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  16. Structure of a Kdo-containing O polysaccharide representing Proteus O79, a newly described serogroup for some clinical Proteus genomospecies isolates from Poland.

    PubMed

    Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Drzewiecka, Dominika; Palusiak, Agata; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zabłotni, Agnieszka; Siwińska, Małgorzata; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2013-09-20

    From 41 Proteus genomospecies strains isolated in Poland, seven displayed similar serospecificity in ELISA with intact and adsorbed O antisera as well as in Western blot. The cross-reacting strains were found to belong to Proteus genomospecies 5/6 and classified into a new Proteus serogroup, O79, which seems to be widespread among Proteus genomospecies clinical isolates in Lodz, Poland. The O polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide of a representative O79 strain, 11 B-r, was studied by chemical analyses and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and the following structure of the repeating unit was established: →4)-α-D-GlcpNAlaAc-(1→5)-α-Kdop-(2→2)-α-D-Glcp-(1→3)-β-D-GlcpNAc-(1→ where AlaAc indicates N-acetyl-L-alanyl and Kdo indicates 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid. The O polysaccharide was unstable under mild acidic conditions and cleaved by acid-labile linkages of Kdo residues to yield a tetrasaccharide with Kdo at the reducing end. The structure established is unique among Proteus O polysaccharides, which is in agreement with the lack of any significant cross-reactivity for the lipopolysaccharide of strain 11 B-r and O antisera against strains of all known Proteus O serogroups and vice versa.

  17. Vaccination with proteus toxic agglutinin, a hemolysin-independent cytotoxin in vivo, protects against Proteus mirabilis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Alamuri, Praveen; Eaton, Kathryn A; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Smith, Sara N; Mobley, Harry L T

    2009-02-01

    Complicated urinary tract infections (UTI) caused by Proteus mirabilis are associated with severe pathology in the bladder and kidney. To investigate the roles of two established cytotoxins, the HpmA hemolysin, a secreted cytotoxin, and proteus toxic agglutinin (Pta), a surface-associated cytotoxin, mutant analysis was used in conjunction with a mouse model of ascending UTI. Inactivation of pta, but not inactivation of hpmA, resulted in significant decreases in the bacterial loads of the mutant in kidneys (P < 0.01) and spleens (P < 0.05) compared to the bacterial loads of the wild type; the 50% infective dose (ID(50)) of an isogenic pta mutant or hpmA pta double mutant was 100-fold higher (5 x 10(8) CFU) than the ID(50) of parent strain HI4320 (5 x 10(6) CFU). Colonization by the parent strain caused severe cystitis and interstitial nephritis as determined by histopathological examination. Mice infected with the same bacterial load of the hpmA pta double mutant showed significantly reduced pathology (P < 0.01), suggesting that the additive effect of these two cytotoxins is critical during Proteus infection. Since Pta is surface associated and important for the persistence of P. mirabilis in the host, it was selected as a vaccine candidate. Mice intranasally vaccinated with a site-directed (indicated by an asterisk) (S366A) mutant purified intact toxin (Pta*) or the passenger domain Pta-alpha*, each independently conjugated with cholera toxin (CT), had significantly lower bacterial counts in their kidneys ( P = 0.001) and spleens (P = 0.002) than mice that received CT alone. The serum immunoglobulin G levels correlated with protection (P = 0.03). This is the first report describing the in vivo cytotoxicity and antigenicity of an autotransporter in P. mirabilis and its use in vaccine development.

  18. Convergence acceleration of the Proteus computer code with multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to implement convergence acceleration techniques based on the multigrid concept in the two-dimensional and three-dimensional versions of the Proteus computer code. The first section presents a review of the relevant literature on the implementation of the multigrid methods in computer codes for compressible flow analysis. The next two sections present detailed stability analysis of numerical schemes for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, based on conventional von Neumann analysis and the bi-grid analysis, respectively. The next section presents details of the computational method used in the Proteus computer code. Finally, the multigrid implementation and applications to several two-dimensional and three-dimensional test problems are presented. The results of the present study show that the multigrid method always leads to a reduction in the number of iterations (or time steps) required for convergence. However, there is an overhead associated with the use of multigrid acceleration. The overhead is higher in 2-D problems than in 3-D problems, thus overall multigrid savings in CPU time are in general better in the latter. Savings of about 40-50 percent are typical in 3-D problems, but they are about 20-30 percent in large 2-D problems. The present multigrid method is applicable to steady-state problems and is therefore ineffective in problems with inherently unstable solutions.

  19. Characteristics of trajectory in the migration of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Hiromi; Masaki, Noritaka; Tsuchiya, Yoshimi

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the behavior of migration of Amoeba proteus in an isotropic environment. We found that the trajectory in the migration of A. proteus is smooth in the observation time of 500-1000 s, but its migration every second (the cell velocity) on the trajectory randomly changes. Stochastic analysis of the cell velocity and the turn angle of the trajectory has shown that the histograms of the both variables well fit to Gaussian curves. Supposing a simple model equation for the cell motion, we have estimated the motive force of the migrating cell, which is of the order of piconewton. Furthermore, we have found that the cell velocity and the turn angle have a negative cross-correlation coefficient, which suggests that the amoeba explores better environment by changing frequently its migrating direction at a low speed and it moves rectilinearly to the best environment at a high speed. On the other hand, the model equation has simulated the negative correlation between the cell velocity and the turn angle. This indicates that the apparently rational behavior comes from intrinsic characteristics in the dynamical system where the motive force is not torquelike.

  20. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents against Proteus species from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Na'was, T E; Mawajdeh, S; Dababneh, A; al-Omari, A

    1994-06-01

    Two hundred clinical isolates of members of the genus Proteus were definitively identified and their antimicrobial susceptibilities to 12 antimicrobials tested, 176 isolates (88%) being identified as Proteus mirabilis, 12 strains (6%) as Proteus vulgaris and 12 strains (6%) as Proteus penneri. Most strains were isolated from pus (62.5%) and urine (34%), but in general there were no significant differences in the rates of isolation of any of the species by age or sex, although it was noted that P. vulgaris was only isolated from patients belonging to the older age group (> 5 years). The Proteus spp. were notably susceptible to nalidixic acid, ceftazidime and the aminoglycosides tested, and resistant to polymyxin B and colistin. The inclination of certain Proteus species to be susceptible or resistant to certain antimicrobials was noted, but strain differences also existed. The results of the study confirm the importance of performing antimicrobials susceptibility testing of each Proteus isolate to avoid potentially misleading therapy. The noted discrepancy in the result of the susceptibility of P. penneri to chloramphenicol as tested by different standard methods merits further investigation.

  1. [Characteristics of bacteria in the genus Proteus isolated from patients with sporadic and group intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Apollonin, A V; Romanenko, E E; Iorzh, A L; Zueva, L P

    1985-02-01

    The biochemical and biological properties of 148 Proteus strains isolated from patients both in sporadic intestinal infections and in a case of group infection in children's hospital was studied. The study revealed that the etiological factor of the group infection was P. mirabilis belonging to rare serovar 48:2. Proteus organisms isolated in sporadic infections belonged to a great number of serovars. No relationship between the isolated serovar and the nosological form of the intestinal disease was established. Among the Proteus strains under study, 82 strains showed atypical biochemical properties in 1 test or more. No correlation between the clinical diagnosis and the occurrence of atypical strains was established.

  2. [Joint action of aminoglycoside antibiotics and nitrofurans with bile on bacteria of the genus Proteus].

    PubMed

    Sytnik, I A; Puzakova, E V

    1980-06-01

    The combined effect of monomycin, kanamycin, neomycin and nitrofurans, such as furacillin, furagin, nitrofurantoin and furazolidone with bovine bile was studied on 36 strains of Proteus mirabilis and 14 strains of Proteus vulgaris. It was found that sub-bacteriostatic doses of the bile significantly increased the antiproteus activity of the aminoglycoside antibiotics and nitrofurans. The combinations of the bile with monomycin and kanamycin and the bile with furazolidone and nitrofurantoin proved to be most effective. Clinical trials of the drugs in treatment of inflammatory diseases of the biliferous system of the Proteus etiology are recommended.

  3. [Comparative evaluation of different methods for typing bacteria in the genus Proteus].

    PubMed

    Shvidenko, I G

    1986-05-01

    The work presents the comparative evaluation of different methods used for differentiating bacteria of the genus Proteus. A scheme of the combined typing of Proteus is presented. This scheme includes the determination of enzymatic and serological variants with the subsequent additional bacteriocinogenic and phage typing. Among the Proteus strains in our collection (600 strains), 123 sero-enzymatic variants, 71 enzymo-lysogenic variants, 64 enzymo-bacteriocinogenic variants, 162 sero-lysogenic variants, 164 sero-bacteriocinogenic variants and 52 bacteriocinogeno-lysogenic variants have been detected.

  4. Extracellular slime associated with Proteus mirabilis during swarming.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, S J; Stewart, K R; Williams, F D

    1983-01-01

    Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to visualize the extracellular slime of Proteus mirabilis swarm cells. Slime was observed with phase-contrast microscopy after fixation in hot sulfuric acid-sodium borate. Ruthenium red was used to stain slime for transmission electron microscopy. Copious quantities of extracellular slime were observed surrounding swarm cells; the slime appeared to provide a matrix through which the cells could migrate. Swarm cells were always found embedded in slime. These observations support the argument that swarming of P. mirabilis is associated with the production of large quantities of extracellular slime. Examination of nonswarming mutants of P. mirabilis revealed that a number of morphological changes, including cell elongation and increased flagellum synthesis, were required for swarm cell migration. It is still unclear whether extracellular slime production also is required for migration. Images PMID:6341364

  5. Purification and characterization of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Surette, M; Gill, T; MacLean, S

    1990-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase was isolated and purified from cell extracts of Proteus vulgaris recovered from spoiling cod fish (Gadus morhua). The molecular weight and isoelectric point of the enzyme were 120,000 +/- 2,000 and pH 6.8. The Michaelis constant for inosine as substrate was 3.9 x 10(-5). Guanosine also served as a substrate (Km = 2.9 x 10(-5). However, the enzyme was incapable of phosphorylizing adenosine. Adenosine proved to be useful as a competitive inhibitor and was used as a ligand for affinity chromatography of purine nucleoside phosphorylase following initial purification steps of gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. PMID:2111121

  6. Merging mythology and morphology: the multifaceted lifestyle of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2012-11-01

    Proteus mirabilis, named for the Greek god who changed shape to avoid capture, has fascinated microbiologists for more than a century with its unique swarming differentiation, Dienes line formation and potent urease activity. Transcriptome profiling during both host infection and swarming motility, coupled with the availability of the complete genome sequence for P. mirabilis, has revealed the occurrence of interbacterial competition and killing through a type VI secretion system, and the reciprocal regulation of adhesion and motility, as well as the intimate connections between metabolism, swarming and virulence. This Review addresses some of the unique and recently described aspects of P. mirabilis biology and pathogenesis, and emphasizes the potential role of this bacterium in single-species and polymicrobial urinary tract infections.

  7. Deciphering simultaneous bioelectricity generation and dye decolorization using Proteus hauseri.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Yann; Wang, Yu-Min; Ng, I-Son; Liu, Shi-Qi; Hung, Jhao-Yin

    2012-04-01

    This first-attempt study disclosed how and why electron-shuttling mediators were capable to stimulate bioelectricity-generating capabilities of dye-bearing microbial fuel cells (MFCs) using Proteus hauseri. Due to significant biotoxicity of 4-aminophenol (4AP) and the absence of electron-mediating potential of 3AP, only 2AP among all isomers could work as an exogenous mediator to stimulate bioelectricity generation of P. hauseri. Dye toxicity to cells on anodic biofilm in MFCs apparently affected the performance of simultaneous bioelectricity production and color removal (SBP&CR) in MFCs. Plus, dose-response analysis upon toxicity potency of reactive blue 160 revealed that cells on anodic biofilm in MFCs had a higher tolerance to reactive blue 160 than suspended cells. Apparently, augmentation of electron mediator(s) with low toxicity was a feasible means to facilitate bioelectricity-generating capability of SBP&CR.

  8. Comparative Screening of Digestion Tract Toxic Genes in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaolu; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Li, Yinghui; Jiang, Min; Chen, Qiongcheng; Jiang, Yixiang; Yuan, Jianhui; Cao, Hong; Hu, Qinghua; Huang, Shenghe

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common urinary tract pathogen, and may induce various inflammation symptoms. Its notorious ability to resist multiple antibiotics and to form urinary tract stones makes its treatment a long and painful process, which is further challenged by the frequent horizontal gene transferring events in P. mirabilis genomes. Three strains of P. mirabilis C02011/C04010/C04013 were isolated from a local outbreak of a food poisoning event in Shenzhen, China. Our hypothesis is that new genes may have been acquired horizontally to exert the digestion tract infection and toxicity. The functional characterization of these three genomes shows that each of them independently acquired dozens of virulent genes horizontally from the other microbial genomes. The representative strain C02011 induces the symptoms of both vomit and diarrhea, and has recently acquired a complete type IV secretion system and digestion tract toxic genes from the other bacteria.

  9. [Study on whorl swarming growth phenomenon of Proteus mirabilis].

    PubMed

    He, Xianyuan; Liao, Sixiang; Liu, Junkang; Li, Kun; Liu, Yanxia; Yu, Lurong

    2015-02-01

    The present paper is aimed to explore the origins of Proteus mirabilis (PM) whorl swarming growth phenomenon. The whorl swarming growth phenomenon of PM was observed by changed bacterial culture inoculation time, humidity, vaccination practices, cultured flat placement, magnetic field, pH and other factors. Bacterial ring spiral direction of rotation is counterclockwise and the volatile growth process of PM was whorl swarming growth phenomenon. Spiro fluctuation phenomenon was of high frequency in the sealing tanks by cultured anytime inoculation, wherever inoculation technique applied or not, the presence or absence of the magnetic field, and wherever the dish position was. The experimental results showed that the whorl swarming growth phenomenon of PM requires specific pH environment, in which the facts may be relative to its genetic characteristics and the Earths rotation.

  10. Merging mythology and morphology: the multifaceted lifestyle of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Chelsie E.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, named for the Greek god who changed shape to avoid capture, has fascinated microbiologists for more than a century with its unique swarming differentiation, Dienes line formation and potent urease activity. Transcriptome profiling during both host infection and swarming motility, coupled with the availability of the complete genome sequence for P. mirabilis, has revealed the occurrence of interbacterial competition and killing through a type VI secretion system, and the reciprocal regulation of adhesion and motility, as well as the intimate connections between metabolism, swarming and virulence. This Review addresses some of the unique and recently described aspects of P. mirabilis biology and pathogenesis, and emphasizes the potential role of this bacterium in single- species and polymicrobial urinary tract infections. PMID:23042564

  11. Comparative Screening of Digestion Tract Toxic Genes in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolu; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Li, Yinghui; Jiang, Min; Chen, Qiongcheng; Jiang, Yixiang; Yuan, Jianhui; Cao, Hong; Hu, Qinghua; Huang, Shenghe

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common urinary tract pathogen, and may induce various inflammation symptoms. Its notorious ability to resist multiple antibiotics and to form urinary tract stones makes its treatment a long and painful process, which is further challenged by the frequent horizontal gene transferring events in P. mirabilis genomes. Three strains of P. mirabilis C02011/C04010/C04013 were isolated from a local outbreak of a food poisoning event in Shenzhen, China. Our hypothesis is that new genes may have been acquired horizontally to exert the digestion tract infection and toxicity. The functional characterization of these three genomes shows that each of them independently acquired dozens of virulent genes horizontally from the other microbial genomes. The representative strain C02011 induces the symptoms of both vomit and diarrhea, and has recently acquired a complete type IV secretion system and digestion tract toxic genes from the other bacteria. PMID:27010388

  12. Proteus mirabilis chromosome mobilization by plasmid D: a physical characterization.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, M C; Coetzee, W F

    1984-03-01

    Plasmid D, a hybrid of plasmids P-lac and R1 drd19, mediates polarized chromosome mobilization from one origin in Proteus mirabilis strain PM5006, while the parental plasmids neither individually nor combined mobilize this chromosome. To elucidate its acquired mobilizing ability plasmid D was characterized physically in relation to P-lac and R1 drd19. Restriction patterns of these plasmids were compared and it was shown that D consists of P-lac and only the r-determinant (r-det) of R1 drd19. A mechanism for the formation of plasmid D, via transduction of the r-det and subsequent transposon-like integration into P-lac, involving insertion sequence IS1, was suggested. Evidence for aberration in plasmid D DNA as a result of r-det integration into P-lac was attributed to IS1 elements which flank the r-det. Recombination regions of parental plasmid DNA were located on HindIII fragments alpha and beta of plasmid D and were subsequently inserted in vitro into IncP-1 plasmid RP4 that fails to mobilize the P. mirabilis chromosome. RP4::HindIII alpha plasmids did not mobilize the latter chromosome, but rendered the Proteus host lac+. RP4::HindIII beta plasmids pMC1 and pMC17, containing the fragment in opposite orientations, mobilized the P. mirabilis chromsome. For pMC17, mobilization was indistinguishable from that of plasmid D, i.e. having the same orientation and the same single origin. However, mobilization promoted by pMC1 was from two distinctly different origins, different from that of pMC17. This apparently deviates from known examples where inversion of homologous DNA inserted into plasmids leads to mobilization from the same origin but in reverse direction.

  13. Treatment of Atypical Compartment Syndrome Due to Proteus Infection.

    PubMed

    Stull, Justin; Bhat, Suneel; Miller, Andrew J; Hoffman, Ryan; Wang, Mark L

    2017-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is an orthopedic emergency with a multitude of etiologies. Although it is most commonly associated with trauma to the extremity, hematoma and infection are 2 rare etiologies of insidious compartment syndrome. Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic gram-negative species that can infect the respiratory tract, urinary tract, and open wounds. The authors present the case of a 69-year-old woman who developed tissue necrosis and compartment syndrome secondary to an untreated hematoma infected by P mirabilis. This case involves an atypical presentation caused by an untreated infected hematoma, emphasizing the need for a high index of suspicion. Current literature supports immediate surgical intervention in the clinical scenario of fulminant compartment syndrome, regardless of compartment pressure findings. The probability of compartment syndrome in the patient presenting with pain, paresthesias, paresis, and pain with passive stretch, all of which were positive findings in this patient, has been reported to be 98%. Thus, Doppler evaluation and intercompartmental pressures were considered but forgone to expedite operative treatment. Emergent 4-compartment fasciotomies, with excision and debridement of nonviable tissue, are potentially limb-saving procedures, intended to limit loss of function and obviate the need for lower extremity amputation. The decision was made to perform a dual-incision fasciotomy to avoid contamination of the uninvolved compartments with a standard single-incision approach. To date, this represents the first report in the English literature of the insidious onset of tissue necrosis secondary to a Proteus-infected hematoma, highlighting a unique etiology of atypical compartment syndrome. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e176-e178.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Structural and serological studies of the related O-specific polysaccharides of Proteus vulgaris O21 and Proteus mirabilis O48 having oligosaccharide-phosphate repeating units.

    PubMed

    Bartodziejska, B; Toukach, F V; Vinogradov, E V; Senchenkova, S N; Shashkov, A S; Ziolkowski, A; Czaja, J; Perry, M B; Knirel, Y A; Rozalski, A

    2000-12-01

    The O-specific polysaccharide chains (O-antigens) of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of Proteus mirabilis O48 and Proteus vulgaris O21 were found to have tetrasaccharide and pentasaccharide repeating units, respectively, interlinked by a glycosidic phosphate. Polysaccharides and an oligosaccharide were derived from the LPSs by various degradation procedures and studied by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, H-detected 1H,13C and 1H,31P HMQC experiments. The following related structures of the repeating units of the O-antigens were established (top: Proteus mirabilis O48; bottom: Proteus vulgaris O21) The O-specific polysaccharide of P. vulgaris O21 has the same structure as that of Hafnia allvei 744 and PCM 1194 [Petersson C., Jachymek, W., Klonowska, A., Lugowski, C., Niedziela, T. & Kenne, L. (1997) Eur. J. Biochem., 245, 668-675], except that the GlcN residue carries the N-acetyl rather than the N-[(R)-3-hydroxybutyryl] group. Serological investigations confirmed the close relatedness of the Proteus and Hafnia O-antigens studied.

  15. 2-methylbutanal, a volatile biomarker, for non-invasive surveillance of Proteus.

    PubMed

    Aarthi, Raju; Saranya, Raju; Sankaran, Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen detection needs a paradigm shift from time-consuming conventional microbiological and biochemical tests to much simpler identification methods with higher sensitivity and specificity. In this regard, a simple detection method for frequently isolated nosocomial uropathogen, Proteus spp., was developed using the characteristic volatile 2-methylbutanal released in Luria Bertani broth. The instant reaction of the compound with 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonylhydrazine (DNSH) has been adapted to develop a sensitive fluorescence assay named "ProteAl" (Prote, "Proteus" & Al, "Aldehyde"). The assay was performed by direct addition of the fluorescence reagent to the culture after 7 h of growth. The distinct green fluorescence by Proteus (other organisms show orange fluorescence) served as the simplest and quicker identification test available for Proteus. In the laboratory, it exhibited 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity during testing of 95 strains including standard and known clinical isolates representing frequently encountered uropathogens.

  16. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents), derived from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris used in... (virus-like bacteria) in serum. Test results aid in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents), derived from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris used in... (virus-like bacteria) in serum. Test results aid in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents), derived from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris used in... (virus-like bacteria) in serum. Test results aid in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents), derived from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris used in... (virus-like bacteria) in serum. Test results aid in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents), derived from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris used in... (virus-like bacteria) in serum. Test results aid in the diagnosis of diseases caused by bacteria...

  1. Proteus genomic island 1 (PGI1), a new resistance genomic island from two Proteus mirabilis French clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Siebor, Eliane; Neuwirth, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    To analyse the genetic environment of the antibiotic resistance genes in two clinical Proteus mirabilis isolates resistant to multiple antibiotics. PCR, gene walking and whole-genome sequencing were used to determine the sequence of the resistance regions, the surrounding genetic structure and the flanking chromosomal regions. A genomic island of 81.1 kb named Proteus genomic island 1 (PGI1) located at the 3'-end of trmE (formerly known as thdF) was characterized. The large MDR region of PGI1 (55.4 kb) included a class 1 integron (aadB and aadA2) and regions deriving from several transposons: Tn2 (blaTEM-135), Tn21, Tn6020-like transposon (aphA1b), a hybrid Tn502/Tn5053 transposon, Tn501, a hybrid Tn1696/Tn1721 transposon [tetA(A)] carrying a class 1 integron (aadA1) and Tn5393 (strA and strB). Several ISs were also present (IS4321, IS1R and IS26). The PGI1 backbone (25.7 kb) was identical to that identified in Salmonella Heidelberg SL476 and shared some identity with the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) backbone. An IS26-mediated recombination event caused the division of the MDR region into two parts separated by a large chromosomal DNA fragment of 197 kb, the right end of PGI1 and this chromosomal sequence being in inverse orientation. PGI1 is a new resistance genomic island from P. mirabilis belonging to the same island family as SGI1. The role of PGI1 in the spread of antimicrobial resistance genes among Enterobacteriaceae of medical importance needs to be evaluated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Structure of the N-acetyl-L-rhamnosamine-containing O-polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris TG 155 from a new Proteus serogroup, O55.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, Anna N; Kolodziejska, Katarzyna; Zych, Krystyna; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2003-09-10

    The O-polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Proteus vulgaris TG 155 was found to contain 2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-L-mannose (N-acetyl-L-rhamnosamine, L-RhaNAc), a monosaccharide that occurs rarely in Nature. The following structure of the O-polysaccharide was established by NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, ROESY and 1H,13C HSQC experiments, along with chemical methods: [carbohydrate structure in text] Rabbit polyclonal O-antiserum against P. vulgaris TG 155 reacted with both core and O-polysaccharide moieties of the homologous LPS but showed no cross-reactivity with other LPS from the complete set of serologically different Proteus strains. Based on the unique O-polysaccharide structure and the serological data, we propose classifying P. vulgaris TG 155 into a new, separate Proteus O-serogroup, O55.

  3. Effects of some tricyclic psychopharmacons and structurally related compounds on motility of Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Molnár, J; Ren, J; Kristiansen, J E; Nakamura, M J

    1992-11-01

    A simple test for the evaluation of drugs interfering with bacterial motility was established with Proteus vulgaris. With this model, promethazine, 7-hydroxy-chlorpromazine, imipramine, 7,8-dioxochlorpromazine and acridine orange were shown to exert significant motility and swarming inhibitory action on Proteus vulgaris strains at subinhibitory concentrations. Quinidine enhanced the antimotility effect of promethazine. The antimotility effect of promethazine was synergized by proton pump inhibitors omeprazole and abscissic acid, but antagonized by extracellular potassium and sodium ions.

  4. Unilateral hypertrophic skin lesions, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma: The many faces of Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lal, Niharika R; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Sarkar, Asim K

    2015-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare condition with a wide spectrum of abnormalities. It is characterized by hamartomatous malformations involving multiple organs. Serious complications may ensue, such as pulmonary embolism, cystic lung disease, and various neoplasms such as parotid adenomas, ovarian cystadenomas, and meningiomas. We report here a case of Proteus syndrome in a 21-year-old woman who had facial hemihypertrophy, cerebriform plantar hyperplasia, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma for the rarity of the entity.

  5. Unilateral hypertrophic skin lesions, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma: The many faces of Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Niharika R.; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Sarkar, Asim K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare condition with a wide spectrum of abnormalities. It is characterized by hamartomatous malformations involving multiple organs. Serious complications may ensue, such as pulmonary embolism, cystic lung disease, and various neoplasms such as parotid adenomas, ovarian cystadenomas, and meningiomas. We report here a case of Proteus syndrome in a 21-year-old woman who had facial hemihypertrophy, cerebriform plantar hyperplasia, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma for the rarity of the entity. PMID:26500869

  6. Haemagglutination, haemolysin production and serum resistance of proteus and related species isolated from clinical sources.

    PubMed

    Mishra, M; Thakar, Y S; Pathak, A A

    2001-01-01

    A total of 148 strains of Proteus and related species comprising of Proteus mirabilis (116), Proteus vulgaris (24), Providentia rettgeri (4), Providentia alcalifaciens (2), Providentia stuarti (1) and Morganella morganii (1), isolated from various sources, were examined for haemagglutination (HA), haemolysin production (HL) and serum resistance (SR). Maximum isolates were obtained from urine (47.30%) and pus (40.54%) and they were multidrug resistant. The sensitivity to Ciprofloxacin was 78.38%, Gentamicin: 62.84%, Cefotaxime: 29.73%, Norfloxacin: 22.97%, Tetracycline: 20.95% and Ampicillin: 6.76%. There were four commonest resistance patterns shown by 58.62% of Proteus mirabilis and 66.67% of Proteus vulgaris strains. Haemagglutination was shown by 91 (61.49%) strains, HL production in 126 (85.14%) strains and SR by 124 (83.78%) isolates. All the three i.e. HA, HL and SR were simultaneously present in 77 (52.27%) strains, any two were present in 40 (27.03%) strains and any one was positive in 30 (20.03%) strains. Thus in as many as 147 (98.32%) isolates, any one or more virulence factors were present. The virulence in commensal pathogen like Proteus is basically a multifactorial phenomenon. The presence of more virulence factors in one strain may increase its pathogenic ability. The evaluation of multiple virulence factors instead of one single parameter will be of greater help in assessing its pathogenic potential.

  7. 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions in four Proteus species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Wang, Min; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Zhemin; Wen, Shaoping; Rozalski, Antoni; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-01

    Proteus is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium. In this study, 813 Proteus 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were determined from 46 Proteus strains, including 388 ITS from 22 P. mirabilis strains, 211 ITS from 12 P. vulgaris strains, 169 ITS from 10 P. penneri strains, and 45 ITS from 2 P. myxofaciens strains. The Proteus strains carry mainly two types of ITS, ITS(Glu) (containing tRNA(Glu (UUC)) gene) and ITS(Ile+Ala) (containing tRNA(Ile (GAU)) and tRNA(Ala (UGC)) gene), and are in the forms of 28 variants with 25 genomic origins. The ITS sequences are a mosaic-like structure consisting of three conservative regions and two variable regions. The nucleotide identity of ITS subtypes in strains of the same species ranges from 96.2% to 100%. The divergence of Proteus ITS divergence was most likely due to intraspecies recombinations or horizontal transfers of sequence blocks. The phylogenetic relationship deduced from the second variable region of ITS sequences of the three facultative human pathogenic species P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris and P. penneri is similar with that based on 16S rDNA sequences, but has higher resolution to differentiate closely related P. vulgaris and P. penneri. This study is the first comprehensive study of ITS in four Proteus species and laid solid foundation for the development of high-throughput technology for quick and accurate identification of the important foodborne and nosocomial pathogens.

  8. Benchmark Evaluation of the HTR-PROTEUS Absorber Rod Worths (Core 4)

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-06-01

    PROTEUS was a zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. The critical assembly was constructed from a large graphite annulus surrounding a central cylindrical cavity. Various experimental programs were investigated in PROTEUS; during the years 1992 through 1996, it was configured as a pebble-bed reactor and designated HTR-PROTEUS. Various critical configurations were assembled with each accompanied by an assortment of reactor physics experiments including differential and integral absorber rod measurements, kinetics, reaction rate distributions, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects [1]. Four benchmark reports were previously prepared and included in the March 2013 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook) [2] evaluating eleven critical configurations. A summary of that effort was previously provided [3] and an analysis of absorber rod worth measurements for Cores 9 and 10 have been performed prior to this analysis and included in PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-004 [4]. In the current benchmark effort, absorber rod worths measured for Core Configuration 4, which was the only core with a randomly-packed pebble loading, have been evaluated for inclusion as a revision to the HTR-PROTEUS benchmark report PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-002.

  9. THE ANTIGENIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROTEUS X-19 AND TYPHUS RICKETTSIA : II. A STUDY OF THE COMMON ANTIGENIC FACTOR.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, M R

    1934-06-30

    A soluble specific substance was isolated from Mexican typhus Rickettsia which gave, with Proteus X-19 antiserum and typhus human serum, the same precipitation reactions as the polysaccharides extracted from B. proteus OX-19. The soluble specific substance extracted from Rickettsia and Proteus OX-19 is likely to be of a polysaccharide nature owing to the strong Molisch reactions obtained with such extracts, the heat stability and the negative protein reactions (biuret). Since, however, it still contains 7 per cent nitrogen, this is not certain. In the antigenic composition of both Proteus X-19 and typhus Rickettsia there is a common soluble specific factor which is responsible for the Weil-Felix reaction.

  10. Genetic diversity of the O antigens of Proteus species and the development of a suspension array for molecular serotyping

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Zhang, Xinjie; Yin, Zhiqiu; Drzewiecka, Dominika; Cao, Hengchun; Liu, Bin; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Rozalski, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    Proteus species are well-known opportunistic pathogens frequently associated with skin wound and urinary tract infections in humans and animals. O antigen diversity is important for bacteria to adapt to different hosts and environments, and has been used to identify serotypes of Proteus isolates. At present, 80 Proteus O-serotypes have been reported. Although the O antigen structures of most Proteus serotypes have been identified, the genetic features of these O antigens have not been well characterized. The O antigen gene clusters of Proteus species are located between the cpxA and secB genes. In this study, we identified 55 O antigen gene clusters of different Proteus serotypes. All clusters contain both the wzx and wzy genes and exhibit a high degree of heterogeneity. Potential functions of O antigen-related genes were proposed based on their similarity to genes in available databases. The O antigen gene clusters and structures were compared, and a number of glycosyltransferases were assigned to glycosidic linkages. In addition, an O serotype-specific suspension array was developed for detecting 31 Proteus serotypes frequently isolated from clinical specimens. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report to describe the genetic features of Proteus O antigens and to develop a molecular technique to identify different Proteus serotypes. PMID:28817637

  11. Classification of a Proteus penneri clinical isolate with a unique O-antigen structure to a new Proteus serogroup, O80.

    PubMed

    Siwińska, Małgorzata; Levina, Evgeniya A; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Drzewiecka, Dominika; Shashkov, Alexander S; Różalski, Antoni; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2015-04-30

    Proteus penneri is an opportunistic pathogen, which may cause severe diseases, most frequently urinary tract infections in immunocompromised patients. P. penneri Br 114 exhibiting a good swarming growth ability as an S-form strain was isolated from a wound of a patient in Łódź, Poland. Serological studies using ELISA and Western blotting and chemical analyses along with (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy showed that the O-antigen (O-polysaccharide) of this strain is unique among the known Proteus serotypes O1-O79. It possesses a linear pentasaccharide repeating unit containing a partially O-acetylated amide of D-glucuronic acid (GlcA) with L-serine having the following structure: [structure: see text]. These data are a basis for creating a new Proteus serogroup, O80, so far represented by the single Br 114 isolate. The O80 is the 21st O-serogroup containing P. penneri strains and the fourth serogroup based on Proteus spp. clinical isolates from Łódź, Poland.

  12. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    DOE PAGES

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; ...

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greatermore » than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.« less

  13. Proteus mirabilis viability after lithotripsy of struvite calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabakharan, Sabitha; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Spore, Scott S.; Sabanegh, Edmund; Glickman, Randolph D.; McLean, Robert J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Urinary calculi composed of struvite harbor urease-producing bacteria within the stone. The photothermal mechanism of holmium:YAG lithotripsy is uniquely different than other lithotripsy devices. We postulated that bacterial viability of struvite calculi would be less for calculi fragmented with holmium:YAG irradiation compared to other lithotripsy devices. Human calculi of known struvite composition (greater than 90% magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate) were incubated with Proteus mirabilis. Calculi were fragmented with no lithotripsy (controls), or shock wave, intracorporeal ultrasonic, electrohydraulic, pneumatic, holmium:YAG or pulsed dye laser lithotripsy. After lithotripsy, stone fragments were sonicated and specimens were serially plated for 48 hours at 38 C. Bacterial counts and the rate of bacterial sterilization were compared. Median bacterial counts (colony forming units per ml) were 8 X 106 in controls and 3 X 106 in shock wave, 3 X 107 in ultrasonic, 4 X 105 in electrohydraulic, 8 X 106 in pneumatic, 5 X 104 in holmium:YAG and 1 X 106 in pulsed dye laser lithotripsy, p less than 0.001. The rate of bacterial sterilization was 50% for holmium:YAG lithotripsy treated stones versus 0% for each of the other cohorts, p less than 0.01. P. mirabilis viability is less after holmium:YAG irradiation compared to other lithotripsy devices.

  14. Ureolytic Biomineralization Reduces Proteus mirabilis Biofilm Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobao; Lu, Nanxi; Brady, Hannah R.

    2016-01-01

    Ureolytic biomineralization induced by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis, is responsible for the formation of urinary tract calculi and the encrustation of indwelling urinary catheters. Such microbial biofilms are challenging to eradicate and contribute to the persistence of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, but the mechanisms responsible for this recalcitrance remain obscure. In this study, we characterized the susceptibility of wild-type (ure+) and urease-negative (ure−) P. mirabilis biofilms to killing by ciprofloxacin. Ure+ biofilms produced fine biomineral precipitates that were homogeneously distributed within the biofilm biomass in artificial urine, while ure− biofilms did not produce biomineral deposits under identical growth conditions. Following exposure to ciprofloxacin, ure+ biofilms showed greater survival (less killing) than ure− biofilms, indicating that biomineralization protected biofilm-resident cells against the antimicrobial. To evaluate the mechanism responsible for this recalcitrance, we observed and quantified the transport of Cy5-conjugated ciprofloxacin into the biofilm by video confocal microscopy. These observations revealed that the reduced susceptibility of ure+ biofilms resulted from hindered delivery of ciprofloxacin into biomineralized regions of the biofilm. Further, biomineralization enhanced retention of viable cells on the surface following antimicrobial exposure. These findings together show that ureolytic biomineralization induced by P. mirabilis metabolism strongly regulates antimicrobial susceptibility by reducing internal solute transport and increasing biofilm stability. PMID:26953206

  15. Study of a melanic pigment of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Agodi, A; Stefani, S; Corsaro, C; Campanile, F; Gribaldo, S; Sichel, G

    1996-01-01

    The present study sought to determine whether the pigment produced by Proteus mirabilis from the L-forms of various aromatic amino acids under aerobic conditions is melanic in nature. It is a black-brown pigment which behaves like a melanin in many respects, namely solubility features, bleaching by oxidizing agents and positive response to the Fontana-Masson assay. In the present study, for the first time, it was shown by electron spin resonance analysis that a bacterial melanin is able to act as a free radical trap, as was previously demonstrated for other melanins. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed a specific organized structure of the pigment as rounded aggregates of spherical bodies. DNA hybridization data did not reveal, in the P. mirabilis genome, any nucleotide sequence related to Shewanella colwelliana mel A, one of the two melanogenesis systems already defined at the molecular level in bacteria. Results obtained from experiments on pigment production inhibition suggest a possible role of tyrosinase in P. mirabilis melanogenesis. In conclusion, from the bulk of our results, it appears that the pigment produced by P. mirabilis is melanic in nature.

  16. Classification of Proteus penneri lipopolysaccharides into core region serotypes.

    PubMed

    Palusiak, Agata

    2016-12-01

    The frequency of P. penneri isolation from hospital patients, mostly from urine and wounds, keeps on growing, and numerous isolates are multi-drug resistant. P. penneri rods produce lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which may lead to the septic shock. Until now, O-specific polysaccharide has been the best structurally and serologically characterized region of P. penneri LPS. It is worth having an insight into the serological specificity of both poly- and oligosaccharide parts of P. penneri LPS. The P. penneri core region is less structurally diverse than OPS, but still, among other enterobacterial LPS core regions, it is characterized by structural variability. In the present study, the serological reactivity of 25 P. penneri LPS core regions was analyzed by ELISA, passive immunohemolysis and Western blot technique using five polyclonal P. penneri antisera after or without their adsorption with the respective LPSs. The results allowed the assignment of the tested strains to five new core serotypes, which together with published serological studies led to the creation of the first serotyping scheme based on LPS core reactivities of 35 P. penneri and three P. mirabilis strains. Together with the O types scheme, it will facilitate assigning Proteus LPSs of clinical isolates into appropriate O and R serotypes.

  17. Proteus mirabilis interkingdom swarming signals attract blow flies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qun; Fonseca, Alicia; Liu, Wenqi; Fields, Andrew T; Pimsler, Meaghan L; Spindola, Aline F; Tarone, Aaron M; Crippen, Tawni L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Wood, Thomas K

    2012-01-01

    Flies transport specific bacteria with their larvae that provide a wider range of nutrients for those bacteria. Our hypothesis was that this symbiotic interaction may depend on interkingdom signaling. We obtained Proteus mirabilis from the salivary glands of the blow fly Lucilia sericata; this strain swarmed significantly and produced a strong odor that attracts blow flies. To identify the putative interkingdom signals for the bacterium and flies, we reasoned that as swarming is used by this bacterium to cover the food resource and requires bacterial signaling, the same bacterial signals used for swarming may be used to communicate with blow flies. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified six novel genes for swarming (ureR, fis, hybG, zapB, fadE and PROSTU_03490), then, confirming our hypothesis, we discovered that fly attractants, lactic acid, phenol, NaOH, KOH and ammonia, restore swarming for cells with the swarming mutations. Hence, compounds produced by the bacterium that attract flies also are utilized for swarming. In addition, bacteria with the swarming mutation rfaL attracted fewer blow flies and reduced the number of eggs laid by the flies. Therefore, we have identified several interkingdom signals between P. mirabilis and blow flies. PMID:22237540

  18. Theory of periodic swarming of bacteria: Application to Proteus mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirók, A.; Matsushita, M.; Vicsek, T.

    2001-03-01

    The periodic swarming of bacteria is one of the simplest examples for pattern formation produced by the self-organized collective behavior of a large number of organisms. In the spectacular colonies of Proteus mirabilis (the most common species exhibiting this type of growth), a series of concentric rings are developed as the bacteria multiply and swarm following a scenario that periodically repeats itself. We have developed a theoretical description for this process in order to obtain a deeper insight into some of the typical processes governing the phenomena in systems of many interacting living units. Our approach is based on simple assumptions directly related to the latest experimental observations on colony formation under various conditions. The corresponding one-dimensional model consists of two coupled differential equations investigated here both by numerical integrations and by analyzing the various expressions obtained from these equations using a few natural assumptions about the parameters of the model. We determine the phase diagram corresponding to systems exhibiting periodic swarming, and discuss in detail how the various stages of the colony development can be interpreted in our framework. We point out that all of our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the complete set of available observations. Thus the present study represents one of the few examples where self-organized biological pattern formation is understood within a relatively simple theoretical approach, leading to results and predictions fully compatible with experiments.

  19. Fimbriae have distinguishable roles in Proteus mirabilis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Paola; Iribarnegaray, Victoria; Caetano, Ana Laura; Schlapp, Geraldine; Härtel, Steffen; Zunino, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is one of the most common etiological agents of complicated urinary tract infections, especially those associated with catheterization. This is related to the ability of P. mirabilis to form biofilms on different surfaces. This pathogen encodes 17 putative fimbrial operons, the highest number found in any sequenced bacterial species so far. The present study analyzed the role of four P. mirabilis fimbriae (MR/P, UCA, ATF and PMF) in biofilm formation using isogenic mutants. Experimental approaches included migration over catheter, swimming and swarming motility, the semiquantitative assay based on adhesion and crystal violet staining, and biofilm development by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Different assays were performed using LB or artificial urine. Results indicated that the different fimbriae contribute to the formation of a stable and functional biofilm. Fimbriae revealed particular associated roles. First, all the mutants showed a significantly reduced ability to migrate across urinary catheter sections but neither swimming nor swarming motility were affected. However, some mutants formed smaller biofilms compared with the wild type (MRP and ATF) while others formed significantly larger biofilms (UCA and PMF) showing different bioarchitecture features. It can be concluded that P. mirabilis fimbriae have distinguishable roles in the generation of biofilms, particularly in association with catheters. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Proteus mirabilis interkingdom swarming signals attract blow flies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qun; Fonseca, Alicia; Liu, Wenqi; Fields, Andrew T; Pimsler, Meaghan L; Spindola, Aline F; Tarone, Aaron M; Crippen, Tawni L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Wood, Thomas K

    2012-07-01

    Flies transport specific bacteria with their larvae that provide a wider range of nutrients for those bacteria. Our hypothesis was that this symbiotic interaction may depend on interkingdom signaling. We obtained Proteus mirabilis from the salivary glands of the blow fly Lucilia sericata; this strain swarmed significantly and produced a strong odor that attracts blow flies. To identify the putative interkingdom signals for the bacterium and flies, we reasoned that as swarming is used by this bacterium to cover the food resource and requires bacterial signaling, the same bacterial signals used for swarming may be used to communicate with blow flies. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified six novel genes for swarming (ureR, fis, hybG, zapB, fadE and PROSTU_03490), then, confirming our hypothesis, we discovered that fly attractants, lactic acid, phenol, NaOH, KOH and ammonia, restore swarming for cells with the swarming mutations. Hence, compounds produced by the bacterium that attract flies also are utilized for swarming. In addition, bacteria with the swarming mutation rfaL attracted fewer blow flies and reduced the number of eggs laid by the flies. Therefore, we have identified several interkingdom signals between P. mirabilis and blow flies.

  1. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  2. Requirement of MrpH for Mannose-Resistant Proteus-Like Fimbria-Mediated Hemagglutination by Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Johnson, David E.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    1999-01-01

    Two new genes, mrpH and mrpJ, were identified downstream of mrpG in the mrp gene cluster encoding mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Since the predicted MrpH has 30% amino acid sequence identity to PapG, the Galα(1-4)Gal-binding adhesin of Escherichia coli P fimbriae, we hypothesized that mrpH encodes the functional MR/P hemagglutinin. MR/P fimbriae, expressed in E. coli DH5α, conferred on bacteria both the ability to cause mannose-resistant hemagglutination and the ability to aggregate to form pellicles on the broth surface. Both a ΔmrpH mutant expressed in E. coli DH5α and an isogenic mrpH::aphA mutant of P. mirabilis were unable to produce normal MR/P fimbriae efficiently, suggesting that MrpH was involved in fimbrial assembly. Amino acid residue substitution of the N-terminal cysteine residues (C66S and C128S) of MrpH abolished the receptor-binding activity (hemagglutinating ability) of MrpH but allowed normal fimbrial assembly, supporting the notion that MrpH was the functional MR/P hemagglutinin. Immunogold electron microscopy of P. mirabilis HI4320 revealed that MrpH was located at the tip of MR/P fimbriae, also consistent with its role in receptor binding. The isogenic mrpH::aphA mutant of HI4320 was less able to colonize the urine, bladder, and kidneys in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection (P < 0.01), and therefore MR/P fimbriae contribute significantly to bacterial colonization in mice. While there are similarities between P. mirabilis MR/P and E. coli P fimbriae, there are more notable differences: (i) synthesis of the MrpH adhesin is required to initiate fimbrial assembly, (ii) MR/P fimbriae confer an aggregation phenotype, (iii) site-directed mutation of specific residues can abolish receptor binding but allows fimbrial assembly, and (iv) mutation of the adhesin gene abolishes virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. PMID:10338487

  3. Requirement of MrpH for mannose-resistant Proteus-like fimbria-mediated hemagglutination by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1999-06-01

    Two new genes, mrpH and mrpJ, were identified downstream of mrpG in the mrp gene cluster encoding mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Since the predicted MrpH has 30% amino acid sequence identity to PapG, the Galalpha(1-4)Gal-binding adhesin of Escherichia coli P fimbriae, we hypothesized that mrpH encodes the functional MR/P hemagglutinin. MR/P fimbriae, expressed in E. coli DH5alpha, conferred on bacteria both the ability to cause mannose-resistant hemagglutination and the ability to aggregate to form pellicles on the broth surface. Both a DeltamrpH mutant expressed in E. coli DH5alpha and an isogenic mrpH::aphA mutant of P. mirabilis were unable to produce normal MR/P fimbriae efficiently, suggesting that MrpH was involved in fimbrial assembly. Amino acid residue substitution of the N-terminal cysteine residues (C66S and C128S) of MrpH abolished the receptor-binding activity (hemagglutinating ability) of MrpH but allowed normal fimbrial assembly, supporting the notion that MrpH was the functional MR/P hemagglutinin. Immunogold electron microscopy of P. mirabilis HI4320 revealed that MrpH was located at the tip of MR/P fimbriae, also consistent with its role in receptor binding. The isogenic mrpH::aphA mutant of HI4320 was less able to colonize the urine, bladder, and kidneys in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection (P < 0.01), and therefore MR/P fimbriae contribute significantly to bacterial colonization in mice. While there are similarities between P. mirabilis MR/P and E. coli P fimbriae, there are more notable differences: (i) synthesis of the MrpH adhesin is required to initiate fimbrial assembly, (ii) MR/P fimbriae confer an aggregation phenotype, (iii) site-directed mutation of specific residues can abolish receptor binding but allows fimbrial assembly, and (iv) mutation of the adhesin gene abolishes virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

  4. Structure and serological properties of the O-antigen of two clinical Proteus mirabilis strains classified into a new Proteus O77 serogroup.

    PubMed

    Drzewiecka, Dominika; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Staczek, Paweł; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2008-11-01

    Two Proteus mirabilis strains, 3 B-m and 3 B-k, were isolated from urine and faeces of a hospitalized patient from Lodz, Poland. It was suggested that one strain originated from the other, and the presence of the bacilli in the patient's urinary tract was most probably a consequence of autoinfection. The O-polysaccharide was obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of P. mirabilis 3 B-m and studied by sugar analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, including two-dimensional rotating frame Overhause effect spectroscopy (ROESY) and 1H,13C heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) experiments. The following structure of the linear trisaccharide-repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide was established:-->2)-beta-D-Glcp-(1-->3)-alpha-L-6dTalp2Ac-(1-->3)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->where 6dTal2Ac stands for 2-O-acetyl-6-deoxy-L-talose. It resembles the structure of the O-polysaccharide of Proteus penneri O66, which includes additional lateral residues of 2,3-diacetamido-2,3,6-trideoxy-L-mannose. The lipopolysaccharides from two P. mirabilis strains studied were serologically identical to each other but not to that from any of the existing 76 Proteus O-serogroups. Therefore, the strains were classified into a new O77 serogroup specially created in the genus Proteus. Serological studies using Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with intact and adsorbed O-antisera showed that the P. mirabilis O77 antigen is related to Proteus vulgaris O2 and P. penneri O68 antigens, and a putative disaccharide epitope responsible for the cross-reactivity was revealed.

  5. Proteus penneri isolated from the pus of a patient with epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Wang, X; Bian, Z; Li, S; Zheng, H; Zhao, B; Chen, J

    1992-02-01

    P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris are the two wellknown species in the genus Proteus. P. myxofaciens and P. penneri are recent additions to the genus. We isolated P. penneri from the pus of a patient with suppurative otitis media and an epidural abscess. The characteristics of the organism, including morphology, staining, physiology and biochemistry, were studied. Clinical microbiological laboratories should suspect P. penneri in the case of as Proteus strain that is negative for indole, salicin and esculin, but otherwise resembles P. vulgaris. Proteus penneri, formerly known as Proteus vulgaris indole-negative or as Proteus vulgaris biogroup 1, was named by Hickman et al in 1932. Little information about human infection by this organism is available. In 1982, Hickman and co-workers studied 20 strain of P. penneri which were isolated from clinical specimens (urine, stool, etc.) in the USA. However, its clinical significance, until recently, was unknown. We isolated a strain of P. penneri from the pus of a patient with suppurative otitis media and an epidural abscess on June 10 and 15, 1989. This paper concerns the problems encountered in identifying this organism and its clinical significance.

  6. Environmental DNA in subterranean biology: range extension and taxonomic implications for Proteus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorički, Špela; Stanković, David; Snoj, Aleš; Kuntner, Matjaž; Jeffery, William R.; Trontelj, Peter; Pavićević, Miloš; Grizelj, Zlatko; Năpăruş-Aljančič, Magdalena; Aljančič, Gregor

    2017-03-01

    Europe’s obligate cave-dwelling amphibian Proteus anguinus inhabits subterranean waters of the north-western Balkan Peninsula. Because only fragments of its habitat are accessible to humans, this endangered salamander’s exact distribution has been difficult to establish. Here we introduce a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction-based environmental DNA (eDNA) approach to detect the presence of Proteus using water samples collected from karst springs, wells or caves. In a survey conducted along the southern limit of its known range, we established a likely presence of Proteus at seven new sites, extending its range to Montenegro. Next, using specific molecular probes to discriminate the rare black morph of Proteus from the closely related white morph, we detected its eDNA at five new sites, thus more than doubling the known number of sites. In one of these we found both black and white Proteus eDNA together. This finding suggests that the two morphs may live in contact with each other in the same body of groundwater and that they may be reproductively isolated species. Our results show that the eDNA approach is suitable and efficient in addressing questions in biogeography, evolution, taxonomy and conservation of the cryptic subterranean fauna.

  7. Environmental DNA in subterranean biology: range extension and taxonomic implications for Proteus.

    PubMed

    Gorički, Špela; Stanković, David; Snoj, Aleš; Kuntner, Matjaž; Jeffery, William R; Trontelj, Peter; Pavićević, Miloš; Grizelj, Zlatko; Năpăruş-Aljančič, Magdalena; Aljančič, Gregor

    2017-03-27

    Europe's obligate cave-dwelling amphibian Proteus anguinus inhabits subterranean waters of the north-western Balkan Peninsula. Because only fragments of its habitat are accessible to humans, this endangered salamander's exact distribution has been difficult to establish. Here we introduce a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction-based environmental DNA (eDNA) approach to detect the presence of Proteus using water samples collected from karst springs, wells or caves. In a survey conducted along the southern limit of its known range, we established a likely presence of Proteus at seven new sites, extending its range to Montenegro. Next, using specific molecular probes to discriminate the rare black morph of Proteus from the closely related white morph, we detected its eDNA at five new sites, thus more than doubling the known number of sites. In one of these we found both black and white Proteus eDNA together. This finding suggests that the two morphs may live in contact with each other in the same body of groundwater and that they may be reproductively isolated species. Our results show that the eDNA approach is suitable and efficient in addressing questions in biogeography, evolution, taxonomy and conservation of the cryptic subterranean fauna.

  8. Evaluation of Proteus as a Tool for the Rapid Development of Models of Hydrologic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, T. M.; Farthing, M. W.; Kees, C. E.; Miller, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    Models of modern hydrologic systems can be complex and involve a variety of operators with varying character. The goal is to implement approximations of such models that are both efficient for the developer and computationally efficient, which is a set of naturally competing objectives. Proteus is a Python-based toolbox that supports prototyping of model formulations as well as a wide variety of modern numerical methods and parallel computing. We used Proteus to develop numerical approximations for three models: Richards' equation, a brine flow model derived using the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT), and a multiphase TCAT-based tumor growth model. For Richards' equation, we investigated discontinuous Galerkin solutions with higher order time integration based on the backward difference formulas. The TCAT brine flow model was implemented using Proteus and a variety of numerical methods were compared to hand coded solutions. Finally, an existing tumor growth model was implemented in Proteus to introduce more advanced numerics and allow the code to be run in parallel. From these three example models, Proteus was found to be an attractive open-source option for rapidly developing high quality code for solving existing and evolving computational science models.

  9. Environmental DNA in subterranean biology: range extension and taxonomic implications for Proteus

    PubMed Central

    Gorički, Špela; Stanković, David; Snoj, Aleš; Kuntner, Matjaž; Jeffery, William R.; Trontelj, Peter; Pavićević, Miloš; Grizelj, Zlatko; Năpăruş-Aljančič, Magdalena; Aljančič, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Europe’s obligate cave-dwelling amphibian Proteus anguinus inhabits subterranean waters of the north-western Balkan Peninsula. Because only fragments of its habitat are accessible to humans, this endangered salamander’s exact distribution has been difficult to establish. Here we introduce a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction-based environmental DNA (eDNA) approach to detect the presence of Proteus using water samples collected from karst springs, wells or caves. In a survey conducted along the southern limit of its known range, we established a likely presence of Proteus at seven new sites, extending its range to Montenegro. Next, using specific molecular probes to discriminate the rare black morph of Proteus from the closely related white morph, we detected its eDNA at five new sites, thus more than doubling the known number of sites. In one of these we found both black and white Proteus eDNA together. This finding suggests that the two morphs may live in contact with each other in the same body of groundwater and that they may be reproductively isolated species. Our results show that the eDNA approach is suitable and efficient in addressing questions in biogeography, evolution, taxonomy and conservation of the cryptic subterranean fauna. PMID:28345609

  10. Computational protein design: the Proteus software and selected applications.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Thomas; Gaillard, Thomas; Mignon, David; Schmidt am Busch, Marcel; Lopes, Anne; Amara, Najette; Polydorides, Savvas; Sedano, Audrey; Druart, Karen; Archontis, Georgios

    2013-10-30

    We describe an automated procedure for protein design, implemented in a flexible software package, called Proteus. System setup and calculation of an energy matrix are done with the XPLOR modeling program and its sophisticated command language, supporting several force fields and solvent models. A second program provides algorithms to search sequence space. It allows a decomposition of the system into groups, which can be combined in different ways in the energy function, for both positive and negative design. The whole procedure can be controlled by editing 2-4 scripts. Two applications consider the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase enzyme and its successful redesign to bind both O-methyl-tyrosine and D-tyrosine. For the latter, we present Monte Carlo simulations where the D-tyrosine concentration is gradually increased, displacing L-tyrosine from the binding pocket and yielding the binding free energy difference, in good agreement with experiment. Complete redesign of the Crk SH3 domain is presented. The top 10000 sequences are all assigned to the correct fold by the SUPERFAMILY library of Hidden Markov Models. Finally, we report the acid/base behavior of the SNase protein. Sidechain protonation is treated as a form of mutation; it is then straightforward to perform constant-pH Monte Carlo simulations, which yield good agreement with experiment. Overall, the software can be used for a wide range of application, producing not only native-like sequences but also thermodynamic properties with errors that appear comparable to other current software packages. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at low pH].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2009-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), three forms of tartrate-sensitive phosphatase were revealed using PAGE of the supernatant of ameba homogenates obtained with 1% Triton X-100 or distilled water and subsequent staining of gels with 2-naphthyl phosphate as substrate (pH 4.0). The form with the highest mobility in the ameba supernatant was sensitive to all tested phosphatase activity modulators. Two other forms with the lower mobilities were completely or significantly inactivated not only by sodium L-(+)-tartrate, but also by L-(+)-tartaric acid, sodium orthovanadate, ammonium molybdate, EDTA, EGTA, o-phospho-L-tyrosine, DL-dithiotreitol, H2O2, 2-mercaptoethanol, and ions of heavy metals - Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cu2+. Based on results of inhibitory analysis, lysosome location in the ameba cell, and wide substrate specificity of these two forms, it has been concluded that they belong to nonspecific acid phosphomonoesterases (AcP, EC 3.1.3.2). This AcP is suggested to have both phosphomonoesterase and phosphotyrosyl-protein phosphatase activitis. Two ecto-phosphatases were revealed in the culture medium, in which amebas were cultivated. One of them was inhibited by the same reagents as the ameba tartrate-sensitive AcP and seems to be the AcP released into the culture medium in the process of exocytosis of the content of food vacuoles. In the culture medium, apart from this AcP, another phosphatase was revealed, which was not inhibited by any tested inhibitors of AcP and alkaline phosphatase. It cannot be ruled out that this phosphatase belong to the ecto-ATPases found in many protists; however, its ability to hydrolyze ATP has not yet been proven.

  12. New Aspects of RpoE in Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Che; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Tsai, Yi-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common human pathogen causing recurrent or persistent urinary tract infections (UTIs). The underlying mechanisms for P. mirabilis to establish UTIs are not fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that loss of the sigma factor E (RpoE), mediating extracytoplasmic stress responses, decreased fimbria expression, survival in macrophages, cell invasion, and colonization in mice but increased the interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression of urothelial cells and swarming motility. This is the first study to demonstrate that RpoE modulated expression of MR/P fimbriae by regulating mrpI, a gene encoding a recombinase controlling the orientation of MR/P fimbria promoter. By real-time reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the IL-8 mRNA amount of urothelial cells was induced significantly by lipopolysaccharides extracted from rpoE mutant but not from the wild type. These RpoE-associated virulence factors should be coordinately expressed to enhance the fitness of P. mirabilis in the host, including the avoidance of immune attacks. Accordingly, rpoE mutant-infected mice displayed more immune cell infiltration in bladders and kidneys during early stages of infection, and the rpoE mutant had a dramatically impaired ability of colonization. Moreover, it is noteworthy that urea (the major component in urine) and polymyxin B (a cationic antimicrobial peptide) can induce expression of rpoE by the reporter assay, suggesting that RpoE might be activated in the urinary tract. Altogether, our results indicate that RpoE is important in sensing environmental cues of the urinary tract and subsequently triggering the expression of virulence factors, which are associated with the fitness of P. mirabilis, to build up a UTI. PMID:25547796

  13. New aspects of RpoE in uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Che; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Tsai, Yi-Lin; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2015-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common human pathogen causing recurrent or persistent urinary tract infections (UTIs). The underlying mechanisms for P. mirabilis to establish UTIs are not fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that loss of the sigma factor E (RpoE), mediating extracytoplasmic stress responses, decreased fimbria expression, survival in macrophages, cell invasion, and colonization in mice but increased the interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression of urothelial cells and swarming motility. This is the first study to demonstrate that RpoE modulated expression of MR/P fimbriae by regulating mrpI, a gene encoding a recombinase controlling the orientation of MR/P fimbria promoter. By real-time reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the IL-8 mRNA amount of urothelial cells was induced significantly by lipopolysaccharides extracted from rpoE mutant but not from the wild type. These RpoE-associated virulence factors should be coordinately expressed to enhance the fitness of P. mirabilis in the host, including the avoidance of immune attacks. Accordingly, rpoE mutant-infected mice displayed more immune cell infiltration in bladders and kidneys during early stages of infection, and the rpoE mutant had a dramatically impaired ability of colonization. Moreover, it is noteworthy that urea (the major component in urine) and polymyxin B (a cationic antimicrobial peptide) can induce expression of rpoE by the reporter assay, suggesting that RpoE might be activated in the urinary tract. Altogether, our results indicate that RpoE is important in sensing environmental cues of the urinary tract and subsequently triggering the expression of virulence factors, which are associated with the fitness of P. mirabilis, to build up a UTI.

  14. An ultrastructural study, effects of Proteus vulgaris OX19 on the rabbit spleen cells.

    PubMed

    Gul, Nursel; Ozkorkmaz, Ebru Gokalp; Kelesoglu, Ilknur; Ozluk, Aydin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of Proteus vulgaris OX19 on the spleen cells of rabbits were investigated. Control group (n=5) and Proteus treated group (n=5) of New Zealand male rabbits were used in this study. Bacteria were injected to the rabbits in five days periods with increasing dosages for one month. Thin sections were examined by transmission electron microscope (Jeol 100CXII). Ultrastructural changes were defined in spleen tissue cells due to the antigenic stimulation of bacteria. Spleen cells observed in control group were in normal structure and cells were in close contact with each other. However, spleen cells of Proteus treated group displayed structural changes with regard to the control group in electron microscopic examinations. Chemotaxis of macrophages, forming of pseudopodia and presence of phagocytic vacuoles were observed. Lymphocytes, the major cells of spleen revealed mitotic activity. In addition, chromatin condensation in nucleus and dilatations in perinuclear space were significant. Interactions of lymphocytes and macrophages were noteworthy.

  15. Abolition of Swarming of Proteus by p-Nitrophenyl Glycerin: General Properties

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fred D.

    1973-01-01

    Para-nitrophenyl glycerin (PNPG) was shown to be an effective agent to abolish the swarming of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris on predried solid culture media. The level required to abolish swarming varied with the strain of Proteus, the components of the medium, and also with the conditions of incubation. Generally 0.1 to 0.2 mM PNPG effectively abolished swarming for at least 24 h with aerobic incubation. Levels of PNPG that abolished swarming showed no effect upon the growth of the cells, little or no effect upon the motility characteristics of the organisms, and no effect upon the cellular morphology. PNPG was found to be freely water soluble, stable to autoclaving, and to retain biological activity for at least one month in prepared culture media stored under refrigeration. PMID:4577177

  16. Effects of ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin on biofilm formation in Proteus mirabilis rods.

    PubMed

    Kwiecińska-Piróg, Joanna; Bogiel, Tomasz; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2013-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis rods are one of the most commonly isolated species of the Proteus genus from human infections, mainly those from the urinary tract and wounds. They are often related to biofilm structure formation. The bacterial cells of the biofilm are less susceptible to routinely used antimicrobials, making the treatment more difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the influence of ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin on biofilm formation on the polyvinyl chloride surface by 42 P. mirabilis strains isolated from urine, purulence, wound swab and bedsore samples. It has been shown that ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin at concentrations equal to 1/4, 1/2 and 1 times their MIC values for particular Proteus spp. strains decrease their ability to form biofilms. Moreover, ciprofloxacin at concentrations equal to 1/4, 1/2 and 1 times their MIC values for particular P. mirabilis strains reduces biofilm formation more efficiently than ceftazidime at the corresponding concentration values.

  17. Repression of AKT signaling by ARQ 092 in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Yourick, Miranda R.; Yu, Yi; Savage, Ronald E.; Ferrari, Dora; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    A somatic activating mutation in AKT1, c.49G>A, pGlu17Lys, that results in elevated AKT signaling in mutation-positive cells, is responsible for the mosaic overgrowth condition, Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 is an allosteric pan-AKT inhibitor under development for treatment in cancer. We tested the efficacy of this drug for suppressing AKT signaling in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 reduced phosphorylation of AKT and downstream targets of AKT in a concentration-dependent manner in as little as two hours. While AKT signaling was suppressed with ARQ 092 treatment, cells retained their ability to respond to growth factor stimulation by increasing pAKT levels proportionally to untreated cells. At concentrations sufficient to decrease AKT signaling, little reduction in cell viability was seen. These results indicate that ARQ 092 can suppress AKT signaling and warrants further development as a therapeutic option for patients with Proteus syndrome. PMID:26657992

  18. Repression of AKT signaling by ARQ 092 in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Yourick, Miranda R; Yu, Yi; Savage, Ronald E; Ferrari, Dora; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2015-12-11

    A somatic activating mutation in AKT1, c.49G>A, pGlu17Lys, that results in elevated AKT signaling in mutation-positive cells, is responsible for the mosaic overgrowth condition, Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 is an allosteric pan-AKT inhibitor under development for treatment in cancer. We tested the efficacy of this drug for suppressing AKT signaling in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 reduced phosphorylation of AKT and downstream targets of AKT in a concentration-dependent manner in as little as two hours. While AKT signaling was suppressed with ARQ 092 treatment, cells retained their ability to respond to growth factor stimulation by increasing pAKT levels proportionally to untreated cells. At concentrations sufficient to decrease AKT signaling, little reduction in cell viability was seen. These results indicate that ARQ 092 can suppress AKT signaling and warrants further development as a therapeutic option for patients with Proteus syndrome.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis is an Autoimmune Disease Triggered by Proteus Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and disabling polyarthritic disease, which affects mainly women in middle and old age. Extensive evidence based on the results of various microbial, immunological and molecular studies from different parts of the world, shows that a strong link exists between Proteus mirabilis microbes and RA. We propose that sub-clinical Proteus urinary tract infections are the main triggering factors and that the presence of molecular mimicry and cross-reactivity between these bacteria and RA-targeted tissue antigens assists in the perpetuation of the disease process through production of cytopathic auto-antibodies. Patients with RA especially during the early stages of the disease could benefit from Proteus anti-bacterial measures involving the use of antibiotics, vegetarian diets and high intake of water and fruit juices such as cranberry juice in addition to the currently employed treatments. PMID:16603443

  20. [Proteus syndrome. Expansion of the phenotype. Apropos of 3 pediatric cases].

    PubMed

    Hulsmans, R F; Schrander-Stumpel, C R; Koopman, R J; Hoorntje, T M; Starink, T M

    1992-01-01

    In 1979 Cohen et Hayden and in 1983 Wiedemann et al. delineated a syndrome consisting of partial gigantism of the hands and/or feet, nevi, hemihypertrophy, subcutaneous tumors, macrocephaly or other skull anomalies and possible accelerated growth and visceral affections. Hitherto the literature pertaining to this syndrome consists of somewhat more than 100 cases of which some, that have been described previously or subsequently under other headings, were rediagnosed as being Proteus syndromes. Of these, more than half show vascular anomalies closely resembling those observed in the Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, but in the Proteus syndrome appear to be more haphazardly distributed over the integument. We report 3 pediatric patients with the Proteus syndrome, all showing cutaneous angiodysplasias. These patients were initially diagnosed as suffering from "severe or atypical Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome". In one of these, cardiac tumors were observed soon after birth which subsequently showed spontaneous involution and were therefore considered to be rhabdomyomas. In the Proteus syndrome cardiac pathology is rare, and cardiac tumors have not been described previously. Moreover, we observed umbilical hernia in two of our patients, a feature which has hitherto not been reported in patients with the Proteus syndrome. In all our patients a broad thoracic cage resembling a "body-builders chest", asymmetrical and disproportional macrodactyly and broad, flat feet were conspicuous. These broad, flat feet with macrodactyly and large spaces between the first and second digits were designed by the parents of one of our patient as "chimpanzee's feet". Macrodactyly, "chimp's" feet and a broad thoracic cage are considered by us to be clinical hallmarks of the Proteus syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Scaled Composites' Proteus and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are seen h

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  2. Efficacy of some colloidal silver preparations and silver salts against Proteus bacteria, one possible cause of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Disaanayake, D M B T; Faoagali, Joan; Laroo, Hans; Hancock, Gerald; Whitehouse, Michael

    2014-04-01

    There has been increased interest in the role of anti-Proteus antibodies in the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and whether chemotherapeutic agents active against Proteus species might reduce the risk and/or exacerbations of RA. We examined the in vitro antibacterial effects of ten different silver preparations which were either ionic silver [Ag(I)] solutions or nanoparticulate silver (NPS) (Ag(0)) suspensions against ATCC and two wild (clinical) strains of Proteus. The data establish the low minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of all the silver formulations tested against these four Proteus strains. In a pilot study, a potent NPS preparation ex vivo showed long-lasting anti-Proteus activity in a normal human volunteer.

  3. [The detection of a choleriform thermolabile enterotoxin in clinical strains of Proteus isolated in different infections].

    PubMed

    Gabidullin, Z G; Zhukova, S L; Ezepchuk, Iu V; Bondarenko, V M

    1989-12-01

    The capacity of Proteus strains, isolated from patients with purulent inflammatory, urological and enteric infections, for the production of choleriform thermolabile enterotoxin was studied by means of the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with the use of antitoxic serum to Escherichia coli enterotoxin. Out of 125 strains, 27 (21.6%) showed the capacity for producing choleriform thermolabile enterotoxin in EIA experiments. The results thus obtained indicate that EIA techniques can be used, in principle, for detecting the capacity of Proteus for the production of choleriform thermolabile enterotoxin.

  4. [Proteus syndrome: Case report of bladder vascular malformation causing massive hematuria].

    PubMed

    Abbo, O; Bouali, O; Galinier, P; Moscovici, J

    2012-02-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare, sporadic disorder consisting of disproportionate overgrowth of multiple tissues, vascular malformations, and connective tissue or epidermal nevi. Due to mosaic pattern of distribution, the phenotypes are variable and diverse. Vascular malformations are part of the major criteria used to define and diagnose this syndrome. It can involve the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, or the urinary tract but bladder malformations are rare. We report here a case of bladder vascular malformation in a 12-year-old boy known to have Proteus syndrome and review the literature on bladder malformations or tumors in this syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Behavioral evidence and supporting electrophysiological observations for electroreception in the blind cave salamander, Proteus anguinus (Urodela).

    PubMed

    Roth, A; Schlegel, P

    1988-01-01

    Conditioning experiments revealed that Proteus perceives a back-and-forth moving (approximately 1 Hz) direct-current field and its polarity. Minimum behavioral thresholds occurred at a current density of 0.15 microA/cm2, corresponding to a voltage gradient of 0.5 mV/cm. Recordings from afferent nerve fibers showed that ampullary electroreceptors in Proteus respond as do other nonteleost receptors, i.e. with an increase in discharge rate to cathodal current and a decrease to anodal current (threshold: approximately 1 mV/cm).

  6. Proteus mirabilis urease: transcriptional regulation by UreR.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, E B; Concaugh, E A; Foxall, P A; Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1993-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea, initiating the formation of urinary stones. The enzyme is critical for kidney colonization and the development of acute pyelonephritis. Urease is induced by urea and is not controlled by the nitrogen regulatory system (ntr) or catabolite repression. Purified whole-cell RNA from induced and uninduced cultures of P. mirabilis and Escherichia coli harboring cloned urease sequences was probed with a 4.2-kb BglI fragment from within the urease operon. Autoradiographs of slot blots demonstrated 4.2- and 5.8-fold increases, respectively, in urease-specific RNA upon induction with urea. Structural and accessory genes necessary for urease activity, ureD, A, B, C, E, and F, were previously cloned and sequenced (B. D. Jones and H. L. T. Mobley, J. Bacteriol. 171:6414-6422, 1989). A 1.2-kb EcoRV-BamHI restriction fragment upstream of these sequences confers inducibility upon the operon in trans. Nucleotide sequencing of this fragment revealed a single open reading frame of 882 nucleotides, designated ureR, which is transcribed in the direction opposite that of the urease structural and accessory genes and encodes a 293-amino-acid polypeptide predicted to be 33,415 Da in size. Autoradiographs of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of [35S]methionine-labeled polypeptides obtained by in vitro transcription-translation of the PCR fragments carrying only ureR yielded a single band with an apparent molecular size of 32 kDa. Fragments carrying an in-frame deletion within ureR synthesized a truncated product. The predicted UreR amino acid sequence contains a potential helix-turn-helix motif and an associated AraC family signature and is similar to that predicted for a number of DNA-binding proteins, including E. coli proteins that regulate acid phosphatase synthesis (AppY), porin synthesis (EnvY), and rhamnose utilization (RhaR). These data suggest that UreR governs the inducibility of P. mirabilis urease. Images PMID

  7. Structure of the O-polysaccharide and serological studies of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus penneri 60 classified into a new Proteus serogroup O70.

    PubMed

    Zych, Krystyna; Perepelov, Andrei; Baranowska, Agata; Zabłotni, Agnieszka; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2005-03-01

    An alkali-treated lipopolysaccharide of Proteus penneri strain 60 was studied by chemical analyses and 1H, 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopy, and the following structure of the linear pentasaccharide-phosphate repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide was established: 6)-alpha-D-Galp-(1-->3)-alpha-L-FucpNAc-(1-->3)-alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->3)-beta-D-Quip4NAc-(1-->6)-alpha-D-Glcp-1-P-(O--> Rabbit polyclonal O-antiserum against P. penneri 60 reacted with both core and O-polysaccharide moieties of the homologous LPS. Based on the unique O-polysaccharide structure and serological data, we propose to classify P. penneri 60 into a new, separate Proteus serogroup O70. A weak cross-reactivity of P. penneri 60 O-antiserum with the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O8, O15 and O19 was observed and discussed in view of the chemical structures of the O-polysaccharides.

  8. Orbital resonances in the inner neptunian system. II. Resonant history of Proteus, Larissa, Galatea, and Despina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the orbital history of the small neptunian satellites discovered by Voyager 2. Over the age of the Solar System, tidal forces have caused the satellites to migrate radially, bringing them through mean-motion resonances with one another. In this paper, we extend our study of the largest satellites Proteus and Larissa [Zhang, K., Hamilton, D.P., 2007. Icarus 188, 386-399] by adding in mid-sized Galatea and Despina. We test the hypothesis that these moons all formed with zero inclinations, and that orbital resonances excited their tilts during tidal migration. We find that the current orbital inclinations of Proteus, Galatea, and Despina are consistent with resonant excitation if they have a common density 0.4<ρ¯<0.8 g/cm. Larissa's inclination, however, is too large to have been caused by resonant kicks between these four satellites; we suggest that a prior resonant capture event involving either Naiad or Thalassa is responsible. Our solution requires at least three past resonances with Proteus, which helps constrain the tidal migration timescale and thus Neptune's tidal quality factor: 9000Proteus and Larissa, finding 36

  9. An Update on Improvements to NiCE Support for PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Andrew; McCaskey, Alexander J.; Billings, Jay Jay

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program has supported the development of the NEAMS Integrated Computational Environment (NiCE), a modeling and simulation workflow environment that provides services and plugins to facilitate tasks such as code execution, model input construction, visualization, and data analysis. This report details the development of workflows for the reactor core neutronics application, PROTEUS. This advanced neutronics application (primarily developed at Argonne National Laboratory) aims to improve nuclear reactor design and analysis by providing an extensible and massively parallel, finite-element solver for current and advanced reactor fuel neutronics modeling. The integration of PROTEUS-specific tools into NiCE is intended to make the advanced capabilities that PROTEUS provides more accessible to the nuclear energy research and development community. This report will detail the work done to improve existing PROTEUS workflow support in NiCE. We will demonstrate and discuss these improvements, including the development of flexible IO services, an improved interface for input generation, and the addition of advanced Fortran development tools natively in the platform.

  10. Endometrioid Paraovarian Borderline Cystic Tumor in an Infant with Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tello, Mariela; Oscanoa, Monica; Dueñas, Milagros; Castro, Haydee; Latorre, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian and paraovarian neoplasms are uncommon in children, mainly originating from germ cell tumors and, least frequently, epithelial tumors. There is an association between genital tract tumors and Proteus syndrome, a rare, sporadic, and progressive entity, characterized by a postnatal overgrowth in several tissues caused by a mosaic mutation in the AKT1 gene. We describe a 20-month-old asymptomatic infant with Proteus syndrome who developed an endometrioid paraovarian borderline cystic tumor. This is the youngest patient so far reported in the literature with this rare syndrome and an adnexal tumor of borderline malignancy. A total of nine patients have been described with female tract tumors and associated Proteus syndrome, which includes bilateral ovarian cystadenomas and other benign masses. A paraovarian neoplasm is extremely rare in children and could be considered a criterion for Proteus syndrome. Standardized staging and treatment of these tumors are not well established; however, most authors conclude that these neoplasms must be treated as their ovarian counterparts. PMID:26558123

  11. Genome sequence of a Proteus mirabilis strain isolated from the salivary glands of larval Lucilia sericata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We announced a draft genome sequence of a Proteus mirabilis strain derived from Lucilia sericata salivary glands. This strain is demonstrated to attract and induce oviposition by L. sericata, a common blow fly important to medicine, agriculture, and forensics. The genome will help to dissect inter...

  12. The antigens contributing to the serological cross-reactions of Proteus antisera with Klebsiella representatives.

    PubMed

    Palusiak, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Proteus sp. and Klebsiella sp. mainly cause infections of the urinary and respiratory tracts or wounds in humans. The representatives of both genera produce virulence factors like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or outer membrane proteins (OMPs) having much in common in the structures and/or functions. To check how far this similarity is revealed in the serological cross-reactivity, the bacterial masses of 24 tested Klebsiella sp. strains were tested in ELISA with polyclonal rabbit antisera specific to the representatives of 79 Proteus O serogroups. The strongest reacting systems were selected to Western blot, where the majority of Klebsiella masses reacted in a way characteristic for electrophoretic patterns of proteins. The strongest reactions were obtained for proteins of near 67 and 40 kDa and 12.5 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins samples of one Proteus sp. and one Klebsiella sp. strain showed the GroEL like protein of a sequence GI number 2980926 to be similar for both strains. In Western blot some Klebsiella sp. masses reacted similarly to the homologous Proteus LPSs. The LPS contribution in the observed reactions of the high molecular-mass LPS species was confirmed for Klebsiella oxytoca 0.062. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genome Sequence of a Proteus mirabilis Strain Isolated from the Salivary Glands of Larval Lucilia sericata

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Shuhua; Crippen, Tawni L.; Visi, David K.; Benbow, M. Eric; Allen, Michael S.; Tomberlin, Jeffery K.; Sze, Sing-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    We announce a draft genome sequence of a Proteus mirabilis strain derived from Lucilia sericata salivary glands. This strain is demonstrated to attract and induce oviposition by L. sericata, a common blow fly important to medicine, agriculture, and forensics. The genome sequence will help dissect interkingdom communication between the species. PMID:27469950

  14. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-26

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis is caused by Proteus: the molecular mimicry theory and Karl Popper.

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Tasha

    2009-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a crippling and disabling joint disease affecting over 20 million people. It occurs predominantly in women and smokers, and affects the HLA-DR1/4 individuals who carry the "shared epitope" of amino acids EQRRAA. The cause of this disease was investigated by the methods of the philosopher of science Karl Popper who suggested that scientific research should be based on bold conjectures and critical refutations. The "Popper sequences" generate new facts which then change or alter the original problem. The new facts must then be explained by any new theory. Using the "molecular mimicry" model, it was found that Proteus bacteria possess an amino acid sequence ESRRAL in haemolysin which resembles the, shared epitope, and another sequence in urease which resembles type XI collagen. Antibodies to Proteus bacteria have been found in 14 different countries. It would appear that rheumatoid arthritis is caused by an upper urinary tract infection by Proteus bacteria. Anti-Proteus therapy should be assessed in the management of this disease separately or in conjunction with existing modalities of therapy.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence and Gene Annotation of the Uropathogenic Bacterium Proteus mirabilis Pr2921

    PubMed Central

    Giorello, F. M.; Romero, V.; Farias, J.; Scavone, P.; Umpiérrez, A.; Zunino, P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of Proteus mirabilis Pr2921, a uropathogenic bacterium that can cause severe complicated urinary tract infections. After gene annotation, we identified two additional copies of ucaA, one of the most studied fimbrial protein genes, and other fimbriae related-proteins that are not present in P. mirabilis HI4320. PMID:27340058

  17. Proteus syndrome associated with hemimegalencephaly and Ohtahara syndrome: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Halisson; da Silva, Paula Fabiana Sobral; de Albuquerque, Marco Antônio Veloso; Mattos, Adriana; Riesgo, Rudimar Santos; Ohlweiler, Lygia; Winckler, Maria Isabel Bragatti; Bragatti, José Augusto; Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Zandoná, Denise Isabel

    2008-06-01

    The authors report two cases of Brazilian children with most of the common syndromic features of Proteus syndrome, such as asymmetric overgrowth of tissues, skin abnormalities, hypotonia and mental retardation. In both patients, a refractory epilepsy, compatible with Ohtahara syndrome, as well as hemimegalencephaly, with asymmetric distribution of facial fat, were also diagnosed.

  18. Proteus - A Free and Open Source Sensor Observation Service (SOS) Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, J.; Satapathy, G.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's 'electronic skin' is becoming ever more sophisticated with a growing number of sensors measuring everything from seawater salinity levels to atmospheric pressure. To further the scientific application of this data collection effort, it is important to make the data easily available to anyone who wants to use it. Making Earth Science data readily available will allow the data to be used in new and potentially groundbreaking ways. The US National Science and Technology Council made this clear in its most recent National Strategy for Civil Earth Observations report, when it remarked that Earth observations 'are often found to be useful for additional purposes not foreseen during the development of the observation system'. On the road to this goal the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is defining uniform data formats and service interfaces to facilitate the discovery and access of sensor data. This is being done through the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) stack of standards, which include the Sensor Observation Service (SOS), Sensor Model Language (SensorML), Observations & Measurements (O&M) and Catalog Service for the Web (CSW). End-users do not have to use these standards directly, but can use smart tools that leverage and implement them. We have developed such a tool named Proteus. Proteus is an open-source sensor data discovery client. The goal of Proteus is to be a general-purpose client that can be used by anyone for discovering and accessing sensor data via OGC-based services. Proteus is a desktop client and supports a straightforward workflow for finding sensor data. The workflow takes the user through the process of selecting appropriate services, bounding boxes, observed properties, time periods and other search facets. NASA World Wind is used to display the matching sensor offerings on a map. Data from any sensor offering can be previewed in a time series. The user can download data from a single sensor offering, or download data in bulk from all

  19. Metabolic variations of Proteus in the Memphis area and other geographical areas.

    PubMed

    Suter, L S; Ulrich, E W; Koelz, B S; Street, V W

    1968-06-01

    The number of strains of Proteus studied was 413, and these were obtained from all clinical materials with the exception of fecal specimens. Lactose was fermented by 37 strains (P. inconstans, 29%; P. rettgeri, 16%; P. mirabilis, 4.2%; P. morganii, 3.6%; and P. vulgaris, 0%) of which 33 were from the genitourinary system. These 33 strains constituted 12.7% of the 260 strains isolated from this source. Biochemically, P. mirabilis was the least variable, and P. rettgeri was the most variable of the five species of Proteus tested. P. inconstans and P. rettgeri resembled each other more closely than any of the other species of Proteus. Comparison of results obtained in the Memphis area with those found in other locations showed that biochemical characteristics varied most with the substances citrate, salicin, xylose, trehalose, and mannitol. In contrast to earlier reports from Israel and England, none of the strains of P. inconstans in the present study was able to attack urea. All five species of Proteus tested (by the disc method) were highly susceptible to methenamine mandelate. P. mirabilis, P. morganii, and P. vulgaris were also highly susceptible to nitrofurantoin. All strains of P. mirabilis were susceptible to ampicillin. P. inconstans was the most resistant species of Proteus. Of the other 356 urease-positive strains tested, 79% were susceptible to chloramphenicol, whereas only 3.8% of the 56 urease-negative strains (P. inconstans) were susceptible. When tested with streptomycin, 61% of urease-positive strains were susceptible and 1.8% of the urease-negative strains were susceptible. Of 36 lactose-positive strains, 33.8% were susceptible to chloramphenicol, whereas 72.8% of all lactose-negative strains were susceptible. Again, of the lactose-positive strains, 17% were susceptible to streptomycin, whereas 56.3% of all lactose-negative strains were susceptible.

  20. Case-control study of the risk factors for acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus species during tigecycline therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Eun; Kang, Cheol-In; Wi, Yu Mi; Ko, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Woo Joo; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Tigecycline is an important agent in clinical practice because of its broad-spectrum activity. However, it has no activity against Pseudomonas or Proteus species. We conducted a case-control study to analyze risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas or Proteus spp. during tigecycline therapy. Placement of suction drainage at infected wound sites, ICU stay, and neurologic disease were identified as independent risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus spp. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. [Antagonistic interrelationships of Bifidobacterium bifidum i Proteus vulgaris in vitro in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic chicks].

    PubMed

    Timoshko, M A; Vil'shanskaia, F L; Pospelova, V V; Rakhimova, N G

    1979-07-01

    The antagonistic relations between Bacterium bifidum, strain I/850 phi, and Proteus vulgaris, strain F-30, were studied. These organisms, when introduced together in equal doses into the digestive tract of gnotobiotic chickens in a single administration, were shown to create certain ecological correlations in various organs with the prevalence of bifidobacteria which exerted no negative influence on Proteus vulgaris. The additional daily administration of bifidobacteria for 3 days running in doses 1000 times as great as the initial dose, the content of both dibifobacteria and Proteus vulgaris in the intestine being at that time at its maximum, resulted in the suppression of the growth of Proteus vulgaris. Our findings indicate that the influence of the pH of the medium should be considered in order to obtain the evidence of significantly pronounced antagonistic relations between the two organisms in vitro.

  2. Molecular Characterization of the Genera Proteus, Morganella, and Providencia by Ribotyping

    PubMed Central

    Pignato, S.; Giammanco, G. M.; Grimont, F.; Grimont, P. A. D.; Giammanco, G.

    1999-01-01

    The so-called Proteus-Providencia group is constituted at present by three genera and 10 species. Several of the recognized species are common opportunistic pathogens for humans and animals. Different methods based on the study of phenotypic characters have been used in the past with variable levels of efficiency for typing some species for epidemiological purposes. We have determined the rRNA gene restriction patterns (ribotypes) for the type strains of the 10 different species of the genera Proteus, Morganella, and Providencia. Visual inspection of EcoRV- and HincII-digested DNA from the type strains showed remarkably different patterns for both enzymes, but EcoRV provided better differentiation. Both endonucleases were retained to study a large number of wild and collection strains belonging to the different species. Clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis, Proteus penneri, Morganella morganii, and Providencia heimbachae showed patterns identical or very similar to those of the respective type strains, so that groups of related patterns (ribogroups) were found to correspond to the diverse species. On the contrary, distinct ribogroups were detected within Providencia alcalifaciens (two ribogroups with both enzymes), Providencia rettgeri (four ribogroups with EcoRV and five with HincII), Providencia stuartii (two ribogroups with EcoRV), Providencia rustigianii (two ribogroups with HincII), and Proteus vulgaris (two ribogroups with both enzymes). The pattern shown by the ancient P. vulgaris type strain NCTC 4175 differed considerably from both P. vulgaris ribogroups as well as from the newly proposed type strain ATCC 29905 and from any other strain in this study, thus confirming its atypical nature. Minor differences were frequently observed among patterns of strains belonging to the same ribogroup. These differences were assumed to define ribotypes within each ribogroup. No correlation was observed between ribogroups or ribotypes and biogroups of P. vulgaris, P

  3. Molecular characterization of the genera Proteus, Morganella, and Providencia by ribotyping.

    PubMed

    Pignato, S; Giammanco, G M; Grimont, F; Grimont, P A; Giammanco, G

    1999-09-01

    The so-called Proteus-Providencia group is constituted at present by three genera and 10 species. Several of the recognized species are common opportunistic pathogens for humans and animals. Different methods based on the study of phenotypic characters have been used in the past with variable levels of efficiency for typing some species for epidemiological purposes. We have determined the rRNA gene restriction patterns (ribotypes) for the type strains of the 10 different species of the genera Proteus, Morganella, and Providencia. Visual inspection of EcoRV- and HincII-digested DNA from the type strains showed remarkably different patterns for both enzymes, but EcoRV provided better differentiation. Both endonucleases were retained to study a large number of wild and collection strains belonging to the different species. Clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis, Proteus penneri, Morganella morganii, and Providencia heimbachae showed patterns identical or very similar to those of the respective type strains, so that groups of related patterns (ribogroups) were found to correspond to the diverse species. On the contrary, distinct ribogroups were detected within Providencia alcalifaciens (two ribogroups with both enzymes), Providencia rettgeri (four ribogroups with EcoRV and five with HincII), Providencia stuartii (two ribogroups with EcoRV), Providencia rustigianii (two ribogroups with HincII), and Proteus vulgaris (two ribogroups with both enzymes). The pattern shown by the ancient P. vulgaris type strain NCTC 4175 differed considerably from both P. vulgaris ribogroups as well as from the newly proposed type strain ATCC 29905 and from any other strain in this study, thus confirming its atypical nature. Minor differences were frequently observed among patterns of strains belonging to the same ribogroup. These differences were assumed to define ribotypes within each ribogroup. No correlation was observed between ribogroups or ribotypes and biogroups of P. vulgaris, P

  4. Antimicrobial activity Study of triclosan-loaded WBPU on Proteus mirabilis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Jian, Zhongyu; Wang, Jianzhong; He, Wei; Liu, Qinyu; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hong; Tan, Hong

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the antimicrobial activity study of triclosan-loaded waterborne polyurethanes (WBPU) on Proteus mirabilis in vitro. Inhibition zone assays on petri plates with triclosan-loaded WBPU samples were used to test its antimicrobial activity on Proteus mirabilis. Models of the catheterized bladder supplied with artificial urine infected with Proteus mirabilis were employed to confirm the antimicrobial activity of triclosan-loaded WBPU. Bacteria colony counting, pH of the residual urine at each time point and catheter blockage time were recorded. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and encrustation deposits dry weighing were used for evaluating the biofilm formation. Inhibition zones formed in the triclosan-loaded WBPU groups in a dose-response manner (the radius for samples with 1, 0.1 and 0.01 mg triclosan were 9.93 ± 1.08, 6.07 ± 0.54 and 2.47 ± 0.25 mm, P < 0.001). The bacterial growth in the triclosan group was markedly inhibited, which was almost undetectable after 12 h of bladder running. Residual urine pH in the control group increased significantly in comparison with the triclosan group (9.50 ± 0.04 vs. 6.17 ± 0.01 at 24 h, P < 0.001). The presence of triclosan-loaded WBPU decreased catheter encrustations and markedly postponed the catheter blockage time, as well as suppressed the Proteus mirabilis biofilm formation (33.9 ± 13.9 mg vs. 1.4 ± 1.5 mg, P = 0.016). Triclosan-loaded WBPU significantly inhibited Proteus mirabilis' growth and biofilm formation, indicating the promising antibacterial effects on Proteus mirabilis in vitro. Further efforts are under way that involves coating the material onto the urinary catheters and in vivo studies.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of the genera Proteus, Morganella and Providencia by comparison of rpoB gene sequences of type and clinical strains suggests the reclassification of Proteus myxofaciens in a new genus, Cosenzaea gen. nov., as Cosenzaea myxofaciens comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Grimont, Patrick A D; Grimont, Francine; Lefevre, Martine; Giammanco, Giuseppe; Pignato, Sarina

    2011-07-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of partial rpoB gene sequences of type and clinical strains belonging to different 16S rRNA gene-fingerprinting ribogroups within 11 species of enterobacteria of the genera Proteus, Morganella and Providencia was performed and allowed the definition of rpoB clades, supported by high bootstrap values and confirmed by ≥2.5 % nucleotide divergence. None of the resulting clades included strains belonging to different species and the majority of the species were confirmed as discrete and homogeneous. However, more than one distinct rpoB clade could be defined among strains belonging to the species Proteus vulgaris (two clades), Providencia alcalifaciens (two clades) and Providencia rettgeri (three clades), suggesting that some strains represent novel species according to the genotypes outlined by rpoB gene sequence analysis. Percentage differences between the rpoB gene sequence of the type strain of Proteus myxofaciens and other members of the same genus (17.3-18.9 %) were similar to those calculated amongst strains of the genus Providencia (16.4-18.7 %), suggesting a genetic distance at the genus-level between Proteus myxofaciens and the rest of the Proteus-Providencia group. Proteus myxofaciens therefore represents a member of a new genus, for which the name Cosenzaea gen. nov., is proposed.

  6. Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center d

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a low-level flyby at Las Cruces Airport in New Mexico. The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  7. A MAP Kinase pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans is required for defense against infection by opportunistic Proteus species.

    PubMed

    JebaMercy, Gnanasekaran; Vigneshwari, Loganathan; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity requires a conserved mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that regulates the basal and pathogen-induced expression of immune effectors. Being in the group of opportunistic pathogens, Proteus spp. cause large number of nosocomial infections. Since, Proteus spp. do not cause death in wild type C. elegans, to understand the role and contribution of MAP Kinase pathway, the mutants (sek-1 and pmk-1) of this pathway were employed. Physiological experiments revealed that the Proteus spp. were able to kill MAP Kinase pathway mutant's C. elegans significantly. To understand the involvement of innate immune pathways specific players at the mRNA level, the regulation of few candidate antimicrobial genes were kinetically investigated during Proteus spp. infections. Real-time PCR analysis indicated a regulation of few candidate immune regulatory genes (F08G5.6, lys-7, nlp-29, ATF-7 and daf-16) during the course of Proteus spp. infections. In addition, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Proteus mirabilis upon exposure to mutant C. elegans showed modifications at their functional regions suggesting that the pathogen modifies its internal machinery according to the specific host for effective pathogenesis.

  8. Anti-Proteus activity of some South African medicinal plants: their potential for the prevention of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cock, I E; van Vuuren, S F

    2014-02-01

    A wide variety of herbal remedies are used in traditional African medicine to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammation. Thirty-four extracts from 13 South African plant species with a history of ethnobotanical usage in the treatment of inflammation were investigated for their ability to control two microbial triggers for RA (Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris). Twenty-nine of the extracts (85.3 %) inhibited the growth of P. mirabilis and 23 of them tested (67.7 %) inhibited the growth of P. vulgaris. Methanol and water extracts of Carpobrotus edulis, Lippia javanica, Pelargonium viridflorum, Ptaeroxylon obliquum, Syzygium cordatum leaf and bark, Terminalia pruinoides, Terminalia sericea, Warburgia salutaris bark and an aqueous extract of W. salutaris leaf were effective Proteus inhibitors, with MIC values <2,000 μg/ml. The most potent extracts were examined by Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and UV-Vis spectroscopy for the presence of resveratrol. Only extracts from T. pruinoides and T. sericea contained resveratrol, indicating that it was not responsible for the anti-Proteus properties reported here. All extracts with Proteus inhibitory activity were also either non-toxic, or of low toxicity in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The low toxicity of these extracts and their inhibitory bioactivity against Proteus spp. indicate their potential for blocking the onset of rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Two nosocomial strains of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia transferring antibiotic resistance to Proteus mirabilis P-38 recipient strain.

    PubMed

    Blahová, J; Králiková, K; Krcméry, V; Chmelarová, E; Torsová, V

    1998-02-01

    In this report we describe a specific transfer of carbenicillin and cephaloridine resistance determinants from two different strains of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: No. 215 and 221 isolated from two critically ill patients treated in different Intensive Care Units of a large University Hospital in Ostrava, Czech Republic. These strains were resistant to flouroquinolones and the following beta-lactam drugs: carbenicillin, cephaloridine, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, cefepime, imipenem, meropenem and aztreonam. Both strains transferred carbenicillin and cephaloridine resistance determinants, with rather different frequency, to Proteus mirabilis P-38. All carbenicillin-selected transconjugants were found by an indirect selection method to be co-resistant to cephaloridine only. In a second cycle of transfers Proteus mirabilis R+ strains directly transferred carbenicillin and cephalothin determinants to Escherichia coli K-12 No. 185 nal+ lac+ recipient strain.

  10. Pathogenicity of Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis to brown tree frogs (Litoria ewingii).

    PubMed

    Schadich, Ermin; Cole, Anthony L J

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial dermatosepticemia, a systemic infectious bacterial disease of frogs, can be caused by several opportunistic gram-negative bacterial species including Aeromonas hydrophila, Chryseobacterium indologenes, Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia liquifaciens. Here we determined the pathogenicity of 3 bacterial species (Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis) associated with an outbreak of fatal dermatosepticemia in New Zealand Litoria ewingii frogs. A bath challenge method was used to expose test frogs to individual bacterial species (2 x 10(7) cfu/mL in pond water); control frogs were exposed to uninfected pond water. None of the control frogs or those exposed to A. hydrophila or P. mirabilis showed any morbidity or mortality. Morbidity and mortality was 40% among frogs exposed to K. pneumonia, and the organism was reisolated from the hearts, spleens, and livers of affected animals.

  11. Tryptophan indole-lyase from Proteus vulgaris: kinetic and spectral properties.

    PubMed

    Zakomirdina, L N; Kulikova, V V; Gogoleva, O I; Dementieva, I S; Faleev, N G; Demidkina, T V

    2002-10-01

    An efficient method for purification of recombinant tryptophanase from Proteus vulgaris was developed. Catalytic properties of the enzyme in reactions with L-tryptophan and some other substrates as well as competitive inhibition by various amino acids in the reaction with S-o-nitrophenyl-L-cysteine were studied. Absorption and circular dichroism spectra of holotryptophanase and its complexes with characteristic inhibitors modeling the structure of the principal reaction intermediates were examined. Kinetic and spectral properties of two tryptophanases which markedly differ in their primary structures are compared. It was found that although the spectral properties of the holoenzymes and their complexes with amino acid inhibitors are different, the principal kinetic properties of the enzymes from Proteus vulgaris and Escherichia coli are analogous. This indicates structural similarity of their active sites.

  12. Mass mortality in ornamental fish, Cyprinus carpio koi caused by a bacterial pathogen, Proteus hauseri.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Swaminathan, T Raja; Kumar, Rahul G; Dharmaratnam, Arathi; Basheer, V S; Jena, J K

    2015-09-01

    Moribund koi carp, Cyprinus carpio koi, from a farm with 50% cumulative mortality were sampled with the aim of isolating and detecting the causative agent. Three bacterial species viz., Citrobacter freundii (NSCF-1), Klebsiella pneumoniae (NSKP-1) and Proteus hauseri [genomospecies 3 of Proteus vulgaris Bio group 3] (NSPH-1) were isolated, identified and characterized on the basis of biochemical tests and sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene using universal bacterial primers. Challenge experiments with these isolates using healthy koi carp showed that P. hauseri induced identical clinical and pathological states within 3 d of intramuscular injection. The results suggest P. hauseri (NSPH-1) was the causative agent. In phylogenetic analysis, strain NSPH-1 formed a distinct cluster with other P. hauseri reference strains with ≥99% sequence similarity. P. hauseri isolates were found sensitive to Ampicillin, Cefalexin, Ciprofloxacin and Cefixime and resistant to Gentamycin, Oxytetracycline, Chloramphenicol, and Kanamycin. The affected fish recovered from the infection after ciprofloxacin treatment.

  13. Separation of glutathione transferase subunits from Proteus vulgaris by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Giaming; Chien, Yi-Chih; Chien, Cheng-I

    2003-10-01

    Cytosolic glutathione transferases of Proteus vulgaris were purified by affinity chromatography and characterized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Four different subunits were identified, and each subunit contained a different molecular mass, ranging from 26.2 kDa to 28.5 kDa; a different pI value, ranging from 8.2 to 9.4; and a different amount of protein fraction, ranging from 10% to 56%. All four subunits existed as basic proteins (pI > 7.0). From these results, we concluded that multiple forms of glutathione transferase enzymes existed in Proteus vulgaris, and four different glutathione transferase subunits were separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis.

  14. The ureases of Proteus strains in relation to virulence for the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Bradford, N C; Simpson, D S

    1980-11-01

    The ureases produced by a large number of strains of different Proteus species, some of which were known to have a special affinity for the urinary tract, were examined by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Each Proteus strain gave a pattern of urease isoenzymes that was characteristic and unique to its species although strains of P. Mirabilis and P. vulgaris gave isoenzyme patterns that were closely similar. There was some minor variation in the patterns of urease isoenzymes even between strains of the same species. This was most noticeable among P. rettgeri strains and to a lesser extent among P. vulgaris strains. No correlation was found between the types of ureases a strain produced and its pathogenicity for the urinary tract.

  15. Pathogenicity of Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis to Brown Tree Frogs (Litoria ewingii)

    PubMed Central

    Schadich, Ermin; Cole, Anthony LJ

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial dermatosepticemia, a systemic infectious bacterial disease of frogs, can be caused by several opportunistic gram-negative bacterial species including Aeromonas hydrophila, Chryseobacterium indologenes, Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia liquifaciens. Here we determined the pathogenicity of 3 bacterial species (Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis) associated with an outbreak of fatal dermatosepticemia in New Zealand Litoria ewingii frogs. A bath challenge method was used to expose test frogs to individual bacterial species (2 × 107 cfu/mL in pond water); control frogs were exposed to uninfected pond water. None of the control frogs or those exposed to A. hydrophila or P. mirabilis showed any morbidity or mortality. Morbidity and mortality was 40% among frogs exposed to K. pneumonia, and the organism was reisolated from the hearts, spleens, and livers of affected animals. PMID:20412685

  16. [Increased effectiveness of antibiotic therapy with adaptogens in dysentery and Proteus infection in children].

    PubMed

    Vereshchagin, I A; Geskina, O D; Bukhteeva, E R

    1982-01-01

    The course of the disease and the host immunological reactivity (IgA, IgM, IgG, CPhI, IgG and IgM antibody titers in the HIT, blood bactericidic properties) were studied in 258 children aged 0 to 14 year suffering from acute dysentery caused by Shigella sonnei and flexneri and enterocolitis of the Proteus etiology. 157 patients were treated with monomycin and kanamycin in combination with adaptogens, such as Eleuterococcus and Echinopanax elatum Nakai L. and 101 patients were treated with the antibiotics alone. It was shown that the use of the adaptogens decreased the periods of the diseases. It is concluded that adaptogens increase the efficacy of antibiotic therapy in children with dysentery and Proteus infection.

  17. The link between Proteus mirabilis, environmental factors and autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Taha; Ebringer, Alan; Wilson, Clyde

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a relatively common and potentially disabling immune-mediated inflammatory systemic disease, predominantly affecting women and characterised by multiple small joint arthritis. Extensive data supports the roles of genetic, environmental and microbial factors in the triggering and development of this disease. Proteus mirabilis is considered as the main microbial culprit in the causation of RA. The evidence for the role of these microbes in RA and their links with commonly associated autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factors and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies have been elucidated together with their relations with some of the non-microbial environmental factors which have been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of RA. The most likely mechanism in the development of RA is "molecular mimicry" where Proteus antigens were found to share homologous sequences, which cross-react with certain self-antigens present in synovial tissues. This could raise possibilities for implementing a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of RA.

  18. Empyema Necessitans Complicating Pleural Effusion Associated with Proteus Species Infection: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Yauba, M. S.; Ahmed, H.; Imoudu, I. A.; Yusuf, M. O.; Makarfi, H. U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Empyema necessitans, a rare complication of pleural effusion, could result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. It is characterized by the dissection of pus through the soft tissues and the skin of the chest wall. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Actinomyces israelii are common causes but Gram negative bacilli could be a rare cause. However, there were challenges in differentiating between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous empyema in a resource poor setting like ours. We report a child with pleural effusion and empyema necessitans secondary to Proteus spp. infection. Methods. We describe a 12-year-old child with empyema necessitans complicating pleural effusion and highlight management challenges. Results. This case was treated with quinolones, antituberculous drugs, chest tube drainage, and nutritional rehabilitation. Conclusion. Empyema necessitatis is a rare condition that can be caused by Gram negative bacterial pathogens like Proteus species. PMID:25893125

  19. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Tehachapi Mountains in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unique shape of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft is clearly visible in this photo of the plane in flight above the rocky slopes of the Tehachapi Mountains near Mojave, California, where the Proteus was designed and built. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the

  20. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Tehachapi Mountains in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unique shape of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft is clearly visible in this photo of the plane in flight above the rocky slopes of the Tehachapi Mountains near Mojave, California, where the Proteus was designed and built. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the

  1. Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of Obesumbacterium proteus, a Common Contaminant of Brewing Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Prest, Andrew G.; Hammond, John R. M.; Stewart, Gordon S. A. B.

    1994-01-01

    We have evaluated the effectiveness of API 20E, Biolog testing, plasmid profiling, ribotyping, and enteric repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR to characterize, classify, and differentiate nine bacterial isolates of the common brewery contaminant Obesumbacterium proteus. Of the five typing techniques, Biolog testing, plasmid profiling, and ERIC-PCR provided the most differentiation, and API 20E testing and ribotyping were relatively indiscriminate. The molecular biology approach of ERIC-PCR offered the ideal combination of speed, simplicity, and discrimination in this study. Overall, the results are supportive of the view that O. proteus can be subdivided into two biogroups, biogroup 1, which has considerable biochemical and genetic homology to Hafnia alvei, and biogroup 2, which is relatively heterogeneous. Images PMID:16349260

  2. Growth and cell structure of Proteus vulgaris when cultivated in weightlessness in the Cytos apparatus.

    PubMed

    Kordyum, V A; Mashinsky, A L; Man'ko, V G; Babski, V G; Sytnik, K M; Kordyum, E L; Bochagova, O P; Nefedov, Y L; Kozharinov, V I; Grechko, G M

    1980-01-01

    Growth data and electron-microscopic analyses are presented for Proteus vulgaris cultures which were grown during space flight in polyethylene packets in a semisolid medium with Tryptose for 96 h. In the suboptimal culture conditions the growth and morphological characteristics of the flight and ground control variants were nearly identical, but we were able to detect a number of differences between the cellular ultrastructure of these variants. These differences testify to changes in the bacterial cell metabolism during space flight.

  3. Venous sinus thrombosis after Proteus vulgaris meningitis and concomitant Clostridium abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Bodur, Hürrem; Colpan, Aylin; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Akinci, Esragul; Cevik, Mustafa Aydin; Balaban, Neriman

    2002-01-01

    A 19-y-old woman presented with Proteus vulgaris meningitis as a complication of chronic otitis media. Despite treatment with ceftazidime and amikacin no clinical improvement was observed. Cranial MRI revealed right-sided mastoiditis/otitis media and venous sinus thrombosis. After mastoidectomy, repeat cranial MRI demonstrated abscess formation in the venous sinuses. The abscess was drained. Clostridium spp. was isolated from the abscess culture.

  4. Effects of Schistosoma mansoni infection on phagocytosis and killing of Proteus vulgaris in Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Douglas, J S; Hunt, M D; Sullivan, J T

    1993-04-01

    With the use of a fluorescence microassay, in vitro phagocytosis and killing of Proteus vulgaris were measured in hemocytes of NIH albino Biomphalaria glabrata infected with Schistosoma mansoni for 1, 2, 3, or 4 wk. Although hemocytes of infected snails displayed decreased phagocytosis, relative to hemocytes of uninfected snails, at 4 wk postinfection (PI), they exhibited enhanced microbicidal activity at 3 wk PI. No microbicidal activity was detected in the plasma of either infected or uninfected snails.

  5. Proteus mirabilis urease. Partial purification and inhibition by boric acid and boronic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Breitenbach, J M; Hausinger, R P

    1988-01-01

    Urease was purified 800-fold and partially characterized from Proteus mirabilis, the predominant microorganism associated with urinary stones. Boric acid is a rapid reversible competitive inhibitor of urease. The pH-dependence of inhibition exhibited pKa values of 6.25 and 9.3, where the latter value is probably due to the inherent pKa of boric acid. Three boronic acids also were shown to inhibit urease competitively. PMID:3291857

  6. IMP-27, a Unique Metallo-β-Lactamase Identified in Geographically Distinct Isolates of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Nyssa; Fowler, Randal C; Yoshizumi, A; Horiyama, Tsukasa; Ishii, Y; Harrison, Lucas; Geyer, Chelsie N; Moland, Ellen Smith; Thomson, Kenneth; Hanson, Nancy D

    2016-10-01

    A novel metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaIMP-27, was identified in unrelated Proteus mirabilis isolates from two geographically distinct locations in the United States. Both isolates harbor blaIMP-27 as part of the first gene cassette in a class 2 integron. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing indicated susceptibility to aztreonam, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ceftazidime but resistance to ertapenem. However, hydrolysis assays indicated that ceftazidime was a substrate for IMP-27. Copyright © 2016 Dixon et al.

  7. A novel functional class 2 integron in clinical Proteus mirabilis isolates.

    PubMed

    Wei, Quhao; Hu, Qingfeng; Li, Shanshan; Lu, Huoyang; Chen, Guoqiang; Shen, Beiqiong; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Yonglie

    2014-04-01

    To describe a novel functional class 2 integron that was found in clinical Proteus mirabilis isolates. Class 1 and 2 integrons were screened by PCR in 153 clinical Proteus isolates. The variable regions of class 1 and 2 integrons were determined by restriction analysis and sequencing. The mutations of internal stop codons in class 2 integrons and their common promoters were also determined by sequencing. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR was used to analyse the phylogenetic relations of class 2 integron-positive P. mirabilis isolates. Class 1 integrons were detected in 96 (63%) of 153 Proteus isolates: eight different gene cassette arrays were detected, including dfrA32-ereA1-aadA2, which was detected for the first time in P. mirabilis. Class 2 integrons were detected in 101 (66%) of 153 Proteus isolates: four different gene cassette arrays were detected, including dfrA1-catB2-sat2-aadA1, which was detected for the first time in a class 2 integron. A novel functional class 2 integron was detected in 38 P. mirabilis isolates with a common promoter (-35 TTTAAT|16 bp|-10 TAAAGT). The variable region of this functional class 2 integron contained dfrA14 and three novel open reading frames with unknown functions. Very similar ERIC-PCR fingerprinting patterns were detected in these 38 P. mirabilis isolates and were different from other class 2 integron-positive isolates. A novel functional class 2 integron was found for the first time in P. mirabilis. These functional class 2 integron-harbouring P. mirabilis isolates were likely to be clonally spread in our hospital.

  8. Integration of the blaNDM-1 carbapenemase gene into Proteus genomic island 1 (PGI1-PmPEL) in a Proteus mirabilis clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Girlich, Delphine; Dortet, Laurent; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    To decipher the mechanisms and their associated genetic determinants responsible for β-lactam resistance in a Proteus mirabilis clinical isolate. The entire genetic structure surrounding the β-lactam resistance genes was characterized by PCR, gene walking and DNA sequencing. Genes encoding the carbapenemase NDM-1 and the ESBL VEB-6 were located in a 38.5 kb MDR structure, which itself was inserted into a new variant of the Proteus genomic island 1 (PGI1). This new PGI1-PmPEL variant of 64.4 kb was chromosomally located, as an external circular form in the P. mirabilis isolate, suggesting potential mobility. This is the first known description of the bla(NDM-1) gene in a genomic island structure, which might further enhance the spread of the bla(NDM-1) carbapenemase gene among enteric pathogens. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Crystallization of urine mineral components may depend on the chemical nature of Proteus endotoxin polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Torzewska, Agnieszka; Staczek, Paweł; Rózalski, Antoni

    2003-06-01

    Formation of infectious urinary calculi is the most common complication accompanying urinary tract infections by members of the genus Proteus. The major factor involved in stone formation is the urease produced by these bacteria, which causes local supersaturation and crystallization of magnesium and calcium phosphates as carbonate apatite [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6).CO(3)] and struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4).6H(2)O), respectively. This effect may also be enhanced by bacterial polysaccharides. Macromolecules of such kind contain negatively charged residues that are able to bind Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), leading to the accumulation of these ions around bacterial cells and acceleration of the crystallization process. The levels of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions bound by whole Proteus cells were measured, as well as the chemical nature of isolated LPS polysaccharides, and the intensity of the in vitro crystallization process was compared in a synthetic urine. The results suggest that the sugar composition of Proteus LPS may either enhance or inhibit the crystallization of struvite and apatite, depending on its chemical structure and ability to bind cations. This points to the increased importance of endotoxin in urinary tract infections.

  10. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code. [two and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two and three dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. Proteus solves the Reynolds-averaged, unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. Turbulence is modeled using a Baldwin-Lomax based algebraic eddy viscosity model. In addition, options are available to solve thin layer or Euler equations, and to eliminate the energy equation by assuming constant stagnation enthalpy. An extensive series of validation cases have been run, primarily using the two dimensional planar/axisymmetric version of the code. Several flows were computed that have exact solution such as: fully developed channel and pipe flow; Couette flow with and without pressure gradients; unsteady Couette flow formation; flow near a suddenly accelerated flat plate; flow between concentric rotating cylinders; and flow near a rotating disk. The two dimensional version of the Proteus code has been released, and the three dimensional code is scheduled for release in late 1991.

  11. Development of a Phage Cocktail to Control Proteus mirabilis Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Luís D. R.; Veiga, Patrícia; Cerca, Nuno; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Almeida, Carina; Azeredo, Joana; Sillankorva, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an enterobacterium that causes catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) due to its ability to colonize and form crystalline biofilms on the catheters surface. CAUTIs are very difficult to treat, since biofilm structures are highly tolerant to antibiotics. Phages have been used widely to control a diversity of bacterial species, however, a limited number of phages for P. mirabilis have been isolated and studied. Here we report the isolation of two novel virulent phages, the podovirus vB_PmiP_5460 and the myovirus vB_PmiM_5461, which are able to target, respectively, 16 of the 26 and all the Proteus strains tested in this study. Both phages have been characterized thoroughly and sequencing data revealed no traces of genes associated with lysogeny. To further evaluate the phages’ ability to prevent catheter’s colonization by Proteus, the phages adherence to silicone surfaces was assessed. Further tests in phage-coated catheters using a dynamic biofilm model simulating CAUTIs, have shown a significant reduction of P. mirabilis biofilm formation up to 168 h of catheterization. These results highlight the potential usefulness of the two isolated phages for the prevention of surface colonization by this bacterium. PMID:27446059

  12. [CHROMATIN ORGANIZATION IN CELL CYCLE OF AMOEBA PROTEUS ACCORDING TO OPTICAL TOMOGRAPHY DATA].

    PubMed

    Demin, S Yu; Berdieva, M A; Podlipaeva, Yu I; Yudin, A L; Goodkov, A V

    2015-01-01

    For the first time the nuclear cycle of large freshwater amoeba Amoeba proteus was studied by the method of optical tomography. The nuclei were fixed in situ in the cells of synchronized culture, stained by DAPI and examined by confocal laser scanning microscope. 3D-images of intranuclear chromatin were studied in details at different stages of nuclear cycle. The obtained data, together with literary ones allow represent the dynamics of structural organization of the nucleus in Amoeba proteus cell cycle in a new fashion. It was concluded that in this species the two-stage interphase takes place, as well as mitosis of peculiar type which does not correspond to any known type of mitosis according to classification existing now. It is presumed that in the course of nuclear cycle the chromosomes and/or their fragments are amplified, this presumption being in a good correspondence with the data about nuclear DNA hyperreplication in the cell cycle of A. proteus. As a result of chromosomes amplification their number may vary at different stages of cell cycle, and it allows to explain the contradictory data concerning the exact number of chromosomes in this species. The elimination of extra-DNA occurs mainly at the stage between prophase and prometaphase. We presume the majority of chromosomes, or may be even all of them to be referred to cholocentric type according to their behaviour during the mitosis.

  13. The association of particular types of Proteus with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Sweeney, G

    1984-04-01

    During a period of 12 months, 57 strains of Proteus were isolated from the ears of 38 unrelated patients with chronic suppurative otitis media. Each strain was identified, typed for bacteriocin production and sensitivity, and tested for Dienes compatibility. The majority of the strains (79%) were P. mirabilis; all but one of the remainder were P.vulgaris. Although 19 different bacteriocin production/sensitivity types were found, two rare types, P. mirabilis P7/S5,12 and P. vulgaris P0/S9, were associated with 47% of these infections. This was confirmed by Dienes typing. Patients with bilateral ear disease carried a different strain in each ear. There was no evidence that persistence of infection had arisen because of the development of antibiotic resistance. Although there was some evidence that persistence may have been the result of reinfection, the isolation of these rare types of Proteus from so many patients with chronic suppurative otitis media may indicate that they play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Most of the Proteus isolates were of "non-faecal" types and it is believed that infection had arisen by a route other than the faecal-aural one.

  14. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code. [two and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two and three dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. Proteus solves the Reynolds-averaged, unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. Turbulence is modeled using a Baldwin-Lomax based algebraic eddy viscosity model. In addition, options are available to solve thin layer or Euler equations, and to eliminate the energy equation by assuming constant stagnation enthalpy. An extensive series of validation cases have been run, primarily using the two dimensional planar/axisymmetric version of the code. Several flows were computed that have exact solution such as: fully developed channel and pipe flow; Couette flow with and without pressure gradients; unsteady Couette flow formation; flow near a suddenly accelerated flat plate; flow between concentric rotating cylinders; and flow near a rotating disk. The two dimensional version of the Proteus code has been released, and the three dimensional code is scheduled for release in late 1991.

  15. Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Mojave Airport in Southern California.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-03

    Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Mojave Airport in Southern California. The unique tandem-wing Proteus was the testbed for a series of UAV collision-avoidance flight demonstrations. An Amphitech 35GHz radar unit installed below Proteus' nose was the primary sensor for the Detect, See and Avoid tests. NASA Dryden's F/A-18 Hornet was one of many different aircraft used in the tests.

  16. [Sensitivity to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotics of clinical Proteus strains as dependent upon on their species classification and the source of their isolation].

    PubMed

    Shvidenko, I G

    1987-11-01

    Sensitivity of 130 Proteus clinical strains was studied. Among beta-lactam antibiotics cefotaxime showed marked advantages with respect to various Proteus species. All the isolates of Proteus mirabilis were sensitive to cefuroxime. Cefamezin and cephapirin were inferior by their activity to cefotaxime and cefuroxime. They were characterized by close antibacterial activity and almost complete cross resistance. Ampicillin and carbenicillin proved to be the least efficient among the tested beta-lactam antibiotics. Isolates of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus penneri were more resistant to the penicillins and cephalosporins than the cultures of Proteus mirabilis. Sensitivity of separate Proteus species to gentamicin, tobramycin, sisomicin and amikacin was close. No cross resistance to the aminoglycosides was detected. Studies on the effect of different doses of the antibiotics revealed pronounced heterogeneity of Proteus by the feature of sensitivity to the tested antibiotics. The level of the heterogeneity was not the same for separate antibiotics. Cultures of Proteus mirabilis resistant to ampicillin, carbenicillin, cefamezin and cephapirin were more frequent in patients with urogenital infections as compared to patients with intestinal infections and suppurative-inflammatory processes of other localization.

  17. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The uniquely shaped Proteus high-altitude aircraft soars over California's Mojave Desert during a July 1999 flight. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The

  18. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft Taxiing on Runway at Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A frontal view of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft on the ramp at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California in July 1999. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera

  19. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft on Runway at Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Proteus high-altitude aircraft on the ramp at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to

  20. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft Taking Off from Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The uniquely-shaped Proteus high-altitude research aircraft lifts off from the runway at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS

  1. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer

  2. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft Taxiing on Runway at Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A frontal view of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft on the ramp at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California in July 1999. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera

  3. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft Taking Off from Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The uniquely-shaped Proteus high-altitude research aircraft lifts off from the runway at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS

  4. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer

  5. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The uniquely shaped Proteus high-altitude aircraft soars over California's Mojave Desert during a July 1999 flight. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The

  6. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft on Runway at Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Proteus high-altitude aircraft on the ramp at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to

  7. Immunochemical characterization of the O antigens of two Proteus strains, O8-related antigen of Proteus mirabilis 12 B-r and O2-related antigen of Proteus genomospecies 5/6 12 B-k, infecting a hospitalized patient in Poland.

    PubMed

    Drzewiecka, Dominika; Shashkov, Alexander S; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-05-01

    A hospitalized 73-year-old woman was infected with a Proteus mirabilis strain, 12 B-r, isolated from the place of injection of a blood catheter. Another strain, 12 B-k, recognized as Proteus genomospecies 5 or 6, was isolated from the patient's faeces, which was an example of a nosocomial infection rather than an auto-infection. Serological investigation using ELISA and Western blotting showed that strain 12 B-k from faeces belonged to the Proteus O2 serogroup. Strain 12 B-r from the wound displayed cross-reactions with several Proteus O serogroups due to common epitopes on the core or O-specific parts of the lipopolysaccharide. Studies of the isolated 12 B-r O-specific polysaccharide by NMR spectroscopy revealed its close structural similarity to that of Proteus O8. The only difference in 12 B-r was the presence of an additional GlcNAc-linked phosphoethanolamine residue, which creates a putative epitope responsible for the cross-reactivity with Pt. mirabilis O16. The new O-antigen form could appear as a result of adaptation of the bacterium to a changing environment. On the basis of the data obtained, we suggest division of the O8 serogroup into two subgroups: O8a for strains of various Proteus species that have been previously classified into the O8 serogroup, and O8a,b for Pt. mirabilis 12 B-r, where 'a' is a common epitope and 'b' is a phosphoethanolamine-associated epitope. These findings further confirm serological and structural heterogeneity of O antigens of Proteus strains isolated lately from patients in Poland.

  8. SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements in Proteus species reveal abundant genetic diversity and multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinyue; Du, Yu; Du, Pengcheng; Dai, Hang; Fang, Yujie; Li, Zhenpeng; Lv, Na; Zhu, Baoli; Kan, Biao; Wang, Duochun

    2016-01-01

    SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) are self-transmissible mobile genetic elements that are found in most members of Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we determined fifteen SXT/R391 ICEs carried by Proteus isolates from food (4.2%) and diarrhoea patients (17.3%). BLASTn searches against GenBank showed that the fifteen SXT/R391 ICEs were closely related to that from different Enterobacteriaceae species, including Proteus mirabilis. Using core gene phylogenetic analysis, the fifteen SXT/R391 ICEs were grouped into six distinct clusters, including a dominant cluster and three clusters that have not been previously reported in Proteus isolates. The SXT/R391 ICEs shared a common structure with a set of conserved genes, five hotspots and two variable regions, which contained more foreign genes, including drug-resistance genes. Notably, a class A β-lactamase gene was identified in nine SXT/R391 ICEs. Collectively, the ICE-carrying isolates carried resistance genes for 20 tested drugs. Six isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, sulfisoxazole and tetracycline, which are drug resistances commonly encoded by ICEs. Our results demonstrate abundant genetic diversity and multidrug resistance of the SXT/R391 ICEs carried by Proteus isolates, which may have significance for public health. It is therefore necessary to continuously monitor the antimicrobial resistance and related mobile elements among Proteus isolates. PMID:27892525

  9. Structural studies on the lipopolysaccharide core of Proteus OX strains used in Weil-Felix test: a mass spectrometric approach.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, Anna N; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Lindner, Buko; Knirel, Yuriy A; Amano, Ken-ichi

    2003-11-14

    The core region of the lipopolysaccharides of Proteus group OX bacteria, which are used as antigens in Weil-Felix test for serodiagnosis of rickettsiosis, were studied by chemical degradations in combination with ESI FTMS, including infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) MS/MS and capillary skimmer dissociation. Structural variants of the inner core region were found to be the same as in Proteus non-OX strains that have been studied earlier. The outer core region has essentially the same structure in Proteus vulgaris OX19 (serogroup O1) and OX2 (serogroup O2) and a different structure in Proteus mirabilis OXK (serogroup O3). A fragmentation due to the rupture of the linkage between GlcN or GalN and GalA was observed in IRMPD-MS/MS of core oligosaccharides and found to be useful for screening of Proteus strains to assign structures of the relatively conserved inner core region and to select for further studies strains with distinct structures of a more variable outer core region.

  10. Studies of antibiotic resistance of rough and smooth Proteus mirabilis strains and influence of polymyxin E on their lipopolysaccharide composition.

    PubMed

    Kaca, W; Ujazda, E

    1996-01-01

    The influence of type of bacterial culture media on antibiotic resistance of Proteus mirabilis R and S forms, was tested. P. mirabilis S1959 (S form), R45 and R110 strains (Re and Ra mutant, respectively) cultivated in media supplemented with 10% heat inactivated bovine serum were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, nalidixic acid and nitroxoline. Proteus strains cultivated in media without serum were sensitive to these antibacterial agents. The presence of serum did not change the polymyxin E (colistin) resistance of there Proteus strains tested. The effects of the presence of colistin (1000 U/ml) in culture media on Proteus lipopolysaccharide composition was studied. The content of uronic acids and phosphate residues in lipopolysaccharides isolated from bacteria cultivated in the presence of colistin (LPS-col), were lower than in control LPSs. The contents of 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose decreases in S1959 LPS-col, increases in R110 LPS-col and remains unchanged in R45 LPS-col. These results indicate that the presence of colistin in cultivation media exerts an influence on the contents of charged components of LPSs isolated from polymyxin E-resistant Proteus R and S strains.

  11. Proteus mirabilis mannose-resistant, Proteus-like fimbriae: MrpG is located at the fimbrial tip and is required for fimbrial assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Zhao, H; Geymonat, L; Bahrani, F; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1997-01-01

    The mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbria, responsible for mannose-resistant hemagglutination, is a virulence factor for uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Based on known fimbrial gene organization, we postulated that MrpG, a putative minor subunit of the MR/P fimbria, functions as an adhesin responsible for hemagglutination, while MrpA serves as the major structural subunit for the filamentous structure. To test this hypothesis, an mrpG mutant was constructed by allelic-exchange mutagenesis and verified by PCR and Southern blotting. The mrpG mutant was found to be negative for hemagglutination, while wild-type strain H14320 and the complemented mutant were positive. Western blots with antiserum raised against an overexpressed MrpG'-His6 fusion protein showed that MrpG was present in the fimbrial preparations of both the wild-type strain and the complemented mutant but absent in that of the mrpG mutant. The mrpG mutant was significantly less virulent in a CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Western blots with antiserum to whole MR/P fimbriae showed that MrpA protein was also missing from the fimbrial preparation of the mrpG mutant. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we found that the normal MR/P-fimbrial structure was absent in the mrpG mutant, suggesting that MrpG is essential for initiation of normal fimbrial formation. In the wild-type strain, MrpG protein was localized to the tips of the fimbriae or at the surface of the cell when antiserum raised against overexpressed MrpG was used. Given the tip localization, MrpG may be required for initiation of assembly of MR/P fimbriae but does not appear to be the fimbrial adhesin. PMID:9119470

  12. Proteus mirabilis mannose-resistant, Proteus-like fimbriae: MrpG is located at the fimbrial tip and is required for fimbrial assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhao, H; Geymonat, L; Bahrani, F; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1997-04-01

    The mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbria, responsible for mannose-resistant hemagglutination, is a virulence factor for uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Based on known fimbrial gene organization, we postulated that MrpG, a putative minor subunit of the MR/P fimbria, functions as an adhesin responsible for hemagglutination, while MrpA serves as the major structural subunit for the filamentous structure. To test this hypothesis, an mrpG mutant was constructed by allelic-exchange mutagenesis and verified by PCR and Southern blotting. The mrpG mutant was found to be negative for hemagglutination, while wild-type strain H14320 and the complemented mutant were positive. Western blots with antiserum raised against an overexpressed MrpG'-His6 fusion protein showed that MrpG was present in the fimbrial preparations of both the wild-type strain and the complemented mutant but absent in that of the mrpG mutant. The mrpG mutant was significantly less virulent in a CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Western blots with antiserum to whole MR/P fimbriae showed that MrpA protein was also missing from the fimbrial preparation of the mrpG mutant. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we found that the normal MR/P-fimbrial structure was absent in the mrpG mutant, suggesting that MrpG is essential for initiation of normal fimbrial formation. In the wild-type strain, MrpG protein was localized to the tips of the fimbriae or at the surface of the cell when antiserum raised against overexpressed MrpG was used. Given the tip localization, MrpG may be required for initiation of assembly of MR/P fimbriae but does not appear to be the fimbrial adhesin.

  13. Structure of a new ribitol teichoic acid-like O-polysaccharide of a serologically separate Proteus vulgaris strain, TG 276-1, classified into a new Proteus serogroup O53.

    PubMed

    Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Kondakova, Anna N; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Siwińska, Malgorzata; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zych, Krystyna; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2007-10-15

    An unusual ribitol teichoic acid-like O-polysaccharide was isolated by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide from a previously non-classified Proteus vulgaris strain TG 276-1. Structural studies using chemical analyses and 2D (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy showed that the polysaccharide is a zwitterionic polymer with a repeating unit containing 2-acetamido-4-amino-2,4,6-trideoxy-D-galactose (D-FucNAc4N) and two D-ribitol phosphate (D-Rib-ol-5-P) residues and having the following structure:[formula: see text] where the non-glycosylated ribitol residue is randomly mono-O-acetylated. Based on the unique O-polysaccharide structure and the finding that the strain studied is serologically separate among Proteus bacteria, we propose to classify P. vulgaris strain TG 276-1 into a new Proteus serogroup, O53.

  14. Preliminary Analysis of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) with PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Connaway, H. M.; Lee, C. H.

    2015-11-30

    The neutron transport code PROTEUS has been used to perform preliminary simulations of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). TREAT is an experimental reactor designed for the testing of nuclear fuels and other materials under transient conditions. It operated from 1959 to 1994, when it was placed on non-operational standby. The restart of TREAT to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s resumption of transient testing is currently underway. Both single assembly and assembly-homogenized full core models have been evaluated. Simulations were performed using a historic set of WIMS-ANL-generated cross-sections as well as a new set of Serpent-generated cross-sections. To support this work, further analyses were also performed using additional codes in order to investigate particular aspects of TREAT modeling. DIF3D and the Monte-Carlo codes MCNP and Serpent were utilized in these studies. MCNP and Serpent were used to evaluate the effect of geometry homogenization on the simulation results and to support code-to-code comparisons. New meshes for the PROTEUS simulations were created using the CUBIT toolkit, with additional meshes generated via conversion of selected DIF3D models to support code-to-code verifications. All current analyses have focused on code-to-code verifications, with additional verification and validation studies planned. The analysis of TREAT with PROTEUS-SN is an ongoing project. This report documents the studies that have been performed thus far, and highlights key challenges to address in future work.

  15. [Antibiotic sensitivity of Proteus, Pseudomonas pyocyanea and staphyloccoci isolated from scleroma and ozena patients].

    PubMed

    Krylov, I A

    1977-01-01

    Antibiotic sensitivity of 292 strains of Proteus, 60 strains of Ps, aeruginosa, 309 strains of S. aureus and 88 strains of S. epidermidis isolated from the upper respiratory tract of patients with scleroma and ozena was studied. The cultures of Pr. mirabilis were sensitive to aminoglucosides (54.9-96.2 per cent) and Pr. morganii were sensitive to levomycetin (81.5 per cent) and neomycin (92.6 per cnet). Sensitivity of Pr. vulgaris and Pr. morganii was reliably higher (p less than 0.001) than that of Pr. mirabilis. The strains of Pr. morganii were less sensitive to monomycin (P less than 0.001) and streptomycin (p less than 0.01) as compared to the cultures of other Proteus species tested. The strains of Ps. aeruginosa were sensitive only to gentamicin (90 per cent) and neomycin (81.1 per cent). Most of the strains of S. aureus (85.4-100 per cent) were sensitive to oleadomycin, erythromycin, olemorphocycline, tetraolean, oxacillin, methicillin ceporin, lincomycin, ristomycin, kanamycin, monomycin and gentamicin. Benzylpenicillin (90.8 per cent of the sensitive strains), ampicillin (67.1 per cent), tetracycline (66.7 per cent), levomycetin (68.6 per cent) and streptomycin (38.1 per cent) were less effective. Antibacterial therapy in cases with scleroma and ozena should be directed not only against causative agents of the diseases but also against the microbes developing due to disbacteriosis. Combination of parenteral and local use of the antibiotics in the treatment of chronic clebsiellesis decreased the isolation rate of Proteus and Ps. aeruginosa in the patients.

  16. The 2:1 Mean-motion Resonance between Proteus and Larissa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Hamilton, D. P.

    2006-06-01

    Voyager 2 discovered six small satellites orbiting near Neptune; Proteus and Larissa, the two largest and outermost ones, display larger eccentricities than average, as well as non-zero inclinations. These satellites formed in a thin debris disk resulting from the catastrophic destruction of the original Neptunian satellites shortly after the capture of Triton. The slim debris disk suggests that moonlet orbits should not acquire significant tilts at formation, and any initial eccentricities should damp away rapidly due to tides. Hence, the non-zero eccentricities and inclinations of these two satellites require an explanation. We investigate the possibility of mean-motion resonance passages as an excitation mechanism for the orbital eccentricities and inclinations of Proteus and Larissa. The most recent strong resonance between these two satellites, the 2:1, is located only 600 km outside Larissa's orbit, or 900 km inside Proteus'. This resonance probably occurred only a few hundred million years ago. We find that not only is this resonance partially responsible for the current orbital shapes and orientations of the moons, but it also provides interesting constraints on their physical properties. Our study of this resonance limits the average density of the moons to 0.05 g/cc < ρ < 1.5 g/cc, and puts a lower limit on their tidal quality factors, which parameterize energy loss due to tides: Q > 10. Through numerical simulations, we identify a new type of three-body resonance between the small satellite pair and Triton. These resonances occur near the traditional 2:1 mean-motion resonances and, surprisingly, are much stronger than their two-body counterparts, presumably due to Triton's large mass and orbital inclination. We derive a mathematical framework to analyze resonances in this system, and discuss applications to extra-Solar planetary systems.

  17. Effect of coliform and Proteus bacteria on growth of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    DiGiacinto, J V; Frazier, W C

    1966-01-01

    Cultures of coliform and Proteus bacteria, mostly from foods, were tested for their effect on growth of Staphylococcus aureus in Trypticase Soy Broth. Inhibition of the staphylococcus by these competitors increased with increasing proportions of inhibiting (effector) bacteria in the inoculum and decreasing incubation temperatures (37 to 10 C). Time required for 2 x 10(4) staphylococci to increase to 5 x 10(6) cells per milliliter, the minimal number assumed to be necessary for food poisoning, varied with the species of effector, the original ratio of effector bacteria to staphylococci in the medium, and the incubation temperature. When the original ratio was 100:1, the staphylococci did not reach 5 x 10(6) cells per milliliter at 10, 15, 22, or 30 C (with one exception), when growing with cultures representing six species of coliform bacteria and two of Proteus. When the ratio was 1:1, all effectors either greatly delayed the staphylococcus or prevented it from reaching hazardous numbers at 15 C, six of the eight caused a delay of 2 to 3 hr at 22 C, and only Escherichia coli delayed the coccus at 30 C. All effectors were ineffective at 22 and 30 C when original numbers of effectors and staphylococci were in the ratio 1:100. Greatest overall inhibition was by E. coli, E. freundii, and Proteus vulgaris, and these species were more effective than the others at 22 and 30 C. Aerobacter cloacae and Paracolobactrum aerogenoides were more effective at 15 C. In general, results were similar with different strains of a species. Except for Aerobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella sp., and P. aerogenoides, which apparently did not compete for nutrients, inhibition of the staphylococcus was by a combination of antibiotic substances and competition for nutrients.

  18. Is the blind cave salamander Proteus anguinus equiped for magnetic orientation ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquerel, H.; Valet, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    The Proteus anguinus is a blind cave salamander which can develop the ability of using the earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation. It has been shown that the strength of the geomagnetic field is not strong enough to excite the electroreceptors of these animals through induction mechanism so that the most likely hypothesis is that they would use cristals of magnetite as permanent magnets. We have been looking for evidence of remanent magnetism in several proteus collected from the underground CNRS laboratory at Moulis (France). Because the level of natural remanent magnetization, if any, was too low to be measured with confidence using a 3 axis squid 2G magnetometer (even bringing the animals as close as possible to the sensors), we stepwise remagnetized the samples between 0.2 and 1.2T. Measurements were performed in different parts of three proteus bodies. No significant magnetization was detected in the head, most of the signal being concentrated in the lower body of the animal. Saturation was attained after 0.2T while stepwise demagnetization by alternating field showed that most magnetization was removed after 40 mT (medium destructive field, MDF of about 10 mT), which is typical of magnetite. Independent measurements of clay soils taken from the surrounding immediate environment of the animals reveal a different magnetic signature for saturation, MDF and viscosity. Thus there is no apparent and direct link between food absorbed from their environment and the magnetic remamence of the animals. New experiments are currently in progress to determine whether magnetite is the unique magnetic carrier and also to provide better clue about the magnetic granulometry and its distribution.

  19. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Proteus mirabilis isolates from dogs.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Niina, Ayaka; Shimizu, Takae; Mukai, Yujiro; Kuwajima, Ken; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Kataoka, Yasushi

    2014-11-01

    Large-scale monitoring of resistance to 14 antimicrobial agents was performed using 103 Proteus mirabilis strains isolated from dogs in Japan. Resistant strains were analysed to identify their resistance mechanisms. Rates of resistance to chloramphenicol, streptomycin, enrofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, kanamycin, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, cephalothin, gentamicin, cefoxitin and cefotaxime were 20.4, 15.5, 12.6, 10.7, 9.7, 8.7, 5.8, 2.9, 2.9, 1.9 and 1.9%, respectively. No resistance to ceftazidime, aztreonam or imipenem was found. Class 1 and 2 integrases were detected in 2.9 and 11.7% of isolates, respectively. Class 1 integrons contained aadB or aadB-catB-like-blaOXA10-aadA1, whereas those of class 2 contained sat-aadA1, dhfr1-sat-aadA1 or none of the anticipated resistance genes. Of five distinct plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistance (PMQR) genes, only qnrD gene was detected in 1.9% of isolates. Quinolone-resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA and parC from 13 enrofloxacin-intermediate and -resistant isolates were sequenced. Seven strains had double mutations and three had single mutations. Three of nine ampicillin-resistant isolates harboured AmpC-type β-lactamases (i.e. blaCMY-2, blaCMY-4 and blaDHA-1). These results suggest that canine Proteus mirabilis deserves continued surveillance as an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance determinants. This is the first report, to our knowledge, describing integrons, PMQRs and QRDR mutations in Proteus mirabilis isolates from companion animals.

  20. Methyl mercaptan and dimethyl disulfide production from methionine by Proteus species detected by head-space gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, N J; Jeavons, T H; Nicholson, A J; Thornton, A G

    1977-01-01

    Head-space gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to detect and identify products formed by Proteus vulgaris, P. mirabilis, P. morganii, and P. rettgeri from a defined medium supplemented with either phenylalanine, methionine, valine, leucine, histidine, lysine, ornithine, threonine, asparagine, aspartic acid, or tryptophan. In a detailed study of the products formed by 68 strains of Proteus spp. from L-methionine, the production of large amounts of both dimethyl disulfide and methyl mercaptan was found to be a characteristic of the genus. Both sulfur products appeared within a few hours of inoculation. Dimethyl disulfide was a more sensitive indicator of growth than the spectrometric determination of optical density. This suggests that it could be useful for the rapid, automated detection of any species of Proteus. PMID:332705

  1. Structure of the O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus penneri 103 containing ribitol and 2-aminoethanol phosphates.

    PubMed

    Drzewiecka, Dominika; Toukach, Philip V; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Zych, Krystyna; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2002-09-27

    The O-specific polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus penneri strain 103 was studied using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, H-detected 1H,(13)C HMQC, 1H, 31P HMQC, and HMBC experiments. It was found that the polysaccharide is built up of oligosaccharide-ribitol phosphate repeating units and thus resembles ribitol teichoic acids of Gram-positive bacteria. The following structure of the polysaccharide was established:where Etn and Rib-ol are ethanolamine and ribitol, respectively. This structure is unique among the known structures of Proteus O-antigens and, therefore, we propose classification of the strain studied into a new Proteus serogroup, O73. The molecular basis for cross-reactivity between O-antiserum against P. penneri 103 and O-antigens of P. mirabilis O33 and D52 is discussed.

  2. Chemometric analysis of attenuated total reflectance infrared spectra of Proteus mirabilis strains with defined structures of LPS.

    PubMed

    Zarnowiec, Paulina; Mizera, Andrzej; Chrapek, Magdalena; Urbaniak, Mariusz; Kaca, Wieslaw

    2016-07-01

    Proteus spp. strains are some of the most important pathogens associated with complicated urinary tract infections and bacteremia affecting patients with immunodeficiency and long-term urinary catheterization. For epidemiological purposes, various molecular typing methods have been developed for this pathogen. However, these methods are labor intensive and time consuming. We evaluated a new method of differentiation between strains. A collection of Proteus spp. strains was analyzed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region. ATR FT-IR spectroscopy used in conjunction with a diamond ATR accessory directly produced the biochemical profile of the surface chemistry of bacteria. We conclude that a combination of ATR FT-IR spectroscopy and mathematical modeling provides a fast and reliable alternative for discrimination between Proteus isolates, contributing to epidemiological research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Proteus-MOC: A 3D deterministic solver incorporating 2D method of characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Marin-Lafleche, A.; Smith, M. A.; Lee, C.

    2013-07-01

    A new transport solution methodology was developed by combining the two-dimensional method of characteristics with the discontinuous Galerkin method for the treatment of the axial variable. The method, which can be applied to arbitrary extruded geometries, was implemented in PROTEUS-MOC and includes parallelization in group, angle, plane, and space using a top level GMRES linear algebra solver. Verification tests were performed to show accuracy and stability of the method with the increased number of angular directions and mesh elements. Good scalability with parallelism in angle and axial planes is displayed. (authors)

  4. Effect of initial carbon sources on the performance of microbial fuel cells containing Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kim, N; Choi, Y; Jung, S; Kim, S

    2000-10-05

    Mediator-coupled microbial fuel cells containing Proteus vulgaris were constructed and the cell performance was tested. Fuel cell efficiency depended on the carbon source in the initial medium of the microorganism. Maltose and trehalose were not utilized substantially by P. vulgaris; however, their presence in the initial medium resulted in enhanced cell performance. In particular, galactose showed 63% coulombic efficiency in a biofuel cell after P. vulgaris was cultured in a trehalose-containing medium. This work demonstrates that optimum utilization of carbon sources by microorganisms, which leads to the maximization of fuel cell performance, is possible simply by adjusting initial carbon sources.

  5. Structure and cross-reactivity of the O-antigen of Proteus vulgaris O8.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, A V; Babicka, D; Shashkov, A S; Arbatsky, N P; Senchenkova, S N; Rozalski, A; Knirel, Y A

    1999-05-31

    A high-molecular-mass O-specific polysaccharide was obtained by mild acid degradation of Proteus vulgaris O8 lipopolysaccharide followed by gel permeation chromatography. Studies of the polysaccharide by sugar and methylation analyses and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, and H-detected 1H, 13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) experiments, demonstrated the presence of a tetrasaccharide repeating unit having the following structure: [sequence: see text] The role of an epitope associated with the alpha-L-FucpNAc-(1-->3)-D-GlcpNAc disaccharide in serological cross-reactivity of P. vulgaris O8 is discussed.

  6. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  7. Proteus: a direct forcing method in the simulations of particulate flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-Gang; Michaelides, Efstathios E.

    2005-01-01

    A new and efficient direct numerical method for the simulation of particulate flows is introduced. The method combines desired elements of the immersed boundary method, the direct forcing method and the lattice Boltzmann method. Adding a forcing term in the momentum equation enforces the no-slip condition on the boundary of a moving particle. By applying the direct forcing scheme, Proteus eliminates the need for the determination of free parameters, such as the stiffness coefficient in the penalty scheme or the two relaxation parameters in the adaptive-forcing scheme. The method presents a significant improvement over the previously introduced immersed-boundary-lattice-Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) where the forcing term was computed using a penalty method and a user-defined parameter. The method allows the enforcement of the rigid body motion of a particle in a more efficient way. Compared to the "bounce-back" scheme used in the conventional LBM, the direct-forcing method provides a smoother computational boundary for particles and is capable of achieving results at higher Reynolds number flows. By using a set of Lagrangian points to track the boundary of a particle, Proteus eliminates any need for the determination of the boundary nodes that are prescribed by the "bounce-back" scheme at every time step. It also makes computations for particles of irregular shapes simpler and more efficient. Proteus has been developed in two- as well as three-dimensions. This new method has been validated by comparing its results with those from experimental measurements for a single sphere settling in an enclosure under gravity. As a demonstration of the efficiency and capabilities of the present method, the settling of a large number (1232) of spherical particles is simulated in a narrow box under two different boundary conditions. It is found that when the no-slip boundary condition is imposed at the front and rear sides of the box the particles motion is significantly hindered

  8. Proteus - A Mission to Investigate the Origins of Earth’s Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, Karen J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie Claire

    2015-08-01

    We still do not know how water and ingredients necessary for life were delivered to our planet. Comets were long thought to have seeded Earth with water, but new models and measurements have shown that comets may not be the right place to look. A growing number of small volatile-rich worlds in the outer asteroid belt - the main belt comets (MBCs) - have been observed to shed dust tails near perihelion and may hold the key to understanding the origin of inner solar system water.Proteus is a proposed Discovery-class solar system origins mission. Proteus, a 6.5-year mission, launches in 2021 to rendezvous with MBC 238P/Read shortly before it reaches perihelion in early 2028 and remains there for five months during its period of maximum activity. 238P/Read is of special interest because en route we have the opportunity to fly past and characterize its likely parent, asteroid 24 Themis. Proteus addresses five science objectives: (1) to determine where Read’s ices formed; (2) to distinguish whether the ices have a nitrogen isotope signature more like Earth or the outer solar system; (3) to determine at what temperature the ices formed; (4) to determine Read’s physical properties using surface composition and geomorphology, and (5) to determine whether Read’s outgassing emanates from discrete sources or diffuse regions and measure the scattering properties of the outgassed dust.To answer questions about the origin of water, isotopic measurements of MBC volatiles will be made with a new sensitive, precise, highly mature mass spectrometer, measuring isotopic abundances of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen as well as the abundances of noble gases. These measurements will be correlated with predictions from two types of models: chemical models which describe the distance-dependent chemistry in the nebula and dynamical models which describe where small bodies were gravitationally scattered during the era of giant-planet migration. Proteus additionally flies two redundant

  9. Molecular characteristics of Salmonella genomic island 1 in Proteus mirabilis isolates from poultry farms in China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chang-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Liu, Bi-Hui; Wang, Hong-Ning; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Xu, Chang-Wen; Xia, Qing-Qing; Cheng, Han; Zhang, Dong-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Six out of the 64 studied Proteus mirabilis isolates from 11 poultry farms in China contained Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). PCR mapping showed that the complete nucleotide sequences of SGI1s ranged from 33.2 to 42.5 kb. Three novel variants, SGI1-W, SGI1-X, and SGI1-Y, have been characterized. Resistance genes lnuF, dfrA25, and qnrB2 were identified in SGI1 for the first time. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. New TEM variant (TEM-92) produced by Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii isolates.

    PubMed

    de Champs, C; Monne, C; Bonnet, R; Sougakoff, W; Sirot, D; Chanal, C; Sirot, J

    2001-04-01

    The sequences of the bla(TEM) genes encoding TEM-92 in Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii isolates were determined and were found to be identical. Except for positions 218 (Lys-6) and 512 (Lys-104), the nucleotide sequence of bla(TEM-92) was identical to that of bla(TEM-20), including the sequence of the promoter region harboring a 135-bp deletion combined with a G-162-->T substitution. The deduced amino acid sequence of TEM-92 differed from that of TEM-52 by the presence of a substitution (Gln-6-->Lys) in the peptide signal.

  11. Rapid detection of urinary tract infections caused by Proteus spp. using PNA-FISH.

    PubMed

    Almeida, C; Azevedo, N F; Bento, J C; Cerca, N; Ramos, H; Vieira, M J; Keevil, C W

    2013-06-01

    We developed a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for the rapid detection of Proteus spp. in urine, using a novel peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe. Testing on 137 urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections has shown specificity and sensitivity values of 98 % (95 % CI, 93.2-99.7) and 100 % (95 % CI, 80,8-100), respectively, when compared with CHROMagar Orientation medium. Results indicate that PNA-FISH is a reliable alternative to traditional culture methods and can reduce the diagnosis time to approximately 2 h.

  12. First report of an OXA-48-producing multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain from Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mediavilla, Jose R; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the bla(OXA-48)-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene bla(OXA-48), extended spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14), and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3')-VIb.

  13. Warthog: A MOOSE-Based Application for the Direct Code Coupling of BISON and PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alexander J.; Slattery, Stuart; Billings, Jay Jay

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program from the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy provides a robust toolkit for the modeling and simulation of current and future advanced nuclear reactor designs. This toolkit provides these technologies organized across product lines: two divisions targeted at fuels and end-to-end reactor modeling, and a third for integration, coupling, and high-level workflow management. The Fuels Product Line and the Reactor Product line provide advanced computational technologies that serve each respective field well, however, their current lack of integration presents a major impediment to future improvements of simulation solution fidelity. There is a desire for the capability to mix and match tools across Product Lines in an effort to utilize the best from both to improve NEAMS modeling and simulation technologies. This report details a new effort to provide this Product Line interoperability through the development of a new application called Warthog. This application couples the BISON Fuel Performance application from the Fuels Product Line and the PROTEUS Core Neutronics application from the Reactors Product Line in an effort to utilize the best from all parts of the NEAMS toolkit and improve overall solution fidelity of nuclear fuel simulations. To achieve this, Warthog leverages as much prior work from the NEAMS program as possible, and in doing so, enables interoperability between the disparate MOOSE and SHARP frameworks, and the libMesh and MOAB mesh data formats. This report describes this work in full. We begin with a detailed look at the individual NEAMS framework technologies used and developed in the various Product Lines, and the current status of their interoperability. We then introduce the Warthog application: its overall architecture and the ways it leverages the best existing tools from across the NEAMS toolkit to enable BISON-PROTEUS integration. Furthermore, we show how Warthog

  14. N-(1-carboxyethyl)alanine (alanopine), a new non-sugar component of lipopolysaccharides of Providencia and Proteus.

    PubMed

    Kocharova, Nina A; Kondakova, Anna N; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Perepelov, Andrei V; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2009-10-12

    O-Polysaccharides were released by mild acid degradation of lipopolysaccharides of Providencia alcalifaciens O35 and Proteus vulgaris O76 and were studied by 1D and 2D (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopies, including HMBC and NOESY (ROESY) experiments. Both polysaccharides were found to contain N-(1-carboxyethyl)alanine (alanopine) that is N-linked to 4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucose. Analysis of published data [Vinogradov, E.; Perry, M. B. Eur. J. Biochem.2000, 267, 2439-2446] shows that alanopine is present also on the same sugar in the lipopolysaccharide core of Proteus mirabilis O6 and O57.

  15. The Ciprofloxacin Impact on Biofilm Formation by Proteus Mirabilis and P. Vulgaris Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecinska-Pirog, Joanna; Skowron, Krzysztof; Bartczak, Wojciech; Gospodarek-Komkowska, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Background Proteus spp. bacilli belong to opportunistic human pathogens, which are primarily responsible for urinary tract and wound infections. An important virulence factor is their ability to form biofilms that greatly reduce the effectiveness of antibiotics in the site of infection. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the value of the minimum concentration of ciprofloxacin that eradicates a biofilm of Proteus spp. strains. Materials and Methods A biofilm formation of 20 strains of P. mirabilis and 20 strains of P. vulgaris were evaluated by a spectrophotometric method using 0.1% 2, 3, 5-Triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride solution (TTC, AVANTORTM). On the basis of the results of the absorbance of the formazan, a degree of reduction of biofilm and minimum biofilm eradication (MBE) values of MBE50 and MBE90 were determined. Results All tested strains formed a biofilm. A value of 1.0 μg/mL ciprofloxacin is MBE50 for the strains of both tested species. An MBE90 value of ciprofloxacin for isolates of P. vulgaris was 2 μg/mL and for P. mirabilis was 512 μg/mL. Conclusions Minimum biofilm eradication values of ciprofloxacin obtained in the study are close to the values of the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC). PMID:27303616

  16. Lytic bacteriophage PM16 specific for Proteus mirabilis: a novel member of the genus Phikmvvirus.

    PubMed

    Morozova, V; Kozlova, Yu; Shedko, E; Kurilshikov, A; Babkin, I; Tupikin, A; Yunusova, A; Chernonosov, A; Baykov, I; Кondratov, I; Kabilov, M; Ryabchikova, E; Vlassov, V; Tikunova, N

    2016-09-01

    Lytic Proteus phage PM16, isolated from human faeces, is a novel virus that is specific for Proteus mirabilis cells. Bacteriophage PM16 is characterized by high stability, a short latency period, large burst size and the occurrence of low phage resistance. Phage PM16 was classified as a member of the genus Phikmvvirus on the basis of genome organization, gene synteny, and protein sequences similarities. Within the genus Phikmvvirus, phage PM16 is grouped with Vibrio phage VP93, Pantoea phage LIMElight, Acinetobacter phage Petty, Enterobacter phage phiKDA1, and KP34-like bacteriophages. An investigation of the phage-cell interaction demonstrated that phage PM16 attached to the cell surface, not to the bacterial flagella. The study of P. mirabilis mutant cells obtained during the phage-resistant bacterial cell assay that were resistant to phage PM16 re-infection revealed a non-swarming phenotype, changes in membrane characteristics, and the absence of flagella. Presumably, the resistance of non-swarming P. mirabilis cells to phage PM16 re-infection is determined by changes in membrane macromolecular composition and is associated with the absence of flagella and a non-swarming phenotype.

  17. Copper response of Proteus hauseri based on proteomic and genetic expression and cell morphology analyses.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Zheng, Xuesong; Wang, Nan; Chen, Bor-Yann; Zhang, Xia; Lu, Yinghua

    2014-07-01

    The copper response of Proteus hauseri ZMd44 was determined using one-dimensional (1D) gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry for a similarity analysis of proteins isolated from P. hauseri ZMd44 cultured in CuSO4-bearing LB medium. Candidate proteins identified as a copper-transporting P-type ATPase (CTPP), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), flagellin (Fla), and outer membrane proteins (Omps) were the major copper-associated proteins in P. hauseri. In a comparative analysis of subcellular (i.e., periplasmic, intracellular, and inner membranes) and cellular debris, proteomics analysis revealed a distinct differential expression of proteins in P. hauseri with and without copper ion exposure. These findings were consistent with the transcription level dynamics determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Based on a genetic cluster analysis of copper-associated proteins from P. hauseri, Fla and one of the Omps showed greater diversity in their protein sequences compared to those of other Proteus species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the observed growth on LB agar plates showed that the swarming motility of cells was significantly suppressed and inhibited upon Cu(II) exposure. Thus, copper stress could have important therapeutic significance due to the loss of swarming motility capacity in P. hauseri, which causes urinary tract infections.

  18. Mixed-Culture Interactions I. Commensalism of Proteus vulgaris with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Shindala, Adnan; Bungay, Henry R.; Krieg, Noel R.; Culbert, Kathleen

    1965-01-01

    Shindala, Adnan (Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg), Henry R. Bungay III, Noel R. Krieg, and Kathleen Culbert. Mixed-culture interactions. I. Commensalism of Proteus vulgaris with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in continuous culture. J. Bacteriol. 89:693–696. 1965.—A chemically defined medium was selected which supported the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not Proteus vulgaris, in pure culture; however, P. vulgaris grew in mixed culture with the yeast. Steady-state populations of each organism in mixed culture at various dilution rates were enumerated with a Coulter electronic counter. The size differences in the organisms permitted easy resolution. An essential niacinlike factor elaborated by the yeast and required by the bacterium caused a dependence of the bacterium on the growth of the yeast. At high dilution rates causing wash-out, the bacterial population continued to reflect changes in the numbers of yeast. The numbers of S. cerevisiae were identical in pure culture or in mixed culture; thus, the interaction is a true commensalism. A single addition of niacin or related compound was made to a steady-state mixed culture, and the dependence of the bacterium on the yeast was upset. The numbers of the bacteria rose, causing a decrease in the yeast population, until continued pumping diluted the added niacin and restored the initial steady state. PMID:14273647

  19. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

  20. Ultrastructure of previtellogene oocytes in the neotenic cave salamander Proteus anguinus anguinus (Amphibia, Urodela, Proteidae).

    PubMed

    Mali, Lilijana Bizjak; Bulog, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Oogenesis in the neotenic, cave dwelling salamander Proteus anguinus anguinus has not been studied yet, and this study provides a detailed description of the early growth of the oocytes. Early previtellogene oocytes ranging from 100 to 600 µm in diameter were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. The oocytes were divided into two stages based on size, color, and histology. Stage I oocytes can be identified by their transparent cytoplasm and a homogenous juxtanuclear mass, composed of numerous lipid droplets and mitochondria. Stage II oocytes are no longer transparent and have increased in diameter to 300- 600 µm, and many cortical alveoli differing in size have appeared. The common and most predominant ultrastructural characteristics of both stages of previtellogene oocytes are extensive quantities of smooth membrane, numerous mitochondria, and lipid droplets, as well as abundant free ribosomes. Myeline-like structures and remarkable annulate lamellae of closely packed membrane stacks are also frequently observed. Previtellogenic oocytes are the most predominant oocytes in the ovaries of Proteus, and while they possess certain structural characteristics typical for other amphibians, some features are unique and could result from adaptation to the subterranean environment.

  1. Urease activity of Proteus species in filtered compared with autoclaved urea media.

    PubMed

    HATCH, M H; STUART, C A

    1962-05-01

    Hatch, M. H. (Brown University, Providence, R.I.) and C. A. Stuart. Urease activity of Proteus species in filtered compared with autoclaved urea media. J. Bacteriol. 83:1119-1123. 1962.-Urease activity of a number of strains of four Proteus species was compared in a filtered medium and an autoclaved medium. Various amounts of saline suspensions of the organisms were used as inocula for the two media. In some experiments Seitz-filtered yeast extract was added to autoclaved basal urea medium. All tests were incubated at 35 C and read 8, 12, 24, and 48 hr after inoculation. The filtered medium appeared superior to the autoclaved medium, particularly when small inocula were employed. Under these conditions, many tests with all four species were negative in the autoclaved medium at 48 hr, in contrast to 100% positive reactions in the filtered medium with all species except P. morganii. The experiments in which Seitz-filtered yeast extract was added to autoclaved basal urea medium suggested that both destruction of growth-promoting substances in the yeast extract and production of conditions inhibitory for growth during autoclaving might be involved in the differences observed between the two media.

  2. Anaerobic choline metabolism in microcompartments promotes growth and swarming of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jameson, Eleanor; Fu, Tiantian; Brown, Ian R; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Purdy, Kevin J; Frank, Stefanie; Chen, Yin

    2016-09-01

    Gammaproteobacteria are important gut microbes but only persist at low levels in the healthy gut. The ecology of Gammaproteobacteria in the gut environment is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that choline is an important growth substrate for representatives of Gammaproteobacteria. Using Proteus mirabilis as a model, we investigate the role of choline metabolism and demonstrate that the cutC gene, encoding a choline-trimethylamine lyase, is essential for choline degradation to trimethylamine by targeted mutagenesis of cutC and subsequent complementation experiments. Proteus mirabilis can rapidly utilize choline to enhance growth rate and cell yield in broth culture. Importantly, choline also enhances swarming-associated colony expansion of P. mirabilis under anaerobic conditions on a solid surface. Comparative transcriptomics demonstrated that choline not only induces choline-trimethylamine lyase but also genes encoding shell proteins for the formation of bacterial microcompartments. Subsequent analyses by transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of such novel microcompartments in cells cultivated in liquid broth and hyper-flagellated swarmer cells from solid medium. Together, our study reveals choline metabolism as an adaptation strategy for P. mirabilis and contributes to better understand the ecology of this bacterium in health and disease. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae: identification, isolation, and characterization of a new ambient-temperature fimbria.

    PubMed Central

    Massad, G; Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Urinary tract infections involving Proteus mirabilis may lead to complications including bladder and kidney stones, acute pyelonephritis, and bacteremia. This bacterium produces a number of fimbriae, two of which, MR/P fimbria and P. mirabilis fimbria, have been shown to contribute to the ability of this pathogen to colonize the bladder and kidney. We have now purified and characterized a previously undescribed fimbria of P. mirabilis, named ambient-temperature fimbria (ATF). Electron microscopy of a pure preparation and immunogold labeling of cells demonstrated that ATF was fimbrial in nature. The major fimbrial subunit of ATF has an apparent molecular weight of 24,000. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, E-X-T-G-T-P-A-P-T-E-V-T-V-D-G-G-T-I-D-F, did not show significant similarity to that of any previously described fimbrial protein. ATF was expressed by all eight P. mirabilis strains examined. Culture conditions affected expression of ATF, with optimal expression observed in static broth cultures at 23 degrees C. This fimbria was not produced by cells grown at 42 degrees C or on solid medium. Expression of ATF did not correlate with mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) or mannose-resistant/Klebsiella-like (MR/K) hemagglutination and represents a novel fimbria of P. mirabilis. Images PMID:7909538

  4. Development of an Intranasal Vaccine To Prevent Urinary Tract Infection by Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Lockatell, C. Virginia; Johnson, David E.; Lane, M. Chelsea; Warren, John W.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2004-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis commonly infects the complicated urinary tract and is associated with urolithiasis. Stone formation is caused by bacterial urease, which hydrolyzes urea to ammonia, causing local pH to rise, and leads to the subsequent precipitation of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) and calcium phosphate (apatite) crystals. To prevent these infections, we vaccinated CBA mice with formalin-killed bacteria or purified mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, a surface antigen expressed by P. mirabilis during experimental urinary tract infection, via four routes of immunization: subcutaneous, intranasal, transurethral, and oral. We assessed the efficacy of vaccination using the CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Subcutaneous or intranasal immunization with formalin-killed bacteria and intranasal or transurethral immunization with purified MR/P fimbriae significantly protected CBA mice from ascending urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.05). To investigate the potential of MrpH, the MR/P fimbrial tip adhesin, as a vaccine, the mature MrpH peptide (residues 23 to 275, excluding the signal peptide), and the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of MrpH (residues 23 to 157) were overexpressed as C-terminal fusions to maltose-binding protein (MBP) and purified on amylose resins. Intranasal immunization of CBA mice with MBP-MrpH (residues 23 to 157) conferred effective protection against urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.002). PMID:14688082

  5. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae: identification, isolation, and characterization of a new ambient-temperature fimbria.

    PubMed

    Massad, G; Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-05-01

    Urinary tract infections involving Proteus mirabilis may lead to complications including bladder and kidney stones, acute pyelonephritis, and bacteremia. This bacterium produces a number of fimbriae, two of which, MR/P fimbria and P. mirabilis fimbria, have been shown to contribute to the ability of this pathogen to colonize the bladder and kidney. We have now purified and characterized a previously undescribed fimbria of P. mirabilis, named ambient-temperature fimbria (ATF). Electron microscopy of a pure preparation and immunogold labeling of cells demonstrated that ATF was fimbrial in nature. The major fimbrial subunit of ATF has an apparent molecular weight of 24,000. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, E-X-T-G-T-P-A-P-T-E-V-T-V-D-G-G-T-I-D-F, did not show significant similarity to that of any previously described fimbrial protein. ATF was expressed by all eight P. mirabilis strains examined. Culture conditions affected expression of ATF, with optimal expression observed in static broth cultures at 23 degrees C. This fimbria was not produced by cells grown at 42 degrees C or on solid medium. Expression of ATF did not correlate with mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) or mannose-resistant/Klebsiella-like (MR/K) hemagglutination and represents a novel fimbria of P. mirabilis.

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Isolated From Newly Weaned Infant Rhesus Monkeys and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenhai; He, Zhanlong; Huang, Fen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proteus mirabilis is an important uropathogen that causes complicated Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) and induces diarrhea in infants. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate P. mirabilis infection in newly weaned infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) with diarrhea. Materials and Methods: Stool samples were collected from 74 rhesus monkeys and 12 ferrets with diarrhea. Proteus mirabilis was isolated from the samples through Polymerase Chain Reaction. The isolated P. mirabilis was subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Results: Seven (7/74, 9.5%) and four (4/12, 30%) P. mirabilis strains were detected in the stool samples collected from the monkeys and ferrets, respectively. Sequence analyses showed that the isolated P. mirabilis was closely related to P. mirabilis strain HI4320, which was isolated from the urine of a patient with a long-term indwelling urinary catheter. In addition, the isolates demonstrated multidrug resistance. Conclusions: Rhesus monkeys and ferrets are susceptible to P. mirabilis, making them useful as animal models for future studies on the mechanism of P. mirabilis-induced UTI and its corresponding treatment. PMID:26301055

  7. Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbrial operon: genetic organization, nucleotide sequence, and conditions for expression.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis, an agent of urinary tract infection, expresses at least four fimbrial types. Among these are the MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. MrpA, the structural subunit, is optimally expressed at 37 degrees C in Luria broth cultured statically for 48 h by each of seven strains examined. Genes encoding this fimbria were isolated, and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The mrp gene cluster encoded by 7,293 bp predicts eight polypeptides: MrpI (22,133 Da), MrpA (17,909 Da), MrpB (19,632 Da), MrpC (96,823 Da), MrpD (27,886 Da), MrpE (19,470 Da), MrpF (17,363 Da), and MrpG (13,169 Da). mrpI is upstream of the gene encoding the major structural subunit gene mrpA and is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the rest of the operon. All predicted polypeptides share > or = 25% amino acid identity with at least one other enteric fimbrial gene product encoded by the pap, fim, smf, fan, or mrk gene clusters.

  8. Proteus mirabilis ambient-temperature fimbriae: cloning and nucleotide sequence of the aft gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Massad, G; Fulkerson, J F; Watson, D C; Mobley, H L

    1996-01-01

    Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis produces at least four types of fimbriae. Amino acid sequences from two peptides, derived by tryptic digestion of the structural subunit of one type of these fimbriae, the ambient-temperature fimbriae, were determined: NVVPGQPSSTQ and LIEGENQLNYNA. PCR primers, based on these sequences and that of the N terminus, were used to amplify a 359-bp fragment. A cosmid clone, isolated from a P. mirabilis genomic library by hybridization with the 359-bp PCR product, was used to determine the nucleotide sequence of the atf gene cluster. A 3,903-bp region encodes three polypeptides: AtfA, the structural subunit; AtfB, the chaperone; and AtfC, the outer membrane molecular usher. No fimbria-related genes are evident either 5' or 3' to the three contiguous genes. AtfA demonstrates significant amino acid sequence identity with type 1 major fimbrial subunits of several enteric species. The 359-bp PCR product hybridized strongly with all Proteus isolates (n = 9) and 25% of 355 Escherichia coli isolates but failed to hybridize with any of 26 isolates among nine other uropathogenic species. Ambient-temperature fimbriae of P. mirabilis may represent a novel type of fimbriae of enteric species. PMID:8926119

  9. Proteus mirabilis ambient-temperature fimbriae: cloning and nucleotide sequence of the aft gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Massad, G; Fulkerson, J F; Watson, D C; Mobley, H L

    1996-10-01

    Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis produces at least four types of fimbriae. Amino acid sequences from two peptides, derived by tryptic digestion of the structural subunit of one type of these fimbriae, the ambient-temperature fimbriae, were determined: NVVPGQPSSTQ and LIEGENQLNYNA. PCR primers, based on these sequences and that of the N terminus, were used to amplify a 359-bp fragment. A cosmid clone, isolated from a P. mirabilis genomic library by hybridization with the 359-bp PCR product, was used to determine the nucleotide sequence of the atf gene cluster. A 3,903-bp region encodes three polypeptides: AtfA, the structural subunit; AtfB, the chaperone; and AtfC, the outer membrane molecular usher. No fimbria-related genes are evident either 5' or 3' to the three contiguous genes. AtfA demonstrates significant amino acid sequence identity with type 1 major fimbrial subunits of several enteric species. The 359-bp PCR product hybridized strongly with all Proteus isolates (n = 9) and 25% of 355 Escherichia coli isolates but failed to hybridize with any of 26 isolates among nine other uropathogenic species. Ambient-temperature fimbriae of P. mirabilis may represent a novel type of fimbriae of enteric species.

  10. Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbrial operon: genetic organization, nucleotide sequence, and conditions for expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, an agent of urinary tract infection, expresses at least four fimbrial types. Among these are the MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. MrpA, the structural subunit, is optimally expressed at 37 degrees C in Luria broth cultured statically for 48 h by each of seven strains examined. Genes encoding this fimbria were isolated, and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The mrp gene cluster encoded by 7,293 bp predicts eight polypeptides: MrpI (22,133 Da), MrpA (17,909 Da), MrpB (19,632 Da), MrpC (96,823 Da), MrpD (27,886 Da), MrpE (19,470 Da), MrpF (17,363 Da), and MrpG (13,169 Da). mrpI is upstream of the gene encoding the major structural subunit gene mrpA and is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the rest of the operon. All predicted polypeptides share > or = 25% amino acid identity with at least one other enteric fimbrial gene product encoded by the pap, fim, smf, fan, or mrk gene clusters. Images PMID:7910820

  11. Structure of the alanopine-containing O-polysaccharide and serological cross-reactivity of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris HSC 438 classified into a new Proteus serogroup, O76.

    PubMed

    Siwinska, Malgorzata; Shashkov, Alexander S; Kondakova, Anna N; Drzewiecka, Dominika; Zablotni, Agnieszka; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Valueva, Olga A; Zych, Krystyna; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2013-06-01

    The O-polysaccharide was isolated by mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris HSC 438, and the following structure was established by chemical methods and one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy: →3)-β-d-Quip4NAlo-(1→3)-α-d-Galp6Ac-(1→6)-α-d-Glcp-(1→3)-α-l-FucpNAc-(1→3)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1→, where d-Qui4N stands for 4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-glucose and Alo for N-((S)-1-carboxyethyl)-l-alanine (alanopine); only about half of the Gal residues are O-acetylated. This structure is unique among the Proteus O-polysaccharides, and therefore it is proposed to classify P. vulgaris HSC 438 into a new Proteus serogroup, O76. A serological cross-reactivity of HSC 438 O-antiserum and lipopolysaccharides of some other Proteus serogroups was observed and accounted for by shared epitopes on the O-polysaccharides or lipopolysaccharide core regions, including that associated with d-Qui4NAlo.

  12. Modeling Multiphase Coastal and Hydraulic Processes in an Interactive Python Environment with the Open Source Proteus Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M. W.; Ahmadia, A. J.; Bakhtyar, R.; Miller, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrology is dominated by multiphase flow processes, due to the importance of capturing water's interaction with soil and air phases. Unfortunately, many different mathematical model formulations are required to model particular processes and scales of interest, and each formulation often requires specialized numerical methods. The Proteus toolkit is a software package for research on models for coastal and hydraulic processes and improvements in numerics, particularly 3D multiphase processes and parallel numerics. The models considered include multiphase flow, shallow water flow, turbulent free surface flow, and various flow-driven processes. We will discuss the objectives of Proteus and recent evolution of the toolkit's design as well as present examples of how it has been used used to construct computational models of multiphase flows for the US Army Corps of Engineers. Proteus is also an open source toolkit authored primarily within the US Army Corps of Engineers, and used, developed, and maintained by a small community of researchers in both theoretical modeling and computational methods research. We will discuss how open source and community development practices have played a role in the creation of Proteus.

  13. Taxonomic characterisation of Proteus terrae sp. nov., a N2O-producing, nitrate-ammonifying soil bacterium.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Undine; Augustin, Jürgen; Spröer, Cathrin; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Schumann, Peter; Ulrich, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    In the context of studying the influence of N-fertilization on N2 and N2O flux rates in relation to the soil bacterial community composition in fen peat grassland, a group of bacterial strains was isolated that performed dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium and concomitantly produced N2O. The amount of nitrous oxide produced was influenced by the C/N ratio of the medium. The potential to generate nitrous oxide was increased by higher availability of nitrate-N. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA and the rpoB gene sequences demonstrated that the investigated isolates belong to the genus Proteus, showing high similarity with the respective type strains of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus penneri. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed differences at the species level. These differences were substantiated by MALDI-TOF MS analysis and several distinct physiological characteristics. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the soil isolates represent a novel species for which the name Proteus terrae sp. nov. (type strain N5/687(T) =DSM 29910(T) =LMG 28659(T)) is proposed.

  14. Investigation of the types and characteristics of the proteolytic enzymes formed by diverse strains of Proteus species.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W

    1999-07-01

    Many diverse clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis (48 strains), P. penneri (25), P. vulgaris biogroup 2 (48) and P. vulgaris biogroup 3 (21) from man were examined for their ability to produce proteolytic enzymes and the nature and characteristics of the proteases were studied. All the P. penneri isolates, most (94-90%) of the P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris biogroup 2 isolates, but only 71% of the P. vulgaris biogroup 3 isolates, secreted proteolytic enzymes. These were detected most readily at pH 8 with gelatin as substrate. A strong correlation was found between the ability of a strain to form swarming growth and its ability to secrete proteases. Non-swarming isolates invariably appeared to be non-proteolytic. However, some isolates, particularly of P. vulgaris biogroup 3, were non-proteolytic even when they formed swarming growth. Analysis of the secreted enzymes of the different Proteus spp. on polyacrylamide-gelatin gels under various constraints of pH and other factors showed that they were all EDTA-sensitive metalloproteinases. Analysis of the kinetics of production of the proteases revealed the formation of an additional protease of undefined type and function that was cell-associated and formed before the others were secreted. The secreted protease was subsequently modified to two isoforms whose mass (53-46 kDa) varied with the Proteus spp. and the strain. There was no evidence that the secreted proteases of strains of Proteus spp. were of types other than metalloproteinases.

  15. A sensor to detect the early stages in the development of crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm on indwelling bladder catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D J; Jones, S M; Adusei, G O; Waters, M G

    2006-04-01

    A simple sensor has been developed to detect the early stages of urinary catheter encrustation and avoid the clinical crises induced by catheter blockage. In laboratory models of colonization by Proteus mirabilis, the sensor signaled encrustation at an average time of 43 h before catheters were blocked with crystalline biofilm.

  16. The Assessment of Proteus mirabilis Susceptibility to Ceftazidime and Ciprofloxacin and the Impact of These Antibiotics at Subinhibitory Concentrations on Proteus mirabilis Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecińska-Piróg, Joanna; Zniszczol, Katarzyna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Rods of the Proteus genus are commonly isolated from patients, especially from the urinary tracts of the catheterised patients. The infections associated with biomaterials are crucial therapeutic obstacles, due to the bactericidal resistance of the biofilm. The aim of this study was to assess the susceptibility of P. mirabilis planktonic forms to ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime, the ability to form biofilm, and the impact of chosen sub-MIC concentrations of these antibiotics on biofilm at different stages of its formation. The research included 50 P. mirabilis strains isolated from wounds and the urinary tracts from patients of the University Hospital No. 1 in Bydgoszcz. The assessment of susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime was conducted using micromethods. The impact of sub-MIC concentrations of the chosen antibiotics on the biofilm was measured using the TTC method. The resistance to ciprofloxacin was confirmed for 20 strains (40.0%) while to ceftazidime for 32 (64.0%) of the tested P. mirabilis strains. All of the tested strains formed biofilm: 24.0% weakly, 26.0% moderately, and 50.0% strongly. It was determined that ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime caused eradication of the biofilm. Moreover, the connection between origin of the strains, biofilm maturity level, and resistance to antibiotics was proved. PMID:24151628

  17. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  18. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  19. Greek rheumatoid arthritis patients have elevated levels of antibodies against antigens from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, Georgios; Christopoulou, V; Routsias, J G; Babionitakis, A; Antoniadis, C; Vaiopoulos, G

    2017-03-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from different ethnic groups present elevated levels of antibodies against Proteus mirabilis. This finding implicates P. mirabilis in the development of RA. The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of P. mirabilis in the etiopathogenesis of RA in Greek RA patients. In this study, 63 patients with RA and 38 healthy controls were included. Class-specific antibodies IgM, IgG, and IgA against three human cross-reactive and non-cross-reactive synthetic peptides from P. mirabilis-hemolysin (HpmB), urease C (UreC), and urease F (UreF)-were performed in all subjects, using the ELISA method. RA patients had elevated levels of IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies against HpmB and UreC Proteus peptide which are significantly different compared to healthy controls: p = 0.005, p < 0.001, and p = 0.003 and p = 0.007, p = 0.002, and p < 0.001, correspondingly. Also, elevated levels of IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies against the UreF Proteus peptide-which are non-cross-reactive with human tissue antigens-were observed and their significant difference compared to healthy controls (p = 0.007, p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Anti-peptide antibodies in RA patients showed a significant correlation with rheumatoid factors (Rf), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP), especially when patients were divided into subgroups according to the receiving treatment. Greek RA patients present elevated levels of antibodies against P. mirabilis antigenic epitopes, such as in North European populations, albeit Greek RA patients presenting the cross-reaction antigen in a low percentage. These results indicate that P. mirabilis through the molecular mimicry mechanism leads to inflammation and damage of the joints in RA.

  20. Comprehensive inhibitor profiling of the Proteus mirabilis metalloprotease virulence factor ZapA (mirabilysin).

    PubMed

    Carson, Louise; Cathcart, George R; Scott, Christopher J; Hollenberg, Morley D; Walker, Brian; Ceri, Howard; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2011-10-01

    In this study we report for the first time the comprehensive inhibitor profiling of the Proteus mirabilis metalloprotease virulence factor ZapA (mirabilysin) using a 160 compound focused library of N-alpha mercaptoamide dipeptides, in order to map the S(1)(') and S(2)(') binding site preferences of this important enzyme. This study has revealed a preference for the aromatic residues tyrosine and tryptophan in P(1)(') and aliphatic residues in P(2)('). From this library, six compounds were identified which exhibited sub- to low-micromolar K(i) values. The most potent inactivator, SH-CO(2)-Y-V-NH(2) was capable of preventing ZapA-mediated hydrolysis of heat-denatured IgA, indicating that these inhibitors may be capable of protecting host proteins against ZapA during colonisation and infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray investigation of holotryptophanases from Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Dementieva, I S; Zakomirdina, L N; Sinitzina, N I; Antson, A A; Wilson, K S; Isupov, M N; Lebedev, A A; Harutyunyan, E H

    1994-01-14

    Crystals of Proteus vulgaris holotryptophanase have been grown by the hanging-drop technique using polyethylene glycol 4000 as precipitant in the presence of monovalent cations K+ or Cs+. Orthorhombic crystals (P2(1)2(1)2(1)) grown with Cs+ have unit cell parameters a = 115.0 A, b = 118.2 A and c = 153.7 A and diffract to 1.8 A. There are four subunits of the tetrameric molecule in the asymmetric unit. Native data have been collected to 2.5 A resolution. The 3.4 A data were collected from tetragonal crystals of Escherichia coli holotryptophanase grown under conditions described by Kawata et al. (1991). The molecular replacement solution for this crystal form has been found using tyrosine phenol-lyase coordinates. The correct enantiomorph is P4(3)2(1)2. There are two subunits in the asymmetric unit.

  2. Co-solvent mediated thermal stabilization of chondroitinase ABC I form Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nazari-Robati, Mahdieh; Khajeh, Khosro; Aminian, Mahdi; Fathi-Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Golestani, Abolfazl

    2012-04-01

    Chondroitinase ABC I (cABC I) from Proteus vulgaris cleaves glycosaminoglycan chains which are responsible for most of the inhibition of axon regrowth in spinal cord injury. The clinical utilization of this enzyme is mainly limited by its thermal instability. This study has been undertaken to determine the effects of glycerol, sorbitol and trehalose on cABC I activity and thermal stability. The results indicated that the enzyme catalytic activity and intrinsic fluorescence intensity increased in the presence of these cosolvents whereas no considerable conformational changes observed in far-UV CD spectra. Thermal CD experiment revealed an increase in T(m) of cABC I in the presence of cosolvents which was significant for trehalose. Our results support the idea that cABC I has stabilized in the presence of glycerol, sorbitol and trehalose. Therefore, the use of these cosolvents seems to be promising for improvement in shelf-life and clinical applications of this drug enzyme.

  3. R-factor in Proteus vulgaris from ulcerative disease of fish, Channa punctatus.

    PubMed

    Mandal, S; Mandal, M; Pal, N K; Halder, P K; Basu, P S

    2002-05-01

    A Proteus vulgaris isolated from external ulcers of the fresh water fish Channa punctatus showed multidrug resistance and heavy metal tolerance. The isolate from the ulcer showed resistance to chloramphenicol (Ch), nalidixic acid (Nx), streptomycin (Str) and tetracycline (Tet) with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 750, 150, 75 and 125 microg/ml, respectively. The isolate showed growth in medium containing cadmium (Cd2+), up to a concentration of 2.5 mM indicating its heavy metal tolerance. Resistance to Ch, Str, Tet and Cd2+ of the isolate was lost after plasmid curing. Presence of plasmid DNA in the wild type and its absence in the cured P. vulgaris suggested that the resistance were plasmid mediated.

  4. Cloning of L-amino acid deaminase gene from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, E; Ito, K; Yoshimoto, T

    1999-12-01

    The L-amino acid degrading enzyme gene from Proteus vulgaris was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of the enzyme gene was clarified. An open reading frame of 1,413 bp starting at an ATG methionine codon was found, which encodes a protein of 471 amino acid residues, the calculated molecular weight of which is 51,518. The amino acid sequence of P. vulgaris was 58.6% identical with the L-amino acid deaminase of P. mirabilis. A significantly conserved sequence was found around the FAD-binding sequence of flavo-proteins. The partially purified wild and recombinant enzymes had the same substrate specificity for L-amino acids to form the respective keto-acids, however not for D-amino acids.

  5. Plant beneficial effect of two strains of Proteus vulgaris isolated from tea plantations.

    PubMed

    Barthakur, M; Bezbaruah, B

    1999-09-01

    Two strains of Proteus isolated from tea plantation soil were tested for their ability to colonise the roots of gram (Cicer arietinum), bean (Phaseolus radiatus) and mung (Phaseolus mungo) using a gnotobiotic system. Seeds bacterized with the two strains grew faster and showed significant increase in root and shoot enlargement of the plants tested. The bioactive fractions obtained from the culture filtrates and separated through HPLC showed that the plant growth promoting fractions were not always fungicidal and that the insecticidal fraction which was found only in RRLJ 16 was not plant growth promoting. These results suggest that the plant growth promotion effect of the plant beneficial bacteria may not always be due to disease suppression.

  6. Structure of the O-specific polysaccharide of the bacterium Proteus vulgaris O23.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, A V; Shashkov, A S; Babichka, D; Senchenkova, S N; Bartodziejska, B; Rozalski, A; Knirel, Y A

    2000-09-01

    An acidic O-specific polysaccharide was obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of the bacterium Proteus vulgaris O23 (strain PrK 44/57) and found to contain 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose, and D-galacturonic acid. Based on 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopic studies, including two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (COSY), total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), and 1H,13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) experiments, the following structure of the branched tetrasaccharide repeating unit of the polysaccharide was established: [figure], where the degree of O-acetylation of the terminal GalA residue at position 4 is about 80%. A structural similarity of the O-specific polysaccharides of P. vulgaris O23 and P. mirabilis O23 is discussed.

  7. Biochemical identification and characterization of DNA groups within the Proteus vulgaris complex.

    PubMed

    Janda, J M; Abbott, S L; Khashe, S; Probert, W

    2001-04-01

    We placed 43 isolates belonging to the Proteus vulgaris complex into proposed DNA groups (genomovars) using five previously recommended tests (tests for esculin hydrolysis, production of acid from salicin, L-rhamnose fermentation, and elaboration of DNase and lipase). On the basis of the results of these five tests, 49% of the isolates fell into DNA groups 5 and 6, 37% fell into DNA group 2, and the remaining 14% fell into DNA groups 3 and 4. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of 11 members of DNA groups 5 and 6 indicated that 10 of these isolates (91%) could be unambiguously assigned to one of these two genomospecies. Overall expression of selected enzymatic and virulence-associated characteristics did not differ significantly among DNA groups.

  8. Involvement of myosin VI immunoanalog in pinocytosis and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Magdalena; Wasik, Anna; Kłopocka, Wanda; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2008-12-01

    Recently, we found a 130-kDa myosin VI immunoanalog in amoeba, which bound to actin in an ATP-sensitive manner and in migrating amoebae colocalized to filamentous actin and dynamin II-containing vesicular structures. To further characterize this protein, we assessed its involvement in amoeba pinocytosis and phagocytosis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy of immunogold-stained cells revealed that, in pinocytotic and phagocytotic amoebae, the myosin VI immunoanalog was visible throughout the cells, including pinocytotic channels and pinocytotic vesicles as well as phagosomes and emerging phagocytic cups. Blocking endogenous protein with anti-porcine myosin VI antibody (introduced into cells by means of microinjection) caused severe defects in pinocytosis and phagocytosis. In comparison with control cells, the treated amoebae formed ~75% less pinocytotic channels and phagocytosed ~65% less Tetrahymena cells. These data indicate that the myosin VI immunoanalog has an important role in pinocytosis and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus (Pal.).

  9. Cloning of the lambda resistant genes from Brevibacterium albidum and Proteus vulgaris into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chae, K S; Yoo, O J

    1986-11-14

    Genes from Proteus vulgaris ATCC13315 and Brevibacterium albidum ATCC15831 were introduced into Escherichia coli, which rendered the host resistant to coliphage lambda. The clones transformed by any one of the two recombinant plasmids, pRMG101 or pRMG216, were totally resistant against the infection of virulent lambda and N4, but sensitive to ø80, T4 and T7. However, when maltose transport systems of the clones were induced by maltose, the clones were no more resistant to the phage: thus, this phenotype was thought to be due to the inhibition of phage adsorption onto the cell surface. The gene product was shown by SDS-PAGE of membrane protein-enriched extract of the clone. Molecular weight as measured was about 40,000 dalton, which coincide with that inferred from the nucleotide sequences.

  10. The incidence and beta-lactam resistance of Proteus vulgaris in hospital infections: the last decade.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Alferez, A; Baquero, F; Canton, R; Loza, E; Martinez-Beltran, J

    1991-10-01

    During the period of 1980-1990, 581 Proteus vulgaris strains were obtained in a general hospital. They were considered as the significant isolate in 0.6% of soft tissue infections, 0.6% of urinary tract infections and in 0.2% of bacteremic episodes. Sixty-three percent of the 393 tested strains showed resistance to ampicillin, cefazolin and cefamandole or cefuroxime. About 7% were susceptible to all beta-lactam drugs, and showed a very low beta-lactamase activity and 5% of the strains showed a phenotype of resistance including ampicillin, carbenicillin-ticarcillin, cefazolin and cefamandole or cefuroxime, and presented increased chromosomal beta-lactamase activity. Cefotaxime-resistance was detected in 2% of the isolates which appeared in the period 1987-1990.

  11. Functional Identification of Proteus mirabilis eptC Gene Encoding a Core Lipopolysaccharide Phosphoethanolamine Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    By comparison of the Proteus mirabilis HI4320 genome with known lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phosphoethanolamine transferases, three putative candidates (PMI3040, PMI3576, and PMI3104) were identified. One of them, eptC (PMI3104) was able to modify the LPS of two defined non-polar core LPS mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae that we use as surrogate substrates. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance showed that eptC directs the incorporation of phosphoethanolamine to the O-6 of l-glycero-d-mano-heptose II. The eptC gene is found in all the P. mirabilis strains analyzed in this study. Putative eptC homologues were found for only two additional genera of the Enterobacteriaceae family, Photobacterium and Providencia. The data obtained in this work supports the role of the eptC (PMI3104) product in the transfer of PEtN to the O-6 of l,d-HepII in P. mirabilis strains. PMID:24756091

  12. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at pH 9.0].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the free-living amoeba Amoeba proteus (strain B), after PAAG disk-electrophoresis of the homogenate supernatant, at using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate and pH 9.0, three forms of phosphatase activity were revealed; they were arbitrarily called "fast", "intermediate", and "slow" phosphatases. The fast phosphatase has been established to be a fraction of lysosomal acid phosphatase that preserves some low activity at alkaline pH. The question as to which particular class the intermediate phosphatase belongs to has remained unanswered: it can be both acid phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Based on data of inhibitor analysis, large substrate specificity, results of experiments with reactivation by Zn ions after inactivation with EDTA, other than in the fast and intermediate phosphatases localization in the amoeba cell, it is concluded that only slow phosphatase can be classified as alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1).

  13. The XerC recombinase of Proteus mirabilis: characterization and interaction with other tyrosine recombinases.

    PubMed

    Villion, Manuela; Szatmari, George

    2003-09-12

    XerC and XerD are two site-specific recombinases, which act on different sites to maintain replicons in a monomeric state. This system, which was first discovered and studied in Escherichia coli, is present in several species including Proteus mirabilis, where the XerD recombinase was previously characterized by our laboratory. In this paper, we report the presence of the xerC gene in P. mirabilis. Using in vitro reactions, we show that the two P. mirabilis recombinases display binding and cleavage activity on the E. coli dif site and the ColE1 cer site, together or in collaboration with E. coli recombinases. In vivo, P. mirabilis XerC and XerD are able to resolve and monomerize a plasmid containing two cer sites, increasing its stability. However, P. mirabilis XerC, in combination with E. coli XerD, is unable to perform these functions.

  14. Observation of multicellular spinning behavior of Proteus mirabilis by atomic force microscopy and multifunctional microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanxia; Deng, Yuanxin; Luo, Shuxiu; Deng, Yu; Guo, Linming; Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Lei; Liu, Junkang

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the multicellular spinning behavior of Proteus mirabilis by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifunctional microscopy in order to understand the mechanism underlying this spinning movement and its biological significance. Multifunctional microscopy with charge-coupled device (CCD) and real-time AFM showed changes in cell structure and shape of P. mirabilis during multicellular spinning movement. Specifically, the morphological characteristics of P. mirabilis, multicellular spinning dynamics, and unique movement were observed. Our findings indicate that the multicellular spinning behavior of P. mirabilis may be used to collect nutrients, perform colonization, and squeeze out competitors. The movement characteristics of P. mirabilis are vital to the organism's biological adaptability to the surrounding environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure of a glucosyl phosphate-containing O-polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O42.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, Andrei V; Bartodziejska, Beata; Shashkov, Alexander S; Wykrota, Marianna; Knirel, Yuriy A; Rozalski, Antoni

    2007-12-28

    An O-polysaccharide was isolated by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O42 and studied by sugar and methylation analyses along with 1H, 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopy. The following structure of the polysaccharide having a linear pentasaccharide phosphate repeating unit was established: -->3)-alpha-L-FucpNAc4Ac-(1-->4)-alpha-D-Glcp-1-P-(O-->4)-alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-FucpNAc4Ac-(1-->3))-alpha-D-GlcpNAc6Ac-(1--> where the degree of O-acetylation is approximately 80% on GlcNAc and approximately 40% on each of the FucNAc residues. A weak serological cross-reaction of anti-P. vulgaris O42 serum with the lipopolysaccharide of P. vulgaris O39 was observed and accounted for by the sharing of a disaccharide fragment of the O-polysaccharides.

  16. In Vitro Activity of Cephalothin and Three Penicillins Against Escherichia coli and Proteus Species

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Arthur L.; Hoeprich, Paul D.

    1973-01-01

    The susceptibility of clinical isolates of Escherichia coli (67) and Proteus species (58) to cephalothin, ampicillin, benzyl penicillin, and phenoxymethyl penicillin was determined in vitro by using broth dilution and disk diffusion tests. The data were correlated by using a four-category scheme for interpreting minimal inhibitory concentrations (groups 1 to 4) as recommended by a subcommittee of an international collaborative study of susceptibility testing. With cephalothin and ampicillin, groups 1 (susceptible) and 2 (moderately susceptible) were susceptible by the disk test, and with benzyl penicillin, similar results were observed when the interpretive zone standards were changed. Strains categorized as group 4 (very resistant) were resistant by the disk method, but group 3 (moderately resistant) strains were not adequately distinguished by disk testing. Group 3 susceptibility to benzyl and phenoxymethyl penicillins can be predicted by extrapolating results from tests with ampicillin disks. PMID:4202343

  17. Insights into copper effect on Proteus hauseri through proteomic and metabolic analyses.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Ye, Chiming; Li, Yuzhe; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2016-02-01

    This is the first-attempt to use liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass (LC-MS-MS) in deciphering the effects of copper ion on Proteus hauseri. Total 941 proteins in copper-addition (+Cu) group and 898 proteins in non-copper-addition (-Cu) group were found, which containing 221 and 178 differential proteins in +Cu and -Cu group, respectively. Differential proteins in both groups were defined into 14 groups by their functional classification which transport/membrane function proteins were the major different part between the two groups, which took 19.5% and 7.7%, respectively. The result of BioCyc and KEGG analyses on metabolic pathway indicated that copper could interrupted the pathway of chemotaxis CheY and inhibited the swarming of P. hauseri, which provided a potential in controlling the pathogenicity of this strain.

  18. Necrotizing suppurative nephritis in a Japanese black feedlot steer due to Proteus mirabilis infection.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tadatsugu; Iizuka, Ayako; Kojima, Hirokazu; Kimura, Kumiko; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Haritani, Makoto

    2017-04-05

    A Japanese black feedlot steer suddenly died after exhibiting astasia and cramping of the extremities. Necropsy of the animal revealed that the right kidney was enlarged and pale with severe nephrolithiasis. The urinary bladder displayed mucosal hemorrhage. Upon bacteriological investigation, Proteus mirabilis was isolated from the liver, spleen, right kidney, lungs and urine. Histopathological examination revealed necrotizing suppurative nephritis with the presence of numerous gram-negative bacilli and fibrinous suppurative cystitis with no bacilli. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the bacteria and cytoplasm of the macrophages stained positively with P. mirabilis antiserum. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous bacteria in the renal tubules. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the histopathological aspects of nephritis caused by P. mirabilis in cattle.

  19. Basal Structure and Attachment of Flagella in Cells of Proteus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Dinah; Koffler, Henry; Vatter, A. E.

    1965-01-01

    Abram, Dinah (Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind.), Henry Koffler, and A. E. Vatter. Basal structure and attachment of flagella in cells of Proteus vulgaris. J. Bacteriol. 90:1337–1354. 1965.—The attachment of flagella to cells of Proteus vulgaris was studied electron microscopically with negatively stained and shadow-cast preparations of ghosts from standard cultures and from special cultures that produced “long forms.” The flagellum, the basal portion of which is hooked, arises within the cell from a nearly spherical structure, 110 to 140 A in diameter. This structure appears to be associated with the cytoplasmic membrane; it may be a part of the membrane or a separate entity that lies just beneath the membrane. Flagella associated with cell walls free from cytoplasmic membrane frequently have larger bodies, 200 to 700 A in diameter, associated with their base. These structures probably consist at least partly of fragments of the cytoplasmic membrane, a portion of which folds around a smaller structure. Flagella in various stages of development were observed in long forms of P. vulgaris cells grown at low temperature. The basal structure of these flagella was similar to that of the long or “mature” flagella. Strands connecting the basal structures were observed in ghosts of long forms; these strands appear to be derived from the cytoplasmic membrane. Flagella were found to be attached to fragments of cell wall and to cytoplasmic membrane in a similar manner as they are attached to ghosts. In isolates of flagella that have been separated from the cells mechanically, the organelles often terminate in hooks which almost always appear naked, but have a different fine structure than the flagellum proper. Images PMID:5848332

  20. Proteus virulence: involvement of the pore forming alpha-hemolysin (a short review).

    PubMed

    Tóth, V; Emódy, L

    2000-01-01

    The genus Proteus belongs to the tribe of Proteae in the family of Enterobacteriaceae, and consists of five species: P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris, P. morganii, P. penneri and P. myxofaciens. They are distinguished from the rest of Enterobacteriaceae by their ability to deaminate phenylalanine and tryptophane. They hydrolyze urea and gelatin and fail to ferment lactose, mannose, dulcitol and malonate; and do not form lysine and arginine decarboxylase or beta-galactosidase [1]. Colonies produce distinct "burned chocolate" odor and frequently show the characteristics of swarming motility on solid media. P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris and P. morganii are widely recognized human pathogens. They have been isolated from urinary tract infections, wounds, ear, and nosocomial bacteremic infections, often in immuncompromised patients [2-6]. P. myxofaciens has no clinical interest to this time. P. penneri as species nova was nominated by the recommendation of Hickman and co-workers [7]. Formerly it was recognized as P. vulgaris biogroup 1 or indole negative P. vulgaris [8, 9]. Although it has been less commonly isolated from clinical samples than the other three human pathogenic Proteus species, it has nevertheless been connected with infections of the urinary tract, wounds and has been isolated from the feces of both healthy and diarrheic individuals [10-12]. Potential virulence factors responsible for virulence of Proteae are: IgA protease, urease, type3 fimbriae associated with MR/K haemagglutinins of at least two antigenic types, endotoxin, swarming motility and HlyA and/or HpmA type hemolysins [for review see ref. 13]. In the followings we give a survey of accumulated concepts about the position and characteristics of HlyA type alpha-hemolysins both in general and with emphasis on virulence functions in the tribe of Proteae.

  1. Comparison of phenotypic and virulence genes characteristics in human and chicken isolates of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Elie K; Hajj, Zahi G; Hamadeh, Shadi; Shaib, Houssam A; Farran, Mohamad T; Araj, George; Faroon, Obaid; Barbour, Kamil E; Jirjis, Faris; Azhar, Esam; Kumosani, Taha; Harakeh, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the phenotypic and virulence genes characteristics in human and chicken isolates of Proteus mirabilis. The bacterial examination of 50 livers of individual broilers, marketed by four major outlets, revealed a high recovery of P. mirabilis (66%), and a low recovery frequency of Salmonella spp. (4%), Serratia odorifera (2%), Citrobacter brakii (2%), and Providencia stuartii (2%). The phenotypic biochemical characterization of the recovered 33 chicken isolates of P. mirabilis were compared to 30 human isolates (23 urinary and six respiratory isolates). The comparison revealed significant differences in the presence of gelatinase enzyme (100% presence in chicken isolates versus 91.3 and 83.3% presence in human urinary and respiratory isolates, respectively, P<0.05). The H2S production occurred in 100% of chicken isolates versus 95.6 and 66.7% presence in human urinary and respiratory isolates, respectively, P<0.05). The other 17 biochemical characteristics did not differ significantly among the three groups of isolates (P>0.05). Two virulence genes, the mrpA and FliL, were having a typical 100% presence in randomly selected isolates of P. mirabilis recovered from chicken livers (N = 10) versus isolates recovered from urinary (N = 5) and respiratory specimens of humans (N = 5) (P>0.05). The average percentage similarity of mrpA gene nucleotide sequence of poultry isolates to human urinary and respiratory isolates was 93.2 and 97.5-%, respectively. The high similarity in phenotypic characteristics, associated with typical frequency of presence of two virulence genes, and high similarity in sequences of mrpA gene among poultry versus human P. mirabilis isolates justifies future investigations targeting the evaluation of adaptable pathogenicity of avian Proteus mirabilis isolates to mammalian hosts. PMID:23182140

  2. Upper Crustal Structure of Santorini Volcano from Seismic Tomography using the PROTEUS dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, B.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Morgan, J. V.; Toomey, D. R.; Nomikou, P.; Papazachos, C. V.; Warner, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present initial travel time tomography results from the PROTEUS experiment (Plumbing Reservoirs Of The Earth Under Santorini), an experiment designed to seismically image magma reservoirs beneath Santorini Volcano (Greece). Few seismic imaging studies have been previously conducted on Santorini and none have investigated the deeper crustal magmatic system. The experiment presents a unique opportunity to seismically probe the plumbing system of a historically active arc volcano because of a relatively thin Aegean crust, permitting easier seismic access to the subvolcanic magmatic system, and because of the ability to use marine air gun sound sources for imaging purposes. The latter provides over 1 million unique station-shot pairs ( 14000 airgun shots, over 100 onshore and offshore seismometers) producing a nearly unparalleled seismic dataset for a continental volcano. Our preliminary travel-time tomography results use tens of thousands of travel-time picks and a 3-D ray tracer to invert for anisotropic velocity structure of the upper 5 km of Santorini Volcano and surrounding tectonic region. Our tomographic images provide new constraints on how differing stages of tectonism and volcanism have shaped the geologic structure of the Aegean Volcanic Arc; specifically, we utilize our seismic dataset as well as the unique bathymetric dataset collected during the PROTEUS experiment to study the relationship between seismic velocity, faulting, and volcanism. These results are the first of a multi-year effort to both seismically image Santorini Volcano and understand how our images compare to other geophysical/geochemical models of Santorini and other analogous volcanoes. This experiment represents an unique opportunity to tomographically investigate the magmatic plumbing of a geochemically and volcanologically well-studied volcano.

  3. Crystal structure of a membrane-bound l-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yingchen; Tong, Shuilong; Gao, Yongxiang; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Qi; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Zhou, Huihao

    2016-09-01

    l-amino acid oxidases/deaminases (LAAOs/LAADs) are a class of oxidoreductases catalyzing the oxidative deamination of l-amino acids to α-keto acids. They are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and exhibit diverse substrate specificity, post-translational modifications and cellular localization. While LAAOs isolated from snake venom have been extensively characterized, the structures and functions of LAAOs from other species are largely unknown. Here, we reported crystal structure of a bacterial membrane-bound LAAD from Proteus vulgaris (pvLAAD) in complex with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). We found that the overall fold of pvLAAD does not resemble typical LAAOs. Instead it, is similar to d-amino acid oxidases (DAAOs) with an additional hydrophobic insertion module on protein surface. Structural analysis and liposome-binding assays suggested that the hydrophobic module serves as an extra membrane-binding site for LAADs. Bacteria from genera Proteus and Providencia were found to encode two classes of membrane-bound LAADs. Based on our structure, the key roles of residues Q278 and L317 in substrate selectivity were proposed and biochemically analyzed. While LAADs on the membrane were proposed to transfer electrons to respiratory chain for FAD re-oxidization, we observed that the purified pvLAAD could generate a significant amount of hydrogen peroxide in vitro, suggesting it could use dioxygen to directly re-oxidize FADH2 as what typical LAAOs usually do. These findings provide a novel insights for a better understanding this class of enzymes and will help developing biocatalysts for industrial applications.

  4. Natural antibiotic susceptibility of Proteus spp., with special reference to P. mirabilis and P. penneri strains.

    PubMed

    Stock, I

    2003-02-01

    The natural susceptibility of 102 Proteus mirabilis and 35 Proteus penneri strains to 71 antibiotics was examined. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by applying a microdilution procedure in IsoSensitest broth (for all strains) and cation-adjusted Mueller Hinton broth (for some strains). P. mirabilis and P. penneri were naturally resistant to penicillin G, oxacillin, all tested macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins, glycopeptides, rifampicin and fusidic acid. Both species were uniformly, naturally sensitive to all tested aminoglycosides, acylureidopenicillins, some cephalosporins, carbapenems, aztreonam, quinolones, sulfamethoxazole and co-trimoxazole. Species-specific differences in natural susceptibility affecting clinical assessment criteria were seen with tetracyclines, several beta-lactams, chloramphenicol and nitrufurantoin. P. mirabilis was naturally resistant to all tested tetracyclines, and was naturally sensitive to all beta-lactams, except penicillin G and oxacillin. Strains of P. penneri were naturally sensitive or of intermediate susceptibility to tetracyclines, and naturally resistant to amoxicillin (but sensitive or of intermediate susceptibility to aminopenicillins in the presence of beta-lactamase inhibitors) and some cephalosporins (i.e. cefaclor, cefazoline, loracarbef, cefuroxime, cefotiam, and cefdinir). P. penneri was less susceptible than P. mirabilis to chloramphenicol; P. mirabilis was less susceptible than P. penneri to nitrofurantoin. Major medium-dependent influences on the MICs were seen with fosfomycin. The present study describes a database concerning the natural antibiotic susceptibility of P. mirabilis and P. penneri strains to a range of antibiotics, which can be applied to validate forthcoming antibiotic susceptibility tests of these bacteria. It was shown that ten of fifteen amoxicillin-sensitive P. mirabilis strains produced beta-lactamases at a low level, supporting the thesis of the presence of a

  5. Toward Reanalysis of the Tight-Pitch HCLWR-PROTEUS Phase II Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Grégory; Vlassopoulos, Efstathios; Hursin, Mathieu; Pautz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The HCLWR-Proteus Phase II experiments were conducted from 1985 to 1990 in the zero-power reactor Proteus at PSI in Switzerland. The experimental program was dedicated to the physics of high conversion light water reactors and in particular to the measurement of reactor parameters such as reaction rate traverses, spectral indices, absorber reactivity worths and void coefficients. The HCLWR experiments are especially interesting because they generated knowledge in the epithermal range of the neutron flux spectrum, for which little integral experimental data is available. In an effort to assess the interest of this experimental data to validate modern nuclear data and improve their uncertainties, a preliminary re-analysis of selected configurations was conducted with Monte-Carlo codes (MCNP6/SERPENT2) and modern nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and JENDL-4.0). The spectral ndices, flux spectra and sensitivity coefficients on k∞ were calculated using cell models representative of the tight-pitch measurement configurations containing 11% PuO2-UO2 fuel rods in different moderation conditions (air, water and dowtherm). Spectral index predictions using the three nuclear data libraries agreed within two standard deviations with the measured values. The only exception is the Pu-242-capture-to-Pu-239-fission ratio, which was overestimated with all libraries by more than four standard deviations, i.e. 13%, in the non-moderated configuration. In this configuration, Pu-242 captures are few since the flux spectrum in the Pu-242 capture resonance region (between 1eV and 1keV) is small making this spectral index hard to measure. Sensitivity coefficient predictions with both MCNP6 and SERPENT2 were in good agreement.

  6. Comparison of phenotypic and virulence genes characteristics in human and chicken isolates of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Elie K; Hajj, Zahi G; Hamadeh, Shadi; Shaib, Houssam A; Farran, Mohamad T; Araj, George; Faroon, Obaid; Barbour, Kamil E; Jirjis, Faris; Azhar, Esam; Kumosani, Taha; Harakeh, Steve

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the phenotypic and virulence genes characteristics in human and chicken isolates of Proteus mirabilis. The bacterial examination of 50 livers of individual broilers, marketed by four major outlets, revealed a high recovery of P. mirabilis (66%), and a low recovery frequency of Salmonella spp. (4%), Serratia odorifera (2%), Citrobacter brakii (2%), and Providencia stuartii (2%). The phenotypic biochemical characterization of the recovered 33 chicken isolates of P. mirabilis were compared to 30 human isolates (23 urinary and six respiratory isolates). The comparison revealed significant differences in the presence of gelatinase enzyme (100% presence in chicken isolates versus 91.3 and 83.3% presence in human urinary and respiratory isolates, respectively, P,0.05). The H(2)S production occurred in 100% of chicken isolates versus 95.6 and 66.7% presence in human urinary and respiratory isolates, respectively, P,0.05). The other 17 biochemical characteristics did not differ significantly among the three groups of isolates (P.0.05). Two virulence genes, the mrpA and FliL, were having a typical 100% presence in randomly selected isolates of P. mirabilis recovered from chicken livers (N510) versus isolates recovered from urinary (N55) and respiratory specimens of humans (N55) (P.0.05). The average percentage similarity of mrpA gene nucleotide sequence of poultry isolates to human urinary and respiratory isolates was 93.2 and 97.5-%, respectively. The high similarity in phenotypic characteristics, associated with typical frequency of presence of two virulence genes, and high similarity in sequences of mrpA gene among poultry versus human P. mirabilis isolates justifies future investigations targeting the evaluation of adaptable pathogenicity of avian Proteus mirabilis isolates to mammalian hosts.

  7. Involvement of polyphosphate kinase in virulence and stress tolerance of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Jiang, Qiao; Pan, Jia-Yun; Deng, Cong; Yu, Jing-Yi; Wu, Xiao-Man; Huang, Sheng-He; Deng, Xiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis), a gram-negative enteric bacterium, frequently causes urinary tract infections. Many virulence factors of uropathogenic P. mirabilis have been identified, including urease, flagella, hemolysin and fimbriae. However, the functions of polyphosphate kinase (PPK), which are related to the pathogenicity of many bacteria, remain entirely unknown in P. mirabilis. In this study, a ppk gene encoding the PPK insertional mutant in P. mirabilis strain HI4320 was constructed, and its biological functions were examined. The results of survival studies demonstrated that the ppk mutant was deficient in resistance to oxidative, hyperosmotic and heat stress. The swarming and biofilm formation abilities of P. mirabilis were also attenuated after the ppk interruption. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that ppk was required for P. mirabilis to invade the bladder. The negative phenotypes of the ppk mutant could be restored by ppk gene complementation. Furthermore, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the proteomes of the wild-type strain and the ppk mutant. Compared with the wild-type strain, seven proteins including TonB-dependent receptor, universal stress protein G, major mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbrial protein (MR/P fimbriae), heat shock protein, flagellar capping protein, putative membrane protein and multidrug efflux protein were down-regulated, and four proteins including exported peptidase, repressor protein for FtsI, FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and phosphotransferase were up-regulated in the ppk mutant. As a whole, these results indicate that PPK is an important regulator and plays a crucial role in stress tolerance and virulence in uropathogenic P. mirabilis.

  8. Chromosomal Amplification of the blaOXA-58 Carbapenemase Gene in a Proteus mirabilis Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Girlich, Delphine; Bogaerts, Pierre; De Laveleye, Morgane; Huang, Daniel T.; Glupczynski, Youri

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Horizontal gene transfer may occur between distantly related bacteria, thus leading to genetic plasticity and in some cases to acquisition of novel resistance traits. Proteus mirabilis is an enterobacterial species responsible for human infections that may express various acquired β-lactam resistance genes, including different classes of carbapenemase genes. Here we report a Proteus mirabilis clinical isolate (strain 1091) displaying resistance to penicillin, including temocillin, together with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems and susceptibility to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins. Using biochemical tests, significant carbapenem hydrolysis was detected in P. mirabilis 1091. Since PCR failed to detect acquired carbapenemase genes commonly found in Enterobacteriaceae, we used a whole-genome sequencing approach that revealed the presence of blaOXA-58 class D carbapenemase gene, so far identified only in Acinetobacter species. This gene was located on a 3.1-kb element coharboring a blaAmpC-like gene. Remarkably, these two genes were bracketed by putative XerC-XerD binding sites and inserted at a XerC-XerD site located between the terminase-like small- and large-subunit genes of a bacteriophage. Increased expression of the two bla genes resulted from a 6-time tandem amplification of the element as revealed by Southern blotting. This is the first isolation of a clinical P. mirabilis strain producing OXA-58, a class D carbapenemase, and the first description of a XerC-XerD-dependent insertion of antibiotic resistance genes within a bacteriophage. This study revealed a new role for the XerC-XerD recombinase in bacteriophage biology. PMID:27855079

  9. Molecular detection of HpmA and HlyA hemolysin of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Silvia Emanoele; Ludovico, Marilucia Santos; Martins, Fernando Henrique; da Rocha, Sérgio Paulo Dejato; Elias, Waldir Pereira; Pelayo, Jacinta Sanchez

    2013-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the bacterial infections frequently documented in humans. Proteus mirabilis is associated with UTI mainly in individuals with urinary tract abnormality or related with vesicular catheterism and it can be difficult to treat because of the formation of stones in the bladder and kidneys. These stones are formed due to the presence of urease synthesized by the bacteria. Another important factor is that P. mirabilis produces hemolysin HpmA, used by the bacteria to damage the kidney tissues. Proteus spp. samples can also express HlyA hemolysin, similar to that found in Escherichia coli. A total of 211 uropathogenic P. mirabilis isolates were analyzed to detect the presence of the hpmA and hpmB genes by the techniques of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot and hlyA by PCR. The hpmA and hpmB genes were expressed by the RT-PCR technique and two P. mirabilis isolates were sequenced for the hpmA and hpmB genes. The presence of the hpmA and hpmB genes was confirmed by PCR in 205 (97.15 %) of the 211 isolates. The dot blot confirmed the presence of the hpmA and hpmB genes in the isolates that did not amplify in the PCR. None of the isolates studied presented the hlyA gene. The hpmA and hpmB genes that were sequenced presented 98 % identity with the same genes of the HI4320 P. mirabilis sample. This study showed that the PCR technique has good sensitivity for detecting the hpmA and hpmB genes of P. mirabilis.

  10. Mucosal vaccination of mice with recombinant Proteus mirabilis structural fimbrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Paola; Sosa, Vanessa; Pellegrino, Rafael; Galvalisi, Umberto; Zunino, Pablo

    2004-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), expresses several types of fimbria including mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbriae (MRP), uroepithelial cell adhesin (UCA), renamed non-agglutinating fimbriae (NAF) by some authors, and P. mirabilis fimbriae (PMF), which are potentially involved in adhesion to the uroepithelium. In this study, we immunised different groups of mice with recombinant structural subunits of these fimbriae (MrpA, UcaA and PmfA) using two mucosal routes (nasal and transurethral) and we transurethrally challenged the animals with a P. mirabilis uropathogenic isolate. Induction of specific serum and urine IgG and IgA was measured to assess the potential role of the humoral immune response in protection against experimental ascending P. mirabilis UTI. Intranasally MrpA- and UcaA-immunised mice were protected against P. mirabilis ascending UTI, since recovery of bacteria from kidneys and bladders was significantly lower than in PBS-treated mice, and both fimbrial subunits significantly induced specific serum and urine antibodies. Only MrpA and PmfA transurethrally immunised animals were protected only at the kidney level, and in this case only MrpA-immunised mice exhibited significant serum IgG induction. Correlation analysis did not show a significant relationship between serum and urine specific antibody response and protection observed against infection. Our results suggest that an immunisation strategy based on structural fimbrial proteins may be useful to prevent P. mirabilis UTI. Further studies are being carried out to characterise the immune and inflammatory response induced by P. mirabilis recombinant fimbrial subunits.

  11. Inhibition of Urease Enzyme Production and some Other Virulence Factors Expression in Proteus mirabilis by N-Acetyl Cysteine and Dipropyl Disulphide.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Baky, Rehab Mahmoud; Ali, Mohamed Abdullah; Abuo-Rahma, Gamal El-Din Ali A; AbdelAziz, Neveen

    2017-02-12

    Proteus mirabilis is one of the important pathogens that colonize the urinary tract and catheters resulting in various complications, such as blockage of the catheters and the formation of infective stones.

  12. Biological activities of lipopolysaccharides of Proteus spp. and their interactions with polymyxin B and an 18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein (CAP18)-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    St Swierzko, A; Kirikae, T; Kirikae, F; Hirata, M; Cedzynski, M; Ziolkowski, A; Hirai, Y; Kusumoto, S; Yokochi, T; Nakano, M

    2000-02-01

    The saccharide constituents of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of Proteus spp. vary with the strain and contain unique components about which little is known. The biological activities of LPS and lipid A from S- and R-forms of 10 Proteus strains were examined. LPS from all S-form Proteus strains was lethal to D-(+)-galactosamine (GalN)-loaded, LPS-responsive, C3H/HeN mice, but not to LPS-hypo-responsive C3H/HeJ mice. P. vulgaris 025 LPS evoked strong anaphylactoid reactions in N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP)-primed C3H/HeJ mice. LPS from S- and R-form Proteus strains induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by macrophages isolated from C3H/HeN but not C3H/HeJ mice. Lipid A from Proteus strains also induced NO and TNF production, although lipid A was less potent than LPS. The effects of LPS were mainly dependent on CD14; LPS-induced NO and TNF production in CD14+ J774.1 cells was significantly greater than in CD14-J7.DEF.3 cells. All LPS from Proteus strains, and especially from P. vulgaris 025, exhibited higher anti-complementary activity than LPS from Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Polymyxin B inactivated proteus LPS in a dose-dependent manner, but these LPS preparations were more resistant to polymyxin B than E. coli LPS. CAP18(109-135), a granulocyte-derived peptide, inhibited proteus LPS endotoxicity only when the LPS:CAP18(109-135) ratio was appropriate, which suggests that CAP18(109-135) acts through a different mechanism than polymyxin B. The results indicate that LPS from Proteus spp. are potently endotoxic, but that the toxicity is different from that of LPS from E. coli or Salmonella spp. and even varies among different Proteus strains. The variation in biological activities among proteus LPS may be due to unique components within the respective LPS.

  13. Production of acylated homoserine lactone by a novel marine strain of Proteus vulgaris and inhibition of its swarming by phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Biswa, Pramal; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-10-01

    A marine strain of Proteus vulgaris capable of activating multiple acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-based reporter cultures was isolated. The cognate signal molecule was characterized as octanoyl homoserine lactone (OHL) and its production was observed to be growth dependent, with maximum production (5.675 µg l(-1)) at 24 h growth. The strain exhibited swarming, but its motility was not affected upon addition of pure OHL or culture supernatant. Phytochemicals such as quercitin and berberine chloride inhibited OHL production and reduced swarming. FliA, the predominantly upregulated protein during swarming, was considered as a possible target for these inhibitors, and docking of the two most active and two least active inhibitors to this protein suggested preferential binding of the former set of compounds. Apart from adding new evidence to AHL production in Proteus vulgaris, active inhibitors shortlisted from this study could help in identifying lead compounds to act against this opportunistic pathogen of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract.

  14. New structures of the O-specific polysaccharides of Proteus. 3. Polysaccharides containing non-carbohydrate organic acids.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, A N; Toukach, F V; Senchenkova, S N; Arbatsky, N P; Shashkov, A S; Knirel, Y A; Bartodziejska, B; Zych, K; Rozalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z

    2003-04-01

    Four new Proteus O-specific polysaccharides were isolated by mild acid degradation from the lipopolysaccharides of P. penneri 28 (1), P. vulgaris O44 (2), P. mirabilis G1 (O3) (3), and P. myxofaciens (4), and their structures were elucidated using NMR spectroscopy and chemical methods. They were found to contain non-carbohydrate organic acids, including ether-linked lactic acid and amide-linked amino acids, and the following structures of the repeating units were established: [Figure: see text], where (S)-Lac and (R)-aLys stand for (S)-1-carboxyethyl (residue of lactic acid) and N(epsilon)-[(R)-1-carboxyethyl]-L-lysine ("alaninolysine"), respectively. The data obtained in this work and earlier serve as the chemical basis for classification of the bacteria Proteus.

  15. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Norsworthy, Allison N.; Sun, Tung-Tien

    2016-01-01

    The catheter-associated uropathogen Proteus mirabilis frequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found that P. mirabilis rapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistant Proteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation by P. mirabilis stands in direct contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism of P. mirabilis survival and virulence in the bladder. PMID:27044107

  16. Proteus mirabilis uroepithelial cell adhesin (UCA) fimbria plays a role in the colonization of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Rafael; Scavone, Paola; Umpiérrez, Ana; Maskell, Duncan J; Zunino, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans. Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic pathogen, capable of causing severe UTIs, with serious kidney damage that may even lead to death. Several virulence factors are involved in the pathogenicity of this bacterium. Among these, adherence to the uroepithelium mediated by fimbriae appears to be a significant bacterial attribute related to urovirulence. Proteus mirabilis expresses several types of fimbriae that could be involved in the pathogenesis of UTI, including uroepithelial cell adhesin (UCA). In this report, we used an uropathogenic P. mirabilis wild-type strain and an isogenic ucaA mutant unable to express UCA to study the pathogenic role of this fimbria in UTI. Ability of the mutant to adhere to desquamated uroepithelial cells and to infect mice using different experimental UTI models was significantly impaired. These results allow us to conclude that P. mirabilis UCA plays an important role in the colonization of the urinary tract.

  17. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Norsworthy, Allison N; Sun, Tung-Tien; Pearson, Melanie M

    2016-04-19

    The catheter-associated uropathogenProteus mirabilisfrequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found thatP. mirabilisrapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistantProteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation byP. mirabilisstands in direct contrast to uropathogenicEscherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism ofP. mirabilissurvival and virulence in the bladder.

  18. Genome Sequences of Two Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Strains Harboring CTX-M-65 Isolated from Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ngeow, Yun Fong; Tee, Kok Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that is commonly associated with urinary tract infections. Here, we present draft genome sequences of two multidrug-resistant P. mirabilis strains, isolated from urine samples in Malaysia, that harbored a CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding gene, as well as a repertoire of other antimicrobial-resistant determinants. PMID:27856593

  19. Native valve Proteus mirabilis endocarditis: successful treatment of a rare entity formulated by in vitro synergy antibiotic testing.

    PubMed

    Brotzki, Caroline R; Mergenhagen, Kari A; Bulman, Zackery P; Tsuji, Brian T; Berenson, Charles S

    2016-10-20

    Infective endocarditis caused by Proteus mirabilis is a rare and poorly reported disease, with no well-defined effective antibiotic regimen. Here, we present a case of P. mirabilis aortic valve endocarditis. We reviewed prior cases and treatment regimens, and devised effective treatment, which was guided by in vitro sensitivity and synergy testing on the pathogen. Our patient survived without complications or the need for a surgical intervention.

  20. Native valve Proteus mirabilis endocarditis: successful treatment of a rare entity formulated by in vitro synergy antibiotic testing

    PubMed Central

    Brotzki, Caroline R; Mergenhagen, Kari A; Bulman, Zackery P; Tsuji, Brian T; Berenson, Charles S

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Infective endocarditis caused by Proteus mirabilis is a rare and poorly reported disease, with no well-defined effective antibiotic regimen. Here, we present a case of P. mirabilis aortic valve endocarditis. We reviewed prior cases and treatment regimens, and devised effective treatment, which was guided by in vitro sensitivity and synergy testing on the pathogen. Our patient survived without complications or the need for a surgical intervention. PMID:27797858

  1. Verification of the proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for flat plate and pipe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.; Zeman, Patrick L.

    1991-01-01

    The Proteus Navier-Stokes Code is evaluated for 2-D/axisymmetric, viscous, incompressible, internal, and external flows. The particular cases to be discussed are laminar and turbulent flows over a flat plate, laminar and turbulent developing pipe flows, and turbulent pipe flow with swirl. Results are compared with exact solutions, empirical correlations, and experimental data. A detailed description of the code set-up, including boundary conditions, initial conditions, grid size, and grid packing is given for each case.

  2. Verification of the Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for flat plate and pipe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.; Zeman, Patrick L.

    1991-01-01

    The Proteus Navier-Stokes Code is evaluated for two-dimensional/axisymmetric, viscous, incompressible, internal and external flows. The particular cases to be discussed are laminar and turbulent flows over a flat plate, laminar and turbulent dveloping pipe flows and turbulent pipe flow with swirl. Results are compared with exact solutions, empirical correlations and experimental data. A detailed description of the code set-up, including boundary conditions, intitial conditions, grid size and grid packing is given for each case.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the First KPC-Type Carbapenemase-Positive Proteus mirabilis Strain from a Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Chiarelli, Adriana; Boinett, Christine J.; Riccobono, Eleonora; Harris, Simon R.; D’Andrea, Marco Maria; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the blaKPC-positive strain Proteus mirabilis AOUC-001 was performed using both the MiSeq and PacBio RS II platforms and yielded a single molecule of 4,272,433 bp, representing the complete chromosome. Genome analysis showed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants, including two copies of blaKPC-2 carried on a fragment of a KPC-producing plasmid previously described in Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:27340072

  4. Structural and serological studies on a new acidic O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O32.

    PubMed

    Bartodziejska, B; Shashkov, A S; Babicka, D; Grachev, A A; Torzewska, A; Paramonov, N A; Chernyak, A Y; Rozalski, A; Knirel, Y A

    1998-09-01

    The following structure of the O-specific polysaccharide chain (O-antigen) of the Proteus vulgaris 032 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was established by 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NOESY and H-detected 1H,13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) experiments: -->2)-alpha-L-RhapI-(1-->2)-alpha-L-RhapII-(1-->4)-beta-D-++ +GalpA(I)-(1-->3)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->4)-alpha-D-GalpA(II)-(1-- >. In addition, an O-acetyl group was detected, which, most probably, is located at position 3 of a part of RhapI residues. Serological studies, using rabbit polyclonal anti-(P. vulgaris 032) serum, homologous and heterologous Proteus O-antigens and related artificial antigens, revealed the importance of an a-D-GalA-associated epitope in manifesting the immunospecificity of P. vulgaris 032 and substantiated serological relationships between the O-antigen studied and those of some other Proteus strains.

  5. Anaerobic respiration using a complete oxidative TCA cycle drives multicellular swarming in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Alteri, Christopher J; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Engstrom, Michael D; Mobley, Harry L T

    2012-10-30

    Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. Bacterial locomotion and the existence of microbes were the first scientific

  6. Proteus mirabilis urease: operon fusion and linker insertion analysis of ure gene organization, regulation, and function.

    PubMed Central

    Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1995-01-01

    Urease is an inducible virulence factor of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Although eight contiguous genes necessary for urease activity have been cloned and sequenced, the transcriptional organization and regulation of specific genes within the Proteus gene cluster has not been investigated in detail. The first gene, ureR, is located 400 bp upstream and is oriented in the direction opposite the other seven genes, ureDABCEFG. The structural subunits of urease are encoded by ureABC. Previously, UreR was shown to contain a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif 30 residues upstream of a consensus sequence which is a signature for the AraC family of positive regulators; this polypeptide is homologous to other DNA-binding regulatory proteins. Nested deletions of ureR linked to either ureD-lacZ or ureA-lacZ operon fusions demonstrated that an intact ureR is required for urea-induced synthesis of LacZ from either ureA or ureD and identified a urea-regulated promoter in the ureR-ureD intergenic region. However, lacZ operon fusions to fragments encompassing putative promoter regions upstream of ureA and ureF demonstrated that no urea-regulated promoters occur upstream of these open reading frames; regions upstream of ureR, ureE, and ureG were not tested. These data suggest that UreR acts as a positive regulator in the presence of urea, activating transcription of urease structural and accessory genes via sequences upstream of ureD. To address the role of the nonstructural regulatory and accessory genes, we constructed deletion, cassette, and linker insertion mutations throughout the ure gene cluster and determined the effect of these mutations on production and regulation of urease activity in Escherichia coli. Mutations were obtained, with locations determine by DNA sequencing, in all genes except ureA and ureE. In each case, the mutation resulted in a urease-negative phenotype. PMID:7559355

  7. [Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase in free-living Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2002-01-01

    Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) of Amoeba proteus (strain B) was represented by 3 of 6 bands (= electromorphs) revealed after disc-electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels with the use of 2-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate at pH 4.0. The presence of MgCl2, CaCl2 or ZnCl2 (50 mM) in the incubation mixture used for gel staining stimulated activities of all 3 TRAP electromorphs or of two of them (in the case of ZnCl2). When gels were treated with MgCl2, CaCl2 or ZnCl2 (10 and 100 mM, 30 min) before their staining activity of TRAP electromorphs also increased. But unlike 1 M MgCl2 or 1 M CaCl2, 1 M ZnCl2 partly inactivated two of the three TRAP electromorphs. EDTA and EGTA (5 mM), and H2O2 (10 mM) completely inhibited TRAP electromorphs after gel treatment for 10, 20 and 30 min, resp. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Fe3+ and Zn2+), only the latter reactivated the TRAP electromorphs previously inactivated by EDTA or EGTA treatment. In addition, after EDTA inactivation, TRAP electromorphs were reactivated better than after EGTA. The resistance of TRAP electromorphs to okadaic acid and phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1 used in different concentrations is indicative of the absence of PP1 and PP2A among these electromorphs. Mg2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+ dependence of TRAP activity, and the resistance of its electromorphs to vanadate and phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 prevents these electromorphs from being classified as PTP. It is suggested that the active center of A. proteus TRAP contains zinc ion, which is essential for catalytic activity of the enzyme. Thus, TRAP of these amoebae is metallophosphatase showing phosphomonoesterase activity in acidic medium. This metalloenzyme differs from both mammalian tartrate-resistant PAPs and tartrate-resistant metallophosphatase of Rana esculenta.

  8. Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft with an F/A-18 Hornet and a Beechcraft KingAir from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a low-level flyby at Mojave Airport in Southern California.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-03

    Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft with an F/A-18 Hornet and a Beechcraft KingAir from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a low-level flyby at Mojave Airport in Southern California. The unique tandem-wing Proteus was the testbed for a series of UAV collision-avoidance flight demonstrations. An Amphitech 35GHz radar unit installed below Proteus' nose was the primary sensor for the Detect, See and Avoid tests.

  9. Anti-biofilm effects of honey against wound pathogens Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Majtan, Juraj; Bohova, Jana; Horniackova, Miroslava; Klaudiny, Jaroslav; Majtan, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm growth and its persistence within wounds have recently been suggested as contributing factors to impaired healing. The goal of this study was to investigate the anti-biofilm effects of several honey samples of different botanical origin, including manuka honey against Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacter cloacae wound isolates. Quantification of biofilm formation was carried out using a microtiter plate assay. All honeys at a sub-inhibitory concentration of 10% (w/v) significantly reduced the biofilm development of both isolates. Similarly, at a concentration of 50% (w/v), each of the honeys caused significant partial detachment of Pr. mirabilis biofilm after 24 h. On the other hand, no honey was able to significantly detach Ent. cloacae biofilm. In addition, treatment of Ent. cloacae and Pr. mirabilis biofilms with all honeys resulted in a significant decrease in colony-forming units per well values in a range of 0.35-1.16 and 1.2-7.5 log units, respectively. Of the tested honeys, manuka honey possessed the most potent anti-biofilm properties. Furthermore, methylglyoxal, an antibacterial compound of manuka honey, was shown to be responsible for killing biofilm-embedded wound bacteria. These findings suggest that manuka honey could be used as a potential therapy for the treatment of wounds containing Pr. mirabilis or Ent. cloacae.

  10. Biofilm Formation and Immunomodulatory Activity of Proteus mirabilis Clinically Isolated Strains.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Alessandra; Coretti, Lorena; Savio, Vittoria; Buommino, Elisabetta; Lembo, Francesca; Donnarumma, Giovanna

    2017-02-15

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and catheter-associated UTIs (CAUTIs) are the principal hospital-acquired infections. Proteus mirabilis is characterized by several virulence factors able to promote adhesion and biofilm formation and ameliorate the colonization of urinary tract and the formation of crystalline biofilms on the abiotic surface of the urinary catheters. Since, to date, the role of P. mirabilis in the etiopathogenesis of different types of urinary tract infections is not well established, in this study we sought to characterize two different clinically isolated strains of P. mirabilis (PM1 and PM2) with distinctive phenotypes and analyzed various virulence factors possibly implicated in the ability to induce UTIs and CAUTIs. In particular, we analyzed motility, biofilm formation both on abiotic and biotic surfaces of PM1 and PM2 and paralleled these parameters with the ability to induce an inflammatory response in an epithelial cell model. Results showed that PM1 displayed major motility and a capacity to form biofilm and was associated with an anti-inflammatory response of host cells. Conversely, PM2 exhibited lack motility and a had slower organization in biofilm but promoted an increase of proinflammatory cytokine expression in infected epithelial cells. Our study provides data useful to start uncovering the pathologic basis of P. mirabilis-associated urinary infections. The evidence of different virulence factors expressed by PM1 and PM2 highlights the possibility to use precise and personalized therapies targeting specific virulence pathways.

  11. Changes in peptidoglycan structure and metabolism during differentiation of Proteus mirabilis into swarmer cells.

    PubMed

    Strating, Hendrik; Vandenende, Chris; Clarke, Anthony J

    2012-10-01

    The O-acetylation of peptidoglycan in Gram-negative bacteria occurs specifically at the C-6 hydroxyl group of muramoyl residues. The level of peptidoglycan O-acetylation was found to decrease from 51% to 29% upon differentiation of Proteus mirabilis vegetative cells to swarmers. This decrease was accompanied by a change in the muropeptide composition of the peptidoglycan. In particular, the content of anhydromuropeptides increased, while the amount of Lys-Lys-muropeptides arising from bound lipoprotein decreased. These changes together with a shift in proportion of larger muropeptides suggested a decrease in average chain length of the muropeptides from swarmer cells. Zymography using SDS-PAGE gels containing either O-acetylated or chemically de-O-acetylated peptidoglycan was used to monitor the activity of specific autolysins during the differentiation of vegetative to swarming cells of P. mirabilis. A 43 kDa autolysin with increased specificity for O-acetylated peptidoglycan was detected in vegetative cells, but its activity appeared to decrease as the cells began to differentiate, while the levels of 3 other autolysins with apparent specificity for non-O-acetylated peptidoglycan increased. These changes are discussed in relation to the autolysin profile of the bacteria and the changes in peptidoglycan composition with cell differentiation.

  12. Allicin from garlic inhibits the biofilm formation and urease activity of Proteus mirabilis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar-Omid, Mahsa; Arzanlou, Mohsen; Amani, Mojtaba; Shokri Al-Hashem, Seyyedeh Khadijeh; Amir Mozafari, Nour; Peeri Doghaheh, Hadi

    2015-05-01

    Several virulence factors contribute to the pathogenesis of Proteus mirabilis. This study determined the inhibitory effects of allicin on urease, hemolysin and biofilm of P. mirabilis ATCC 12453 and its antimicrobial activity against 20 clinical isolates of P. mirabilis. Allicin did not inhibit hemolysin, whereas it did inhibit relative urease activity in both pre-lysed (half-maximum inhibitory concentration, IC50 = 4.15 μg) and intact cells (IC50 = 21 μg) in a concentration-dependent manner. Allicin at sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (2-32 μg mL(-1)) showed no significant effects on the growth of the bacteria (P > 0.05), but it reduced biofilm development in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.001). A higher concentration of allicin was needed to inhibit the established biofilms. Using the microdilution technique, the MIC90 and MBC90 values of allicin against P. mirabilis isolates were determined to be 128 and 512 μg mL(-1), respectively. The results suggest that allicin could have clinical applications in controlling P. mirabilis infections.

  13. Proteobactin and a yersiniabactin-related siderophore mediate iron acquisition in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Pearson, Melanie M.; Arewång, Carl J.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Sherman, David H.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2010-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis causes complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). While the urinary tract is an iron-limiting environment, iron acquisition remains poorly characterized for this uropathogen. Microarray analysis of P. mirabilis HI4320 cultured under iron limitation identified 45 significantly up-regulated genes (P ≤ 0.05) that represent 21 putative iron-regulated systems. Two gene clusters, PMI0229-0239 and PMI2596–2605, encode putative siderophore systems. PMI0229-0239 encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-independent siderophore (NIS) system for producing a novel siderophore, proteobactin. PMI2596-2605 are contained within the high-pathogenicity island, originally described in Yersinia pestis, and encodes proteins with apparent homology and organization to those involved in yersiniabactin production and uptake. Cross-feeding and biochemical analysis shows that P. mirabilis is unable to utilize or produce yersiniabactin, suggesting that this yersiniabactin-related locus is functionally distinct. Only disruption of both systems resulted in an in vitro iron-chelating defect; demonstrating production and iron-chelating activity for both siderophores. These findings clearly show that proteobactin and the yersiniabactin-related siderophore function as iron acquisition systems. Despite the activity of both siderophores, only mutants lacking the yersiniabactin-related siderophore reduce fitness in vivo. The fitness requirement for the yersiniabactin-related siderophore during UTI shows, for the first time, the importance of siderophore production in vivo for P. mirabilis. PMID:20923418

  14. Structure of an extended-spectrum class A beta-lactamase from Proteus vulgaris K1.

    PubMed

    Nukaga, Michiyoshi; Mayama, Kayoko; Crichlow, Gregg V; Knox, James R

    2002-03-15

    The structure of a chromosomal extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) having the ability to hydrolyze cephalosporins including cefuroxime and ceftazidime has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.75 A resolution. The species-specific class A beta-lactamase from Proteus vulgaris K1 was crystallized at pH 6.25 and its structure solved by molecular replacement. Refinement of the model resulted in crystallographic R and R(free) of 16.9 % and 19.3 %, respectively. The folding of the K1 enzyme is broadly similar to that of non-ESBL TEM-type beta-lactamases (2 A rmsd for C(alpha)) and differs by only 0.35 A for all atoms of six conserved residues in the catalytic site. Other residues promoting extended-spectrum activity in K1 include the side-chains of atypical residues Ser237 and Lys276. These side-chains are linked by two water molecules, one of which lies in the position normally filled by the guanidinium group of Arg244, present in most non-ESBL enzymes but absent from K1. The ammonium group of Lys276, ca 3.5 A from the virtual Arg244 guanidinium position, may interact with polar R2 substitutents on the dihydrothiazene ring of cephalosporins.

  15. Overexpression and characterization in Bacillus subtilis of a positionally nonspecific lipase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaping; Lin, Qian; Wang, Jin; Wu, Yufan; Bao, Wuyundalai; Lv, Fengxia; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2010-09-01

    A Proteus vulgaris strain named T6 which produced lipase (PVL) with nonpositional specificity had been isolated in our laboratory. To produce the lipase in large quantities, we cloned its gene, which had an opening reading frame of 864 base pairs and encoded a deduced 287-amino-acid protein. The PVL gene was inserted into the Escherichia coli expression vector pET-DsbA, and active lipase was expressed in E. coli BL21 cells. The secretive expression of PVL gene in Bacillus subtilis was examined. Three vectors, i.e., pMM1525 (xylose-inducible), pMMP43 (constitutive vector, derivative of pMM1525), and pHPQ (sucrose-inducible, constructed based on pHB201), were used to produce lipase in B. subtilis. Recombinant B. subtilis WB800 cells harboring the pHPQ-PVL plasmid could synthesize and secrete the PVL protein in high yield. The lipase activity reached 356.8 U/mL after induction with sucrose for 72 h in shake-flask culture, representing a 12-fold increase over the native lipase activity in P. vulgaris. The characteristics of the heterologously expressed lipase were identical to those of the native one.

  16. Role of arginine 226 in the mechanism of tryptophan indole-lyase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, V V; Zakomirdina, L N; Bazhulina, N P; Dementieva, I S; Faleev, N G; Gollnick, P D; Demidkina, T V

    2003-11-01

    In the spatial structure of tryptophanase from Proteus vulgaris the guanidinium group of arginine 226 forms a salt bridge with the 3;-oxygen atom of the coenzyme. The replacement of arginine 226 with alanine using site-directed mutagenesis reduced the affinity of the coenzyme for the protein by one order of magnitude compared to the wild-type enzyme. The catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme in the reaction with L-tryptophan was reduced 10(5)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. The rates of the reactions with some other substrates decreased 10(3)-10(4)-fold. The mutant enzyme catalyzed exchange of the C-alpha-proton in complexes with some inhibitors with rates reduced 10(2)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. Absorption and circular dichroism spectra of the mutant enzyme and the enzyme-inhibitor complexes demonstrate that the replacement of arginine 226 with alanine does not significantly affect the tautomeric equilibrium of the internal aldimine, but it leads to an alteration of the optimal conformation of the coenzyme-substrate intermediates.

  17. Recombinant expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of chondroitinase ABC II from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Vikas; Capila, Ishan; Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Raman, Rahul; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2009-01-09

    Chondroitin lyases (or chondroitinases) are a family of enzymes that depolymerize chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) galactosaminoglycans, which have gained prominence as important players in central nervous system biology. Two distinct chondroitinase ABC enzymes, cABCI and cABCII, were identified in Proteus vulgaris. Recently, cABCI was cloned, recombinantly expressed, and extensively characterized structurally and biochemically. This study focuses on recombinant expression, purification, biochemical characterization, and understanding the structure-function relationship of cABCII. The biochemical parameters for optimal activity and kinetic parameters associated with processing of various CS and DS substrates were determined. The profile of products formed by action of cABCII on different substrates was compared with product profile of cABCI. A homology-based structural model of cABCII and its complexes with CS oligosaccharides was constructed. This structural model provided molecular insights into the experimentally observed differences in the product profile of cABCII as compared with that of cABCI. The critical active site residues involved in the catalytic activity of cABCII identified based on the structural model were validated using site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic characterization of the mutants. The development of such a contaminant-free cABCII enzyme provides additional tools to decode the biologically important structure-function relationship of CS and DS galactosaminoglycans and offers novel therapeutic strategies for recovery after central nervous system injury.

  18. [Response to antibiotics of Proteus strains isolated from different types of clinical material].

    PubMed

    Ovetchin, P V; Tsyganenko, A Ia

    1984-04-01

    The data on the study of the antibiotic response to 42 Proteus strains isolated from different sources in the hospitals of Kharkov are presented. The isolates belonged to P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris. Many strains were resistant to gentamicin, ampicillin and carbenicillin irrespective of the isolation source. 58.0 and 90.3 per cent of the strains isolated from patients with intestinal infections, 66.6 and 100 per cent of the strains isolated from patients with otitis, 33.3 and 66.6 per cent of the strains isolated from patients with bronchopulmonary affections and 100 and 100 per cent of the strains isolated from patients with urological diseases were resistant to gentamicin and carbenicillin, respectively. As for ampicillin, the respective figures were 74.2, 66.6, 66.6 and 100 per cent. All the strains of P. vulgaris isolated from patients with otitis, urological diseases and bronchopulmonary affections were resistant to ampicillin. The MIC of carbenicillin for all the strains except 4 indole-positive strains of P. vulgaris isolated from the faeces and bronchial excreta was much higher than the borderline values.

  19. Crystal structure of Proteus vulgaris chondroitin sulfate ABC lyase I at 1.9A resolution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijun; Lunin, Vladimir V; Li, Yunge; Suzuki, Sakaru; Sugiura, Nobuo; Miyazono, Hirofumi; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2003-05-02

    Chondroitin Sulfate ABC lyase I from Proteus vulgaris is an endolytic, broad-specificity glycosaminoglycan lyase, which degrades chondroitin, chondroitin-4-sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronan by beta-elimination of 1,4-hexosaminidic bond to unsaturated disaccharides and tetrasaccharides. Its structure revealed three domains. The N-terminal domain has a fold similar to that of carbohydrate-binding domains of xylanases and some lectins, the middle and C-terminal domains are similar to the structures of the two-domain chondroitin lyase AC and bacterial hyaluronidases. Although the middle domain shows a very low level of sequence identity with the catalytic domains of chondroitinase AC and hyaluronidase, the residues implicated in catalysis of the latter enzymes are present in chondroitinase ABC I. The substrate-binding site in chondroitinase ABC I is in a wide-open cleft, consistent with the endolytic action pattern of this enzyme. The tryptophan residues crucial for substrate binding in chondroitinase AC and hyaluronidases are lacking in chondroitinase ABC I. The structure of chondroitinase ABC I provides a framework for probing specific functions of active-site residues for understanding the remarkably broad specificity of this enzyme and perhaps engineering a desired specificity. The electron density map showed clearly that the deposited DNA sequence for residues 495-530 of chondroitin ABC lyase I, the segment containing two putative active-site residues, contains a frame-shift error resulting in an incorrectly translated amino acid sequence.

  20. Carbon nanoparticles-assisted mediator-less microbial fuel cells using Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Ahmed, Jalal; Zhou, Lihua; Zhao, Bo; Kim, Sunghyun

    2011-09-15

    Recently mediator-less microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are attracting great interest among researchers due to their potential applications to electricity generation as well as wastewater treatment. Common mediator-less MFCs employ electroactive bacteria called exoelectrogens to directly transfer electrons to the anode from the bacteria. However, exoelectrogens are rather limited in number and thus may not find general use for practical purposes. Here we showed our results in which mediator-less MFCs could be developed from Gram-negative non-exoelectrogens. By using carbon nanoparticles as a conductive medium to immobilize bacteria, it was possible to generate appreciable electricity from Proteus vulgaris without exogenous mediators. Maximum power density of 269 mW m(-2) and cell voltage of ca. 400 mV were obtained using glucose as a substrate. Power generation was attributed to direct electron transfer and to self-produced mediators, both of which were assisted by carbon nanoparticles. Bacillus subtilis, a Gram-positive bacterium, in the meantime, did not produce appreciable electricity.

  1. Characterization of Proteus vulgaris K80 lipase immobilized on amine-terminated magnetic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Natalia, Agnes; Kristiani, Lidya; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2014-10-01

    Proteus vulgaris K80 lipase was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and immobilized on amine-terminated magnetic microparticles (Mag-MPs). The immobilization yield and activity retention were 84.15% and 7.87%, respectively. A homology model of lipase K80 was constructed using P. mirabilis lipase as the template. Many lysine residues were located on the protein surface, remote from active sites. The biochemical characteristics of immobilized lipase K80 were compared with the soluble free form of lipase K80. The optimum temperature of K80-Mag-MPs was 60°C, which was 20°C higher than that of the soluble form. K80-Mag-MPs also tended to be more stable than the soluble form at elevated temperatures and a broad range of pH. K80-Mag-MP maintained its stable form at up to 40°C and in a pH range of 5.0- 10.0, whereas soluble K80 maintained its activity up to 35°C and pH 6.0-10.0. K80-Mag-MPs had broader substrate specificity compared with that of soluble K80. K80-Mag-MPs showed about 80% residual relative activity after five recovery trials. These results indicate the potential benefit of K80-Mag-MPs as a biocatalyst in various industries.

  2. Inhibition of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis adhesion and biofilm formation on medical grade silicone surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Neoh, Koon Gee; Shi, Zhilong; Kang, En-Tang; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Chiong, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    Silicone has been utilized extensively for biomedical devices due to its excellent biocompatibility and biodurability properties. However, its surface is easily colonized by bacteria which will increase the probability of nosocomial infection. In the present work, a hydrophilic antimicrobial carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) layer has been grafted on medical grade silicone surface pre-treated with polydopamine (PDA). The increase in hydrophilicity was confirmed from contact angle measurement. Bacterial adhesion tests showed that the PDA-CMCS coating reduced the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis by ≥ 90%. The anti-adhesion property was preserved even after the aging of the functionalized surfaces for 21 days in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and also after autoclaving at 121°C for 20 min. Both E. coli and P. mirabilis readily form biofilms on the pristine surface under static and flow conditions but with the PDA-CMCS layer, biofilm formation is inhibited. The flow experiments indicated that it is more difficult to inhibit biofilm formation by the highly motile P. mirabilis as compared to E. coli. No significant cytotoxicity of the modified substrates was observed with 3T3 fibroblasts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Proteus mirabilis biofilm - qualitative and quantitative colorimetric methods-based evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinska-Piróg, Joanna; Bogiel, Tomasz; Skowron, Krzysztof; Wieckowska, Ewa; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis strains ability to form biofilm is a current topic of a number of research worldwide. In this study the biofilm formation of P. mirabilis strains derived from urine of the catheterized and non-catheterized patients has been investigated. A total number of 39 P. mirabilis strains isolated from the urine samples of the patients of dr Antoni Jurasz University Hospital No. 1 in Bydgoszcz clinics between 2011 and 2012 was used. Biofilm formation was evaluated using two independent quantitative and qualitative methods with TTC (2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride) and CV (crystal violet) application. The obtained results confirmed biofilm formation by all the examined strains, except quantitative method with TTC, in which 7.7% of the strains did not have this ability. It was shown that P. mirabilis rods have the ability to form biofilm on the surfaces of both biomaterials applied, polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride (Nelaton catheters). The differences in ability to form biofilm observed between P. mirabilis strains derived from the urine of the catheterized and non-catheterized patients were not statistically significant.

  4. Macromolecular oxidation in planktonic population and biofilms of Proteus mirabilis exposed to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Aiassa, Virginia; Barnes, Ana I; Albesa, Inés

    2014-01-01

    Diverse chemical and physical agents can alter cellular functions associated with the oxidative metabolism, thus stimulating the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Proteins and lipids may be important targets of oxidation, and this may alter their functions in planktonic bacterial physiology. However, more research is necessary to determine the precise role of cellular stress and macromolecular oxidation in biofilms. The present study was designed to evaluate whether ciprofloxacin (CIP) could oxidize the lipids to malondialdehyde (MDA) and the proteins to carbonyl residues and to advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) in planktonic populations and biofilms of Proteus mirabilis. Incubation with CIP generated an increase of lipid and protein oxidation in planktonic cells, with a greater effect found in sensitive strains than resistant ones. Biofilms showed higher basal levels of oxidized macromolecules than planktonic bacteria, but there was no significant enhancement of MDA, carbonyl, or AOPP with antibiotic. The results described in this article show the high basal levels of MDA, carbonyls, and AOPP, with aging and loss of proliferation of biofilms cells. The low response to the oxidative stress generated by CIP in biofilms helps to clarify the resistance to antibiotics of P. mirabilis when adhered to surfaces.

  5. Immunodetection and intracellular localization of caldesmon-like proteins in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Gagola, M; Kłopocka, W; Greebecki, A; Makuch, R

    2003-09-01

    Caldesmon immunoanalogues were detected in Amoeba proteus cell homogenates by the Western blot technique. Three immunoreactive bands were recognized by polyclonal antibodies against the whole molecule of chicken gizzard caldesmon as well as by a monoclonal antibody against its C-terminal domain: one major and two minor bands corresponding to proteins with apparent molecular masses of 150, 69, and 60 kDa. The presence of caldesmon-like protein(s) in amoebae was revealed as well in single cells after their fixation, staining with the same antibodies, and recording their total fluorescence in a confocal laser scanning microscope. Proteins recognized by the antibodies bind to filamentous actin. This was established by a cosedimentation assay in cell homogenates and by colocalization of the caldesmon-related immunofluorescence with the fluorescence of filamentous actin stained with rhodamine-labelled phalloidin, demonstrated in optical sections of single cells in a confocal microscope. Caldesmon is colocalized with filamentous actin in the withdrawn cell regions where the cortical actomyosin network contracts and actin is depolymerized, in the frontal zone where actin is polymerized again and the cortical cytoskeleton is reconstructed, inside the nucleus and in the perinuclear cytoskeleton, and probably at the cell-to-substratum adhesion sites. The regulatory role of caldesmon in these functionally different regions of locomoting amoebae is discussed.

  6. Environmental scanning electron microscopy analysis of Proteus mirabilis biofilms grown on chitin and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Duque, Zoilabet; Rojas, Héctor; Suárez, Paula; Contreras, Monica; García-Amado, María A; Alciaturi, Carlos

    Proteus mirabilis is a human pathogen able to form biofilms on the surface of urinary catheters. Little is known about P. mirabilis biofilms on natural or industrial surfaces and the potential consequences for these settings. The main aim of this work was to assess and compare the adhesion and biofilm formation of P. mirabilis strains from different origins on chitin and stainless steel surfaces within 4 to 96 h. Using environmental scanning electron microscopy, the biofilms of a clinical strain grown on chitin at 4 h showed greater adhesion, aggregation, thickness, and extracellular matrix production than those grown on stainless steel, whereas biofilms of an environmental strain had less aggregation on both surfaces. Biofilms of both P. mirabilis strains developed different structures on chitin, such as pillars, mushrooms, channels, and crystalline-like precipitates between 24 and 96 h, in contrast with flat-layer biofilms produced on stainless steel. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the frequency of pillars and channels. Images of transmission electron microscopy demonstrated abundant fimbriae in 100 % of cells from both strains, which could be related to surface adherence and biofilm formation. This represents the first study of P. mirabilis showing adhesion, biofilm formation, and development of different structures on surfaces found outside the human host.

  7. Characterization of a cryptic plasmid from an alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Park, Miey; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Kyung-Min; Hwang, Sue-Yun; Ahn, Tae In

    2009-01-01

    A new cryptic plasmid pAP3.9 was discovered in symbiotic alpha-proteobacteria present in the cytoplasm of Amoeba proteus. The plasmid is 3869bp with a GC content of 34.66% and contains replication origins for both double-strand (dso) and single-strand (sso). It has three putative ORFs encoding Mob, Rep and phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGPase). The pAP3.9 plasmid appears to propagate by the conjugative rolling-circle replication (RCR), since it contains all required factors such as Rep, sso and dso. Mob and Rep showed highest similarities to those of the cryptic plasmid pBMYdx in Bacillus mycoides. The PGPase was homologous to that of Bacillus cereus and formed a clade with those of Bacillus sp. in molecular phylogeny. These results imply that the pAP3.9 plasmid evolved by the passage through Bacillus species. We hypothesize that the plasmid-encoded PGPase may have contributed to the establishment of bacterial symbiosis within the hostile environment of amoeba cytoplasm.

  8. [Effect of acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase on the activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh, 1 microM) stimulates activity of the contractile vacuole of proteus. The effect of ACh is not mimicked by its analogs which are not hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE), i. e., carbacholine and 5-methylfurmethide. The effect of ACh is not sensitive to the blocking action of M-cholinolytics, atropine and mytolone, but is suppressed by N-cholinolytic, tubocurarine. The inhibitors of AChE, eserine (0.01 microM) and armine (0.1 microM), suppress the effect of ACh on amoeba contractile vacuole. ACh does not affect activation of contractile vacuole induced by arginine-vasopressin (1 microM), but it blocks such effect of opiate receptors agonist, dynorphin A1-13 (0.01 microM). This effect of ACh is also suppressed by the inhibitors of AChE. These results suggest that, in the above-described effects of ACh, AChE acts not as an antagonist, but rather as a synergist.

  9. Paradoxical activity of beta-lactam antibiotics against Proteus vulgaris in experimental infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Fukuoka, Y; Motomura, K; Yasuda, T; Nishino, T

    1990-01-01

    In previous papers (Y. Ikeda and T. Nishino, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 32:1073-1077, 1988; Y. Ikeda, T. Nishino, and T. Tanino, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 31:865-869, 1987), we reported that many of the 7-aminothiazolyl cephalosporins, such as cefmenoxime, showed paradoxically reduced activity against Proteus vulgaris at higher concentrations, whereas these paradoxical effects were not observed for other types of cephalosporins, such as cefbuperazone and cefoperazone. In this study, we compare the therapeutic effect of cefmenoxime with that of cefbuperazone and explore the in vivo paradoxical effect of cefmenoxime by using an experimental infection model in mice. In an intraperitoneal infection with P. vulgaris 11, the survival rate with cefmenoxime was increased to 43% at 3.13 mg/kg but was lower at higher doses. On the other hand, cefbuperazone did not show such a paradoxical therapeutic effect. In mice infected with P. vulgaris 11, cefmenoxime levels in both serum and peritoneal washings were rapidly reduced and beta-lactamase activities in the peritoneal cavity were increased at higher cefmenoxime doses. These findings suggested that high levels of cefmenoxime at the infection site induced increased production of beta-lactamase, which then rapidly inactivated the antibiotic. We conclude that the paradoxical therapeutic effect of cefmenoxime against P. vulgaris occurs by the same mechanisms as the in vitro effect and that the high beta-lactamase inducibility and low beta-lactamase stability may account for the paradoxical therapeutic effect of cefmenoxime against P. vulgaris.

  10. Proteus vulgaris urinary tract infections in rats; treatment with nitrofuran derivatives.

    PubMed

    HOSSACK, D J

    1962-10-01

    Ascending urinary tract infections with stone formation have been produced experimentally in rats, using a modification of the method of Vermuelen & Goetz (1954a, b). A zinc disc infected with a culture of Proteus vulgaris was inserted into the bladder by suprapubic cystotomy under ether anaesthesia. The pH of the urine rises from 6.9 to 8 or 9 and calculi develop in the bladder within a few days of infection. The bladder and ureters become swollen, distended and inflamed, and renal abscesses develop. Death from renal failure generally occurs within 10 days of infection. Oral treatment with nitrofurantoin was commenced three days after infection and continued for one month. This arrested the initial rise in urine alkalinity and stone formation, and few, if any, macroscopic lesions were found at post-mortem examination. Of nine nitrofuran derivatives examined for activity against this infection several showed slight activity, but only one, N-(5-Nitrofurfurylidene)-gamma-butyric acid, was as active as nitrofurantoin when given at four times the dose, but it was also one-third as toxic. It is concluded that this technique is suitable for the examination of potential urinary antiseptics.

  11. Putrescine importer PlaP contributes to swarming motility and urothelial cell invasion in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Shin; Sakai, Yumi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Muth, Aaron; Phanstiel, Otto; Rather, Philip N

    2013-05-31

    Previously, we reported that the speA gene, encoding arginine decarboxylase, is required for swarming in the urinary tract pathogen Proteus mirabilis. In addition, this previous study suggested that putrescine may act as a cell-to-cell signaling molecule (Sturgill, G., and Rather, P. N. (2004) Mol. Microbiol. 51, 437-446). In this new study, PlaP, a putative putrescine importer, was characterized in P. mirabilis. In a wild-type background, a plaP null mutation resulted in a modest swarming defect and slightly decreased levels of intracellular putrescine. In a P. mirabilis speA mutant with greatly reduced levels of intracellular putrescine, plaP was required for the putrescine-dependent rescue of swarming motility. When a speA/plaP double mutant was grown in the presence of extracellular putrescine, the intracellular levels of putrescine were greatly reduced compared with the speA mutant alone, indicating that PlaP functioned as the primary putrescine importer. In urothelial cell invasion assays, a speA mutant exhibited a 50% reduction in invasion when compared with wild type, and this defect could be restored by putrescine in a PlaP-dependent manner. The putrescine analog Triamide-44 partially inhibited the uptake of putrescine by PlaP and decreased both putrescine stimulated swarming and urothelial cell invasion in a speA mutant.

  12. Flagellum density regulates Proteus mirabilis swarmer cell motility in viscous environments.

    PubMed

    Tuson, Hannah H; Copeland, Matthew F; Carey, Sonia; Sacotte, Ryan; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with urinary tract infections. In the lab, P. mirabilis cells become long and multinucleate and increase their number of flagella as they colonize agar surfaces during swarming. Swarming has been implicated in pathogenesis; however, it is unclear how energetically costly changes in P. mirabilis cell morphology translate into an advantage for adapting to environmental changes. We investigated two morphological changes that occur during swarming--increases in cell length and flagellum density--and discovered that an increase in the surface density of flagella enabled cells to translate rapidly through fluids of increasing viscosity; in contrast, cell length had a small effect on motility. We found that swarm cells had a surface density of flagella that was ∼5 times larger than that of vegetative cells and were motile in fluids with a viscosity that inhibits vegetative cell motility. To test the relationship between flagellum density and velocity, we overexpressed FlhD(4)C(2), the master regulator of the flagellar operon, in vegetative cells of P. mirabilis and found that increased flagellum density produced an increase in cell velocity. Our results establish a relationship between P. mirabilis flagellum density and cell motility in viscous environments that may be relevant to its adaptation during the infection of mammalian urinary tracts and movement in contact with indwelling catheters.

  13. Virulence factors in Proteus bacteria from biofilm communities of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Hola, Veronika; Peroutkova, Tereza; Ruzicka, Filip

    2012-07-01

    More than 40% of nosocomial infections are those of the urinary tract, most of these occurring in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters results not only in infection, but also various complications, such as blockage of catheters with crystalline deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. The diversity of the biofilm microbial community increases with duration of catheter emplacement. One of the most important pathogens in this regard is Proteus mirabilis. The aims of this study were to identify and assess particular virulence factors present in catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) isolates, their correlation and linkages: three types of motility (swarming, swimming and twitching), the ability to swarm over urinary catheters, biofilm production in two types of media, urease production and adherence of bacterial cells to various types of urinary tract catheters. We examined 102 CAUTI isolates and 50 isolates taken from stool samples of healthy people. Among the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters, significant differences were found in biofilm-forming ability and the swarming motility. In comparison with the control group, the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters showed a wider spectrum of virulence factors. The virulence factors (twitching motility, swimming motility, swarming over various types of catheters and biofilm formation) were also more intensively expressed. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biofilm Formation and Immunomodulatory Activity of Proteus mirabilis Clinically Isolated Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Alessandra; Coretti, Lorena; Savio, Vittoria; Buommino, Elisabetta; Lembo, Francesca; Donnarumma, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and catheter-associated UTIs (CAUTIs) are the principal hospital-acquired infections. Proteus mirabilis is characterized by several virulence factors able to promote adhesion and biofilm formation and ameliorate the colonization of urinary tract and the formation of crystalline biofilms on the abiotic surface of the urinary catheters. Since, to date, the role of P. mirabilis in the etiopathogenesis of different types of urinary tract infections is not well established, in this study we sought to characterize two different clinically isolated strains of P. mirabilis (PM1 and PM2) with distinctive phenotypes and analyzed various virulence factors possibly implicated in the ability to induce UTIs and CAUTIs. In particular, we analyzed motility, biofilm formation both on abiotic and biotic surfaces of PM1 and PM2 and paralleled these parameters with the ability to induce an inflammatory response in an epithelial cell model. Results showed that PM1 displayed major motility and a capacity to form biofilm and was associated with an anti-inflammatory response of host cells. Conversely, PM2 exhibited lack motility and a had slower organization in biofilm but promoted an increase of proinflammatory cytokine expression in infected epithelial cells. Our study provides data useful to start uncovering the pathologic basis of P. mirabilis-associated urinary infections. The evidence of different virulence factors expressed by PM1 and PM2 highlights the possibility to use precise and personalized therapies targeting specific virulence pathways. PMID:28212280

  15. Proteus mirabilis biofilm - Qualitative and quantitative colorimetric methods-based evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecinska-Piróg, Joanna; Bogiel, Tomasz; Skowron, Krzysztof; Wieckowska, Ewa; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis strains ability to form biofilm is a current topic of a number of research worldwide. In this study the biofilm formation of P. mirabilis strains derived from urine of the catheterized and non-catheterized patients has been investigated. A total number of 39 P. mirabilis strains isolated from the urine samples of the patients of dr Antoni Jurasz University Hospital No. 1 in Bydgoszcz clinics between 2011 and 2012 was used. Biofilm formation was evaluated using two independent quantitative and qualitative methods with TTC (2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride) and CV (crystal violet) application. The obtained results confirmed biofilm formation by all the examined strains, except quantitative method with TTC, in which 7.7% of the strains did not have this ability. It was shown that P. mirabilis rods have the ability to form biofilm on the surfaces of both biomaterials applied, polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride (Nelaton catheters). The differences in ability to form biofilm observed between P. mirabilis strains derived from the urine of the catheterized and non-catheterized patients were not statistically significant. PMID:25763050

  16. Proteobactin and a yersiniabactin-related siderophore mediate iron acquisition in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Himpsl, Stephanie D; Pearson, Melanie M; Arewång, Carl J; Nusca, Tyler D; Sherman, David H; Mobley, Harry L T

    2010-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis causes complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). While the urinary tract is an iron-limiting environment, iron acquisition remains poorly characterized for this uropathogen. Microarray analysis of P. mirabilis HI4320 cultured under iron limitation identified 45 significantly upregulated genes (P ≤ 0.05) that represent 21 putative iron-regulated systems. Two gene clusters, PMI0229-0239 and PMI2596-2605, encode putative siderophore systems. PMI0229-0239 encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore system for producing a novel siderophore, proteobactin. PMI2596-2605 are contained within the high-pathogenicity island, originally described in Yersinia pestis, and encodes proteins with apparent homology and organization to those involved in yersiniabactin production and uptake. Cross-feeding and biochemical analysis shows that P. mirabilis is unable to utilize or produce yersiniabactin, suggesting that this yersiniabactin-related locus is functionally distinct. Only disruption of both systems resulted in an in vitro iron-chelating defect; demonstrating production and iron-chelating activity for both siderophores. These findings clearly show that proteobactin and the yersiniabactin-related siderophore function as iron acquisition systems. Despite the activity of both siderophores, only mutants lacking the yersiniabactin-related siderophore have reduced fitness in vivo. The fitness requirement for the yersiniabactin-related siderophore during UTI shows, for the first time, the importance of siderophore production in vivo for P. mirabilis.

  17. Abolition of Swarming of Proteus by p-Nitrophenyl Glycerin: Application to Blood Agar Media

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fred D.

    1973-01-01

    Comparative plate counts were made of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes growing on blood agar supplemented with individual chemicals to abolish the swarming of Proteus. B-phenylethanol, sodium azide, and p-nitrophenyl glycerin (PNPG) were used as anti-swarm agents. Each anti-swarm agent effectively abolished swarming for 24 h, but azide failed to control swarming for longer periods of incubation. In addition, azide displayed growth inhibition towards the staphylococci and streptococci resulting in no hemolysis and reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci. Phenylethanol showed reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci and unreliable hemolytic reactions. At 0.1 to 0.3 mM, PNPG proved to be a superior anti-swarm agent in that it showed no growth inhibition and allowed normal hemolysis, but abolished swarming for extended periods of time. When laboratory strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Listeria monocytogenes, and Vibrio cholerae were screened on a blood agar medium containing 0.1 mm PNPG, they displayed similar growth and hemolytic characteristics to the identical medium without PNPG. PMID:4715553

  18. Modified insulator semiconductor electrode with functionalized nanoparticles for Proteus mirabilis bacteria biosensor development.

    PubMed

    Braham, Yosra; Barhoumi, Houcine; Maaref, Abderrazak; Bakhrouf, Amina; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    The development of enzymatic sensors for biological purposes such as biomedicine, pharmacy, food industry, and environmental toxicity requires the purification step of the enzyme. To prevent the loss of the enzyme activity, a new strategy is held in order to immobilize the bacteria. It will constitute the biological sensing element leading to a high operational stability and multiple adaptations to various conditions such as temperature, pH and ionic strength changes. In this work we describe the development of a urea biosensor by immobilizing Proteus mirabilis bacteria onto an insulator-semiconductor electrode on functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs), using cationic, Poly (allylamine hydrochloride) then anionic, Poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolytes, BSA (serum bovin albumin), and glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. The response of P. mirabilis to urea addition is evaluated in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. Before the immobilization step, the activity of urease produced from the P. mirabilis bacteria was attempted using the ion ammonium selective electrodes (ISEs). Adhesion of the bacteria cells on IS electrodes have been studied using contact angle measurements. After immobilization of the bacteria, on the (Si/SiO2/Si3N4) and (Si/SiO2) substrates, the relationship between the evolution of the flat band potential ∆VFB and the urea concentration is found to be linear for values ranging from 10(-2)M to 10(-5)M.

  19. Two-directional pattern of movements on the cell surface of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Grebecki, A

    1986-07-01

    Particles of latex, glass and precipitated Alcian Blue were studied cinematographically on the surface of migrating Amoeba proteus and in the surrounding medium. The majority of the attached and all unattached particles flow steadily forward in the direction of the endoplasmic streaming and cell locomotion. Flow on the surface is faster than in suspension. Some particles stuck on the membrane move backwards from the frontal region. This retrograde transport is slower than the anterograde flow, and the rate decreases further when the particles approach cell regions adhering to the substratum, accurately following the pattern of the withdrawal of ectoplasm in the same zone. Both movements coexist in the same region and retrograde particles may pass anterograde ones at a distance less than their diameter. Transition from forward flow to backward transport occurs just behind the frontal cap, where the new ectoplasm is formed. The anterograde movement is interpreted as reflecting the general forward flow of the laterally mobile fluid membrane components, which become added to the frontal surface of the locomoting cell; the retrograde movement as retraction of membrane components that, externally, are linked to the transported material and, on the cytoplasmic side, to the contractile microfilamentous layer, as is postulated for cap formation in tissue cells.

  20. Production of a High Efficiency Microbial Flocculant by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 Using Compound Organic Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Zhang, Jiao

    2010-11-01

    The production of a high efficiency microbial flocculant (MBF) by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 using compound organic wastewater was investigated. To cut down the cost of the MBF production, several nutritive organic wastewaters were selected to replace glucose and peptone as the carbon source and the nitrogen source in the optimized medium of strain TJ-1, respectively. The compound wastewater of the milk candy and the soybean milk was found to be good carbon source and nitrogen source for this strain to produce MBF. The cost-effective culture medium consists of (per liter): 800 mL wastewater of milk candy, 200 mL wastewater of soybean milk, 0.3 g MgSO4ṡ7 H2O, 5 g K2HPO4, 2 g and KH2PO4, pH 7.0. The economic cost for the MBF production can be cut down over a half by using the developed culture medium. Furthermore, the utilization of the two wastewaters in the preparation of culture medium of strain TJ-1 can not only save their big treatment cost, but also realize their resource reuse.

  1. Rapidly spreading CTX-M-type beta-lactamase-producing Proteus mirabilis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, Akiko; Iyoda, Takako; Matsuzaki, Kaoru; Saika, Takeshi; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Kobayashi, Intetsu

    2010-10-01

    In recent years, increased isolation of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Proteus mirabilis has been reported in Japan. We undertook an investigation to determine the prevalence of ESBL-producing P. mirabilis isolated in Japan and to characterise the genotype. Seventy-four P. mirabilis isolates recovered from specimens at 54 hospitals in Japan between March and October 2006 were included in the study. Of the 74 P. mirabilis isolates examined, 28 (37.8%) were ESBL-producers. The bla(CTX-M-2) gene was found in 27 isolates, whilst 1 isolate possessed bla(CTX-M-3). Amongst the 28 ESBL-producers, 25 (89.3%) were non-susceptible to ciprofloxacin, whilst 11 (23.9%) of 46 ESBL-non-producing isolates were non-susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of the 28 ESBL-producing isolates from 19 hospitals revealed 17 clusters. The same PFGE type was observed in two or more hospitals especially in the greater Tokyo area, suggesting possible clonal spread and the need for monitoring to determine whether emergence of a dominant clone occurs. Our results show that in Japan there is a high prevalence of CTX-M-type beta-lactamase-producing P. mirabilis. Moreover, these isolates are characterised by reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones.

  2. Development of an "early warning" sensor for encrustation of urinary catheters following Proteus infection.

    PubMed

    Malic, Sladjana; Waters, Mark G J; Basil, Leo; Stickler, David J; Williams, David W

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation in long-term urinary catheterized patients can lead to encrustation and blockage of urinary catheters with serious clinical complication. Catheter encrustation stems from infection with urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Urease generates ammonia from urea, and the elevated pH of the urine results in crystallization of calcium and magnesium phosphates, which block the flow of urine. The aim of this research is to develop an "early warning" silicone sensor for catheter encrustation following bacterial infection of an in vitro bladder model system. The in vitro bladder model was infected with a range of urease positive and negative bacterial strains. Developed sensors enabled catheter blockage to be predicted ~17-24 h in advance of its occurrence. Signaling only occurred following infection with urease positive bacteria and only when catheter blockage followed. In summary, sensors were developed that could predict urinary catheter blockage in in vitro infection models. Translation of these sensors to a clinical environment will allow the timely and appropriate management of catheter blockage in long-term catheterized patients. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Surveying Europe's Only Cave-Dwelling Chordate Species (Proteus anguinus) Using Environmental DNA.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Judit; Márton, Orsolya; Schmidt, Benedikt R; Gál, Júlia Tünde; Jelić, Dušan

    2017-01-01

    In surveillance of subterranean fauna, especially in the case of rare or elusive aquatic species, traditional techniques used for epigean species are often not feasible. We developed a non-invasive survey method based on environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect the presence of the red-listed cave-dwelling amphibian, Proteus anguinus, in the caves of the Dinaric Karst. We tested the method in fifteen caves in Croatia, from which the species was previously recorded or expected to occur. We successfully confirmed the presence of P. anguinus from ten caves and detected the species for the first time in five others. Using a hierarchical occupancy model we compared the availability and detection probability of eDNA of two water sampling methods, filtration and precipitation. The statistical analysis showed that both availability and detection probability depended on the method and estimates for both probabilities were higher using filter samples than for precipitation samples. Combining reliable field and laboratory methods with robust statistical modeling will give the best estimates of species occurrence.

  4. Proteus mirabilis alleviates zinc toxicity by preventing oxidative stress in maize (Zea mays) plants.

    PubMed

    Islam, Faisal; Yasmeen, Tahira; Riaz, Muhammad; Arif, Muhammad Saleem; Ali, Shafaqat; Raza, Syed Hammad

    2014-12-01

    Plant-associated bacteria can have beneficial effects on the growth and health of their host. However, the role of plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPR), under metal stress, has not been widely investigated. The present study investigated the possible mandatory role of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in protecting plants from zinc (Zn) toxicity. The exposure of maize plants to 50µM zinc inhibited biomass production, decreased chlorophyll, total soluble protein and strongly increased accumulation of Zn in both root and shoot. Similarly, Zn enhanced hydrogen peroxide, electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation as indicated by malondaldehyde accumulation. Pre-soaking with novel Zn tolerant bacterial strain Proteus mirabilis (ZK1) isolated zinc (Zn) contaminated soil, alleviated the negative effect of Zn on growth and led to a decrease in oxidative injuries caused by Zn. Furthermore, strain ZK1 significantly enhanced the activities of catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and ascorbic acid but lowered the Proline accumulation in Zn stressed plants. The results suggested that the inoculation of Zea mays plants with P. mirabilis during an earlier growth period could be related to its plant growth promoting activities and avoidance of cumulative damage upon exposure to Zn, thus reducing the negative consequences of oxidative stress caused by heavy metal toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural studies on the fucosamine-containing O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O19.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, E V; Kaca, W; Knirel, Y A; Rózalski, A; Kochetkov, N K

    1989-03-01

    The polysaccharide chain of Proteus vulgaris O19 lipopolysaccharide contains D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and N-acetyl-L-fucosamine in the ratio 1:1:1:1. The structure of the polysaccharide was established by full acid hydrolysis and methylation analysis, as well as by non-destructive methods, i.e. the computer-assisted evaluation of the 13C-NMR spectrum and computer-assisted evaluation of the specific optical rotation by Klyne's rule. The polysaccharide is regular and built up of tetrasaccharide repeating units of the following structure: ----3)-alpha-L-FucNAcp-(1----3)-beta-D-GlcNAcp-(1----3)-alph a-D-Galp- (1----4)-alpha-D-GalNAcp-(1---- The O19-antiserum cross-reacts with lipopolysaccharide from P. vulgaris O42, the structure of which is still unknown. No cross-reactions were observed with O-polysaccharides Pseudomonas aeruginosa O7 and Salmonella arizonae O59 in spite of some structural similarities.

  6. Surveying Europe’s Only Cave-Dwelling Chordate Species (Proteus anguinus) Using Environmental DNA

    PubMed Central

    Márton, Orsolya; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Gál, Júlia Tünde; Jelić, Dušan

    2017-01-01

    In surveillance of subterranean fauna, especially in the case of rare or elusive aquatic species, traditional techniques used for epigean species are often not feasible. We developed a non-invasive survey method based on environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect the presence of the red-listed cave-dwelling amphibian, Proteus anguinus, in the caves of the Dinaric Karst. We tested the method in fifteen caves in Croatia, from which the species was previously recorded or expected to occur. We successfully confirmed the presence of P. anguinus from ten caves and detected the species for the first time in five others. Using a hierarchical occupancy model we compared the availability and detection probability of eDNA of two water sampling methods, filtration and precipitation. The statistical analysis showed that both availability and detection probability depended on the method and estimates for both probabilities were higher using filter samples than for precipitation samples. Combining reliable field and laboratory methods with robust statistical modeling will give the best estimates of species occurrence. PMID:28129383

  7. Complicated Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, S. M.; Stickler, D. J.; Mobley, H. L. T.; Shirtliff, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent the most common type of nosocomial infection and are a major health concern due to the complications and frequent recurrence. These infections are often caused by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. Gram-negative bacterial species that cause CAUTIs express a number of virulence factors associated with adhesion, motility, biofilm formation, immunoavoidance, and nutrient acquisition as well as factors that cause damage to the host. These infections can be reduced by limiting catheter usage and ensuring that health care professionals correctly use closed-system Foley catheters. A number of novel approaches such as condom and suprapubic catheters, intermittent catheterization, new surfaces, catheters with antimicrobial agents, and probiotics have thus far met with limited success. While the diagnosis of symptomatic versus asymptomatic CAUTIs may be a contentious issue, it is generally agreed that once a catheterized patient is believed to have a symptomatic urinary tract infection, the catheter is removed if possible due to the high rate of relapse. Research focusing on the pathogenesis of CAUTIs will lead to a better understanding of the disease process and will subsequently lead to the development of new diagnosis, prevention, and treatment options. PMID:18202436

  8. Parenting children with Proteus syndrome: experiences with, and adaptation to, courtesy stigma.

    PubMed

    Turner, Joyce; Biesecker, Barbara; Leib, Jennifer; Biesecker, Leslie; Peters, Kathryn F

    2007-09-15

    Courtesy stigma refers to the stigmatization an unaffected person experiences due to his or her relationship with a person who bears a stigma. Parents of children with genetic conditions are particularly vulnerable to courtesy stigma, but little research has been done to explore this phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to investigate the courtesy stigma experiences of parents of children with Proteus syndrome (PS) and related overgrowth conditions. Thematic analysis of transcripts from 31 parents identified three distinct themes: stigma experiences, social-emotional reactions to stigmatizing encounters, and coping responses. Four types of stigmatizing experiences were identified: intrusive inquires, staring and pointing, devaluing remarks, and social withdrawal. Additionally, we uncovered eight strategies parents used to cope with courtesy stigma: attributing cause, assigning meaning to social exchanges, concealing, withdrawing socially, taking the offensive, employing indifference, instructing and learning from family, and educating others. Parents' choices of strategy type were found to be context dependent and evolved over time. This is the first study to document the adaptive evolution of coping strategies to offset courtesy stigma by parents of children with genetic conditions. These results provide groundwork for genetic counseling interventions aimed at addressing issues of courtesy stigma and further investigation of the phenomenon itself. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Complicated catheter-associated urinary tract infections due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, S M; Stickler, D J; Mobley, H L T; Shirtliff, M E

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent the most common type of nosocomial infection and are a major health concern due to the complications and frequent recurrence. These infections are often caused by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. Gram-negative bacterial species that cause CAUTIs express a number of virulence factors associated with adhesion, motility, biofilm formation, immunoavoidance, and nutrient acquisition as well as factors that cause damage to the host. These infections can be reduced by limiting catheter usage and ensuring that health care professionals correctly use closed-system Foley catheters. A number of novel approaches such as condom and suprapubic catheters, intermittent catheterization, new surfaces, catheters with antimicrobial agents, and probiotics have thus far met with limited success. While the diagnosis of symptomatic versus asymptomatic CAUTIs may be a contentious issue, it is generally agreed that once a catheterized patient is believed to have a symptomatic urinary tract infection, the catheter is removed if possible due to the high rate of relapse. Research focusing on the pathogenesis of CAUTIs will lead to a better understanding of the disease process and will subsequently lead to the development of new diagnosis, prevention, and treatment options.

  10. The role of Proteus mirabilis cell wall features in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Guzy, Anna; Kałuża, Klaudia; Grosicka, Michalina; Dańczuk, Magdalena; Lechowicz, Łukasz; Gmiter, Dawid; Kowalczyk, Paweł; Kaca, Wiesław

    2016-11-01

    Biofilms formed by Proteus mirabilis strains are a serious medical problem, especially in the case of urinary tract infections. Early stages of biofilm formation, such as reversible and irreversible adhesion, are essential for bacteria to form biofilm and avoid eradication by antibiotic therapy. Adhesion to solid surfaces is a complex process where numerous factors play a role, where hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions with solid surface seem to be substantial. Cell surface hydrophobicity and electrokinetic potential of bacterial cells depend on their surface composition and structure, where lipopolysaccharide, in Gram-negative bacteria, is prevailing. Our studies focused on clinical and laboratory P. mirabilis strains, where laboratory strains have determined LPS structures. Adherence and biofilm formation tests revealed significant differences between strains adhered in early stages of biofilm formation. Amounts of formed biofilm were expressed by the absorption of crystal violet. Higher biofilm amounts were formed by the strains with more negative values of zeta potential. In contrast, high cell surface hydrophobicity correlated with low biofilm amount.

  11. Characteristics of bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yoko; Hitomi, Shigemi; Oishi, Tsuyoshi; Kondo, Tsukasa; Ebihara, Tsugio; Funayama, Yasunori; Kawakami, Yasushi

    2013-10-01

    Although Proteus mirabilis is a common human pathogen, bacteremia caused by the organism, especially strains producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), has rarely been investigated. We examined 64 cases of P. mirabilis bacteremia identified in the Minami Ibaraki Area, Japan, between 2001 and 2010 and compared the characteristics of cases with ESBL-producing and ESBL-non-producing strains (13 and 51 cases, respectively). All ESBL-producing strains with the gene encoding the CTX-M-2-group were genetically nonidentical. Isolation of ESBL-producing strains was significantly associated with onset in a hospital (p = 0.030), receiving hemodialysis (p = 0.0050), and previous antibiotic use within 1 month (p = 0.036; especially penicillin and/or cephalosporin (p = 0.010) and fluoroquinolone (p = 0.0069)). Isolation was also associated with inappropriate antibiotic therapy on the 1st and 4th days (p = 0.011 and 0.032, respectively) but not with mortality on the 30th day. These findings indicate that, for P. mirabilis bacteremia, isolation of ESBL-producing strains causes delay of initiating appropriate antimicrobial therapy but may not be associated with mortality.

  12. The Rcs regulon in Proteus mirabilis: implications for motility, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Howery, Kristen E; Clemmer, Katy M; Rather, Philip N

    2016-11-01

    The overall role of the Rcs phosphorelay in Proteus mirabilis is largely unknown. Previous work had demonstrated that the Rcs phosphorelay represses the flhDC operon and activates the minCDE cell division inhibition system. To identify additional cellular functions regulated by the Rcs phosphorelay, an analysis of RNA-seq data was undertaken. In this report, the results of the RNA-sequencing are discussed with an emphasis on the predicted roles of the Rcs phosphorelay in swarmer cell differentiation, motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. RcsB is shown to activate genes important for differentiation and fimbriae formation, while repressing the expression of genes important for motility and virulence. Additionally, to follow up on the RNA-Seq data, we demonstrate that an rcsB mutant is deficient in its ability to form biofilm and exhibits enhanced virulence in a Galleria mellonella waxworm model. Overall, these results indicate the Rcs regulon in P. mirabilis extends beyond flagellar genes to include those involved in biofilm formation and virulence. Furthermore, the information presented in this study may provide clues to additional roles of the Rcs phosphorelay in other members of the Enterobacteriaceae.

  13. Immune enhancement of Taishan Robinia pseudoacacia polysaccharide on recombinant Proteus mirabilis OmpA in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongbing; Yang, Shifa; Zhao, Xue; Yang, Ya; Li, Bing; Zhu, Fujie; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Taishan Robinia pseudoacacia polysaccharide (TRPPS) on immune responses of chickens immunized with Proteus mirabilis outer membrane protein A (OmpA) recombinant protein vaccine. OmpA was expressed in Pichia pastoris and mixed with TRPPS. 360 chickens were randomly divided into six groups. Groups I to IV were treated with OmpA which contained TRPPS of three different dosages, Freund's adjuvant, respectively. Groups V and VI were treated with pure OmpA and physiological saline, respectively. The data showed that the antibody titers against OmpA, the concentration of IL-2, CD4 +, and CD8 +, T lymphocyte proliferation rate in Group II were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those in the other groups, little difference in SIgA content was observed among groups I to VI. These results indicated that TRPPS strengthened humoral and cellular immune responses against recombinant OmpA vaccine. Moreover, 200 mg/mL TRPPS showed significance (P < 0.05) compared with Freund's adjuvant. Therefore, TRPPS can be developed into an adjuvant for recombinant subunit vaccine.

  14. Laser hazard analysis for airborne AURA (Big Sky variant) Proteus platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-02-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the airborne AURA (Big Sky Laser Technology) lidar system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The AURA lidar system is installed in the instrument pod of a Proteus airframe and is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites. The targets are located at various distances or ranges from the airborne platform. In order to protect personnel, who may be in the target area and may be subjected to exposures, it was necessary to determine the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) for each laser wavelength, calculate the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD), and determine the maximum 'eye-safe' dwell times for various operational altitudes and conditions. It was also necessary to calculate the appropriate minimum Optical Density (ODmin) of the laser safety eyewear used by authorized personnel who may receive hazardous exposures during ground base operations of the airborne AURA laser system (system alignment and calibration).

  15. Characteristics of motive force derived from trajectory analysis of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Noritaka; Miyoshi, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Yoshimi

    2007-01-01

    We used a monochromatic charge-coupled-device camera to observe the migration behavior of Amoeba proteus every 5 s over a time course of 10000 s in order to investigate the characteristics of its centroid movement (cell velocity) over the long term. Fourier transformation of the time series of the cell velocity revealed that its power spectrum exhibits a Lorentz type profile with a relaxation time of a few hundred seconds. Moreover, some sharp peaks were found in the power spectrum, where the ratios of any two frequencies corresponding to the peaks were expressed as simple rational numbers. Analysis of the trajectory using a Langevin equation showed that the power spectrum reflects characteristics of the cell's motive force. These results suggest that some phenomena relating to the cell's motility, such as protoplasmic streaming and the sol-gel transformation of actin filaments, which seem to be independent phenomena and have different relaxation times, interact with each other and cooperatively participate in the generation process of the motive force.

  16. Isolation and Purification of Complex II from Proteus Mirabilis Strain ATCC 29245

    PubMed Central

    Shabbiri, Khadija; Ahmad, Waqar; Syed, Quratulain; Adnan, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    A respiratory complex was isolated from plasma membrane of pathogenic Proteus mirabilis strain ATCC 29245. It was identified as complex II consisting of succinate:quinone oxidoreductase (EC 1.3.5.1) containing single heme b. The complex II was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The molecular weight of purified complex was 116.5 kDa and it was composed of three subunits with molecular weights of 19 kDa, 29 kDa and 68.5 kDa. The complex II contained 9.5 nmoles of cytochrome b per mg protein. Heme staining indicated that the 19 kDa subunit was cytochrome b. Its reduced form showed absorptions peaks at 557.0, 524.8 and 424.4 nm. The α-band was shifted from 557.0 nm to 556.8 nm in pyridine ferrohemochrome spectrum. The succinate: quinone oxidoreductase activity was found to be high in this microorganism. PMID:24031557

  17. Dynamical Properties of Transient Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Bacterial Colony of Proteus mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Kurosu, Sayuri; Ikeda, Takemasa; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2002-02-01

    Spatio-temporal patterns emerged inside a colony of bacterial species Proteus mirabilis on the surface of nutrient-rich semisolid agar medium have been investigated. We observed various patterns composed of the following basic types: propagating stripe, propagating stripe with fixed dislocation, expanding and shrinking target, and rotating spiral. The remarkable point is that the pattern changes immediately when we alter the position for observation, but it returns to the original if we restore the observing position within a few minutes. We further investigated mesoscopic and microscopic properties of the spatio-temporal patterns. It turned out that whenever the spatio-temporal patterns are observed in a colony, the areas are composed of two superimposed monolayers of elongated bacterial cells. In each area they are aligned almost parallel with each other like a two-dimensional nematic liquid crystal, and move collectively and independently of another layer. It has been found that the observed spatio-temporal patterns are explained as the moiré effect.

  18. Comparison of antibiotic resistance patterns in collections of Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis uropathogenic strains.

    PubMed

    Adamus-Bialek, Wioletta; Zajac, Elzbieta; Parniewski, Pawel; Kaca, Wieslaw

    2013-04-01

    Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis are important urinary tract pathogens. The constant increase in the antibiotic resistance of clinical bacterial strains has become an important clinical problem. The aim of this study was to compare the antibiotic resistance of 141 clinical (Sweden and Poland) and 42 laboratory (Czech Republic) P. mirabilis strains and 129 clinical (Poland) uropathogenic E. coli strains. The proportion of unique versus diverse patterns in Swedish clinical and laboratory P. mirabilis strain collections was comparable. Notably, a similar proportion of unique versus diverse patterns was observed in Polish clinical P. mirabilis and E. coli strain collections. Mathematical models of the antibiotic resistance of E. coli and P. mirabilis strains based on Kohonen networks and association analysis are presented. In contrast to the three clinical strain collections, which revealed complex associations with the antibiotics tested, laboratory P. mirabilis strains provided simple antibiotic association diagrams. The monitoring of antibiotic resistance patterns of clinical E. coli and P. mirabilis strains plays an important role in the treatment procedures for urinary tract infections and is important in the context of the spreading drug resistance in uropathogenic strain populations. The adaptability and flexibility of the genomes of E. coli and P. mirabilis strains are discussed.

  19. Innate immune responses to Proteus mirabilis flagellin in the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Umpiérrez, Ana; Scavone, Paola; Romanin, David; Marqués, Juan Martín; Chabalgoity, José Alejandro; Rumbo, Martín; Zunino, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Flagella are bacterial virulence factors allowing microorganisms to move over surfaces. Flagellin, the structural component of flagella, is sensed by the host via Toll and NOD-like receptors and triggers pro-inflammatory responses. The use of Toll-like receptors agonists to modulate innate immune responses has aroused great interest as an alternative to improve the treatment of diverse infectious diseases. Proteus mirabilis is a Gram negative bacterium that causes urinary tract infections in humans. In the present work we used different approaches to study the ability of P. mirabilis flagellin to induce an innate immune response. We demonstrated that P. mirabilis flagellin has the ability to induce pro-inflammatory chemokines expression in T24 bladder cultures cells and in the mouse bladder after instillation. It was evidenced also that flagellin from different P. mirabilis strains differed in their capacity to induce an innate immune response in the CacoCCL20-Luc system. Also, flagellin elicited inflammation, with recruitment of leukocytes to the bladder epithelium. Flagellin instillation before an experimental P. mirabilis infection showed that the inflammatory response due to flagellin did not help to clear the infection but favored bacterial colonization. Thus, induction of inflammatory response in the bladder did not contribute to P. mirabilis infection neutralization. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. In silico maturation of binding-specificity of DNA aptamers against Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Savory, Nasa; Lednor, Danielle; Tsukakoshi, Kaori; Abe, Koichi; Yoshida, Wataru; Ferri, Stefano; Jones, Brian V; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2013-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a prominent cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) among patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization. There are currently no effective means of preventing P. mirabilis infections, and strategies for prophylaxis and rapid early diagnosis are urgently required. Aptamers offer significant potential for development of countermeasures against P. mirabilis CAUTI and are an ideal class of molecules for the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the application of Cell-SELEX to identify DNA aptamers that show high affinity for P. mirabilis. While the aptamers identified displayed high affinity for P. mirabilis cells in dot blotting assays, they also bound to other uropathogenic bacteria. To improve aptamer specificity for P. mirabilis, an in silico maturation (ISM) approach was employed. Two cycles of ISM allowed the identification of an aptamer showing 36% higher specificity, evaluated as a ratio of binding signal for P. mirabilis to that for Escherichia coli (also a cause of CAUTI and the most common urinary tract pathogen). Aptamers that specifically recognize P. mirabilis would have diagnostic and therapeutic values and constitute useful tools for studying membrane-associated proteins in this organism. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Oxygen-Limiting Conditions Enrich for Fimbriate Cells of Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Lane, M. Chelsea; Li, Xin; Pearson, Melanie M.; Simms, Amy N.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2009-01-01

    MR/P fimbriae of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis undergo invertible element-mediated phase variation whereby an individual bacterium switches between expressing fimbriae (phase ON) and not expressing fimbriae (phase OFF). Under different conditions, the percentage of fimbriate bacteria within a population varies and could be dictated by either selection (growth advantage of one phase) or signaling (preferentially converting one phase to the other in response to external signals). Expression of MR/P fimbriae increases in a cell-density dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. However, rather than the increased cell density itself, this increase in fimbrial expression is due to an enrichment of fimbriate bacteria under oxygen limitation resulting from increased cell density. Our data also indicate that the persistence of MR/P fimbriate bacteria under oxygen-limiting conditions is a result of both selection (of MR/P fimbrial phase variants) and signaling (via modulation of expression of the MrpI recombinase). Furthermore, the mrpJ transcriptional regulator encoded within the mrp operon contributes to phase switching. Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli, which are likewise subject to phase variation via an invertible element, also increase in expression during reduced oxygenation. These findings provide evidence to support a mechanism for persistence of fimbriate bacteria under oxygen limitation, which is relevant to disease progression within the oxygen-restricted urinary tract. PMID:19114498

  2. Purification and characterization of three forms of glutathione transferase from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Di Ilio, C; Aceto, A; Piccolomini, R; Allocati, N; Faraone, A; Cellini, L; Ravagnan, G; Federici, G

    1988-01-01

    Three forms of glutathione transferase (GST) with pI values of 6.0, 6.4 and 7.3 were isolated from Proteus mirabilis AF 2924 by glutathione-affinity chromatography followed by isoelectric focusing, and their structural, kinetic and immunological properties were investigated. Upon SDS/polyacrylamide-slab-gel electrophoresis, all forms proved to be composed of two subunits of identical (22,500) Mr. GST-6.0 and GST-6.4 together account for about 95% of the total activity, whereas GST-7.3 is present only in trace amounts. Extensive similarities have been found between GST-6.0 and GST-6.4. These include subunit molecular mass, amino acid composition, substrate specificities and immunological characteristics. GST-7.3 also cross-reacted (non-identity) with antisera raised against bacterial GST-6.0. None of the antisera raised against a number of human, rat and mouse GSTs cross-reacted with the bacterial enzymes, indicating major structural differences between them and the mammalian GSTs. This conclusion is further supported by c.d. spectra. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3145740

  3. Occurrence of TEM, SHV and CTX-M β lactamases in clinical isolates of Proteus species in a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Mohit; Shenoy, Suchitra

    2017-04-25

    Extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL) are responsible for increased resistance to third generation cephalosporins. Proteus species is an important cause of both community acquired and nosocomial infections. The Proteus spp is usually susceptible to beta lactam drugs but there is progressive increase in beta lactam resistance and recently ESBLs are also fast spreading to this species. This study was conducted to study ESBL production and occurrence of TEM, SHV and CTX M beta lactamases in clinical isolates of Proteus spp in a tertiary care centre. This prospective hospital based study was carried out in Microbiology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore over 9 months. All non-duplicate consecutive proteus isolates were identified and antibiotic susceptibility testing done. ESBL detection was done by double disk synergy method and TEM, SHV, CTX M genes were detected by PCR. 84 proteus isolates from urine (29), blood (1), respiratory secretions (2), tissue (20) and exudates (47) were included in the study. 20.2% (17) were ESBL positive by disk synergy method. CTX M was present in 6, TEM in 2 and both in 9 isolates. SHV was not present in any isolate. Our findings showed that 20% of clinical isolates of proteus spp were ESBL producers. 52% of ESBL positive isolates carried both TEM and CTX M genes followed by CTX M alone (35%) and only 11% had TEM alone. This stresses on the fact that ESBL detection should be done routinely in proteus isolates and the genotype surveyed periodically for better management. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Structures and serospecificity of threonine-containing O polysaccharides of two clinical isolates belonging to the genus Proteus and their classification into O11 subserogroups.

    PubMed

    Drzewiecka, Dominika; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Kondakova, Anna N; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-11-01

    Two clinical isolates from Polish patients, Proteus mirabilis 9B-m and Proteus genomospecies 3J-r, were found to be serologically related to P mirabilis O11. However, serological studies involving ELISA and Western blotting methods, using lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) extracted from the strains as antigens and native or adsorbed rabbit polyclonal O antisera, specific to the studied strains, revealed slight differences in the cross-reactivity and specificity of the two studied Proteus isolates, when compared to P. mirabilis O11. Two different O polysaccharides containing N-(d-galacturonoyl)-l-threonine were isolated from the LPSs of the isolates. Their structures were determined by chemical analysis and NMR spectroscopy and found to be related to the P. mirabilis O11 antigen structure established earlier, the 9B-m structure differing in the absence of the lateral glucose residue and the 3J-r structure in non-stoichiometric O-acetylation of the threonine residue only. Thus, the Proteus O11 serogroup should be divided into two subgroups: O11a, represented by the 9B-m isolate and O11a, b possessing the additional b epitope, containing the lateral residue of glucose and formed by the 3J-r isolate as well as P. mirabilis 25/57 belonging to O11 serogroup so far. O11a is the sixth new serotype found in Proteus spp. strains recently isolated from patients in central Poland.

  5. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide.

  6. Detection of the staphylococcal multiresistance gene cfr in Proteus vulgaris of food animal origin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yang; Wu, Cong-Ming; Schwarz, Stefan; Shen, Zhangqi; Zhang, Wanjiang; Zhang, Qijing; Shen, Jian-Zhong

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the presence and the genetic environment of the multiresistance gene cfr in naturally occurring Gram-negative bacteria of pigs. A total of 391 bacterial isolates with florfenicol MICs of ≥16 mg/L, obtained from 557 nasal swabs of individual pigs, were screened by PCR for the known florfenicol resistance genes. The species assignment of the cfr-carrying isolate was based on the results of Gram's staining, colony morphology, 16S rDNA sequencing and biochemical profiling. The location of the cfr and floR genes was determined by Southern blotting and the regions flanking the cfr gene were sequenced by a modified random primer walking strategy. A single Proteus vulgaris isolate, which carried the genes floR and cfr, was detected in this study. A cfr-carrying segment of 7 kb with homology to a staphylococcal plasmid was found to be inserted into the chromosomal fimD gene of P. vulgaris. This segment was flanked by two IS26 elements located in the same orientation, which are believed to have played a role in this integration process. Stability testing via inverse PCR approaches showed that this integrate is not entirely stable, but the cfr-carrying centre region plus one IS26 copy can be looped out via IS26-mediated recombination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the cfr gene in a naturally occurring Gram-negative bacterium. Surveillance and monitoring of the cfr gene in Gram-negative bacteria are warranted with respect to food safety and consumer protection.

  7. The Pathogenic Potential of Proteus mirabilis Is Enhanced by Other Uropathogens during Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Smith, Sara N; Johnson, Alexandra O; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Eaton, Kathryn A; Yep, Alejandra; Mody, Lona; Wu, Weisheng; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-02-01

    Urinary catheter use is prevalent in health care settings, and polymicrobial colonization by urease-positive organisms, such as Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii, commonly occurs with long-term catheterization. We previously demonstrated that coinfection with P. mirabilis and P. stuartii increased overall urease activity in vitro and disease severity in a model of urinary tract infection (UTI). In this study, we expanded these findings to a murine model of catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI), delineated the contribution of enhanced urease activity to coinfection pathogenesis, and screened for enhanced urease activity with other common CAUTI pathogens. In the UTI model, mice coinfected with the two species exhibited higher urine pH values, urolithiasis, bacteremia, and more pronounced tissue damage and inflammation compared to the findings for mice infected with a single species, despite having a similar bacterial burden within the urinary tract. The presence of P. stuartii, regardless of urease production by this organism, was sufficient to enhance P. mirabilis urease activity and increase disease severity, and enhanced urease activity was the predominant factor driving tissue damage and the dissemination of both organisms to the bloodstream during coinfection. These findings were largely recapitulated in the CAUTI model. Other uropathogens also enhanced P. mirabilis urease activity in vitro, including recent clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa We therefore conclude that the underlying mechanism of enhanced urease activity may represent a widespread target for limiting the detrimental consequences of polymicrobial catheter colonization, particularly by P. mirabilis and other urease-positive bacteria.

  8. Sequential unfolding of the hemolysin two-partner secretion domain from Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Megan R; Woods, Christopher N; Adamczak, Kyle J; Glasgow, Evan M; Novak, Walter RP; Grilley, Daniel P; Weaver, Todd M

    2015-01-01

    Protein secretion is a major contributor to Gram-negative bacterial virulence. Type Vb or two-partner secretion (TPS) pathways utilize a membrane bound β-barrel B component (TpsB) to translocate large and predominantly virulent exoproteins (TpsA) through a nucleotide independent mechanism. We focused our studies on a truncated TpsA member termed hemolysin A (HpmA265), a structurally and functionally characterized TPS domain from Proteus mirabilis. Contrary to the expectation that the TPS domain of HpmA265 would denature in a single cooperative transition, we found that the unfolding follows a sequential model with three distinct transitions linking four states. The solvent inaccessible core of HpmA265 can be divided into two different regions. The C-proximal region contains nonpolar residues and forms a prototypical hydrophobic core as found in globular proteins. The N-proximal region of the solvent inaccessible core, however, contains polar residues. To understand the contributions of the hydrophobic and polar interiors to overall TPS domain stability, we conducted unfolding studies on HpmA265 and site-specific mutants of HpmA265. By correlating the effect of individual site-specific mutations with the sequential unfolding results we were able to divide the HpmA265 TPS domain into polar core, nonpolar core, and C-terminal subdomains. Moreover, the unfolding studies provide quantitative evidence that the folding free energy for the polar core subdomain is more favorable than for the nonpolar core and C-terminal subdomains. This study implicates the hydrogen bonds shared among these conserved internal residues as a primary means for stabilizing the N-proximal polar core subdomain. PMID:26350294

  9. Sequential unfolding of the hemolysin two-partner secretion domain from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Megan R; Woods, Christopher N; Adamczak, Kyle J; Glasgow, Evan M; Novak, Walter R P; Grilley, Daniel P; Weaver, Todd M

    2015-11-01

    Protein secretion is a major contributor to Gram-negative bacterial virulence. Type Vb or two-partner secretion (TPS) pathways utilize a membrane bound β-barrel B component (TpsB) to translocate large and predominantly virulent exoproteins (TpsA) through a nucleotide independent mechanism. We focused our studies on a truncated TpsA member termed hemolysin A (HpmA265), a structurally and functionally characterized TPS domain from Proteus mirabilis. Contrary to the expectation that the TPS domain of HpmA265 would denature in a single cooperative transition, we found that the unfolding follows a sequential model with three distinct transitions linking four states. The solvent inaccessible core of HpmA265 can be divided into two different regions. The C-proximal region contains nonpolar residues and forms a prototypical hydrophobic core as found in globular proteins. The N-proximal region of the solvent inaccessible core, however, contains polar residues. To understand the contributions of the hydrophobic and polar interiors to overall TPS domain stability, we conducted unfolding studies on HpmA265 and site-specific mutants of HpmA265. By correlating the effect of individual site-specific mutations with the sequential unfolding results we were able to divide the HpmA265 TPS domain into polar core, nonpolar core, and C-terminal subdomains. Moreover, the unfolding studies provide quantitative evidence that the folding free energy for the polar core subdomain is more favorable than for the nonpolar core and C-terminal subdomains. This study implicates the hydrogen bonds shared among these conserved internal residues as a primary means for stabilizing the N-proximal polar core subdomain. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  10. Whole-cell Proteus mirabilis urease inhibition by aminophosphinates for the control of struvite formation.

    PubMed

    Grela, Ewa; Dziełak, Anna; Szydłowska, Katarzyna; Mucha, Artur; Kafarski, Paweł; Grabowiecka, Agnieszka Monika

    2016-10-01

    The study evaluated the in vitro impact of a series of aminophosphinic urease inhibitors on Proteusmirabilis. The group of compounds comprised structurally diverse analogues of diamidophosphate built on an N-C-P scaffold. The influence of urease inhibition on urea-splitting activity was assessed by whole-cell pH-static kinetic measurements. The potential to prevent struvite formation was determined by monitoring changes in pH and ionic composition of artificial urine medium during P. mirabilis growth. The most active compounds exhibited stronger positive effect on urine stability than the acknowledged inhibitor acetohydroxamic acid. The high anti-ureolytic and pH-stabilizing effect of urease inhibitors 4 and 14 was well correlated with their reported kinetic properties against pure urease from P. mirabilis (Ki values of 0.62±0.09 and 0.202±0.057 µM, respectively, compared to 5.7±0.4 µM for acetohydroxamic acid). The effect of repressed ureolysis upon the viability of Proteus cells was studied using MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] metabolic efficiency assay and LIVE/DEAD fluorescent staining. Most of the compounds caused whole-cell dehydrogenase activity loss; four structures (1, 2, 4 and 14) reduced the culture viability by nearly 70 % at 1 mM concentration. Results of dual fluorescent staining suggested that besides urea-splitting prevention, the structures additionally exerted an outer-membrane-destabilizing effect.

  11. Proteus mirabilis mutants defective in swarmer cell differentiation and multicellular behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Belas, R; Erskine, D; Flaherty, D

    1991-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a dimorphic bacterium which exists in liquid cultures as a 1.5- to 2.0-microns motile swimmer cell possessing 6 to 10 peritrichous flagella. When swimmer cells are placed on a surface, they differentiate by a combination of events that ultimately produce a swarmer cell. Unlike the swimmer cell, the polyploid swarmer cell is 60 to 80 microns long and possesses hundreds to thousands of surface-induced flagella. These features, combined with multicellular behavior, allow the swarmer cells to move over a surface in a process called swarming. Transposon Tn5 was used to produce P. mirabilis mutants defective in wild-type swarming motility. Two general classes of mutants were found to be defective in swarming. The first class was composed of null mutants that were completely devoid of swarming motility. The majority of nonswarming mutations were the result of defects in the synthesis of flagella or in the ability to rotate the flagella. The remaining nonswarming mutants produced flagella but were defective in surface-induced elongation. Strains in the second general class of mutants, which made up more than 65% of all defects in swarming were motile but were defective in the control and coordination of multicellular swarming. Analysis of consolidation zones produced by such crippled mutants suggested that this pleiotropic phenotype was caused by a defect in the regulation of multicellular behavior. A possible mechanism controlling the cyclic process of differentiation and dediferentiation involved in the swarming behavior of P. mirabilis is discussed. Images PMID:1917860

  12. Identification of Proteus mirabilis Mutants with Increased Sensitivity to Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Andrea J.; Liu, Hongjian; Falla, Timothy J.; Gunn, John S.

    2001-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (APs) are important components of the innate defenses of animals, plants, and microorganisms. However, some bacterial pathogens are resistant to the action of APs. For example, Proteus mirabilis is highly resistant to the action of APs, such as polymyxin B (PM), protegrin, and the synthetic protegrin analog IB-367. To better understand this resistance, a transposon mutagenesis approach was used to generate P. mirabilis mutants sensitive to APs. Four unique PM-sensitive mutants of P. mirabilis were identified (these mutants were >2 to >128 times more sensitive than the wild type). Two of these mutants were also sensitive to IB-367 (16 and 128 times more sensitive than the wild type). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profiles of the PM- and protegrin-sensitive mutants demonstrated marked differences in both the lipid A and O-antigen regions, while the PM-sensitive mutants appeared to have alterations of either lipid A or O antigen. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry analysis of the wild-type and PM-sensitive mutant lipid A showed species with one or two aminoarabinose groups, while lipid A from the PM- and protegrin-sensitive mutants was devoid of aminoarabinose. When the mutants were streaked on an agar-containing medium, the swarming motility of the PM- and protegrin-sensitive mutants was completely inhibited and the swarming motility of the mutants sensitive to only PM was markedly decreased. DNA sequence analysis of the mutagenized loci revealed similarities to an O-acetyltransferase (PM and protegrin sensitive) and ATP synthase and sap loci (PM sensitive). These data further support the role of LPS modifications as an elaborate mechanism in the resistance of certain bacterial species to APs and suggest that LPS surface charge alterations may play a role in P. mirabilis swarming motility. PMID:11408219

  13. Dynamics of hybrid amoeba proteus containing zoochlorellae studied using fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.-H.; Fong, B. A.; Alfano, S. A., Jr.; Rakhlin, I.; Wang, W. B.; Ni, X. H.; Yang, Y. L.; Zhou, F.; Zuzolo, R. C.; Alfano, R. R.

    2011-03-01

    The microinjection of organelles, plants, particles or chemical solutions into Amoeba proteus coupled with spectroscopic analysis and observed for a period of time provides a unique new model for cancer treatment and studies. The amoeba is a eukaryote having many similar features of mammalian cells. The amoeba biochemical functions monitored spectroscopically can provide time sequence in vivo information about many metabolic transitions and metabolic exchanges between cellar organelles and substances microinjected into the amoeba. It is possible to microinject algae, plant mitochondria, drugs or carcinogenic solutions followed by recording the native fluorescence spectra of these composites. This model can be used to spectroscopically monitor the pre-metabolic transitions in developing diseased cells such as a cancer. Knowing specific metabolic transitions could offer solutions to inhibit cancer or reverse it as well as many other diseases. In the present study a simple experiment was designed to test the feasibility of this unique new model by injecting algae and chloroplasts into amoeba. The nonradiative dynamics found from these composites are evidence in terms of the emission ratios between the intensities at 337nm and 419nm; and 684nm bands. There were reductions in the metabolic and photosynthetic processes in amoebae that were microinjected with chloroplasts and zoochlorellae as well of those amoebae that ingested the algae and chloroplasts. The changes in the intensity of the emissions of the peaks indicate that the zoochlorellae lived in the amoebae for ten days. Spectral changes in intensity under the UV and 633nm wavelength excitation are from the energy transfer of DNA and RNA, protein-bound chromophores and chlorophylls present in zoochlorellae undergoing photosynthesis. The fluorescence spectroscopic probes established the biochemical interplay between the cell organelles and the algae present in the cell cytoplasm. This hybrid state is indicative

  14. Histology and ultrastructure of the gut epithelium of the neotenic cave salamander, Proteus anguinus (Amphibia, Caudata).

    PubMed

    Bizjak Mali, Lilijana; Bulog, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Histological, histochemical, and ultrastructural features of the gut of the European endemic cave salamander Proteus anguinus were studied. The gut is a relatively undifferentiated muscular tube lined with a simple columnar epithelium containing numerous goblet cells. The mucosa and underlying lamina propria/submucosa are elevated into a number of high longitudinal folds projecting into the lumen. The enterocytes are covered apically with uniform microvilli. Irregularity in the arrangement of microvilli was observed. Occasionally, irregular protrusions of the cytoplasm appear between groups of microvilli. Pinocytotic activity occurs at the bases of the intermicrovillous space. Mitochondria are numerous in the apical cytoplasm and basally beneath the nuclei. The supranuclear cytoplasm contains most of the cell organelles. The lateral plasma membranes of adjacent cells interdigitate and are joined by junctional complexes. The periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reaction, indicating neutral mucosubstances, is positive only in the apical brush border of enterocytes and in goblet cells. The goblet cells also stained with Alcian blue (AB), at pH 2.5, thus revealing the presence of carboxylated glycosaminoglycans. Compact aggregations of AB- and PAS-negative cells are situated directly below the epithelium. Mitotic figures are present in individual clusters of cells. The fine structure of cells in these clusters indicated that these cells could be responsible for renewal of intestinal epithelium. Numerous endocrine-like cells could also be seen. The closely packed smooth muscle cells and amorphous extracellular material with collagen fibrils constitute a net-like structure under the basal lamina that is very closely associated with the epithelium. There are numerous acidophilic granular cells between epithelial cells, in the lamina propria/submucosa, and between cells aggregations. They seem to be associated with nematode infections and possibly constitute a humoral defense

  15. Monitoring health and reproductive status of olms (Proteus anguinus) by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Holtze, Susanne; Lukač, Maja; Cizelj, Ivan; Mutschmann, Frank; Szentiks, Claudia Anita; Jelić, Dušan; Hermes, Robert; Göritz, Frank; Braude, Stanton; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The olm (Proteus anguinus) is a troglomorphic, neotenous amphibian with extraordinary life expectancy and unique adaptations that deserve further investigation. A low reproductive rate and habitat decline render it threatened by extinction. Establishing captive populations for maintenance and artificial breeding may one day become crucial to the species. Longitudinal, in-vivo assessment of inner organs is invaluable to our understanding of reproductive physiology, health, and behavior. Using ultrasound, we measured heart rate and assessed health and reproductive status of 13 captive olms at Zagreb Zoo. Heart rate averaged 42.9 ± 4.6 bpm (32-55 bpm), as determined via pulsed-wave Doppler at 4-12 MHz. By using frequencies of up to 70 MHz (ultrasound biomicroscopy), inner organs were visualized in detail. Assessment of the gastrointestinal tract provided insights into feeding status and digestive processes. Several subclinical pathologies were detected, including biliary sludge, subcutaneous edema, ascites, and skin lesions. Detection of skin lesions by ultrasound was more sensitive than visual adspection. Olms with ultrasonographically detected skin lesions tested positive for Saprolegnia and were treated. Three of the four affected individuals survived and subsequently tested negative for Saprolegnia. Sex was reliably determined; only one individual proved male. The reason for this extreme female-biased sex-ratio remains unknown. However, as most of the individuals were flushed from the caves by strong currents in spring, the sample may not be representative of natural populations. In female olms, different stages of ovarian follicular development were observed with diameters ranging between 0.1 and 1.1 mm. Results were confirmed by comparing ultrasound, necropsy, and histological findings of one dead specimen. In summary, ultrasound proved a valuable tool to support conservation and captive breeding programs by allowing non-invasive assessment of physiological

  16. Interaction of Proteus mirabilis Urease Apoenzyme and Accessory Proteins Identified with Yeast Two-Hybrid Technology

    PubMed Central

    Heimer, Susan R.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2001-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a gram-negative bacterium associated with complicated urinary tract infections, produces a metalloenzyme urease which hydrolyzes urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide. The apourease is comprised of three structural subunits, UreA, UreB, and UreC, assembled as a homotrimer of individual UreABC heterotrimers (UreABC)3. To become catalytically active, apourease acquires divalent nickel ions through a poorly understood process involving four accessory proteins, UreD, UreE, UreF, and UreG. While homologues of UreD, UreF, and UreG have been copurified with apourease, it remains unclear specifically how these polypeptides associate with the apourease or each other. To identify interactions among P. mirabilis accessory proteins, in vitro immunoprecipitation and in vivo yeast two-hybrid assays were employed. A complex containing accessory protein UreD and structural protein UreC was isolated by immunoprecipitation and characterized with immunoblots. This association occurs independently of coaccessory proteins UreE, UreF, and UreG and structural protein UreA. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, UreD was found to directly interact in vivo with coaccessory protein UreF. Unique homomultimeric interactions of UreD and UreF were also detected in vivo. To substantiate the study of urease proteins with a yeast two-hybrid assay, previously described UreE dimers and homomultimeric UreA interactions among apourease trimers were confirmed in vivo. Similarly, a known structural interaction involving UreA and UreC was also verified. This report suggests that in vivo, P. mirabilis UreD may be important for recruitment of UreF to the apourease and that crucial homomultimeric associations occur among these accessory proteins. PMID:11157956

  17. High potential application in bioremediation of selenate by Proteus hauseri strain QW4

    PubMed Central

    Khalilian, Mohaddeseh; Zolfaghari, Mohammad Reza; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Selenium is essential for biological systems at low concentrations and toxic at higher levels. Heavy metals and metalloids such as selenium are major contaminants in 40% of hazardous waste sites. Thus, bioremediation has been considered as an effective means of cleaning up of selenium-contaminated sites. Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 strains were isolated from wastewater samples collected from selenium-contaminated sites in Qom, Iran using the enrichment culture technique. One bacterial strain designated QW4, identified as Proteus hauseri by morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was studied for its ability to tolerate different concentrations of sodium selenate (100–800 mM). Also, the disk diffusion method was performed to determine resistance to some antibiotics Results: Strain QW4 showed maximum minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to selenate (760 mM). The maximum selenate removal was exhibited at 35 °C, while the removal activity reduced by 30.7% and 37% at 25 °C and 40 °C, respectively. The optimum pH and shaking incubator for removal activity was shown to be 7.0 and 150 rpm, with 60.2% and 60.3%, respectively. This bacterial strain was resistant to some antibiotics. Conclusion: The concentration of toxic sodium selenate (1000 μg/ml) in the supernatant of the bacterial culture medium decreased by 100% after 2 days and the color of the medium changed to red due to the formation of less toxic elemental selenium. Also, our results imply that heavy metal pollution may contribute to increased antibiotic resistance through indirect selection. PMID:26622970

  18. Production and characterization of a bioflocculant by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1.

    PubMed

    Xia, Siqing; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xuejiang; Yang, Aming; Chen, Ling; Zhao, Jianfu; Leonard, Didier; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2008-09-01

    A bioflocculant TJ-F1 with high flocculating activity, produced by strain TJ-1 from a mixed activated sludge, was investigated with regard to its production and characterization. By 16S rDNA sequence and biochemical and physiological characteristics, strain TJ-1 was identified as Proteus mirabilis. The most preferred carbon source, nitrogen source and C/N ratio (w/w) for strain TJ-1 to produce the bioflocculant were found to be glucose, peptone and 10, respectively. TJ-F1 production could be greatly stimulated by cations Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Fe(3+). The optimal conditions for TJ-F1 production were inoculum size 2 per thousand (v/v), initial pH 7.0, culture temperature 25 degrees C, and shaking speed 130r/min, under which the flocculating activity of the bioflocculant reached 93.13%. About 1.33 g of the purified bioflocculant, whose molecular weight (MW) was 1.2 x 10(5) Da, could be recovered from 1.0 l of fermentation broth. Chemical analysis of bioflocculant TJ-F1 indicated that it contained protein (30.9%, w/w) and acid polysaccharide (63.1%, w/w), including neutral sugar, glucuronic acid and amino sugar as the principal constituents in the relative weight proportions of 8.2:5.3:1. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of the purified solid-state TJ-F1 showed that it had a crystal-linear structure. Spectroscopic analysis of the bioflocculant by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry indicated the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups preferred for the flocculation process.

  19. Rho/Rho-dependent kinase affects locomotion and actin-myosin II activity of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Kłopocka, W; Redowicz, M J

    2004-10-01

    The highly motile free-living unicellular organism Amoeba proteus has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion are still scarcely known. Recently, we have shown that blocking the amoebae's endogenous Rac- and Rho-like proteins led to distinct and irreversible changes in the appearance of these large migrating cells as well as to a significant inhibition of their locomotion. In order to elucidate the mechanism of the Rho pathway, we tested the effects of blocking the endogenous Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK) by anti-ROCK antibodies and Y-27632, (+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, on migrating amoebae and the effect of the Rho and ROCK inhibition on the actin-activated Mg-ATPase of the cytosolic fraction of the amoebae. Amoebae microinjected with anti-ROCK inhibitors remained contracted and strongly attached to the glass surface and exhibited an atypical locomotion. Despite protruding many pseudopodia that were advancing in various directions, the amoebae could not effectively move. Immunofluorescence studies showed that ROCK-like protein was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and was also found in the regions of actin-myosin II interaction during both isotonic and isometric contraction. The Mg-ATPase activity was about two- to threefold enhanced, indicating that blocking the Rho/Rho-dependent kinase activated myosin. It is possible then that in contrast to the vertebrate cells, the inactivation of Rho/Rho-dependent kinase in amoebae leads to the activation of myosin II and to the observed hypercontracted cells which cannot exert effective locomotion.

  20. Regional outbreak of CTX-M-2 β-lactamase-producing Proteus mirabilis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryuichi; Nakano, Akiyo; Abe, Michiko; Inoue, Matsuhisa; Okamoto, Ryoichi

    2012-12-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of urinary tract infection. Wild-type P. mirabilis strains are usually susceptible to penicillins and cephalosporins, but occurrences of P. mirabilis producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) have been recently reported. Here, we surveyed the prevalence of cefotaxime resistance among P. mirabilis strains at seven different hospitals in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, and investigated their molecular epidemiology to explain the mechanism of their spread. The prevalence of cefotaxime resistance among P. mirabilis increased annually, from 10.1 % in 1998 to 23.1 % in 2003, and increased drastically in 2004, exceeding 40 %. We collected 105 consecutive and non-duplicate cefotaxime-resistant P. mirabilis isolates (MIC 16 to >256 µg ml(-1)) from these hospitals from June 2004 to May 2005 and characterized their profile. PCR and sequence analysis revealed that all resistant strains produced exclusively CTX-M-2 β-lactamase. PFGE analysis identified 47 banding patterns with 83 % or greater similarity. These results indicated that a regional outbreak of P. mirabilis producing CTX-M-2 β-lactamase has occurred in Japan and suggest that the epidemic spread occurred within and across hospitals and communities by extended clonal strains. Plasmid analysis revealed that 44.8 % of plasmids harboured by bla(CTX-M-2) isolates had common profiles, encoding ISEcp1, IS26 and Int1, and belonged to incompatibility group T. Spread of the resistant isolates in Japan resulted from dissemination of narrow-host-range plasmids of the IncT group encoding bla(CTX-M-2). These findings indicate the rapidly developing problem of treating the species to prevent dissemination of ESBL producers.

  1. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Is Involved in Stress Tolerance and Virulence in Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min-Cheng; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Hfq is a bacterial RNA chaperone involved in the riboregulation of diverse genes via small noncoding RNAs. Here, we show that Hfq is critical for the uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis to effectively colonize the bladder and kidneys in a murine urinary tract infection (UTI) model and to establish burned wound infection of the rats. In this regard, we found the hfq mutant induced higher IL-8 and MIF levels of uroepithelial cells and displayed reduced intra-macrophage survival. The loss of hfq affected bacterial abilities to handle H2O2 and osmotic pressures and to grow at 50°C. Relative to wild-type, the hfq mutant had reduced motility, fewer flagella and less hemolysin expression and was less prone to form biofilm and to adhere to and invade uroepithelial cells. The MR/P fimbrial operon was almost switched to the off phase in the hfq mutant. In addition, we found the hfq mutant exhibited an altered outer membrane profile and had higher RpoE expression, which indicates the hfq mutant may encounter increased envelope stress. With the notion of envelope disturbance in the hfq mutant, we found increased membrane permeability and antibiotic susceptibilities in the hfq mutant. Finally, we showed that Hfq positively regulated the RpoS level and tolerance to H2O2 in the stationary phase seemed largely mediated through the Hfq-dependent RpoS expression. Together, our data indicate that Hfq plays a critical role in P. mirabilis to establish UTIs by modulating stress responses, surface structures and virulence factors. This study suggests Hfq may serve as a scaffold molecule for development of novel anti-P. mirabilis drugs and P. mirabilis hfq mutant is a vaccine candidate for preventing UTIs. PMID:24454905

  2. Loss of FliL alters Proteus mirabilis surface sensing and temperature-dependent swarming.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Ying; Belas, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a dimorphic motile bacterium well known for its flagellum-dependent swarming motility over surfaces. In liquid, P. mirabilis cells are 1.5- to 2.0-μm swimmer cells with 4 to 6 flagella. When P. mirabilis encounters a solid surface, where flagellar rotation is limited, swimmer cells differentiate into elongated (10- to 80-μm), highly flagellated swarmer cells. In order for P. mirabilis to swarm, it first needs to detect a surface. The ubiquitous but functionally enigmatic flagellar basal body protein FliL is involved in P. mirabilis surface sensing. Previous studies have suggested that FliL is essential for swarming through its involvement in viscosity-dependent monitoring of flagellar rotation. In this study, we constructed and characterized ΔfliL mutants of P. mirabilis and Escherichia coli. Unexpectedly and unlike other fliL mutants, both P. mirabilis and E. coli ΔfliL cells swarm (Swr(+)). Further analysis revealed that P. mirabilis ΔfliL cells also exhibit an alteration in their ability to sense a surface: e.g., ΔfliL P. mirabilis cells swarm precociously over surfaces with low viscosity that normally impede wild-type swarming. Precocious swarming is due to an increase in the number of elongated swarmer cells in the population. Loss of fliL also results in an inhibition of swarming at <30°C. E. coli ΔfliL cells also exhibit temperature-sensitive swarming. These results suggest an involvement of FliL in the energetics and function of the flagellar motor. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Emergence of Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) among Proteus mirabilis clinical isolates in Dijon, France.

    PubMed

    Siebor, Eliane; Neuwirth, Catherine

    2013-08-01

    Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) is often encountered in antibiotic-resistant Salmonella enterica and exceptionally in Proteus mirabilis. We investigated the prevalence of SGI1-producing clinical isolates of P. mirabilis in our hospital (Dijon, France). A total of 57 strains of P. mirabilis resistant to amoxicillin and/or gentamicin and/or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole isolated from August 2011 to February 2012 as well as 9 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing P. mirabilis from our collection were tested for the presence of SGI1 by PCR. The complete SGI1 structure from positive isolates [backbone and multidrug resistance (MDR) region] was sequenced. SGI1 was detected in 7 isolates; 5 out of the 57 isolates collected during the study period (9%) and 2 out of the 9 ESBL-producing strains of our collection. The structures of the seven SGI1s were distinct. Three different backbones were identified: one identical to the SGI1 backbone from the epidemic Salmonella Typhimurium DT104, one with variations already described in SGI1-K from Salmonella Kentucky (deletion and insertion of IS1359 in the region spanning from S005 to S009) and one with a variation never detected before (deletion from S005 to S009). Six different MDR regions were identified: four simple variants containing resistance genes already described and two variants harbouring a very complex structure including regions derived from several transposons and IS26 elements with aphA1a never reported to date in SGI1. SGI1 variants are widely distributed among P. mirabilis clinical strains and might spread to other commensal Enterobacteriaceae. This would become a serious public health problem.

  4. Anaerobic Respiration Using a Complete Oxidative TCA Cycle Drives Multicellular Swarming in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Engstrom, Michael D.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. PMID:23111869

  5. The Pathogenic Potential of Proteus mirabilis Is Enhanced by Other Uropathogens during Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sara N.; Johnson, Alexandra O.; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Eaton, Kathryn A.; Yep, Alejandra; Mody, Lona; Wu, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary catheter use is prevalent in health care settings, and polymicrobial colonization by urease-positive organisms, such as Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii, commonly occurs with long-term catheterization. We previously demonstrated that coinfection with P. mirabilis and P. stuartii increased overall urease activity in vitro and disease severity in a model of urinary tract infection (UTI). In this study, we expanded these findings to a murine model of catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI), delineated the contribution of enhanced urease activity to coinfection pathogenesis, and screened for enhanced urease activity with other common CAUTI pathogens. In the UTI model, mice coinfected with the two species exhibited higher urine pH values, urolithiasis, bacteremia, and more pronounced tissue damage and inflammation compared to the findings for mice infected with a single species, despite having a similar bacterial burden within the urinary tract. The presence of P. stuartii, regardless of urease production by this organism, was sufficient to enhance P. mirabilis urease activity and increase disease severity, and enhanced urease activity was the predominant factor driving tissue damage and the dissemination of both organisms to the bloodstream during coinfection. These findings were largely recapitulated in the CAUTI model. Other uropathogens also enhanced P. mirabilis urease activity in vitro, including recent clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We therefore conclude that the underlying mechanism of enhanced urease activity may represent a widespread target for limiting the detrimental consequences of polymicrobial catheter colonization, particularly by P. mirabilis and other urease-positive bacteria. PMID:27895127

  6. The RNA chaperone Hfq is involved in stress tolerance and virulence in uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min-Cheng; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Tsai, Yi-Lin; Liu, Ming-Che; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Hfq is a bacterial RNA chaperone involved in the riboregulation of diverse genes via small noncoding RNAs. Here, we show that Hfq is critical for the uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis to effectively colonize the bladder and kidneys in a murine urinary tract infection (UTI) model and to establish burned wound infection of the rats. In this regard, we found the hfq mutant induced higher IL-8 and MIF levels of uroepithelial cells and displayed reduced intra-macrophage survival. The loss of hfq affected bacterial abilities to handle H2O2 and osmotic pressures and to grow at 50 °C. Relative to wild-type, the hfq mutant had reduced motility, fewer flagella and less hemolysin expression and was less prone to form biofilm and to adhere to and invade uroepithelial cells. The MR/P fimbrial operon was almost switched to the off phase in the hfq mutant. In addition, we found the hfq mutant exhibited an altered outer membrane profile and had higher RpoE expression, which indicates the hfq mutant may encounter increased envelope stress. With the notion of envelope disturbance in the hfq mutant, we found increased membrane permeability and antibiotic susceptibilities in the hfq mutant. Finally, we showed that Hfq positively regulated the RpoS level and tolerance to H2O2 in the stationary phase seemed largely mediated through the Hfq-dependent RpoS expression. Together, our data indicate that Hfq plays a critical role in P. mirabilis to establish UTIs by modulating stress responses, surface structures and virulence factors. This study suggests Hfq may serve as a scaffold molecule for development of novel anti-P. mirabilis drugs and P. mirabilis hfq mutant is a vaccine candidate for preventing UTIs.

  7. Characterization of 17 chaperone-usher fimbriae encoded by Proteus mirabilis reveals strong conservation

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Lisa; Schaffer, Jessica N.; Zouzias, Christos D.

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative enteric bacterium that causes complicated urinary tract infections, particularly in patients with indwelling catheters. Sequencing of clinical isolate P. mirabilis HI4320 revealed the presence of 17 predicted chaperone-usher fimbrial operons. We classified these fimbriae into three groups by their genetic relationship to other chaperone-usher fimbriae. Sixteen of these fimbriae are encoded by all seven currently sequenced P. mirabilis genomes. The predicted protein sequence of the major structural subunit for 14 of these fimbriae was highly conserved (≥95 % identity), whereas three other structural subunits (Fim3A, UcaA and Fim6A) were variable. Further examination of 58 clinical isolates showed that 14 of the 17 predicted major structural subunit genes of the fimbriae were present in most strains (>85 %). Transcription of the predicted major structural subunit genes for all 17 fimbriae was measured under different culture conditions designed to mimic conditions in the urinary tract. The majority of the fimbrial genes were induced during stationary phase, static culture or colony growth when compared to exponential-phase aerated culture. Major structural subunit proteins for six of these fimbriae were detected using MS of proteins sheared from the surface of broth-cultured P. mirabilis, demonstrating that this organism may produce multiple fimbriae within a single culture. The high degree of conservation of P. mirabilis fimbriae stands in contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, which exhibit greater variability in their fimbrial repertoires. These findings suggest there may be evolutionary pressure for P. mirabilis to maintain a large fimbrial arsenal. PMID:24809384

  8. Characterization of 17 chaperone-usher fimbriae encoded by Proteus mirabilis reveals strong conservation.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Lisa; Schaffer, Jessica N; Zouzias, Christos D; Pearson, Melanie M

    2014-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative enteric bacterium that causes complicated urinary tract infections, particularly in patients with indwelling catheters. Sequencing of clinical isolate P. mirabilis HI4320 revealed the presence of 17 predicted chaperone-usher fimbrial operons. We classified these fimbriae into three groups by their genetic relationship to other chaperone-usher fimbriae. Sixteen of these fimbriae are encoded by all seven currently sequenced P. mirabilis genomes. The predicted protein sequence of the major structural subunit for 14 of these fimbriae was highly conserved (≥ 95% identity), whereas three other structural subunits (Fim3A, UcaA and Fim6A) were variable. Further examination of 58 clinical isolates showed that 14 of the 17 predicted major structural subunit genes of the fimbriae were present in most strains (>85%). Transcription of the predicted major structural subunit genes for all 17 fimbriae was measured under different culture conditions designed to mimic conditions in the urinary tract. The majority of the fimbrial genes were induced during stationary phase, static culture or colony growth when compared to exponential-phase aerated culture. Major structural subunit proteins for six of these fimbriae were detected using MS of proteins sheared from the surface of broth-cultured P. mirabilis, demonstrating that this organism may produce multiple fimbriae within a single culture. The high degree of conservation of P. mirabilis fimbriae stands in contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, which exhibit greater variability in their fimbrial repertoires. These findings suggest there may be evolutionary pressure for P. mirabilis to maintain a large fimbrial arsenal. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide on the subunit vaccine of Proteus mirabilis in birds.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guolin; Zhong, Shixun; Yang, Shifa; Zuo, Xuemei; Liang, Manfei; Sun, Jing; Liu, Jingjing; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2013-05-01

    Three adjuvants, namely, Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), white mineral oil (WO) and propolis (PP), were added to the outer membrane protein (OMP) of Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis) and their effects were compared. Three hundred 1-day-old chicks were randomly divided into five groups (I-V), with 60 chicks per group, and injected subcutaneously with WO-OMP vaccine (I), PP-OMP vaccine (II), TPPPS-OMP vaccine (III), OMP-only vaccine (IV) and physiological saline (V) at 3, 7 and 12 days old. On days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42 and 49 after the first vaccination, the antibody titers, interleukin-2 levels (IL-2) and T-lymphocyte proliferation rates in the peripheral blood as well as the secreting-type IgA levels (SIgA) in the duodenum were measured. On day 7 after the third vaccination, the chicks were challenged with P. mirabilis strain Q1 and the protective effects of each group were observed. The highest protective rate was observed in group III. Moreover, the antibody titers as well as IL-2, SIgA and T-lymphocyte proliferation rates in this group significantly increased and were significantly higher than those in the other groups at most time points. The results indicate that TPPPS could significantly enhance the effects of the subunit vaccine of P. mirabilis; induced stronger humoral, cellular and mucosal immunity as compared with WO and PP; and should be developed as a vaccine adjuvant. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Elucidating the genetic basis of crystalline biofilm formation in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Holling, N; Lednor, D; Tsang, S; Bissell, A; Campbell, L; Nzakizwanayo, J; Dedi, C; Hawthorne, J A; Hanlon, G; Ogilvie, L A; Salvage, J P; Patel, B A; Barnes, L M; Jones, B V

    2014-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms extensive crystalline biofilms on urethral catheters that occlude urine flow and frequently complicate the management of long-term-catheterized patients. Here, using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with in vitro models of the catheterized urinary tract, we elucidate the mechanisms underpinning the formation of crystalline biofilms by P. mirabilis. Mutants identified as defective in blockage of urethral catheters had disruptions in genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and efflux systems but were unaffected in general growth, survival in bladder model systems, or the ability to elevate urinary pH. Imaging of biofilms directly on catheter surfaces, along with quantification of levels of encrustation and biomass, confirmed that the mutants were attenuated specifically in the ability to form crystalline biofilms compared with that of the wild type. However, the biofilm-deficient phenotype of these mutants was not due to deficiencies in attachment to catheter biomaterials, and defects in later stages of biofilm development were indicated. For one blocking-deficient mutant, the disrupted gene (encoding a putative multidrug efflux pump) was also found to be associated with susceptibility to fosfomycin, and loss of this system or general inhibition of efflux pumps increased sensitivity to this antibiotic. Furthermore, homologues of this system were found to be widely distributed among other common pathogens of the catheterized urinary tract. Overall, our findings provide fundamental new insight into crystalline biofilm formation by P. mirabilis, including the link between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance in this organism, and indicate a potential role for efflux pump inhibitors in the treatment or prevention of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms.

  11. Activity of Proteus mirabilis FliL Is Viscosity Dependent and Requires Extragenic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ying; Patellis, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a urinary tract pathogen and well known for its ability to move over agar surfaces by flagellum-dependent swarming motility. When P. mirabilis encounters a highly viscous environment, e.g., an agar surface, it differentiates from short rods with few flagella to elongated, highly flagellated cells that lack septa and contain multiple nucleoids. The bacteria detect a surface by monitoring the rotation of their flagellar motors. This process involves an enigmatic flagellar protein called FliL, the first gene in an operon (fliLMNOPQR) that encodes proteins of the flagellar rotor switch complex and flagellar export apparatus. We used a fliL knockout mutant to gain further insight into the function of FliL. Loss of FliL results in cells that cannot swarm (Swr−) but do swim (Swm+) and produces cells that look like wild-type swarmer cells, termed “pseudoswarmer cells,” that are elongated, contain multiple nucleoids, and lack septa. Unlike swarmer cells, pseudoswarmer cells are not hyperflagellated due to reduced expression of flaA (the gene encoding flagellin), despite an increased transcription of both flhD and fliA, two positive regulators of flagellar gene expression. We found that defects in fliL prevent viscosity-dependent sensing of a surface and viscosity-dependent induction of flaA transcription. Studies with fliL cells unexpectedly revealed that the fliL promoter, fliL coding region, and a portion of fliM DNA are needed to complement the Swr− phenotype. The data support a dual role for FliL as a critical link in sensing a surface and in the maintenance of flagellar rod integrity. PMID:23222728

  12. Characterization of a Novel Gene, wosA, Regulating FlhDC Expression in Proteus mirabilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Hatt, Janet K.; Rather, Philip N.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we describe wosA, a Proteus mirabilis gene identified by its ability to increase swarming motility when overexpressed. At various times during the swarming cycle, the increased expression of wosA resulted in a 4- to 16-fold upregulation of the transcription of flhDC, encoding the master regulator of the flagellar cascade. In turn, the expression of flaA, encoding flagellin, was substantially increased in wosA-overexpressing strains. The overexpression of wosA also resulted in constitutive swarmer cell differentiation in liquid medium, a normally nonpermissive condition. However, in wosA-overexpressing strains, the onset of swarming was not altered. A null wosA allele resulted in a slight decrease in swarming motility. The expression of wosA was growth phase dependent during growth in liquid and on agar plates during swarmer cell differentiation. Increasing the viscosity of liquid medium by the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone induced swarmer cell differentiation and resulted in a fourfold increase in wosA transcription. A fliL mutation that results in constitutive swarmer cell elongation also increased wosA transcription. In this study, we discuss the possible role of the wosA gene product in signal transduction from solid surfaces to induce swarmer cell differentiation, possibly via alterations in the motor switch complex. This study also suggests that despite constitutive swarmer cell differentiation in wosA-overexpressing strains, there are additional regulatory and/or environmental conditions that may control the onset of swarming migration. PMID:18192389

  13. Perturbation of FliL interferes with Proteus mirabilis swarmer cell gene expression and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cusick, Kathleen; Lee, Yi-Ying; Youchak, Brian; Belas, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a dimorphic, motile bacterium often associated with urinary tract infections. Colonization of urinary tract surfaces is aided by swarmer cell differentiation, which is initiated by inhibition of flagellar rotation when the bacteria first contact a surface. Mutations in fliL, encoding a flagellar structural protein with an enigmatic function, result in the inappropriate production of differentiated swarmer cells, called pseudoswarmer cells, under noninducing conditions, indicating involvement of FliL in the surface sensing pathway. In the present study, we compared the fliL transcriptome with that of wild-type swarmer cells and showed that nearly all genes associated with motility (flagellar class II and III genes) and chemotaxis are repressed. In contrast, spontaneous motile revertants of fliL cells that regained motility yet produced differentiated swarmer cells under noninducing conditions transcribed flagellar class II promoters at consistent levels. Expression of umoA (a known regulator of swarmer cells), flgF, and flgI increased significantly in both swarmer and pseudoswarmer cells, as did genes in a degenerate prophage region situated immediately adjacent to the Rcs phosphorelay system. Unlike swarmer cells, pseudoswarmers displayed increased activity, rather than transcription, of the flagellar master regulatory protein, FlhD(4)C(2), and analyses of the fliL parent strain and its motile revertants showed that they result from mutations altering the C-terminal 14 amino acids of FliL. Collectively, the data suggest a functional role for the C terminus of FliL in surface sensing and implicate UmoA as part of the signal relay leading to the master flagellar regulator FlhD(4)C(2), which ultimately controls swarmer cell differentiation.

  14. Perturbation of FliL Interferes with Proteus mirabilis Swarmer Cell Gene Expression and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cusick, Kathleen; Lee, Yi-Ying; Youchak, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a dimorphic, motile bacterium often associated with urinary tract infections. Colonization of urinary tract surfaces is aided by swarmer cell differentiation, which is initiated by inhibition of flagellar rotation when the bacteria first contact a surface. Mutations in fliL, encoding a flagellar structural protein with an enigmatic function, result in the inappropriate production of differentiated swarmer cells, called pseudoswarmer cells, under noninducing conditions, indicating involvement of FliL in the surface sensing pathway. In the present study, we compared the fliL transcriptome with that of wild-type swarmer cells and showed that nearly all genes associated with motility (flagellar class II and III genes) and chemotaxis are repressed. In contrast, spontaneous motile revertants of fliL cells that regained motility yet produced differentiated swarmer cells under noninducing conditions transcribed flagellar class II promoters at consistent levels. Expression of umoA (a known regulator of swarmer cells), flgF, and flgI increased significantly in both swarmer and pseudoswarmer cells, as did genes in a degenerate prophage region situated immediately adjacent to the Rcs phosphorelay system. Unlike swarmer cells, pseudoswarmers displayed increased activity, rather than transcription, of the flagellar master regulatory protein, FlhD4C2, and analyses of the fliL parent strain and its motile revertants showed that they result from mutations altering the C-terminal 14 amino acids of FliL. Collectively, the data suggest a functional role for the C terminus of FliL in surface sensing and implicate UmoA as part of the signal relay leading to the master flagellar regulator FlhD4C2, which ultimately controls swarmer cell differentiation. PMID:22081397

  15. A Novel Membrane Protein Influencing Cell Shape and Multicellular Swarming of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Nicole A.; Tipper, Donald J.; Gygi, Daniel; Hughes, Colin

    1999-01-01

    Swarming in Proteus mirabilis is characterized by the coordinated surface migration of multicellular rafts of highly elongated, hyperflagellated swarm cells. We describe a transposon mutant, MNS185, that was unable to swarm even though vegetative cells retained normal motility and the ability to differentiate into swarm cells. However, these elongated cells were irregularly curved and had variable diameters, suggesting that the migration defect results from the inability of these deformed swarm cells to align into multicellular rafts. The transposon was inserted at codon 196 of a 228-codon gene that lacks recognizable homologs. Multiple copies of the wild-type gene, called ccmA, for curved cell morphology, restored swarming to the mutant. The 25-kDa CcmA protein is predicted to span the inner membrane twice, with its C-terminal major domain being present in the cytoplasm. Membrane localization was confirmed both by immunoblotting and by electron microscopy of immunogold-labelled sections. Two forms of CcmA were identified for wild-type P. mirabilis; they were full-length integral membrane CcmA1 and N-terminally truncated peripheral membrane CcmA2, both present at approximately 20-fold higher concentrations in swarm cells. Differentiated MNS185 mutant cells contained wild-type levels of the C-terminally truncated versions of both proteins. Elongated cells of a ccmA null mutant were less misshapen than those of MNS185 and were able to swarm, albeit more slowly than wild-type cells. The truncated CcmA proteins may therefore interfere with normal morphogenesis, while the wild-type proteins, which are not essential for swarming, may enhance migration by maintaining the linearity of highly elongated cells. Consistent with this view, overexpression of the ccmA gene caused cells of both Escherichia coli and P. mirabilis to become enlarged and ellipsoidal. PMID:10094676

  16. Lack of mutation-histopathology correlation in a patient with Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Meggie E; Bloomhardt, Hadley M; Moroz, Krzysztof; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2016-06-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is characterized by progressive, disproportionate, segmental overgrowth, and tumor susceptibility caused by a somatic mosaic AKT1 activating mutation. Each individual has unique manifestations making this disorder extremely heterogeneous. We correlated three variables in 38 tissue samples from a patient who died with PS: the gross affection status, the microscopic affection status, and the mutation level. The AKT1 mutation was measured using a PCR-based RFLP assay. Thirteen samples were grossly normal; six had detectable mutation (2-29%) although four of these six were histopathologically normal. Of the seven grossly normal samples that had no mutation, only four were histologically normal. The mutation level in the grossly abnormal samples was 3-35% and all but the right and left kidneys, skull, and left knee bone, with mutation levels of 19%, 15%, 26%, and 17%, respectively, had abnormal histopathology. The highest mutation level was in a toe bone sample whereas the lowest levels were in the soft tissue surrounding that toe, and an omental fat nodule. We also show here that PS overgrowth can be caused by cellular proliferation or by extracellular matrix expansion. Additionally, papillary thyroid carcinoma was identified, a tumor not previously associated with PS. We conclude that gross pathology and histopathology correlate poorly with mutation levels in PS, that overgrowth can be mediated by cellular proliferation or extracellular matrix expansion, and that papillary thyroid carcinoma is part of the tumor susceptibility of PS. New methods need to be developed to facilitate genotype-phenotype correlation in mosaic disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Loss of FliL Alters Proteus mirabilis Surface Sensing and Temperature-Dependent Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a dimorphic motile bacterium well known for its flagellum-dependent swarming motility over surfaces. In liquid, P. mirabilis cells are 1.5- to 2.0-μm swimmer cells with 4 to 6 flagella. When P. mirabilis encounters a solid surface, where flagellar rotation is limited, swimmer cells differentiate into elongated (10- to 80-μm), highly flagellated swarmer cells. In order for P. mirabilis to swarm, it first needs to detect a surface. The ubiquitous but functionally enigmatic flagellar basal body protein FliL is involved in P. mirabilis surface sensing. Previous studies have suggested that FliL is essential for swarming through its involvement in viscosity-dependent monitoring of flagellar rotation. In this study, we constructed and characterized ΔfliL mutants of P. mirabilis and Escherichia coli. Unexpectedly and unlike other fliL mutants, both P. mirabilis and E. coli ΔfliL cells swarm (Swr+). Further analysis revealed that P. mirabilis ΔfliL cells also exhibit an alteration in their ability to sense a surface: e.g., ΔfliL P. mirabilis cells swarm precociously over surfaces with low viscosity that normally impede wild-type swarming. Precocious swarming is due to an increase in the number of elongated swarmer cells in the population. Loss of fliL also results in an inhibition of swarming at <30°C. E. coli ΔfliL cells also exhibit temperature-sensitive swarming. These results suggest an involvement of FliL in the energetics and function of the flagellar motor. PMID:25331431

  18. Chondroitinase ABC I from Proteus vulgaris: cloning, recombinant expression and active site identification

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    GalAGs (galactosaminoglycans) are one subset of the GAG (glycosaminoglycan) family of chemically heterogeneous polysaccharides that are involved in a wide range of biological processes. These complex biomacromolecules are believed to be responsible for the inhibition of nerve regeneration following injury to the central nervous system. The enzymic degradation of GAG chains in damaged nervous tissue by cABC I (chondroitinase ABC I), a broad-specificity lyase that degrades GalAGs, promotes neural recovery. In the present paper, we report the subcloning of cABC I from Proteus vulgaris, and discuss a simple methodology for the recombinant expression and purification of this enzyme. The originally expressed cABC I clone resulted in an enzyme with negligible activity against a variety of GalAG substrates. Sequencing of the cABC I clone revealed four point mutations at issue with the electron-density data of the cABC I crystal structure. Site-directed mutagenesis produced a clone with restored GalAG-degrading function. We have characterized this enzyme biochemically, including an analysis of its substrate specificity. By coupling structural inspections of cABC I and an evaluation of sequence homology against other GAG-degrading lyases, a set of amino acids was chosen for further study. Mutagenesis studies of these residues resulted in the first experimental evidence of cABC I's active site. This work will facilitate the structure–function characterization of biomedically relevant GalAGs and further the development of therapeutics for nerve regeneration. PMID:15691229

  19. Chondroitinase ABC I from Proteus vulgaris: cloning, recombinant expression and active site identification.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Vikas; Capila, Ishan; Bosques, Carlos J; Pojasek, Kevin; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2005-02-15

    GalAGs (galactosaminoglycans) are one subset of the GAG (glycosaminoglycan) family of chemically heterogeneous polysaccharides that are involved in a wide range of biological processes. These complex biomacromolecules are believed to be responsible for the inhibition of nerve regeneration following injury to the central nervous system. The enzymic degradation of GAG chains in damaged nervous tissue by cABC I (chondroitinase ABC I), a broad-specificity lyase that degrades GalAGs, promotes neural recovery. In the present paper, we report the subcloning of cABC I from Proteus vulgaris, and discuss a simple methodology for the recombinant expression and purification of this enzyme. The originally expressed cABC I clone resulted in an enzyme with negligible activity against a variety of GalAG substrates. Sequencing of the cABC I clone revealed four point mutations at issue with the electron-density data of the cABC I crystal structure. Site-directed mutagenesis produced a clone with restored GalAG-degrading function. We have characterized this enzyme biochemically, including an analysis of its substrate specificity. By coupling structural inspections of cABC I and an evaluation of sequence homology against other GAG-degrading lyases, a set of amino acids was chosen for further study. Mutagenesis studies of these residues resulted in the first experimental evidence of cABC I's active site. This work will facilitate the structure-function characterization of biomedically relevant GalAGs and further the development of therapeutics for nerve regeneration.

  20. In vitro synthesis and O acetylation of peptidoglycan by permeabilized cells of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, C; Clarke, A J

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis and O acetylation in vitro of peptidoglycan by Proteus mirabilis was studied in microorganisms made permeable to specifically radiolabelled nucleotide precursors by treatment with either diethyl ether or toluene. Optimum synthesis occurred with cells permeabilized by 1% (vol/vol) toluene in 30 mM MgCl2 in in vitro experiments with 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 6.80). Acetate recovered by mild base hydrolysis from sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble peptidoglycan synthesized in the presence of UDP-[acetyl-1-14C]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine was found to be radioactive. Radioactivity was not retained by peptidoglycan synthesized when UDP-[acetyl-1-14C]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine was replaced with both unlabelled nucleotide and either [acetyl-3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or [glucosamine-1,6-3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. In addition, no radioactive acetate was detected in the mild base hydrolysates of peptidoglycan synthesized in vitro with UDP-[glucosamine-6-3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine as the radiolabel. Chasing UDP-[acetyl-1-14C]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine with unlabelled material served to increase the yield of O-linked [14C]acetate, whereas penicillin G blocked both peptidoglycan synthesis and [14C]acetate transfer. These results support the hypothesis that the base-labile O-linked acetate is derived directly from N-acetylglucosamine incorporated into insoluble peptidoglycan via N----O transacetylation and not from the catabolism of the supplemented peptidoglycan precursors followed by subsequent reactivation of acetate. PMID:1856164

  1. Bacteriophage Can Prevent Encrustation and Blockage of Urinary Catheters by Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Hanin, Aurélie; Alves, Diana R.; McCutcheon, Benjamin; Dedi, Cinzia; Salvage, Jonathan; Knox, Karen; Stewart, Bruce; Metcalfe, Anthony; Clark, Jason; Gilmore, Brendan F.; Gahan, Cormac G. M.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms dense crystalline biofilms on catheter surfaces that occlude urine flow, leading to serious clinical complications in long-term catheterized patients, but there are presently no truly effective approaches to control catheter blockage by this organism. This study evaluated the potential for bacteriophage therapy to control P. mirabilis infection and prevent catheter blockage. Representative in vitro models of the catheterized urinary tract, simulating a complete closed drainage system as used in clinical practice, were employed to evaluate the performance of phage therapy in preventing blockage. Models mimicking either an established infection or early colonization of the catheterized urinary tract were treated with a single dose of a 3-phage cocktail, and the impact on time taken for catheters to block, as well as levels of crystalline biofilm formation, was measured. In models of established infection, phage treatment significantly increased time taken for catheters to block (∼3-fold) compared to untreated controls. However, in models simulating early-stage infection, phage treatment eradicated P. mirabilis and prevented blockage entirely. Analysis of catheters from models of established infection 10 h after phage application demonstrated that phage significantly reduced crystalline biofilm formation but did not significantly reduce the level of planktonic cells in the residual bladder urine. Taken together, these results show that bacteriophage constitute a promising strategy for the prevention of catheter blockage but that methods to deliver phage in sufficient numbers and within a key therapeutic window (early infection) will also be important to the successful application of phage to this problem. PMID:26711744

  2. SU-E-T-566: Neutron Dose Cloud Map for Compact ProteusONE Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Syh, J; Patel, B; Syh, J; Rosen, L; Wu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To establish the base line of neutron cloud during patient treatment in our new compact Proteus One proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) system with various beam delivery gantry angles, with or without range shifter (RS) at different body sites. Pencil beam scanning is an emerging treatment technique, for the concerns of neutron exposure, this study is to evaluate the neutron dose equivalent per given delivered dose under various treatment conditions at our proton therapy center. Methods: A wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, Thermo Scientific, MA) was used for neutron dose measurements. It was conducted in the proton therapy vault during beam was on. The measurement location was specifically marked in order to obtain the equivalent dose of neutron activities (H). The distances of 100, 150 and 200 cm at various locations are from the patient isocenter. The neutron dose was measured of proton energy layers, # of spots, maximal energy range, modulation width, field radius, gantry angle, snout position and delivered dose in CGE. The neutron dose cloud is reproducible and is useful for the future reference. Results: When distance increased the neutron equivalent dose (H) reading did not decrease rapidly with changes of proton energy range, modulation width or spot layers. For cranial cases, the average mSv/CGE was about 0.02 versus 0.032 for pelvis cases. RS will induce higher H to be 0.10 mSv/CGE in average. Conclusion: From this study, neutron per dose ratio (mSv/CGE) slightly depends upon various treatment parameters for pencil beams. For similar treatment conditions, our measurement demonstrates this value for pencil beam scanning beam has lowest than uniform scanning or passive scattering beam with a factor of 5. This factor will be monitored continuously for other upcoming treatment parameters in our facility.

  3. Structure of the O-polysaccharide of Proteus serogroup O34 containing 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-galactosyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, Andrei V; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna; Kondakova, Anna N; Wykrota, Marianna; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt; Rozalski, Antoni

    2004-08-23

    On mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O34, strain CCUG 4669, the O-polysaccharide was cleaved at a glycosyl-phosphate linkage that is present in the main chain. The resultant phosphorylated oligosaccharides and an alkali-treated lipopolysaccharide were studied by sugar and methylation analyses along with 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and the following structure of the branched tetrasaccharide phosphate repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide was established: [carbohydrate structure: see text]The O-polysaccharide of Proteus mirabilis strain TG 276 was found to have the same structure and, based on the structural and serological data, this strain was proposed to be classified into the same Proteus serogroup O34.

  4. Predation in caves: the effects of prey immobility and darkness on the foraging behaviour of two salamanders, Euproctus asper and Proteus anguinus.

    PubMed

    Uiblein, F; Durand, J P; Juberthie, C; Parzefall, J

    1992-12-01

    The behavioural responses of the blind cave salamander Proteus anguinus and the Pyrenean salamander Euproctus asper (a facultative cave dweller) to living and dead chironomids offered in light or in darkness were studied experimentally. Both species were able to detect and locate single prey items positioned at distances of 30 cm. Proteus responded to dead prey in light faster and captured live prey in darkness earlier than E. asper. E. asper captured live prey in light earlier than in darkness. Proteus is well equipped to search for non-visual information and used an active, mechanically and chemically guided approach in all experiments. E. asper showed a more directed, visually dominated approach behaviour with live chironomids in light, but used an active, widely foraging mode with live prey in darkness and dead prey in light. E. asper may forage successfully both in epigean and hypogean habitats.

  5. [Interaction between Bifidobacterium bifidum, Proteus vulgaris, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 204 in the gastrointestinal tract of gnotobiotic chicks].

    PubMed

    Timoshko, M A; Vil'shanskaia, F L; Pospelova, V V; Rakhimova, N G

    1981-03-01

    Experiments on gnotobiont chickens indicated that the strains B. bifidum 1/85 phi, P. vulgaris F-30 and K. pneumoniae 204, when introduced simultaneously into the gastrointestinal tract in a single administration, proliferate there with the pronounced predominance of bifidobacteria. 6 additional administrations of B. bifidum 1/85 phi culture resulted in the complete suppression of microorganisms belonging to the genera Rroteus and Klebsiella as early as 10 days after the introduction of bifidobacteria. These data suggest that it is necessary to use B. bifidum 1/85 phi in cases of intestinal dysbacteriosis characterized by the predominance of microorganisms belonging to the genera Proteus and Klebsiella.

  6. Structure and serological specificity of a new acidic O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O45.

    PubMed

    Bartodziejska, B; Shashkov, A S; Torzewska, A; Grachev, A A; Ziolkowski, A; Paramonov, N A; Rozalski, A; Knirel, Y A

    1999-01-01

    The following structure of the O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) of Proteus vulgaris O45 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was established using 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NOESY and H-detected 1H, 13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence ( HMQC) experiments: [structure: see text text] Immunochemical studies, using rabbit polyclonal anti-P. vulgaris O45 serum and LPS, OPS and Smith-degraded OPS of P. vulgaris O45, showed the importance of beta-D-GlcA in manifesting the serological specificity of the O-antigen studied.

  7. TEM-187, a new extended-spectrum β-lactamase with weak activity in a Proteus mirabilis clinical strain.

    PubMed

    Corvec, Stéphane; Beyrouthy, Racha; Crémet, Lise; Aubin, Guillaume Ghislain; Robin, Frédéric; Bonnet, Richard; Reynaud, Alain

    2013-05-01

    A Proteus mirabilis clinical strain (7001324) was isolated from urine sample of a patient hospitalized in a long-term-care facility. PCR and cloning experiments performed with this strain identified a novel TEM-type β-lactamase (TEM-187) differing by four amino acid substitutions (Leu21Phe, Arg164His, Ala184Val, and Thr265Met) from TEM-1. This characterization provides further evidence for the diversity of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) produced by P. mirabilis and for their potential spread to other Enterobacteriaceae due to a lack of sensitive detection methods used in daily practice.

  8. Rapid Turnover of FlhD and FlhC, the Flagellar Regulon Transcriptional Activator Proteins, during Proteus Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Claret, Laurent; Hughes, Colin

    2000-01-01

    The enterobacterial flhDC master operon activates expression of the flagellar biogenesis gene hierarchy and also represses cell division. During Proteus mirabilis differentiation into elongated hyperflagellated swarm cells, flhDC transcription is strongly but transiently increased. We show that concentration of the FlhD and FlhC proteins is also tightly controlled at the posttranslational level. This is achieved by protein degradation, which is most severe after differentiation when the half-life of both proteins is ca. 2 min. Degradation is energy dependent and putatively involves the Lon protease. PMID:10633123

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the First KPC-Type Carbapenemase-Positive Proteus mirabilis Strain from a Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Chiarelli, Adriana; Boinett, Christine J; Riccobono, Eleonora; Harris, Simon R; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Thomson, Nicholas R; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Giani, Tommaso

    2016-06-23

    Sequencing of the blaKPC-positive strain Proteus mirabilis AOUC-001 was performed using both the MiSeq and PacBio RS II platforms and yielded a single molecule of 4,272,433 bp, representing the complete chromosome. Genome analysis showed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants, including two copies of blaKPC-2 carried on a fragment of a KPC-producing plasmid previously described in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Copyright © 2016 Di Pilato et al.

  10. Structure of a new acidic O-antigen of Proteus vulgaris O22 containing O-acetylated 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Toukach, F V; Bartodziejska, B; Senchenkova, S N; Wykrota, M; Shashkov, A S; Rozalski, A; Knirel, Y A

    1999-05-31

    The acidic O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O22 was studied using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, and H-detected 1H, 13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) experiments, and the following structure for the branched pentasaccharide repeating unit was established: [sequence: see text] where Qui3NAc is 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxyglucose, O-acetylation of QuiNAc at position 4 is stoichiometric and at position 2 nonstoichiometric. Serological relationships of P. vulgaris O22 with some other Proteus strains were substantiated on the level of the O-antigen structures.

  11. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  12. [Evaluation of biofilm formation by Proteus mirabilis strains on the surface of different biomaterials by two methods].

    PubMed

    Kwiecińska-Piróg, Joanna; Bogiel, Tomasz; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    Proteus sp. rods are opportunistic human pathogens. These microorganisms are mainly isolated from patients with urinary tract infections, particularly associated with using of biomaterials, on which surface they can form biofilm. The aim of our study was the estimation of Proteus mirabilis rods ability to form biofilm on the surface of 5 biomaterials (polychloride vinyl, silicone latex, polypropylene, polybutylen teraftalan and polyamide) using Richards' and quantitative method and comparison results of both methods. A total number of 84 P. mirabilis strains were included into the study. All of them were isolated in the Department of Clinical Microbiology University Hospital no. 1 of dr A. Jurasz Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń between 2005 and 2008. Examined P. mirabilis strains formed heavy biofilm with statistically significantly values on the surface of silicone latex than on polychloride vinyl and on polypropylene surface than polybutylen teraftalen or polyamide. High correlation of both methods was established. The Richards' method can be used to quick identification of P. mirabilis biofilm.

  13. Characterization of a cDNA of peroxiredoxin II responding to hydrogen peroxide and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Park, Miey; Shin, Hae J; Lee, Soo Y; Ahn, Tae I

    2005-01-01

    Phagocytic cells have defense systems against reactive oxygen species generated as the first non-specific defense mechanism against invading pathogens or microorganisms. We cloned a cDNA encoding a 21.69-kDa protein in Amoeba proteus homologous to 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx-Ap). In the disk inhibition assay using H2O2 as an oxidizing agent, Escherichia coli overproducing Prx-Ap showed better viability than did E. coli transformed with pBluescript II SK for control. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) produced against Prx-Ap reacted with a 22.5-kDa protein and several minor proteins. In Western blot analysis, levels of the 22.5-kDa protein in amoebae treated with 2-mM H2O2 for 1 h increased about 2-fold over those in control cells. Immunofluorescence scattered throughout the cytoplasm also increased after H2O2 treatment. In Northern blot analysis using the cDNA as a probe, the level of transcripts also changed with H2O2 treatment. When amoebae were fed with Tetrahymena, the intensity of immunofluorescence increased from 15 min and persisted until 2 h after phagocytosis. These results suggest that the 22.5-kDa protein of A. proteus is a Prx protein and that it has an antioxidant property responding to phagocytosis.

  14. Reanalysis of the Gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility Proteus - Spectral indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero power reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute which has been employed during the 1970's to study experimentally the physics of the gas-cooled fast reactor. Reaction rate distributions, flux spectrum and reactivity effects have been measured in several configurations featuring PuO2/UO2 fuel, absorbers, large iron shields, and thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasihomogeneously in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. This papers focus on the spectral indices - including fission and capture in 232Th and 237Np - measured in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattices and their predictions with an MCNPX model specially developed for the PROTEUS-GCFR core. Predictions were obtained with JEFF-3.1 and -3.11, ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, and JENDL-3.3 and -4.0. A general good agreement was demonstrated. The ratio of 232Th fission to 239Pu fission, however, was under-predicted by 8.7±2.1% and 6.5±2.1% using ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, respectively. Finally, the capture rates in 237Np tended to be underpredicted by the JEFF and JENDL libraries, although the new cross section in JEFF-3.1.1 slightly improved the 237Np capture to 239Pu fission results (3.4±2.4%).

  15. Comparative evaluations on bio-treatment of hexavalent chromate by resting cells of Pseudochrobactrum sp. and Proteus sp. in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shimei; Dong, Xinjiao; Zhou, Jiangmin; Ge, Shichao

    2013-09-15

    Two marine bacterial strains, B5 and H24, were isolated from long-term Cr(VI) contaminated seawater and identified as Pseudochrobactrum and Proteus, respectively, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Both strains were examined for their tolerance to Cr(VI) and other metal salts and their abilities to reduce Cr(VI) to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. Growing cells of Pseudochrobactrum sp. B5 and Proteus sp. H24 could tolerate Cr(VI) at a concentration of 2000 and 1500 mg/l and completely reduce 1000 mg/l Cr(VI) in LB medium within 96 and 144 h, respectively. Resting cells of the two strains were able to reduce 200mg/l Cr(VI) in Tris-HCl buffer within 16 and 24h, respectively. Furthermore, resting cells of both strains were able to reduce Cr(VI) in industrial wastewaters three times consecutively. Overall, this study provides evidence of the potential for application of chromate-reducing bacteria to direct Cr(VI) decontamination of industrial effluents.

  16. Transcriptome of Proteus mirabilis in the Murine Urinary Tract: Virulence and Nitrogen Assimilation Gene Expression▿†

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Melanie M.; Yep, Alejandra; Smith, Sara N.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2011-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of complicated urinary tract infections. In this study, microarrays were used to analyze P. mirabilis gene expression in vivo from experimentally infected mice. Urine was collected at 1, 3, and 7 days postinfection, and RNA was isolated from bacteria in the urine for transcriptional analysis. Across nine microarrays, 471 genes were upregulated and 82 were downregulated in vivo compared to in vitro broth culture. Genes upregulated in vivo encoded mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, urease, iron uptake systems, amino acid and peptide transporters, pyruvate metabolism enzymes, and a portion of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Flagella were downregulated. Ammonia assimilation gene glnA (glutamine synthetase) was repressed in vivo, while gdhA (glutamate dehydrogenase) was upregulated in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, ammonia availability due to urease activity in P. mirabilis did not drive this gene expression. A gdhA mutant was growth deficient in minimal medium with citrate as the sole carbon source, and loss of gdhA resulted in a significant fitness defect in the mouse model of urinary tract infection. Unlike Escherichia coli, which represses gdhA and upregulates glnA in vivo and cannot utilize citrate, the data suggest that P. mirabilis uses glutamate dehydrogenase to monitor carbon-nitrogen balance, and this ability contributes to the pathogenic potential of P. mirabilis in the urinary tract. PMID:21505083

  17. Novel Insights into the Proteus mirabilis Crystalline Biofilm Using Real-Time Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Sandra A.; Fader, Mandy J.; Keevil, C. William

    2015-01-01

    The long-term use of indwelling catheters results in a high risk from urinary tract infections (UTI) and blockage. Blockages often occur from crystalline deposits, formed as the pH rises due to the action of urease-producing bacteria; the most commonly found species being Proteus mirabilis. These crystalline biofilms have been found to develop on all catheter materials with P. mirabilis attaching to all surfaces and forming encrustations. Previous studies have mainly relied on electron microscopy to describe this process but there remains a lack of understanding into the stages of biofilm formation. Using an advanced light microscopy technique, episcopic differential interference contrast (EDIC) microscopy combined with epifluorescence (EF), we describe a non-destructive, non-contact, real-time imaging method used to track all stages of biofilm development from initial single cell attachment to complex crystalline biofilm formation. Using a simple six-well plate system, attachment of P. mirabilis (in artificial urine) to sections of silicone and hydrogel latex catheters was tracked over time (up to 24 days). Using EDIC and EF we show how initial attachment occurred in less than 1 h following exposure to P. mirabilis. This was rapidly followed by an accumulation of an additional material (indicated to be carbohydrate based using lectin staining) and the presence of highly elongated, motile cells. After 24 h exposure, a layer developed above this conditioning film and within 4 days the entire surface (of both catheter materials) was covered with diffuse crystalline deposits with defined crystals embedded. Using three-dimensional image reconstruction software, cells of P. mirabilis were seen covering the crystal surfaces. EDIC microscopy could resolve these four components of the complex crystalline biofilm and the close relationship between P. mirabilis and the crystals. This real-time imaging technique permits study of this complex biofilm development with no risk

  18. Enhanced motility of a Proteus mirabilis strain expressing hybrid FlaAB flagella.

    PubMed

    Manos, Jim; Artimovich, Elena; Belas, Robert

    2004-05-01

    Proteus mirabilis has two tandemly arranged flagellin-encoding genes, flaA and flaB. flaA is transcribed from a sigma(28) promoter, while flaB is silent. flaA and flaB can undergo reversible rearrangement to produce a set of hybrid genes referred to as flaAB. Flagellins composed of FlaAB protein have a different amino acid sequence and are antigenically distinct from flagellin composed of FlaA, implicating flagellin gene conversion as a putative virulence mechanism for P. mirabilis. The change in amino acid sequence is also hypothesized to alter the filament helix and, hence, affect the motility of FlaAB-expressing strains. To test this hypothesis, the motility of wild-type P. mirabilis was compared with that of a strain, DF1003, locked into the FlaAB(+) hybrid phase, under conditions of altered ionic strength, pH and viscosity. Cell motion tracking analysis showed that DF1003 has wild-type swimming velocity at physiological conditions, but moves significantly faster and travels further compared to the wild-type at NaCl concentrations greater than 170 mM. DF1003 is also significantly faster than the wild-type at pH 5.2, 5.8 and 8.2, and at 5 and 10 % polyvinylpyrrolidone. Measurements of amplitude and wavelength for isolated flagella subjected to pH 5.8 or 425 mM NaCl showed a loss of helical structure in FlaA flagella compared to FlaAB filaments, a feature that could significantly affect motility under these conditions. These results support a hypothesis that FlaAB flagellin imparts a motile advantage to P. mirabilis in conditions that otherwise may impede bacterial movement. In a broader context, flagellar antigenic variation, commonly thought to serve as means to avoid host defences, may also enhance motility in other bacterial species, thus aiding in the adaptation and survival of the cells.

  19. Novel Insights into the Proteus mirabilis Crystalline Biofilm Using Real-Time Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Sandra A; Fader, Mandy J; Keevil, C William

    2015-01-01

    The long-term use of indwelling catheters results in a high risk from urinary tract infections (UTI) and blockage. Blockages often occur from crystalline deposits, formed as the pH rises due to the action of urease-producing bacteria; the most commonly found species being Proteus mirabilis. These crystalline biofilms have been found to develop on all catheter materials with P. mirabilis attaching to all surfaces and forming encrustations. Previous studies have mainly relied on electron microscopy to describe this process but there remains a lack of understanding into the stages of biofilm formation. Using an advanced light microscopy technique, episcopic differential interference contrast (EDIC) microscopy combined with epifluorescence (EF), we describe a non-destructive, non-contact, real-time imaging method used to track all stages of biofilm development from initial single cell attachment to complex crystalline biofilm formation. Using a simple six-well plate system, attachment of P. mirabilis (in artificial urine) to sections of silicone and hydrogel latex catheters was tracked over time (up to 24 days). Using EDIC and EF we show how initial attachment occurred in less than 1 h following exposure to P. mirabilis. This was rapidly followed by an accumulation of an additional material (indicated to be carbohydrate based using lectin staining) and the presence of highly elongated, motile cells. After 24 h exposure, a layer developed above this conditioning film and within 4 days the entire surface (of both catheter materials) was covered with diffuse crystalline deposits with defined crystals embedded. Using three-dimensional image reconstruction software, cells of P. mirabilis were seen covering the crystal surfaces. EDIC microscopy could resolve these four components of the complex crystalline biofilm and the close relationship between P. mirabilis and the crystals. This real-time imaging technique permits study of this complex biofilm development with no risk

  20. Regulation of the Min Cell Division Inhibition Complex by the Rcs Phosphorelay in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Howery, Kristen E; Clemmer, Katy M; Şimşek, Emrah; Kim, Minsu; Rather, Philip N

    2015-08-01

    A key regulator of swarming in Proteus mirabilis is the Rcs phosphorelay, which represses flhDC, encoding the master flagellar regulator FlhD4C2. Mutants in rcsB, the response regulator in the Rcs phosphorelay, hyperswarm on solid agar and differentiate into swarmer cells in liquid, demonstrating that this system also influences the expression of genes central to differentiation. To gain a further understanding of RcsB-regulated genes involved in swarmer cell differentiation, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) was used to examine the RcsB regulon. Among the 133 genes identified, minC and minD, encoding cell division inhibitors, were identified as RcsB-activated genes. A third gene, minE, was shown to be part of an operon with minCD. To examine minCDE regulation, the min promoter was identified by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5'-RACE), and both transcriptional lacZ fusions and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (qRT) PCR were used to confirm that the minCDE operon was RcsB activated. Purified RcsB was capable of directly binding the minC promoter region. To determine the role of RcsB-mediated activation of minCDE in swarmer cell differentiation, a polar minC mutation was constructed. This mutant formed minicells during growth in liquid, produced shortened swarmer cells during differentiation, and exhibited decreased swarming motility. This work describes the regulation and role of the MinCDE cell division system in P. mirabilis swarming and swarmer cell elongation. Prior to this study, the mechanisms that inhibit cell division and allow swarmer cell elongation were unknown. In addition, this work outlines for the first time the RcsB regulon in P. mirabilis. Taken together, the data presented in this study begin to address how P. mirabilis elongates upon contact with a solid surface. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. qnrA6 genetic environment and quinolone resistance conferred on Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jayol, Aurélie; Janvier, Frédéric; Guillard, Thomas; Chau, Françoise; Mérens, Audrey; Robert, Jérôme; Fantin, Bruno; Berçot, Béatrice; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2016-04-01

    To determine the genetic location and environment of the qnrA6 gene in Proteus mirabilis PS16 where it was first described and to characterize the quinolone resistance qnrA6 confers. Transformation experiments and Southern blotting were performed for plasmid and genomic DNA of P. mirabilis PS16 to determine the qnrA6 location. Combinatorial PCRs with primers in qnrA6 and genes usually surrounding qnrA genes were used to determine the genetic environment. The qnrA6 coding region, including or not the promoter region, was cloned into vectors pTOPO and pBR322 and the MICs of six quinolones were measured for transformants of Escherichia coli TOP10 and P. mirabilis ATCC 29906 Rif(R). qnrA6 was shown to be chromosomally encoded in P. mirabilis PS16 and its genetic environment was 81%-87% similar to that of qnrA2 in the Shewanella algae chromosome. The 5138 bp region up- and downstream of qnrA6 contained an IS10 sequence surrounded by two ISCR1. This resulted in qnrA6 being displaced 1.9 kb from its native promoter but supplied a promoter present in ISCR1. qnrA6 cloned into pTOPO and pBR322 conferred a 4-32-fold increase in fluoroquinolone MICs when expressed in E. coli but only 2-3-fold in P. mirabilis. When including the promoter region, a further increase in resistance was observed in both species, reaching MIC values above clinical breakpoints for only P. mirabilis. qnrA6 is the first chromosomally located qnrA gene described in Enterobacteriaceae. The quinolone resistance conferred by qnrA6 depends on the proximity of an efficient promoter and the host strain where it is expressed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Bloodstream Infections: Risk Factors and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Fiori, Barbara; Losito, Angela Raffaella; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Campana, Lara; Ruggeri, Alberto; Di Meco, Eugenia; Liberto, Elvira; Fadda, Giovanni; Cauda, Roberto; Spanu, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Our aims were to identify (i) risk factors associated with the acquisition of multidrug-resistant (MDR, to 3 or more classes of antimicrobials) Proteus mirabilis isolates responsible for bloodstream infections (BSIs) and (ii) the impact on mortality of such infections. Risk factors for acquiring MDR P. mirabilis BSIs were investigated in a case-case-control study; those associated with mortality were assessed by comparing survivors and nonsurvivors in a cohort study. The population consisted of 99 adult inpatients with P. mirabilis BSIs identified by our laboratory over an 11-year period (1999 to 2009), 36 (33.3%) of which were caused by MDR strains, and the overall 21-day mortality rate was 30.3%. Acquisition of an MDR strain was independently associated with admission from a long-term care facility (odds ratio [OR], 9.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.94 to 49.16), previous therapy with fluoroquinolones (OR, 5.52; 95% CI, 1.30 to 23.43) or oxyimino-cephalosporins (OR, 4.72; 95% CI, 1.31 to 16.99), urinary catheterization (OR, 3.89; 95% CI, 1.50 to 10.09), and previous hospitalization (OR, 2.68; 95% CI, 10.4 to 6.89). Patients with MDR P. mirabilis BSIs received inadequate initial antimicrobial therapy (IIAT, i.e., treatment with drugs to which the isolate displayed in vitro resistance) more frequently than those with non-MDR infections; they also had increased mortality and (for survivors) longer post-BSI-onset hospital stays. In multivariate regression analysis, 21-day mortality was associated with septic shock at BSI onset (OR, 12.97; 95% CI, 32.2 to 52.23), P. mirabilis isolates that were MDR (OR, 6.62; 95% CI, 16.4 to 26.68), and IIAT (OR, 9.85; 95% CI, 26.7 to 36.25), the only modifiable risk factor of the 3. These findings can potentially improve clinicians' ability to identify P. mirabilis BSIs likely to be MDR, thereby reducing the risk of IIAT—a major risk factor for mortality in these cases—and facilitating the prompt implementation of appropriate

  3. Overexpression of an outer membrane protein associated with decreased susceptibility to carbapenems in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Lin; Wang, Min-Cheng; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Liu, Ming-Che; Hu, Rouh-Mei; Wu, Yue-Jin; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis isolates commonly have decreased susceptibility to imipenem. Previously, we found P. mirabilis hfq mutant was more resistant to imipenem and an outer membrane protein (OMP) could be involved. Therefore, we investigated the role of this OMP in carbapenem susceptibility. By SDS-PAGE we found this OMP (named ImpR) was increased in hfq mutant and LC-MS/MS revealed it to be the homologue of Salmonella YbfM, which is a porin for chitobiose and subject to MicM (a small RNA) regulation. We demonstrated that ImpR overexpression resulted in increased carbapenem MICs in the laboratory strain and clinical isolates. Chitobiose induced expression of chb (a chitobiose utilization operon). Real-time RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE were performed to elucidate the relationship of hfq, impR, chb and MicM in P. mirabilis. We found MicM RNA was decreased in hfq mutant and chbBC-intergenic region (chbBC-IGR) overexpression strain (chbIGRov), while impR mRNA was increased in hfq mutant, micM mutant and chbIGRov strain. In addition, mutation of hfq or micM and overexpression of chbBC-IGR increased ImpR protein level. Accordingly, chitobiose made wild-type have higher levels of ImpR protein and are more resistant to carbapenems. Hfq- and MicM-complemented strains restored wild-type MICs. Mutation of both impR and hfq eliminated the increase in carbapenem MICs observed in hfq mutant and ImpR-complementation of hfq/impR double mutant resulted in MICs as hfq mutant, indicating that the ImpR-dependent decreased carbapenem susceptibility of hfq mutant. These indicate MicM was antisense to impR mRNA and was negatively-regulated by chbBC-IGR. Together, overexpression of ImpR contributed to the decreased carbapenem susceptibility in P. mirabilis.

  4. Effects of Proteus vulgaris growth on the establishment of a cheese microbial community and on the production of volatile aroma compounds in a model cheese.

    PubMed

    Deetae, P; Mounier, J; Bonnarme, P; Spinnler, H E; Irlinger, F; Helinck, S

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the impact of Proteus vulgaris growth on a multispecies ecosystem and on volatile aroma compound production during cheese ripening. The microbial community dynamics and the production of volatile aroma compounds of a nine-species cheese ecosystem were compared with or without the presence of P. vulgaris in the initial inoculum. Proteus vulgaris was able to colonize the cheese surface and it was one of the dominant species, representing 37% of total isolates at the end of ripening with counts of 9.2 log(10) CFU g(-1). In the presence of P. vulgaris, counts of Arthrobacter arilaitensis, Brevibacterium aurantiacum and Hafnia alvei significantly decreased. Proteus vulgaris influenced the production of total volatile aroma compounds with branched-chain aldehydes and their corresponding alcohols being most abundant. Proteus vulgaris was able to successfully implant itself in a complex cheese ecosystem and significantly contributed to the organoleptic properties of cheese during ripening. This bacterium also interacted negatively with other bacteria in the ecosystem studied. This is the first time that the impact of a Gram-negative bacterium on cheese microbial ecology and functionality has been described.

  5. Detection of KPC-2 in a Clinical Isolate of Proteus mirabilis and First Reported Description of Carbapenemase Resistance Caused by a KPC Beta-Lactamase in P. mirabilis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An isolate of Proteus mirabilis recovered from bacterial cultures was shown to be resistant to imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem by disk diffusion susceptibility testing. Amplification of whole cell and/or plasmid DNA recovered from the isolate using primers specific for the blaKPC carbapenemase g...

  6. Implementation/validation of a low Reynolds number two-equation turbulence model in the Proteus Navier-Stokes code: Two-dimensional/axisymmetric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation and validation of the Chien low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model in the two dimensional axisymmetric version Proteus, a compressible Navier-Stokes computer code, are presented. The set of k-epsilon equations are solved by marching in time using a coupled alternating direction implicit (ADI) solution procedure with generalized first or second order time differencing. To validate Proteus and the k-epsilon turbulence model, laminar and turbulent computations were done for several benchmark test cases: incompressible fully developed 2-D channel flow; fully developed axisymmetric pipe flow; boundary layer flow over a flat plate; and turbulent Sajben subsonic transonic diffuser flows. Proteus results from these test cases showed good agreement with analytical results and experimental data. Detailed comparisons of both mean flow and turbulent quantities showed that the Chien k-epsilon turbulence model given good results over a wider range of turbulent flow than the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model in the Proteus code with no significant CPU time penalty for more complicated flow cases.

  7. HTR-Proteus Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 5,6,7,&8: Columnar Hexagonal Point-on-Point Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Sterbentz, James W.; Snoj, Luka; Lengar, Igor; Koberl, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  8. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 5, 6, 7, & 8: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:2 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  9. The potential of selected Australian medicinal plants with anti-Proteus activity for the treatment and prevention of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cock, I. E.; Winnett, V.; Sirdaarta, J.; Matthews, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A wide variety of herbal medicines are used in indigenous Australian traditional medicinal systems to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammation. The current study was undertaken to test the ability of a panel of Australian plants with a history of the ethnobotanical usage in the treatment of inflammation for the ability to block the microbial trigger of RA. Materials and Methods: One hundred and six extracts from 40 plant species were investigated for the ability to inhibit the growth of the bacterial trigger of RA (Proteus mirabilis). The extracts were tested for toxicity in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The most potent inhibitor of P. mirabilis growth was further analyzed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to high accuracy time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results: Sixty-five of the 106 extracts tested (61.3%) inhibited the growth of P. The Aleurites moluccanus, Datura leichardtii, Eucalyptus major, Leptospermum bracteata, L. juniperium, Macadamia integriflora nut, Melaleuca alternifolia, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Petalostigma pubescens, P. triloculorae, P. augustifolium, Scaevola spinescens, Syzygiumaustrale, and Tasmannia lanceolata extracts were determined to be the most effective inhibitors of P. mirabilis growth, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values generally significantly below 1000 μg/ml. T. lanceolata fruit extracts were the most effective P. mirabilis growth inhibitors, with a MIC values of 11 and 126 μg/ml for the methanolic and aqueous extracts, respectively. Subsequent analysis of the T. lanceolata fruit extracts by RP-HPLC coupled to high-resolution TOF mass spectroscopy failed to detect resveratrol in either T. lanceolata fruit extract. However, the resveratrol glycoside piceid and 2 combretastatin stilbenes (A-1 and A-4) were detected in both T. lanceolata fruit extracts. With the exception of the Eucalyptus and Syzygium extracts, all extracts exhibiting Proteus

  10. Distinct Residues Contribute to Motility Repression and Autoregulation in the Proteus mirabilis Fimbria-Associated Transcriptional Regulator AtfJ

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Nadine J.; Chan, Kun-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteus mirabilis contributes to a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, where coordinated regulation of adherence and motility is critical for ascending disease progression. Previously, the mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbria-associated transcriptional regulator MrpJ has been shown to both repress motility and directly induce the transcription of its own operon; in addition, it affects the expression of a wide range of cellular processes. Interestingly, 14 additional mrpJ paralogs are included in the P. mirabilis genome. Looking at a selection of MrpJ paralogs, we discovered that these proteins, which consistently repress motility, also have nonidentical functions that include cross-regulation of fimbrial operons. A subset of paralogs, including AtfJ (encoded by the ambient temperature fimbrial operon), Fim8J, and MrpJ, are capable of autoinduction. We identified an element of the atf promoter extending from 487 to 655 nucleotides upstream of the transcriptional start site that is responsive to AtfJ, and we found that AtfJ directly binds this fragment. Mutational analysis of AtfJ revealed that its two identified functions, autoregulation and motility repression, are not invariably linked. Residues within the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix domain are required for motility repression but not necessarily autoregulation. Likewise, the C-terminal domain is dispensable for motility repression but is essential for autoregulation. Supported by a three-dimensional (3D) structural model, we hypothesize that the C-terminal domain confers unique regulatory capacities on the AtfJ family of regulators. IMPORTANCE Balancing adherence with motility is essential for uropathogens to successfully establish a foothold in their host. Proteus mirabilis uses a fimbria-associated transcriptional regulator to switch between these antagonistic processes by increasing fimbrial adherence while simultaneously downregulating flagella. The

  11. Proteus: a random forest classifier to predict disorder-to-order transitioning binding regions in intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sankar; Söderquist, Fredrik; Wallner, Björn

    2017-05-01

    The focus of the computational structural biology community has taken a dramatic shift over the past one-and-a-half decades from the classical protein structure prediction problem to the possible understanding of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) or proteins containing regions of disorder (IDPR). The current interest lies in the unraveling of a disorder-to-order transitioning code embedded in the amino acid sequences of IDPs/IDPRs. Disordered proteins are characterized by an enormous amount of structural plasticity which makes them promiscuous in binding to different partners, multi-functional in cellular activity and atypical in folding energy landscapes resembling partially folded molten globules. Also, their involvement in several deadly human diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases) makes them attractive drug targets, and important for a biochemical understanding of the disease(s). The study of the structural ensemble of IDPs is rather difficult, in particular for transient interactions. When bound to a structured partner, an IDPR adapts an ordered conformation in the complex. The residues that undergo this disorder-to-order transition are called protean residues, generally found in short contiguous stretches and the first step in understanding the modus operandi of an IDP/IDPR would be to predict these residues. There are a few available methods which predict these protean segments from their amino acid sequences; however, their performance reported in the literature leaves clear room for improvement. With this background, the current study presents `Proteus', a random forest classifier that predicts the likelihood of a residue undergoing a disorder-to-order transition upon binding to a potential partner protein. The prediction is based on features that can be calculated using the amino acid sequence alone. Proteus compares favorably with existing methods predicting twice as many true positives as the second best method (55

  12. Distinct Residues Contribute to Motility Repression and Autoregulation in the Proteus mirabilis Fimbria-Associated Transcriptional Regulator AtfJ.

    PubMed

    Bode, Nadine J; Chan, Kun-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Pearson, Melanie M

    2016-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis contributes to a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, where coordinated regulation of adherence and motility is critical for ascending disease progression. Previously, the mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbria-associated transcriptional regulator MrpJ has been shown to both repress motility and directly induce the transcription of its own operon; in addition, it affects the expression of a wide range of cellular processes. Interestingly, 14 additional mrpJ paralogs are included in the P. mirabilis genome. Looking at a selection of MrpJ paralogs, we discovered that these proteins, which consistently repress motility, also have nonidentical functions that include cross-regulation of fimbrial operons. A subset of paralogs, including AtfJ (encoded by the ambient temperature fimbrial operon), Fim8J, and MrpJ, are capable of autoinduction. We identified an element of the atf promoter extending from 487 to 655 nucleotides upstream of the transcriptional start site that is responsive to AtfJ, and we found that AtfJ directly binds this fragment. Mutational analysis of AtfJ revealed that its two identified functions, autoregulation and motility repression, are not invariably linked. Residues within the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix domain are required for motility repression but not necessarily autoregulation. Likewise, the C-terminal domain is dispensable for motility repression but is essential for autoregulation. Supported by a three-dimensional (3D) structural model, we hypothesize that the C-terminal domain confers unique regulatory capacities on the AtfJ family of regulators. Balancing adherence with motility is essential for uropathogens to successfully establish a foothold in their host. Proteus mirabilis uses a fimbria-associated transcriptional regulator to switch between these antagonistic processes by increasing fimbrial adherence while simultaneously downregulating flagella. The discovery of multiple

  13. The potential of selected Australian medicinal plants with anti-Proteus activity for the treatment and prevention of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cock, I E; Winnett, V; Sirdaarta, J; Matthews, B

    2015-05-01

    A wide variety of herbal medicines are used in indigenous Australian traditional medicinal systems to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammation. The current study was undertaken to test the ability of a panel of Australian plants with a history of the ethnobotanical usage in the treatment of inflammation for the ability to block the microbial trigger of RA. One hundred and six extracts from 40 plant species were investigated for the ability to inhibit the growth of the bacterial trigger of RA (Proteus mirabilis). The extracts were tested for toxicity in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The most potent inhibitor of P. mirabilis growth was further analyzed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to high accuracy time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectroscopy. Sixty-five of the 106 extracts tested (61.3%) inhibited the growth of P. The Aleurites moluccanus, Datura leichardtii, Eucalyptus major, Leptospermum bracteata, L. juniperium, Macadamia integriflora nut, Melaleuca alternifolia, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Petalostigma pubescens, P. triloculorae, P. augustifolium, Scaevola spinescens, Syzygium australe, and Tasmannia lanceolata extracts were determined to be the most effective inhibitors of P. mirabilis growth, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values generally significantly below 1000 μg/ml. T. lanceolata fruit extracts were the most effective P. mirabilis growth inhibitors, with a MIC values of 11 and 126 μg/ml for the methanolic and aqueous extracts, respectively. Subsequent analysis of the T. lanceolata fruit extracts by RP-HPLC coupled to high-resolution TOF mass spectroscopy failed to detect resveratrol in either T. lanceolata fruit extract. However, the resveratrol glycoside piceid and 2 combretastatin stilbenes (A-1 and A-4) were detected in both T. lanceolata fruit extracts. With the exception of the Eucalyptus and Syzygium extracts, all extracts exhibiting Proteus inhibitory activity were also shown to be nontoxic

  14. Mannose-Resistant Proteus-Like Fimbriae Are Produced by Most Proteus mirabilis Strains Infecting the Urinary Tract, Dictate the In Vivo Localization of Bacteria, and Contribute to Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Angela M.; Lockatell, Virginia; Johnson, David E.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2004-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, an etiologic agent of complicated urinary tract infections, expresses mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae whose expression is phase variable. Here we examine the role of these fimbriae in biofilm formation and colonization of the urinary tract. The majority of wild-type P. mirabilis cells in transurethrally infected mice produced MR/P fimbriae. Mutants that were phase-locked for either constitutive expression (MR/P ON) or the inability to express MR/P fimbriae (MR/P OFF) were phenotypically distinct and swarmed at different rates. The number of P. mirabilis cells adhering to bladder tissue did not appear to be affected by MR/P fimbriation. However, the pattern of adherence to the bladder surface was strikingly different. MR/P OFF colonized the lamina propria underlying exfoliated uroepithelium, while MR/P ON colonized the luminal surfaces of bladder umbrella cells and not the exfoliated regions. Wild-type P. mirabilis was usually found colonizing intact uroepithelium, but it occasionally adhered to exfoliated areas. MR/P ON formed significantly more biofilm than either P. mirabilis HI4320 (P = 0.03) or MR/P OFF (P = 0.05). MR/P OFF was able to form a biofilm similar to that of the wild type. MR/P ON formed a three-dimensional biofilm structure as early as 18 h after the initiation of the biofilm, while MR/P OFF and the wild type did not. After 7 days, however, P. mirabilis HI4320 formed a 65-μm-thick biofilm, while the thickest MR/P ON and MR/P OFF biofilms were only 12 μm thick. We concluded that MR/P fimbriae are expressed by most P. mirabilis cells infecting the urinary tract, dictate the localization of bacteria in the bladder, and contribute to biofilm formation. PMID:15557655

  15. Characterization of an alkaline lipase from Proteus vulgaris K80 and the DNA sequence of the encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, H K; Lee, J K; Kim, H; Oh, T K

    1996-01-01

    A facultatively anaerobic bacterium producing an extracellular alkaline lipase was isolated from the soil collected near a sewage disposal plant in Korea and identified to be a strain of Proteus vulgaris. The molecular mass of the purified lipase K80 was estimated to be 31 kDa by SDS-PAGE. It was found to be an alkaline enzyme having maximum hydrolytic activity at pH 10, while fairly stable in a wide pH range from 5 to 11. The gene for lipase K80 was cloned in Escherichia coli. Sequence analysis showed an open reading frame of 861 bp coding for a polypeptide of 287 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the lipase gene had 46.3% identity to the lipase from Pseudomonas fragi.

  16. Structure of a glycerol teichoic acid-like O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O12.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, A V; Torzewska, A; Shashkov, A S; Senchenkova, S N; Rozalski, A; Knirel, Y A

    2000-02-01

    A phosphorylated O-specific polysaccharide (O-antigen) was obtained by mild acid degradation of Proteus vulgaris O12 lipopolysaccharide and studied by sugar and methylation analyses, 1H-, 13C- and 31P-NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, H-detected 1H, 13C and 1H, 31P heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence experiments. It was found that the polysaccharide consists of pentasaccharide repeating units connected via a glycerol phosphate group, and has the following structure: where FucNAc is 2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxygalactose and the degree of O-acetylation at position 4 of GalNAc is approximately 25%. Immunochemical studies with P. vulgaris O12 O-antiserum suggested that the lipopolysaccharide studied shares common epitopes with the lipopolysaccharide core of P. vulgaris O8 and with the O-antigens of P. penneri strains 8 and 63.

  17. Modification biological activity of S and R forms of Proteus mirabilis and Burkholderia cepacia lipopolysaccharides by carrageenans.

    PubMed

    Arabski, Michał; Barabanova, Anna; Gałczyńska, Katarzyna; Węgierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Dzidowska, Kamila; Augustyniak, Daria; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Lankoff, Anna; Yermak, Irina; Molinaro, Antonio; Kaca, Wiesław

    2016-09-20

    The modification of biological features of S and R forms of Proteus mirabilis and Burkholderia cepacia LPS by kappa/iota and kappa/beta carrageenans was shown in Limulus activation test, ELISA, human complement activation and apoptotic assay. The role of positively charged substituent Ara4N in lipid A was evaluated as a suspected major domain for interactions with sulphate groups of carrageenans.The experiments obtained by three serological methods indicated that not only lipid A part of LPS but also polysaccharide elements such as core and O-specific chain are involved in interaction with carrageenes. Carrageenans turned out to be non-cytotoxic for A549 cells and were able to inhibit the apoptotic effect caused by lipid A of P. mirabilis and B. cepacia.

  18. Characterization of an Unusual Strain of Proteus rettgeri Associated with an Outbreak of Nosocomial Urinary-Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Traub, W. H.; Craddock, M. E.; Raymond, E. A.; Fox, M.; McCall, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    An outbreak of nosocomial urinary-tract infection was caused by a strain of Proteus rettgeri that fermented lactose overnight and was resistant to all antimicrobial drugs tested. The nonmotile isolates shared an O (somatic) antigen that differed from those of wild-type P. rettgeri. The organisms proved markedly serum-sensitive. In rats, the isolates elicited an acute interstitial nephritis with associated transient bacteriuria. Attempts to transfer the lac+ trait and drug-resistance markers to recipient strains of Escherichia coli K-12 failed; exposure of the isolates to acridine orange yielded small numbers of non-lactose-fermenting variants which, however, were still as drug-resistant as before. Epidemiological studies failed to uncover the source of this unique strain and appeared to indicate exogenous spread of infection. PMID:4940869

  19. Differences in the motility of Amoeba proteus isolated fragments are determined by F-actin arrangement and cell nucleus presence.

    PubMed

    Grebecka, L; Pomorski, P; Lopatowska, A

    1995-10-01

    Isolated fragments produced by bisection of Amoeba proteus differ by their position in the original cell and by the presence or absence of the cell nucleus. Immediately after the operation, both types of anterior fragments preserve the former motory polarity, and do not interrupt locomotion. In the same time, all posterior fragments stop, round up and fail to react stimuli. In the second phase of experiment, these anterior fragments, which had no nucleus ceased to move, whereas the nucleated posterior ones resumed locomotion. It was demonstrated, that the behaviour of a fragment is primarily determined by the peripheral F-actin distribution, which is different depending on the origin of the fragment either from the anterior or from the posterior cell region. Later, the "inherited" F-actin distribution may be stabilized or reorganized in the presence of the nucleus, or desorganized in its absence.

  20. Design, synthesis, molecular docking, anti-Proteus mirabilis and urease inhibition of new fluoroquinolone carboxylic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Mohammed A A; Abuo-Rahma, Gamal El-Din A A; Abdelhafez, El-Shimaa M N; Hassan, Heba A; Abd El-Baky, Rehab M

    2017-02-01

    New hydroxamic acid, hydrazide and amide derivatives of ciprofloxacin in addition to their analogues of levofloxacin were prepared and identified by different spectroscopic techniques. Some of the prepared compounds revealed good activity against the urease splitting bacteria, Proteus mirabilis. The urease inhibitory activity was investigated using indophenol method. Most of the tested compounds showed better activity than the reference acetohydroxamic acid (AHA). The ciprofloxacin hydrazide derivative 3a and levofloxacin hydroxamic acid 7 experienced the highest activity (IC50=1.22μM and 2.20μM, respectively). Molecular docking study revealed high spontaneous binding ability of the tested compounds to the active site of urease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Two Independent Pathways for Self-Recognition in Proteus mirabilis Are Linked by Type VI-Dependent Export

    PubMed Central

    Wenren, Larissa M.; Sullivan, Nora L.; Cardarelli, Lia; Septer, Alecia N.; Gibbs, Karine A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Swarming colonies of the bacterium Proteus mirabilis are capable of self-recognition and territorial behavior. Swarms of independent P. mirabilis isolates can recognize each other as foreign and establish a visible boundary where they meet; in contrast, genetically identical swarms merge. The ids genes, which encode self-identity proteins, are necessary but not sufficient for this territorial behavior. Here we have identified two new gene clusters: one (idr) encodes rhs-related products, and another (tss) encodes a putative type VI secretion (T6S) apparatus. The Ids and Idr proteins function independently of each other in extracellular transport and in territorial behaviors; however, these self-recognition systems are linked via this type VI secretion system. The T6S system is required for export of select Ids and Idr proteins. Our results provide a mechanistic and physiological basis for the fundamental behaviors of self-recognition and territoriality in a bacterial model system. PMID:23882014

  2. Secondary metabolites produced by marine streptomyces as antibiofilm and quorum-sensing inhibitor of uropathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Younis, Khansa Mohammed; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-03-01

    Quorum-sensing regulates bacterial biofilm formation and virulence factors, thereby making it an interesting target for attenuating pathogens. In this study, we investigated anti-biofilm and anti-quorum-sensing compounds from secondary metabolites of halophiles marine streptomyces against urinary catheter biofilm forming Proteus mirabilis without effect on growth viability. A total of 40 actinomycetes were isolated from samples collected from different places in Iraq including marine sediments and soil samples. Fifteen isolates identified as streptomyces and their supernatant screened as anti-quorum-sensing by inhibiting quorum-sensing regulated prodigiosin biosynthesis of Serratia marcescens strain Smj-11 as a reporter strain. Isolate Sediment Lake Iraq (sdLi) showed potential anti-quorum-sensing activity. Out of 35 clinical isolates obtained from Urinary catheter used by patient at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, 22 isolates were characterized and identified as Proteus mirabilis. Isolate Urinary Catheter B4 (UCB4) showed the highest biofilm formation with highest resistance to used antibiotic and was chosen for further studies. Ethyl acetate secondary metabolites extract was produced from sdLi isolate. First, we determined the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of sdLi crude extract against UCB4 isolate, and all further experiments used concentrations below the MIC. Tests of subinhibitory concentrations of sdLi crude extract showed good inhibition against UCB4 isolate biofilm formation on urinary catheter and cover glass using Scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy respectively. The influence of sub-MIC of sdLi crude extract was also found to attenuate the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent factors such as hemolysin activity, urease activity, pH value, and motility of UCB4 isolate. Evidence is presented that these nontoxic secondary metabolites may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with quorum-sensing signals

  3. Design of a proteus lattice representative of a burnt and fresh fuel interface at power conditions in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hursin, M.; Perret, G.

    2012-07-01

    The research program LIFE (Large-scale Irradiated Fuel Experiment) between PSI and Swissnuclear has been started in 2006 to study the interaction between large sets of burnt and fresh fuel pins in conditions representative of power light water reactors. Reactor physics parameters such as flux ratios and reaction rate distributions ({sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fissions and {sup 238}U capture) are calculated to estimate an appropriate arrangement of burnt and fresh fuel pins within the central element of the test zone of the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. The arrangement should minimize the number of burnt fuel pins to ease fuel handling and reduce costs, whilst guaranteeing that the neutron spectrum in both burnt and fresh fuel regions and at their interface is representative of a large uniform array of burnt and fresh pins in the same moderation conditions. First results are encouraging, showing that the burnt/fresh fuel interface is well represented with a 6 x 6 bundle of burnt pins. The second part of the project involves the use of TSUNAMI, CASMO-4E and DAKOTA to perform parametric and optimization studies on the PROTEUS lattice by varying its pitch (P) and fraction of D{sub 2}O in moderator (F{sub D2O}) to be as representative as possible of a power light water reactor core at hot full power conditions at beginning of cycle (BOC). The parameters P and F{sub D2O} that best represent a PWR at BOC are 1.36 cm and 5% respectively. (authors)

  4. Zinc uptake contributes to motility and provides a competitive advantage to Proteus mirabilis during experimental urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nielubowicz, Greta R; Smith, Sara N; Mobley, Harry L T

    2010-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a Gram-negative bacterium, represents a common cause of complicated urinary tract infections in catheterized patients or those with functional or anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract. ZnuB, the membrane component of the high-affinity zinc (Zn(2+)) transport system ZnuACB, was previously shown to be recognized by sera from infected mice. Since this system has been shown to contribute to virulence in other pathogens, its role in Proteus mirabilis was investigated by constructing a strain with an insertionally interrupted copy of znuC. The znuC::Kan mutant was more sensitive to zinc limitation than the wild type, was outcompeted by the wild type in minimal medium, displayed reduced swimming and swarming motility, and produced less flaA transcript and flagellin protein. The production of flagellin and swarming motility were restored by complementation with znuCB in trans. Swarming motility was also restored by the addition of Zn(2+) to the agar prior to inoculation; the addition of Fe(2+) to the agar also partially restored the swarming motility of the znuC::Kan strain, but the addition of Co(2+), Cu(2+), or Ni(2+) did not. ZnuC contributes to but is not required for virulence in the urinary tract; the znuC::Kan strain was outcompeted by the wild type during a cochallenge experiment but was able to colonize mice to levels similar to the wild-type level during independent challenge. Since we demonstrated a role for ZnuC in zinc transport, we hypothesize that there is limited zinc present in the urinary tract and P. mirabilis must scavenge this ion to colonize and persist in the host.

  5. Epidemiology of extended-spectrum β-lactamase, AmpC, and carbapenemase production in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Priya; Gupta, Varsha; Arora, Shilpa; Garg, Shivani; Chander, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis strains that produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC β-lactamase, and carbapenemase pose potential threats to patient care because most clinical diagnostic laboratories may not attempt to detect these three major groups of enzymes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to ascertain if P. mirabilis isolates collected from our heathcare facility possess various mechanisms of resistance to β-lactams (i.e., ESBL, AmpC, and carbapenemases) and to additionally arrive at conclusions regarding concurrent testing for these three mechanism of drug resistance in order to reduce cost and time in routine diagnostic testing. Between January 2011 and June 2011, 60 consecutive non-repeated strains of P. mirabilis were evaluated for production of ESBLs, AmpC β-lactamases, and carbapenemases. Of these, 36 isolates were found to be ESBL producers, and 7 (12%) were positive for production of AmpC β-lactamases and ESBLs. Therefore, 19.4% of ESBL-producing Proteus strains coproduced AmpC enzymes. The modified Hodge test confirmed carbapenemase production in only 1 isolate (1.7%), which was also ESBL- and AmpC-positive. The clinical impact of additional AmpC expression in ESBL-producing P. mirabilis results in a newly acquired resistance to β-lactamase inhibitors. In addition, to save time and costs, we recommend the use of cefepime/cefepime-clavulanate or boronic acid for the ESBL detection but in only those strains that were positive for ESBL by screening and negative by confirmatory tests.

  6. Scaled Composites' Doug Shane examines the screen of his ground control station during tests in New Mexico. Shane used this configuration as the ground control station to remotely pilot the Proteus aircraft during a NASA sponsored series of tests.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-03-13

    Scaled Composites' Doug Shane examines the screen of his ground control station during tests in New Mexico. Shane used this configuration as the ground control station to remotely pilot the Proteus aircraft during a NASA sponsored series of tests.

  7. The formation of germtubes by Candida albicans, when grown with Staphylococcus pyogene, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Lactobacilius acidophilus and Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Purohit, B C; Joshi, K R; Ramdeo, I N; Bharadwaj, T P

    1977-12-31

    The formation of germtubes by twelve clinical isolates of C. albicans was studied in human serum containing per millilitre 10(3) to 10(9) organisms as: Staphylococcus pyegene, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Proteus vulgaris. All the five bacteria inhibited formation of germtubes by C. albicans at all concentrations and the percent germtube formed diminished with increasing concentration of the bacteria. Lactobacillus acidophilus inhibited the formation of germtubes maximally followed by Staphylococcus pyogene, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Proteus vulgaris in the concentrations of 10(3) to 10(7) bacteria per millilitre produced only insignificant inhibition of formation of germtubes by C. albicans. Since germtubes of C. albicans are invasive, it is suggested that inhibition of "blastospore-germtube transformation" may be significantly responsible for prevention of infection by C. albicans by coexisting bacterial flora.

  8. Structure of the O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O45 containing 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, Andrei V; Bartodziejska, Beata; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Shashkov, Alexander S; Rozalski, Antoni; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2003-02-07

    An O-specific polysaccharide was isolated by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O45 and studied by sugar and methylation analyses along with 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, H-detected 1H,13C HSQC and HMBC experiments. The following structure of the pentasaccharide repeating unit of the polysaccharide was established:-->6)-alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->4)-alpha-D-GalpNAc-(1-->4)-alpha-D-GalpA-(1-->3)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->2)-beta-D-Fucp3NAc4Ac-(1-->where Fuc3NAc4Ac is 3-acetamido-4-O-acetyl-3,6-dideoxygalactose. A cross-reactivity of anti-P. vulgaris O45 serum was observed with several other Proteus lipopolysaccharides, which contains Fuc3N derivatives.

  9. Identification of a Proteus penneri isolate as the causal agent of red body disease of the cultured white shrimp Penaeus vannamei and its control with Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haipeng; He, Shan; Lu, Liqun; Yang, Xianle; Chen, Baiyao

    2014-02-01

    Bacteriosis has become a major economic problem in the farming of the Pacific white shrimp Penaeus vannamei. However, no definitive data are available about Proteus penneri infection in cultured P. vannamei and its control. In this study, a virulent strain NC was isolated from diseased P. vannamei suffering from red body disease and identified as a P. penneri isolate through phylogenetic analysis and ATB 32GN system. A phylogenetic constructed tree using the neighbour-joining method identified the NC isolate as a P. penneri strain. In addition, Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus conferred significant protection against P. penneri: it exhibited significant bacteriolytic effects on the pathogenic P. penneri, had a wide prey range towards Proteus pathogens, and displayed a good protective efficacy on experimental P. penneri infection in P. vannamei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of farmed P. vannamei infected with P. penneri and its control with B. bacteriovorus.

  10. Gene cloning and characterization of a novel highly organic solvent tolerant lipase from Proteus sp. SW1 and its application for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Whangsuk, Wirongrong; Sungkeeree, Pareenart; Thiengmag, Sirinthra; Kerdwong, Jarunee; Sallabhan, Ratiboot; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Loprasert, Suvit

    2013-01-01

    Proteus sp. SW1 was found to produce an extracellular solvent tolerant lipase. The gene, lipA, encoding a bacterial lipase, was cloned from total Proteus sp. SW1 DNA. lipA was predicted to encode a 287 amino acid protein of 31.2 kDa belonging to the Group I proteobacterial lipases. Purified His-tagged LipA exhibited optimal activity at pH 10.0 and 55°C. It was highly stable in organic solvents retaining 112% of its activity in 100% isopropanol after 24 h, and exhibited more than 200% of its initial activity upon exposure to 60% acetone, ethanol, and hexane for 18 h. Biodiesel synthesis reactions, using a single step addition of 13% an acyl acceptor ethanol, showed that LipA was highly effective at converting palm oil into biodiesel.

  11. Characterization of a stable spheroplast type L-form of Proteus mirabilis D 52 as cell envelope mutant. I. Isolation, growth characteristics, biochemical activities, and sensitivity to bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Gumpert, J; Taubeneck, U

    1975-01-01

    A stable spheroplast type L-form could be isolated by transferring 627 single colonies and 195 agar blocks with several colonies of unstable L-forms of Proteus mirabilis D 52 on agar media without supplements of penicillin. The L-form grows well on complex and synthetic agar media, however, it failed to grow in any of the liquid media which have been proved. With one exception (formation of acid from maltose) the L-form shows the same bioche mical activities like the parent rod-shaped bacterium. However, the insensitivity for various phages and the failure of DAP in the envelopes demonstrate that there are profound alterations in the biosynthesis and structure of the murein and of the outer wall layers. The results of these investigations and an ultrastructural analysis (Gumpert and Taubeneck 1975) show that the stable spheroplast type L-form LD 52 B of Proteus mirabilis must be considered as a true cell envelope mutant.

  12. Emergence of Extensively Drug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Harboring a Conjugative NDM-1 Plasmid and a Novel Salmonella Genomic Island 1 Variant, SGI1-Z.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shangshang; Qi, Hui; Zhang, Qijing; Zhao, Di; Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Tian, Hao; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Hui; Zhou, Mengmeng; Feng, Xianju; Liu, Hong-Min

    2015-10-01

    Acquisition of blaNDM-1 in bacterial species, such as Proteus mirabilis that is intrinsically resistant to tetracycline, tigecycline and colistin, will make clinical treatment extremely difficult. Here, we characterized an NDM-1-producing clinical isolate of P. mirabilis (PM58) that displayed an extensively drug-resistant (XDR) phenotype, susceptible only to aztreonam. Molecular analysis revealed that PM58 harbored both a conjugative NDM-1 plasmid and a novel Salmonella genomic island 1 variant on chromosome.

  13. Outbreak caused by Proteus mirabilis isolates producing weakly expressed TEM-derived extended-spectrum β-lactamase in spinal cord injury patients with recurrent bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Cremet, Lise; Bemer, Pascale; Rome, Joanna; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Navas, Dominique; Bourigault, Celine; Guillouzouic, Aurelie; Caroff, Nathalie; Lepelletier, Didier; Asseray, Nathalie; Perrouin-Verbe, Brigitte; Corvec, Stephane

    2011-12-01

    We performed a retrospective extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) molecular characterization of Proteus mirabilis isolates recovered from urine of spinal cord injury patients. A incorrectly detected TEM-24-producing clone and a new weakly expressed TEM-derived ESBL were discovered. In such patients, ESBL detection in daily practice should be improved by systematic use of a synergy test in strains of P. mirabilis resistant to penicillins.

  14. Fragmentation of 23S rRNA in Strains of Proteus and Providencia Results from Intervening Sequences in the rrn (rRNA) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Wayne L.; Pabbaraju, Kanti; Sanderson, Kenneth E.

    2000-01-01

    Intervening sequences (IVSs) were originally identified in the rrl genes for 23S rRNA (rrl genes, for large ribosomal subunit, part of rrn operon encoding rRNA) of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium LT2 and Arizonae. These sequences are transcribed but later removed during RNase III processing of the rRNA, resulting in fragmentation of the 23S species; IVSs are uncommon, but have been reported in at least 10 bacterial genera. Through PCR amplification of IVS-containing regions of the rrl genes we showed that most Proteus and Providencia strains contain IVSs similar to those of serovar Typhimurium in distribution and location in rrl genes. By extraction and Northern blotting of rRNA, we also found that these IVSs result in rRNA fragmentation. We report the first finding of two very different sizes of IVS (113 bp and 183 to 187 bp) in different rrl genes in the same strain, in helix 25 of Proteus and Providencia spp.; IVSs from helix 45 are 113 to 123 bp in size. Analysis of IVS sequence and postulated secondary structure reveals striking similarities of Proteus and Providencia IVSs to those of serovar Typhimurium, with the stems of the smaller IVSs from helix 25 being similar to those of Salmonella helix 25 IVSs and with both the stem and the central loop domain of helix 45 IVSs being similar. Thus, IVSs of related sequences are widely distributed throughout the Enterobacteriaceae, in Salmonella, Yersinia, Proteus, and Providencia spp., but we did not find them in Escherichia coli, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, or Morganella spp.; the sporadic distribution of IVSs of related sequence indicates that lateral genetic transfer has occurred. PMID:10648538

  15. [Evaluation of Vitek 2 performance for identifying extended spectrum beta-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae "other than Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella spp"].

    PubMed

    Diamante, Paola; Camporese, Alessandro

    2006-12-01

    Production of beta-lactamases is the main resistance mechanism of gram-negative bacteria against beta-lactam antibiotics. Extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) have the ability to hydrolyze a broader spectrum of beta-lactam drugs. Hence rapid, accurate detection of this resistance mechanism is extremely important to guide proper patient antimicrobial therapy. These enzymes are most commonly produced by Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli, but may also occur widely in other gram-negative bacteria, including Enterobacter spp., Proteus spp., Morganella morganii, Providencia stuartii, Serratia marcescens and others that also produce other chromosomal and plasmid-mediated enzymes, like AmpC beta-lactamases. The main problem is that no CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) recommendations exist for ESBL detection for Enterobacteriaceae other than E. coli, Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella spp and for detecting plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamases. We carried out an evaluation of Vitek 2 Advanced Expert System (AES) performance for identifying ESBL in Enterobacteriaceae, also other than E. coli, Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella spp, comparing results obtained with Etest and double disk data. Seventy isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were tested for the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) by using Vitek 2, Etest and the double disk method. The use of Etest was performed as a gold standard method by comparing interpretation results of Vitek 2 Advanced Expert System (AES). In comparison with the Etest method, AES produced 19 ESBL warnings, of which only 5 were classified as major misunderstandings, especially for Enterobacteriaceae other than E. coli, Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella spp which produced plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamases. The Etest, together with the cefoxitin sensibility test, was found to be the best method to confirm ESBLs and distinguish AmpC from ESBLs.

  16. Serological studies of an acid-labile O-polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris OX19 lipopolysaccharide using human and rabbit antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kaca, W; Swierzko, A S; Ziolkowski, A; Amano, K; Senchenkova, S N; Knirel, Y A

    1998-01-01

    In a Weil-Felix test, sera from patients infected with Rickettsia sp. agglutinate Proteus OX types of bacteria and Proteus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are responsible for the cross-reaction. Data on the character of LPS of one of the OX group strains, Proteus vulgaris OX19, are contradictory, and it remained unclear whether it has an O-polysaccharide (OPS) and is thus LPS of the smooth type (S) or not (rough-type LPS). Our studies showed that P. vulgaris OX19 (strain PZH-24) produces a smooth-type LPS that contains a long-chain OPS, but it undergoes depolymerization during mild acid hydrolysis conventionally used for LPS delipidation and loses the serological activity. An elucidation of the complete structure of OPS demonstrated the presence of a glycosyl phosphate linkage responsible for the acid-lability of the polysaccharide chain. In ELISA, both IgM type antibodies in a Weil-Felix test with human anti-Rickettsia typhi sera and rabbit anti-P. vulgaris OX19 antibodies reacted with OPS. Rabbit antibodies did not inhibit the cross-reaction with human antibodies and thus bind to different epitopes.

  17. Detection of human antibodies binding with smooth and rough LPSs from Proteus mirabilis O3 strains S1959, R110, R45.

    PubMed

    Gleńska-Olender, J; Durlik, K; Konieczna, I; Kowalska, P; Gawęda, J; Kaca, W

    2017-09-09

    Bacteria of the genus Proteus of the family Enterobacteriaceae are facultative human pathogens responsible mainly for urinary tract and wound infections, bacteremia and the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have analyzed and compared by ELISA the titer of antibodies in plasmas of healthy individuals and in sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients recognizing a potential host cross-reactive epitope (lysine-galacturonic acid epitopes) present in Proteus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In our experiments LPSs isolated from two mutants of smooth Proteus mirabilis 1959 (O3), i.e. strains R110 and R45, were used. R110 (Ra type mutant) is lacking the O-specific polysaccharide, but possesses a complete core oligosaccharide, while R45 (Re type) has a reduced core oligosaccharide and contains two 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid residues and one of 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinopyranose residues. Titer of P. mirabilis S1959 LPS-specific-antibodies increased with the age of blood donors. RA and blood donors' sera contained antibodies against S and Ra and Re type of P. mirabilis O3 LPSs. Antibodies recognizing lysine-galacturonic acid epitopes of O3 LPS were detected by ELISA in some plasmas of healthy individuals and sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients. RA patients antibodies reacting with P. mirabilis S1959 S and R LPSs may indicate a potential role of anti-LPS antibodies in molecular mimicry in RA diseases.

  18. Genetic and biochemical diversity of ureases of Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella species isolated from urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, B D; Mobley, H L

    1987-09-01

    Bacterial urease, particularly from Proteus mirabilis, has been implicated as a contributing factor in the formation of urinary and kidney stones, obstruction of urinary catheters, and pyelonephritis. Weekly urine specimens (n = 1,135) from 32 patients, residing at two chronic-care facilities, with urinary catheters in place for greater than or equal to 30 days yielded 5,088 phenotypically and serotypically diverse bacterial isolates at greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml. A total of 86% of specimens contained at least one urease-positive species, and 46% of 3,939 gram-negative bacilli were urease positive. For investigation of genetic relatedness of urease determinants, whole-cell DNA from 50 urease-positive isolates each of Providencia stuartii, Providencia rettgeri, P. mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Morganella morganii were hybridized with a urease gene probe derived from within the urease operon of Providencia stuartii BE2467. The percentage of strains hybridizing with the gene probe was 98 for Providencia stuartii, 100 for Providencia rettgeri, 70 for P. mirabilis, 2 for M. morganii, and 0 for P. vulgaris. Electrophoretic mobilities of ureases from representative isolates revealed nine different patterns among the five species. The urease gene probe hybridized with fragments of HindIII-digested chromosomal DNA from all isolates except M. morganii. Fragment sizes differed between species. Molecular sizes of the enzymes, determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, were found to be 280 kilodaltons (kDa) (P. mirabilis), 323 to 337 kDa (Providencia stuartii, Providencia rettgeri, P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris), 620 kDa (providencia rettgeri), and greater than 700 kDa (M. morganii, Providencia rettgeri). Kms ranged from 0.7 mM urea for M. morganii to 60 mM urea for a P. mirabilis isolate. In general, P. mirabilis ureases demonstrated lower affinities for substrate but hydrolyzed urea at rates 6- to 25-fold faster than did enzymes from other species, which may

  19. Genetic and biochemical diversity of ureases of Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella species isolated from urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B D; Mobley, H L

    1987-01-01

    Bacterial urease, particularly from Proteus mirabilis, has been implicated as a contributing factor in the formation of urinary and kidney stones, obstruction of urinary catheters, and pyelonephritis. Weekly urine specimens (n = 1,135) from 32 patients, residing at two chronic-care facilities, with urinary catheters in place for greater than or equal to 30 days yielded 5,088 phenotypically and serotypically diverse bacterial isolates at greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml. A total of 86% of specimens contained at least one urease-positive species, and 46% of 3,939 gram-negative bacilli were urease positive. For investigation of genetic relatedness of urease determinants, whole-cell DNA from 50 urease-positive isolates each of Providencia stuartii, Providencia rettgeri, P. mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Morganella morganii were hybridized with a urease gene probe derived from within the urease operon of Providencia stuartii BE2467. The percentage of strains hybridizing with the gene probe was 98 for Providencia stuartii, 100 for Providencia rettgeri, 70 for P. mirabilis, 2 for M. morganii, and 0 for P. vulgaris. Electrophoretic mobilities of ureases from representative isolates revealed nine different patterns among the five species. The urease gene probe hybridized with fragments of HindIII-digested chromosomal DNA from all isolates except M. morganii. Fragment sizes differed between species. Molecular sizes of the enzymes, determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, were found to be 280 kilodaltons (kDa) (P. mirabilis), 323 to 337 kDa (Providencia stuartii, Providencia rettgeri, P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris), 620 kDa (providencia rettgeri), and greater than 700 kDa (M. morganii, Providencia rettgeri). Kms ranged from 0.7 mM urea for M. morganii to 60 mM urea for a P. mirabilis isolate. In general, P. mirabilis ureases demonstrated lower affinities for substrate but hydrolyzed urea at rates 6- to 25-fold faster than did enzymes from other species, which may

  20. Results of the Simulation of the HTR-Proteus Core 4.2 Using PEBBED-COMBINE: FY10 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hans Gougar

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The Idaho National Laboratory’s deterministic neutronics analysis codes and methods were applied to the computation of the core multiplication factor of the HTR-Proteus pebble bed reactor critical facility. This report is a follow-on to INL/EXT-09-16620 in which the same calculation was performed but using earlier versions of the codes and less developed methods. In that report, results indicated that the cross sections generated using COMBINE-7.0 did not yield satisfactory estimates of keff. It was concluded in the report that the modeling of control rods was not satisfactory. In the past year, improvements to the homogenization capability in COMBINE have enabled the explicit modeling of TRIS particles, pebbles, and heterogeneous core zones including control rod regions using a new multi-scale version of COMBINE in which the 1-dimensional discrete ordinate transport code ANISN has been integrated. The new COMBINE is shown to yield benchmark quality results for pebble unit cell models, the first step in preparing few-group diffusion parameters for core simulations. In this report, the full critical core is modeled once again but with cross sections generated using the capabilities and physics of the improved COMBINE code. The new PEBBED-COMBINE model enables the exact modeling of the pebbles and control rod region along with better approximation to structures in the reflector. Initial results for the core multiplication factor indicate significant improvement in the INL’s tools for modeling the neutronic properties of a pebble bed reactor. Errors on the order of 1.6-2.5% in keff are obtained; a significant improvement over the 5-6% error observed in the earlier This is acceptable for a code system and model in the early stages of development but still too high for a production code. Analysis of a simpler core model indicates an over-prediction of the flux in the low end of the thermal spectrum. Causes of this discrepancy are under investigation. New