Science.gov

Sample records for proto-gas giant planets

  1. MIGRATION AND GROWTH OF PROTOPLANETARY EMBRYOS. II. EMERGENCE OF PROTO-GAS-GIANT CORES VERSUS SUPER EARTH PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 15%-20% of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planets. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses 10 times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gases and solids in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that (1) there is no shortage of planetary building block material, (2) a gas giant's growth barrier is probably associated with whether it can merge into super-critical cores, and (3) super Earths are probably failed cores that did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a prescription for the embryo-disk tidal interaction. This code is used to simulate the convergent migration of embryos, and their close encounters and coagulation. Around the progenitors of solar-type stars, the progenitor super-critical-mass cores of gas giant planets primarily form in protostellar disks with relatively high (≳ 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) mass accretion rates, whereas systems of super Earths (failed cores) are more likely to emerge out of natal disks with modest mass accretion rates, due to the mean motion resonance barrier and retention efficiency.

  2. Migration and Growth of Protoplanetary Embryos. II. Emergence of Proto-Gas-Giant Cores versus Super Earth Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 15%-20% of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planets. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses 10 times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gases and solids in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that (1) there is no shortage of planetary building block material, (2) a gas giant's growth barrier is probably associated with whether it can merge into super-critical cores, and (3) super Earths are probably failed cores that did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a prescription for the embryo-disk tidal interaction. This code is used to simulate the convergent migration of embryos, and their close encounters and coagulation. Around the progenitors of solar-type stars, the progenitor super-critical-mass cores of gas giant planets primarily form in protostellar disks with relatively high (gsim 10-7 M ⊙ yr-1) mass accretion rates, whereas systems of super Earths (failed cores) are more likely to emerge out of natal disks with modest mass accretion rates, due to the mean motion resonance barrier and retention efficiency.

  3. Reinflating Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Two new, large gas-giant exoplanets have been discovered orbiting close to their host stars. A recent study examining these planets and others like them may help us to better understand what happens to close-in hot Jupiters as their host stars reach the end of their main-sequence lives.OversizedGiantsUnbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-65b. [Adapted from Hartman et al. 2016]The discovery of HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, two new transiting hot Jupiters, is intriguing. These planets have periods of just under 3 days and masses of roughly 0.5 and 0.8 times that of Jupiter, but their sizes are whats really interesting: they have inflated radii of 1.89 and 1.59 times that of Jupiter.These two planets, discovered using the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) in Arizona and Hawaii, mark the latest in an ever-growing sample of gas-giant exoplanets with radii larger than expected based on theoretical planetary structure models.What causes this discrepancy? Did the planets just fail to contract to the expected size when they were initially formed, or were they reinflated later in their lifetimes? If the latter, how? These are questions that scientists are only now starting to be able to address using statistics of the sample of close-in, transiting planets.Unbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-66b. [Hartman et al. 2016]Exploring Other PlanetsLed by Joel Hartman (Princeton University), the team that discovered HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b has examined these planets observed parameters and those of dozens of other known close-in, transiting exoplanets discovered with a variety of transiting exoplanet missions: HAT, WASP, Kepler, TrES, and KELT. Hartman and collaborators used this sample to draw conclusions about what causes some of these planets to have such large radii.The team found that there is a statistically significant correlation between the radii of close-in giant planets and the fractional ages of their host stars (i.e., the stars age divided by its full

  4. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, <4.1% of FGK stars, and <3.9% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme AO systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  5. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  6. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  7. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  8. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  9. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  10. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  11. Formation of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  12. Formation of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  13. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J.; Seager, S.; Barman, T.

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum - and hence its detectability and evolution - lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of EGPs and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a single stellar system leads to the study of comparative planetary architectures.

  14. Kuiper Prize: Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2007-10-01

    The study of giant planet atmospheres is near and dear to me, for several reasons. First, the giant planets are photogenic; the colored clouds are great tracers, and one can make fantastic movies of the atmosphere in motion. Second, the giant planets challenge us with storms that last for hundreds of years and winds that blow faster the farther you go from the sun. Third, they remind us of Earth with their hurricanes, auroras, and lightning, but they also are the link to the 200 giant planets that have been discovered around other stars. This talk will cover the past, present, and future (one hopes) of giant planet research. I will review the surprises of the Voyager and Galileo eras, and will discuss what we are learning now from the Cassini orbiter. I will review the prospects for answering the outstanding questions like: Where's the water? What is providing the colors of the clouds? How deep do the features extend? Where do the winds get their energy? What is the role of the magnetic field? Finally, I will briefly discuss how extrasolar giant planets compare with objects in our own solar system.

  15. Gravitational scattering by giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, T.; Rantala, J.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2006-09-01

    We seek to characterize giant-planet systems by their gravitational scattering properties. We do this to a given system by integrating it numerically along with a large number of hypothetical small bodies that are initially in eccentric habitable zone (HZ)-crossing orbits. Our analysis produces a single number, the escape rate, which represents the rate at which the small-body flux is perturbed away by the giant planets into orbits that no longer pose a threat to terrestrial planets inside the HZ. Obtaining the escape rate this way is similar to computing the largest Liapunov exponent as the exponential rate of divergence of two nearby orbits. For a terrestrial planet inside the HZ, the escape rate value quantifies the "protective" effect that the studied giant-planet system offers. Therefore, escape rates could provide information on whether certain giant-planet configurations produce a more desirable environment for life than the others. We present some computed escape rates on selected planetary systems, focusing on effects of varying the masses and semi-major axes of the giant planets. In the case of our Solar System we find rather surprisingly that Jupiter, in its current orbit, may provide a minimal amount of protection to the Earth.

  16. Electrodynamics in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets such as HD209458b are strongly ionized by the UV flux of their host stars. We show that photoionization on such planets creates a dayside ionosphere that extends from the thermosphere to the 100 mbar level. The resulting peak electron density near the 1 mbar level is higher than that encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the model conductivity is in fact comparable to the atmospheres of Sun-like stars. As a result, the momentum and energy balance in the upper atmosphere of HD209458b and similar planets can be strongly affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Despite much weaker ionization, electrodynamics is nevertheless also important on the giant planets of the solar system. We use a generic framework to constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in extrasolar planets, and compare the results with conductivites based on the same approach for Jupiter and Saturn. By using a generalized Ohm's law and assumed magnetic fields, we then demonstrate the basic effects of wind-driven ion drag in giant planet atmospheres. Our results show that ion drag is often significant in the upper atmosphere where it can also substantially alter the energy budget through resistive heating.

  17. The Metallicity of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorngren, Daniel P.; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Unique clues about the formation processes of giant planets can be found in their bulk compositions. Transiting planets provide us with bulk density determinations that can then be compared to models of planetary structure and evolution, to deduce planet bulk metallicities. At a given mass, denser planets have a higher mass fraction of metals. However, the unknown hot Jupiter "radius inflation" mechanism leads to under-dense planets that severely biases this work. Here we look at cooler transiting gas giants (Teff < 1000 K), which do not exhibit the radius inflation effect seen in their warmer cousins. We identified 40 such planets between 20 M_Earth and 20 M_Jup from the literature and used evolution models to determine their bulk heavy-element ("metal") mass. Several important trends are apparent. We see that all planets have at least ~10 M_Earth of metals, and that the mass of metal correlates strongly with the total mass of the planet. The heavy-element mass goes as the square root of the total mass. Both findings are consistent with the core accretion model. We also examined the effect of the parent star metallicity [Fe/H], finding that planets around high-metallicity stars are more likely to have large amounts of metal, but the relation appears weaker than previous studies with smaller sample sizes had suggested. We also looked for connections between bulk composition and planetary orbital parameters and stellar parameters, but saw no pattern, which is also an important result. This work can be directly compared to current and future outputs from planet formation models, including population synthesis.

  18. Formation of Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Under the support of NASA Origins grant, we studied the formation of gaps in protoplanetary disks due the tidal interaction between a fully grown protoplanet and protostellar disk. The result of this study is published in the Astrophysical Journal, (vol 514, 344-367, 1999) and in several conference proceedings. The main focus of this work is to analyze planet-disk interaction during the final stages of protoplanetary formation.

  19. Migration of accreting giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, A.; Bitsch, B.; Raibaldi, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of 2D hydro simulations of giant planets in proto-planetary discs, which accrete gas at a more or less high rate. First, starting from a solid core of 20 Earth masses, we show that as soon as the runaway accretion of gas turns on, the planet is saved from type I migration : the gap opening mass is reached before the planet is lost into its host star. Furthermore, gas accretion helps opening the gap in low mass discs. Consequently, if the accretion rate is limited to the disc supply, then the planet is already inside a gap and in type II migration. We further show that the type II migration of a Jupiter mass planet actually depends on its accretion rate. Only when the accretion is high do we retrieve the classical picture where no gas crosses the gap and the planet follows the disc spreading. These results impact our understanding of planet migration and planet population synthesis models. The e-poster presenting these results in French can be found here: L'e-poster présentant ces résultats en français est disponible à cette adresse: http://sf2a.eu/semaine-sf2a/2016/posterpdfs/156_179_49.pdf.

  20. Tides in Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    2015-11-01

    The arrival of Juno at Jupiter in less than a year necessitates analysis of what we can learn from the gravitational signal due to tides raised on the planet by satellites (especially Io but also Europa). In the existing literature, there is extensive work on static tidal theory (the response of the planet to a tidal potential whose time dependence is ignored) and this is what is usually quoted when people refer to tidal Love numbers. If this were correct then there would be almost no new information content in the measurement of tidally induced gravity field, since the perturbation is of the same kind as the response to rotation (i.e., the measurement of J2, a well-known quantity). However, tides are dynamic (that is, k2 is frequency dependent) and so there is new information in the frequency dependent part. There is also (highly important) information in the imaginary part (more commonly expressed as tidal Q) but there is no prospect of direct detection of this by Juno since that quadrature signal is so small. The difference between what we expect to measure and what we can already calculate directly from J2 is easily shown to be of order the square of tidal frequency over the lowest order normal mode frequency, and thus of order 10%. However, the governing equations are not simple (not separable) because of the Coriolis force. An approximate solution has been obtained for the n =1 polytrope showing that the correction to k2 is even smaller, typically a few percent, because the tidal frequency is not very different from twice the rotation frequency. Moreover, it is not highly sensitive to structure in standard models. However, the deep interior of the planet may be stably stratified because of a compositional gradient and this modifies the tidal flow amplitude, changing the dynamic k2 but not the static k2. This raises the exciting possibility that we can use the determination of k2 to set bounds on the extent of static stability, if any. There is also the slight

  1. Giant Planets in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, S. N.; White, R. J.; Latham, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery of 51 Peg b, more than 200 hot Jupiters have now been confirmed, but the details of their inward migration remain uncertain. While it is widely accepted that short period giant planets could not have formed in situ, several different mechanisms (e.g., Type II migration, planet-planet scattering, Kozai-Lidov cycles) may contribute to shrinking planetary orbits, and the relative importance of each is not well-constrained. Migration through the gas disk is expected to preserve circular, coplanar orbits and must occur quickly (within ˜ 10 Myr), whereas multi-body processes should initially excite eccentricities and inclinations and may take hundreds of millions of years. Subsequent evolution of the system (e.g., orbital circularization and inclination damping via tidal interaction with the host star) may obscure these differences, so observing hot Jupiters soon after migration occurs can constrain the importance of each mechanism. Fortunately, the well-characterized stars in young and adolescent open clusters (with known ages and compositions) provide natural laboratories for such studies, and recent surveys have begun to take advantage of this opportunity. We present a review of the discoveries in this emerging realm of exoplanet science, discuss the constraints they provide for giant planet formation and migration, and reflect on the future direction of the field.

  2. Atmospheres of the Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    The giant planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, are fluid objects. They have no solid surfaces because the light elements constituting them do not condense at solar-system temperatures. Instead, their deep atmospheres grade downward until the distinction between gas and liquid becomes meaningless. The preceding chapter delved into the hot, dark interiors of the Jovian planets. This one focuses on their atmospheres, especially the observable layers from the base of the clouds to the edge of space. These veneers arc only a few hundred kilometers thick, less than one percent of each planet's radius, but they exhibit an incredible variety of dynamic phenomena. The mixtures of elements in these outer layers resemble a cooled-down piece of the Sun. Clouds precipitate out of this gaseous soup in a variety of colors. The cloud patterns are organized by winds, which are powered by heat derived from sunlight (as on Earth) and by internal heat left over from planetary formation. Thus the atmospheres of the Jovian planets are distinctly different both compositionally and dynamically from those of the terrestrial planets. Such differences make them fascinating objects for study, providing clues about the origin and evolution of the planets and the formation of the solar system.

  3. How Giant Planets Shape the Characteristics of Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2016-01-01

    The giant planets in the Solar System likely played a defining role in shaping the properties of the Earth and other terrestrial planets during their formation. Observations from the Kepler spacecraft indicate that terrestrial planets are highly abundant. However, there are hints that giant planets a few AU from their stars are not ubiquitous. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that many terrestrial planets lack a Jupiter-like companion. We use a recently developed, state-of-the-art N-body model that allows for collisional fragmentation to perform hundreds of numerical simulations of the final stages of terrestrial planet formation around a Sun-like star -- with and without giant outer planets. We quantify the effects that outer giant planet companions have on collisions and the planet accretion process. We focus on Earth-analogs that form in each system and explore how giant planets influence the relative frequency of giant impacts occurring at late times and the delivery of volitiles. This work has important implications for determining the frequency of habitable planets.

  4. Terrestrial versus giant planet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1988-01-01

    Given a solar nebular surrounding the early protosun, containing dust grains that have already undergone growth through collisions to about centimeter-size, the question of the formation of the terrestrial and giant planets is considered. In contrast to the usual approach of emphasizing how well a problem is understood, the uncertainties and areas where more work needs to be done will be accentuated. Also, the emphasis will be on the dynamics of planetary formation, because profound problems still exist in this area, and because it seems most logical to concentrate first on the dynamical questions involved with assembling the planets before putting too much effort into the detailed chemical and geological consequences of certain formation mechanisms.

  5. Formation of Giant Planets and Brown Dwarves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2003-01-01

    According to the prevailing core instability model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Models predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. Ongoing theoretical modeling of accretion of giant planet atmospheres, as well as observations of protoplanetary disks, will help decide this issue. Observations of extrasolar planets around main sequence stars can only provide a lower limit on giant planet formation frequency . This is because after giant planets form, gravitational interactions with material within the protoplanetary disk may cause them to migrat inwards and be lost to the central star. The core instability model can only produce planets greater than a few jovian masses within protoplanetary disks that are more viscous than most such disks are believed to be. Thus, few brown dwarves (objects massive enough to undergo substantial deuterium fusion, estimated to occur above approximately 13 jovian masses) are likely to be formed in this manner. Most brown dwarves, as well as an unknown number of free-floating objects of planetary mass, are probably formed as are stars, by the collapse of extended gas/dust clouds into more compact objects.

  6. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., Io, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  7. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., lo, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  8. Electrodynamics on extrasolar giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, T. T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J. Y-K.

    2014-11-20

    Strong ionization on close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) suggests that their atmospheres may be affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Recent models of ion drag on these planets, however, are based on thermal ionization only and do not include the upper atmosphere above the 1 mbar level. These models are also based on simplified equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics that are not always valid in extrasolar planet atmospheres. We show that photoionization dominates over thermal ionization over much of the dayside atmosphere above the 100 mbar level, creating an upper ionosphere dominated by ionization of H and He and a lower ionosphere dominated by ionization of metals such as Na, K, and Mg. The resulting dayside electron densities on close-in exoplanets are higher than those encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the conductivities are comparable to the chromosphere of the Sun. Based on these results and assumed magnetic fields, we constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in EGPs and use a generalized Ohm's law to study the basic effects of electrodynamics in their atmospheres. We find that ion drag is important above the 10 mbar level where it can also significantly alter the energy balance through resistive heating. Due to frequent collisions of the electrons and ions with the neutral atmosphere, however, ion drag is largely negligible in the lower atmosphere below the 10 mbar level for a reasonable range of planetary magnetic moments. We find that the atmospheric conductivity decreases by several orders of magnitude in the night side of tidally locked planets, leading to a potentially interesting large-scale dichotomy in electrodynamics between the day and night sides. A combined approach that relies on UV observations of the upper atmosphere, phase curve and Doppler measurements of global dynamics, and visual transit observations to probe the alkali metals can potentially be

  9. YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David

    2011-12-15

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside {approx}15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  10. Exotic Earths: forming habitable worlds with giant planet migration.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Sean N; Mandell, Avi M; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2006-09-08

    Close-in giant planets (e.g., "hot Jupiters") are thought to form far from their host stars and migrate inward, through the terrestrial planet zone, via torques with a massive gaseous disk. Here we simulate terrestrial planet growth during and after giant planet migration. Several-Earth-mass planets also form interior to the migrating jovian planet, analogous to recently discovered "hot Earths." Very-water-rich, Earth-mass planets form from surviving material outside the giant planet's orbit, often in the habitable zone and with low orbital eccentricities. More than a third of the known systems of giant planets may harbor Earth-like planets.

  11. The Effect of Giant Planets on Habitable Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Barclay, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The giant planets in the Solar System likely played a large role in shaping the properties of the Earth during its formation. To explore their effects, we numerically model the growth of Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars with and without Jupiter and Saturn analog companions. Employing state-of-the-art dynamical formation models that allow both accretion and collisional fragmentation, we perform hundreds of simulations and quantify the specific impact energies of all collisions that lead to the formation of an Earth-analog. Our model tracks the bulk compositions and water abundances in the cores and mantles of the growing protoplanets to constrain the types of giant planet configurations that allow the formation of habitable planets. We find significant differences in the collisional histories and bulk compositions of the final planets formed in the presence of different giant planet configurations. Exoplanet surveys like Kepler hint at a paucity of Jupiter analogs, thus these analyses have important implications for determining the frequency of habitable planets and also support target selection for future exoplanet characterization missions.

  12. STELLAR ROTATION AND PLANET INGESTION IN GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Massarotti, Alessandro

    2008-06-15

    We investigate the expected increase in the rotation rate of post-main-sequence stars as they expand and ingest orbiting planets. This phenomenon is expected to occur when the stellar radius becomes larger than the planet's periastron distance. We calculate the expected frequency of planet ingestion during the red giant, horizontal branch (HB), and early asymptotic giant branch phases for planets of mass m{sub p}{>=}1M{sub J}. We also calculate the probability of observing anomalous rotation rates in a population of solar metallicity giants as a function of stellar mass and evolutionary stage. Planet ingestion is most easily detectable in a solar mass HB star, with a probability of about 1% for solar-neighborhood metallicity. Our analysis is based on the observed distribution of mass, eccentricity, semimajor axis for extrasolar planets around solar-type main-sequence stars, on stellar evolution models, and on the typical observed rotation rates observed in a sample of solar-neighborhood giants.

  13. Trace Molecules in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Smith, G. P.

    2010-12-01

    Chemical kinetics matters in the upper atmospheres of giant planets in our solar system and in extrasolar systems. The composition of a volume of gas depends not only on where it is, but also on how it got there. The giant planets in our own solar system still have much to teach us about what we will be observing on extrasolar giant planets and how to interpret what we observe. Some molecules, such as CO, C2H2, C2H6, PH3, and NH3, which we call tracer molecules, provide remotely observable signatures of vertical transport. PH3 and NH3 especially have complicated thermochemistry and chemical kinetics that, until recently, have been poorly understood. Based on analysis of recent literature, we have identified new chemical mechanisms for interconverting NH3 and N2 and for interconverting PH3 and NH4-H2PO4.

  14. Giant Transiting Planets Observations GITPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, C.; Henning, Th.; Weldrake, D.; Mazeh, T.; Dreizler, S.

    The search for extrasolar planets is nowadays one of the most promising science drivers in Astronomy. The radial velocity technique proved to be successful in planet hunting, harvesting more than a hundred planets to date. In these last recent years, the transit method has come to fruition, with the detection of seven Jupiter-mass extrasolar transiting planets in close-in orbits ({ AU). Currently, the radius of planets can only be determined from transiting planets, representing the principal motivation and strength of this technique. The MPIA is presently building the Large Area Imager (LAIWO) for the 1m telescope in the Wise Observatory, Israel. LAIWO will have a field of view of one square degree. An intensive search for extra-solar planets will be performed with the 1m Wise telescope, together with the 1.2m MONET telescope in Texas. We will monitor three fields at a given time during three years and more than 200 nights per year. We expect several dozens of extra-solar planets.

  15. Giant Transiting Planets Observations - GITPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, C.

    2006-08-01

    The search for extrasolar planets is nowadays one of the most promising science drivers in Astronomy. The radial velocity technique proved to be successful in planet hunting, harvesting more than a hundred planets to date. In these last years, the transit method has come to fruition, with the detection of seven Jupiter-mass extrasolar transiting planets in close-in orbits (< 0.05 AU). Currently, the radius of planets can only be determined from transiting planets, representing the principal motivation and strength of this technique. The MPIA is presently building the Large Area Imager (LAIWO) for the 1m telescope in the Wise Observatory, Israel. LAIWO will have a field of view of one square degree. An intensive search for extra-solar planets will be performed with the 1m Wise telecope, together with the 1.2m MONET telescope in Texas. We will monitor three fields at a given time during three years and more than 200 nights per year. We expect several dozens of extra-solar planets.

  16. Giant planets around AF and M stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameau, Julien; Chauvin, Gaël; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Delorme, Philippe; Lannier, Justine

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of two three-year surveys of young and nearby stars to search for wide orbit giant planets. On the one hand, we focus on early-type and massive, namely β Pictoris analogs. On the other hand, we observe late type and very low mass stars, i.e., M dwarfs. We report individual detections of new planetary mass objects. According to our deep detection performances, we derive the observed frequency of giant planets between these two classes of parent stars. We find frequency between 6 to 12% but we are not able to assess a/no correlation with the host-mass.

  17. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Tommi T.; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres. PMID:24664923

  18. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Tommi T; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J; Yelle, Roger V

    2014-04-28

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres.

  19. The Anelastic Equilibrium Tide in Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remus, Francoise; Mathis, S.; Zahn, J.; Lainey, V.

    2012-10-01

    Once a planetary system is formed, its dynamical evolution is governed by gravitational interactions between its components, be it a star-planet or planet-satellite interaction. By converting kinetic energy into heat, the tides pertub their orbital and rotational properties. The rate at which the system evolves depends on the physical properties of tidal dissipation. Therefore, to understand the past history and predict the fate of a binary system, one has to identify the dissipative processes that achieve this conversion of energy. Planetary systems display a large diversity of planets by their composition. Since tidal mechanism is closely related with the internal structure of the perturbed body, one has to investigate its effects on either its fluid and solid layers. Studies have been carried out on tidal effects in fluid bodies such as stars and envelopes of giant planets. However, the planetary solid regions may also contribute to tidal dissipation, be it the mantles of Earth-like planets that have been investigated by many works, or the cores of giant planets. The purpose of our study is to determine the tidal dissipation in the solid central regions of giant planets, taking into account the presence of a fluid envelope. We derive the different Love numbers that describe the anelastic deformation and discuss the dependence of the quality factor Q on the rheological parameters and the size of the core. Taking plausible values for these parameters, and discussing the frequency-dependence of the solid dissipation, we show how this mechanism may compete with the dissipation in fluid layers, when applied to Jupiter- and Saturn-like planets. We also discuss the case of the icy giants Uranus and Neptune. Finally, we present the way to implement the results in the equations that describe the dynamical evolution of planetary systems.

  20. Giant planet formation via pebble accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilera, O. M.

    2016-08-01

    In the standard model of core accretion, the formation of giant planets occurs by two main processes: first, a massive core is formed by the accretion of solid material; then, when this core exceeds a critical value (typically greater than ) a gaseous runaway growth is triggered and the planet accretes big quantities of gas in a short period of time until the planet achieves its final mass. Thus, the formation of a massive core has to occur when the nebular gas is still available in the disk. This phenomenon imposes a strong time-scale constraint in the giant planet formation due to the fact that the lifetimes of the observed protoplanetary disks are in general lower than 10 Myr. The formation of massive cores before 10 Myr by accretion of big planetesimals (with radii 10 km) in the oligarchic growth regime is only possible in massive disks. However, planetesimal accretion rates significantly increase for small bodies, especially for pebbles, particles of sizes between mm and cm, which are strongly coupled with the gas. In this work, we study the formation of giant planets incorporating pebble accretion rates in our global model of planet formation.

  1. Assimilation of planets by red giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen Karen

    The typical red giant star rotates slowly. This characteristic is expected from the conservation of angular momentum as these stars expand during their evolution. Nevertheless, a small percentage of red giant stars are rapidly rotating. One possible source of these stars' excess angular momenta is the orbital angular momentum of a planetary companion. The transfer of orbital angular momentum to the stellar envelope decays the planet's orbit, ultimately leading to the rapid in-spiral of the planet into the star. Using the known sample of exoplanets around main sequence host stars, I simulated both the future evolution of these stars and the expected interactions with their planets and found that Jupiter-mass planets residing at inner solar system distances---relatively common in exoplanetary systems---can contribute enough angular momentum to cause rapid rotation in their host stars during the red giant phase. Gas giant planets are also massive enough to alter the chemical composition of their host stars' envelopes when they are accreted. The central experiment of this thesis is to search for abundance anomalies in the rapid rotators that could be indicative of planet accretion. Hypothetical anomalies include the replenishment of light elements that are diluted by giant stars during first dredge-up (such as the stellar surface abundance of lithium), changes in isotopic abundance ratios that were altered by nucleosynthesis (such as increasing the stellar surface 12C/13C), and the preferential enhancement of refractory elements (indicative of the accretion of chemically fractionated material such as a planet). To increase the total number of known rapid rotators, I measured rotational velocities in a large database of spectra collected for the Grid Giant Star Survey developed for NASA's Space Interferometry Mission's astrometric grid. The 28 new rapid rotators discovered in this sample were combined with rapid rotators from the literature and a control sample of slow

  2. Compositional constraints on giant planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Tobias; Encrenaz, Therese

    2006-10-01

    Using Ockham's razor as a guide, we have tried to find the simplest model for the formation of giant planets that can explain current observations of atmospheric composition. While this "top-down" approach is far from sufficient to define such models, it establishes a set of boundary conditions whose satisfaction is necessary. Using Jupiter as the prototype, we find that a simple model for giant planet formation that begins with a solar nebula of uniform composition and relies on accretion of low temperature icy planetesimals plus collapse of surrounding solar nebula gas supplies that satisfaction. We compare the resulting predictions of elemental abundances and isotope ratios in the atmospheres of the other giants with those from contrasting models and suggest some key measurements to make further progress.

  3. Formation of gas and ice giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2003-10-01

    The only presently known example of a planetary system containing a terrestrial planet in the habitable zone of a main sequence star is the Solar System. If the Solar System's giant planets formed by the generally assumed mechanism of core accretion, the Solar System probably formed in a relatively long-lived protoplanetary disk in a quiescent region of star formation, such as in the Taurus molecular cloud. However, if the giant planets formed by the more radical disk instability mechanism, then the Solar System would have formed in a region of high mass star formation, similar to the Orion Nebula Cluster or the Carina Nebula. In the latter case, the number of extrasolar planetary systems strongly resembling our own is likely to be significantly larger than in the former case, with important implications for the design of Darwin/TPF.

  4. Simultaneous formation of solar system giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilera, O. M.; Fortier, A.; Brunini, A.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    2011-08-01

    Context. In the last few years, the so-called "Nice model" has become increasingly significant for studying the formation and evolution of the solar system. According to this model, the initial orbital configuration of the giant planets was much more compact than the one we observe today. Aims: We study the formation of the giant planets in connection with several parameters that describe the protoplanetary disk. We aim to establish which conditions enable their simultaneous formation in line with the initial configuration proposed by the Nice model. We focus on the conditions that lead to the simultaneous formation of two massive cores, corresponding to Jupiter and Saturn, which are able to reach the cross-over mass (where the mass of the envelope of the giant planet equals the mass of the core, and gaseous runway starts), while two other cores that correspond to Uranus and Neptune have to be able to grow to their current masses. Methods: We compute the in situ planetary formation, employing the numerical code introduced in our previous work for different density profiles of the protoplanetary disk. Planetesimal migration is taken into account and planetesimals are considered to follow a size distribution between r_pmin (free parameter) and r_pmax= 100 km. The core's growth is computed according to the oligarchic growth regime. Results: The simultaneous formation of the giant planets was successfully completed for several initial conditions of the disk. We find that for protoplanetary disks characterized by a power law (Σ ∝ r - p), flat surface density profiles (p ≤ 1.5) favor the simultaneous formation. However, for steep slopes (p 2, as previously proposed by other authors) the simultaneous formation of the solar system giant planets is unlikely. Conclusions: The simultaneous formation of the giant planets - in the context of the Nice model - is favored by flat surface density profiles. The formation time-scale agrees with the estimates of disk lifetimes if

  5. Characterizing Cool Giant Planets in Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2016-01-01

    While the James Webb Space Telescope will detect and characterize extrasolar planets by transit and direct imaging, a new generation of telescopes will be required to detect and characterize extrasolar planets by reflected light imaging. NASA's WFIRST space telescope, now in development, will image dozens of cool giant planets at optical wavelengths and will obtain spectra for several of the best and brightest targets. This mission will pave the way for the detection and characterization of terrestrial planets by the planned LUVOIR or HabEx space telescopes. In my presentation I will discuss the challenges that arise in the interpretation of direct imaging data and present the results of our group's effort to develop methods for maximizing the science yield from these planned missions.

  6. Optical Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Hubeny, Ivan; Sudarsky, David; Burrows, Adam

    2004-01-01

    The flux distribution of a planet relative to its host star is a critical quantity for planning space observatories to detect and characterize extrasolar giant planets (EGP's). In this paper, we present optical planet-star contrasts of Jupiter-mass planets as a function of stellar type, orbital distance, and planetary cloud characteristics. As originally shown by Sudarsky et al. (2000, 2003), the phaseaveraged brightness of an EGP does not necessarily decrease monotonically with greater orbital distance because of changes in its albedo and absorption spectrum at lower temperatures. We apply our results to Eclipse, a 1.8-m optical telescope + coronograph to be proposed as a NASA Discovery mission later this year.

  7. Atmospheric models for post- giant impact planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, R.; Zahnle, K. J.; Marley, M. S.; Schaefer, L. K.; Fegley, B.; Morley, C.; Cahoy, K.; Freedman, R. S.; Fortney, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    The final assembly of terrestrial planets is now universally thought to have occurred through a series of giant impacts, such as Earth's own Moon-forming impact. These collisions take place over a time interval of about 100 million years, during which time it takes at least 10 collisions between planets to make a Venus or an Earth. In the aftermath of one of these collisions the surviving planet is hot, and can remain hot for millions of years. During this phase of accretion, the proto-terrestrial planet may have a dense steam atmosphere, that will affect both the cooling of the planet and our ability to detect it. Here we explore the atmospheric chemistry, photochemistry, and spectral signatures of post-giant-impact terrestrial planets enveloped by thick atmospheres consisting of vaporized rock material. The atmospheric chemistry is computed self-consistently for atmospheres in equilibrium with hot surfaces, with compositions reflecting either the bulk silicate Earth (BSE, which includes the crust, mantle, atmosphere and oceans) or Earth's continental crust (CC). These two cases allow us to examine differences in atmospheres formed by outgassing of silica-rich (felsic) rocks - like the Earth's continental crust - and MgO- and FeO-rich (mafic) rocks - like the BSE. Studies of detrital zircons from Jack Hills, Australia, show that the continental crust existed 164 million years after the formation of the solar system, in which case the material vaporized in a giant impact should likely reflect the CC composition. However, if at the time of impact the surface of the planet does not yet exhibit the formation of continents, then the BSE case becomes relevant. We compute atmospheric profiles for surface temperatures ranging from 1000 to 2200 K, surface pressures of 10 and 100 bar, and surface gravities of 10 and 30 m/s^2. We account for all major molecular and atomic opacity sources, including collision-induced absorption, to derive the atmospheric structure and compute

  8. Interiors of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    Various investigations concerning Jupiter, Uranus and Saturn are discussed. Revisions in the Galilean satellite ephemerides led to a new interpretation of earth-based measurements of Jovian oblateness which agrees with Pioneer measurements. In the area of scintillation theory, a semi-qualitative result was obtained for spike profiles produced by finite stellar disks viewed through Kolmogorov turbulence. It was also possible to set limits on the systematic distortion of stellar occulation profiles by turbulence which minimize the systematic distortion problem. The position of Miranda was studied for the purpose of obtaining an accurate prediction of a possible stellar occultation by Miranda in 1977, following an occultation of the same star by Uranus. In addition, using thermodynamic calculations, a model was developed for the adiabiatic cooling of Jovian-type planets and an observational test of the model was proposed. The dynamic structure of Saturn's rings was also studied.

  9. A giant planet around HD95086 ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameau, Julien; Chauvin, Gaël; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Meshkat, Tiffany; Boccaletti, Anthony; Quanz, Sascha P.; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Bailey, Vanessa; Kenworthy, Matthew; Currie, Thayne; Girard, Julien H.; Delorme, Philippe; Desidera, Silvano; Dumas, Christophe; Mordasini, Christoph; Klahr, Hubert; Bonavita, Mariangela

    2013-07-01

    Understanding planetary systems formation and evolution has become one of the challenges in as- tronomy, since the discovery of the first exoplanet around the solar-type star 51 Peg in the 90's. While more than 800 planets (mostly giants) closer than a few AU have been identified with radial velocity and transit techniques, very few have been imaged and definitely confirmed around stars, at separations below a hundred of astronomical units. Direct imaging detection of exoplanet is indeed a major frontier in planetary astrophysics. It surveys a region of semi-major axes (> 5 AU) that is almost inaccessible to other methods. Moreover, the planets imaged so far orbit young stars; indeed the young planets are still hot and the planet-star contrasts are compatible with the detection limits currently achievable, in contrast with similar planets in older systems. Noticeably, the stars are of early-types, and surrounded by debris disks, i.e. disks populated at least by small grains with lifetimes so short that they must be permanently produced, probably by destruction (evaporation, collisions) of larger solid bodies. Consequently, every single discovery has a tremendous impact on the understanding of the formation, the dynamical evolution, and the physics of giant planets. In this context, I will present our recent discovery of one faint companion to a nearby, dusty, and young A-type star (at 56 AU projected separation). Background contaminants are rejected with high confidence level based on both astrometry and photometry with three dataset at more than a year-time-laps and two different wavelength regimes. From the system age (10 to 17 Myr) and from model-dependent luminosity estimates, we derive mass of 4 to 5 Jupiter mass. This planet is therefore the one with the lowest mass ever imaged around a star. Given its orbital and physical properties, I will discuss the implication on its atmosphere with respect to other imaged companions but also on its formation.

  10. General circulation of giant planet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Schneider, T.

    2008-12-01

    The atmospheres of the giant planets are driven by differential solar heating and intrinsic heat fluxes emanating from the deep interior. We show that if both processes are taken into account in an energetic consistent manner, the observed large-scale features of the general circulations of all giant planet atmospheres can be reproduced. We use energetically consistent general circulation models to simulate the outer atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In the models, the solar radiative fluxes are deposited in the upper atmosphere by absorption and scattering, and temporally constant and spatially homogeneous heat fluxes consistent with the observed intrinsic heat fluxes are imposed at the bottom boundary. Convection transports heat from the bottom boundary into the upper atmosphere when the intrinsic heat fluxes are sufficiently strong to generate statically unstable conditions. For Jupiter and Saturn, the intrinsic heat fluxes are strong enough to lead to convection, which generates Rossby waves in the equatorial upper atmosphere. Momentum transport associated with these Rossby waves leads to the generation of equatorial superrotation on Jupiter and Saturn. For Uranus and Neptune, the intrinsic heat fluxes are not strong enough to lead to convection penetrating into the upper atmosphere; as a consequence, the equatorial flow is retrograde. Differences in the optical properties of the atmospheres and in planetary parameters such as the gravitational acceleration and rotation rate can account for the differences in the general circulations of the giant planets, such as the different jet widths and strengths.

  11. DO GIANT PLANETS SURVIVE TYPE II MIGRATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2013-09-10

    Planetary migration is one of the most serious problems to systematically understand the observations of exoplanets. We clarify that the theoretically predicted type II, migration (like type I migration) is too fast, by developing detailed analytical arguments in which the timescale of type II migration is compared with the disk lifetime. In the disk-dominated regime, the type II migration timescale is characterized by a local viscous diffusion timescale, while the disk lifetime is characterized by a global diffusion timescale that is much longer than the local one. Even in the planet-dominated regime where the inertia of the planet mass reduces the migration speed, the timescale is still shorter than the disk lifetime except in the final disk evolution stage where the total disk mass decays below the planet mass. This suggests that most giant planets plunge into the central stars within the disk lifetime, and it contradicts the exoplanet observations that gas giants are piled up at r {approx}> 1 AU. We examine additional processes that may arise in protoplanetary disks: dead zones, photoevaporation of gas, and gas flow across a gap formed by a type II migrator. Although they make the type II migration timescale closer to the disk lifetime, we show that none of them can act as an effective barrier for rapid type II migration with the current knowledge of these processes. We point out that gas flow across a gap and the fraction of the flow accreted onto the planets are uncertain and they may have the potential to solve the problem. Much more detailed investigation for each process may be needed to explain the observed distribution of gas giants in extrasolar planetary systems.

  12. Theory of giant planet atmospheres and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam Seth

    2014-06-01

    Giant exoplanet atmospheres have now been studied by transit spectroscopy, spectroscopy and photometry at secondary eclipse, photometric light curves as a function of orbital phase, very high-resolution spectroscopic velocity measurements, and high-contrast imaging. Moreover, there is a correspondence between brown dwarf and giant planet atmospheres and spectra that has been profitably exploited for many years to better understand exoplanets. In this presentation, I endeavor to review the information extracted by these techniques about close-in giant exoplanet compositions and temperatures. Then, I will summarize the expected character of the spectra, light curves, and polarizations of the objects soon to be studied using high-contrast imaging by GPI, SPHERE, WFIRST-AFTA, and Subaru/HiCIAO as a function of mass, age, Keplerian elements, and birth properties (such as entropy). The goal will be to frame the theoretical discussion concerning what physical information can be gleaned in the next years about giant planet atmospheres by direct (or almost direct) imaging and characterization campaigns, and their role as stepping stones to the even more numerous sub-Neptunes, super-Earths, and Earths.

  13. Interiors of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    This theoretical/observational project constrains interior structure of Jovian planets through observational data. Researchers continue to concentrate on Neptune in support of the 1989 Voyager encounter. Occultations of stars by Neptune are observed from the Tucson area and from Chile to obtain information about Neptune's atmosphere and to continue to search for Neptune arcs. Occultations by other solar system objects are also observed as part of collaborative efforts from time to time. New results on the structure of scintillations in the central flash occultation by Neptune on 20 August 1985 were derived. Analysis shows that scintillations are present throughout the lightcurve, both near the half-intensity points (at a pressure of 1 microbar) and near the central flash (at 0.4 mbar). Near the planetary limb, the scintillations are extended parallel to the limb; near the shadow center, they are extended parallel to the limb; near the shadow center, they are extended in a radial direction. Researchers collaborated with Ramesh Narayan to derive a theory relating the scintillations to density fluctuations in Neptune's atmosphere. The theory will ultimately enable researchers to test whether the scintillations are caused by internal gravity waves in Neptune's upper atmosphere.

  14. Atmospheric circulation of extrasolar giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    Of the many known extrasolar planets, nearly 200 have orbital semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU, and a significant fraction of these hot Jupiters and Neptunes are known to transit their stars, allowing them to be characterized with the Spitzer, Hubble, and groundbased telescopes. The stellar flux incident on these planets is expected to drive an atmospheric circulation that shapes the day-night temperature difference, infrared light curves, spectra, albedo, and atmospheric composition, and recent Spitzer infrared light curves show evidence for dynamical meteorology in these planets' atmospheres. Here, I will survey basic dynamical ideas and detailed 3D numerical models that illuminate the atmospheric circulation of these exotic, tidally locked planets. These models suggest that, generally, the circulation will be characterized by broad, fast zonal jets, with day-night temperature contrasts at the photosphere that may vary from small in some cases to large in others. I will discuss the dynamical mechanisms for maintaining the fast zonal jets that develop in these models, as well as the mechanisms for controlling the temperature patterns, including the day-night temperature contrasts. These mechanisms help to explain current observations, and they predict regime transitions for how the wind and temperature patterns should vary with the incident stellar flux, strength of atmospheric drag, and other parameters. These transitions are observable and in some cases are already becoming evident in the data. I will also compare the circulation of the hot Jupiters to that of young, massive giant planets being directly imaged around other stars, which will be the subject of a new observational vanguard over the next decade. To emphasize the similarities as well as differences, I will ground this discussion in our understanding of the more familiar atmospheric dynamical regime of Earth, as well as our "local" giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  15. Atmospheric circulation of extrasolar giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Of the many known extrasolar planets, over 100 have orbital semi-major axes less than 0.1 AU, and a significant fraction of these hot Jupiters and Neptunes are known to transit their stars, allowing them to be characterized with the Spitzer, Hubble, and groundbased telescopes. The stellar flux incident on these planets is expected to drive an atmospheric circulation that shapes the day-night temperature difference, infrared light curves, spectra, albedo, and atmospheric composition, and recent Spitzer infrared light curves show evidence for dynamical meteorology in these planets' atmospheres. Here, I will survey basic dynamical ideas and detailed 3D numerical models that illuminate the atmospheric circulation of these exotic, tidally locked planets. These models suggest that, generally, the circulation will be characterized by broad, fast zonal jets, with day-night temperature contrasts at the photosphere that may vary from small in some cases to large in others. I will discuss the dynamical mechanisms for maintaining the fast zonal jets that develop in these models, as well as the mechanisms for controlling the temperature patterns, including the day-night temperature contrasts. These mechanisms help to explain current observations, and they predict regime transitions for how the wind and temperature patterns should vary with the incident stellar flux, strength of atmospheric drag, and other parameters. These transitions are observable and in some cases are already becoming evident in the data. I will also compare the circulation of the hot Jupiters to that of young, massive giant planets being directly imaged around other stars, which will be the subject of a new observational vanguard over the next decade. To emphasize the similarities as well as differences, I will ground this discussion in our understanding of the more familiar atmospheric dynamical regime of Earth, as well as our "local" giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

  16. Unravelling tidal dissipation in gaseous giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenel, M.; Mathis, S.; Remus, F.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Tidal dissipation in planetary interiors is one of the key physical mechanisms that drive the evolution of star-planet and planet-moon systems. New constraints on this dissipation are now obtained both in the solar and exo-planetary systems. Aims: Tidal dissipation in planets is intrinsically related to their internal structure. Indeed, the dissipation behaves very differently when we compare its properties in solid and fluid planetary layers. Since planetary interiors consist of both types of regions, it is necessary to be able to assess and compare the respective intensity of the reservoir of dissipation in each type of layers. Therefore, in the case of giant planets, the respective contribution of the potential central dense rocky/icy core and of the deep convective fluid envelope must be computed as a function of the mass and the radius of the core. This will allow us to obtain their respective strengths. Methods: Using a method that evaluates the reservoir of dissipation associated to each region, which is a frequency-average of complex tidal Love numbers, we compared the respective contributions of the central core and of the fluid envelope. Results: For Jupiter- and Saturn-like planets, we show that the viscoelastic dissipation in the core could dominate the turbulent friction acting on tidal inertial waves in the envelope. However, the fluid dissipation would not be negligible. This demonstrates that it is necessary to build complete models of tidal dissipation in planetary interiors from their deep interior to their surface without any arbitrary assumptions. Conclusions: We demonstrate how important it is to carefully evaluate the respective strength of each type of dissipation mechanism in planetary interiors and to go beyond the usually adopted ad-hoc models. We confirm the significance of tidal dissipation in the potential dense core of gaseous giant planets.

  17. GIANT PLANETS ORBITING METAL-RICH STARS SHOW SIGNATURES OF PLANET-PLANET INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.

    2013-04-20

    Gas giants orbiting interior to the ice line are thought to have been displaced from their formation locations by processes that remain debated. Here we uncover several new metallicity trends, which together may indicate that two competing mechanisms deliver close-in giant planets: gentle disk migration, operating in environments with a range of metallicities, and violent planet-planet gravitational interactions, primarily triggered in metal-rich systems in which multiple giant planets can form. First, we show with 99.1% confidence that giant planets with semimajor axes between 0.1 and 1 AU orbiting metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] < 0) are confined to lower eccentricities than those orbiting metal-rich stars. Second, we show with 93.3% confidence that eccentric proto-hot Jupiters undergoing tidal circularization primarily orbit metal-rich stars. Finally, we show that only metal-rich stars host a pile-up of hot Jupiters, helping account for the lack of such a pile-up in the overall Kepler sample. Migration caused by stellar perturbers (e.g., stellar Kozai) is unlikely to account for the trends. These trends further motivate follow-up theoretical work addressing which hot Jupiter migration theories can also produce the observed population of eccentric giant planets between 0.1 and 1 AU.

  18. Wide Giant Planets are Rare: Planet Demographics from Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth

    2015-08-01

    The previous generation of direct imaging surveys probed samples of 100-200 stars with AO-driven coronagraphic imaging and advanced techniques such as Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) (e.g. surveys such as SEEDS, IDPS, the NICI Science Campaign, among others). These surveys found that wide giant planets are comparatively rare, especially at separations > 50 AU: for instance, Biller et al. 2013 find for a sample of 78 young moving group stars that the the frequency of 1-20 M Jup companions at semi-major axes from 10-150 AU is <18% at a 95.4% confidence level using DUSTY models and <6% at a 95.4% using COND models. As next generation planet-finding cameras such as GPI at Gemini, SPHERE at VLT, project 1640, and SceXAO at Suburu come online, our understanding of wide planet populations is likely to undergo a rapid evolution, especially for planets at separations of 10-50 AU. New large-scale surveys (400-500 stars) are now underway with these new instruments, e.g. NIRSUR with SPHERE and GPIES with GPI. In this talk, I will review the previous generation of surveys and the statistical results that they have yielded. I will also discuss prospects for the new generation of ongoing surveys.

  19. On the Final Mass of Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Mosqueira, I.

    2004-01-01

    In the core accretion model of giant planet formation, when the core reaches critical mass, hydrostatic equilibrium is no longer possible and gas accretion ensues. If the envelope is radiative, the critical core mass is nearly independent of the boundary conditions and is roughly M(sub crit) 10Mass of the Earth (with weak dependence on the rate of planetesimal accretion M(sub core) and the disk opacity k). Given that such a core may form at the present location of Jupiter in a time comparable to its Type I migration time (10(exp 5) - 10(exp 6) years) provided that the nebula was significantly enhanced in solids with respect to the MMSN and stall at this location in a weakly turbulent (alpha approximately less than 10(exp -4) disk, it may be appropriate to assume that such objects inevitably form and drive the evolution of late-phase T Tauri star disks. Here we investigate the final masses of giant planets in disks with one or more than one such cores. Although the presence of several planets would lead to Type II migration (due to the effective viscosity resulting from the planetary tidal torques), we ignore this complication for now and simply assume that each core has stalled at its location in the disk. Once a core has achieved critical mass, its gaseous accretion is governed by the given Kelvin-Helmholtz timescale.

  20. Tidal Dissipation in Rotating Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, G. I.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2004-07-01

    Many extrasolar planets orbit sufficiently close to their host stars that significant tidal interactions can be expected, resulting in an evolution of the spin and orbital properties of the planets. The accompanying dissipation of energy can also be an important source of heat, leading to the inflation of short-period planets and even mass loss through Roche lobe overflow. Tides may therefore play an important role in determining the observed distributions of mass, orbital period, and eccentricity of the extrasolar planets. In addition, tidal interactions between gaseous giant planets in the solar system and their moons are thought to be responsible for the orbital migration of the satellites, leading to their capture into resonant configurations. Traditionally, the efficiency of tidal dissipation is simply parameterized by a quality factor Q, which depends, in principle, in an unknown way on the frequency and amplitude of the tidal forcing. In this paper we treat the underlying fluid dynamical problem with the aim of determining the efficiency of tidal dissipation in gaseous giant planets such as Jupiter, Saturn, or the short-period extrasolar planets. Efficient convection enforces a nearly adiabatic stratification in these bodies, which may or may not contain solid cores. With some modifications, our approach can also be applied to low-mass stars with extended convective envelopes. In cases of interest, the tidal forcing frequencies are typically comparable to the spin frequency of the planet but are small compared to its dynamical frequency. We therefore study the linearized response of a slowly and possibly differentially rotating planet to low-frequency tidal forcing. Convective regions of the planet support inertial waves, which possess a dense or continuous frequency spectrum in the absence of viscosity, while any radiative regions support generalized Hough waves. We formulate the relevant equations for studying the excitation of these disturbances and

  1. Formation of terrestrial planets in eccentric and inclined giant-planet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriadis, Sotiris; Libert, Anne-Sophie; Raymond, Sean

    2016-10-01

    The orbits of extrasolar planets are more various than the circular and coplanar ones of the Solar system. We study the impact of inclined and eccentric massive giant planets on the terrestrial planet formation process. The physical and orbital parameters of the giant planets considered in this study arise from n-body simulations of three giant planets in the late stage of the gas disc, under the combined action of Type II migration and planet-planet scattering. At the dispersal of the gas disc, the two- and three-planet systems interact then with an inner disc of planetesimals and planetary embryos. We discuss the mass and orbital parameters of the terrestrial planets formed by our simulations, as well as their water content. We also investigate how the disc of planetesimals and planetary embryos modifies the eccentric and inclined orbits of the giant planets.

  2. Dynamics of Giant Planet Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueshaber, Shawn R.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.

    2016-10-01

    The polar atmospheres of the giant planets have come under increasing interest since a compact, warm-core, stable, cyclonic polar vortex was discovered at each of Saturn's poles. In addition, the south pole of Neptune appears to have a similar feature, and Uranus' north pole is exhibiting activity that could indicate the formation of a polar vortex. We investigate the formation and maintenance of these giant planet polar vortices by varying several key atmospheric dynamics parameters in a forced-dissipative, 1.5-layer shallow water model. Our simulations are run using the EPIC (Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate) global circulation model, to which we have added a gamma-plane rectangular grid option appropriate for simulating polar atmospheric dynamics.In our numerical simulations, we vary the atmospheric deformation radius, planetary rotation rate, storm forcing intensity, and storm vorticity (cyclone-to-anticyclone) ratio to determine what combination of values favors the formation of a polar vortex. We find that forcing the atmosphere by injecting small-scale mass perturbations ("storms") to form either all cyclones, all anticyclones, or equal numbers of both, may all result in a cyclonic polar vortex. Additionally, we examine the role of eddy momentum convergence in the intensification and maintenance of a polar cyclone.Our simulation results are applicable to understanding all four of the solar system giant planets. In the future, we plan to expand our modeling effort with a more realistic 3D primitive equations model, also with a gamma-plane rectangular grid using EPIC. With our 3D primitive equations model, we will study how various vertical atmospheric stratification structures influence the formation and maintenance of a polar cyclone. While our shallow-water model only involves storms of a single layer, a 3D primitive equations model allows us to study how storms of finite vertical extent and at differing levels in the atmosphere may further favor

  3. Giant planet formation on wide orbits by core accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilera, O. M.; Ronco, M. P.

    2017-07-01

    The discovery of giant planets on wide orbits represents a major challenge for the standard core accretion model. In such model, giant planets are expected to form at small or moderate distances from the central star in order to form massive cores able to trigger the gaseous runaway growth before the dissipation of the disk. In this work, we present a new simple mechanism for the formation of giant planets on wide orbits by core accretion considering planet formation, planet migration and disk evolution.

  4. Type II Migration and Giant Planet Survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, William R.

    2003-01-01

    Type II migration, in which a newly formed large planet opens a gap in its precursor circumstellar nebula and subsequently evolves with it, has been implicated as a delivery mechanism responsible for close stellar companions. Large scale migration is possible in a viscously spreading disk of surface density sigma (r,t) when most of it is sacrificed to the primary in order to promote a small portion of the disk to much higher angular momentum orbits. Embedded planets generally follow its evolution unless their own angular momentum is comparable to that of the disk. The fraction of the starting disk mass, M (sub d) = 2pi integral rsigma(r,0)dr, that is consumed by the star depends on the distance at which material escapes the disk's outer boundary. If the disk is allowed to expand indefinitely, virtually all of the disk will fall into the primary in order to send a vanishingly small portion to infinity. For such a case, it is difficult to explain the survival of any giant planets, including Jupiter and Saturn. Realistically, however, there are processes that could truncate a disk at a finite distance, r(sub d). Recent numerical modeling has illustrated that planets can survive in this case. We show here that much of these results can be understood by simple conservation arguments.

  5. IONIZATION OF EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANET ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, Tommi T.; Cho, James Y-K.; Achilleos, Nicholas; Aylward, Alan D.

    2010-10-10

    Many extrasolar planets orbit close in and are subject to intense ionizing radiation from their host stars. Therefore, we expect them to have strong, and extended, ionospheres. Ionospheres are important because they modulate escape in the upper atmosphere and can modify circulation, as well as leave their signatures, in the lower atmosphere. In this paper, we evaluate the vertical location Z{sub I} and extent D{sub I} of the EUV ionization peak layer. We find that Z{sub I{approx}}1-10 nbar-for a wide range of orbital distances (a = 0.047-1 AU) from the host star-and D{sub I}/H{sub p{approx}}>15, where H{sub p} is the pressure scale height. At Z{sub I}, the plasma frequency is {approx}80-450 MHz, depending on a. We also study global ion transport, and its dependence on a, using a three-dimensional thermosphere-ionosphere model. On tidally synchronized planets with weak intrinsic magnetic fields, our model shows only a small, but discernible, difference in electron density from the dayside to the nightside ({approx}9 x 10{sup 13} m{sup -3} to {approx}2 x 10{sup 12} m{sup -3}, respectively) at Z{sub I}. On asynchronous planets, the distribution is essentially uniform. These results have consequences for hydrodynamic modeling of the atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets.

  6. EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON SURVIVAL OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Soko; Ida, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Makiko

    2013-04-20

    The orbital distributions of currently observed extrasolar giant planets allow marginally stable orbits for hypothetical, terrestrial planets. In this paper, we propose that many of these systems may not have additional planets on these ''stable'' orbits, since past dynamical instability among giant planets could have removed them. We numerically investigate the effects of early evolution of multiple giant planets on the orbital stability of the inner, sub-Neptune-like planets which are modeled as test particles, and determine their dynamically unstable region. Previous studies have shown that the majority of such test particles are ejected out of the system as a result of close encounters with giant planets. Here, we show that secular perturbations from giant planets can remove test particles at least down to 10 times smaller than their minimum pericenter distance. Our results indicate that, unless the dynamical instability among giant planets is either absent or quiet like planet-planet collisions, most test particles down to {approx}0.1 AU within the orbits of giant planets at a few AU may be gone. In fact, out of {approx}30% of survived test particles, about three quarters belong to the planet-planet collision cases. We find a good agreement between our numerical results and the secular theory, and present a semi-analytical formula which estimates the dynamically unstable region of the test particles just from the evolution of giant planets. Finally, our numerical results agree well with the observations, and also predict the existence of hot rocky planets in eccentric giant planet systems.

  7. Atmospheric circulation of eccentric extrasolar giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole Kae

    This dissertation explores the three-dimensional coupling between radiative and dynamical processes in the atmospheres of eccentric extrasolar giant planets GJ436b, HAT-P-2b, and HD80606b. Extrasolar planets on eccentric orbits are subject to time-variable heating and probable non-synchronous rotation, which results in significant variations in global circulation and thermal patterns as a function of orbital phase. Atmospheric simulations for the low eccentricity (e=0.15) Neptune sized planet GJ436b reveal that when Neptune-like atmospheric compositions are assumed day/night temperature contrasts and equatorial jet speeds are significantly increased relative to models that assume a solar-like composition. Comparisons between our theoretical light curves and recent observations support a high metallicity atmosphere with disequilibrium carbon chemistry for GJ436b. The analysis of full-orbit light curve observations at 3.6 and 4.5 microns of the HAT-P-2 system reveal swings in the planet's temperature of more than 900 K during its significantly eccentric ( e=0.5) orbit with a four to six hour offset between periapse passage and the peak of the planet's observed flux. Comparisons between our atmospheric model of HAT-P-2b and the observed light curves indicate an increased carbon to oxygen ratio in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere compared to solar values. Atmospheric simulations of the highly eccentric (e=0.9) HD80606b show that flash-heating events completely alter planetary thermal and jet structures and that assumptions about the rotation period of this planet could affect the shape of light curve observations near periapse. Our simulations of HD80606b also show the development an atmospheric shock on the nightside of the planet that is associated with an observable thermal signature in our theoretical light curves. The simulations and observations presented in this dissertation mark an important step in the exploration of atmospheric circulation on the more than 300

  8. The Obliquities of the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.; Ward, Wm. R.

    2002-09-01

    Jupiter has by far the smallest obliquity ( ~ 3o) of the planets (not counting tidally de-spun Mercury and Venus) which may be reflective of its formation by hydrodynamic gas flow rather than stochastic impacts. Saturn's obliquity ( ~ 26o), however, seems to belie this simple formation picture. But since the spin angular momentum of any planet is much smaller than its orbital angular momentum, post-formation obliquity can be strongly modified by passing through secular spin-orbit resonances, i.e., when the spin axis precession rate of the planet matches one of the frequencies describing the precession of the orbit plane. Spin axis precession is due to the solar torque on both the oblate figure of the planet and any orbiting satellites. In the case of Jupiter, the torque on the Galilean satellites is the principal cause of its 4.5*105 year precession; Saturn's precession of 1.8*106 years is dominated by Titan. In the past, the planetary spin axis precession rates should have been much faster due to the massive circumplanetary disks from which the current satellites condensed. The regression of the orbital node of a planet is due to the gravitational perturbations of the other planets. Nodal regression is not uniform, but is instead a composite of the planetary system's normal modes. For Jupiter and Saturn, the principal frequency is the nu16, with a period of ~ 49,000 years; the amplitude of this term is I ~ 0o.36 for Jupiter and I ~ 0o.90 for Saturn. In spite of the small amplitudes, slow adiabatic passages through this resonance (due to circumplanetary disk dispersal) could increase planetary obliquities from near zero to ~ [tan1/3 I] ~ 10o. We will discuss scenarios in which giant planet obliquities are affected by this and other resonances, and will use Jupiter's low obliquity to constrain the mass and duration of a satellite precursor disk. DPH acknowledges support from NSF Career Grant AST 9733789 and WRW is grateful to the NASA OSS and PGG programs.

  9. Giant Planets Can Act as Stabilizing Agents on Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, M. A.; Pichardo, B.; Peimbert, A.

    2017-07-01

    We have explored the evolution of a cold debris disk under the gravitational influence of dwarf-planet-sized objects (DPs), both in the presence and absence of an interior giant planet. Through detailed long-term numerical simulations, we demonstrate that when the giant planet is not present, DPs can stir the eccentricities and inclinations of disk particles, in linear proportion to the total mass of the DPs; on the other hand, when the giant planet is included in the simulations, the stirring is approximately proportional to the mass squared. This creates two regimes: below a disk mass threshold (defined by the total mass of DPs), the giant planet acts as a stabilizing agent of the orbits of cometary nuclei, diminishing the effect of the scatterers; above the threshold, the giant contributes to the dispersion of the particles.

  10. Zonal Jets on the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, A. P.; Lian, Y.; Gierasch, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    The question of what causes the numerous east-west zonal jets on the giant planets has remained a mystery since high-resolution Pioneer and Voyager images were returned in the 1970s. A probable hypothesis is that small-scale turbulence undergoes an inverse energy cascade that reorganizes the energy into zonal jets, but whether this turbulence results from deep penetrative convection or shallow cloud-layer processes (e.g., thunderstorms) remains unknown. Here I provide a broad summary of this problem and proceed to describe several results on the effect of cloud-layer turbulence on the flow. I present 3D numerical simulations showing that cloud-layer thermal contrasts (resulting from sunlight or latent-heat variations in the upper troposphere) can drive numerous Jupiter-like zonal jets at the cloud level, in some cases including a superrotating equatorial jet resembling that on Jupiter. Furthermore, these simulations -- as well as linear, analytic calculations -- show that such shallow forcing can produce deep jets that extend far below the level of the forcing. This disproves the common assumption that jets produced by cloud-layer processes would be confined to these shallow layers. An implication is that, contrary to the claims of many publications, the winds measured by the Galileo probe to pressures of 22 bars might just as easily result from shallow forcing as from deep convective forcing. Detailed diagnostics show that the deep jets result from Coriolis accelerations acting on deep meridional circulations that are induced by the upper-level forcing. I also show that, under some conditions, vertical stretching of atmospheric columns can inhibit the standard jet-formation mechanism and lead to vortices instead of jets. Cloud-layer turbulence can also substantially modify pre-existing deep jets, leading to different jet patterns at the 1-bar cloud level than exist in the interior. On balance, these simulations support the idea that cloud-level forcing plays an

  11. Origin and evolution of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, P.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion is presented of two major giant planet origin hypotheses: (1) protoplanet formation in the solar nebula in the form of a gravitationally unstable, gaseous subcondensation, subsequently evolving as a chemically homogeneous object until a stage at which a solid core may form; and (2) solid core formation by accumulation of planetesimals, followed by the accretion of solar-composition gas onto the core until it becomes unstable to collapse. Under either of the scenarios, evolution is found to comprise an early, cool phase in hydrostatic equilibrium, a hydrodynamic collapse, and a final phase of hydrostatic contraction and cooling to the present state. Attention is given to the physical processes that are most important in the determination of evolutionary characteristics. A concluding note on the cases of Uranus and Neptune is also given.

  12. Interiors of giant planets inside and outside the solar system.

    PubMed

    Guillot, T

    1999-10-01

    An understanding of the structure and composition of the giant planets is rapidly evolving because of (i) high-pressure experiments with the ability to study metallic hydrogen and define the properties of its equation of state and (ii) spectroscopic and in situ measurements made by telescopes and satellites that allow an accurate determination of the chemical composition of the deep atmospheres of the giant planets. However, the total amount of heavy elements that Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune contain remains poorly constrained. The discovery of extrasolar giant planets with masses ranging from that of Saturn to a few times the mass of Jupiter opens up new possibilities for understanding planet composition and formation. Evolutionary models predict that gaseous extrasolar giant planets should have a variety of atmospheric temperatures and chemical compositions, but the radii are estimated to be close to that of Jupiter (between 0.9 and 1.7 Jupiter radii), provided that they contain mostly hydrogen and helium.

  13. Giant elves: Lightning-generated electromagnetic pulses in giant planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque Estepa, Alejandro; Dubrovin, Daria; José Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco; Ebert, Ute; Parra-Rojas, Francisco Carlos; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    We currently have direct optical observations of atmospheric electricity in the two giant gaseous planets of our Solar System [1-5] as well as radio signatures that are possibly generated by lightning from the two icy planets Uranus and Neptune [6,7]. On Earth, the electrical activity of the troposphere is associated with secondary electrical phenomena called Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the mesosphere and lower ionosphere. This led some researchers to ask if similar processes may also exist in other planets, focusing first on the quasi-static coupling mechanism [8], which on Earth is responsible for halos and sprites and then including also the induction field, which is negligible in our planet but dominant in Saturn [9]. However, one can show that, according to the best available estimation for lightning parameters, in giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter the effect of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) dominates the effect that a lightning discharge has on the lower ionosphere above it. Using a Finite-Differences, Time-Domain (FDTD) solver for the EMP we found [10] that electrically active storms may create a localized but long-lasting layer of enhanced ionization of up to 103 cm-3 free electrons below the ionosphere, thus extending the ionosphere downward. We also estimate that the electromagnetic pulse transports 107 J to 1010 J toward the ionosphere. There emissions of light of up to 108 J would create a transient luminous event analogous to a terrestrial elve. Although these emissions are about 10 times fainter than the emissions coming from the lightning itself, it may be possible to target them for detection by filtering the appropiate wavelengths. [1] Cook, A. F., II, T. C. Duxbury, and G. E. Hunt (1979), First results on Jovian lightning, Nature, 280, 794, doi:10.1038/280794a0. [2] Little, B., C. D. Anger, A. P. Ingersoll, A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Senske, H. H. Breneman, W. J. Borucki, and The Galileo SSI Team (1999), Galileo images of

  14. Constraining Planetary Migration Mechanisms in Systems of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Johnson, John Asher

    2014-01-01

    It was once widely believed that planets formed peacefully in situ in their proto-planetary disks and subsequently remain in place. Instead, growing evidence suggests that many giant planets undergo dynamical rearrangement that results in planets migrating inward in the disk, far from their birthplaces. However, it remains debated whether this migration is caused by smooth planet-disk interactions or violent multi-body interactions. Both classes of model can produce Jupiter-mass planets orbiting within 0.1 AU of their host stars, also known as hot Jupiters. In the latter class of model, another planet or star in the system perturbs the Jupiter onto a highly eccentric orbit, which tidal dissipation subsequently shrinks and circularizes during close passages to the star. We assess the prevalence of smooth vs. violent migration through two studies. First, motivated by the predictions of Socrates et al. (2012), we search for super-eccentric hot Jupiter progenitors by using the ``photoeccentric effect'' to measure the eccentricities of Kepler giant planet candidates from their transit light curves. We find a significant lack of super- eccentric proto-hot Jupiters compared to the number expected, allowing us to place an upper limit on the fraction of hot Jupiters created by stellar binaries. Second, if both planet-disk and multi-body interactions commonly cause giant planet migration, physical properties of the proto-planetary environment may determine which is triggered. We identify three trends in which giant planets orbiting metal rich stars show signatures of planet-planet interactions: (1) gas giants orbiting within 1 AU of metal-rich stars have a range of eccentricities, whereas those orbiting metal- poor stars are restricted to lower eccentricities; (2) metal-rich stars host most eccentric proto-hot Jupiters undergoing tidal circularization; and (3) the pile-up of short-period giant planets, missing in the Kepler sample, is a feature of metal-rich stars and is

  15. The SEEDs of Planet Formation: Indirect Signatures of Giant Planets in Transitional Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol; Currie, T.

    2012-01-01

    We live in a planetary system with 2 gas giant planets, and as a resu lt of RV, transit, microlensing, and transit timing studies have ide ntified hundreds of giant planet candidates in the past 15 years. Su ch studies have preferentially concentrated on older, low activity So lar analogs, and thus tell us little about .when, where, and how gian t planets form in their disks, or how frequently they form in disks associated with intermediate-mass stars.

  16. Observational evidence for two distinct giant planet populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, N. C.; Adibekyan, V.; Figueira, P.; Andreasen, D. T.; Barros, S. C. C.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Demangeon, O.; Faria, J. P.; Oshagh, M.; Sousa, S. G.; Viana, P. T. P.; Ferreira, A. C. S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Analysis of the statistical properties of exoplanets, together with those of their host stars, are providing a unique view into the process of planet formation and evolution. Aims: In this paper we explore the properties of the mass distribution of giant planet companions to solar-type stars, in a quest for clues about their formation process. Methods: With this goal in mind we studied, with the help of standard statistical tests, the mass distribution of giant planets using data from the exoplanet.eu catalog and the SWEET-Cat database of stellar parameters for stars with planets. Results: We show that the mass distribution of giant planet companions is likely to present more than one population with a change in regime around 4 MJup. Above this value host stars tend to be more metal poor and more massive and have [Fe/H] distributions that are statistically similar to those observed in field stars of similar mass. On the other hand, stars that host planets below this limit show the well-known metallicity-giant planet frequency correlation. Conclusions: We discuss these results in light of various planet formation models and explore the implications they may have on our understanding of the formation of giant planets. In particular, we discuss the possibility that the existence of two separate populations of giant planets indicates that two different processes of formation are at play. A table with the planet and stellar parameters is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/603/A30

  17. Giant Planet Observations with the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, James; Moses, Julianne; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, Glenn; Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Atreya, Sushil; Rages, Kathy; Cavalié, Thibault; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustin; Hueso, Ricardo; Chanover, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This white paper examines the benefit of the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for studies of the Solar System's four giant planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. JWST's superior sensitivity, combined with high spatial and spectral resolution, will enable near- and mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of these objects with unprecedented quality. In this paper, we discuss some of the myriad scientific investigations possible with JWST regarding the giant planets. This discussion is preceded by the specifics of JWST instrumentation most relevant to giant-planet observations. We conclude with identification of desired pre-launch testing and operational aspects of JWST that would greatly benefit future studies of the giant planets.

  18. Theories of the origin and evolution of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Bodenheimer, P.

    1989-01-01

    Following the accretion of solids and gases in the solar nebula, the giant planets contracted to their present sizes over the age of the solar system. It is presently hypothesized that this contraction was rapid, but not hydrodynamic; at a later stage, a nebular disk out of which the regular satellites formed may have been spun out of the outer envelope of the contracting giant planets due to a combination of total angular momentum conservation and the outward transfer of specific angular momentum in the envelope. If these hypotheses are true, the composition of the irregular satellites directly reflects the composition of planetesimals from which the giant planets formed, while the composition of the regular satellites is indicative of the composition of the less volatile components of the outer envelopes of the giant planets.

  19. Theories of the origin and evolution of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Bodenheimer, P.

    1989-01-01

    Following the accretion of solids and gases in the solar nebula, the giant planets contracted to their present sizes over the age of the solar system. It is presently hypothesized that this contraction was rapid, but not hydrodynamic; at a later stage, a nebular disk out of which the regular satellites formed may have been spun out of the outer envelope of the contracting giant planets due to a combination of total angular momentum conservation and the outward transfer of specific angular momentum in the envelope. If these hypotheses are true, the composition of the irregular satellites directly reflects the composition of planetesimals from which the giant planets formed, while the composition of the regular satellites is indicative of the composition of the less volatile components of the outer envelopes of the giant planets.

  20. Directly Imaged Giant Planets: What Do We Hope to Learn?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    As we move into an era when GPI and SPHERE are (hopefully) discovering and characterizing new young giant planets, it is worthwhile to step back and review our science goals for young giant planets. Of course for individual planets we ideally would hope to measure mass, radius, atmospheric composition, temperature, and cloud properties, but how do these characteristics fit into our broader understanding of planetary system origin and evolution theories? In my presentation I will review both the specifics of what we hope to learn from newly discovered young worlds as well as how these characteristics inform our broader understanding of giant planets and planetary systems. Finally I will consider the limitations realistic datasets will place on our ability to understand newly discovered planets, illustrating with data from any new such worlds that are available by the conference date.

  1. Capture of terrestrial-sized moons by gas giant planets.

    PubMed

    Williams, Darren M

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial moons with masses >0.1 M (symbol in text) possibly exist around extrasolar giant planets, and here we consider the energetics of how they might form. Binary-exchange capture can occur if a binary-terrestrial object (BTO) is tidally disrupted during a close encounter with a giant planet and one of the binary members is ejected while the other remains as a moon. Tidal disruption occurs readily in the deep gravity wells of giant planets; however, the large encounter velocities in the wells make binary exchange more difficult than for planets of lesser mass. In addition, successful capture favors massive binaries with large rotational velocities and small component mass ratios. Also, since the interaction tends to leave the captured moons on highly elliptical orbits, permanent capture is only possible around planets with sizable Hill spheres that are well separated from their host stars.

  2. Kepler-108: A Mutually Inclined Giant Planet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Sean M.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of well studied giant-planet systems, including the solar system, are nearly coplanar, which implies dissipation within a primordial gas disk. However, intrinsic instability may lead to planet-planet scattering, which often produces non-coplanar, eccentric orbits. Planet scattering theories have been developed to explain observed high-eccentricity systems and also hot Jupiters; thus far their predictions for mutual inclination (I) have barely been tested. Here we characterize a highly mutually inclined (I={24}-8+11°), moderately eccentric (e≳ 0.1) giant planet system: Kepler-108. This system consists of two approximately Saturn-mass planets with periods of approximately 49 and 190 days around a star with a wide (˜300 au) binary companion in an orbital configuration inconsistent with a purely disk migration origin.

  3. Kepler-108: A Mutually Inclined Giant Planet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Sean M.; Fabrycky, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of well studied giant-planet systems, including the Solar System, are nearly coplanar which implies dissipation within a primordial gas disk. However, intrinsic instability may lead to planet-planet scattering, which often produces non-coplanar, eccentric orbits. Planet scattering theories have been developed to explain observed high eccentricity systems and possibly hot Jupiters; thus far their predictions for mutual inclination (I) have barely been tested. Here we characterize a highly mutually-inclined (I ~ 15-60 degrees), moderately eccentric (e > 0.1) giant planet system: Kepler-108. This system consists of two Saturn mass planets with periods of ~49 and ~190 days around a star with a wide (~300 AU) binary companion in an orbital configuration inconsistent with a purely disk migration origin.

  4. THE INTERIORS OF GIANT PLANETS: Models and Outstanding Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Tristan

    2005-01-01

    We know that giant planets played a crucial role in the making of our Solar System. The discovery of giant planets orbiting other stars is a formidable opportunity to learn more about these objects, what their composition is, how various processes influence their structure and evolution, and most importantly how they form. Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune can be studied in detail, mostly from close spacecraft flybys. We can infer that they are all enriched in heavy elements compared to the Sun, with the relative global enrichments increasing with distance to the Sun. We can also infer that they possess dense cores of varied masses. The intercomparison of presently characterized extrasolar giant planets shows that they are also mainly made of hydrogen and helium, but that they either have significantly different amounts of heavy elements, have had different orbital evolutions, or both. Hence, many questions remain and need to be answered to make significant progress on the origins of planets.

  5. How giant planets sculpt terrestrial exoplanets and debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, S. N.; Armitage, P. J.; Moro-Martin, A.; Booth, M.; Wyatt, M. C.; Armstrong, J. C.; Mandell, A.; Selsis, F.; West, A. A.

    2011-10-01

    There exists strong circumstantial evidence from their eccentric orbits that most of the known giant exoplanet systems are the survivors of violent dynamical instabilities. We numerically simulate the evolution of planetary systems around Sun-like stars with three components: (i) an inner disk of planetesimals and planetary embryos, (ii) three giant planets at Jupiter- Saturn distances, and (iii) an outer disk of planetesimals comparable to the primitive Kuiper belt. We calculate the dust production and spectral energy distribution of each system by assuming that each planetesimal particle represents an ensemble of smaller bodies in collisional equilibrium. Our main result is a strong correlation between the presence of terrestrial planets and debris disks. Strong giant planet instabilities that produce very eccentric surviving planets destroy all rocky material in the system, including fully-formed terrestrial planets if the instabilities occur late, and also destroy the icy planetesimal population. Stable or weakly unstable systems allow terrestrial planets to accrete in their inner regions and significant dust to be produced in their outer regions, detectable at midinfrared wavelengths as debris disks. Stars older than ˜ 100 Myr with bright cold dust emission (in particular at ? ˜ 70μm) signpost dynamically calm environments that were conducive to efficient terrestrial accretion. Such emission is present around ˜16% of billion-year old Solar-type stars. We make two predictions. First, eccentric giant planets should be anticorrelated with both debris disks and terrestrial exoplanets. Second, the presence of debris disks and terrestrial exoplanets should be correlated.

  6. A THIRD GIANT PLANET ORBITING HIP 14810

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. T.; Fischer, D. A.; Ford, Eric B.; Veras, D.; Wang, J.; Henry, G. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Howard, A. W.; Johnson, John Asher

    2009-07-10

    We present new precision radial velocities and a three-planet Keplerian orbit fit for the V = 8.5, G5 V star HIP 14810. We began observing this star at Keck Observatory as part of the N2K Planet Search Project. Wright et al. announced the inner two planets to this system, and subsequent observations have revealed the outer planet and the proper orbital solution for the middle planet. The planets have minimum masses of 3.9, 1.3, and 0.6 M {sub Jup} and orbital periods of 6.67, 147.7, and 952 day, respectively. We have numerically integrated the family of orbital solutions consistent with the data and find that they are stable for at least 10{sup 6} yr. Our photometric search shows that the inner planet does not transit.

  7. THE HEAVY-ELEMENT MASSES OF EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANETS, REVEALED

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Neil; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate a population of transiting planets that receive relatively modest stellar insolation, indicating equilibrium temperatures <1000 K, and for which the heating mechanism that inflates hot Jupiters does not appear to be significantly active. We use structural evolution models to infer the amount of heavy elements within each of these planets. There is a correlation between the stellar metallicity and the mass of heavy elements in its transiting planet(s). It appears that all giant planets possess a minimum of {approx}10-15 Earth masses of heavy elements, with planets around metal-rich stars having larger heavy-element masses. There is also an inverse relationship between the mass of the planet and the metal enrichment (Z{sub pl}/Z{sub star}), which appears to have little dependency on the metallicity of the star. Saturn- and Jupiter-like enrichments above solar composition are a hallmark of all the gas giants in the sample, even planets of several Jupiter masses. These relationships provide an important constraint on planet formation and suggest large amounts of heavy elements within planetary H/He envelopes. We suggest that the observed correlation can soon also be applied to inflated planets, such that the interior heavy-element abundance of these planets could be estimated, yielding better constraints on their interior energy sources. We point to future directions for planetary population synthesis models and suggest future correlations. This appears to be the first evidence that extrasolar giant planets, as a class, are enhanced in heavy elements.

  8. On the Radii of Close-in Giant Planets.

    PubMed

    Burrows; Guillot; Hubbard; Marley; Saumon; Lunine; Sudarsky

    2000-05-01

    The recent discovery that the close-in extrasolar giant planet HD 209458b transits its star has provided a first-of-its-kind measurement of the planet's radius and mass. In addition, there is a provocative detection of the light reflected off of the giant planet tau Bootis b. Including the effects of stellar irradiation, we estimate the general behavior of radius/age trajectories for such planets and interpret the large measured radii of HD 209458b and tau Boo b in that context. We find that HD 209458b must be a hydrogen-rich gas giant. Furthermore, the large radius of a close-in gas giant is not due to the thermal expansion of its atmosphere but to the high residual entropy that remains throughout its bulk by dint of its early proximity to a luminous primary. The large stellar flux does not inflate the planet but retards its otherwise inexorable contraction from a more extended configuration at birth. This implies either that such a planet was formed near its current orbital distance or that it migrated in from larger distances (>/=0.5 AU), no later than a few times 107 yr of birth.

  9. Separating gas-giant and ice-giant planets by halting pebble accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, M.; Johansen, A.; Morbidelli, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the solar system giant planets come in two flavours: gas giants (Jupiter and Saturn) with massive gas envelopes, and ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) with much thinner envelopes around their cores. It is poorly understood how these two classes of planets formed. High solid accretion rates, necessary to form the cores of giant planets within the life-time of protoplanetary discs, heat the envelope and prevent rapid gas contraction onto the core, unless accretion is halted. We find that, in fact, accretion of pebbles (~cm sized particles) is self-limiting: when a core becomes massive enough it carves a gap in the pebble disc. This halt in pebble accretion subsequently triggers the rapid collapse of the super-critical gas envelope. Unlike gas giants, ice giants do not reach this threshold mass and can only bind low-mass envelopes that are highly enriched by water vapour from sublimated icy pebbles. This offers an explanation for the compositional difference between gas giants and ice giants in the solar system. Furthermore, unlike planetesimal-driven accretion scenarios, our model allows core formation and envelope attraction within disc life-times, provided that solids in protoplanetary discs are predominantly made up of pebbles. Our results imply that the outer regions of planetary systems, where the mass required to halt pebble accretion is large, are dominated by ice giants and that gas-giant exoplanets in wide orbits are enriched by more than 50 Earth masses of solids.

  10. Long-term evolution of planetary systems with a terrestrial planet and a giant planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Way, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    We study the long-term orbital evolution of a terrestrial planet under the gravitational perturbations of a giant planet. In particular, we are interested in situations where the two planets are in the same plane and are relatively close. We examine both possible configurations: the giant planet orbit being either outside or inside the orbit of the smaller planet. The perturbing potential is expanded to high orders, and an analytical solution of the terrestrial planetary orbit is derived. The analytical estimates are then compared against results from the numerical integration of the full equations of motion, and we find that the analytical solution works reasonably well. An interesting finding is that the new analytical estimates improve greatly the predictions for the time-scales of the orbital evolution of the terrestrial planet compared to an octupole order expansion. Finally, we briefly discuss possible applications of the analytical estimates in astrophysical problems.

  11. Long Term Evolution of Planetary Systems with a Terrestrial Planet and a Giant Planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Way, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the long term orbital evolution of a terrestrial planet under the gravitational perturbations of a giant planet. In particular, we are interested in situations where the two planets are in the same plane and are relatively close. We examine both possible configurations: the giant planet orbit being either outside or inside the orbit of the smaller planet. The perturbing potential is expanded to high orders and an analytical solution of the terrestrial planetary orbit is derived. The analytical estimates are then compared against results from the numerical integration of the full equations of motion and we find that the analytical solution works reasonably well. An interesting finding is that the new analytical estimates improve greatly the predictions for the timescales of the orbital evolution of the terrestrial planet compared to an octupole order expansion. Finally, we briefly discuss possible applications of the analytical estimates in astrophysical problems.

  12. Long Term Evolution of Planetary Systems with a Terrestrial Planet and a Giant Planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Way, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We study the long term orbital evolution of a terrestrial planet under the gravitational perturbations of a giant planet. In particular, we are interested in situations where the two planets are in the same plane and are relatively close. We examine both possible configurations: the giant planet orbit being either outside or inside the orbit of the smaller planet. The perturbing potential is expanded to high orders and an analytical solution of the terrestrial planetary orbit is derived. The analytical estimates are then compared against results from the numerical integration of the full equations of motion and we find that the analytical solution works reasonably well. An interesting finding is that the new analytical estimates improve greatly the predictions for the timescales of the orbital evolution of the terrestrial planet compared to an octupole order expansion. Finally, we briefly discuss possible applications of the analytical estimates in astrophysical problems.

  13. Planets around Giant Stars: Results from the Lick Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reffert, Sabine; Trifonov, Trifon; Bergmann, Christoph; Schwab, Christian

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a radial-velocity survey of 373 giant stars at Lick Observatory, which started in 1999. We have detected planets around 15 of these stars; an additional 20 stars host planet candidates. Companions with up to 25 Jupiter masses are rather commonly found around stars with about 2 Solar masses. The frequency of detected planetary companions appears to increase with metallicity. No planets or planet candidates are found around stars with more than 2.7 Solar masses, although our sample contains 113 such stars. We conclude that the occurrence rate of giant planets as a function of Stellar mass peaks around 2 Solar masses. This has important consequences for our understanding of giant planet formation.The stars 91 Aqr and tau Gem have companions with orbits that are among those with the lowest eccentricities of all known exoplanets, perhaps due to tidal circularization during the RGB phase. If confirmed, this would be the first evidence of planetary orbits modified through stellar evolution.We have discovered several multiple systems in our sample. An extensive dynamical analysis of the eta Cet system indicates that it contains two massive planets in a 2:1 orbital resonance. The star nu Oph is orbited by two brown dwarf companions in a 6:1 resonance. It is likely that they arrived in this resonance through migration in a circumstellar disk, arguing strongly that objects with more than 20 Jupiter masses can be formed in disks around Herbig Ae stars.

  14. The accretion of migrating giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürmann, Christoph; Kley, Wilhelm

    2017-02-01

    Aims: Most studies concerning the growth and evolution of massive planets focus either on their accretion or their migration only. In this work we study both processes concurrently to investigate how they might mutually affect one another. Methods: We modeled a two-dimensional disk with a steady accretion flow onto the central star and embedded a Jupiter mass planet at 5.2 au. The disk is locally isothermal and viscosity is modeled using a constant α. The planet is held on a fixed orbit for a few hundred orbits to allow the disk to adapt and carve a gap. After this period, the planet is released and free to move according to the gravitational interaction with the gas disk. The mass accretion onto the planet is modeled by removing a fraction of gas from the inner Hill sphere, and the removed mass and momentum can be added to the planet. Results: Our results show that a fast migrating planet is able to accrete more gas than a slower migrating planet. Utilizing a tracer fluid we analyzed the origin of the accreted gas originating predominantly from the inner disk for a fast migrating planet. In the case of slower migration, the fraction of gas from the outer disk increases. We also found that even for very high accretion rates, in some cases gas crosses the planetary gap from the inner to the outer disk. Our simulations show that the crossing of gas changes during the migration process as the migration rate slows down. Therefore, classical type II migration where the planet migrates with the viscous drift rate and no gas crosses the gap is no general process but may only occur for special parameters and at a certain time during the orbital evolution of the planet.

  15. The frequency of giant planets around metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortier, A.; Santos, N. C.; Sozzetti, A.; Mayor, M.; Latham, D.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The discovery of about 700 extrasolar planets, so far, has lead to the first statistics concerning extrasolar planets. The presence of giant planets seems to depend on stellar metallicity and mass. For example, they are more frequent around metal-rich stars, with an exponential increase in planet occurrence rates with metallicity. Aims: We analyzed two samples of metal-poor stars (-2.0 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.0) to see if giant planets are indeed rare around these objects. Radial velocity datasets were obtained with two different spectrographs (HARPS and HIRES). Detection limits for these data, expressed in minimum planetary mass and period, are calculated. These produce trustworthy numbers for the planet frequency. Methods: A general Lomb-Scargle (GLS) periodogram analysis was used together with a bootstrapping method to produce the detection limits. Planet frequencies were calculated based on a binomial distribution function within metallicity bins. Results: Almost all hot Jupiters and most giant planets should have been found in these data. Hot Jupiters around metal-poor stars have a frequency lower than 1.0% at one sigma. Giant planets with periods up to 1800 days, however, have a higher frequency of fp = 2.63-0.8+2.5%. Taking into account the different metallicities of the stars, we show that giant planets appear to be very frequent (fp = 4.48-1.38+4.04%) around stars with [Fe/H] > - 0.7, while they are rare around stars with [Fe/H] ≤ - 0.7 ( ≤ 2.36% at one sigma). Conclusions: Giant planet frequency is indeed a strong function of metallicity, even in the low-metallicity tail. However, the frequencies are most likely higher than previously thought. The data presented herein are based on observations collected at the La Silla Parana Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m telescope (ESO runs ID 72.C-0488, 082.C-0212, and 085.C-0063) and at the W. M. Keck Observatory that is operated as a scientific partnership among the

  16. Planetesimal dissolution in the envelopes of the forming, giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Podolak, M.; Bodenheimer, P.; Christofferson, B.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the capacity of planetesimals to penetrate the envelopes of giant planets during their growth phase, by means of a core instability mechanism in which the growing core becomes gradually more adept in the gravitational concentration of gas from its solar nebula environment, until a runaway gas accretion occurs. If most of the accreted mass is contained in planetesimals larger that about 1 km, the critical core mass for runaway accretion will not significantly change when planetesimal dissolution is taken into account; it is accordingly suggested that giant planet envelopes should contain above-solar proportions of virtually all elements, relative to hydrogen.

  17. Planetesimal dissolution in the envelopes of the forming, giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.; Podolak, M.; Bodenheimer, P.; Christofferson, B.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the capacity of planetesimals to penetrate the envelopes of giant planets during their growth phase, by means of a core instability mechanism in which the growing core becomes gradually more adept in the gravitational concentration of gas from its solar nebula environment, until a runaway gas accretion occurs. If most of the accreted mass is contained in planetesimals larger that about 1 km, the critical core mass for runaway accretion will not significantly change when planetesimal dissolution is taken into account; it is accordingly suggested that giant planet envelopes should contain above-solar proportions of virtually all elements, relative to hydrogen.

  18. Hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction between giant stars and planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; De Marco, Orsola; Wood, Peter; Galaviz, Pablo; Passy, Jean-Claude

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction between a 10 Jupiter mass planet and a red or asymptotic giant branch stars, both with a zero-age main sequence mass of 3.5 M⊙. Dynamic in-spiral time-scales are of the order of few years and a few decades for the red and asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. The planets will eventually be destroyed at a separation from the core of the giants smaller than the resolution of our simulations, either through evaporation or tidal disruption. As the planets in-spiral, the giant stars' envelopes are somewhat puffed up. Based on relatively long time-scales and even considering the fact that further in-spiral should take place before the planets are destroyed, we predict that the merger would be difficult to observe, with only a relatively small, slow brightening. Very little mass is unbound in the process. These conclusions may change if the planet's orbit enhances the star's main pulsation modes. Based on the angular momentum transfer, we also suspect that this star-planet interaction may be unable to lead to large-scale outflows via the rotation-mediated dynamo effect of Nordhaus and Blackman. Detectable pollution from the destroyed planets would only result for the lightest, lowest metallicity stars. We furthermore find that in both simulations the planets move through the outer stellar envelopes at Mach-3 to Mach-5, reaching Mach-1 towards the end of the simulations. The gravitational drag force decreases and the in-spiral slows down at the sonic transition, as predicted analytically.

  19. Perturbation of Compact Planetary Systems by Distant Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Bradley M. S.

    2017-05-01

    We examine the effect of secular perturbations by giant planets on systems of multiple, lower mass planets orbiting Sun-like stars and compare our results to the statistics of the observed Kepler data. We cannot reproduce the observed excess of single transiting planets by only pumping inclination without driving most systems to dynamical instability. Thus, we expect the underlying planetary population for single transiting planets to contain an intrinsically low multiplicity component. We can reproduce the Kepler statistics and occurrence rates for R < 2 R⊕ planets with a perturber population consistent with that inferred from radial velocity surveys, but require too many giant planets if we wish to explain all planets with R < 4 R⊕. These numbers can be brought into agreement if we posit the existence of an equivalent size population of planets below the RV detection limit (of characteristic mass ˜0.1MJ). This population would need to be dynamically hot to produce sufficiently strong perturbations and would leave the imprint of high obliquities and eccentricities amongst the surviving planets. The histories of our perturbed populations also produce a significant number of planets that are lost by collision with the star and some that are driven to short orbital periods by the combined action of secular evolution and tidal dissipation. Some of our simulations also produce planetary systems with planets that survive in the habitable zone but have no planets interior to them - much as in the case of our Solar system. Such configurations may occur around a few per cent of FGK stars.

  20. Perturbation of Compact Planetary Systems by Distant Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Bradley M. S.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the effect of secular perturbations by giant planets on systems of multiple, lower mass planets orbiting Sun-like stars and compare our results to the statistics of the observed Kepler data. We cannot reproduce the observed excess of single transitting planets by pumping only inclination without driving most systems to dynamical instability. Thus we expect the underlying planetary population for single transitting planets to contain an intrinsically low multiplicity component. We can reproduce the Kepler statistics and occurrence rates for R < 2R⊕ planets with a perturber population consistent with that inferred from radial velocity surveys, but require too many giant planets if we wish to explain all planets with R < 4R⊕. These numbers can be brought into agreement if we posit the existence of an equivalent size population of planets below the RV detection limit (of characteristic mass ˜0.1MJ). This population would need to be dynamically hot to produce sufficiently strong perturbations and would leave the imprint of high obliquities and eccentricities amongst the surviving planets. The histories of our perturbed populations also produce a significant number of planets that are lost by collision with the star and some that are driven to short orbital periods by the combined action of secular evolution and tidal dissipation. Some of our simulations also produce planetary systems with planets that survive in the habitable zone but have no planets interior to them - much as in the case of our Solar System. Such configurations may occur around a few percent of FGK stars.

  1. Exploring How Giant Planet Formation Affected the Asteroid Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretke, Katherine A.; Levison, Harold F.; Bottke, William

    2016-10-01

    The asteroid belt is observed to be a mixture of objects with different compositions, with volatile-poor asteroids (mostly S-complex) dominant in the inner asteroid belt while volatile-rich (mostly C-complex) asteroids dominate the outer asteroid belt. While this general compositional stratification was originally thought to be an indicator of the primordial temperature gradient in the protoplanetary disk, the very distinct properties of these populations suggest that they must represent two completely decoupled reservoirs, not a simple gradient (e.g., Warren 2011). It is possible to create this general stratification (as well as the observed mixing) as the implantation of outer Solar System material into the asteroid belt by the early migration of the giant planets (e.g. the Grand Tack, Walsh et al. 2011). However, this presupposes that the inner and outer Solar System materials were still sorted in their primordial locations prior to any migration of the planets. The lack of a fully dynamically self-consistent model of giant planet core formation has prevented the study of how the core formation process itself may result in dynamical mixing in the early Solar System's history. Recently, pebble accretion, the process by which planetesimals can grow to giant planet cores via the accretion of small, rapidly drifting sub-meter-sized bodies known as ``pebbles,'' (Lambrechts & Johansen 2012, Levison, Kretke & Duncan 2015) finally offers such a model. Here we show how the process of giant planet formation will impact the surrounding planetesimal population, possibly resulting in the observed compositional mixture of the asteroid belt, without requiring a dramatic migration of the giant planets. For example, preliminary runs suggest planetesimals from the Jupiter-formation zone can be implanted in the outer main belt via interactions with scattered Jupiter-zone protoplanets. This could potentially provide an alternative non-Grand Tack solution to the origin of many C

  2. MISCIBILITY CALCULATIONS FOR WATER AND HYDROGEN IN GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Soubiran, François; Militzer, Burkhard

    2015-06-20

    We present results from ab initio simulations of liquid water–hydrogen mixtures in the range from 2 to 70 GPa and from 1000 to 6000 K, covering conditions in the interiors of ice giant planets and parts of the outer envelope of gas giant planets. In addition to computing the pressure and the internal energy, we derive the Gibbs free energy by performing a thermodynamic integration. For all conditions under consideration, our simulations predict hydrogen and water to mix in all proportions. The thermodynamic behavior of the mixture can be well described with an ideal mixing approximation. We suggest that a substantial fraction of water and hydrogen in giant planets may occur in homogeneously mixed form rather than in separate layers. The extent of mixing depends on the planet’s interior dynamics and its conditions of formation, in particular on how much hydrogen was present when icy planetesimals were delivered. Based on our results, we do not predict water–hydrogen mixtures to phase separate during any stage of the evolution of giant planets. We also show that the hydrogen content of an exoplanet is much higher if the mixed interior is assumed.

  3. Early Giant Planet Candidates from the SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Neil; Ge, J.; Li, R.; Sithajan, S.; Chen, Y.; Shi, J.; Ma, B.; Liu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first discoveries of giant planet candidates from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey. These candidates are found using the new MARVELS data pipeline developed at UF from scratch over the past two years. Unlike the old data pipeline, this pipeline carefully corrects most of the instrument effects (such as trace, slant, distortion, drifts and dispersion) and observation condition effects (such as illumination profile). The result is long-term RV precisions that approach the photon limits in many cases and has yielded four giant planet candidates of ~1-6 Jupiter mass from only the initial fraction of data processed with the new techniques. More survey data is being processed which will likely lead to discoveries of additional giant planet candidates that will be verified and characterized with follow-up observations by the MARVELS team. The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars with well defined cadence 27 RV measurements over 2 years). The MARVELS RV data and other follow-up data (photometry, high contrast imaging, high resolution spectroscopy and RV measurements) will explore the diversity of giant planet companion formation and evolution around stars with a broad range in metallicity ([Fe/H -1.5-0.5), mass ( 0.6-2.5M(sun)), and environment (thin disk and thick disk), and will help to address the key scientific questions identified for the MARVELS survey including, but not limited to: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate-mass stars and binaries? Is the “planet desert” within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real?

  4. Gaseous accretion and the formation of giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, Morris; Hubbard, William B.; Pollack, James B.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter presents a review of the structure and composition of the giant planets and the theory of their formation and growth. All of the giant planets have heavy-element cores, and have envelopes which contain large amounts of high-Z material in addition to hydrogen and helium. The planets most probably formed through the core instability mechanism. This is a much more complex mechanism than was previously thought, depending, as it does, on several time-dependent parameters. We present the results of new, more detailed, simulations. Towards the end of accretion, the transfer of angular momentum to the outer layers of the contracting protoplanet should lead to the formation of a disk. This disk may be the site of satellite formation. Some recent simulation results are shown.

  5. Hot-start Giant Planets Form with Radiative Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardo, David; Cumming, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    In the hot-start core accretion formation model for gas giants, the interior of a planet is usually assumed to be fully convective. By calculating the detailed internal evolution of a planet assuming hot-start outer boundary conditions, we show that such a planet will in fact form with a radially increasing internal entropy profile, so that its interior will be radiative instead of convective. For a hot outer boundary, there is a minimum value for the entropy of the internal adiabat S min below which the accreting envelope does not match smoothly onto the interior, but instead deposits high entropy material onto the growing interior. One implication of this would be to at least temporarily halt the mixing of heavy elements within the planet, which are deposited by planetesimals accreted during formation. The compositional gradient this would impose could subsequently disrupt convection during post-accretion cooling, which would alter the observed cooling curve of the planet. However, even with a homogeneous composition, for which convection develops as the planet cools, the difference in cooling timescale will change the inferred mass of directly imaged gas giants.

  6. THE GEMINI PLANET-FINDING CAMPAIGN: THE FREQUENCY OF GIANT PLANETS AROUND DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Ftaclas, Christ; Chun, Mark; Biller, Beth A.; Hayward, Thomas L.; Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Matthias; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Kuchner, Marc; Reid, I. Neill; De Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.; Gregorio-Hetem, Jane; Boss, Alan; Lin, Douglas N. C.; and others

    2013-08-20

    We have completed a high-contrast direct imaging survey for giant planets around 57 debris disk stars as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. We achieved median H-band contrasts of 12.4 mag at 0.''5 and 14.1 mag at 1'' separation. Follow-up observations of the 66 candidates with projected separation <500 AU show that all of them are background objects. To establish statistical constraints on the underlying giant planet population based on our imaging data, we have developed a new Bayesian formalism that incorporates (1) non-detections, (2) single-epoch candidates, (3) astrometric and (4) photometric information, and (5) the possibility of multiple planets per star to constrain the planet population. Our formalism allows us to include in our analysis the previously known {beta} Pictoris and the HR 8799 planets. Our results show at 95% confidence that <13% of debris disk stars have a {>=}5 M{sub Jup} planet beyond 80 AU, and <21% of debris disk stars have a {>=}3 M{sub Jup} planet outside of 40 AU, based on hot-start evolutionary models. We model the population of directly imaged planets as d {sup 2} N/dMda{proportional_to}m {sup {alpha}} a {sup {beta}}, where m is planet mass and a is orbital semi-major axis (with a maximum value of a{sub max}). We find that {beta} < -0.8 and/or {alpha} > 1.7. Likewise, we find that {beta} < -0.8 and/or a{sub max} < 200 AU. For the case where the planet frequency rises sharply with mass ({alpha} > 1.7), this occurs because all the planets detected to date have masses above 5 M{sub Jup}, but planets of lower mass could easily have been detected by our search. If we ignore the {beta} Pic and HR 8799 planets (should they belong to a rare and distinct group), we find that <20% of debris disk stars have a {>=}3 M{sub Jup} planet beyond 10 AU, and {beta} < -0.8 and/or {alpha} < -1.5. Likewise, {beta} < -0.8 and/or a{sub max} < 125 AU. Our Bayesian constraints are not strong enough to reveal any dependence of the planet

  7. Habitable moons around extrasolar giant planets.

    PubMed

    Williams, D M; Kasting, J F; Wade, R A

    1997-01-16

    Possible planetary objects have now been discovered orbiting nine different main-sequence stars. These companion objects (some of which might actually be brown dwarfs) all have a mass at least half that of Jupiter, and are therefore unlikely to be hospitable to Earth-like life: jovian planets and brown dwarfs support neither a solid nor a liquid surface near which organisms might dwell. Here we argue that rocky moons orbiting these companions could be habitable if the planet-moon system orbits the parent star within the so-called 'habitable zone', where life-supporting liquid water could be present. The companions to the stars 16 Cygni B and 47 Ursae Majoris might satisfy this criterion. Such a moon would, however, need to be large enough (>0.12 Earth masses) to retain a substantial and long-lived atmosphere, and would also need to possess a strong magnetic field in order to prevent its atmosphere from being sputtered away by the constant bombardment of energetic ions from the planet's magnetosphere.

  8. Habitable moons around extrasolar giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. M.; Kasting, J. F.; Wade, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Possible planetary objects have now been discovered orbiting nine different main-sequence stars. These companion objects (some of which might actually be brown dwarfs) all have a mass at least half that of Jupiter, and are therefore unlikely to be hospitable to Earth-like life: jovian planets and brown dwarfs support neither a solid nor a liquid surface near which organisms might dwell. Here we argue that rocky moons orbiting these companions could be habitable if the planet-moon system orbits the parent star within the so-called 'habitable zone', where life-supporting liquid water could be present. The companions to the stars 16 Cygni B and 47 Ursae Majoris might satisfy this criterion. Such a moon would, however, need to be large enough (>0.12 Earth masses) to retain a substantial and long-lived atmosphere, and would also need to possess a strong magnetic field in order to prevent its atmosphere from being sputtered away by the constant bombardment of energetic ions from the planet's magnetosphere.

  9. Habitable moons around extrasolar giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. M.; Kasting, J. F.; Wade, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Possible planetary objects have now been discovered orbiting nine different main-sequence stars. These companion objects (some of which might actually be brown dwarfs) all have a mass at least half that of Jupiter, and are therefore unlikely to be hospitable to Earth-like life: jovian planets and brown dwarfs support neither a solid nor a liquid surface near which organisms might dwell. Here we argue that rocky moons orbiting these companions could be habitable if the planet-moon system orbits the parent star within the so-called 'habitable zone', where life-supporting liquid water could be present. The companions to the stars 16 Cygni B and 47 Ursae Majoris might satisfy this criterion. Such a moon would, however, need to be large enough (>0.12 Earth masses) to retain a substantial and long-lived atmosphere, and would also need to possess a strong magnetic field in order to prevent its atmosphere from being sputtered away by the constant bombardment of energetic ions from the planet's magnetosphere.

  10. Giant Planets in Reflected Light: What Science Can We Expect?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Interpreting the reflection spectra of cool giant planets will be a challenge. Spectra of such worlds are expected to be primarily shaped by scattering from clouds and hazes and punctuated by absorption bands of methane, water, and ammonia. While the warmest giants may be cloudless, their atmospheres will almost certainly sport substantial photochemical hazes. Furthermore the masses of most direct imaging targets will be constrained by radial velocity observations, their radii, and thus atmospheric gravity, will be imperfectly known. The uncertainty in planet radius and gravity will compound with uncertain aerosol properties to make estimation of key absorber abundances difficult. To address such concerns our group is developing atmospheric retrieval tools to constrain quantities of interest, particular gas mixing ratios. We have applied our Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to simulated data of the quality expected from the WFIRST CGI instrument and found that given sufficiently high SNR data we can confidentially identify and constrain the abundance of methane, cloud top pressures, gravity, and the star-planet-observer phase angle. In my presentation I will explain the expected characteristics of cool extrasolar giant planet reflection spectra, discuss these and other challenges in their interpretation, and summarize the science results we can expect from direct imaging observations.

  11. Migration of Gas Giant Planets in a Gravitationally Unstable Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Karna Mahadev; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Michael, Scott; Durisen, Richard H.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the migration of giant planets in gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disks is important for understanding planetary system architecture, especially the existence of planets orbiting close to and at large distances from their stars. Migration rates can determine the efficiency of planet formation and survival rates of planets. We present results from simulations of 0.3, 1, and 3 Jupiter-mass planets in a 0.14 M⊙ protoplanetary disk around a 1 M⊙ star, where the disk is marginally unstable to gravitational instabilities (GIs). Each planet is simulated separately. We use CHYMERA, a radiative 3D hydrodynamics code developed by the Indiana University Hydrodynamics Group. The simulations include radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. The planets are inserted into the disk, once the disk has settled into its quasi-steady GI-active phase. We simulate each of the 0.3, 1, and 3 Jupiter-mass planets by inserting it at three different locations in the disk, at the corotation radius and at the inner and outer Lindblad resonances. No matter where placed, the 3 Jupiter-mass planets tend to drift inexorably inward but with a rate that slows after many orbital periods. The 1 Jupiter-mass planets migrate mostly inward, but their motion can be delayed or reversed near the corotation of the two-armed wave. The 0.3 Jupiter-mass planets are much less predictable and frequently migrate outward. We analyze how the density of matter and waves in the disk at different azimuthal locations affect the migration.

  12. Meeting contribution: Bright lights on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S.

    2007-04-01

    Prof Miller explained that his scientific background was in chemistry rather than astronomy, but that he had become involved with planetary science, and especially aurorae, through an interest in the chemical composition of planetary atmospheres. The various colours seen in aurorae were powerful probes of the chemical constituents of atmospheres, and the speaker illustrated this with an image of the aurora borealis of our own planet. The deep red emission seen at the highest celestial altitudes could be attributed to atomic oxygen, and likewise the brighter green emission below it. Towards the lower edge of the aurora, closest to the horizon, reddish-pink emission stemmed from molecular nitrogen.

  13. The atmospheres of earthlike planets after giant impact events

    SciTech Connect

    Lupu, R. E.; Freedman, Richard; Schaefer, Laura; Morley, Caroline; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Cahoy, Kerri

    2014-03-20

    It is now understood that the accretion of terrestrial planets naturally involves giant collisions, the moon-forming impact being a well-known example. In the aftermath of such collisions, the surface of the surviving planet is very hot and potentially detectable. Here we explore the atmospheric chemistry, photochemistry, and spectral signatures of post-giant-impact terrestrial planets enveloped by thick atmospheres consisting predominantly of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The atmospheric chemistry and structure are computed self-consistently for atmospheres in equilibrium with hot surfaces with composition reflecting either the bulk silicate Earth (which includes the crust, mantle, atmosphere, and oceans) or Earth's continental crust. We account for all major molecular and atomic opacity sources including collision-induced absorption. We find that these atmospheres are dominated by H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, while the formation of CH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} is quenched because of short dynamical timescales. Other important constituents are HF, HCl, NaCl, and SO{sub 2}. These are apparent in the emerging spectra and can be indicative that an impact has occurred. The use of comprehensive opacities results in spectra that are a factor of two lower brightness temperature in the spectral windows than predicted by previous models. The estimated luminosities show that the hottest post-giant-impact planets will be detectable with near-infrared coronagraphs on the planned 30 m class telescopes. The 1-4 μm will be most favorable for such detections, offering bright features and better contrast between the planet and a potential debris disk. We derive cooling timescales on the order of 10{sup 5-6} yr on the basis of the modeled effective temperatures. This leads to the possibility of discovering tens of such planets in future surveys.

  14. On the Composition of Young, Directly Imaged Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. I.; Marley, M. S.; Zahnle, K.; Line, M. R.; Fortney, J. J.; Barman, T. S.; Visscher, C.; Lewis, N. K.; Wolff, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant progress on the direct detection and characterization of young, self-luminous giant planets at wide orbital separations from their host stars. Some of these planets show evidence for disequilibrium processes like transport-induced quenching in their atmospheres; photochemistry may also be important, despite the typically large orbital distances. Disequilibrium chemical processes such as these can alter the expected composition, spectral behavior, thermal structure, and cooling history of the planets, and can potentially confuse determinations of bulk elemental ratios, which provide important insights into planet-formation mechanisms. Using a thermo/photochemical kinetics and transport model, we investigate the extent to which disequilibrium chemical processes affect the composition and spectra of directly imaged giant exoplanets. Results for specific "young Jupiters" such as HR 8799 b and c and 51 Eri b are presented, as are general trends as a function of planetary effective temperature, surface gravity, incident ultraviolet flux, and strength of deep atmospheric convection. We find that quenching is very important on young Jupiters, leading to CO/CH4 and N2/NH3 ratios much greater than; and H2O mixing ratios a factor of a few less than chemical equilibrium predictions. Photochemistry can also be important on such planets, with CO2 and HCN being key photochemical products. Carbon dioxide becomes a particularly major constituent when stratospheric temperatures are low and recycling of water following H2O photolysis becomes stifled. Young Jupiters with effective temperatures less than 700 degrees Kelvin are in a particularly interesting photochemical regime that differs from both transiting hot Jupiters and our own solar-system giant planets.

  15. Investigating the link between composition and evolution of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrini, Diego; Altieri, Francesca; Grassi, Davide; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Adriani, Alberto; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Filacchione, Gianrico; Micela, Giusi

    2013-04-01

    In the recent years, thanks to ground-based and space-based observations, the number of discovered exoplanets orbiting other stars has greatly increased. As a consequence, the focus in the exoplanetary quest for knowledge is starting to shift from their discovery to their characterization. The composition of exoplanets, in fact, is linked to the formation and evolution of the systems that host them. As in all inverse problems, however, such a link is not easy to unfold. As is shown by the case of our solar system, giant planets offer a unique opportunity to investigate the relationship between formation, evolution and atmospheric composition. The Galileo and Cassini missions, in fact, have revealed that the atmospheric and bulk composition of Jupiter and Saturn significantly deviate from the originally expected ones, each planet being characterized by different enrichment factors in high-Z elements. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain these deviations, but the Solar System alone does not supply enough constraints to solve this problem. The aim of this work is to investigate how the tools and models developed for the case of the Solar System can be applied to the study of extrasolar planets and shed new light on the early evolution of forming planetary systems. Using N-body simulations that account for the growth and the migration of giant planets and considering a selected sample of observed single-planet extrasolar systems as test cases, we will assess what are the sources and the composition of the material accreted by the forming giant planets and its effects on their atmospheric composition.

  16. On the Composition of Young, Directly Imaged Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J. I.; Marley, M. S.; Zahnle, K.; Line, M. R.; Fortney, J. J.; Barman, T. S.; Visscher, C.; Lewis, N. K.; Wolff, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    The past decade has seen significant progress on the direct detection and characterization of young, self-luminous giant planets at wide orbital separations from their host stars. Some of these planets show evidence for disequilibrium processes like transport-induced quenching in their atmospheres; photochemistry may also be important, despite the large orbital distances. These disequilibrium chemical processes can alter the expected composition, spectral behavior, thermal structure, and cooling history of the planets, and can potentially confuse determinations of bulk elemental ratios, which provide important insights into planet-formation mechanisms. Using a thermo/photochemical kinetics and transport model, we investigate the extent to which disequilibrium chemistry affects the composition and spectra of directly imaged giant exoplanets. Results for specific “young Jupiters” such as HR 8799 b and 51 Eri b are presented, as are general trends as a function of planetary effective temperature, surface gravity, incident ultraviolet flux, and strength of deep atmospheric convection. We find that quenching is very important on young Jupiters, leading to CO/CH4 and N2/NH3 ratios much greater than, and H2O mixing ratios a factor of a few less than, chemical-equilibrium predictions. Photochemistry can also be important on such planets, with CO2 and HCN being key photochemical products. Carbon dioxide becomes a major constituent when stratospheric temperatures are low and recycling of water via the {{{H}}}2 + OH reaction becomes kinetically stifled. Young Jupiters with effective temperatures ≲ 700 K are in a particularly interesting photochemical regime that differs from both transiting hot Jupiters and our own solar-system giant planets.

  17. The Atmospheres of Earthlike Planets after Giant Impact Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupu, R. E.; Zahnle, Kevin; Marley, Mark S.; Schaefer, Laura; Fegley, Bruce; Morley, Caroline; Cahoy, Kerri; Freedman, Richard; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-03-01

    It is now understood that the accretion of terrestrial planets naturally involves giant collisions, the moon-forming impact being a well-known example. In the aftermath of such collisions, the surface of the surviving planet is very hot and potentially detectable. Here we explore the atmospheric chemistry, photochemistry, and spectral signatures of post-giant-impact terrestrial planets enveloped by thick atmospheres consisting predominantly of CO2 and H2O. The atmospheric chemistry and structure are computed self-consistently for atmospheres in equilibrium with hot surfaces with composition reflecting either the bulk silicate Earth (which includes the crust, mantle, atmosphere, and oceans) or Earth's continental crust. We account for all major molecular and atomic opacity sources including collision-induced absorption. We find that these atmospheres are dominated by H2O and CO2, while the formation of CH4 and NH3 is quenched because of short dynamical timescales. Other important constituents are HF, HCl, NaCl, and SO2. These are apparent in the emerging spectra and can be indicative that an impact has occurred. The use of comprehensive opacities results in spectra that are a factor of two lower brightness temperature in the spectral windows than predicted by previous models. The estimated luminosities show that the hottest post-giant-impact planets will be detectable with near-infrared coronagraphs on the planned 30 m class telescopes. The 1-4 μm will be most favorable for such detections, offering bright features and better contrast between the planet and a potential debris disk. We derive cooling timescales on the order of 105-6 yr on the basis of the modeled effective temperatures. This leads to the possibility of discovering tens of such planets in future surveys.

  18. Model Atmospheres and Spectra for Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Richard S.; Beebe, Reta (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In the past few years much new observational data has become available for brown dwarfs and extra solar planets. Not only are new objects being discovered but the availability of higher resolution spectra is improving. This allows a better comparison between the models and the available data, and places new constraints on the models which now have to be made more physically realistic in order to better interpret the observations. Under this grant, an array of new opacities were calculated and successfully applied to a variety of physical situations that were used as input to model available observations of brown dwarfs and extra solar giant planets.

  19. The Pan-Pacific Planet Search. VI. Giant Planets Orbiting HD 86950 and HD 222076

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Jones, M. I.; Zhao, Jinglin; Marshall, J. P.; Butler, R. P.; Tinney, C. G.; Wang, Liang; Johnson, John Asher

    2017-02-01

    We report the detection of two new planets orbiting the K giants HD 86950 and HD 222076, based on precise radial velocities obtained with three instruments: AAT/UCLES, FEROS, and CHIRON. HD 86950b has a period of 1270 ± 57 days at a=2.72+/- 0.08 au, and m sin i=3.6+/- 0.7 {M}{Jup}. HD 222076b has P=871+/- 19 days at a=1.83+/- 0.03 au, and m sin i=1.56+/- 0.11 {M}{Jup}. These two giant planets are typical of the population of planets known to orbit evolved stars. In addition, we find a high-amplitude periodic velocity signal (K∼ 50 m s‑1) in HD 29399 and show that it is due to stellar variability rather than Keplerian reflex motion. We also investigate the relation between planet occurrence and host-star metallicity for the 164-star Pan-Pacific Planet Search (PPPS) sample of evolved stars. In spite of the small sample of PPPS detections, we confirm the trend of increasing planet occurrence as a function of metallicity found by other studies of planets orbiting evolved stars.

  20. Orbital migration of giant planets induced by gravitationally unstable gaps: the effect of planet mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Lin, Min-Kai

    2013-09-01

    It has been established that self-gravitating disc-satellite interaction can lead to the formation of a gravitationally unstable gap. Such an instability may significantly affect the orbital migration of gap-opening perturbers in self-gravitating discs. In this paper, we extend the two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of Lin & Papaloizou to investigate the role of the perturber or planet mass on the gravitational stability of gaps and its impact on orbital migration. We consider giant planets with planet-to-star mass ratio q ≡ Mp/M* ∈ [0.3, 3.0] × 10-3 (so that q = 10-3 corresponds to a Jupiter mass planet if M* = M⊙), in a self-gravitating disc with disc-to-star mass ratio Md/M* = 0.08, aspect ratio h = 0.05 and Keplerian Toomre parameter Qk0 = 1.5 at 2.5 times the planet's initial orbital radius. These planet masses correspond to tilde{q}in [0.9, 1.7], where tilde{q} is the ratio of the planet Hill radius to the local disc scale-height. Fixed-orbit simulations show that all planet masses we consider open gravitationally unstable gaps, but the instability is stronger and develops sooner with increasing planet mass. The disc-on-planet torques typically become more positive with increasing planet mass. In freely migrating simulations, we observe faster outward migration with increasing planet mass, but only for planet masses capable of opening unstable gaps early on. For q = 0.0003 (tilde{q}=0.9), the planet undergoes rapid inward type III migration before it can open a gap. For q = 0.0013 (tilde{q}=1.5) we find it is possible to balance the tendency for inward migration by the positive torques due to an unstable gap, but only for a few 10 s of orbital periods. We find the unstable outer gap edge can trigger outward type III migration, sending the planet to twice its initial orbital radius on dynamical time-scales. We briefly discuss the importance of our results in the context of giant planet formation on wide orbits through disc fragmentation.

  1. Europa, tidally heated oceans, and habitable zones around giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Ray T.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Kasting, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Tidal dissipation in the satellites of a giant planet may provide sufficient heating to maintain an environment favorable to life on the satellite surface or just below a thin ice layer. Europa could have a liquid ocean which may occasionally receive sunlight through cracks in the overlying ice shell. In such a case, sufficient solar energy could reach liquid water that organisms similar to those found under Antarctic ice could grow. In other solar systems, larger satellites with more significant heat flow could represent environments that are stable over an order of eons and in which life could perhaps evolve. A zone around a giant planet is defined in which such satellites could exist as a tidally-heated habitable zone. This zone can be compared to the habitable zone which results from heating due to the radiation of a central star. In this solar system, this radiatively-heated habitable zone contains the earth.

  2. Oxygen in the stratospheres of the giant planets and Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuchtgruber, H.; Lellouch, E.; Encrenaz, Th.; Bezard, B.; Coustenis, A.; Drossart, P.; Salama, A.; de Graauw, Th.; Davis, G. R.

    1999-03-01

    Infrared spectra of the Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) of ISO at wavelengths between 25 - 45 μm have provided the first detection of stratospheric H2O on all four giant planets and Titan. Together with SWS observations of CO2 at 14.98 μm, leading to first detections on Neptune, Saturn and Jupiter an external source of oxygen is required to explain the derived upper stratospheric mixing ratios of up to several ppb at mbar-μbar levels. We provide an overview on the required amounts of external oxygen fluxes and a detailed discussion on the various scenarios for the origin of CO2 in the stratospheres of the giant planets.

  3. Early Giant Planet Migration in the Solar System: Geochemical and Cosmochemical Implications for Terrestrial Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, David P.; Walsh, K. J.; Morbidelli, A.; Raymond, S. N.; Mandell, A. M.; Bond, J. C.

    2010-10-01

    A new terrestrial planet formation model (Walsh et al., this meeting) explores the effects of a two-stage, inward-then-outward migration of Jupiter and Saturn, as found in numerous hydrodynamical simulations of giant planet formation (Masset & Snellgrove 2001, Morbidelli & Crida 2007, Pierens & Nelson 2008). Walsh et al. show that the inward migration of Jupiter truncates the disk of planetesimals and embryos in the terrestrial planet region. Subsequent accretion in that region then forms a realistic system of terrestrial planets, in particular giving a low-mass Mars, which has been difficult to reproduce in simulations with a self-consistent set of initial conditions (see, eg. Raymond et al. 2009). Additionally, the outward migration of the giant planets populates the asteroid belt with distinct populations of bodies, with the inner belt filled by bodies originating inside of 3 AU, and the outer belt filled with bodies originating from beyond the giant planets. From a geochemical and cosmochemical point of view, this scenario differs significantly from the "standard model" in which essentially all of the material in the inner Solar System initially formed there. Specifically, the assumption that the current radial distribution of material in the inner Solar System is reflective of the primordial distribution of material in that region is no longer necessary. This is important for understanding the chemical and isotopic diversity of the inner Solar System as inferred from studies of the terrestrial planets, asteroids, and meteorites, as well as for understanding the origin of Earth's water. We will discuss the geochemical and cosmochemical implications of this model in relation to available constraints, as well as to previous models of terrestrial planet formation. Masset & Snellgrove (2001), MNRAS 320, L55. Morbidelli & Crida (2007), Icarus 191, 158. Pierens & Nelson (2008), A&A 482, 333. Raymond et al. (2009), Icarus 203, 644.

  4. Exploring the Relationship Between Planet Mass and Atmospheric Metallicity for Cool Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Nancy H.; Wong, Ian; Knutson, Heather; Deming, Drake; Desert, Jean-Michel; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Morley, Caroline; Kammer, Joshua A.; Line, Michael R.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the average densities of exoplanets have begun to help constrain their bulk compositions and to provide insight into their formation locations and accretionary histories. Current mass and radius measurements suggest an inverse relationship between a planet's bulk metallicity and its mass, a relationship also seen in the gas and ice giant planets of our own solar system. We expect atmospheric metallicity to similarly increase with decreasing planet mass, but there are currently few constraints on the atmospheric metallicities of extrasolar giant planets. For hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, equilibrium chemistry models predict a transition from CO to CH4 below ~1200 K. However, with increased atmospheric metallicity the relative abundance of CH4 is depleted and CO is enhanced. In this study we present new secondary eclipse observations of a set of cool (<1200 K) giant exoplanets at 3.6 and 4.5 microns using the Spitzer Space Telescope, which allow us to constrain their relative abundances of CH4 and CO and corresponding atmospheric metallicities. We discuss the implications of our results for the proposed correlation between planet mass and atmospheric metallicity as predicted by the core accretion models and observed in our solar system.

  5. On the rapid formation of giant planet cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, William R.

    1989-01-01

    The formation of the ice-rock cores of the giant planets by density wave-assisted accretion is outlined. The process could be rapid (100,000-1,000,000 yr) and completed within the probable lifetime of the solar nebula. The mechanism works for both Jupiter and Saturn and does not require a large excess of mass over that believed present in their cores.

  6. GIANT PLANET FORMATION BY DISK INSTABILITY IN LOW MASS DISKS?

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-20

    Forming giant planets by disk instability requires a gaseous disk that is massive enough to become gravitationally unstable and able to cool fast enough for self-gravitating clumps to form and survive. Models with simplified disk cooling have shown the critical importance of the ratio of the cooling to the orbital timescales. Uncertainties about the proper value of this ratio can be sidestepped by including radiative transfer. Three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics models of a disk with a mass of 0.043 M{sub sun} from 4 to 20 AU in orbit around a 1 M{sub sun} protostar show that disk instabilities are considerably less successful in producing self-gravitating clumps than in a disk with twice this mass. The results are sensitive to the assumed initial outer disk (T{sub o}) temperatures. Models with T{sub o} = 20 K are able to form a single self-gravitating clump, whereas models with T{sub o} = 25 K form clumps that are not quite self-gravitating. These models imply that disk instability requires a disk with a mass of at least {approx}0.043 M{sub sun} inside 20 AU in order to form giant planets around solar-mass protostars with realistic disk cooling rates and outer-disk temperatures. Lower mass disks around solar-mass protostars must rely upon core accretion to form inner giant planets.

  7. Terrestrial planets in high-mass disks without gas giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Elía, G. C.; Guilera, O. M.; Brunini, A.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Observational and theoretical studies suggest that planetary systems consisting only of rocky planets are probably the most common in the Universe. Aims: We study the potential habitability of planets formed in high-mass disks without gas giants around solar-type stars. These systems are interesting because they are likely to harbor super-Earths or Neptune-mass planets on wide orbits, which one should be able to detect with the microlensing technique. Methods: First, a semi-analytical model was used to define the mass of the protoplanetary disks that produce Earth-like planets, super-Earths, or mini-Neptunes, but not gas giants. Using mean values for the parameters that describe a disk and its evolution, we infer that disks with masses lower than 0.15 M⊙ are unable to form gas giants. Then, that semi-analytical model was used to describe the evolution of embryos and planetesimals during the gaseous phase for a given disk. Thus, initial conditions were obtained to perform N-body simulations of planetary accretion. We studied disks of 0.1, 0.125, and 0.15 M⊙. Results: All our simulations form massive planets on wide orbits. For a 0.1 M⊙ disk, 2-3 super-Earths of 2.8 to 5.9 M⊕ are formed between 2 and 5 AU. For disks of 0.125 and 0.15 M⊙, our simulations produce a 10-17.1 M⊕ planet between 1.6 and 2.7 AU, and other super-Earths are formed in outer regions. Moreover, six planets survive in the habitable zone (HZ). These planets have masses from 1.9 to 4.7 M⊕ and significant water contents ranging from 560 to 7482 Earth oceans, where one Earth ocean represents the amount of water on Earth's surface, which equals 2.8 × 10-4M⊕. Of the six planets formed in the HZ, three are water worlds with 39%-44% water by mass. These planets start the simulations beyond the snow line, which explains their high water abundances. In general terms, the smaller the mass of the planets observed on wide orbits, the higher the possibility to find water worlds in the

  8. Model Atmospheres and Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M. S.; Guillot, T.; Saumon, D.; Freedman, R. S.

    1996-09-01

    Of the known extrasolar giant planets, five have estimated effective temperatures below ~ 800K. We report on the application of a radiative-convective equilibrium model, originally developed to study the atmospheres of the solar jovian planets, to these objects (70 Vir b, 47 UMa b, Gl 411 b, 55 Cnc c, and HD 114762 b). The deposition of incident radiation from the various primaries and the estimated internal heat fluxes are included in the models. Condensible species are removed and clouds inserted where appropriate. To span the likely range of planet masses, a variety of surface gravities are considered for each object. Preliminary results suggest that water clouds are present in all these atmospheres except for 70 Vir b and HD 114762 b. Water marginally condenses in the atmosphere of the former while that of the latter should be essentially cloud free. Condensation of trace species (e.g. NH_4Cl and NH_4H_2PO_4) may produce thin hazes in these two cases. Thermochemical equilibrium favors NH_3 and CH_4 in all these atmospheres while N_2 and CO are favored in the atmospheres of the close-orbit, hot companions like 51 Peg b and upsilon And b. The reflected visible and thermal infrared spectra of these objects are dominated by water, methane, and ammonia absorption. We find that the 4 to 5 microns window in CH_4 and H_2O opacity is open for all of these objects. Consequently, as in the case of Jupiter and the brown dwarf Gliese 229 B, the emitted flux in this region is significantly greater than the blackbody flux for the planetary effective temperature. Thus this spectral region is favorable for the detection of extrasolar giant planets and brown dwarfs. Comparison of model spectra with observations would constrain the vertical temperature and cloud structure of these new atmospheres. Burrows et al. (this meeting) use these and other models to examine the evolution of extrasolar giant planets.

  9. Search for giant planets in M 67. IV. Survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucalassi, A.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Saglia, R.; Pasquini, L.; Ruiz, M. T.; Bonifacio, P.; Bedin, L. R.; Libralato, M.; Biazzo, K.; Melo, C.; Lovis, C.; Randich, S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. We present the results of a seven-year-long radial velocity survey of a sample of 88 main-sequence and evolved stars to reveal signatures of Jupiter-mass planets in the solar-age and solar-metallicity open cluster M 67. Aims: We aim at studying the frequency of giant planets in this cluster with respect to the field stars. In addition, our sample is also ideal to perform a long-term study to compare the chemical composition of stars with and without giant planets in detail. Methods: We analyzed precise radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with the HARPS spectrograph at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla), the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France), the HRS spectrograph at the Hobby Eberly Telescope (Texas), and the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (La Palma). Additional RV data come from the CORALIE spectrograph at the Euler Swiss Telescope (La Silla). We conducted Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the occurrence rate of giant planets in our radial velocity survey. We considered orbital periods between 1.0 day and 1000 days and planet masses between 0.2 MJ and 10.0 MJ. We used a measure of the observational detection efficiency to determine the frequency of planets for each star. Results: All the planets previously announced in this RV campaign with their properties are summarized here: 3 hot Jupiters around the main-sequence stars YBP1194, YBP1514, and YBP401, and 1 giant planet around the evolved star S364. Two additional planet candidates around the stars YBP778 and S978 are also analyzed in the present work. We discuss stars that exhibit large RV variability or trends individually. For 2 additional stars, long-term trends are compatible with new binary candidates or substellar objects, which increases the total number of binary candidates detected in our campaign to 14. Based on the Doppler-detected planets discovered in this survey, we find an occurrence of giant planets of 18

  10. MIGRATION OF GAS GIANT PLANETS IN GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Scott; Durisen, Richard H.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu

    2011-08-20

    Characterization of migration in gravitationally unstable disks is necessary to understand the fate of protoplanets formed by disk instability. As part of a larger study, we are using a three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics code to investigate how an embedded gas giant planet interacts with a gas disk that undergoes gravitational instabilities (GIs). This Letter presents results from simulations with a Jupiter-mass planet placed in orbit at 25 AU within a 0.14 M{sub sun} disk. The disk spans 5-40 AU around a 1 M{sub sun} star and is initially marginally unstable. In one simulation, the planet is inserted prior to the eruption of GIs; in another, it is inserted only after the disk has settled into a quasi-steady GI-active state, where heating by GIs roughly balances radiative cooling. When the planet is present from the beginning, its own wake stimulates growth of a particular global mode with which it strongly interacts, and the planet plunges inward 6 AU in about 10{sup 3} years. In both cases with embedded planets, there are times when the planet's radial motion is slow and varies in direction. At other times, when the planet appears to be interacting with strong spiral modes, migration both inward and outward can be relatively rapid, covering several AUs over hundreds of years. Migration in both cases appears to stall near the inner Lindblad resonance of a dominant low-order mode. Planet orbit eccentricities fluctuate rapidly between about 0.02 and 0.1 throughout the GI-active phases of the simulations.

  11. FORMATION AND SURVIVABILITY OF GIANT PLANETS ON WIDE ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@astro.uwo.c

    2010-05-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of massive planets on wide orbits, we present a mechanism for the formation of such planets via disk fragmentation in the embedded phase of star formation. In this phase, the forming disk intensively accretes matter from the natal cloud core and undergoes several fragmentation episodes. However, most fragments are either destroyed or driven into the innermost regions (and probably onto the star) due to angular momentum exchange with spiral arms, leading to multiple FU-Ori-like bursts and disk expansion. Fragments that are sufficiently massive and form in the late embedded phase (when the disk conditions are less extreme) may open a gap and evolve into giant planets on typical orbits of several tens to several hundreds of AU. For this mechanism to work, the natal cloud core must have sufficient mass and angular momentum to trigger the burst mode and also form extended disks of the order of several hundreds of AU. When mass loading from the natal cloud core diminishes and the main fragmentation phase ends, such extended disks undergo a transient episode of contraction and density increase, during which they may give birth to a last and survivable set of giant planets on wide and relatively stable orbits.

  12. How empty are disk gaps opened by giant planets?

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Jeffrey; Shi, Ji-Ming; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Gap clearing by giant planets has been proposed to explain the optically thin cavities observed in many protoplanetary disks. How much material remains in the gap determines not only how detectable young planets are in their birth environments, but also how strong co-rotation torques are, which impacts how planets can survive fast orbital migration. We determine numerically how the average surface density inside the gap, Σ{sub gap}, depends on planet-to-star mass ratio q, Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter α, and disk height-to-radius aspect ratio h/r. Our results are derived from our new graphics processing unit accelerated Lagrangian hydrodynamical code PEnGUIn and are verified by independent simulations with ZEUS90. For Jupiter-like planets, we find Σ{sub gap}∝q {sup –2.2}α{sup 1.4}(h/r){sup 6.6}, and for near brown dwarf masses, Σ{sub gap}∝q {sup –1}α{sup 1.3}(h/r){sup 6.1}. Surface density contrasts inside and outside gaps can be as large as 10{sup 4}, even when the planet does not accrete. We derive a simple analytic scaling, Σ{sub gap}∝q {sup –2}α{sup 1}(h/r){sup 5}, that compares reasonably well to empirical results, especially at low Neptune-like masses, and use discrepancies to highlight areas for progress.

  13. Are Giant Planet Satellites Mini-solar Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    The regular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn exhibit a number of characteristics strongly suggestive of formation in a thin (aspect ratio H/r ˜ 0.1) circumplanetary gas disk (Mosqueira and Estrada 2003a). Also, the mass ratio of the largest satellites to the primary μ ˜ 10-4 lead one to think of these satellite systems as scaled-down solar systems. Yet, the larger mass ratio for the giant planets to the primary μ ˜ 10-3 appears to limit the usefulness of the planet-satellite analogy. If gap-opening determines the final size of at least Jupiter (Lin and Papaloizou 1993), then significantly smaller objects would be unable to truncate the disk. There are, however, at least two significant difficulties with this point of view. First, the non-linear or thermal gap-opening criterion (Lin and Papaloizou 1993) does not yield a Jupiter mass. Second, the migration timescale due to planet-disk interactions (Ward 1997) is too fast for the formation of giant planets through the core accretion process (Pollack et. al 1996) despite recent work which has lengthened it by up to an order of magnitude (Tanaka et al. 2002, D'Angelo et al. 2002, Bate et al. 2003). An alternative viewpoint has accretion taking place in a weakly turbulent disk, and the survival of both planets and satellites a direct consequence of gap-opening. In this view at least the largest satellites (Mosqueira and Estrada 2003b) and planetary cores ( ˜ 10 M⊕ ; Rafikov 2002) were able to open gaps in the disk. However, because the waves launched by such pertubers do not become non-linear immediately, the gap begins to form a distance away from the perturber given by the shocking length of acoustic waves (Goodman and Rafikov 2001; Rafikov 2002). Estrada and Mosqueira (2003) have suggested that the annulus of material adjacent to the proto-planet that immediately precedes the runaway gas accretion phase (Pollack et al. 1996) can be used to provide the mass needed to lead to the formation of a giant planet. If

  14. Impact cratering of the terrestrial planets and the Moon during the giant planet instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Fernando Virgilio; Nesvorny, David; Bottke, William

    2016-10-01

    The dynamical instability of the giant planets and the planetesimal driven migration both have major implications for the crater record of the terrestrial planets and the Moon. The crater record can thus provide contraints to the behavior of the planets in the early Solar System. Here we determine the impact fluxes and the crater production rates on the terrestrial planets and the Moon from impactors originating in the primordial asteroid main belt (2.1 to 3.2 au) and the E-belt (1.5 to 2.1 au - Bottke et al. 2012). We determine the impact flux over the age of the Solar System, with particular focus on the instability of the giant planets in the jumping Jupiter model. We start with a population of asteroids uniformly distributed in the orbital parameters space, and numerically evolve them as test particles under the gravitational perturbations of the giant and terrestrial planets. We test the effects on this population due to different jumping Jupiter evolutions (the idealized jump as in Bottke et al. 2012 or models taken from Nesvorny & Morbidelli 2012). The number of impacts is determined by applying Opik's theory. We compute the impact rates on different targets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Moon, and Mars) and from different source regions in the asteroid belt (E-belt, inner belt, outer belt). By properly calibrating the impact rates, and using crater scaling laws, we estimate the number and size distribution of craters. We show how the impact flux and crater production rates depend on the different parameters of the model such as the initial orbital distribution of the asteroids, time of the instability, different evolution of the planets, initial size distribution of the impactors, etc.

  15. Gas giants in hot water: inhibiting giant planet formation and planet habitability in dense star clusters through cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-05-01

    I show that the temperature of nuclear star clusters, starburst clusters in M82, compact high-z galaxies and some globular clusters of the Galaxy likely exceeded the ice-line temperature (TIce ≈ 150-170 K) during formation for a time comparable to the planet formation time-scale. The protoplanetary discs within these systems will thus, not have an ice line, decreasing the total material available for building protoplanetary embryos, inhibiting the formation of gas- and ice-giants if they form by core accretion, and prohibiting habitability. Planet formation by gravitational instability is similarly suppressed because Toomre's Q > 1 in all but the most massive discs. I show that cluster irradiation can in many cases dominate the thermodynamics and structure of passive and active protoplanetary discs for semi-major axes larger than ˜1-5 au. I discuss these results in the context of the observed lack of planets in 47 Tuc. I predict that a similar search for planets in the globular cluster NGC 6366 ([Fe/H] = -0.82) should yield detections, whereas (counterintuitively) the relatively metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6440, 6441 and 6388 should be devoid of giant planets. The characteristic stellar surface density above which TIce is exceeded in star clusters is ˜ 6 × 103 M⊙ pc- 2 f- 1/2dg, MW, where fdg, MW is the dust-to-gas ratio of the embedding material, normalized to the Milky Way value. Simple estimates suggest that ˜5-50 per cent of the stars in the universe formed in an environment exceeding this surface density. Future microlensing planet searches that directly distinguish between the bulge and disc planet populations of the Galaxy and M31 can test these predictions. Caveats and uncertainties are detailed.

  16. Accumulation of Giant Planet Atmospheres Around 5 -- 10 M⊕ Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubickyj, O.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lissauer, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Observations of protoplanetary disks imply that gas giant planets form very quickly (≤ 10 Myr). Recent interior models of Jupiter suggest smaller core masses (0 -- 10 M⊕ ) than had been previously predicted (10 to 30 M⊕ ). We have computed evolutionary simulations of Jupiter based on the core accretion model of gas giant planet formation where we vary the grain opacity and the planetesimal surface density of the solar density of the solar nebula. We also explore the implications of halting the solid accretion at selected core mass values during the protoplanet's growth, thus simulating the presence of a competing embryo. The core accretion model states that a solid core is formed from the accretion of planetesimals in the solar nebular followed by the capture of a massive envelope from the solar nebula gas. Our simulations based on this model (Pollack et al. 1996) have been successful in explaining many features of the giant planets. Our most recent results (Hubickyj et al. 2004) demonstrate that decreasing the grain opacity reduces the formation time by more than half of that for models computed with full interstellar grain opacity values. In fact, it is the reduction of the grain opacity in the upper portion of the envelope with T < 500 K that governs the lowering of the formation time. Decreasing the surface density of the planetesimals lowers the final core mass of the protoplanet but increases the formation timescale. Finally, a core mass cutoff results in the reduction of the time needed for a protoplanet to evolve to the stage of runaway gas accretion provided the cutoff mass is not too small. Our models show that with reasonable parameters it is possible to form Jupiter by means of the core accretion process in 3 Myr or less. \\ref Hubickyj, O., P. Bodenheimer, & J. J. Lissauer 2004. Accumulation of giant planet atmospheres around 5 -- 10 M⊕ cores. In preparation. \\ref Pollack J. B., O. Hubickyj, P. Bodenheimer, J. J. Lissauer, M. Podolak, and Y

  17. Giant Planet Candidates, Brown Dwarfs, and Binaries from the SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Neil; Ge, Jian; Li, Rui; de Lee, Nathan M.; Heslar, Michael; Ma, Bo; SDSS-Iii Marvels Team

    2015-01-01

    We report the discoveries of giant planet candidates, brown dwarfs, and binaries from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey. The finalized 1D pipeline has provided 18 giant planet candidates, 16 brown dwarfs, and over 500 binaries. An additional 96 targets having RV variability indicative of a giant planet companion are also reported for future investigation. These candidates are found using the advanced MARVELS 1D data pipeline developed at UF from scratch over the past three years. This pipeline carefully corrects most of the instrument effects (such as trace, slant, distortion, drifts and dispersion) and observation condition effects (such as illumination profile, fiber degradation, and tracking variations). The result is long-term RV precisions that approach the photon limits in many cases for the ~89,000 individual stellar observations. A 2D version of the pipeline that uses interferometric information is nearing completion and is demonstrating a reduction of errors to half the current levels. The 2D processing will be used to increase the robustness of the detections presented here and to find new candidates in RV regions not confidently detectable with the 1D pipeline. The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars with a well defined cadence of 27 RV measurements over 2 years. The MARVELS RV data and other follow-up data (photometry, high contrast imaging, high resolution spectroscopy and RV measurements) will explore the diversity of giant planet companion formation and evolution around stars with a broad range in metallicity (Fe/H -1.5-0.5), mass ( 0.6-2.5M(sun)), and environment (thin disk and thick disk), and will help to address the key scientific questions identified for the MARVELS survey including, but not limited to: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate-mass stars and binaries? Is the 'planet desert

  18. TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION DURING THE MIGRATION AND RESONANCE CROSSINGS OF THE GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lykawka, Patryk Sofia; Ito, Takashi

    2013-08-10

    The newly formed giant planets may have migrated and crossed a number of mutual mean motion resonances (MMRs) when smaller objects (embryos) were accreting to form the terrestrial planets in the planetesimal disk. We investigated the effects of the planetesimal-driven migration of Jupiter and Saturn, and the influence of their mutual 1:2 MMR crossing on terrestrial planet formation for the first time, by performing N-body simulations. These simulations considered distinct timescales of MMR crossing and planet migration. In total, 68 high-resolution simulation runs using 2000 disk planetesimals were performed, which was a significant improvement on previously published results. Even when the effects of the 1:2 MMR crossing and planet migration were included in the system, Venus and Earth analogs (considering both orbits and masses) successfully formed in several runs. In addition, we found that the orbits of planetesimals beyond a {approx} 1.5-2 AU were dynamically depleted by the strengthened sweeping secular resonances associated with Jupiter's and Saturn's more eccentric orbits (relative to the present day) during planet migration. However, this depletion did not prevent the formation of massive Mars analogs (planets with more than 1.5 times Mars's mass). Although late MMR crossings (at t > 30 Myr) could remove such planets, Mars-like small mass planets survived on overly excited orbits (high e and/or i), or were completely lost in these systems. We conclude that the orbital migration and crossing of the mutual 1:2 MMR of Jupiter and Saturn are unlikely to provide suitable orbital conditions for the formation of solar system terrestrial planets. This suggests that to explain Mars's small mass and the absence of other planets between Mars and Jupiter, the outer asteroid belt must have suffered a severe depletion due to interactions with Jupiter/Saturn, or by an alternative mechanism (e.g., rogue super-Earths)

  19. Scenarios of giant planet formation and evolution and their impact on the formation of habitable terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2014-04-28

    In our Solar System, there is a clear divide between the terrestrial and giant planets. These two categories of planets formed and evolved separately, almost in isolation from each other. This was possible because Jupiter avoided migrating into the inner Solar System, most probably due to the presence of Saturn, and never acquired a large-eccentricity orbit, even during the phase of orbital instability that the giant planets most likely experienced. Thus, the Earth formed on a time scale of several tens of millions of years, by collision of Moon- to Mars-mass planetary embryos, in a gas-free and volatile-depleted environment. We do not expect, however, that this clear cleavage between the giant and terrestrial planets is generic. In many extrasolar planetary systems discovered to date, the giant planets migrated into the vicinity of the parent star and/or acquired eccentric orbits. In this way, the evolution and destiny of the giant and terrestrial planets become intimately linked. This paper discusses several evolutionary patterns for the giant planets, with an emphasis on the consequences for the formation and survival of habitable terrestrial planets. The conclusion is that we should not expect Earth-like planets to be typical in terms of physical and orbital properties and accretion history. Most habitable worlds are probably different, exotic worlds.

  20. THE PROPOSED GIANT PLANET ORBITING VB 10 DOES NOT EXIST

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, Jacob L.; Seifahrt, Andreas; Reiners, Ansgar; Dreizler, Stefan; Hartman, Henrik; Nilsson, Hampus; Henry, Todd J.; Wiedemann, Guenter

    2010-03-01

    We present high-precision relative radial velocities of the very low mass star VB 10 that were obtained over a time span of 0.61 years as part of an ongoing search for planets around stars at the end of the main sequence. The radial velocities were measured from high-resolution near-infrared spectra obtained using the CRIRES instrument on the Very Large Telescope with an ammonia gas cell. The typical internal precision of the measurements is 10 m s{sup -1}. These data do not exhibit significant variability and are essentially constant at a level consistent with the measurement uncertainties. Therefore, we do not detect the radial velocity variations of VB 10 expected due to the presence of an orbiting giant planet similar to that recently proposed by Pravdo and Shaklan based on apparent astrometric perturbations. In addition, we do not confirm the {approx}1 km s{sup -1} radial velocity variability of the star tentatively detected by Zapatero Osorio and colleagues with lower precision measurements. Our measurements rule out planets with M {sub p} > 3 M {sub Jup} and the orbital period and inclination suggested by Pravdo and Shaklan at better than 5{sigma} confidence. We conclude that the planet detection claimed by Pravdo and Shaklan is spurious on the basis of this result. Although the outcome of this work is a non-detection, it illustrates the potential of using ammonia cell radial velocities to detect planets around very low mass stars.

  1. Predicting the Atmospheric Composition of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, A. G.; Moses, J. I.; Friedson, A. J.; Fegley, B., Jr.; Marley, M. S.; Lodders, K.

    2004-01-01

    To date, approximately 120 planet-sized objects have been discovered around other stars, mostly through the radial-velocity technique. This technique can provide information about a planet s minimum mass and its orbital period and distance; however, few other planetary data can be obtained at this point in time unless we are fortunate enough to find an extrasolar giant planet that transits its parent star (i.e., the orbit is edge-on as seen from Earth). In that situation, many physical properties of the planet and its parent star can be determined, including some compositional information. Our prospects of directly obtaining spectra from extrasolar planets may improve in the near future, through missions like NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder. Most of the extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) discovered so far have masses equal to or greater than Jupiter's mass, and roughly 16% have orbital radii less than 0.1 AU - extremely close to the parent star by our own Solar-System standards (note that Mercury is located at a mean distance of 0.39 AU and Jupiter at 5.2 AU from the Sun). Although all EGPs are expected to have hydrogen-dominated atmospheres similar to Jupiter, the orbital distance can strongly affect the planet's temperature, physical, chemical, and spectral properties, and the abundance of minor, detectable atmospheric constituents. Thermochemical equilibrium models can provide good zero-order predictions for the atmospheric composition of EGPs. However, both the composition and spectral properties will depend in large part on disequilibrium processes like photochemistry, chemical kinetics, atmospheric transport, and haze formation. We have developed a photochemical kinetics, radiative transfer, and 1-D vertical transport model to study the atmospheric composition of EGPs. The chemical reaction list contains H-, C-, O-, and N-bearing species and is designed to be valid for atmospheric temperatures ranging from 100-3000 K and pressures up to 50 bar. Here we examine

  2. Predicting the Atmospheric Composition of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, A. G.; Moses, J. I.; Friedson, A. J.; Fegley, B., Jr.; Marley, M. S.; Lodders, K.

    2004-01-01

    To date, approximately 120 planet-sized objects have been discovered around other stars, mostly through the radial-velocity technique. This technique can provide information about a planet s minimum mass and its orbital period and distance; however, few other planetary data can be obtained at this point in time unless we are fortunate enough to find an extrasolar giant planet that transits its parent star (i.e., the orbit is edge-on as seen from Earth). In that situation, many physical properties of the planet and its parent star can be determined, including some compositional information. Our prospects of directly obtaining spectra from extrasolar planets may improve in the near future, through missions like NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder. Most of the extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) discovered so far have masses equal to or greater than Jupiter's mass, and roughly 16% have orbital radii less than 0.1 AU - extremely close to the parent star by our own Solar-System standards (note that Mercury is located at a mean distance of 0.39 AU and Jupiter at 5.2 AU from the Sun). Although all EGPs are expected to have hydrogen-dominated atmospheres similar to Jupiter, the orbital distance can strongly affect the planet's temperature, physical, chemical, and spectral properties, and the abundance of minor, detectable atmospheric constituents. Thermochemical equilibrium models can provide good zero-order predictions for the atmospheric composition of EGPs. However, both the composition and spectral properties will depend in large part on disequilibrium processes like photochemistry, chemical kinetics, atmospheric transport, and haze formation. We have developed a photochemical kinetics, radiative transfer, and 1-D vertical transport model to study the atmospheric composition of EGPs. The chemical reaction list contains H-, C-, O-, and N-bearing species and is designed to be valid for atmospheric temperatures ranging from 100-3000 K and pressures up to 50 bar. Here we examine

  3. On the Minimum Core Mass for Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piso, Ana-Maria; Youdin, Andrew; Murray-Clay, Ruth

    2013-07-01

    The core accretion model proposes that giant planets form by the accretion of gas onto a solid protoplanetary core. Previous studies have found that there exists a "critical core mass" past which hydrostatic solutions can no longer be found and unstable atmosphere collapse occurs. This core mass is typically quoted to be around 10Me. In standard calculations of the critical core mass, planetesimal accretion deposits enough heat to alter the luminosity of the atmosphere, increasing the core mass required for the atmosphere to collapse. In this study we consider the limiting case in which planetesimal accretion is negligible and Kelvin-Helmholtz contraction dominates the luminosity evolution of the planet. We develop a two-layer atmosphere model with an inner convective region and an outer radiative zone that matches onto the protoplanetary disk, and we determine the minimum core mass for a giant planet to form within the typical disk lifetime for a variety of disk conditions. We denote this mass as critical core mass. The absolute minimum core mass required to nucleate atmosphere collapse is ˜ 8Me at 5 AU and steadily decreases to ˜ 3.5Me at 100 AU, for an ideal diatomic gas with a solar composition and a standard ISM opacity law. Lower opacity and disk temperature significantly reduce the critical core mass, while a decrease in the mean molecular weight of the nebular gas results in a larger critical core mass. Our results yield lower mass cores than corresponding studies for large planetesimal accretion rates.

  4. The Properties of Heavy Elements in Giant Planet Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, François; Militzer, Burkhard

    2016-09-01

    The core-accretion model for giant planet formation suggests a two-layer picture for the initial structure of Jovian planets, with heavy elements in a dense core and a thick H-He envelope. Late planetesimal accretion and core erosion could potentially enrich the H-He envelope in heavy elements, which is supported by the threefold solar metallicity that was measured in Jupiter’s atmosphere by the Galileo entry probe. In order to reproduce the observed gravitational moments of Jupiter and Saturn, models for their interiors include heavy elements, Z, in various proportions. However, their effect on the equation of state of the hydrogen-helium mixtures has not been investigated beyond the ideal mixing approximation. In this article, we report results from ab initio simulations of fully interacting H-He-Z mixtures in order to characterize their equation of state and to analyze possible consequences for the interior structure and evolution of giant planets. Considering C, N, O, Si, Fe, MgO, and SiO2, we show that the behavior of heavy elements in H-He mixtures may still be represented by an ideal mixture if the effective volumes and internal energies are chosen appropriately. In the case of oxygen, we also compute the effect on the entropy. We find the resulting changes in the temperature-pressure profile to be small. A homogeneous distribution of 2% oxygen by mass changes the temperature in Jupiter’s interior by only 80 K.

  5. H3+: the driver of giant planet atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Miller, Steve; Stallard, Tom; Smith, Chris; Millward, George; Melin, Henrik; Lystrup, Makenzie; Aylward, Alan

    2006-11-15

    We present a review of recent developments in the use of H3+ molecular ion as a probe of physics and chemistry of the upper atmospheres of giant planets. This ion is shown to be a good tracer of energy inputs into Jupiter (J), Saturn (S) and Uranus (U). It also acts as a 'thermostat', offsetting increases in the energy inputs owing to particle precipitation via cooling to space (J and U). Computer models have established that H3+ is also the main contributor to ionospheric conductivity. The coupling of electric and magnetic fields in the auroral polar regions leads to ion winds, which, in turn, drive neutral circulation systems (J and S). These latter two effects, dependent on H3+, also result in very large heating terms, approximately 5 x 10(12) W for Saturn and greater than 10(14) W for Jupiter, planet-wide; these terms compare with approximately 2.5 x 10(11) W of solar extreme UV absorbed at Saturn and 10(12) W at Jupiter. Thus, H3+ is shown to play a major role in explaining why the temperatures of the giant planets are much greater (by hundreds of kelvin) at the top of the atmosphere than solar inputs alone can account for.

  6. Giant planet formation at the pressure maxima of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilera, O. M.; Sándor, Zs.

    2017-07-01

    Context. In the classical core-accretion planet-formation scenario, rapid inward migration and accretion timescales of kilometer size planetesimals may not favor the formation of massive cores of giant planets before the dissipation of protoplanetary disks. On the other hand, the existence of pressure maxima in the disk could act as migration traps and locations for solid material accumulation, favoring the formation of massive cores. Aims: We aim to study the radial drift of pebbles and planetesimals and planet migration at pressure maxima in a protoplanetary disk and their implications for the formation of massive cores as triggering a gaseous runaway accretion phase. Methods: The time evolution of a viscosity driven accretion disk is solved numerically introducing a a dead zone as a low-viscosity region in the protoplanetary disk. A population of pebbles and planetesimals evolving by radial drift and accretion by the planets is also considered. Finally, the embryos embedded in the disk grow by the simultaneous accretion of pebbles, planetesimals, and the surrounding gas. Results: Our simulations show that the pressure maxima generated at the edges of the low-viscosity region of the disk act as planet migration traps, and that the pebble and planetesimal surface densities are significantly increased due to the radial drift towards pressure maxima locations. However, our simulations also show that migration-trap locations and solid-material-accumulation locations are not exactly at the same positions. Thus, a planet's semi-major axis oscillations around zero torque locations predicted by MHD and HD simulations are needed for the planet to accrete all the available material accumulated at the pressure maxima. Conclusions: Pressure maxima generated at the edges of a low-viscosity region of a protoplanetary disk seem to be preferential locations for the formation and trap of massive cores.

  7. Exploring our outer solar system - The Giant Planet System Observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Sturner, S. J.; Pitman, J. T.

    As space-faring peoples now work together to plan and implement future missions that robotically prepare for landing humans to explore the Moon, and later Mars, the time is right to develop evolutionary approaches for extending this next generation of exploration beyond Earth's terrestrial planet neighbors to the realm of the giant planets. And while initial fly-by missions have been hugely successful in providing exploratory surveys of what lies beyond Mars, we need to consider now what robotic precursor mission capabilities we need to emplace that prepare us properly, and comprehensively, for long-term robotic exploration, and eventual human habitation, beyond Mars to the outer reaches of our solar system. To develop practical strategies that can establish prioritized capabilities, and then develop a means for achieving those capabilities within realistic budget and technology considerations, and in reasonable timeframes, is our challenge. We suggest one component of such an approach to future outer planets exploration is a series of Giant Planets System Observer (GPSO) missions that provide for long- duration observations, monitoring, and relay functions to help advance our understanding of the outer planets and thereby enable a sound basis for planning their eventual exploration by humans. We envision these missions as being comparable to taking Hubble-class remote-sensing facilities, along with the space physics capabilities of long-lived geospace and heliospheric missions, to the giant planet systems and dedicating long observing lifetimes (HST, 16 yr.; Voyagers, 29 yr.) to the exhaustive study and characterization of those systems. GPSO missions could feature 20-yr+ extended mission lifetimes, direct inject trajectories to maximize useful lifetime on target, placement strategies that take advantage of natural environment shielding (e.g., Ganymede magnetic field) where possible, orbit designs having favorable planetary system viewing geometries, comprehensive

  8. The Gemini Planet-finding Campaign: The Frequency Of Giant Planets around Debris Disk Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Biller, Beth A.; Hayward, Thomas L.; Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Skemer, Andrew; Ftaclas, Christ; Chun, Mark; Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Matthias; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Kuchner, Marc; Reid, I. Neill; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.; Alencar, Silvia H. P.; Gregorio-Hetem, Jane; Boss, Alan; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Toomey, Douglas W.

    2013-08-01

    We have completed a high-contrast direct imaging survey for giant planets around 57 debris disk stars as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. We achieved median H-band contrasts of 12.4 mag at 0.''5 and 14.1 mag at 1'' separation. Follow-up observations of the 66 candidates with projected separation <500 AU show that all of them are background objects. To establish statistical constraints on the underlying giant planet population based on our imaging data, we have developed a new Bayesian formalism that incorporates (1) non-detections, (2) single-epoch candidates, (3) astrometric and (4) photometric information, and (5) the possibility of multiple planets per star to constrain the planet population. Our formalism allows us to include in our analysis the previously known β Pictoris and the HR 8799 planets. Our results show at 95% confidence that <13% of debris disk stars have a >=5 M Jup planet beyond 80 AU, and <21% of debris disk stars have a >=3 M Jup planet outside of 40 AU, based on hot-start evolutionary models. We model the population of directly imaged planets as d 2 N/dMdavpropm α a β, where m is planet mass and a is orbital semi-major axis (with a maximum value of a max). We find that β < -0.8 and/or α > 1.7. Likewise, we find that β < -0.8 and/or a max < 200 AU. For the case where the planet frequency rises sharply with mass (α > 1.7), this occurs because all the planets detected to date have masses above 5 M Jup, but planets of lower mass could easily have been detected by our search. If we ignore the β Pic and HR 8799 planets (should they belong to a rare and distinct group), we find that <20% of debris disk stars have a >=3 M Jup planet beyond 10 AU, and β < -0.8 and/or α < -1.5. Likewise, β < -0.8 and/or a max < 125 AU. Our Bayesian constraints are not strong enough to reveal any dependence of the planet frequency on stellar host mass. Studies of transition disks have suggested that about 20% of stars are undergoing planet

  9. THE CALIFORNIA PLANET SURVEY. I. FOUR NEW GIANT EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Peek, Kathryn M. G.; Johnson, John Asher; Fischer, Debra A.; Isaacson, Howard; Wright, Jason T.; Bernat, David; Henry, Gregory W.; Apps, Kevin; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Anderson, Jay; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2010-10-01

    We present precise Doppler measurements of four stars obtained during the past decade at Keck Observatory by the California Planet Survey (CPS). These stars, namely, HD 34445, HD 126614, HD 13931, and Gl 179, all show evidence for a single planet in Keplerian motion. We also present Doppler measurements from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) for two of the stars, HD 34445 and Gl 179, that confirm the Keck detections and significantly refine the orbital parameters. These planets add to the statistical properties of giant planets orbiting near or beyond the ice line, and merit follow-up by astrometry, imaging, and space-borne spectroscopy. Their orbital parameters span wide ranges of planetary minimum mass (M sin i = 0.38-1.9 M{sub Jup}), orbital period (P = 2.87-11.5 yr), semimajor axis (a = 2.1-5.2 AU), and eccentricity (e = 0.02-0.41). HD 34445 b (P = 2.87 yr, M sin i = 0.79 M{sub Jup}, e = 0.27) is a massive planet orbiting an old, G-type star. We announce a planet, HD 126614 Ab, and an M dwarf, HD 126614 B, orbiting the metal-rich star HD 126614 (which we now refer to as HD 126614 A). The planet, HD 126614 Ab, has minimum mass M sin i = 0.38 M{sub Jup} and orbits the stellar primary with period P = 3.41 yr and orbital separation a = 2.3 AU. The faint M dwarf companion, HD 126614 B, is separated from the stellar primary by 489 mas (33 AU) and was discovered with direct observations using adaptive optics and the PHARO camera at Palomar Observatory. The stellar primary in this new system, HD 126614 A, has the highest measured metallicity ([Fe/H] = +0.56) of any known planet-bearing star. HD 13931 b (P = 11.5 yr, M sin i = 1.88 M{sub Jup}, e = 0.02) is a Jupiter analog orbiting a near solar twin. Gl 179 b (P = 6.3 yr, M sin i = 0.82 M{sub Jup}, e = 0.21) is a massive planet orbiting a faint M dwarf. The high metallicity of Gl 179 is consistent with the planet-metallicity correlation among M dwarfs, as documented recently by Johnson and Apps.

  10. Numerical models of giant planet formation with rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycansky, D. G.; Pollack, J. B.; Bodenheimer, P.

    1991-01-01

    A 1D quasi-spherical approximation is presently used under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium to model giant-planet formation processes that encompass the accretion and transport of angular momentum for both radiative and convective zones. These calculations have been conducted up to masses comparable to those of Saturn. Angular momentum transport is strong, leading to strong concentration of angular momentum in the outer convective zones which develop envelope masses greater than 30 earth masses. When the models are allowed to contract near the calculation's end, the ratio of centrifugal force to gravity at the outer radius rises sufficiently to validate the quasi-spherical approximation.

  11. Core Accretion - Gas Capture Model for Gas Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubickyj, O.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lissauer, J. J.

    2005-12-01

    The core accretion - gas capture model is generally accepted as the standard formation model for gas giant planets. This model proposes that a solid core grows via the accretion of planetesimals and then captures a massive envelope from the solar nebula gas. Simulations based on this model (Pollack et al. 1996, Bodenheimer et al. 2000) have been successful in explaining many features of giant planets. We have computed simulations (Hubickyj et al. 2005) of the growth of Jupiter using various values for the opacity produced by grains in the protoplanet's atmosphere and for the initial planetesimal surface density in the protoplanetary disk. We also explore the implications of halting the solid accretion at selected core mass values during the protoplanet's growth. Halting planetesimal accretion at low core mass simulates the presence of a competing embryo, and decreasing the atmospheric opacity due to grains emulates the settling and coagulation of grains within the protoplanet's atmosphere. We examine the effects of adjusting these parameters to determine whether or not gas runaway can occur for small mass cores on a reasonable timescale. Our results demonstrate that reducing grain opacities results in formation times less than half of those for models computed with full interstellar grain opacity values. The reduction of opacity due to grains in the upper portion of the envelope with T ≤ 500 K has the largest effect on the lowering of the formation time. If the accretion of planetesimals is not cut off prior to the accretion of gas, then decreasing the surface density of planetesimals lowers the final core mass of the protoplanet, but increases the formation timescale considerably. Finally, a core mass cutoff results in a reduction of the time needed for a protoplanet to evolve to the stage of runaway gas accretion, provided the cutoff mass is sufficiently large. The overall results indicate that, with reasonable parameters, it is possible that Jupiter formed at

  12. Forming Big Moons Through Capture Around Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Darren M.

    2010-10-01

    Agnor and Hamilton (2006 Nature 441:192-194) have convincingly demonstrated how Triton might have been captured in a three-body "binary-exchange” encounter involving Neptune and Pluto-mass binary. In such an event, a binary terrestrial object is tidally disrupted by a giant planet and one member of the binary is lost while the other member is captured. Here we consider how the process might play out for more massive binaries over a plausible range of encounter circumstances, and we show that such encounters sometimes produce moons exceeding a Mars mass around Jupiter-class planets. Binary-exchange capture might then be the best way to form moons large enough to hold onto temperate atmospheres and harbor water-dependent life.

  13. Could giant impacts cripple core dynamos of small terrestrial planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar; Ghods, Abdolreza

    2011-04-01

    Large impacts not only create giant basins on terrestrial planets but also heat their interior by shock waves. We investigate the impacts that have created the largest basins existing on the planets: Utopia on Mars, Caloris on Mercury, Aitken on Moon, all formed at ˜4 Ga. We determine the impact-induced temperature increases in the interior of a planet using the "foundering" shock heating model of Watters et al. (Watters, W.A., Zuber, M.T., Hager, B.H. [2009]. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E02001. doi: 10.1029/2007JE002964). The post-impact thermal evolution of the planet is investigated using 2D axi-symmetric convection in a spherical shell of temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity, and pressure-dependent thermal expansion. The impact heating creates a superheated giant plume in the upper mantle which ascends rapidly and develops a strong convection in the mantle of the sub-impact hemisphere. The upwelling of the plume rapidly sweeps up the impact-heated base of the mantle away from the core-mantle boundary and replaces it with the colder surrounding material, thus reducing the effects of the impact-heated base of the mantle on the heat flux out of core. However, direct shock heating of the core stratifies the core, suppresses the pre-existing thermal convection, and cripples a pre-existing thermally-driven core dynamo. It takes about 17, 4, and 5 Myr for the stratified cores of Mars, Mercury, and Moon to exhaust impact heat and resume global convection, possibly regenerating core dynamos.

  14. THE PAN-PACIFIC PLANET SEARCH. I. A GIANT PLANET ORBITING 7 CMa

    SciTech Connect

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Tinney, C. G.; Endl, Michael; Wang Liang; Johnson, John Asher; O'Toole, S. J.

    2011-12-20

    We introduce the Pan-Pacific Planet Search, a survey of 170 metal-rich Southern Hemisphere subgiants using the 3.9 m Anglo-Australian Telescope. We report the first discovery from this program, a giant planet orbiting 7 CMa (HD 47205) with a period of 763 {+-} 17 days, eccentricity e = 0.14 {+-} 0.06, and msin i = 2.6 {+-} 0.6 M{sub Jup}. The host star is a K giant with a mass of 1.5 {+-} 0.3 M{sub Sun} and metallicity [Fe/H] = 0.21 {+-} 0.10. The mass and period of 7 CMa b are typical of planets which have been found to orbit intermediate-mass stars (M{sub *} > 1.3 M{sub Sun }). Hipparcos photometry shows this star to be stable to 0.0004 mag on the radial-velocity period, giving confidence that this signal can be attributed to reflex motion caused by an orbiting planet.

  15. A SEARCH FOR GIANT PLANET COMPANIONS TO T TAURI STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Hartigan, Patrick M.; Prato, L.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2012-12-20

    We present results from an ongoing multiwavelength radial velocity (RV) survey of the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region as part of our effort to identify pre-main-sequence giant planet hosts. These 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars present significant challenges to traditional RV surveys. The presence of strong magnetic fields gives rise to large, cool star spots. These spots introduce significant RV jitter which can mimic the velocity modulation from a planet-mass companion. To distinguish between spot-induced and planet-induced RV modulation, we conduct observations at {approx}6700 A and {approx}2.3 {mu}m and measure the wavelength dependence (if any) in the RV amplitude. CSHELL observations of the known exoplanet host Gl 86 demonstrate our ability to detect not only hot Jupiters in the near-infrared but also secular trends from more distant companions. Observations of nine very young stars reveal a typical reduction in RV amplitude at the longer wavelengths by a factor of {approx}2-3. While we cannot confirm the presence of planets in this sample, three targets show different periodicities in the two wavelength regions. This suggests different physical mechanisms underlying the optical and the K-band variability.

  16. METALLICITIES OF PLANET-HOSTING STARS: A SAMPLE OF GIANTS AND SUBGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, L.; Cunha, K.; Schuler, S. C.; Smith, V. V.

    2010-12-10

    This work presents a homogeneous derivation of atmospheric parameters and iron abundances for a sample of giant and subgiant stars which host giant planets, as well as a control sample of subgiant stars not known to host giant planets. The analysis is done using the same technique as for our previous analysis of a large sample of planet-hosting and control sample dwarf stars. A comparison between the distributions of [Fe/H] in planet-hosting main-sequence (MS) stars, subgiants, and giants within these samples finds that the MS stars and subgiants have the same mean metallicity of ([Fe/H]){approx_equal} +0.11 dex, while the giant sample is typically more metal poor, having an average metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.06 dex. The fact that the subgiants have the same average metallicities as the dwarfs indicates that significant accretion of solid metal-rich material onto the planet-hosting stars has not taken place, as such material would be diluted in the evolution from dwarf to subgiant. The lower metallicity found for the planet-hosting giant stars in comparison with the planet-hosting dwarfs and subgiants is interpreted as being related to the underlying stellar mass, with giants having larger masses and thus, on average, larger-mass protoplanetary disks. In core accretion models of planet formation, larger disk masses can contain the critical amount of metals necessary to form giant planets even at lower metallicities.

  17. Discovery of a warm, dusty giant planet around HIP 65426

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, G.; Desidera, S.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Vigan, A.; Gratton, R.; Langlois, M.; Bonnefoy, M.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Feldt, M.; Mouillet, D.; Meyer, M.; Cheetham, A.; Biller, B.; Boccaletti, A.; D'Orazi, V.; Galicher, R.; Hagelberg, J.; Maire, A.-L.; Mesa, D.; Olofsson, J.; Samland, M.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Sissa, E.; Bonavita, M.; Charnay, B.; Cudel, M.; Daemgen, S.; Delorme, P.; Janin-Potiron, P.; Janson, M.; Keppler, M.; Le Coroller, H.; Ligi, R.; Marleau, G. D.; Messina, S.; Mollière, P.; Mordasini, C.; Müller, A.; Peretti, S.; Perrot, C.; Rodet, L.; Rouan, D.; Zurlo, A.; Dominik, C.; Henning, T.; Menard, F.; Schmid, H.-M.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Vakili, F.; Abe, L.; Antichi, J.; Baruffolo, A.; Baudoz, P.; Baudrand, J.; Blanchard, P.; Bazzon, A.; Buey, T.; Carbillet, M.; Carle, M.; Charton, J.; Cascone, E.; Claudi, R.; Costille, A.; Deboulbe, A.; De Caprio, V.; Dohlen, K.; Fantinel, D.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gigan, P.; Giro, E.; Gisler, D.; Gluck, L.; Hubin, N.; Hugot, E.; Jaquet, M.; Kasper, M.; Madec, F.; Magnard, Y.; Martinez, P.; Maurel, D.; Le Mignant, D.; Möller-Nilsson, O.; Llored, M.; Moulin, T.; Origné, A.; Pavlov, A.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Pragt, J.; Puget, P.; Rabou, P.; Ramos, J.; Rigal, R.; Rochat, S.; Roelfsema, R.; Rousset, G.; Roux, A.; Salasnich, B.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Sevin, A.; Soenke, C.; Stadler, E.; Suarez, M.; Weber, L.; Wildi, F.; Antoniucci, S.; Augereau, J.-C.; Baudino, J.-L.; Brandner, W.; Engler, N.; Girard, J.; Gry, C.; Kral, Q.; Kopytova, T.; Lagadec, E.; Milli, J.; Moutou, C.; Schlieder, J.; Szulágyi, J.; Thalmann, C.; Wahhaj, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Aims: The SHINE program is a high-contrast near-infrared survey of 600 young, nearby stars aimed at searching for and characterizing new planetary systems using VLT/SPHERE's unprecedented high-contrast and high-angular-resolution imaging capabilities. It is also intended to place statistical constraints on the rate, mass and orbital distributions of the giant planet population at large orbits as a function of the stellar host mass and age to test planet-formation theories. Methods: We used the IRDIS dual-band imager and the IFS integral field spectrograph of SPHERE to acquire high-contrast coronagraphic differential near-infrared images and spectra of the young A2 star HIP 65426. It is a member of the 17 Myr old Lower Centaurus-Crux association. Results: At a separation of 830 mas (92 au projected) from the star, we detect a faint red companion. Multi-epoch observations confirm that it shares common proper motion with HIP 65426. Spectro-photometric measurements extracted with IFS and IRDIS between 0.95 and 2.2 μm indicate a warm, dusty atmosphere characteristic of young low-surface-gravity L5-L7 dwarfs. Hot-start evolutionary models predict a luminosity consistent with a 6-12 MJup, Teff = 1300-1600 K and R = 1.5 ± 0.1 RJup giant planet. Finally, the comparison with Exo-REM and PHOENIX BT-Settl synthetic atmosphere models gives consistent effective temperatures but with slightly higher surface gravity solutions of log (g) = 4.0-5.0 with smaller radii (1.0-1.3 RJup). Conclusions: Given its physical and spectral properties, HIP 65426 b occupies a rather unique placement in terms of age, mass, and spectral-type among the currently known imaged planets. It represents a particularly interesting case to study the presence of clouds as a function of particle size, composition, and location in the atmosphere, to search for signatures of non-equilibrium chemistry, and finally to test the theory of planet formation and evolution. Based on observations collected at La Silla

  18. A possible giant planet orbiting the cataclysmic variable LX Ser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Hu, Shaoming; Zhou, Jilin; Wu, Donghong; Guo, Difu; Jiang, Yunguo; Gao, Dongyang; Chen, Xu; Wang, Xianyu

    2017-04-01

    LX Ser is a deeply eclipsing cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 0.1584325 d. 62 new eclipse times were determined by our observations and the AAVSO International Data base. Combining all available eclipse times, we analyzed the O - C behavior of LX Ser. We found that the O - C diagram of LX Ser shows a sinusoidal oscillation with a period of 22.8 yr and an amplitude of 0.00035 d. Two mechanisms (i.e., the Applegate mechanism and the light-travel time effect) are applied to explain the cyclic modulation. We found that it is difficult to apply the Applegate mechanism to explain the cyclic oscillation in the orbital period. Therefore, the cyclic period change is most likely to be caused by the light-travel time effect due to the presence of a third body. The mass of the tertiary component was determined to be M3 ∼ 7.5 MJup. We supposed that the tertiary companion is plausibly a giant planet. The stability of the giant planet was checked, and we found that the multiple system is stable.

  19. A possible giant planet orbiting the cataclysmic variable LX Ser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Hu, Shaoming; Zhou, Jilin; Wu, Donghong; Guo, Difu; Jiang, Yunguo; Gao, Dongyang; Chen, Xu; Wang, Xianyu

    2017-02-01

    LX Ser is a deeply eclipsing cataclysmic variable with an orbital period of 0.1584325 d. 62 new eclipse times were determined by our observations and the AAVSO International Data base. Combining all available eclipse times, we analyzed the O - C behavior of LX Ser. We found that the O - C diagram of LX Ser shows a sinusoidal oscillation with a period of 22.8 yr and an amplitude of 0.00035 d. Two mechanisms (i.e., the Applegate mechanism and the light-travel time effect) are applied to explain the cyclic modulation. We found that it is difficult to apply the Applegate mechanism to explain the cyclic oscillation in the orbital period. Therefore, the cyclic period change is most likely to be caused by the light-travel time effect due to the presence of a third body. The mass of the tertiary component was determined to be M3 ∼ 7.5 MJup. We supposed that the tertiary companion is plausibly a giant planet. The stability of the giant planet was checked, and we found that the multiple system is stable.

  20. Compressible convection in the deep atmospheres of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris A.; Kuzanyan, Kirill M.

    2009-11-01

    Fast rotating giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn possess alternate prograde and retrograde zonal winds which are stable over long periods of time. We consider a compressible model of convection in a spherical shell with rapid rotation, using the anelastic approximation, to explore the parameter range for which such zonal flows can be produced. We consider models with a large variation in density across the layer. Our models are based only on the molecular H/He region above the metallic hydrogen transition at about 2 Mbar, and we do not include the hydromagnetic effects which may be important if the electrical conductivity is significant. We find that the convective velocities are significantly higher in the low density regions of the shell, but the zonal flow is almost independent of the z-coordinate parallel to the rotation axis. We analyse how this behaviour is consistent with the Proudman-Taylor theorem. We find that deep prograde zonal flow near the equator is a very robust feature of our models. Prograde and retrograde jets alternating in latitude can occur inside the tangent cylinder in compressible as well as Boussinesq models, particularly at lower Prandtl numbers. However, the zonal jets inside the tangent cylinder are suppressed if a no-slip condition is imposed at the inner boundary. This suggests that deep high latitude jets may be suppressed if there is significant magnetic dissipation. Our compressible calculations include the viscous dissipation in the entropy equation, and we find this is comparable to, and in some cases exceeds, the total heat flux emerging from the surface. For numerical reasons, these simulations cannot reach the extremely low Ekman number found in giant planets, and they necessarily also have a much larger heat flux than planets. We therefore discuss how our results might scale down to give solutions with lower dissipation and lower heat flux.

  1. Detection of Hot Earths by Giant Planet Transit Tming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Sada, Pedro

    2008-08-01

    Many exoplanet systems contain Jupiter-mass planets on close-in orbits. Theories of planetary system formation account for these hot Jupiters as being end states of inward migration. Variants of those theories also predict terrestrial planets to be captured in mean motion resonance with the hot Jupiters. A recent explosion of discoveries by transit surveys have given us a sample of 25 hot Jupiters transiting stars brighter than V=13. A transit timing survey of these systems could detect hot Earths in resonance, via the large (typically 180 second) perturbations they induce on the giant planet transits. The relatively large sample now available implies that a transit timing survey is well matched to classical observing and telescope scheduling. We propose exploratory observations to perform transit photometry using the 2.1-meter/FLAMINGOS instrument in the J-band, where stellar limb darkening is minimal and transit photometry has maximum sensitivity to shifts in transit time. If our exploratory observations confirm timing precision approaching the predicted values (about 10 seconds for a typical system), we will propose additional observations in later semesters to establish a timing survey.

  2. Timing of the formation and migration of giant planets as constrained by CB chondrites

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brandon C.; Walsh, Kevin J.; Minton, David A.; Krot, Alexander N.; Levison, Harold F.

    2016-01-01

    The presence, formation, and migration of giant planets fundamentally shape planetary systems. However, the timing of the formation and migration of giant planets in our solar system remains largely unconstrained. Simulating planetary accretion, we find that giant planet migration produces a relatively short-lived spike in impact velocities lasting ~0.5 My. These high-impact velocities are required to vaporize a significant fraction of Fe,Ni metal and silicates and produce the CB (Bencubbin-like) metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites, a unique class of meteorites that were created in an impact vapor-melt plume ~5 My after the first solar system solids. This indicates that the region where the CB chondrites formed was dynamically excited at this early time by the direct interference of the giant planets. Furthermore, this suggests that the formation of the giant planet cores was protracted and the solar nebula persisted until ~5 My. PMID:27957541

  3. Timing of the formation and migration of giant planets as constrained by CB chondrites.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brandon C; Walsh, Kevin J; Minton, David A; Krot, Alexander N; Levison, Harold F

    2016-12-01

    The presence, formation, and migration of giant planets fundamentally shape planetary systems. However, the timing of the formation and migration of giant planets in our solar system remains largely unconstrained. Simulating planetary accretion, we find that giant planet migration produces a relatively short-lived spike in impact velocities lasting ~0.5 My. These high-impact velocities are required to vaporize a significant fraction of Fe,Ni metal and silicates and produce the CB (Bencubbin-like) metal-rich carbonaceous chondrites, a unique class of meteorites that were created in an impact vapor-melt plume ~5 My after the first solar system solids. This indicates that the region where the CB chondrites formed was dynamically excited at this early time by the direct interference of the giant planets. Furthermore, this suggests that the formation of the giant planet cores was protracted and the solar nebula persisted until ~5 My.

  4. PLANETS AROUND THE K-GIANTS BD+20 274 AND HD 219415

    SciTech Connect

    Gettel, S.; Wolszczan, A.; Niedzielski, A.; Nowak, G.; Adamow, M.; Zielinski, P.; Maciejewski, G. E-mail: alex@astro.psu.edu

    2012-09-01

    We present the discovery of planet-mass companions to two giant stars by the ongoing Penn State-Torun Planet Search conducted with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The less massive of these stars, K5-giant BD+20 274, has a 4.2 M{sub J} minimum mass planet orbiting the star at a 578 day period and a more distant, likely stellar-mass companion. The best currently available model of the planet orbiting the K0-giant HD 219415 points to a {approx}> Jupiter-mass companion in a 5.7 year, eccentric orbit around the star, making it the longest period planet yet detected by our survey. This planet has an amplitude of {approx}18 m s{sup -1}, comparable to the median radial velocity 'jitter', typical of giant stars.

  5. Giant planets: Clues on current and past organic chemistry in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Atreya, Sushil K.

    1992-01-01

    The giant planets of the outer solar system - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune - were formed in the same flattened disk of gas and dust, the solar nebula, as the terrestrial planets were. Yet, the giant planets differ in some very fundamental ways from the terrestrial planets. Despite enormous differences, the giant planets are relevant to exobiology in general and the origin of life on the Earth in particular. The giant planets are described as they are today. Their basic properties and the chemistry occurring in their atmospheres is discussed. Theories of their origin are explored and aspects of these theories that may have relevance to exobiology and the origin of life on Earth are stressed.

  6. A DEFINITION FOR GIANT PLANETS BASED ON THE MASS–DENSITY RELATIONSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Rauer, Heike E-mail: Heike.Rauer@dlr.de

    2015-09-10

    We present the mass–density relationship (log M − log ρ) for objects with masses ranging from planets (M ≈ 0.01 M{sub Jup}) to stars (M > 0.08 M{sub ⊙}). This relationship shows three distinct regions separated by a change in slope in the log M − log ρ plane. In particular, objects with masses in the range 0.3 M{sub Jup}–60 M{sub Jup} follow a tight linear relationship with no distinguishing feature to separate the low-mass end (giant planets) from the high-mass end (brown dwarfs). We propose a new definition of giant planets simply based on changes in the slope of the log M versus log ρ relationship. By this criterion, objects with masses less than ≈0.3 M{sub Jup} are low-mass planets, either icy or rocky. Giant planets cover the mass range 0.3 M{sub Jup}–60 M{sub Jup}. Analogous to the stellar main sequence, objects on the upper end of the giant planet sequence (brown dwarfs) can simply be referred to as “high-mass giant planets,” while planets with masses near that of Jupiter can be called “low-mass giant planets.”.

  7. Photochemical aerosols on Titan and the giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R.

    2015-10-01

    Our ideas about the nature of photochemical aerosols on Titan and the giant planets is evolving thanks to new data coming in from the Cassini spacecraft, ground-based and space-based telescopes, and theory and modeling. Aerosol formation begins at altitudes around 1000 km on Titan and around 800 km above the 1-bar pressure level in the polar thermospheres of Jupiter and Saturn where auroral energy is available to form ions and radicals. We have evidence that hydrocarbon chemistry is important in aerosol formation for all of these bodies and we believe that hydrazine on Jupiter and phosphine on Saturn may lead to aerosol production. Aeroso ls have a fractal aggregate structure on Titan and in the polar regions of Jupiter and Saturn. Their vertical and horizontal distributions reflect a balance between local production and horizontal and vertical transport governed by eddies and jets. They are important for radiative energy balance in ways that have only recently come to light.

  8. Debris disks as signposts of terrestrial planet formation. II. Dependence of exoplanet architectures on giant planet and disk properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, S. N.; Armitage, P. J.; Moro-Martín, A.; Booth, M.; Wyatt, M. C.; Armstrong, J. C.; Mandell, A. M.; Selsis, F.; West, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    We present models for the formation of terrestrial planets, and the collisional evolution of debris disks, in planetary systems that contain multiple marginally unstable gas giants. We previously showed that in such systems, the dynamics of the giant planets introduces a correlation between the presence of terrestrial planets and cold dust, i.e., debris disks, which is particularly pronounced at λ ~ 70 μm. Here we present new simulations that show that this connection is qualitatively robust to a range of parameters: the mass distribution of the giant planets, the width and mass distribution of the outer planetesimal disk, and the presence of gas in the disk when the giant planets become unstable. We discuss how variations in these parameters affect the evolution. We find that systems with equal-mass giant planets undergo the most violent instabilities, and that these destroy both terrestrial planets and the outer planetesimal disks that produce debris disks. In contrast, systems with low-mass giant planets efficiently produce both terrestrial planets and debris disks. A large fraction of systems with low-mass (M ≲ 30 M⊕) outermost giant planets have final planetary separations that, scaled to the planets' masses, are as large or larger than the Saturn-Uranus and Uranus-Neptune separations in the solar system. We find that the gaps between these planets are not only dynamically stable to test particles, but are frequently populated by planetesimals. The possibility of planetesimal belts between outer giant planets should be taken into account when interpreting debris disk SEDs. In addition, the presence of ~ Earth-mass "seeds" in outer planetesimal disks causes the disks to radially spread to colder temperatures, and leads to a slow depletion of the outer planetesimal disk from the inside out. We argue that this may explain the very low frequency of >1 Gyr-old solar-type stars with observed 24 μm excesses. Our simulations do not sample the full range of

  9. Star-planet interactions. IV. Possibility of detecting the orbit-shrinking of a planet around a red giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Eggenberger, Patrick; Privitera, Giovanni; Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia; Alibert, Yann; Lovis, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    The surface rotations of some red giants are so fast that they must have been spun up by tidal interaction with a close companion, either another star, a brown dwarf, or a planet. We focus here on the case of red giants that are spun up by tidal interaction with a planet. When the distance between the planet and the star decreases, the spin period of the star decreases, the orbital period of the planet decreases, and the reflex motion of the star increases. We study the change rate of these three quantities when the circular orbit of a planet of 15 MJ that initially orbits a 2 M⊙ star at 1 au shrinks under the action of tidal forces during the red giant phase. We use stellar evolution models coupled with computations of the orbital evolution of the planet, which allows us to follow the exchanges of angular momentum between the star and the orbit in a consistent way. We obtain that the reflex motion of the red giant star increases by more than 1 m s-1 per year in the last 40 yr before the planet engulfment. During this phase, the reflex motion of the star is between 660 and 710 m s-1. The spin period of the star increases by more than about 10 min per year in the last 3000 yr before engulfment. During this period, the spin period of the star is shorter than 0.7 yr. During this same period, the variation in orbital period, which is shorter than 0.18 yr, is on the same order of magnitude. Changes in reflex-motion and spin velocities are very small and thus most likely out of reach of being observed. The most promising way of detecting this effect is through observations of transiting planets, that is, through changes of the beginning or end of the transit. For the relatively long orbital periods expected around red giants, long observing runs of typically a few years are needed. Interesting star-planet systems that currently are in this stage of orbit-shrinking would be red giants with fast rotation (above typically 4-5 km s-1), a low surface gravity (log g lower

  10. Survival of the Jovian Planets with the Sun a Red Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Samuel C.

    1985-12-01

    The survival of the Jovian planets and their satellites as the Sun becomes a red giant is considered. It is found that the Jovian planets would not lose any matter - not even hydrogen. The satellites would lose their gaseous or volatile envelopes. Their rocky cores would resist melting and survive. Both the planets and the satellites would be unsuited to support human life.

  11. Effects of mass loss for highly-irradiated giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Hattori, M. F.; Burrows, A.; Hubeny, I.; Sudarsky, D.

    2007-04-01

    We present calculations for the evolution and surviving mass of highly-irradiated extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) at orbital semimajor axes ranging from 0.023 to 0.057 AU using a generalized scaled theory for mass loss, together with new surface-condition grids for hot EGPs and a consistent treatment of tidal truncation. Theoretical estimates for the rate of energy-limited hydrogen escape from giant-planet atmospheres differ by two orders of magnitude, when one holds planetary mass, composition, and irradiation constant. Baraffe et al. [Baraffe, I., Selsis, F., Chabrier, G., Barman, T.S., Allard, F., Hauschildt, P.H., Lammer, H., 2004. Astron. Astrophys. 419, L13-L16] predict the highest rate, based on the theory of Lammer et al. [Lammer, H., Selsis, F., Ribas, I., Guinan, E.F., Bauer, S.J., Weiss, W.W., 2003. Astrophys. J. 598, L121-L124]. Scaling the theory of Watson et al. [Watson, A.J., Donahue, T.M., Walker, J.C.G., 1981. Icarus 48, 150-166] to parameters for a highly-irradiated exoplanet, we find an escape rate ˜10 lower than Baraffe's. With the scaled Watson theory we find modest mass loss, occurring early in the history of a hot EGP. In this theory, mass loss including the effect of Roche-lobe overflow becomes significant primarily for masses below a Saturn mass, for semimajor axes ⩾0.023 AU. This contrasts with the Baraffe model, where hot EGPs are claimed to be remnants of much more massive bodies, originally several times Jupiter and still losing substantial mass fractions at present.

  12. Homogeneous abundance analysis of FGK dwarf, subgiant, and giant stars with and without giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Ronaldo; Milone, André de C.; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We have analyzed high-resolution and high signal-to-noise-ratio optical spectra of nearby FGK stars with and without detected giant planets in order to homogeneously measure their photospheric parameters, mass, age, and the abundances of volatile (C, N, and O) and refractory (Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ba) elements. Our sample contains 309 stars from the solar neighborhood (up to the distance of 100 pc), out of which 140 are dwarfs, 29 are subgiants, and 140 are giants. Methods: The photospheric parameters are derived from the equivalent widths of Fe i and Fe ii lines. Masses and ages come from the interpolation in evolutionary tracks and isochrones on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. The abundance determination is based on the equivalent widths of selected atomic lines of the refractory elements and on the spectral synthesis of C2, CN, C i, O i, and Na i features. We apply a set of statistical methods to analyze the abundances derived for the three subsamples. Results: Our results show that: i) giant stars systematically exhibit underabundance in [C/Fe] and overabundance in [N/Fe] and [Na/Fe] in comparison with dwarfs, a result that is normally attributed to evolution-induced mixing processes in the envelope of evolved stars; ii) for solar analogs alone, the abundance trends with the condensation temperature of the elements are correlated with age and anticorrelated with the surface gravity, which agrees with recent studies; iii) as in the case of [Fe/H], dwarf stars with giant planets are systematically enriched in [X/H] for all the analyzed elements, except for O and Ba (the former due to limitations of statistics), confirming previous findings in the literature that it is not only iron that has an important relation with the planetary formation; and iv) giant planet hosts are also significantly overabundant for the same metallicity when the elements from Mg to Cu are combined. Based on public data from the ELODIE archive (Moultaka et al

  13. Giant Planet Atmospheres: The Illusion of Element Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Tobias; Bolton, Scott

    2015-04-01

    Contrary to expectation, the mass spectrometer on the Galileo Probe into Jupiter's atmosphere revealed that the abundances of N, C, S, Ar Kr, and Xe relative to hydrogen are all super-solar (Niemann et al. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 22831-22846 (1996), Owen et al. Nature 402, 269-270 (1999)). The most recent values and their uncertainties for both Jovian and solar abundances show an apparent enrichment of 3.5±1.5 X the solar values Subsequently the abundance of carbon (as methane) on Saturn was found by the Cassini IR spectrometer (CIRS) to be 10.9±0.5 X solar (Fletcher et al. Icarus 199, 351-367 (2009)). Attempts to explain these anomalies have focused on delivery of the excess abundances by icy planetesimals. However, new studies of 15N/14N in Saturn, comets and the solar wind support an alternative hypothesis viz., these apparent super-solar abundances are actually the result of a depletion of hydrogen and helium in the matter that made the planets (Guillot and Hueso, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 367, L47-L51 (2006)). This depletion is the result of photoevaporation and viscous spreading of the solar nebula. There is no requirement for augmentation of specific element abundances; the accretion-collapse model for giant planet formation remains valid.

  14. On the Nature and Timing of Giant Planet Migration in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnor, Craig B.

    2016-05-01

    Giant planet migration is a natural outcome of gravitational scattering and planet formation processes (Fernandez & Ip 1984). There is compelling evidence that the solar system's giant planets experienced large-scale migration involving close approaches between planets as well as smooth radial migration via planetesimal scattering. Aspects of giant planet migration have been invoked to explain many features of the outer solar system including the resonant structure of the Kuiper Belt (e.g., Malhotra 1993, Levison et al. 2008), the eccentricities of Jupiter and Saturn (Tsiganis et al. 2005, Morbidelli et al. 2009), the capture of Jupiter's Trojan companions (Morbidelli et al. 2005) and the capture of irregular planetary satellites (e.g., Nesvorny et al. 2007) to name a few. If this migration epoch occurred after the formation of the inner planets, then it may also explain the so-called lunar Late Heavy Bombardment (Gomes et al. 2005). This scenario necessarily requires coeval terrestrial and migrating giant planets. Recent N-body integrations exploring this issue have shown that giant planet migration may excite the terrestrial system via nodal and apsidal secular resonances (e.g., Brasser et al. 2013), may drive the terrestrial planets to crossing orbits (Kaib & Chambers 2016) or alternatively leave the inner solar system in a state closely resembling the observed one (Roig et al. 2016). The factors accounting for the large range of outcomes remain unclear. Using linear secular models and N-body simulations I am identifying and characterising the principal aspects of giant planet migration that excite the terrestrial planets' orbits. I will present these results and discuss how they inform the nature and timing of giant planet migration in the solar system.

  15. Evaluating Key Processes the Formation of Giant Planet Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levison, Harold F.; Thommes, E.; Duncan, M. J.

    2009-09-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in our understanding of planet formation is how Jupiter and Saturn could have formed before the the solar nebula dispersed. The most popular model of giant planet formation is the so-called 'core accretion' model. In this model a large planetary embryo formed first, mainly by two-body accretion. This is then followed by a period of inflow of nebular gas directly onto the growing planet. The core accretion model has an Achilles heel, namely the very first step. We have undertaken the most comprehensive study of this process to date. In this study we numerically integrate the orbits of a number of planetary embryos embedded in a swarm of planetesimals. In these experiments we have included a large number of physical processes that might enhance accretion. In particular, we have included: 1) aerodynamic gas drag, 2) collisional damping between planetesimals, 3) enhanced embryo cross-sections due to their atmospheres, 4) planetesimal fragmentation, and 5) planetesimal driven migration. We find that the gravitational interaction between the embryos and the planetesimals lead to the wholesale redistribution of material - regions are cleared of material and gaps open near the embryos. Indeed, in 90% of our simulations without fragmentation, the region near that embryos is cleared of planetesimals before much growth can occur. The remaining 10%, however, the embryos undergo a burst of outward migration that significantly increases growth. On timescales of 100,000 years, the outer embryo can migrate 6 AU and grow to roughly 30 Earth-masses. We also find that the inclusion of planetesimal fragmentation tends to inhibit growth. This work as been directly supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (Award ID 0708775). HFL is also grateful for funding from NASA's Origins and OPR programs.

  16. Exploring extrasolar worlds: from gas giants to terrestrial habitable planets.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Griffith, Caitlin A; Swain, Mark R; Deroo, Pieter; Beaulieu, Jean Philippe; Vasisht, Gautam; Kipping, David; Waldmann, Ingo; Tennyson, Jonathan; Barber, Robert J; Bouwman, Jeroen; Allard, Nicole; Brown, Linda R

    2010-01-01

    Almost 500 extrasolar planets have been found since the discovery of 51 Peg b by Mayor and Queloz in 1995. The traditional field of planetology has thus expanded its frontiers to include planetary environments not represented in our Solar System. We expect that in the next five years space missions (Corot, Kepler and GAIA) or ground-based detection techniques will both increase exponentially the number of new planets discovered and lower the present limit of a approximately 1.9 Earth-mass object [e.g. Mayor et al., Astron. Astrophys., 2009, 507, 487]. While the search for an Earth-twin orbiting a Sun-twin has been one of the major goals pursued by the exoplanet community in the past years, the possibility of sounding the atmospheric composition and structure of an increasing sample of exoplanets with current telescopes has opened new opportunities, unthinkable just a few years ago. As a result, it is possible now not only to determine the orbital characteristics of the new bodies, but moreover to study the exotic environments that lie tens of parsecs away from us. The analysis of the starlight not intercepted by the thin atmospheric limb of its planetary companion (transit spectroscopy), or of the light emitted/reflected by the exoplanet itself, will guide our understanding of the atmospheres and the surfaces of these extrasolar worlds in the next few years. Preliminary results obtained by interpreting current atmospheric observations of transiting gas giants and Neptunes are presented. While the full characterisation of an Earth-twin might requires a technological leap, our understanding of large terrestrial planets (so called super-Earths) orbiting bright, later-type stars is within reach by current space and ground telescopes.

  17. Magnetic coupling in the disks around young gas giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, T. E-mail: mhlee@hku.hk

    2014-03-01

    We examine the conditions under which the disks of gas and dust orbiting young gas giant planets are sufficiently conducting to experience turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. By modeling the ionization and conductivity in the disk around proto-Jupiter, we find that turbulence is possible if the X-rays emitted near the Sun reach the planet's vicinity and either (1) the gas surface densities are in the range of the minimum-mass models constructed by augmenting Jupiter's satellites to solar composition, while dust is depleted from the disk atmosphere, or (2) the surface densities are much less, and in the range of gas-starved models fed with material from the solar nebula, but not so low that ambipolar diffusion decouples the neutral gas from the plasma. The results lend support to both minimum-mass and gas-starved models of the protojovian disk. (1) The dusty minimum-mass models have internal conductivities low enough to prevent angular momentum transfer by magnetic forces, as required for the material to remain in place while the satellites form. (2) The gas-starved models have magnetically active surface layers and a decoupled interior 'dead zone'. Similar active layers in the solar nebula yield accretion stresses in the range assumed in constructing the circumjovian gas-starved models. Our results also point to aspects of both classes of models that can be further developed. Non-turbulent minimum-mass models will lose dust from their atmospheres by settling, enabling gas to accrete through a thin surface layer. For the gas-starved models it is crucial to learn whether enough stellar X-ray and ultraviolet photons reach the circumjovian disk. Additionally, the stress-to-pressure ratio ought to increase with distance from the planet, likely leading to episodic accretion outbursts.

  18. Magnetic Coupling in the Disks around Young Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. J.; Lee, Man Hoi; Sano, T.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the conditions under which the disks of gas and dust orbiting young gas giant planets are sufficiently conducting to experience turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. By modeling the ionization and conductivity in the disk around proto-Jupiter, we find that turbulence is possible if the X-rays emitted near the Sun reach the planet's vicinity and either (1) the gas surface densities are in the range of the minimum-mass models constructed by augmenting Jupiter's satellites to solar composition, while dust is depleted from the disk atmosphere, or (2) the surface densities are much less, and in the range of gas-starved models fed with material from the solar nebula, but not so low that ambipolar diffusion decouples the neutral gas from the plasma. The results lend support to both minimum-mass and gas-starved models of the protojovian disk. (1) The dusty minimum-mass models have internal conductivities low enough to prevent angular momentum transfer by magnetic forces, as required for the material to remain in place while the satellites form. (2) The gas-starved models have magnetically active surface layers and a decoupled interior "dead zone." Similar active layers in the solar nebula yield accretion stresses in the range assumed in constructing the circumjovian gas-starved models. Our results also point to aspects of both classes of models that can be further developed. Non-turbulent minimum-mass models will lose dust from their atmospheres by settling, enabling gas to accrete through a thin surface layer. For the gas-starved models it is crucial to learn whether enough stellar X-ray and ultraviolet photons reach the circumjovian disk. Additionally, the stress-to-pressure ratio ought to increase with distance from the planet, likely leading to episodic accretion outbursts.

  19. A Survey for Massive Giant Planets in Debris Disks with Evacuated Inner Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, D.; Janson, M.; Moro-Martín, A.; Meyer, M. R.; Mamajek, E. E.; Masciadri, E.; Henning, Th.; Pascucci, I.; Kim, J. S.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Kasper, M.; Biller, B.

    2008-01-01

    The commonality of collisionally replenished debris around main-sequence stars suggests that minor bodies are frequent around Sun-like stars. Whether or not debris disks in general are accompanied by planets is yet unknown, but debris disks with large inner cavities—perhaps dynamically cleared—are considered to be prime candidates for hosting large-separation massive giant planets. We present here a high-contrast VLT/NACO angular differential imaging survey for eight such cold debris disks. We investigated the presence of massive giant planets in the range of orbital radii where the inner edge of the dust debris is expected. Our observations are sensitive to planets and brown dwarfs with masses >3-7 Jupiter mass, depending on the age and distance of the target star. Our observations did not identify any planet candidates. We compare the derived planet mass upper limits to the minimum planet mass required to dynamically clear the inner disks. While we cannot exclude that single giant planets are responsible for clearing out the inner debris disks, our observations constrain the parameter space available for such planets. The nondetection of massive planets in these evacuated debris disks further reinforces the notion that the giant planet population is confined to the inner disk (<15 AU). Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile (ESO programs P078.C-0412(A) and P077.C-0391(A)).

  20. PLANET ENGULFMENT BY {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunitomo, M.; Ikoma, M.; Sato, B.; Ida, S.; Katsuta, Y.

    2011-08-20

    Recent radial-velocity surveys for GK clump giants have revealed that planets also exist around {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} stars. However, no planets have been found inside 0.6 AU around clump giants, in contrast to solar-type main-sequence stars, many of which harbor short-period planets such as hot Jupiters. In this study, we examine the possibility that planets were engulfed by host stars evolving on the red-giant branch (RGB). We integrate the orbital evolution of planets in the RGB and helium-burning phases of host stars, including the effects of stellar tide and stellar mass loss. Then we derive the critical semimajor axis (or the survival limit) inside which planets are eventually engulfed by their host stars after tidal decay of their orbits. Specifically, we investigate the impact of stellar mass and other stellar parameters on the survival limit in more detail than previous studies. In addition, we make detailed comparisons with measured semimajor axes of planets detected so far, which no previous study has done. We find that the critical semimajor axis is quite sensitive to stellar mass in the range between 1.7 and 2.1 M{sub sun}, which suggests a need for careful comparison between theoretical and observational limits of the existence of planets. Our comparison demonstrates that all planets orbiting GK clump giants that have been detected are beyond the survival limit, which is consistent with the planet-engulfment hypothesis. However, on the high-mass side (>2.1M{sub sun}), the detected planets are orbiting significantly far from the survival limit, which suggests that engulfment by host stars may not be the main reason for the observed lack of short-period giant planets. To confirm our conclusion, the detection of more planets around clump giants, especially with masses {approx}> 2.5M{sub sun}, is required.

  1. LONG RANGE OUTWARD MIGRATION OF GIANT PLANETS, WITH APPLICATION TO FOMALHAUT b

    SciTech Connect

    Crida, Aurelien; Masset, Frederic

    2009-11-10

    Recent observations of exoplanets by direct imaging reveal that giant planets orbit at a few dozens to more than a hundred AU from their central star. The question of the origin of these planets challenges the standard theories of planet formation. We propose a new way of obtaining such far planets, by outward migration of a pair of planets formed in the 10 AU region. Two giant planets in mean motion resonance in a common gap in the protoplanetary disk migrate outward, if the inner one is significantly more massive than the outer one. Using hydrodynamical simulations, we show that their semimajor axes can increase by almost 1 order of magnitude. In a flared disk, the pair of planets should reach an asymptotic radius. This mechanism could account for the presence of Fomalhaut b; then, a second, more massive planet, should be orbiting Fomalhaut at about 75 AU.

  2. Extrasolar Giant Planet in Earth-like Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    companion . iota Hor b has an orbital period of 320 days. From this period, the known mass of the central star (1.03 solar masses) and the amplitude of the velocity changes, a mass of at least 2.26 times that of planet Jupiter is deduced for the planet. It revolves around the host star in a somewhat elongated orbit (the eccentricity is 0.16). If it were located in our own solar system, this orbit would stretch from just outside the orbit of Venus (at 117 million km or 0.78 Astronomical Units from the Sun) to just outside the orbit of the Earth (the point farthest from the Sun, at 162 million km or 1.08 Astronomical Units) The new giant planet is thus moving in an orbit not unlike that of the Earth. In fact, of all the planets discovered so far, the orbit of iota Hor b is the most Earth-like. Also, with a spectral type of G0 V , its host star is quite similar to the Sun (G2 V). iota Hor b is, however, at least 720 times more massive than the Earth and it is probably more similar to planet Jupiter in our own solar system. While the radial velocity technique described above only determines a minimum value for the planet's mass, an analysis of the velocity with which the star turns around its own axis suggests that the true mass of iota Hor b is unlikely to be much higher. A difficult case Natural phenomena with periods near one solar year always present a particular challenge to astronomers. This is one of the reasons why it has been necessary to observe the iota Hor system for such a long time to be absolutely sure about the present result. First, special care must be taken to verify that the radial velocity variations found in the data are not an artefact of the Earth's movement around the Sun. In any case, the effect of this movement on the measurements must be accurately accounted for; it reaches about ± 30 km/sec over one year, i.e. much larger than the effect of the new planet. In the present case of iota Hor , this was thoroughly tested and any residual influence of

  3. A Secular Resonance Between Iapetus and the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuk, Matija; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Nesvorny, David; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2017-06-01

    Iapetus is the outermost of the regular satellites of Saturn, and its origin and evolution present a number of unsolved problems. From the point of view of orbital dynamics, it is remarkable that Iapetus has a large inclination (8 degrees) and a significantly smaller eccentricity (0.03), contrary to the pattern expected if its orbit was excited by encounters between Saturn and other planets early in the Solar System's history (Nesvorny et al, 2014). Here we report our long-term numerical integrations of Iapetus's orbit that show multi-Myr oscillations of Iapetus's eccentricity with an amplitude on the order of 0.01. We find that the basic argument causing this behavior is the sum of the longitude of pericenter and the longitude of the node of Iapetus, with a 0.3 Myr period. This argument appears to be in resonance with the period of the g5 mode in the eccentricity and perihelion of Saturn. We find that our nominal solution, including Saturn's oblateness, Titan, Iapetus and all four giant planets, shows librations of the argument: ǎrpi_Iapetus - ǎrpi_g5 + \\Omega_Iapetus - \\Omega_SaturnEq, where ǎrpi and \\Omega are the longitudes of pericenters and nodes, respectively, and \\Omega_SaturnEq is Saturn's equinox. While planetary perturbations are crucial in generating the g5 mode and therefore maintaining this resonance, we find that Iapetus is affected by the planets only indirectly, with the Sun being the dominant direct perturber. The libration is stable for tens of Myr for the nominal rate of Saturn's pole precession (French et al, 2017), and appears stable indefinitely if we assume a secular resonance between Saturn's node and the secular mode g18 (Ward and Hamilton, 2004; Hamilton and Ward, 2004). We will present the implication of this resonance for the origin of Iapetus's orbit and the dynamical history of Saturn's system. This research is funded by NASA Outer Planets Research Program award NNX14AO38G. References: French, R. G., McGhee-French, C. A

  4. Characterizing Young Giant Planets with the Gemini Planet Imager: An Iterative Approach to Planet Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    After discovery, the first task of exoplanet science is characterization. However experience has shown that the limited spectral range and resolution of most directly imaged exoplanet data requires an iterative approach to spectral modeling. Simple, brown dwarf-like models, must first be tested to ascertain if they are both adequate to reproduce the available data and consistent with additional constraints, including the age of the system and available limits on the planet's mass and luminosity, if any. When agreement is lacking, progressively more complex solutions must be considered, including non-solar composition, partial cloudiness, and disequilibrium chemistry. Such additional complexity must be balanced against an understanding of the limitations of the atmospheric models themselves. For example while great strides have been made in improving the opacities of important molecules, particularly NH3 and CH4, at high temperatures, much more work is needed to understand the opacity of atomic Na and K. The highly pressure broadened fundamental band of Na and K in the optical stretches into the near-infrared, strongly influencing the spectral shape of Y and J spectral bands. Discerning gravity and atmospheric composition is difficult, if not impossible, without both good atomic opacities as well as an excellent understanding of the relevant atmospheric chemistry. I will present examples of the iterative process of directly imaged exoplanet characterization as applied to both known and potentially newly discovered exoplanets with a focus on constraints provided by GPI spectra. If a new GPI planet is lacking, as a case study I will discuss HR 8799 c and d will explain why some solutions, such as spatially inhomogeneous cloudiness, introduce their own additional layers of complexity. If spectra of new planets from GPI are available I will explain the modeling process in the context of understanding these new worlds.

  5. Dynamics of the Giant Planets due to a Fully Self-gravitating Planetesimal Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Billy L.; Kaib, Nathan A.

    2017-01-01

    Specific features of our solar system can be well-explained with an early orbital instability among the giant planets driven by interactions between the planets and a massive planetesimal disk. These features include the the dynamical architecture of the Trans-Neptunian objects and the 'Late Heavy Bombardment' inferred from the lunar cratering record. Most previous studies of this process have been forced to neglect the interactions between members of the primordial planetesimal disk, but advances in GPU accelerated dynamical modelling have allowed us to perform simulations of the giant planet instability that include fully self-interacting disk. With these simulations, we explore the timing and mass conditions for the giant planet instability using different versions of the Nice model that include up to six giant planets. Using a large ensemble of numerical simulations of this giant planet instability, we directly model the evolution of the giant planets and a massive planetesimal disk. In particular, we seek to determine what sets of initial conditions do and do not permit a delayed scattering event on the correct timescale to be attributed to a `Late Heavy Bombardment'.

  6. Magnetic fields in giant planet formation and protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Sarah Louise

    2015-12-01

    Protoplanetary discs channel accretion onto their host star. How this is achieved is critical to the growth of giant planets which capture their massive gaseous atmosphere from the surrounding flow. Theoretical studies find that an embedded magnetic field could power accretion by hydromagnetic turbulence or torques from a large-scale field. This thesis presents a study of the inuence of magnetic fields in three key aspects of this process: circumplanetary disc accretion, gas flow across gaps in protoplanetary discs, and magnetic-braking in accretion discs. The first study examines the conditions needed for self-consistent accretion driven by magnetic fields or gravitational instability. Models of these discs typically rely on hydromagnetic turbulence as the source of effective viscosity. However, magnetically coupled,accreting regions may be so limited that the disc may not support sufficient inflow. An improved Shakura-Sunyaev ? disc is used to calculate the ionisation fraction and strength of non-ideal effects. Steady magnetically-driven accretion is limited to the thermally ionised, inner disc so that accretion in the remainder of the disc is time-dependent. The second study addresses magnetic flux transport in an accretion gap evacuated by a giant planet. Assuming the field is passively drawn along with the gas, the hydrodynamical simulation of Tanigawa, Ohtsuki & Machida (2012) is used for an a posteriori analysis of the gap field structure. This is used to post-calculate magnetohydrodynamical quantities. This assumption is self-consistent as magnetic forces are found to be weak, and good magnetic coupling ensures the field is frozen into the gas. Hall drift dominates across much of the gap, with the potential to facilitate turbulence and modify the toroidal field according to the global field orientation. The third study considers the structure and stability of magnetically-braked accretion discs. Strong evidence for MRI dead-zones has renewed interest in

  7. Off-equatorial Jets in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T.; Liu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Jupiter and Saturn have similar radii, rotation rates, and atmospheres. Yet their off-equatorial jets differ markedly: Jupiter has 15--20 off-equatorial jets, with speeds at the level of the visible clouds around 20 m/s; Saturn has only 5--10 wider off-equatorial jets, with speeds around 100 m/s. Here it is shown that the differences between the off-equatorial jets can be accounted for by differences in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) drag the jets experience in the planetary interiors. The relation between jet characteristics and drag strength is examined systematically through simulations with a general circulation model (GCM). The GCM domain is a thin spherical shell in the upper atmosphere of a giant planet, with flow parameters relevant for Jupiter. Rayleigh drag at an artificial lower boundary (with mean pressure of 3~bar) is used as a simple representation of the MHD drag the flow on giant planets experiences at depth. The drag coefficient is varied to investigate how it affects characteristics of off-equatorial jets. As the drag coefficient decreases, the eddy length scale and eddy kinetic energy increase. Jets become wider and stronger, with increased interjet spacing. Coherent vortices also become more prevalent. Generally, the jet widths scale with the Rhines scale, which is of similar magnitude as the Rossby radius in the simulations. The jet strengths increases primarily through strengthening of the barotropic component, which increases as the drag coefficient decreases because the overall kinetic energy dissipation remains roughly constant: an increasing mean flow strength in the drag layer roughly balances a decreasing drag coefficient to lead to the same kinetic energy dissipation, which is dominated by the drag on the mean flow. The overall kinetic energy dissipation remains roughly constant presumably because it is controlled by baroclinic conversion of potential to kinetic energy in the upper troposphere, where differential solar heating has an

  8. Korean-Japanese Planet Search Program: Substellar Companions around Intermediate-Mass Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiya, Masashi; Han, Inwoo; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Sato, Bun'ei; Kim, Kang-Min; Yoon, Tae Seog; Kambe, Eiji; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Masuda, Seiji; Toyota, Eri; Urakawa, Seitaro; Takada-Hidai, Masahide

    2011-03-01

    A Korean-Japanese planet search program has been carried out using the 1.8m telescope at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO) in Korea, and the 1.88m telescope at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO) in Japan to search for planets around intermediate-mass giant stars. The program aims to show the properties of planetary systems around such stars by precise Doppler survey of about 190 G or K type giants together with collaborative surveys of the East-Asian Planet Search Network. So far, we detected two substellar companions around massive intermediate-mass giants in the Korean-Japanese planet search program. One is a brown dwarf-mass companion with 37.6 MJ orbiting a giant HD 119445 with 3.9 Msolar, which is the most massive brown dwarf companion among those found around intermediate-mass giants. The other is a planetary companion with 1.8 MJ orbiting a giant star with 2.4 Msolar, which is the lowest-mass planetary companion among those detected around giant stars with >1.9 Msolar. Plotting these systems on companion mass vs. stellar mass diagram, there seem to exist two unpopulated regions of substellar companions around giants with 1.5-3 Msolar and planetary companions orbiting giants with 2.4-4 Msolar. The existence of these possible unpopulated regions supports a current characteristic view that more massive substellar companions tend to exist around more massive stars.

  9. A giant planet orbiting the 'extreme horizontal branch' star V 391 Pegasi.

    PubMed

    Silvotti, R; Schuh, S; Janulis, R; Solheim, J-E; Bernabei, S; Østensen, R; Oswalt, T D; Bruni, I; Gualandi, R; Bonanno, A; Vauclair, G; Reed, M; Chen, C-W; Leibowitz, E; Paparo, M; Baran, A; Charpinet, S; Dolez, N; Kawaler, S; Kurtz, D; Moskalik, P; Riddle, R; Zola, S

    2007-09-13

    After the initial discoveries fifteen years ago, over 200 extrasolar planets have now been detected. Most of them orbit main-sequence stars similar to our Sun, although a few planets orbiting red giant stars have been recently found. When the hydrogen in their cores runs out, main-sequence stars undergo an expansion into red-giant stars. This expansion can modify the orbits of planets and can easily reach and engulf the inner planets. The same will happen to the planets of our Solar System in about five billion years and the fate of the Earth is matter of debate. Here we report the discovery of a planetary-mass body (Msini = 3.2M(Jupiter)) orbiting the star V 391 Pegasi at a distance of about 1.7 astronomical units (au), with a period of 3.2 years. This star is on the extreme horizontal branch of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, burning helium in its core and pulsating. The maximum radius of the red-giant precursor of V 391 Pegasi may have reached 0.7 au, while the orbital distance of the planet during the stellar main-sequence phase is estimated to be about 1 au. This detection of a planet orbiting a post-red-giant star demonstrates that planets with orbital distances of less than 2 au can survive the red-giant expansion of their parent stars.

  10. THE CALIFORNIA PLANET SURVEY IV: A PLANET ORBITING THE GIANT STAR HD 145934 AND UPDATES TO SEVEN SYSTEMS WITH LONG-PERIOD PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Katherina Feng, Y.; Wright, Jason T.; Nelson, Benjamin; Wang, Sharon X.; Ford, Eric B.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.

    2015-02-10

    We present an update to seven stars with long-period planets or planetary candidates using new and archival radial velocities from Keck-HIRES and literature velocities from other telescopes. Our updated analysis better constrains orbital parameters for these planets, four of which are known multi-planet systems. HD 24040 b and HD 183263 c are super-Jupiters with circular orbits and periods longer than 8 yr. We present a previously unseen linear trend in the residuals of HD 66428 indicative of an additional planetary companion. We confirm that GJ 849 is a multi-planet system and find a good orbital solution for the c component: it is a 1 M {sub Jup} planet in a 15 yr orbit (the longest known for a planet orbiting an M dwarf). We update the HD 74156 double-planet system. We also announce the detection of HD 145934 b, a 2 M {sub Jup} planet in a 7.5 yr orbit around a giant star. Two of our stars, HD 187123 and HD 217107, at present host the only known examples of systems comprising a hot Jupiter and a planet with a well constrained period greater than 5 yr, and with no evidence of giant planets in between. Our enlargement and improvement of long-period planet parameters will aid future analysis of origins, diversity, and evolution of planetary systems.

  11. ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS OF BROWN DWARFS AND DIRECTLY IMAGED GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Showman, Adam P.; Kaspi, Yohai

    2013-10-20

    A variety of observations provide evidence for vigorous motion in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets. Motivated by these observations, we examine the dynamical regime of the circulation in the atmospheres and interiors of these objects. Brown dwarfs rotate rapidly, and for plausible wind speeds, the flow at large scales will be rotationally dominated. We present three-dimensional, global, numerical simulations of convection in the interior, which demonstrate that at large scales, the convection aligns in the direction parallel to the rotation axis. Convection occurs more efficiently at high latitudes than low latitudes, leading to systematic equator-to-pole temperature differences that may reach ∼1 K near the top of the convection zone. The interaction of convection with the overlying, stably stratified atmosphere will generate a wealth of atmospheric waves, and we argue that, as in the stratospheres of planets in the solar system, the interaction of these waves with the mean flow will cause a significant atmospheric circulation at regional to global scales. At large scales, this should consist of stratified turbulence (possibly organizing into coherent structures such as vortices and jets) and an accompanying overturning circulation. We present an approximate analytic theory of this circulation, which predicts characteristic horizontal temperature variations of several to ∼50 K, horizontal wind speeds of ∼10-300 m s{sup –1}, and vertical velocities that advect air over a scale height in ∼10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} s. This vertical mixing may help to explain the chemical disequilibrium observed on some brown dwarfs. Moreover, the implied large-scale organization of temperature perturbations and vertical velocities suggests that near the L/T transition, patchy clouds can form near the photosphere, helping to explain recent observations of brown-dwarf variability in the near-IR.

  12. Structure and evolution of transiting giant planets: a Bayesian homogeneous determination of orbital and physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomo, A. S.; Desidera, S.; Damasso, M.; Lanza, A. F.; Sozzetti, A.; Benatti, S.; Borsa, F.; Crespi, S.; GAPS Team

    2015-10-01

    We present a Bayesian homogeneous determination of orbital and physical parameters of a large sample of 211 giant transiting planets with masses between 0.1 and 24 M_{Jup} and precision on mass estimates better than 30%. We analyse new high-precision radial velocities for forty-five of them obtained with the HARPS-N@TNG spectrograph to improve and, in some cases, to revise the measure of their orbital eccentricity, and to search for long-period companions. From the updated orbital eccentricities we put constraints on the modified tidal quality factors of giant planets and their host stars. Our comprehensive study 1) allows for improved understanding of orbital evolution and migration scenarios for giant planets, and 2) provides the much needed benchmark statistics for thorough investigations of the diversity of giant planet densities and interior structures.

  13. The Pan-Pacific Planet Search III: five companions orbiting giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenmyer, R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Wang, L.; Bergmann, C.; Salter, G. S.; Tinney, C. G.; Johnson, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report a new giant planet orbiting the K giant HD 155233, as well as four stellar-mass companions from the Pan-Pacific Planet Search, a Southern hemisphere radial velocity survey for planets orbiting nearby giants and sub-giants. We also present updated velocities and a refined orbit for HD 47205b (7 CMa b), the first planet discovered by this survey. HD 155233b has a period of 885 ± 63 d, eccentricity e = 0.03 ± 0.20, and m sin i = 2.0 ± 0.5 MJup. The stellar-mass companions range in m sin i from 0.066 to 0.33 M⊙. Whilst HD 104358B falls slightly below the traditional 0.08 M⊙ hydrogen-burning mass limit, and is hence a brown-dwarf candidate, we estimate only a 50 per cent a priori probability of a truly sub-stellar mass.

  14. Giant planets and their satellites: What are the relationships between their properties and how they formed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) the mass distribution; (2) interior models; (3) atmospheric compositions and their implications; (4) heat flows and their implications; (5) satellite systems; (6) temperatures in the solar nebula; and (7) giant planet formation.

  15. The formation of giant planets in wide orbits by photoevaporation-synchronized migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilera, O. M.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Ronco, M. P.

    2017-10-01

    The discovery of giant planets in wide orbits represents a major challenge for planet formation theory. In the standard core accretion paradigm, planets are expected to form at radial distances ≲20 au in order to form massive cores (with masses ≳10 M⊕) able to trigger the gaseous runaway growth before the dissipation of the disc. This has encouraged authors to find modifications of the standard scenario as well as alternative theories like the formation of planets by gravitational instabilities in the disc to explain the existence of giant planets in wide orbits. However, there is not yet consensus on how these systems are formed. In this Letter, we present a new natural mechanism for the formation of giant planets in wide orbits within the core accretion paradigm. If photoevaporation is considered, after a few Myr of viscous evolution a gap in the gaseous disc is opened. We found that, under particular circumstances planet migration becomes synchronized with the evolution of the gap, which results in an efficient outward planet migration. This mechanism is found to allow the formation of giant planets with masses Mp ≲ 1MJup in wide stable orbits as large as ˜130 au from the central star.

  16. Accessing High Pressure States Relevant to Core Conditions in the Giant Planets

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Cavallo, R M; Edwards, M J; Ho, D D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H E; Lasinski, B F; McNaney, J M; Pollaine, S M; Smith, R F

    2004-04-15

    We have designed an experimental technique to use on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to achieve very high pressure (P{sub max} > 10 Mbar = 1000 GPa), dense states of matter at moderate temperatures (kT < 0.5 eV = 6000 K), relevant to the core conditions of the giant planets. A discussion of the conditions in the interiors of the giant planets is given, and an experimental design that can approach those conditions is described.

  17. Accessing High Pressure States Relevant to Core Conditions in the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Cavallo, R. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Ho, D. D.-M.; Lasinski, B. F.; Lorenz, K. T.; Lorenzana, H. E.; McNaney, J. M.; Pollaine, S. M.; Smith, R. F.

    2005-07-01

    We have designed an experimental technique to use on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to achieve very high pressure (P max > 10 Mbar = 1000 GPa), dense states of matter at moderate temperatures (T < 0.5 eV = 6000 K), relevant to the core conditions of the giant planets. A discussion of the conditions in the interiors of the giant planets is given, and an experimental design that can approach those conditions is described.

  18. Accessing High Pressure States Relevant to Core Conditions in the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Cavallo, R. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Ho, D. D.-M.; Lasinski, B. F.; Lorenz, K. T.; Lorenzana, H. E.; McNaney, J. M.; Pollaine, S. M.; Smith, R. F.

    We have designed an experimental technique to use on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to achieve very high pressure (Pmax > 10 Mbar = 1000 GPa), dense states of matter at moderate temperatures (T < 0.5 eV = 6000 K), relevant to the core conditions of the giant planets. A discussion of the conditions in the interiors of the giant planets is given, and an experimental design that can approach those conditions is described.

  19. CONSTRAINT ON THE GIANT PLANET PRODUCTION BY CORE ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2011-02-01

    The issue of giant planet formation by core accretion (CA) far from the central star is rather controversial because the growth of a massive solid core necessary for triggering the gas runaway can take longer than the lifetime of the protoplanetary disk. In this work, we assess the range of separations at which CA may operate by (1) allowing for an arbitrary (physically meaningful) rate of planetesimal accretion by the core and (2) properly taking into account the dependence of the critical mass for the gas runaway on the planetesimal accretion luminosity. This self-consistent approach distinguishes our work from similar studies in which only a specific planetesimal accretion regime was explored and/or the critical core mass was fixed at some arbitrary level. We demonstrate that the largest separation at which the gas runaway can occur within 3 Myr corresponds to the surface density of solids in the disk {approx}>0.1 g cm{sup -2} and is 40-50 AU in the minimum mass solar nebula. This limiting separation is achieved when the planetesimal accretion proceeds at the fastest possible rate, even though the high associated accretion luminosity increases the critical core mass, delaying the onset of gas runaway. Our constraints are independent of the mass of the central star and vary only weakly with the core density and its atmospheric opacity. We also discuss various factors that can strengthen or weaken our limits on the operation of CA.

  20. Statistics of Long Period Gas Giant Planets in Known Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The presence of a substantial population of volatile-rich planets on orbits interior to 1AU poses a challenge to models of planet formation and migration. There is currently an ongoing debate as to whether these planets could have formed in situ or instead migrated inward from a more distant formation location. While it has generally been assumed that gas giant planets formed out beyond the ice line and migrated inwards, more recent work has suggested that even these relatively massive planets may be able to form in situ. To constrain possible formation and migration scenarios, we searched for massive, long-period gas giant companions in known exoplanet systems by looking for long-term trends in the RV data. In addition to estimating the total occurrence rate of long-period gas giant companions in known exoplanet systems, we found that hot gas giants inside 1 AU are more likely to have an outer companion than cold gas giants. We also found that planets with an outer companion have higher than average eccentricities than their single counterparts, suggesting that dynamical interactions between planets may play an important role in these systems.

  1. ON THE SURVIVABILITY AND METAMORPHISM OF TIDALLY DISRUPTED GIANT PLANETS: THE ROLE OF DENSE CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shang-Fei; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    A large population of planetary candidates in short-period orbits have been found recently through transit searches, mostly with the Kepler mission. Radial velocity surveys have also revealed several Jupiter-mass planets with highly eccentric orbits. Measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect indicate that the orbital angular momentum vector of some planets is inclined relative to the spin axis of their host stars. This diversity could be induced by post-formation dynamical processes such as planet-planet scattering, the Kozai effect, or secular chaos which brings planets to the vicinity of their host stars. In this work, we propose a novel mechanism to form close-in super-Earths and Neptune-like planets through the tidal disruption of gas giant planets as a consequence of these dynamical processes. We model the core-envelope structure of gas giant planets with composite polytropes which characterize the distinct chemical composition of the core and envelope. Using three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of close encounters between Jupiter-like planets and their host stars, we find that the presence of a core with a mass more than 10 times that of the Earth can significantly increase the fraction of envelope which remains bound to it. After the encounter, planets with cores are more likely to be retained by their host stars in contrast with previous studies which suggested that coreless planets are often ejected. As a substantial fraction of their gaseous envelopes is preferentially lost while the dense incompressible cores retain most of their original mass, the resulting metallicity of the surviving planets is increased. Our results suggest that some gas giant planets can be effectively transformed into either super-Earths or Neptune-like planets after multiple close stellar passages. Finally, we analyze the orbits and structure of known planets and Kepler candidates and find that our model is capable of producing some of the shortest-period objects.

  2. Planetary Formation: From the Earth and Moon to Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation is presented. These models are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments. They predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases-such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Specific issues to be discussed include: (1) how large a solid core is needed to initiate rapid accumulation of gas? (2) can giant planets form very close to stars? (3) could a giant impact leading to lunar formation have occurred approx. 100 million years after the condensation of the oldest meteorites?

  3. Planetary Formation: From the Earth and Moon to Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation is presented. These models are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments. They predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Specific issues to be discussed include: (1) how large a solid core is needed to initiate rapid accumulation of gas? (2) can giant planets form very close to stars? (3) could a giant impact leading to lunar formation have occurred approximately 100 million years after the condensation of the oldest meteorites?

  4. Planetary Formation: From the Earth and Moon to Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation is presented. These models are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments. They predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases-such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Specific issues to be discussed include: (1) how large a solid core is needed to initiate rapid accumulation of gas? (2) can giant planets form very close to stars? (3) could a giant impact leading to lunar formation have occurred approx. 100 million years after the condensation of the oldest meteorites?

  5. Planetary Formation: From the Earth and Moon to Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    An overview of current theories of star and planet formation is presented. These models are based upon observations of the Solar System and of young stars and their environments. They predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, although it is possible that in some cases such planets are lost to orbital decay within the protoplanetary disk. The frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth like terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Specific issues to be discussed include: (1) how large a solid core is needed to initiate rapid accumulation of gas? (2) can giant planets form very close to stars? (3) could a giant impact leading to lunar formation have occurred approximately 100 million years after the condensation of the oldest meteorites?

  6. Search for giant planets in M 67. I. Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, L.; Brucalassi, A.; Ruiz, M. T.; Bonifacio, P.; Lovis, C.; Saglia, R.; Melo, C.; Biazzo, K.; Randich, S.; Bedin, L. R.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Precise stellar radial velocities (RVs) are used to search for massive (Jupiter masses or higher) exoplanets around the stars of the open cluster M 67. Aims: We aim to obtain a census of massive exoplanets in a cluster of solar metallicity and age in order to study the dependence of planet formation on stellar mass and to compare in detail the chemical composition of stars with and without planets. This first work presents the sample and the observations, discusses the cluster characteristics and the RV distribution of the stars, and individuates the most likely planetary host candidates. Methods: We observed a total of 88 main-sequence stars, subgiants, and giants all highly probable members of M 67, using four telescopes and instrument combinations: the HARPS spectrograph at the ESO 3.6 m, the SOPHIE spectrograph at OHP, the CORALIE spectrograph at the Euler swiss telescope and the HRS spectrograph at Hobby Eberly Telescope. We investigate whether exoplanets are present by obtaining RVs with precisions as good as ≃ 10 m s-1. To date, we have performed 680 single observations (Dec. 2011) and a preliminary analysis of data, spanning a period of up to eight years. We computed zero-point deviations for each spectrograph with respect to HARPS, finding that for SOPHIE and CORALIE the offsets are minimal (at -11.4 m s-1 and 26.8 m s-1, respectively), while for our HET measurements the offset is larger, 242.0 m s-1. After reducing all the observations to the HARPS zero point, the RV measurements for each star are used to evaluate the RV variability along the cluster color magnitude diagram (CMD). Results: Although the sample was pre-selected to avoid the inclusion of binaries, we identify 11 previously unknown binary candidates. The RV variance (including the observational error) for the bulk of stars is almost constant with stellar magnitude (therefore stellar gravity) at σ = 20 m s-1. This number includes both the stellar intrinsic variability and the

  7. M dwarf metallicities and giant planet occurrence: Ironing out uncertainties and systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.

    2014-08-10

    Comparisons between the planet populations around solar-type stars and those orbiting M dwarfs shed light on the possible dependence of planet formation and evolution on stellar mass. However, such analyses must control for other factors, i.e., metallicity, a stellar parameter that strongly influences the occurrence of gas giant planets. We obtained infrared spectra of 121 M dwarfs stars monitored by the California Planet Search and determined metallicities with an accuracy of 0.08 dex. The mean and standard deviation of the sample are –0.05 and 0.20 dex, respectively. We parameterized the metallicity dependence of the occurrence of giant planets on orbits with a period less than two years around solar-type stars and applied this to our M dwarf sample to estimate the expected number of giant planets. The number of detected planets (3) is lower than the predicted number (6.4), but the difference is not very significant (12% probability of finding as many or fewer planets). The three M dwarf planet hosts are not especially metal rich and the most likely value of the power-law index relating planet occurrence to metallicity is 1.06 dex per dex for M dwarfs compared to 1.80 for solar-type stars; this difference, however, is comparable to uncertainties. Giant planet occurrence around both types of stars allows, but does not necessarily require, a mass dependence of ∼1 dex per dex. The actual planet-mass-metallicity relation may be complex, and elucidating it will require larger surveys like those to be conducted by ground-based infrared spectrographs and the Gaia space astrometry mission.

  8. Energy Budgets of the Giant Planets and Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liming, Li; Smith, Mark A.; Conrath, Barney J.; Conrath, Peter J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Baines, Kevin H.; West, Robert A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Orton, Glenn S.; Santiago, Perez-Hoyos; hide

    2012-01-01

    As a fundamental property, the energy budget affects many aspeCts of planets and their moons, such as thermal structure, meteorology, and evolution. We use the observations from two Cassini spectrometers (i.e., CIRS and VIMS) to explore one important component of the energy budget the total emitted power of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan (Li et al., 2010, 2011, 2012). Key results are: (1) The Cassini observations precisely measure the global-average emitted power of three bodies: 14.l0+/-0.03 Wm(exp -2), 4.952+/-0.035 Wm(exp -2), and 2.834+/-0.012 Wm(exp -2) for Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan, respectively. (2) The meridional distribution of emitted power displays a significant asymmetry between the northern and southern hemispheres on Jupiter and Saturn. On Titan, the meridional distribution of emitted power is basically symmetric around the equator. (3) Comparing with the Voyager measurements, the new Cassini observations reveal a significant temporal variation of emitted power on both Jupiter and Saturn: i) The asymmetry between the two hemisphere shown in the Cassini epoch (2000-2010) is not present in the Voyager epoch (1979-1980); and ii) From the Voyager epoch to the Cassini epoch, the global-average emitted power appeared to increase by approx 3.8% for Jupiter and approx 6.4% for Saturn. (4) Together with previous measurements of the absorbed solar power on Titan, the new Cassini measurements of emitted power provide the first observational evidence of the global energy balance on Titan. The uncertainty in the previous measurements of absorbed solar energy places an upper limit on its energy imbalance of 6.0% on Titan. The exploration of emitted power is the first part of a series of studies examining the temporal variability of the energy budget on the giant planets and Titan. Currently, We are measuring the absorbed solar energy in order to determine new constraints on the energy budgets of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan.

  9. Atmospheric Circulation of Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, A. P.; Kaspi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of observations now provide evidence for vigorous motion in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets. Motivated by these observations, we examine the dynamical regime of the circulation in the atmospheres and interiors of these objects. Brown dwarfs rotate rapidly, and for plausible wind speeds, the flow at large scales will be rotationally dominated, exhibiting geostrophic balance between pressure gradient and Coriolis forces. We present three-dimensional, global, anelastic numerical simulations of convection in the interior. Fundamental theory, scaling arguments, and our anelastic simulations all demonstrate that, at large scales, the convection aligns in the direction parallel to the rotation axis. Convection occurs more efficiently at high latitudes than low latitudes, leading to systematic equator-to-pole temperature differences that may reach ~1 K near the top of the convection zone. The rotation significantly modifies the convective properties. The interaction of convection with the overlying, stably stratified atmosphere will generate a wealth of atmospheric waves, and we argue that, just as in the stratospheres of planets in the solar system, the interaction of these waves with the mean flow will lead to a significant atmospheric circulation at regional to global scales. At scales exceeding thousands of km, this should consist of geostrophically balanced, stratified turbulence (possibly organizing into coherent structures such as vortices and jets) and an accompanying overturning circulation. We present a semi-quantitative, analytic theory of this circulation as a function of the wave-driving efficiency. When applied to Jupiter, the theory predicts horizontal temperature perturbations of ~3K and wind speeds of ~50 m/sec, similar to those observed in Jupiter's stratosphere. For brown dwarfs, we predict characteristic horizontal temperature variations of several to ~50 K, horizontal wind speeds of ~10-300 m/sec, and

  10. Four new planets around giant stars and the mass-metallicity correlation of planet-hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. I.; Jenkins, J. S.; Brahm, R.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Olivares E., F.; Melo, C. H. F.; Rojo, P.; Jordán, A.; Drass, H.; Butler, R. P.; Wang, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Exoplanet searches have revealed interesting correlations between the stellar properties and the occurrence rate of planets. In particular, different independent surveys have demonstrated that giant planets are preferentially found around metal-rich stars and that their fraction increases with the stellar mass. Aims: During the past six years we have conducted a radial velocity follow-up program of 166 giant stars to detect substellar companions and to characterize their orbital properties. Using this information, we aim to study the role of the stellar evolution in the orbital parameters of the companions and to unveil possible correlations between the stellar properties and the occurrence rate of giant planets. Methods: We took multi-epoch spectra using FEROS and CHIRON for all of our targets, from which we computed precision radial velocities and derived atmospheric and physical parameters. Additionally, velocities computed from UCLES spectra are presented here. By studying the periodic radial velocity signals, we detected the presence of several substellar companions. Results: We present four new planetary systems around the giant stars HIP 8541, HIP 74890, HIP 84056, and HIP 95124. Additionally, we study the correlation between the occurrence rate of giant planets with the stellar mass and metallicity of our targets. We find that giant planets are more frequent around metal-rich stars, reaching a peak in the detection of f = 16.7+15.5-5.9% around stars with [Fe/H] ~ 0.35 dex. Similarly, we observe a positive correlation of the planet occurrence rate with the stellar mass, between M⋆ ~ 1.0 and 2.1 M⊙, with a maximum of f = 13.0+10.1-4.2% at M⋆ = 2.1 M⊙. Conclusions: We conclude that giant planets are preferentially formed around metal-rich stars. In addition, we conclude that they are more efficiently formed around more massive stars, in the stellar mass range of ~1.0-2.1 M⊙. These observational results confirm previous findings for solar

  11. Very high-density planets: a possible remnant of gas giants.

    PubMed

    Mocquet, A; Grasset, O; Sotin, C

    2014-04-28

    Data extracted from the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia (see http://exoplanet.eu) show the existence of planets that are more massive than iron cores that would have the same size. After meticulous verification of the data, we conclude that the mass of the smallest of these planets is actually not known. However, the three largest planets, Kepler-52b, Kepler-52c and Kepler-57b, which are between 30 and 100 times the mass of the Earth, have indeed density larger than an iron planet of the same size. This observation triggers this study that investigates under which conditions these planets could represent the naked cores of gas giants that would have lost their atmospheres during their migration towards the star. This study shows that for moderate viscosity values (10(25) Pa s or lower), large values of escape rate and associated unloading stress rate during the atmospheric loss process lead to the explosion of extremely massive planets. However, for moderate escape rate, the bulk viscosity and finite-strain incompressibility of the cores of giant planets can be large enough to retain a very high density during geological time scales. This would make those a new kind of planet, which would help in understanding the interior structure of the gas giants. However, this new family of exoplanets adds some degeneracy for characterizing terrestrial exoplanets.

  12. Rossby solitary vortices, on giant planets and in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Nezlin, Mikhail V.

    1994-06-01

    This is a review of laboratory experiments with a layer of shallow water having a free surface and rotating together with a vessel of parabolic form. Such a (rather original) setup has allowed one to create Rossby solitary vortex for the first time. The latter is an anticyclonic Rossby vortex not subjected to dispersive spread owing to its compensation by the nonlinearity of KdV type. By its structural, collisional, and other properties, including clear-cut cyclonic-anticyclonic asymmetry, it may be considered as a physical prototype of the large-scale long-lived anticyclonic Rossby vortices like the Great Red Spot of Jupiter or the Great Dark Spot of Neptune (this remarkable vortex was discovered by the spacecraft Voyager-2 during its farewell to the Solar System) and other vortices dominating in the atmospheres of giant planets and created by the unstable zonal flows. It has been shown that the vortex under study is a long-lived entity provided it satisfies "antitwisting condition," i.e., it has rather large amplitude (at which it rotates more quickly than it propagates and thereby carries the trapped fluid). In this case, it is not subjected to the "twisting" deformation and may be ascribed by the generalized Charney-Obukhov equation for Rossby vortices on shallow water with a free surface. The results of creating the vortex under consideration by the different methods have been compared with the results obtained by other authors in the experiments on shear-flow generation of Rossby vortices.

  13. A compact system of small planets around a former red-giant star.

    PubMed

    Charpinet, S; Fontaine, G; Brassard, P; Green, E M; Van Grootel, V; Randall, S K; Silvotti, R; Baran, A S; Ostensen, R H; Kawaler, S D; Telting, J H

    2011-12-21

    Planets that orbit their parent star at less than about one astronomical unit (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance) are expected to be engulfed when the star becomes a red giant. Previous observations have revealed the existence of post-red-giant host stars with giant planets orbiting as close as 0.116 AU or with brown dwarf companions in tight orbits, showing that these bodies can survive engulfment. What has remained unclear is whether planets can be dragged deeper into the red-giant envelope without being disrupted and whether the evolution of the parent star itself could be affected. Here we report the presence of two nearly Earth-sized bodies orbiting the post-red-giant, hot B subdwarf star KIC 05807616 at distances of 0.0060 and 0.0076 AU, with orbital periods of 5.7625 and 8.2293 hours, respectively. These bodies probably survived deep immersion in the former red-giant envelope. They may be the dense cores of evaporated giant planets that were transported closer to the star during the engulfment and triggered the mass loss necessary for the formation of the hot B subdwarf, which might also explain how some stars of this type did not form in binary systems.

  14. Differential Imaging Search for the Giant Planet Epsilon Eri b with ESO-VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Markus; Brandner, W.; Henning, T.; Close, L.

    2007-12-01

    Thanks to rapid development of methods and instrumentation for high-contrast imaging over the past few years, the detection limits for faint companions to stars have been continuously been pushed downwards. Even so, direct imaging of giant planets remains highly challenging. We have performed deep, multi-epoch spectral and angular differential imaging of the most nearby known exoplanet host, Eps Eri, in an attempt to directly detect the planet. Here, we briefly describe the methods involved in optimizing the contrast range for detection of very faint companions to very bright stars. We derive improved upper limits on the brightness of the giant planet, and discuss the implications on age estimates for Eps Eri, theoretical models of giant planet evolution, and current observational limits and observing strategies. M.J. is funded by IMPRS Heidelberg.

  15. Transmission Spectra as Diagnostics of Extrasolar Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Timothy M.

    2001-06-01

    Atmospheres of transiting extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD 209458b must impose features on the spectra of their parent stars during transits; these features contain information about the physical conditions and chemical composition of the atmospheres. The most convenient observational index showing these features is the ``spectrum ratio'' ℜ(λ), defined as the wavelength-dependent ratio of spectra taken in and out of transit. The principal source of structure in ℜ is the variation with wavelength of the height at which the EGP atmosphere first becomes opaque to tangential rays-one may think of the planet as having different radii, and hence different transit depths, at each wavelength. The characteristic depth of absorption lines in ℜ scales with the atmospheric scale height and with the logarithm of the opacity ratio between continuum and strong lines. For close-in EGPs, line depths of 10-3 relative to the stellar continuum can occur. The atmospheres of EGPs probably consist mostly of molecular species, including H2, CO, H2O, and CH4, while the illuminating flux is characteristic of a Sun-like star. Thus, the most useful diagnostics are likely to be the near-infrared bands of these molecules, and the visible/near-IR resonance lines of the alkali metals. I describe a model that estimates ℜ(λ) for EGPs with prescribed radius, mass, temperature structure, chemical composition, and cloud properties. This model assumes hydrostatic and chemical equilibrium in an atmosphere with chemistry involving only H, C, N, and O. Other elements (He, Na, K, Si) are included as nonreacting minor constituents. Opacity sources include Rayleigh scattering, the strongest lines of Na and K, collision-induced absorption by H2, scattering by cloud particles, and molecular lines of CO, H2O, and CH4. The model simulates Doppler shifts from height-dependent winds and from planetary rotation, and deals in a schematic way with photoionization of Na and K by the stellar UV flux

  16. Hot super-Earths and giant planet cores from different migration histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossou, Christophe; Raymond, Sean N.; Hersant, Franck; Pierens, Arnaud

    2014-09-01

    Planetary embryos embedded in gaseous protoplanetary disks undergo Type I orbital migration. Migration can be inward or outward depending on the local disk properties but, in general, only planets more massive than several M⊕ can migrate outward. Here we propose that an embryo's migration history determines whether it becomes a hot super-Earth or the core of a giant planet. Systems of hot super-Earths (or mini-Neptunes) form when embryos migrate inward and pile up at the inner edge of the disk. Giant planet cores form when inward-migrating embryos become massive enough to switch direction and migrate outward. We present simulations of this process using a modified N-body code, starting from a swarm of planetary embryos. Systems of hot super-Earths form in resonant chains with the innermost planet at or interior to the disk inner edge. Resonant chains are disrupted by late dynamical instabilities triggered by the dispersal of the gaseous disk. Giant planet cores migrate outward toward zero-torque zones, which move inward and eventually disappear as the disk disperses. Giant planet cores migrate inward with these zones and are stranded at ~1-5 AU. Our model reproduces several properties of the observed extra-solar planet populations. The frequency of giant planet cores increases strongly when the mass in solids is increased, consistent with the observed giant exoplanet - stellar metallicity correlation. The frequency of hot super-Earths is not a function of stellar metallicity, also in agreement with observations. Our simulations can reproduce the broad characteristics of the observed super-Earth population.

  17. K2-97b: A (Re-?)Inflated Planet Orbiting a Red Giant Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunblatt, Samuel K.; Huber, Daniel; Gaidos, Eric J.; Lopez, Eric D.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Barclay, Thomas; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Mann, Andrew W.; Petigura, Erik; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Sinukoff, Evan J.

    2016-12-01

    Strongly irradiated giant planets are observed to have radii larger than thermal evolution models predict. Although these inflated planets have been known for over 15 years, it is unclear whether their inflation is caused by the deposition of energy from the host star or the inhibited cooling of the planet. These processes can be distinguished if the planet becomes highly irradiated only when the host star evolves onto the red giant branch. We report the discovery of K2-97b, a 1.31 ± 0.11 R J, 1.10 ± 0.11 M J planet orbiting a 4.20 ± 0.14 R ⊙, 1.16 ± 0.12 M ⊙ red giant star with an orbital period of 8.4 days. We precisely constrained stellar and planetary parameters by combining asteroseismology, spectroscopy, and granulation noise modeling along with transit and radial velocity measurements. The uncertainty in planet radius is dominated by systematic differences in transit depth, which we measure to be up to 30% between different light-curve reduction methods. Our calculations indicate the incident flux on this planet was {170}-60+140 times the incident flux on Earth, while the star was on the main sequence. Previous studies suggest that this incident flux is insufficient to delay planetary cooling enough to explain the present planet radius. This system thus provides the first evidence that planets may be inflated directly by incident stellar radiation rather than by delayed loss of heat from formation. Further studies of planets around red giant branch stars will confirm or contradict this hypothesis and may reveal a new class of re-inflated planets.

  18. EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE DELIVERY OF ATMOPHILE ELEMENTS DURING TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Soko; Brasser, Ramon; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-02-10

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar disks and planets beyond the solar system. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by the dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of the building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the solar system. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disk, as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disk. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial planets appears to be difficult. For the Grand Tack model, both of these mechanisms are efficient, which leads to a relatively uniform accretion of atmophile elements in the inner disk. It is also possible to have a “hybrid” scenario where the mixing is not very efficient but the scattering is efficient. The abundances of atmophile elements in this case increase with orbital radii. Such a scenario may occur in some of the extrasolar planetary systems, which are not accompanied by giant planets or those without strong perturbations from giants. We also confirm that the Grand Tack scenario leads to the distribution of asteroid analogues where rocky planetesimals tend to exist interior to icy ones, and show that their overall compositions are consistent with S-type and C-type chondrites, respectively.

  19. GIANT PLANET MIGRATION, DISK EVOLUTION, AND THE ORIGIN OF TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Richard D.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2009-10-20

    We present models of giant planet migration in evolving protoplanetary disks. Our disks evolve subject to viscous transport of angular momentum and photoevaporation, while planets undergo Type II migration. We use a Monte Carlo approach, running large numbers of models with a range in initial conditions. We find that relatively simple models can reproduce both the observed radial distribution of extrasolar giant planets, and the lifetimes and accretion histories of protoplanetary disks. The use of state-of-the-art photoevaporation models results in a degree of coupling between planet formation and disk clearing, which has not been found previously. Some accretion across planetary orbits is necessary if planets are to survive at radii approx<1.5 AU, and if planets of Jupiter mass or greater are to survive in our models they must be able to form at late times, when the disk surface density in the formation region is low. Our model forms two different types of 'transitional' disks, embedded planets and clearing disks, which show markedly different properties. We find that the observable properties of these systems are broadly consistent with current observations, and highlight useful observational diagnostics. We predict that young transition disks are more likely to contain embedded giant planets, while older transition disks are more likely to be undergoing disk clearing.

  20. THE ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PLANET SEARCH. XXI. A GAS-GIANT PLANET IN A ONE YEAR ORBIT AND THE HABITABILITY OF GAS-GIANT SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Tinney, C. G.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Bailey, Jeremy A.; Horner, J.; Butler, R. Paul; Jones, Hugh R. A.; O'Toole, Simon J.; Carter, Brad D.

    2011-05-01

    We have detected the Doppler signature of a gas-giant exoplanet orbiting the star HD 38283, in an eccentric orbit with a period of almost exactly one year (P = 363.2 {+-} 1.6 d, m sin i = 0.34 {+-} 0.02 M{sub Jup}, e = 0.41 {+-} 0.16). The detection of a planet with period very close to one year critically relied on year-round observation of this circumpolar star. Discovering a planet in a 1 AU orbit around a G dwarf star has prompted us to look more closely at the question of the habitability of the satellites of such planets. Regular satellites orbit all the giant planets in our solar system, suggesting that their formation is a natural by-product of the planet formation process. There is no reason for exomoon formation not to be similarly likely in exoplanetary systems. Moreover, our current understanding of that formation process does not preclude satellite formation in systems where gas giants undergo migration from their formation locations into the terrestrial planet habitable zone. Indeed, regular satellite formation and Type II migration are both linked to the clearing of a gap in the protoplanetary disk by a planet, and so may be inextricably linked. Migration would also multiply the chances of capturing both irregular satellites and Trojan companions sufficiently massive to be habitable. The habitability of such exomoons and exo-Trojans will critically depend on their mass, whether or not they host a magnetosphere, and (for the exomoon case) their orbital radius around the host exoplanet.

  1. High surface magnetic field in red giants as a new signature of planet engulfment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privitera, Giovanni; Meynet, Georges; Eggenberger, Patrick; Georgy, Cyril; Ekström, Sylvia; Vidotto, Aline A.; Bianda, Michele; Villaver, Eva; ud-Doula, Asif

    2016-09-01

    Context. Red giant stars may engulf planets. This may increase the rotation rate of their convective envelope, which could lead to strong dynamo-triggered magnetic fields. Aims: We explore the possibility of generating magnetic fields in red giants that have gone through the process of a planet engulfment. We compare them with similar models that evolve without any planets. We discuss the impact of magnetic braking through stellar wind on the evolution of the surface velocity of the parent star. Methods: By studying rotating stellar models with and without planets and an empirical relation between the Rossby number and the surface magnetic field, we deduced the evolution of the surface magnetic field along the red giant branch. The effects of stellar wind magnetic braking were explored using a relation deduced from magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Results: The stellar evolution model of a red giant with 1.7 M⊙ without planet engulfment and with a time-averaged rotation velocity during the main sequence equal to 100 km s-1 shows a surface magnetic field triggered by convection that is stronger than 10 G only at the base of the red giant branch, that is, for gravities log g> 3. When a planet engulfment occurs, this magnetic field can also appear at much lower gravities, that is, at much higher luminosities along the red giant branch. The engulfment of a 15 MJ planet typically produces a dynamo-triggered magnetic field stronger than 10 G for gravities between 2.5 and 1.9. We show that for reasonable magnetic braking laws for the wind, the high surface velocity reached after a planet engulfment may be maintained sufficiently long to be observable. Conclusions: High surface magnetic fields for red giants in the upper part of the red giant branch are a strong indication of a planet engulfment or of an interaction with a companion. Our theory can be tested by observing fast-rotating red giants such as HD 31994, Tyc 0347-00762-1, Tyc 5904-00513-1, and Tyc 6054

  2. BD+15 2940 AND HD 233604: TWO GIANTS WITH PLANETS CLOSE TO THE ENGULFMENT ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, G.; Niedzielski, A.; Adamow, M.; Maciejewski, G.; Wolszczan, A. E-mail: andrzej.niedzielski@astri.umk.pl E-mail: gracjan.maciejewski@astri.umk.pl

    2013-06-10

    We report the discovery of planetary-mass companions to two red giants by the ongoing Penn State-Torun Planet Search (PTPS) conducted with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The 1.1 M{sub Sun} K0-giant, BD+15 2940, has a 1.1 M{sub J} minimum mass companion orbiting the star at a 137.5 day period in a 0.54 AU orbit what makes it the closest-in planet around a giant and possible subject of engulfment as the consequence of stellar evolution. HD 233604, a 1.5 M{sub Sun} K5-giant, is orbited by a 6.6 M{sub J} minimum mass planet which has a period of 192 days and a semi-major axis of only 0.75 AU making it one of the least distant planets to a giant star. The chemical composition analysis of HD 233604 reveals a relatively high {sup 7}Li abundance which may be a sign of its early evolutionary stage or recent engulfment of another planet in the system. We also present independent detections of planetary-mass companions to HD 209458 and HD 88133, and stellar activity-induced radial velocity variations in HD 166435, as part of the discussion of the observing and data analysis methods used in the PTPS project.

  3. The California Planet Survey IV: A Planet Orbiting the Giant Star HD 145934 and Updates to Seven Systems with Long-period Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y. Katherina; Wright, Jason T.; Nelson, Benjamin; Wang, Sharon X.; Ford, Eric B.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Howard, Andrew W.

    2015-02-01

    We present an update to seven stars with long-period planets or planetary candidates using new and archival radial velocities from Keck-HIRES and literature velocities from other telescopes. Our updated analysis better constrains orbital parameters for these planets, four of which are known multi-planet systems. HD 24040 b and HD 183263 c are super-Jupiters with circular orbits and periods longer than 8 yr. We present a previously unseen linear trend in the residuals of HD 66428 indicative of an additional planetary companion. We confirm that GJ 849 is a multi-planet system and find a good orbital solution for the c component: it is a 1 M Jup planet in a 15 yr orbit (the longest known for a planet orbiting an M dwarf). We update the HD 74156 double-planet system. We also announce the detection of HD 145934 b, a 2 M Jup planet in a 7.5 yr orbit around a giant star. Two of our stars, HD 187123 and HD 217107, at present host the only known examples of systems comprising a hot Jupiter and a planet with a well constrained period greater than 5 yr, and with no evidence of giant planets in between. Our enlargement and improvement of long-period planet parameters will aid future analysis of origins, diversity, and evolution of planetary systems. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology.

  4. Studies of Constraints from the Terrestrial Planets, Asteroid Belt and Giant Planet Obliquities on the Early Solar System Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorny, David

    The planetary instability has been invoked as a convenient way to explain several observables in the present Solar System. This theory, frequently referred to under a broad and somewhat ill-defined umbrella as the ‘Nice model’, postulates that at least one of the ice giants suffered scattering encounters with Jupiter and Saturn. This could explain several things, including the excitation of the proper eccentric mode in Jupiter's orbit, survival of the terrestrial planets during giant planet migration, and, if the instability was conveniently delayed, also the Late Heavy Bombardment of the Moon. These properties/events would be unexpected if the migration histories of the outer planets were ideally smooth (at least no comprehensive model has yet been fully developed to collectively explain them). Additional support for the planetary instability comes from the dynamical properties of the asteroid and Kuiper belts, Trojans, and planetary satellites. We created a large database of dynamical evolutions of the outer planets through and 100 Myr past the instability (Nesvorny and Morbidelli 2012. Many of these dynamical histories have been found to match constraints from the orbits of the outer planets themselves. We now propose to test these different scenarios using constraints from the terrestrial planets, asteroid belt and giant planet obliquities. As we explain in the proposal narrative, we will bring all these constraints together in an attempt to develop a comprehensive model of early Solar System's evolution. This will be a significant improvement over the past work, where different constraints were considered piecewise and in various approximations. Our work has the potential to generate support for the Nice-type instability, or to rule it out, which could help in sparking interest in developing better models. RELEVANCE The proposed research is fundamental to understanding the formation and early evolution of the Solar System. This is a central theme of NASA

  5. The Rings of Chariklo under Close Encounters with the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, R. A. N.; Sfair, R.; Winter, O. C.

    2016-06-01

    The Centaur population is composed of minor bodies wandering between the giant planets that frequently perform close gravitational encounters with these planets, leading to a chaotic orbital evolution. Recently, the discovery of two well-defined narrow rings was announced around the Centaur 10199 Chariklo. The rings are assumed to be in the equatorial plane of Chariklo and to have circular orbits. The existence of a well-defined system of rings around a body in such a perturbed orbital region poses an interesting new problem. Are the rings of Chariklo stable when perturbed by close gravitational encounters with the giant planets? Our approach to address this question consisted of forward and backward numerical simulations of 729 clones of Chariklo, with similar initial orbits, for a period of 100 Myr. We found, on average, that each clone experiences during its lifetime more than 150 close encounters with the giant planets within one Hill radius of the planet in question. We identified some extreme close encounters that were able to significantly disrupt or disturb the rings of Chariklo. About 3% of the clones lose their rings and about 4% of the clones have their rings significantly disturbed. Therefore, our results show that in most cases (more than 90%), the close encounters with the giant planets do not affect the stability of the rings in Chariklo-like systems. Thus, if there is an efficient mechanism that creates the rings, then these structures may be common among these kinds of Centaurs.

  6. There might be giants: unseen Jupiter-mass planets as sculptors of tightly packed planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hands, T. O.; Alexander, R. D.

    2016-03-01

    The limited completeness of the Kepler sample for planets with orbital periods ≳1 yr leaves open the possibility that exoplanetary systems may host undetected giant planets. Should such planets exist, their dynamical interactions with the inner planets may prove vital in sculpting the final orbital configurations of these systems. Using an N-body code with additional forces to emulate the effects of a protoplanetary disc, we perform simulations of the assembly of compact systems of super-Earth-mass planets with unseen giant companions. The simulated systems are analogous to Kepler-11 or Kepler-32 in that they contain four or five inner super-Earths, but our systems also contain longer-period giant companions which are unlikely to have been detected by Kepler. We find that giant companions tend to break widely spaced first-order mean-motion resonances, allowing the inner planets to migrate into tighter resonances. This leads to more compact architectures and increases the occurrence rate of Laplace resonant chains.

  7. Polarization of Directly Imaged Young Giant Planets as a Probe of Mass, Rotation, and Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Sengupta, Sujan

    2012-01-01

    Young, hot gas giant planets at large separations from their primaries have been directly imaged around several nearby stars. More such planets will likely be detected by ongoing and new imaging surveys with instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). Efforts continue to model the spectra of these planets in order to constrain their masses, effective temperatures, composition, and cloud structure. One potential tool for analyzing these objects, which has received relatively less attention, is polarization. Linear polarization of gas giant exoplanets can arise from the combined influences of light scattering by atmospheric dust and a rotationally distorted shape. The oblateness of gas giant planet increases of course with rotation rate and for fixed rotation also rises with decreasing gravity. Thus young, lower mass gas giant planets with youthful inflated radii could easily have oblateness greater than that of Saturn s 10%. We find that polarizations of over 1% may easily be produced in the near-infrared in such cases. This magnitude of polarization may be measurable by GPI and other instruments. Thus if detected, polarization of a young Jupiter places constraints on the combination of its gravity, rotation rate, and degree of cloudiness. We will present results of our multiple scattering analysis coupled with a self-consistent dusty atmospheric models to demonstrate the range of polarizations that might be expected from resolved exoplanets and the range of parameter space that such observations may inform.

  8. Tidal dissipation in the dense anelastic core of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remus, Francoise; Mathis, Stéphane; Lainey, Valéry

    2014-05-01

    The prescriptions used today in celestial mechanics to describe dynamical processes, such as tidal interactions, are somewhat crude. In particular, the quality factor Q, quantifying the tidal dissipation, is often taken as constant, despite its dependence on internal structure, and thus on the tidal frequency. In a solid layer, Efroimsky & Lainey (2007) showed the importance of using a realistic prescription of Q to estimate the evolution speed of the Mars-Phobos system. Such studies confirm the necessity to go beyond evolution models using ad-hoc Q values. Recent astrometric observations of the dynamical evolution of the Jovian and Saturnian systems have shown a higher tidal dissipation than expected (for Jupiter: Q≈3.6×10^4, and for Saturn: Q≈1.7×10^3, from Lainey et al. 2009,2012 resp.). According to a recent model of the Saturnian system formation, such a high tidal dissipation is required by the satellites to migrate up to their present location over the age of the solar system (Charnoz et al., 2011). Globally, gas giants are constituted by a large fluid envelope and a dense central icy/rocky core (Hubbard & Marley 1989). Fluid models, where the tide excites the inertial waves of the convective envelope, show that the resulting tidal dissipation is of the order of Q≈10^5-10^7 (Wu 2005, Ogilvie & Lin 2004). These models have neglected the possible dissipation by the core. Thus, we have developed a model evaluating the tidal dissipation in the anelastic central region of a two-layer planet, surrounded by a static envelope, tidally excited by the hostingstar or a satellite (Remus et al., 2012). The tide exerted by the companion deforms both the envelope and the core. Because of its anelasticity, the core also creates tidal dissipation. I will discuss how the tidal dissipation depends on the rheological parameters and the size of the core. Assuming realistic models of internal structure and taking into account the frequency dependence of the solid

  9. Hilda Asteroid Colors: Insight into Giant Planet Migration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, Benjamin; Ryan, Erin L.; Woodward, Charles E.; Noll, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    The Hilda asteroids are a unique population of small bodies that are locked in a 3:2 mean motion resonance with Jupiter. Unlike other resonances in the asteroid belt, the 3:2 is a stable resonance at 3.95 AU. Objects at this resonance have stable orbits for at least 2 GYr and, more likely, for the age of the Solar System. In an instantaneous top down view of the solar system, the Hildas approximately trace a triangle with over-densities of asteroids near the L3, L4 and L5 Jovian Lagrange points. This configuration is cited as evidence that Jupiter migrated inwards by ~0.4 AU. Stable Hilda orbits have mean eccentricities of 0.16 with typical perihelia of 3.15 AU. These latter properties, in terms of observability and accessibility to spacecraft, are a major advantage that distinguishes the Hildas from other populations of potential scientific interest such as the Jovian Trojans. The Outer Main Belt (OMB) also has many objects that may have originated in the outer protoplanetary disk (OPD). However, the OMB appears to be more mixed with objects from elsewhere in the Main Belt and enjoys only a small advantage in terms of brightness for a given diameter and albedo. The intrinsic collisional probability for objects in the Hilda population is also a factor of 3 to 5 less than the collisional probabilities for Trojan and OMB populations. Thus, the Hildas likely represent a significant population of objects unaltered due to collisional processing. Here we discuss findings of our ongoing NASA Planetary Astronomy program to obtain Sloan optical (g' r' i' z') colors of Hilda-group asteroids. The loci of these colors are compared to the Kuiper Belt populations to test post-formation migration effects of the giant planets in our solar system on the small body population. In part, this work was conducted as part of a University of Minnesota Undergraduate Research Scholarship, and is supported by NASA PAST Award NNX13AJ11G.

  10. Peering into the Giant-planet-forming Region of the TW Hydrae Disk with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapson, Valerie A.; Kastner, Joel H.; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A.; Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-01

    We present Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) adaptive optics near-infrared images of the giant-planet-forming regions of the protoplanetary disk orbiting the nearby (D = 54 pc), pre-main-sequence (classical T Tauri) star TW Hydrae. The GPI images, which were obtained in coronagraphic/polarimetric mode, exploit starlight scattered off small dust grains to elucidate the surface density structure of the TW Hya disk from ∼80 AU to within ∼10 AU of the star at ∼1.5 AU resolution. The GPI polarized intensity images unambiguously confirm the presence of a gap in the radial surface brightness distribution of the inner disk. The gap is centered near ∼23 AU, with a width of ∼5 AU and a depth of ∼50%. In the context of recent simulations of giant-planet formation in gaseous, dusty disks orbiting pre-main-sequence stars, these results indicate that at least one young planet with a mass ∼0.2 MJ could be present in the TW Hya disk at an orbital semimajor axis similar to that of Uranus. If this (proto)planet is actively accreting gas from the disk, it may be readily detectable by GPI or a similarly sensitive, high-resolution infrared imaging system.

  11. PEERING INTO THE GIANT-PLANET-FORMING REGION OF THE TW HYDRAE DISK WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Rapson, Valerie A.; Kastner, Joel H.; Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A.; Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-20

    We present Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) adaptive optics near-infrared images of the giant-planet-forming regions of the protoplanetary disk orbiting the nearby (D = 54 pc), pre-main-sequence (classical T Tauri) star TW Hydrae. The GPI images, which were obtained in coronagraphic/polarimetric mode, exploit starlight scattered off small dust grains to elucidate the surface density structure of the TW Hya disk from ∼80 AU to within ∼10 AU of the star at ∼1.5 AU resolution. The GPI polarized intensity images unambiguously confirm the presence of a gap in the radial surface brightness distribution of the inner disk. The gap is centered near ∼23 AU, with a width of ∼5 AU and a depth of ∼50%. In the context of recent simulations of giant-planet formation in gaseous, dusty disks orbiting pre-main-sequence stars, these results indicate that at least one young planet with a mass ∼0.2 M{sub J} could be present in the TW Hya disk at an orbital semimajor axis similar to that of Uranus. If this (proto)planet is actively accreting gas from the disk, it may be readily detectable by GPI or a similarly sensitive, high-resolution infrared imaging system.

  12. Implications of the giant planets for the formation and evolution of planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    1989-01-01

    The giant planet region in the solar system appears to be bounded inside by the limit of water condensation, suggesting that the most abundant astrophysical condensate plays an important role in giant planet formation. Indeed, Jupiter and Saturn exhibit evidence for rock and/or ice cores or central concentrations that probably accumulated first, acting as nuclei for subsequent gas accumulation. This is a 'planetary' accumulation process, distinct from the stellar formation process, even though most of Jupiter has a similar composition to the primordial sun. Uranus and Neptune appear to exhibit evidence of an important role for giant impacts in their structure and evolution. No simple picture emerges for the temperature structure of the solar nebula from observations alone. However, it seems likely that Jupiter is the key to the planetary system, and a similar planet could be expected for other systems. The data and inferences from these data are summarized for the entire known solar system beyond the asteroid belt.

  13. FORMATION OF GIANT PLANETS BY DISK INSTABILITY ON WIDE ORBITS AROUND PROTOSTARS WITH VARIED MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.

    2011-04-10

    Doppler surveys have shown that more massive stars have significantly higher frequencies of giant planets inside {approx}3 AU than lower mass stars, consistent with giant planet formation by core accretion. Direct imaging searches have begun to discover significant numbers of giant planet candidates around stars with masses of {approx}1 M{sub sun} to {approx}2 M{sub sun} at orbital distances of {approx}20 AU to {approx}120 AU. Given the inability of core accretion to form giant planets at such large distances, gravitational instabilities of the gas disk leading to clump formation have been suggested as the more likely formation mechanism. Here, we present five new models of the evolution of disks with inner radii of 20 AU and outer radii of 60 AU, for central protostars with masses of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 M{sub sun}, in order to assess the likelihood of planet formation on wide orbits around stars with varied masses. The disk masses range from 0.028 M{sub sun} to 0.21 M{sub sun}, with initial Toomre Q stability values ranging from 1.1 in the inner disks to {approx}1.6 in the outer disks. These five models show that disk instability is capable of forming clumps on timescales of {approx}10{sup 3} yr that, if they survive for longer times, could form giant planets initially on orbits with semimajor axes of {approx}30 AU to {approx}70 AU and eccentricities of {approx}0 to {approx}0.35, with initial masses of {approx}1 M{sub Jup} to {approx}5 M{sub Jup}, around solar-type stars, with more protoplanets forming as the mass of the protostar (and protoplanetary disk) is increased. In particular, disk instability appears to be a likely formation mechanism for the HR 8799 gas giant planetary system.

  14. Giant Planets in Open Clusters and Binaries: Observational Constraints on Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Samuel N.; White, Russel J.; Latham, David W.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Torres, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Some giant planets migrate from their birthplace beyond the ice line to short-period orbits just a fraction of an AU from their host stars. Though many theories have been proposed, it is not yet clear which mechanism is most important for migration, and by extension, in which types of planetary system we can expect a greater prevalence of disruptive gas giant migration. One way to constrain this process is to observe the orbital properties of migrating planets, which are expected to be shaped according to the mode of migration: in general, interaction with the gas disk should produce circular, coplanar orbits, while multi-body processes stir up eccentricities and inclinations. Unfortunately, tidal and magnetic interactions between hot Jupiters and their host stars can obscure these differences by damping eccentricities and inclinations over time, so the most direct constraints will come from difficult-to-observe young systems. Additional constraints on migration can be obtained by observing the architectures of systems containing short-period giant planets: if an outer companion is often responsible for driving migration, there should be a higher incidence of massive companions on wide orbits in hot Jupiter systems than in systems not hosting a short-period giant planet. Further, the properties of these outer companions can help differentiate between multi-body migration mechanisms. We describe two complementary surveys that we have carried out to address these problems. The first, a precise radial-velocity survey in nearby adolescent (100-600 Myr) open clusters, characterizes the orbits of giant planets soon after migration. The second, an adaptive optics imaging survey of hot Jupiter host stars, constrains the population of wide companions in hot Jupiter systems. We present the results from these two surveys and discuss the orbital properties and system architectures of our discoveries in the context of giant planet migration.

  15. CONSEQUENCES OF THE EJECTION AND DISRUPTION OF GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Lin, Douglas

    2011-05-10

    The discovery of Jupiter-mass planets in close orbits about their parent stars has challenged models of planet formation. Recent observations have shown that a number of these planets have highly inclined, sometimes retrograde orbits about their parent stars, prompting much speculation as to their origin. It is known that migration alone cannot account for the observed population of these misaligned hot Jupiters, which suggests that dynamical processes after the gas disk dissipates play a substantial role in yielding the observed inclination and eccentricity distributions. One particularly promising candidate is planet-planet scattering, which is not very well understood in the nonlinear regime of tides. Through three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of multi-orbit encounters, we show that planets that are scattered into an orbit about their parent stars with closest approach distance being less than approximately three times the tidal radius are either destroyed or completely ejected from the system. We find that as few as 9 and as many as 12 of the currently known hot Jupiters have a maximum initial apastron for scattering that lies well within the ice line, implying that these planets must have migrated either before or after the scattering event that brought them to their current positions. If stellar tides are unimportant (Q{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 7}), disk migration is required to explain the existence of the hot Jupiters present in these systems. Additionally, we find that the disruption and/or ejection of Jupiter-mass planets deposits a Sun's worth of angular momentum onto the host star. For systems in which planet-planet scattering is common, we predict that planetary hosts have up to a 35% chance of possessing an obliquity relative to the invariable plane of greater than 90{sup 0}.

  16. SOLUBILITY OF WATER ICE IN METALLIC HYDROGEN: CONSEQUENCES FOR CORE EROSION IN GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, H. F.; Militzer, B.

    2012-01-20

    Using ab initio simulations we investigate whether water ice is stable in the cores of giant planets, or whether it dissolves into the layer of metallic hydrogen above. By Gibbs free energy calculations we find that for pressures between 10 and 40 Mbar the ice-hydrogen interface is thermodynamically unstable at temperatures above approximately 3000 K, far below the temperature of the core-mantle boundaries in Jupiter and Saturn. This implies that the dissolution of core material into the fluid layers of giant planets is thermodynamically favored, and that further modeling of the extent of core erosion is warranted.

  17. Characterizing transiting extrasolar giant planets: On companions, rings, and love handles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason Wayne

    2004-10-01

    For my Ph.D. research I investigated the prospects for characterizing transiting extrasolar giant planets from their transit lightcurves. Hubble Space Telescope photometry of transiting planet HD209458b revealed that the planet has no moons. Here, I show that tidal orbital evolution of moons limits their lifetimes, and hence that no moons larger than Amalthea in size should survive around HD209458b, consistent with observations. I then calculate the detectability and scientific potential of planetary rings and oblateness. Oblateness will prove difficult to reliably detect, even with the Hubble Space Telescope. However, large Saturn-like ring systems should be easy to find around transiting extrasolar giant planets if such rings exist.

  18. Formation of the giant planets and their satellite-ring systems - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The origin of the outer planets and their satellite systems is discussed within the framework of astrophysical theories of the origin of stars and the nature of viscous accretion disks. The nature of the outer planet systems is reviewed, and the gas-instability and core-instability models of the origin of the outer planets are described. Critical tests of the models are discussed, showing that the core-instability model is favored. The main phases of evolution that the giant planets underwent during and after their formation are outlined, and the source of their current excess luminosity is considered in detail. The origin of the regular and irregular satellites of the outer planets is discussed, focusing on their formation in viscous accretion disks or by collision, and the possibility of capture by planets.

  19. A Program To Detect and Characterize Extra-Solar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Robert W.; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This grant report highlights activity in the following areas: (1) Improvement in Precise Radial Velocity (PRV) analysis code; (2) Reanalysis of previous data; (3) Improvements to the AFOE (Advanced Fiber Optic Echelle) spectrograph; (4) Development of PRV capabilities for the Hectochelle; (5) Extra-solar planet studies; (6) Longer-term plans for the AFOE; (7) Completion and publication of the analysis of the transiting gas-giant planet HD 209458b.

  20. WARM DEBRIS DISKS PRODUCED BY GIANT IMPACTS DURING TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Genda, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Kokubo, E.

    2015-09-10

    In our solar system, Mars-sized protoplanets frequently collided with each other during the last stage of terrestrial planet formation, called the giant impact stage. Giant impacts eject a large amount of material from the colliding protoplanets into the terrestrial planet region, which may form debris disks with observable infrared excesses. Indeed, tens of warm debris disks around young solar-type stars have been observed. Here we quantitatively estimate the total mass of ejected materials during the giant impact stages. We found that ∼0.4 times the Earth’s mass is ejected in total throughout the giant impact stage. Ejected materials are ground down by collisional cascade until micron-sized grains are blown out by radiation pressure. The depletion timescale of these ejected materials is determined primarily by the mass of the largest body among them. We conducted high-resolution simulations of giant impacts to accurately obtain the mass of the largest ejected body. We then calculated the evolution of the debris disks produced by a series of giant impacts and depleted by collisional cascades to obtain the infrared excess evolution of the debris disks. We found that the infrared excess is almost always higher than the stellar infrared flux throughout the giant impact stage (∼100 Myr) and is sometimes ∼10 times higher immediately after a giant impact. Therefore, giant impact stages would explain the infrared excess from most observed warm debris disks. The observed fraction of stars with warm debris disks indicates that the formation probability of our solar-system-like terrestrial planets is approximately 10%.

  1. The In Situ Formation of Giant Planets at Short Orbital Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boley, Aaron C.; Gladman, Brett; Granados Contreras, A. Paula

    2016-05-01

    We propose that two of the most surprising results so far among exoplanet discoveries are related: the existences of both hot Jupiters and the high frequency of multi-planet systems with periods P < 200 days. In this paradigm, the vast majority of stars rapidly form along with multiple close-in planets in the mass range of Mars to super-Earths/mini-Neptunes. Such systems of tightly packed inner planets are metastable, with the time scale of the dynamical instability having a major influence on final planet types. In most cases, the planets consolidate into a system of fewer, more massive planets, but long after the circumstellar gas disk has dissipated. This can yield planets with masses above the traditional critical core of ~10 Mearth yielding short-period giants that lack abundant gas. A rich variety of physical states are also possible given the range of collisional outcomes and formation time of the close-in planets. However, when dynamical consolidation occurs before gas dispersal, a critical core can form that then grows via gas capture into a short-period gas giant. In this picture the majority of Hot and Warm Jupiters formed locally, rather than migrating down from larger distances.

  2. The In Situ Formation of Giant Planets at Short Orbital Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boley, A. C.; Granados Contreras, A. P.; Gladman, B.

    2016-02-01

    We propose that two of the most surprising results so far among exoplanet discoveries are related: the existences of both hot Jupiters and the high frequency of multi-planet systems with periods P ≲ 200 days. In this paradigm, the vast majority of stars rapidly form along with multiple close-in planets in the mass range of Mars to super-Earths/mini-Neptunes. Such systems of tightly packed inner planets are metastable, with the time scale of the dynamical instability having a major influence on final planet types. In most cases, the planets consolidate into a system of fewer, more massive planets, but long after the circumstellar gas disk has dissipated. This can yield planets with masses above the traditional critical core of ∼10 M⊕, yielding short-period giants that lack abundant gas. A rich variety of physical states are also possible given the range of collisional outcomes and formation time of the close-in planets. However, when dynamical consolidation occurs before gas dispersal, a critical core can form that then grows via gas capture into a short-period gas giant. In this picture the majority of Hot and Warm Jupiters formed locally, rather than migrating down from larger distances.

  3. Making Planet Nine: A Scattered Giant in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2016-07-01

    Correlations in the orbits of several minor planets in the outer solar system suggest the presence of a remote, massive Planet Nine. With at least 10 times the mass of the Earth and a perihelion well beyond 100 au, Planet Nine poses a challenge to planet formation theory. Here we expand on a scenario in which the planet formed closer to the Sun and was gravitationally scattered by Jupiter or Saturn onto a very eccentric orbit in an extended gaseous disk. Dynamical friction with the gas then allowed the planet to settle in the outer solar system. We explore this possibility with a set of numerical simulations. Depending on how the gas disk evolves, scattered super-Earths or small gas giants settle on a range of orbits, with perihelion distances as large as 300 au. Massive disks that clear from the inside out on million-year timescales yield orbits that allow a super-Earth or gas giant to shepherd the minor planets as observed. A massive planet can achieve a similar orbit in a persistent, low-mass disk over the lifetime of the solar system.

  4. Albedo and Reflection Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarsky, David; Burrows, Adam; Pinto, Philip

    2000-08-01

    We generate theoretical albedo and reflection spectra for a full range of extrasolar giant planet (EGP) models, from Jovian to 51 Pegasi class objects. Our albedo modeling utilizes the latest atomic and molecular cross sections, Mie theory treatment of scattering and absorption by condensates, a variety of particle size distributions, and an extension of the Feautrier technique, which allows for a general treatment of the scattering phase function. We find that, because of qualitative similarities in the compositions and spectra of objects within each of five broad effective temperature ranges, it is natural to establish five representative EGP albedo classes. At low effective temperatures (Teff<~150 K) is a class of ``Jovian'' objects (class I) with tropospheric ammonia clouds. Somewhat warmer class II, or ``water cloud,'' EGPs are primarily affected by condensed H2O. Gaseous methane absorption features are prevalent in both classes. In the absence of nonequilibrium condensates in the upper atmosphere, and with sufficient H2O condensation, class II objects are expected to have the highest visible albedos of any class. When the upper atmosphere of an EGP is too hot for H2O to condense, radiation generally penetrates more deeply. In these objects, designated class III or ``clear'' because of a lack of condensation in the upper atmosphere, absorption lines of the alkali metals, sodium and potassium, lower the albedo significantly throughout the visible. Furthermore, the near-infrared albedo is negligible, primarily because of strong CH4 and H2O molecular absorption and collision-induced absorption (CIA) by H2 molecules. In those EGPs with exceedingly small orbital distance (``roasters'') and 900 K<~Teff<~1500 K (class IV), a tropospheric silicate layer is expected to exist. In all but the hottest (Teff>~1500 K) or lowest gravity roasters, the effect of this silicate layer is likely to be insignificant because of the very strong absorption by sodium and potassium

  5. Transits of extrasolar moons around luminous giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, R.

    2016-04-01

    Beyond Earth-like planets, moons can be habitable, too. No exomoons have been securely detected, but they could be extremely abundant. Young Jovian planets can be as hot as late M stars, with effective temperatures of up to 2000 K. Transits of their moons might be detectable in their infrared photometric light curves if the planets are sufficiently separated (≳10 AU) from the stars to be directly imaged. The moons will be heated by radiation from their young planets and potentially by tidal friction. Although stellar illumination will be weak beyond 5 AU, these alternative energy sources could liquify surface water on exomoons for hundreds of Myr. A Mars-mass H2O-rich moon around β Pic b would have a transit depth of 1.5 × 10-3, in reach of near-future technology.

  6. Effect of Giant Planet Formation on the Compositional Mixture of the Asteroid Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretke, Katherine A.; Bottke, William; Kring, David A.; Levison, Harold F.

    2017-06-01

    The asteroid belt is observed to be a mixture of objects with different compositions, with volatile-poor asteroids (mostly S-complex) dominant in the inner asteroid belt while volatile-rich (mostly C-complex) asteroids dominate the outer asteroid belt. While this general compositional stratification was originally thought to be an indicator of the primordial temperature gradient in the protoplanetary disk, the very distinct properties of these populations suggest that they must represent two completely decoupled reservoirs, not a simple gradient (e.g., Warren 2011). It is possible to create this general stratification (as well as the observed mixing) as the implantation of outer Solar System material into the asteroid belt by the early migration of the giant planets (e.g. the Grand Tack, Walsh et al. 2011). However, this presupposes that the inner and outer Solar System materials were still sorted in their primordial locations prior to any migration of the planets. The lack of a fully dynamically self-consistent model of giant planet core formation has prevented the study of how the core formation process itself may result in dynamical mixing in the early Solar System's history. Recently, pebble accretion, the process by which planetesimals can grow to giant planet cores via the accretion of small, rapidly drifting sub-meter-sized bodies known as ``pebbles,'' (Lambrechts & Johansen 2012, Levison, Kretke & Duncan 2015) finally offers such a model. Here we show how the process of giant planet formation will impact the surrounding planetesimal population, possibly resulting in the observed compositional mixture of the asteroid belt, without requiring a dramatic migration of the giant planets. For example, preliminary runs suggest planetesimals from the Jupiter-formation zone can be implanted in the outer main belt via interactions with scattered Jupiter-zone protoplanets. This could potentially provide an alternative non-Grand Tack solution to the origin of many C

  7. The Changing Face of the Extrasolar Giant Planet HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, James Y.-K.; Menou, Kristen; Hansen, Bradley M. S.; Seager, Sara

    2003-04-01

    High-resolution atmospheric flow simulations of the tidally locked extrasolar giant planet HD 209458b show large-scale spatio-temporal variability. This is in contrast to the simple, permanent day/night (i.e., hot/cold) picture. The planet's global circulation is characterized by a polar vortex in motion around each pole and a banded structure corresponding to approximately three broad zonal (east-west) jets. For very strong jets, the circulation-induced temperature difference between moving hot and cold regions can reach up to ~1000 K, suggesting that atmospheric variability could be observed in the planet's spectral and photometric signatures.

  8. Gravitational scattering as a possible origin for giant planets at small stellar distances.

    PubMed

    Weidenschilling, S J; Marzari, F

    The recent discoveries of massive planetary companions orbiting several solar-type stars pose a conundrum. Conventional models for the formation of giant planets (such as Jupiter and Saturn) place such objects at distances of several astronomical units from the parent star, whereas all but one of the new objects are on orbits well inside 1 AU; these planets must therefore have originated at larger distances and subsequently migrated inwards. One suggested migration mechanism invokes tidal interactions between the planet and the evolving circumstellar disk. Such a mechanism results in planets with small, essentially circular orbits, which appears to be the case for many of the new planets. But two of the objects have substantial orbital eccentricities, which are difficult to reconcile with a tidal-linkage model. Here we describe an alternative model for planetary migration that can account for these large orbital eccentricities. If a system of three or more giant planets form about a star, their orbits may become unstable as they gain mass by accreting gas from the circumstellar disk; subsequent gravitational encounters among these planets can eject one from the system while placing the others into highly eccentric orbits both closer and farther from the star.

  9. Zero age planetary orbit of gas giant planets revisited: reinforcement of the link with stellar metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, R.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; Porto de Mello, G. F.

    2017-01-01

    In 2005, we suggested a relation between the optimal locus of gas giant planet formation, prior to migration, and the metallicity of the host star, based on the core accretion model, and radial profiles of dust surface density and gas temperature. At that time, less than 200 extrasolar planets were known, limiting the scope of our analysis. Here, we take into account the expanded statistics allowed by new discoveries, in order to check the validity of some premises. We compare predictions with the present available data and results for different stellar mass ranges. We find that the zero age planetary orbit (ZAPO) hypothesis continues to hold after an order of magnitude increase in discovered planets. In particular, the prediction that metal-poor stars harbour planets with average radii distinctively lower than metal-rich ones is still evident in the statistics, and cannot be explained by chaotic planetary formation mechanisms involving migration and gravitational interaction between planets. The ZAPO hypothesis predicts that in metal-poor stars the planets are formed near their host stars; as a consequence, they are more frequently engulfed by the stars during the migration process or stripped of their gaseous envelops. The depleted number of gas giant planets around metal-poor stars would then be the result of the synergy between low formation probability, as predicted by the core accretion model, and high destruction probability, for the ones that are formed.

  10. On the orbital evolution of a pair of giant planets in mean motion resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Q.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2016-10-01

    Pairs of extrasolar giant planets in a mean motion commensurability are common with 2:1 resonance occurring most frequently. Disc-planet interaction provides a mechanism for their origin. However, the time-scale on which this could operate in particular cases is unclear. We perform 2D and 3D numerical simulations of pairs of giant planets in a protoplanetary disc as they form and maintain a mean motion commensurability. We consider systems with current parameters similar to those of HD 155358, 24 Sextantis and HD 60532, and disc models of varying mass, decreasing mass corresponding to increasing age. For the lowest mass discs, systems with planets in the Jovian mass range migrate inwards maintaining a 2:1 commensurability. Systems with the inner planet currently at around 1 au from the central star could have originated at a few au and migrated inwards on a time-scale comparable to protoplanetary disc lifetimes. Systems of larger mass planets such as HD 60532 attain 3:1 resonance as observed. For a given mass accretion rate, results are insensitive to the disc model for the range of viscosity prescriptions adopted, there being good agreement between 2D and 3D simulations. However, in a higher mass disc a pair of Jovian mass planets passes through 2:1 resonance before attaining a temporary phase lasting a few thousand orbits in an unstable 5:3 resonance prior to undergoing a scattering. Thus, finding systems in this commensurability is unlikely.

  11. Planet traps and first planets: The critical metallicity for gas giant formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hirashita, Hiroyuki E-mail: hirashita@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-06-10

    The ubiquity of planets poses an interesting question: when are first planets formed in galaxies? We investigate this by adopting a theoretical model where planet traps are combined with the standard core accretion scenario in which the efficiency of forming planetary cores directly relates to the metallicity ([Fe/H]) in disks. Three characteristic exoplanetary populations are examined: hot Jupiters, exo-Jupiters around 1 AU, and low-mass planets in tight orbits, such as super-Earths. We statistically compute planet formation frequencies (PFFs), as well as the orbital radius (〈R{sub rapid}〉) within which gas accretion becomes efficient enough to form Jovian planets, as a function of metallicity (–2 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤–0.6). We show that the total PFFs for these three populations increase steadily with metallicity. This is the direct outcome of the core accretion picture. For the metallicity range considered here, the population of low-mass planets dominates Jovian planets. The Jovian planets contribute to the PFFs above [Fe/H] ≅ –1. We find that the hot Jupiters form more efficiently than the exo-Jupiters at [Fe/H] ≲ –0.7. This arises from the slower growth of planetary cores and their more efficient radial inward transport by the host traps in lower metallicity disks. We show that the critical metallicity for forming Jovian planets is [Fe/H] ≅ –1.2 by comparing 〈R{sub rapid}〉 of hot Jupiters and low-mass planets. The comparison intrinsically links to the different gas accretion efficiency between these two types of planets. Therefore, this study implies that important physical processes in planet formation may be tested by exoplanet observations around metal-poor stars.

  12. SOLUBILITY OF IRON IN METALLIC HYDROGEN AND STABILITY OF DENSE CORES IN GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Sean M.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-08-20

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is most commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H{sub 2}O, MgO, and SiO{sub 2} dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interiors, particularly for Saturn-mass planets. Understanding the distribution of iron and other heavy elements in gas giants may be relevant in understanding mass-radius relationships, as well as deviations in transport properties from pure hydrogen-helium mixtures.

  13. Origin of the orbital architecture of the giant planets of the Solar System.

    PubMed

    Tsiganis, K; Gomes, R; Morbidelli, A; Levison, H F

    2005-05-26

    Planetary formation theories suggest that the giant planets formed on circular and coplanar orbits. The eccentricities of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus, however, reach values of 6 per cent, 9 per cent and 8 per cent, respectively. In addition, the inclinations of the orbital planes of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune take maximum values of approximately 2 degrees with respect to the mean orbital plane of Jupiter. Existing models for the excitation of the eccentricity of extrasolar giant planets have not been successfully applied to the Solar System. Here we show that a planetary system with initial quasi-circular, coplanar orbits would have evolved to the current orbital configuration, provided that Jupiter and Saturn crossed their 1:2 orbital resonance. We show that this resonance crossing could have occurred as the giant planets migrated owing to their interaction with a disk of planetesimals. Our model reproduces all the important characteristics of the giant planets' orbits, namely their final semimajor axes, eccentricities and mutual inclinations.

  14. DETECTING THE WIND-DRIVEN SHAPES OF EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANETS FROM TRANSIT PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Jason W.; Cooper, Curtis S.; Showman, Adam P.; Hubbard, William B.

    2009-11-20

    Several processes can cause the shape of an extrasolar giant planet's shadow, as viewed in transit, to depart from circular. In addition to rotational effects, cloud formation, non-homogenous haze production and movement, and dynamical effects (winds) could also be important. When such a planet transits its host star as seen from the Earth, the asphericity will introduce a deviation in the transit light curve relative to the transit of a perfectly spherical (or perfectly oblate) planet. We develop a theoretical framework to interpret planetary shapes. We then generate predictions for transiting planet shapes based on a published theoretical dynamical model of HD189733b. Using these shape models we show that planet shapes are unlikely to introduce detectable light-curve deviations (those >1 x 10{sup -5} of the host star), but that the shapes may lead to astrophysical sources of systematic error when measuring planetary oblateness, transit time, and impact parameter.

  15. The SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets. X. Detection and characterization of giant planets by the dozen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard, G.; Arnold, L.; Forveille, T.; Correia, A. C. M.; Laskar, J.; Bonfils, X.; Boisse, I.; Díaz, R. F.; Hagelberg, J.; Sahlmann, J.; Santos, N. C.; Astudillo-Defru, N.; Borgniet, S.; Bouchy, F.; Bourrier, V.; Courcol, B.; Delfosse, X.; Deleuil, M.; Demangeon, O.; Ehrenreich, D.; Gregorio, J.; Jovanovic, N.; Labrevoir, O.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Lozi, J.; Moutou, C.; Montagnier, G.; Pepe, F.; Rey, J.; Santerne, A.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.; Vanhuysse, M.; Vigan, A.; Wilson, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements of eight stars that were secured with the spectrograph SOPHIE at the 193 cm telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory. The measurements allow detecting and characterizing new giant extrasolar planets. The host stars are dwarfs of spectral types between F5 and K0 and magnitudes of between 6.7 and 9.6; the planets have minimum masses Mp sin i of between 0.4 to 3.8 MJup and orbitalperiods of several days to several months. The data allow only single planets to be discovered around the first six stars (HD 143105, HIP 109600, HD 35759, HIP 109384, HD 220842, and HD 12484), but one of them shows the signature of an additional substellar companion in the system. The seventh star, HIP 65407, allows the discovery of two giant planets that orbit just outside the 12:5 resonance in weak mutual interaction. The last star, HD 141399, was already known to host a four-planet system; our additional data and analyses allow new constraints to be set on it. We present Keplerian orbits of all systems, together with dynamical analyses of the two multi-planet systems. HD 143105 is one of the brightest stars known to host a hot Jupiter, which could allow numerous follow-up studies to be conducted even though this is not a transiting system. The giant planets HIP 109600b, HIP 109384b, and HD 141399c are located in the habitable zone of their host star. Based on observations collected with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, by the SOPHIE Consortium (programs 07A.PNP.CONS to 15A.PNP.CONS).Full version of the SOPHIE measurements (Table 1) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A145

  16. Hydrogen-water mixtures in giant planet interiors studied with ab initio simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, F.; Militzer, B.

    2015-12-01

    We study water-hydrogen mixtures under planetary interior conditions using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We determine the thermodynamic properties of various water-hydrogen mixing ratios at temperatures of 2000 and 6000 K for pressures of a few tens of GPa. These conditions are relevant for ice giant planets and for the outer envelope of the gas giants. We find that at 2000 K the mixture is in a molecular regime, while at 6000 K the dissociation of hydrogen and water is important and affects the thermodynamic properties. We study the structure of the liquid and analyze the radial distribution function. We provide estimates for the transport properties, diffusion and viscosity, based on autocorrelation functions. We obtained viscosity estimates of the order of a few tenths of mPa s for the conditions under consideration. These results are relevant for dynamo simulations of ice giant planets.

  17. Thermodynamics of giant planet formation: shocking hot surfaces on circumplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Mordasini, C.

    2017-02-01

    The luminosity of young giant planets can inform about their formation and accretion history. The directly imaged planets detected so far are consistent with the `hot-start' scenario of high entropy and luminosity. If nebular gas passes through a shock front before being accreted into a protoplanet, the entropy can be substantially altered. To investigate this, we present high-resolution, three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic simulations of accreting giant planets. The accreted gas is found to fall with supersonic speed in the gap from the circumstellar disc's upper layers on to the surface of the circumplanetary disc and polar region of the protoplanet. There it shocks, creating an extended hot supercritical shock surface. This shock front is optically thick; therefore, it can conceal the planet's intrinsic luminosity beneath. The gas in the vertical influx has high entropy which when passing through the shock front decreases significantly while the gas becomes part of the disc and protoplanet. This shows that circumplanetary discs play a key role in regulating a planet's thermodynamic state. Our simulations furthermore indicate that around the shock surface extended regions of atomic - sometimes ionized - hydrogen develop. Therefore, circumplanetary disc shock surfaces could influence significantly the observational appearance of forming gas giants.

  18. Origin of the obliquities of the giant planets in mutual interactions in the early Solar System.

    PubMed

    Brunini, Adrián

    2006-04-27

    The origin of the spin-axis orientations (obliquities) of the giant planets is a fundamental issue because if the obliquities resulted from tangential collisions with primordial Earth-sized protoplanets, then they are related to the masses of the largest planetesimals out of which the planets form. A problem with this mechanism, however, is that the orbital planes of regular satellites would probably be uncorrelated with the obliquities, contrary to observations. Alternatively, they could have come from an external twist that affected the orientation of the Solar System plane; but in this model, the outer planets must have formed too rapidly, before the event that produced the twist. Moreover, the model cannot be quantitatively tested. Here I show that the present obliquities of the giant planets were probably achieved when Jupiter and Saturn crossed the 1:2 orbital resonance during a specific migration process: different migration scenarios cannot account for the large observed obliquities. The existence of the regular satellites of the giant planets does not represent a problem in this model because, although they formed soon after the planetary formation, they can follow the slow evolution of the equatorial plane it produces.

  19. An extrasolar giant planet in a close triple-star system.

    PubMed

    Konacki, Maciej

    2005-07-14

    Hot Jupiters are gas-giant planets orbiting with periods of 3-9 days around Sun-like stars. They are believed to form in a disk of gas and condensed matter at or beyond approximately 2.7 astronomical units (au-the Sun-Earth distance) from their parent star. At such distances, there exists a sufficient amount of solid material to produce a core capable of capturing enough gas to form a giant planet. Subsequently, they migrate inward to their present close orbits. Here I report the detection of an unusual hot Jupiter orbiting the primary star of a triple stellar system, HD 188753. The planet has an orbital period of 3.35 days and a minimum mass of 1.14 times that of Jupiter. The primary star's mass is 1.06 times that of the Sun, 1.06 M(\\circ). The secondary star, itself a binary stellar system, orbits the primary at an average distance of 12.3 au with an eccentricity of 0.50. The mass of the secondary pair is 1.63 M(\\circ). Such a close and massive secondary would have truncated a disk around the primary to a radius of only approximately 1.3 AU (ref. 4) and might have heated it up to temperatures high enough to prohibit giant-planet formation, leaving the origin of this planet unclear.

  20. BD+48 740-Li OVERABUNDANT GIANT STAR WITH A PLANET: A CASE OF RECENT ENGULFMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Adamow, M.; Niedzielski, A.; Nowak, G.; Villaver, E.; Wolszczan, A.

    2012-07-20

    We report the discovery of a unique object, BD+48 740, a lithium overabundant giant with A(Li) = 2.33 {+-} 0.04 (where A(Li) = log n{sub Li}/n{sub H} + 12), that exhibits radial velocity (RV) variations consistent with a 1.6 M{sub J} companion in a highly eccentric, e = 0.67 {+-} 0.17, and extended, a 1.89 AU (P = 771 days), orbit. The high eccentricity of the planet is uncommon among planetary systems orbiting evolved stars and so is the high lithium abundance in a giant star. The ingestion by the star of a putative second planet in the system originally in a closer orbit could possibly allow for a single explanation to these two exceptional facts. If the planet candidate is confirmed by future RV observations, it might represent the first example of the remnant of a multiple planetary system recently affected by stellar evolution.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AO imaging of KOIs with gas giant planets (Wang+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Fischer, D. A.; Horch, E. P.; Xie, J.-W.

    2017-09-01

    From the NASA Exoplanet Archive (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu), we select Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) that satisfy the following criteria: (1) disposition of either Candidate or Confirmed, (2) stellar effective temperature (Teff) lower than 6500 K, (3) stellar surface gravity (log g) higher than 4.0, (4) Kepler magnitude (KP) brighter than 14th mag, (5) with at least one gas giant planet (3.8 R{earth}=giant planets. Stellar and orbital parameters for these KOIs are given in Table 1. The median distance of these KOIs is 580 pc. There are 27 multi-planet systems among 84 KOIs. (2 data files).

  2. The capture and release of Trojan asteroids by the giant planets during the solar system history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykawka, P. S.; Horner, J.

    2011-10-01

    Trojan objects can be dynamically stable over billions of years, implying that they carry precious information about the history of the solar system. We performed numerical simulations to investigate the origin and long term evolution of Trojans of the four giant planets. The results suggest all giant planets are able to capture and retain a significant population of Trojan objects from the primordial planetesimal disk after planet migration. In general, captured Trojans yielded a wide range of eccentricities and inclinations. The bulk of captured objects decay over Gyr providing an important source of new objects on unstable orbits. Our results suggest the bulk of observed Jovian and Neptunian Trojan populations are the survivors from a larger captured population, but their high-i component (>20°) remain unexplained so far.

  3. Insights into Planet Formation from Debris Disks. II. Giant Impacts in Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Mark C.; Jackson, Alan P.

    2016-12-01

    Giant impacts refer to collisions between two objects each of which is massive enough to be considered at least a planetary embryo. The putative collision suffered by the proto-Earth that created the Moon is a prime example, though most Solar System bodies bear signatures of such collisions. Current planet formation models predict that an epoch of giant impacts may be inevitable, and observations of debris around other stars are providing mounting evidence that giant impacts feature in the evolution of many planetary systems. This chapter reviews giant impacts, focussing on what we can learn about planet formation by studying debris around other stars. Giant impact debris evolves through mutual collisions and dynamical interactions with planets. General aspects of this evolution are outlined, noting the importance of the collision-point geometry. The detectability of the debris is discussed using the example of the Moon-forming impact. Such debris could be detectable around another star up to 10 Myr post-impact, but model uncertainties could reduce detectability to a few 100 yr window. Nevertheless the 3 % of young stars with debris at levels expected during terrestrial planet formation provide valuable constraints on formation models; implications for super-Earth formation are also discussed. Variability recently observed in some bright disks promises to illuminate the evolution during the earliest phases when vapour condensates may be optically thick and acutely affected by the collision-point geometry. The outer reaches of planetary systems may also exhibit signatures of giant impacts, such as the clumpy debris structures seen around some stars.

  4. Evolution of Giant Planets Close to the Roche Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Two formation models have been proposed to explain hot Jupiters’ tight orbits. These could have migrated inward in a disk (disk migration), or they could have formed via tidal circularization of an orbit made highly eccentric following gravitational interactions with a companion (high-eccentricity migration). I will show how current observations coupled with a detailed treatment of tides can be used to constrain both hot Jupiter formation and tidal dissipation theories.Eventually, stellar tides will cause the orbits of many hot Jupiters to decay down to their Roche limit. Using a detailed binary mass transfer model we show how a hot Jupiter undergoing a phase of Roche-lobe overflow (RLO) leads to lower-mass planets in orbits of a few days. The remnant planets have a rocky core and some amount of envelope material, which is slowly removed via photo-evaporation at nearly constant orbital period; these have properties resembling many of the observed super-Earths and sub-Neptunes. For these remnant planets we also predict an anti-correlation between mass and orbital period; very low-mass planets in ultra-short periods cannot be produced through this type of evolution.

  5. Optical Ground-Based Spectra of Jupiter and Saturn: An Exploration of Giant Planet Chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Hudson, R. L.; Loeffler, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present and interpret ground-based optical spectra of Jupiter and Saturn recently acquired in an effort to characterize candidate coloring agents, or chromophores, in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets of our solar system. Surprisingly, despite hundreds of years of observations, we still do not know the identity of the trace chemical compounds that color the atmospheres of the giant planets. Previous analyses have attempted to identify a specific chemical that is responsible for the colors, but none has yet been conclusively proven. We acquired spatially resolved optical spectra of various regions in the atmospheres of both Jupiter and Saturn in February 2013 using the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) on the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The spectra cover the range of 300-1000 nm, with a spectral resolution of R ~ 1200. For the observations of both Jupiter and Saturn, we used DIS with the 6 arcminute long slit aligned with the planets' latitudinal bands and stepped the slit north-south to build up a spectral image cube with spectra at all locations on the planet. This enables the extraction of subapertures within the slit corresponding to specific locations, e.g. the Great Red Spot on Jupiter, during the data reduction process. We compare the optical spectra of various colored regions in the giant planet atmospheres to laboratory data of candidate chromophores. The characterization of chromophore materials will provide insight into the upper tropospheric dynamics and circulation patterns on Jupiter and Saturn that provide a stable environment for the creation and/or sustenance of chromophores. This will help further our understanding of the different evolutionary pathways of the gas giant planets of our solar system, providing a process-oriented view of their variations in cloud colors.

  6. THE GEMINI NICI PLANET-FINDING CAMPAIGN: THE FREQUENCY OF GIANT PLANETS AROUND YOUNG B AND A STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Eric L.; Liu, Michael C.; Chun, Mark; Ftaclas, Christ; Wahhaj, Zahed; Biller, Beth A.; Hayward, Thomas L.; Hartung, Markus; Alencar, Silvia H. P.; Artymowicz, Pawel; Boss, Alan; Clarke, Fraser; De Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Gregorio-Hetem, Jane; Kuchner, Marc; Lin, Douglas N. C.; and others

    2013-10-10

    We have carried out high contrast imaging of 70 young, nearby B and A stars to search for brown dwarf and planetary companions as part of the Gemini NICI Planet-Finding Campaign. Our survey represents the largest, deepest survey for planets around high-mass stars (≈1.5-2.5 M{sub ☉}) conducted to date and includes the planet hosts β Pic and Fomalhaut. We obtained follow-up astrometry of all candidate companions within 400 AU projected separation for stars in uncrowded fields and identified new low-mass companions to HD 1160 and HIP 79797. We have found that the previously known young brown dwarf companion to HIP 79797 is itself a tight (3 AU) binary, composed of brown dwarfs with masses 58{sup +21}{sub -20} M{sub Jup} and 55{sup +20}{sub -19} M{sub Jup}, making this system one of the rare substellar binaries in orbit around a star. Considering the contrast limits of our NICI data and the fact that we did not detect any planets, we use high-fidelity Monte Carlo simulations to show that fewer than 20% of 2 M{sub ☉} stars can have giant planets greater than 4 M{sub Jup} between 59 and 460 AU at 95% confidence, and fewer than 10% of these stars can have a planet more massive than 10 M{sub Jup} between 38 and 650 AU. Overall, we find that large-separation giant planets are not common around B and A stars: fewer than 10% of B and A stars can have an analog to the HR 8799 b (7 M{sub Jup}, 68 AU) planet at 95% confidence. We also describe a new Bayesian technique for determining the ages of field B and A stars from photometry and theoretical isochrones. Our method produces more plausible ages for high-mass stars than previous age-dating techniques, which tend to underestimate stellar ages and their uncertainties.

  7. STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM'S INSTABILITY WITH FOUR, FIVE, AND SIX GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Several properties of the solar system, including the wide radial spacing and orbital eccentricities of giant planets, can be explained if the early solar system evolved through a dynamical instability followed by migration of planets in the planetesimal disk. Here we report the results of a statistical study, in which we performed nearly 10{sup 4} numerical simulations of planetary instability starting from hundreds of different initial conditions. We found that the dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, leading to ejection of at least one ice giant from the solar system. Planet ejection can be avoided if the mass of the transplanetary disk of planetesimals was large (M{sub disk} {approx}> 50 M{sub Earth}), but we found that a massive disk would lead to excessive dynamical damping (e.g., final e{sub 55} {approx}< 0.01 compared to present e{sub 55} = 0.044, where e{sub 55} is the amplitude of the fifth eccentric mode in the Jupiter's orbit), and to smooth migration that violates constraints from the survival of the terrestrial planets. Better results were obtained when the solar system was assumed to have five giant planets initially, and one ice giant, with mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, was ejected into interstellar space by Jupiter. The best results were obtained when the ejected planet was placed into the external 3:2 or 4:3 resonance with Saturn and M{sub disk} {approx_equal} 20 M{sub Earth}. The range of possible outcomes is rather broad in this case, indicating that the present solar system is neither a typical nor expected result for a given initial state, and occurs, in best cases, with only a {approx_equal}5% probability (as defined by the success criteria described in the main text). The case with six giant planets shows interesting dynamics but does offer significant advantages relative to the five-planet case.

  8. A Search for Giant Planet Companions to T Tauri Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-20

    Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA 6 NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI), California Institute of Technology, 770 S. Wilson Ave...RV amplitude. CSHELL observations of the known exoplanet host Gl 86 demonstrate our ability to detect not only hot Jupiters in the near-infrared but...Queloz 1995), and retrograde orbits (Hebrard et al. 2011) repeatedly challenge our assumptions about planet formation. After two decades of exoplanet

  9. On Migration of the Solar System Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurova, V. M.

    2017-05-01

    The paper begins with a very brief overview of the contribution of Soviet scientists in the second half of the twentieth century in the study of the dynamic evolution of the solar system. The second part of the paper contains a brief overview of modern hypotheses of West-European and American planetologists, that intent to explain the discrepancies between the state of the Solar System and extrasolar systems on the base of Otto Schmidt theory of planet formation.

  10. Evidence for a Distant Giant Planet in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-02-01

    Recent analyses have shown that distant orbits within the scattered disk population of the Kuiper Belt exhibit an unexpected clustering in their respective arguments of perihelion. While several hypotheses have been put forward to explain this alignment, to date, a theoretical model that can successfully account for the observations remains elusive. In this work we show that the orbits of distant Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) cluster not only in argument of perihelion, but also in physical space. We demonstrate that the perihelion positions and orbital planes of the objects are tightly confined and that such a clustering has only a probability of 0.007% to be due to chance, thus requiring a dynamical origin. We find that the observed orbital alignment can be maintained by a distant eccentric planet with mass ≳10 m⊕ whose orbit lies in approximately the same plane as those of the distant KBOs, but whose perihelion is 180° away from the perihelia of the minor bodies. In addition to accounting for the observed orbital alignment, the existence of such a planet naturally explains the presence of high-perihelion Sedna-like objects, as well as the known collection of high semimajor axis objects with inclinations between 60° and 150° whose origin was previously unclear. Continued analysis of both distant and highly inclined outer solar system objects provides the opportunity for testing our hypothesis as well as further constraining the orbital elements and mass of the distant planet.

  11. Obtaining the Mass and Radius of Extra-Solar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Tim; Mead, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The scientific utility and feasibility of detecting transits of the 9 known extrasolar planets is explored. A transit of a solar-like star by a Jupiter mass planet produces a 1% decrease in the amount of light received from the star. Transit observation will remove the ambiguity in the measurement of the planetary mass inherent in the radial velocity method and confirm the planet's existence. The 9 known planets have a 33% chance of producing at least one observable transit. Additional extrasolar planet detections from the radial velocity surveys will increase this probability to greater than 90%. The radius of the planet can be determined by the fractional decrease in light received during transit. The mass and radius may distinguish rocky or gas giant planets from brown dwarfs. The probability of detection, the transit signal size and duration, and predictions of the transit times (including errors) are calculated for circular and elliptical orbits. Observational limits are investigated and it is shown that small telescopes and existing detectors are adequate enough to achieve the 0.1% photometry necessary to detect transits of the known extrasolar planets.

  12. On the minimum core mass for giant planet formation at wide separations

    SciTech Connect

    Piso, Ana-Maria A.; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2014-05-01

    In the core accretion hypothesis, giant planets form by gas accretion onto solid protoplanetary cores. The minimum (or critical) core mass to form a gas giant is typically quoted as 10 M {sub ⊕}. The actual value depends on several factors: the location in the protoplanetary disk, atmospheric opacity, and the accretion rate of solids. Motivated by ongoing direct imaging searches for giant planets, this study investigates core mass requirements in the outer disk. To determine the fastest allowed rates of gas accretion, we consider solid cores that no longer accrete planetesimals, as this would heat the gaseous envelope. Our spherical, two-layer atmospheric cooling model includes an inner convective region and an outer radiative zone that matches onto the disk. We determine the minimum core mass for a giant planet to form within a typical disk lifetime of 3 Myr. The minimum core mass declines with disk radius, from ∼8.5 M {sub ⊕} at 5 AU to ∼3.5 M {sub ⊕} at 100 AU, with standard interstellar grain opacities. Lower temperatures in the outer disk explain this trend, while variations in disk density are less influential. At all distances, a lower dust opacity or higher mean molecular weight reduces the critical core mass. Our non-self-gravitating, analytic cooling model reveals that self-gravity significantly affects early atmospheric evolution, starting when the atmosphere is only ∼10% as massive as the core.

  13. Dynamic coupling of magnetic fields, thermal emissions, and zonal flows in ice giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderlund, Krista M.; Heimpel, M. H.; King, E. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the solar system, yet their characteristics are as diverse as the planets themselves. These fields are thought to result from dynamo action driven by thermochemical convection in electrically conducting fluid regions. The multipolar dynamos of Uranus and Neptune provide a unique opportunity to test hypotheses for magnetic field generation. Since no sharp structural boundaries in the ice giants between the ionic ocean and overlying molecular envelope are expected, it is possible that these regions are linked dynamically. Thus, an understanding of the coupling between magnetic fields, heat flow, and atmospheric winds is crucial to determine what controls the strength, morphology, and evolution of giant planet dynamos. Here we present numerical simulations of turbulent convection in spherical shells to test the hypothesis that poorly organized turbulence will generate ice giant-like magnetic fields, thermal emissions, and zonal flows. We find that this style of convection leads to small-scale, fluctuating dynamo action that generates a multipolar magnetic field, Hadley-like circulation cells that promote equatorial upwellings to create low latitude peaks in internal heat flux, and homogenized absolute angular momentum that drives three-jet zonal flows. This qualitative agreement with observations suggests that the internal dynamics of ice giant planets may be characterized by three-dimensional convective turbulence with dynamic coupling between the dynamo region and electrically insulating envelope above playing an important role as well.

  14. All in the Family: What Brown Dwarfs Teach Us About Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, M.

    2003-01-01

    As we await the first direct image of an extrasolar giant planet, we can turn to theory and the experience gained in the campaign to detect and understand brown dwarfs for guidance on what to expect. As with any new arrival to a family, there should be a strong family resemblance (one hopes) along with notable unique features and interesting peculiarities. The 300 or so known L and T dwarfs, combined with our own giant planets, already span much of the effective temperature range within which extrasolar planets will be found. Only objects with thick, easily detectable, water clouds have yet to be seen. Thus we already know much of the family. I will describe what we have learned from studying these objects, focusing on the important roles clouds and atmospheric chemistry play in affecting their atmospheres and emergent spectra. Relying on these findings and theoretical models, I'll sketch out what we can expect from extrasolar giant planets, focusing on easily detectable features. Some wild cards, of course, are to be expected. Photochemical hazes, in particular, may obscure the family traits on the faces of Jupiter's distant cousins and may make one wonder, at least momentarily, about the milkman.

  15. Temperature changes and energy inputs in giant planet atmospheres: what we are learning from H3+.

    PubMed

    Stallard, Tom S; Melin, Henrik; Miller, Steve; O'Donoghue, James; Cowley, Stan W H; Badman, Sarah V; Adriani, Alberto; Brown, Robert H; Baines, Kevin H

    2012-11-13

    Since its discovery at Jupiter in 1988, emission from H(3)(+) has been used as a valuable diagnostic tool in our understanding of the upper atmospheres of the giant planets. One of the lasting questions we have about the giant planets is why the measured upper atmosphere temperatures are always consistently hotter than the temperatures expected from solar heating alone. Here, we describe how H(3)(+) forms across each of the planetary disks of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus, presenting the first observations of equatorial H(3)(+) at Saturn and the first profile of H(3)(+) emission at Uranus not significantly distorted by the effects of the Earth's atmosphere. We also review past observations of variations in temperature measured at Uranus and Jupiter over a wide variety of time scales. To this, we add new observations of temperature changes at Saturn, using observations by Cassini. We conclude that the causes of the significant level of thermal variability observed over all three planets is not only an important question in itself, but that explaining these variations could be the key to answering the more general question of why giant planet upper atmospheres are so hot.

  16. All in the Family: What Brown Dwarfs Teach Us About Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, M.

    2003-01-01

    As we await the first direct image of an extrasolar giant planet, we can turn to theory and the experience gained in the campaign to detect and understand brown dwarfs for guidance on what to expect. As with any new arrival to a family, there should be a strong family resemblance (one hopes) along with notable unique features and interesting peculiarities. The 300 or so known L and T dwarfs, combined with our own giant planets, already span much of the effective temperature range within which extrasolar planets will be found. Only objects with thick, easily detectable, water clouds have yet to be seen. Thus we already know much of the family. I will describe what we have learned from studying these objects, focusing on the important roles clouds and atmospheric chemistry play in affecting their atmospheres and emergent spectra. Relying on these findings and theoretical models, I'll sketch out what we can expect from extrasolar giant planets, focusing on easily detectable features. Some wild cards, of course, are to be expected. Photochemical hazes, in particular, may obscure the family traits on the faces of Jupiter's distant cousins and may make one wonder, at least momentarily, about the milkman.

  17. All in the Family: What Brown Dwarfs Teach Us About Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M.

    2003-05-01

    As we await the first direct image of an extrasolar giant planet, we can turn to theory and the experience gained in the campaign to detect and understand brown dwarfs for guidance on what to expect. As with any new arrival to a family, there should be a strong family resemblance (one hopes) along with notable unique features and interesting peculiarities. The 300 or so known L and T dwarfs, combined with our own giant planets, already span much of the effective temperature range within which extrasolar planets will be found. Only objects with thick, easily detectable, water clouds have yet to be seen. Thus we already know much of the family. I will describe what we have learned from studying these objects, focusing on the important roles clouds and atmospheric chemistry play in affecting their atmospheres and emergent spectra. Relying on these findings and theoretical models, I'll sketch out what we can expect from extrasolar giant planets, focusing on easily detectable features. Some wild cards, of course, are to be expected. Photochemical hazes, in particular, may obscure the family traits on the faces of Jupiter's distant cousins and may make one wonder, at least momentarily, about the milkman.

  18. Using Animations to Study the Formation of Gas Giant Planets via the Core Accretion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubickyj, O.; Lissauer, J. J.; Bodemheimer, P.; D'Angelo, G.

    2009-12-01

    With the ever increasing number of extrasolar planets being discovered (373 as of 8/13/09 quoted by The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopedia: exoplanet.eu) and the recognition of their diverse nature it is very important to understand the formation processes of the gas giant planets. The core accretion model has successfully explained many features of the formation of gas giant planets in the Solar System (Pollack et al. 1996, Hubickyj et al. 2005) and it has provided an explanation of the characteristics of exoplanets. One example is the observed frequency of planets around stars with a high metal content (e.g. Kornet et al. 2005, Valenti and Fischer 2008). Improvements to the input physics to our computer model have resulted in the very important result that gas giant planets (i.e. Jupiter) can form via the core accretion model on a timescale that agrees with observations of protoplanetary disks (Hillenbrand 2008). These observations set the formation time to about 3 to 5 million years. We will present our recent results (Hubickyj et al. 2005,Lissauer et al. 2009) in the form of animations. Our models generate a substantial amount of data. Having published plots of the important values of our study: mass and radius growth, luminosity, and accretion rates as a function of time, we are now ready to study the second tier of information from our recorded data. We examine the energy profiles within the envelope as it evolves, the location and changes of the convective layers, and the location of the mass deposited by the planetesimals in the envelope as the protoplanet evolves. We find that by animating the data we can study the internal processes in the growing envelope of the protoplanet. The qualitative nature of the processes in the protoplanetary envelope is easily discerned in these animations and a deeper insight to the core accretion processes in the gas giant planets is gained. Hillenbrand, L. A. 2008. Disk-dispersal and planet-formation timescales. Physica

  19. Disequilibrium chemistry in the atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets as a function of stellar distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J. I.; Sharp, A. G.; Fegley, B., Jr.; Marley, M. S.; Friedson, A. J.; Lodders, K.; Rages, K. A.

    2003-05-01

    The atmospheric composition and spectral properties of extrasolar giant planets will depend in large part on disequilibrium processes like photochemistry, chemical kinetics, diffusive transport, and haze formation. We have developed a photochemical kinetics, radiative transfer, and 1-D vertical transport model for extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) and brown dwarfs. The chemical reaction list contains H-, C-, O-, N-, P-, and S-bearing species and is designed to be valid for atmospheric temperatures ranging from 100-3000 K at pressures from 0-50 bar. Here we examine the effect of stellar distance (e.g., ultraviolet flux, atmospheric temperature) on the composition and other physical/chemical properties of EGPs. Our focus will be on comparing photochemical models for Jupiter with those for very close-in EGPs (e.g., the recently discovered transitting planet HD209458b at 0.045 AU) and for intermediate-temperature EGPs (e.g., generic Class II and III EGPs at <= 1-3 AU, as described by Sudarsky et al. 2003, ApJ 588, 1121-1148). The closer the giant planet is to its central star, the fewer elements that are tied up in condensed phases deep in the troposphere. First ammonia, then hydrogen sulfide, then water become available in the gas phase as the stellar distance decreases. The photochemistry of ``warm'' and ``hot'' EGPs will be more complex than the simple methane-based photochemistry that dominates on the cold giant planets in our own solar system. We will identify the possible observational consequences of disequilibrium chemistry and diffusive transport in EGPs.

  20. Zonal Flow Magnetic Field Interaction in the Semi-Conducting Region of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    All four giant planets in the Solar System feature zonal flows on the order of 100 m/s in the cloud deck, and large-scale intrinsic magnetic fields on the order of 1 Gauss near the surface. The vertical structure of the zonal flows remains obscure. The end-member scenarios are shallow flows confined in the radiative atmosphere and deep flows throughout the planet with constant velocity along the direction of the spin-axis. The electrical conductivity increases smoothly as a function of depth inside Jupiter and Saturn, while a discontinuity of electrical conductivity inside Uranus and Neptune cannot be ruled out. Deep zonal flows will inevitably interact with the magnetic field, at depth with even modest electrical conductivity. We first investigate the kinematic interaction between zonal flows and magnetic fields in the semi-conducting region of giant planets. Employing mean-field electrodynamics, we show that the kinematic interaction will generate detectable poloidal magnetic field perturbations spatially correlated with the deep zonal flows. These poloidal perturbations should be detectable with the in-situ magnetic field measurements from the Juno mission and the Cassini Grand Finale. This implies that magnetic field measurements can be employed to constrain the properties of deep zonal flows in the semi-conducting region of giant planets. We then investigate the role of magnetic field in establishing the global property of deep zonal flows inside giant planet. By solving the Reynolds-averaged magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equation, we show that the meridional circulation driven by the Reynolds stress and the Lorentz force in mid-to-high latitude will give rise to latitudinal thermal gradient acting to decrease the zonal wind velocity along the direction of the spin-axis (the thermal wind shear). Furthermore, we evaluate the modified Taylor integral, which takes into account the contribution from the Reynolds stress, to assess its role in determining the amplitude

  1. A theoretical look at the direct detection of giant planets outside the Solar System.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam

    2005-01-20

    Astronomy is at times a science of unexpected discovery. When it is, and if we are lucky, new intellectual territories emerge to challenge our views of the cosmos. The recent indirect detections using high-precision Doppler spectroscopy of more than 100 giant planets orbiting more than 100 nearby stars is an example of such rare serendipity. What has been learned has shaken out preconceptions, for none of the planetary systems discovered so far is like our own. The key to unlocking a planet's chemical, structural, and evolutionary secrets, however, is the direct detection of the planet's light. Because there have been as yet no confirmed detections, a theoretical analysis of such a planet's atmosphere is necessary for guiding our search.

  2. The capture of Trojan asteroids by the giant planets during planetary migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykawka, P. S.; Horner, J.

    2010-06-01

    Of the four giant planets in the Solar system, only Jupiter and Neptune are currently known to possess swarms of Trojan asteroids - small objects that experience a 1:1 mean motion resonance with their host planet. In Lykawka et al., we performed extensive dynamical simulations, including planetary migration, to investigate the origin of the Neptunian Trojan population. Utilizing the vast amount of simulation data obtained for that work, together with fresh results from new simulations, we here investigate the dynamical capture of Trojans by all four giant planets from a primordial trans-Neptunian disc. We find the likelihood of a given planetesimal from this region being captured on to an orbit within Jupiter's Trojan cloud lies between several times 10-6 and 10-5. For Saturn, the probability is found to be in the range <10-6 to 10-5, whilst for Uranus the probabilities range between 10-5 and 10-4. Finally, Neptune displays the greatest probability of Trojan capture, with values ranging between 10-4 and 10-3. Our results suggest that all four giant planets are able to capture and retain a significant population of Trojan objects from the disc by the end of planetary migration. As a result of encounters with the giant planets prior to Trojan capture, these objects tend to be captured on orbits that are spread over a wide range of orbital eccentricities and inclinations. The bulk of captured objects are to some extent dynamically unstable, and therefore, the populations of these objects tend to decay over the age of the Solar system, providing an important ongoing source of new objects moving on dynamically unstable orbits among the giant planets. Given that a huge population of objects would be displaced by Neptune's outward migration (with a potential cumulative mass a number of times that of the Earth), we conclude that the surviving remnant of the Trojans captured during the migration of the outer planets might be sufficient to explain the currently known Trojan

  3. Sequestration of noble gases in giant planet interiors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Hugh F; Militzer, Burkhard

    2010-03-26

    The Galileo probe showed that Jupiter's atmosphere is severely depleted in neon compared to protosolar values. We show via ab initio simulations of the partitioning of neon between hydrogen-helium phases that the observed depletion can be explained by the sequestration of neon into helium-rich droplets within the postulated hydrogen-helium immiscibility layer of the planets interior. We also demonstrate that this mechanism will not affect argon explaining the observed lack of depletion of this gas. This provides strong indirect evidence for hydrogen-helium immiscibility in Jupiter.

  4. Formation of giant planets by fragmentation of protoplanetary disks.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Lucio; Quinn, Thomas; Wadsley, James; Stadel, Joachim

    2002-11-29

    The evolution of gravitationally unstable protoplanetary gaseous disks has been studied with the use of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations with unprecedented resolution. We have considered disks with initial masses and temperature profiles consistent with those inferred for the protosolar nebula and for other protoplanetary disks. We show that long-lasting, self-gravitating protoplanets arise after a few disk orbital periods if cooling is efficient enough to maintain the temperature close to 50 K. The resulting bodies have masses and orbital eccentricities similar to those of detected extrasolar planets.

  5. Formation and Early Evolution of Solar and Extra-Solar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, P. H.; Hubickyj, Olenka; Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project investigates the origin of giant planets, both in the Solar System and around other stars. It is assumed that the planets form by the core accretion process: small solid particles in a disk surrounding a young star gradually coagulate into objects of a few kilometers in size, known as planetesimals, which then accumulate into solid protoplanetary cores. Once the cores have become large enough, they are able to attract gas from the surrounding disk to form the deep gaseous envelope of the giant planet. Our code simulates giant planet growth in a spherical approximation, and it has been quite successful in addressing a number of basic planetary properties. Further improvements to the code have been made to achieve a more realistic understanding of planetary formation. The computations of the models were based on an earlier version of our code and were stopped at the onset of runaway gas accretion. Now, improved boundary conditions have been incorporated into the code to allow for hydrodynamic inflow of gas and to handle the late stages of evolution when the planet evolves at constant mass. These changes were made to the version of the code that uses a constant accretion rate and to the version that uses a self-consistent method for calculating both the solid and gas accretion rates. The equation of state has been updated to incorporate the detailed tables of Saumon, Chabrier, and Van Horn. The opacities were updated to include the results of Alexander and Ferguson. The outer boundary conditions were modified. During the accretion phase when the planet's radius is between the accretion radius and the tidal radius, we set the outer boundary at a 'modified' accretion radius, which is the point where thermal energy is enough to bring gas to the edge of the Hill sphere.

  6. The detectability of extrasolar terrestrial and giant planets during their luminous final accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1994-01-01

    One of the outstanding scientific questions in astronomy is the frequency at which solar systems form. Answering this question is an observational challenge because extrasolar planets are intrinsically difficult to directly detect. The direct detectability of planets is examined during the short but unique epoch of giant impacts that is a hallmark of the standard theory of planetary formation. Sufficiently large impacts during this era are capable of creating a luminous, 1500-2500 K photosphere, which can persist for timescales exceeding 103 years in some cases. The detectability of such events and the number of young stars one would need to examine to expect to find a luminous terrestrial class planet after a giant impact are examined. With emerging IR interferometric technology, thermally-luminous earth-sized objects can be detected in nearby star forming regions in 1-2 nights observing time. Unfortunately, predictions indicate that approximately 250 young stars would have to be searched to expect to find one hot, terrestrial-sized planet. By comparison, the detection of Saturn and Uranus/Neptune-sized planets after a giant impact requires only 1-2 hours of observing time. A single Keck-class telescope should be able to determine whether such planets are common in the nearest star forming regions by examining about less than 100 young stars over a few tens of nights. The results obtained herein suggest a new strategy for the detection of solar systems with the potential for the observational confirmation of the standard theory of late-stage planetary accretion.

  7. The Impact of Semi-convection on (Extrasolar) Giant Planet Interior Structure and Evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, Jeremy; Chabrier, G.

    2011-09-01

    While conventional interior models for giant (exo)planets are based on the simplistic assumption of a solid core surrounded by a homogeneous gaseous envelope, we derive new models with an inhomogeneous distribution of heavy elements, i.e. a gradient of composition within these planets. Because such a continuous heavy element gradient impedes large-scale convection, the inner thermal profile of these «semi-convective» planets departs from the traditionally assumed adiabatic one. This yields a slower cooling, thus contraction, than in the fully convective, adiabatic case, possibly providing the missing piece to the puzzle of anomalously inflated Hot Jupiters. In order to test the viability of this hypothesis, we derive semi-convective, inhomogeneous structure models for Jupiter and Saturn which satisfy all observational constraints (gravitational moments, surface abundances), while being substantially super adiabatic. The larger internal temperature in the semi-convective planet, which implies a larger fraction of heavy elements to counteract the radius increase, leads to metal enrichments up to 30 to 60% larger than previously thought for our gas giants. However, as the heavy elements tend to be redistributed within the gaseous envelope, the models predict smaller than usual central cores inside Saturn and Jupiter, with possibly no core for this latter. As these new structural and cooling properties directly apply to extrasolar planets, we also examine the efficiency of this «bloating mechanism» by quantifying the impact of the reduced heat flux due to semi-convection on the contraction/cooling of Hot Jupiters. Such a possibility of semi-convective planetary interiors opens a new window on our understanding of giant planet formation, structure and evolution, inside and outside our Solar System.

  8. Runaway greenhouse effect on exomoons due to irradiation from hot, young giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, R.; Barnes, R.

    2015-04-01

    The Kepler space telescope has proven capable of detecting transits of objects almost as small as the Earth's Moon. Some studies suggest that moons as small as 0.2 Earth masses can be detected in the Kepler data by transit timing variations and transit duration variations of their host planets. If such massive moons exist around giant planets in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), then they could serve as habitats for extraterrestrial life. While earlier studies on exomoon habitability assumed the host planet to be in thermal equilibrium with the absorbed stellar flux, we here extend this concept by including the planetary luminosity from evolutionary shrinking. Our aim is to assess the danger of exomoons to be in a runaway greenhouse state due to extensive heating from the planet. We apply pre-computed evolution tracks for giant planets to calculate the incident planetary radiation on the moon as a function of time. Added to the stellar flux, the total illumination yields constraints on a moon's habitability. Ultimately, we include tidal heating to evaluate a moon's energy budget. We use a semi-analytical formula to parameterize the critical flux for the moon to experience a runaway greenhouse effect. Planetary illumination from a 13-Jupiter-mass planet onto an Earth-sized moon at a distance of ten Jupiter radii can drive a runaway greenhouse state on the moon for about 200 million years (Myr). When stellar illumination equivalent to that received by Earth from the Sun is added, then the runaway greenhouse holds for about 500 Myr. After 1000 Myr, the planet's habitable edge has moved inward to about six Jupiter radii. Exomoons in orbits with eccentricities of 0.1 experience strong tidal heating; they must orbit a 13-Jupiter-mass host beyond 29 or 18 Jupiter radii after 100 Myr (at the inner and outer boundaries of the stellar HZ, respectively), and beyond 13 Jupiter radii (in both cases) after 1000 Myr to be habitable. If a roughly Earth-sized, Earth-mass moon would

  9. DETECTION OF A GIANT EXTRASOLAR PLANET ORBITING THE ECLIPSING POLAR DP LEO

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Liao, W.-P.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Dai, Z.-B.

    2010-01-01

    DP Leo is the first discovered eclipsing polar with a short period of 1.4967 hours. The period variation of the eclipsing binary was analyzed by using five new determined eclipse times together with those compiled from the literature. It is discovered that the O - C curve of DP Leo shows a cyclic variation with a period of 23.8 years and a semiamplitude of 31.5 s. The small-amplitude periodic change can be plausibly explained as the light-travel time effect due to the presence of a tertiary companion. The mass of the tertiary component is determined to be M {sub 3}sin i' = 0.00600({+-}0.00055) M {sub sun} = 6.28({+-}0.58) M {sub Jupiter} when a total mass of 0.69 M {sub sun} is adopted. If the tertiary companion is coplanar to the eclipsing binary (i.e., i' = 79.{sup 0}5), it should be a giant extrasolar planet with a mass of 6.39 M {sub Jupiter} at a distance of 8.6 astronomical units to the central binary. One of the most interesting things that we have learned about extrasolar planets over the last 17 years is that they can exist almost anywhere. The detection of a giant planet orbiting a polar would provide insight into the formation and evolution of circumbinary planets (planets orbiting both components of short-period binaries) as well as the late evolution of binary stars.

  10. Statistics of Long-Period Gas Giant Planets in Known Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque Bryan, Marta; Knutson, Heather; Howard, Andrew; Ngo, Henry; Batygin, Konstantin; Crepp, Justin; Fulton, Benjamin; Hinkley, Sasha; Isaacson, Howard T.; Johnson, John Asher; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Wright, Jason

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a Doppler survey at Keck combined with NIRC2 K-band AO imaging to search for massive, long-period companions to 123 known exoplanet systems with one or two planets detected using the radial velocity (RV) method. Our survey is sensitive to Jupiter mass planets out to 20 AU for a majority of the stars in our sample, and we report the discovery of eight new long-period planets in addition to 20 RV trends at 3 sigma significance indicating the presence of an outer companion beyond 5 AU. We combined our RV observations with AO imaging to determine the range of allowed masses and orbital separations for these companions and fit this population with a power law in mass and semi-major axis. We estimate the total occurrence rate of companions in our sample, and find that hot and warm gas giants inside 1 AU are more likely to have an outer companion than cold gas giants. We also find that planets with an outer companion have higher than average eccentricities than their single counterparts, suggesting that dynamical interactions between planets may play an important role in these systems.

  11. A Cloud Microphysics Model for the Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palotai, Csaba J.; Le Beau, Raymond P.; Shankar, Ramanakumar; Flom, Abigail; Lashley, Jacob; McCabe, Tyler

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have significantly increased the quality and the number of observed meteorological features on the jovian planets, revealing banded cloud structures and discrete features. Our current understanding of the formation and decay of those clouds also defines the conceptual modes about the underlying atmospheric dynamics. The full interpretation of the new observational data set and the related theories requires modeling these features in a general circulation model (GCM). Here, we present details of our bulk cloud microphysics model that was designed to simulate clouds in the Explicit Planetary Hybrid-Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) GCM for the jovian planets. The cloud module includes hydrological cycles for each condensable species that consist of interactive vapor, cloud and precipitation phases and it also accounts for latent heating and cooling throughout the transfer processes (Palotai and Dowling, 2008. Icarus, 194, 303-326). Previously, the self-organizing clouds in our simulations successfully reproduced the vertical and horizontal ammonia cloud structure in the vicinity of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA (Palotai et al. 2014, Icarus, 232, 141-156). In our recent work, we extended this model to include water clouds on Jupiter and Saturn, ammonia clouds on Saturn, and methane clouds on Uranus and Neptune. Details of our cloud parameterization scheme, our initial results and their comparison with observations will be shown. The latest version of EPIC model is available as open source software from NASA's PDS Atmospheres Node.

  12. A Possible Mechanism for Driving Oscillations in Hot Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dederick, Ethan; Jackiewicz, Jason

    2017-03-01

    The κ-mechanism has been successful in explaining the origin of observed oscillations of many types of “classical” pulsating variable stars. Here we examine quantitatively if that same process is prominent enough to excite the potential global oscillations within Jupiter, whose energy flux is powered by gravitational collapse rather than nuclear fusion. Additionally, we examine whether external radiative forcing, i.e., starlight, could be a driver for global oscillations in hot Jupiters orbiting various main-sequence stars at defined orbital semimajor axes. Using planetary models generated by the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics and nonadiabatic oscillation calculations, we confirm that Jovian oscillations cannot be driven via the κ-mechanism. However, we do show that, in hot Jupiters, oscillations can likely be excited via the suppression of radiative cooling due to external radiation given a large enough stellar flux and the absence of a significant oscillatory damping zone within the planet. This trend does not seem to be dependent on the planetary mass. In future observations, we can thus expect that such planets may be pulsating, thereby giving greater insight into the internal structure of these bodies.

  13. A stability limit for the atmospheres of giant extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Tommi T; Aylward, Alan D; Miller, Steve

    2007-12-06

    Recent observations of the planet HD209458b indicate that it is surrounded by an expanded atmosphere of atomic hydrogen that is escaping hydrodynamically. Theoretically, it has been shown that such escape is possible at least inside an orbit of 0.1 au (refs 4 and 5), and also that H3+ ions play a crucial role in cooling the upper atmosphere. Jupiter's atmosphere is stable, so somewhere between 5 and 0.1 au there must be a crossover between stability and instability. Here we show that there is a sharp breakdown in atmospheric stability between 0.14 and 0.16 au for a Jupiter-like planet orbiting a solar-type star. These results are in contrast to earlier modelling that implied much higher thermospheric temperatures and more significant evaporation farther from the star. (We use a three-dimensional, time-dependent coupled thermosphere-ionosphere model and properly include cooling by H3+ ions, allowing us to model globally the redistribution of heat and changes in molecular composition.) Between 0.2 and 0.16 au cooling by H3+ ions balances heating by the star, but inside 0.16 au molecular hydrogen dissociates thermally, suppressing the formation of H3+ and effectively shutting down that mode of cooling.

  14. NH4SH and cloud cover in the atmospheres of the giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, K. Iu.; Solodovnik, A. A.

    1991-02-01

    The probability of the formation of NH4SH and (NH4)2S is examined on the basis of the Le Chatelier principle. It is shown that it is very doubtful if NH4SH can be created in the atmospheres of the giant planets in quantities sufficient for cloud formation. Thus (NH4)2S is considered as a more likely candidate for cloud formation in the atmospheres of these planets, inasmuch as the conditions for its production there are more favorable.

  15. THE ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PLANET SEARCH. XX. A SOLITARY ICE-GIANT PLANET ORBITING HD 102365

    SciTech Connect

    Tinney, C. G.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Bailey, Jeremy; Butler, R. Paul; Jones, Hugh R. A.; O'Toole, Simon; Carter, Brad D.

    2011-02-01

    We present 12 years of precision Doppler data for the very nearby G3 star HD 102365, which reveals the presence of a Neptune-like planet with a 16.0 M{sub Earth} minimum mass in a 122.1 day orbit. Very few 'Super Earth' planets have been discovered to date in orbits this large and those that have been found reside in multiple systems of between three and six planets. HD 102365 b, in contrast, appears to orbit its star in splendid isolation. Analysis of the residuals to our Keplerian fit for HD 102365 b indicates that there are no other planets with minimum mass above 0.3 M{sub Jup} orbiting within 5 AU and no other 'Super Earths' more massive than 10 M{sub Earth} orbiting at periods shorter than 50 days. At periods of less than 20 days these limits drop to as low as 6 M{sub Earth}. There are now 32 exoplanets known with minimum mass below 20 M{sub Earth}, and interestingly the period distributions of these low-mass planets seem to be similar whether they orbit M-, K-, or G-type dwarfs.

  16. Electrical conductivity of condensed molecular hydrogen in the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical interpretation of several phenomena concerning Jupiter and Saturn depends upon the electrical conductivity of molecular hydrogen which, according to present models, forms the outermost layer of both planets. The layer starts at the transition pressure between the metallic and the molecular form of hydrogen, that is around 1 Mbar, and extends to the outside limits of the atmosphere. Whether at the highest pressures (and temperatures) this layer is a solid or a dense fluid is not certain. In any case, the fluid is in supercritical condition so that there is only a gradual transition from dense liquid to a gaseous form. The two theories which require specific values of the conductivity of the condensed molecular hydrogen are those pertaining to the generation of a magnetic field in the liquid hydrogen rather than in the deep metallic interior (HIDE, 1967), and those concerned with the electromagnetic coupling and exchange of angular momentum between the liquid core and the solid molecular hydrogen mantle.

  17. Accretional origin of the giant planets and its consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Wing-Huen; Fernández, Julio A.

    The basic mass distribution and orbital structure of the solar system are determined by the original mass and angular momentum of the solar nebula and planetary accretion effect. Dust-gas aerodynamic interaction in the gaseous solar nebula could lead to the formation of an outer boundary or edge of the condensed matter in the outer planetary region. Such inward drift of the small solid bodies was subsequently reversed by the angular momentum transfer effect associated with the collisional accretion process. The orbits of Neptune and Uranus were found to expand outward during the accretional phase in numerical simulations. Such orbital migration mechanism might have played a key role at the same time in capturing Pluto into its 3:2 resonance with Neptune and the trapping of a significant number of Kuiper belt objects in this resonance. Gravitational scattering of icy planetesimals by the growing proto-Uranus and, most importantly, proto-Neptune was very effective in planting comets in the distant Oort cloud reservoir and driving the heavy bombardment event of the terrestrial planets and the Kuiper belt objects. To some extent the quasi-resonant relation of the major planets might have also been influenced by the orbital migration process. Besides gravitational scattering and accumulation of small planetesimals there is evidence that the protoplanets had collided with large planetoids of Mars- to Earth-size. The formation of an extended gaseous envelope/disk after the megaimpact event could be important in reprocessing the isotope (i.e., D/H) ratio of the cometary material. This might provide a possible explanation to the unexpected difference between the D/H ratio in the water ice of comets (with an enrichment factor of f ≍ 10 in comparison with the interstellar value) and those in the cores of Uranus and Neptune (with f ≍ 3).

  18. Kuiper: A Discovery-class Observatory for Giant Planets, Satellites, and Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James F.; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Brown, Michael E.; Clarke, John T.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Hendrix, Amanda R.; Wong, Michael H.

    2014-11-01

    The recent Planetary Decadal identified important science goals for the study of the outer solar system. However, after the end of the Cassini and Juno missions in 2017, outer solar system science might face over a decade without new U.S. missions. The Survey thus noted the critical role that space-based telescopic observations, especially those enabling significant time-domain and target coverage, can play in advancing key planetary science questions. We propose a dedicated planetary space telescope, implementable in the Discovery program, to conduct three diverse investigations. Named after pioneering planetary astronomer Gerard P. Kuiper, the mission will address 9 of the 10 Decadal's Key Questions by studying 1) the giant planets, 2) their major satellites, and 3) the panoply of small bodies that populate the outer solar system. These three diverse investigations will enable significant advances in outer solar system science, through time-domain observations and substantial time on the targets. Advances in understanding the connections between weather and climate in giant planet atmospheres, as well as the interactions between giant planet atmospheres, satellites, and their external environments (e.g., auroral, solar wind, plumes, impacts), require consistent, well-calibrated, nearly-continuous observations spanning timescales from hours to years. Progress in understanding the ways that small outer solar system bodies can be used to understand the details of early giant planet migration requires compositional knowledge of statistically significant members of key dynamical populations. Observations with the required temporal coverage and fidelity needed to address these and many other important outer solar system Decadal science goals simply cannot be obtained from ground-based telescopes, or existing or planned space telescopes. Kuiper's combination of spatial resolution, spectral resolution, UV to near-IR coverage, and substantial time-domain sampling will

  19. THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS: LUMINOSITY CLASS, PLANET OCCURRENCE, AND PLANET-METALLICITY RELATION OF THE COOLEST KEPLER TARGET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J.; Gaidos, Eric; Lepine, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    We estimate the stellar parameters of late K- and early M-type Kepler target stars. We obtain medium-resolution visible spectra of 382 stars with K{sub P} - J > 2 ({approx_equal}K5 and later spectral type). We determine luminosity class by comparing the strength of gravity-sensitive indices (CaH, K I, Ca II, and Na I) to their strength in a sample of stars of known luminosity class. We find that giants constitute 96% {+-} 1% of the bright (K{sub P} < 14) Kepler target stars, and 7% {+-} 3% of dim (K{sub P} > 14) stars, significantly higher than fractions based on the stellar parameters quoted in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC effective temperatures are systematically (110{sup +15}{sub -35} K) higher than temperatures we determine from fitting our spectra to PHOENIX stellar models. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the Kepler exoplanet candidate population, we find a planet occurrence of 0.36 {+-} 0.08 when giant stars are properly removed, somewhat higher than when a KIC log g > 4 criterion is used (0.27 {+-} 0.05). Last, we show that there is no significant difference in g - r color (a probe of metallicity) between late-type Kepler stars with transiting Earth-to-Neptune-size exoplanet candidates and dwarf stars with no detected transits. We show that a previous claimed offset between these two populations is most likely an artifact of including a large number of misidentified giants.

  20. Opportunities for Laboratory Opacity Chemistry Studies to Facilitate Characterization of Young Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark; Freedman, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal emission spectra of young giant planets is shaped by the opacity of atoms and molecules residing in their atmospheres. While great strides have been made in improving the opacities of important molecules, particularly NH3 and CH4, at high temperatures, much more work is needed to understand the opacity and chemistry of atomic Na and K. The highly pressure broadened fundamental band of Na and K in the optical stretches into the near-infrared, strongly influencing the shape of the Y and K spectral bands. Since young giant planets are bright in these bands it is important to understand the influences on the spectral shape. Discerning gravity and atmospheric composition is difficult, if not impossible, without both good atomic opacities as well as an excellent understanding of the relevant atmospheric chemistry. Since Na and K condense at temperatures near 500 to 600 K, the chemistry of the condensation process must be well understood as well, particularly any disequilibrium chemical pathways. Comparisons of the current generation of sophisticated atmospheric models and available data, however, reveal important shortcomings in the models. We will review the current state of observations and theory of young giant planets and will discuss these and other specific examples where improved laboratory measurements for alkali compounds have the potential of substantially improving our understanding of these atmospheres.

  1. Possible Rapid Gas Giant Planet Formation in the Solar Nebula and Other Protoplanetary Disks.

    PubMed

    Boss

    2000-06-20

    Gas giant planets have been detected in orbit around an increasing number of nearby stars. Two theories have been advanced for the formation of such planets: core accretion and disk instability. Core accretion, the generally accepted mechanism, requires several million years or more to form a gas giant planet in a protoplanetary disk like the solar nebula. Disk instability, on the other hand, can form a gas giant protoplanet in a few hundred years. However, disk instability has previously been thought to be important only in relatively massive disks. New three-dimensional, "locally isothermal," hydrodynamical models without velocity damping show that a disk instability can form Jupiter-mass clumps, even in a disk with a mass (0.091 M middle dot in circle within 20 AU) low enough to be in the range inferred for the solar nebula. The clumps form with initially eccentric orbits, and their survival will depend on their ability to contract to higher densities before they can be tidally disrupted at successive periastrons. Because the disk mass in these models is comparable to that apparently required for the core accretion mechanism to operate, the models imply that disk instability could obviate the core accretion mechanism in the solar nebula and elsewhere.

  2. Inhibition of giant-planet formation by rapid gas depletion around young stars.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, B; Forveille, T; Kastner, J H

    1995-02-09

    Although stars form from clouds of gas and dust, there are insignificant amounts of gas around ordinary (Sun-like) stars. This suggests that hydrogen and helium, the primary constituents of planets such as Jupiter and Saturn, are not easily retained in orbit as a star matures. The gas-giant planets in the Solar System must therefore have formed rapidly. Models of their formation generally suggest that a solid core formed in < or = 10(6) yr, followed by the accretion of the massive gaseous envelope in approximately 10(7) yr (refs 1-5). But how and when the gas of the solar nebula dissipated, and how this compares with the predicted timescale of gas-giant formation, remains unclear, in part because direct observations of circumstellar gas have been made only for stars either younger or older than the critical range of 10(6)-10(7) yr (refs 8-15). Here we report observations of the molecular gas surrounding 20 stars whose ages are likely to be in this range. The gas dissipates rapidly; after a few million years the mass remaining is typically much less than the mass of Jupiter. Thus, if gas-giant planets are common in the Galaxy, they must form even more quickly than present models suggest.

  3. The role of plasma/neutral source and loss processes in shaping the giant planet magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delamere, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The giant planet magnetospheres are filled with neutral and ionized gases originating from satellites orbiting deep within the magnetosphere. The complex chemical and physical pathways for the flow of mass and energy in this partially ionized plasma environment is critical for understanding magnetospheric dynamics. The flow of mass at Jupiter and Saturn begins, primarily, with neutral gases emanating from Io (~1000 kg/s) and Enceladus (~200 kg/s). In addition to ionization losses, the neutral gases are absorbed by the planet, its rings, or escape at high speeds from the magnetosphere via charge exchange reactions. The net result is a centrifugally confined torus of plasma that is transported radially outward, distorting the magnetic field into a magnetodisc configuration. Ultimately the plasma is lost to the solar wind. A critical parameter for shaping the magnetodisc and determining its dynamics is the radial plasma mass transport rate (~500 kg/s and ~50 kg/s for Jupiter and Saturn respectively). Given the plasma transport rates, several simple properties of the giant magnetodiscs can be estimated including the physical scale of the magnetosphere, the magnetic flux transport, and the magnitude of azimuthal magnetic field bendback. We will discuss transport-related magnetic flux conservation and the mystery of plasma heating—two critical issues for shaping the giant planet magnetospheres.

  4. The Longevity of Water Ice on Ganymedes and Europas around Migrated Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, Owen R.; Catling, David C.; Zahnle, Kevin J.

    2017-04-01

    The gas giant planets in the Solar System have a retinue of icy moons, and we expect giant exoplanets to have similar satellite systems. If a Jupiter-like planet were to migrate toward its parent star the icy moons orbiting it would evaporate, creating atmospheres and possible habitable surface oceans. Here, we examine how long the surface ice and possible oceans would last before being hydrodynamically lost to space. The hydrodynamic loss rate from the moons is determined, in large part, by the stellar flux available for absorption, which increases as the giant planet and icy moons migrate closer to the star. At some planet-star distance the stellar flux incident on the icy moons becomes so great that they enter a runaway greenhouse state. This runaway greenhouse state rapidly transfers all available surface water to the atmosphere as vapor, where it is easily lost from the small moons. However, for icy moons of Ganymede’s size around a Sun-like star we found that surface water (either ice or liquid) can persist indefinitely outside the runaway greenhouse orbital distance. In contrast, the surface water on smaller moons of Europa’s size will only persist on timescales greater than 1 Gyr at distances ranging 1.49-0.74 au around a Sun-like star for Bond albedos of 0.2 and 0.8, where the lower albedo becomes relevant if ice melts. Consequently, small moons can lose their icy shells, which would create a torus of H atoms around their host planet that might be detectable in future observations.

  5. THE EVOLUTION OF CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS AROUND PLANETS IN WIDE ORBITS: IMPLICATIONS FOR FORMATION THEORY, OBSERVATIONS, AND MOON SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Shabram, Megan; Boley, Aaron C.

    2013-04-10

    Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we explore the evolution of circumplanetary disks around wide-orbit proto-gas giants. At large distances from the star ({approx}100 AU), gravitational instability followed by disk fragmentation can form low-mass substellar companions (massive gas giants and/or brown dwarfs) that are likely to host large disks. We examine the initial evolution of these subdisks and their role in regulating the growth of their substellar companions, as well as explore consequences of their interactions with circumstellar material. We find that subdisks that form in the context of GIs evolve quickly from a very massive state. Long-term accretion rates from the subdisk onto the proto-gas giant reach {approx}0.3 Jupiter masses kyr{sup -1}. We also find consistency with previous simulations, demonstrating that subdisks are truncated at {approx}1/3 of the companion's Hill radius and are thick, with (h/r) of {approx}> 0.2. The thickness of subdisks draws to question the use of thin-disk approximations for understanding the behavior of subdisks, and the morphology of subdisks has implications for the formation and extent of satellite systems. These subdisks create heating events in otherwise cold regions of the circumstellar disk and serve as planet formation beacons that can be detected by instruments such as ALMA.

  6. Far Infrared and Submillimeter Observations of the Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, R. F.; Harper, D. A.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.; Orton, G. S.; Whitcomb, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Far infrared measurements of the effective temperatures of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune were made. The measurements presented here cover the range from 35-1000 micrometers in relatively narrow bands. The observations at lambda 350 micrometers were made at the 3m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) of the Mauna Kea Observatory; those at lambda 350 micrometer were made on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). All observations of Saturn were made when the ring inclination to Earth was 1.7 deg assuring an unambiguous measurement of the flux from the disk itself. Mars was used as the calibration reference. The results represent a consistent set of calibration standards. In these measurements, it is assumed that sub b(lambda = 350 micrometers) = T sub (lambda 350 micrometers). Measurements have been made of roughly 50% of the total flux emitted by Jupiter, 65% by Saturn, and 92% by Uranus and Neptune. These measurements therefore permit a considerable reduction in the uncertainties associated with the bolometric thermal outputs of the planets. The effective temperatures (T sub e) and the ratios of emitted to absorbed solar radiation were calculated.

  7. Properties of hydrogen, helium, and silicon dioxide mixtures in giant planet interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, François; Militzer, Burkhard; Driver, Kevin P.; Zhang, Shuai

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations of Jupiter and Saturn provided by spacecraft missions, such as Juno and Cassini, compel us to revise and improve our models of giant planet interiors. Even though hydrogen and helium are by far the dominant species in these planets, heavy elements can play a significant role in the structure and evolution of the planet. For instance, giant-planet cores may be eroded by their surrounding fluid, which would result in a significantly increased concentration of heavy elements in the hydrogen-helium envelope. Furthermore, the heavy elements could inhibit convection by creating a stabilizing gradient of composition. In order to explore the effects of core erosion, we performed ab initio simulations to study structural, diffusion, and viscosity properties of dense multicomponent mixtures of hydrogen, helium, and silicon dioxide at relevant pressure-temperature conditions. We computed radial distribution functions to identify changes in the chemical behavior of the mixture and to reveal dissociation trends with pressure and temperature. The computed diffusion coefficients of the different species as well as the viscosity provide constraints for the time scale of the dynamics of the core erosion and the mixing of its constituents into the envelope, which will help improve planetary models.

  8. Circumplanetary discs around young giant planets: a comparison between core-accretion and disc instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Mayer, L.; Quinn, T.

    2017-01-01

    Circumplanetary discs can be found around forming giant planets, regardless of whether core accretion or gravitational instability built the planet. We carried out state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations of the circumplanetary discs for both formation scenarios, using as similar initial conditions as possible to unveil possible intrinsic differences in the circumplanetary disc mass and temperature between the two formation mechanisms. We found that the circumplanetary discs' mass linearly scales with the circumstellar disc mass. Therefore, in an equally massive protoplanetary disc, the circumplanetary discs formed in the disc instability model can be only a factor of 8 more massive than their core-accretion counterparts. On the other hand, the bulk circumplanetary disc temperature differs by more than an order of magnitude between the two cases. The subdiscs around planets formed by gravitational instability have a characteristic temperature below 100 K, while the core-accretion circumplanetary discs are hot, with temperatures even greater than 1000 K when embedded in massive, optically thick protoplanetary discs. We explain how this difference can be understood as the natural result of the different formation mechanisms. We argue that the different temperatures should persist up to the point when a full-fledged gas giant forms via disc instability; hence, our result provides a convenient criterion for observations to distinguish between the two main formation scenarios by measuring the bulk temperature in the planet vicinity.

  9. Gas-Assisted Capture of Earth-sized Moons around Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. W.; Sands, B. L.

    2001-11-01

    Today nearly 20 Jupiter-sized planets are known to orbit within or near the habitable zones of their parent stars [see Williams D.W. and Pollard, D. 2001. submitted Inter. J. Astrobiology]. Some of these planets might support life on their moons if their moons are able to form and hold onto sizeable atmospheres. Moons larger than 0.2 Mearth should have little trouble holding their atmospheres for billions of years [Williams D.W., Kasting, J.F., & Wade R.A. 1997. Nature 385,234]. But forming moons of this size through pair-wise accretion of small bodies in low-mass circum-planetary nebulas may be difficult; Ganymede (0.03 Mearth) was the largest moon to form out of a circum-planetary nebula in the Solar System. A more plausible scenario is for giant moons to be captured through collision of an earth-sized planetary body with a gaseous proto-planetary disk around a giant planet, as is thought to have occurred to form Triton around Neptune [McKinnon, W.B., & Leith, A.C. 1995. Icarus 118,392]. Such collisions can remove enormous amounts of energy from the impacting body and often result in a bound satellite on a near-circular orbit. Here we demonstrate that for a reasonable set of nebula parameters such captured moons can avoid spiraling into their planets on timescales comparable to or greater than the lifetime of a circum-planetary nebula.

  10. Gas Giant Planets as Dynamical Barriers to Inward-Migrating Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Izidoro da Costa, Andre; Raymond, Sean

    2015-08-01

    Planets of 1-4 times Earth’s size on orbits shorter than 100 days exist around 30-50% of all Sun-like stars. In fact, the Solar System is particularly outstanding in its lack of “hot super-Earths” (or “mini-Neptunes”). These planets —or their building blocks—may have formed on wider orbits and migrated inward due to interactions with the gaseous protoplanetary disk. Here, we use a suite of dynamical simulations to show that gas giant planets act as barriers to the inward migration of super-Earths initially placed on more distant orbits. Jupiter’s early formation may have prevented Uranus and Neptune (and perhaps Saturn’s core) from becoming hot super-Earths. Our model predicts that the populations of hot super-Earth systems and Jupiter-like planets should be anti-correlated: gas giants (especially if they form early) should be rare in systems with many hot super-Earths. Testing this prediction will constitute a crucial assessment of the validity of the migration hypothesis for the origin of close-in super-Earths.

  11. COUPLED EVOLUTION WITH TIDES OF THE RADIUS AND ORBIT OF TRANSITING GIANT PLANETS: GENERAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ibgui, Laurent; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-08-01

    Some transiting extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) have measured radii larger than predicted by the standard theory. In this paper, we explore the possibility that an earlier episode of tidal heating can explain such radius anomalies and apply the formalism we develop to HD 209458b as an example. We find that for strong enough tides the planet's radius can undergo a transient phase of inflation that temporarily interrupts canonical, monotonic shrinking due to radiative losses. Importantly, an earlier episode of tidal heating can result in a planet with an inflated radius, even though its orbit has nearly circularized. Moreover, we confirm that at late times, and under some circumstances, by raising tides on the star itself a planet can spiral into its host. We note that a 3x to 10x solar planet atmospheric opacity with no tidal heating is sufficient to explain the observed radius of HD 209458b. However, our model demonstrates that with an earlier phase of episodic tidal heating, we can fit the observed radius of HD 209458b even with lower (solar) atmospheric opacities. This work demonstrates that, if a planet is left with an appreciable eccentricity after early inward migration and/or dynamical interaction, coupling radius and orbit evolution in a consistent fashion that includes tidal heating, stellar irradiation, and detailed model atmospheres might offer a generic solution to the inflated radius puzzle for transiting EGPs such as WASP-12b, TrES-4, and WASP-6b.

  12. The International Deep Planet Survey. II. The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicher, R.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Barman, T.; Konopacky, Q.; Song, I.; Patience, J.; Lafrenière, D.; Doyon, R.; Nielsen, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. Aims: We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. Methods: We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 yr. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. Results: The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05+2.80-0.70% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14 MJ and between 20 and 300 AU. This result is obtained assuming uniform distributions of planet masses and semi-major axes. If we consider power law distributions as measured for close-in planets instead, the derived frequency is 2.30+5.95-1.55%, recalling the strong impact of assumptions on Monte Carlo output distributions. We also find no evidence that the derived frequency depends on the mass of the hosting star, whereas it does for close-in planets. Conclusions: The international deep planet survey provides a database of confirmed background sources that may be useful for other exoplanet direct imaging surveys. It also puts new constraints on the number of stars with at least one giant planet reducing by a factor of two the frequencies derived by almost all previous works. Tables 11-15 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  13. Intensity of Hydrogen Line Emission from Accreting Gas-Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yuhiko; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ikoma, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    Planets have been thought to form in circumstellar gaseous disks. Indeed, a number of young stars surrounded by such disks have been already detected. Recently, there are some reports on detection of gap-like structure in circumstellar disks, which suggests that there are forming massive protoplanets embedded in the disks. A challenging issue is how to find forming planets in circumstellar disks directly. In this study, we investigate whether detectable emission occurs from accreting gas-giant planets. In a circumstellar disk, once a solid core becomes massive enough, it captures the surrounding disk gas gravitationally in a runaway manner. Since the disk gas accretion occurs much faster than angular momentum loss, a circumplanetary disk is formed in the mid-plane of the circumstellar disk. Recent three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations by Tanigawa et al. (2012) revealed that the gas flowed from the cicumstellar disk to the circumplanetary disk not horizontally but vertically. According to those simulations, the disk gas falls onto the circumplanetary disk at a speed comparable to the free fall speed, and the local gas temperature reaches up to tens of thousands of kelvin because of shock heating near the planet. Thus, the presence of an accreting gas giant planet may be found by observation of the radiative emission from such hot gas in the circumplanetary disk, which we quantify in this study. In particular, we focus on the intensity of line emission from hydrogen. We have simulated the post-shock gas flow with non-equilibrium chemical reaction and electron transition. Then, we have found that the intensity of some hydrogen lines is proportional to the number density of the surrounding circumstellar disk gas and square of the planet mass, so the protoplanet’s hydrogen-line emission is less intense by a few orders of magnitude relative to the protostar’s emission under some realistic conditions. Also, the duration time is comparable to the dissipation time

  14. Atmosphere Models for the Brown Dwarf Gliese 229 B and the Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.

    1996-01-01

    Brown dwarfs inhabit a realm intermediate between the more massive stars and the less massive planets. Their thermal infrared emission is powered by the release of gravitational potential energy as regulated by their atmospheres. Long known only as theoretical constructs. the discovery of the first unimpeachable brown dwarf. Gliese 229 has opened up a new field: the study of brown dwarf atmospheres. The subsequent discoverv of numerous extrasolar giant planets circling nearby stars, further demonstrated the need for a comprehensive modeling effort to understand this new class of jovian atmospheres. Although no spectra are yet available of the new planets, the next generation of groundbased and spacebased telescopes will return such data. Here author report on the effort with Ames collaborator Dr. Christopher McKay to better understand these new atmospheres.

  15. Atmosphere Models for the Brown Dwarf Gliese 229 B and the Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark S.

    1996-01-01

    Brown dwarfs inhabit a realm intermediate between the more massive stars and the less massive planets. Their thermal infrared emission is powered by the release of gravitational potential energy as regulated by their atmospheres. Long known only as theoretical constructs. the discovery of the first unimpeachable brown dwarf. Gliese 229 has opened up a new field: the study of brown dwarf atmospheres. The subsequent discoverv of numerous extrasolar giant planets circling nearby stars, further demonstrated the need for a comprehensive modeling effort to understand this new class of jovian atmospheres. Although no spectra are yet available of the new planets, the next generation of groundbased and spacebased telescopes will return such data. Here author report on the effort with Ames collaborator Dr. Christopher McKay to better understand these new atmospheres.

  16. Search for Planets Companion to Late G-type Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yujuan; Zhao, Gang; Chen, Yuqin

    2005-03-01

    The searching for `other worlds' is one of the oldest well known scientific questions. With the first discovery of planets around the pulsar PSR1257+12 (Wolszczan & Frail 1992) and the main sequence star 51 Peg (Mayor & Queloz 1995), a new field of astronomy has been opened. Most of the planets have been found around main-sequence solar-mass stars. However in this investigation, we present our plan to search for planets around intermediate-mass late G type giant stars (1.5 - 3Msolar) with cooperation with Japanese astronomers and give the preliminary results of this research. A long-term monitoring of the Doppler velocities of stars will be carried out with mid-size telescopes at Okayama (Japan) and Xinglong (China).

  17. ASYMMETRIC FUNDAMENTAL BAND CO LINES AS A SIGN OF AN EMBEDDED GIANT PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Regály, Zs.; Király, S.; Kiss, L. L.

    2014-04-20

    We investigate the formation of double-peaked asymmetric line profiles of CO in the fundamental band spectra emitted by young (1-5 Myr) protoplanetary disks hosted by a 0.5-2 M {sub ☉} star. Distortions of the line profiles can be caused by the gravitational perturbation of an embedded giant planet with q = 4.7 × 10{sup –3} stellar-to-planet mass ratio. Locally isothermal, two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations show that the disk becomes globally eccentric inside the planetary orbit with stationary ∼0.2-0.25 average eccentricity after ∼2000 orbital periods. For orbital distances 1-10 AU, the disk eccentricity is peaked inside the region where the fundamental band of CO is thermally excited. Hence, these lines become sensitive indicators of the embedded planet via their asymmetries (both in flux and wavelength). We find that the line shape distortions (e.g., distance, central dip, asymmetry, and positions of peaks) of a given transition depend on the excitation energy (i.e., on the rotational quantum number J). The magnitude of line asymmetry is increasing/decreasing with J if the planet orbits inside/outside the CO excitation zone (R {sub CO} ≤ 3, 5, and 7 AU for a 0.5, 1, and 2 M {sub ☉} star, respectively), thus one can constrain the orbital distance of a giant planet by determining the slope of the peak asymmetry-J profile. We conclude that the presented spectroscopic phenomenon can be used to test the predictions of planet formation theories by pushing the age limits for detecting the youngest planetary systems.

  18. SIM PlanetQuest Key Project Precursor Observations to Detect Gas Giant Planets Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Angelle; Beichman, Charles; Akeson, Rachel; Ghez, Andrea; Grankin, Konstantin N.; Herbst, William; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Huerta, Marcos; Konopacky, Quinn; Metchev, Stanimir; hide

    2008-01-01

    We present a review of precursor observing programs for the SIM PlanetQuest Key project devoted to detecting Jupiter mass planets around young stars. In order to ensure that the stars in the sample are free of various sources of astrometric noise that might impede the detection of planets, we have initiated programs to collect photometry, high contrast images, interferometric data and radial velocities for stars in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. We have completed a high contrast imaging survey of target stars in Taurus and the Pleiades and found no definitive common proper motion companions within one arcsecond (140 AU) of the SIM targets. Our radial velocity surveys have shown that many of the target stars in Sco-Cen are fast rotators and a few stars in Taurus and the Pleiades may have sub-stellar companions. Interferometric data of a few stars in Taurus show no signs of stellar or sub-stellar companions with separations of <5 mas. The photometric survey suggests that approximately half of the stars initially selected for this program are variable to a degree (1(sigma) >0.1 mag) that would degrade the astrometric accuracy achievable for that star. While the precursor programs are still a work in progress, we provide a comprehensive list of all targets ranked according to their viability as a result of the observations taken to date. By far, the observable that removes the most targets from the SIM-YSO program is photometric variability.

  19. SIM PlanetQuest Key Project Precursor Observations to Detect Gas Giant Planets Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Angelle; Beichman, Charles; Akeson, Rachel; Ghez, Andrea; Grankin, Konstantin N.; Herbst, William; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Huerta, Marcos; Konopacky, Quinn; Metchev, Stanimir; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Prato, L.; Simon, Michal

    2008-01-01

    We present a review of precursor observing programs for the SIM PlanetQuest Key project devoted to detecting Jupiter mass planets around young stars. In order to ensure that the stars in the sample are free of various sources of astrometric noise that might impede the detection of planets, we have initiated programs to collect photometry, high contrast images, interferometric data and radial velocities for stars in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. We have completed a high contrast imaging survey of target stars in Taurus and the Pleiades and found no definitive common proper motion companions within one arcsecond (140 AU) of the SIM targets. Our radial velocity surveys have shown that many of the target stars in Sco-Cen are fast rotators and a few stars in Taurus and the Pleiades may have sub-stellar companions. Interferometric data of a few stars in Taurus show no signs of stellar or sub-stellar companions with separations of <5 mas. The photometric survey suggests that approximately half of the stars initially selected for this program are variable to a degree (1(sigma) >0.1 mag) that would degrade the astrometric accuracy achievable for that star. While the precursor programs are still a work in progress, we provide a comprehensive list of all targets ranked according to their viability as a result of the observations taken to date. By far, the observable that removes the most targets from the SIM-YSO program is photometric variability.

  20. Formation Of the Giant Planets By Concurrent Accretion Of Solids And Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Hubickyj, Olenka; Bodenheimer, Peter; Lissauer, Jack J.; Podolak, Morris; Greenzweig, Yuval; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    New numerical simulations of the formation of the giant planets are presented, in which for the first time both the gas and planetesimal accretion rates are calculated in a self-consistent, interactive fashion. The simulations combine three elements: 1) three-body accretion cross-sections of solids onto an isolated planetary embryo, 2) a stellar evolution code for the planet's gaseous envelope, and 3) a planetesimal dissolution code within the envelope, used to evaluate the planet's effective capture radius and the energy deposition profile of accreted material. Major assumptions include: The planet is embedded in a disk of gas and small planetesimals with locally uniform initial surface mass density, and planetesimals are not allowed to migrate into or out of the planet's feeding zone. All simulations are characterized by three major phases. During the first phase, the planet's mass consists primarily of solid material. The planetesimal accretion rate, which dominates that of gas, rapidly increases owing to runaway accretion, then decreases as the planet's feeding zone is depleted. During the second phase, both solid and gas accretion rates are small and nearly independent of time. The third phase, marked by runaway gas accretion, starts when the solid and gas masses are about equal. It is engendered by a strong positive feedback on the gas accretion rates, driven by the rapid contraction of the gaseous envelope and the rapid expansion of the outer boundary, which depends on the planet's total mass. The overall evolutionary time scale is generally determined by the length of the second phase. The actual rates at which the giant planets accreted small planetesimals is probably intermediate between the constant rates assumed in most previous studies and the highly variable rates that we have used. Within the context, of the adopted model of planetesimal accretion, the joint constraints of the time scale for dissipation of the solar nebula and the current high

  1. Formation Of the Giant Planets By Concurrent Accretion Of Solids And Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Hubickyj, Olenka; Bodenheimer, Peter; Lissauer, Jack J.; Podolak, Morris; Greenzweig, Yuval; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    New numerical simulations of the formation of the giant planets are presented, in which for the first time both the gas and planetesimal accretion rates are calculated in a self-consistent, interactive fashion. The simulations combine three elements: 1) three-body accretion cross-sections of solids onto an isolated planetary embryo, 2) a stellar evolution code for the planet's gaseous envelope, and 3) a planetesimal dissolution code within the envelope, used to evaluate the planet's effective capture radius and the energy deposition profile of accreted material. Major assumptions include: The planet is embedded in a disk of gas and small planetesimals with locally uniform initial surface mass density, and planetesimals are not allowed to migrate into or out of the planet's feeding zone. All simulations are characterized by three major phases. During the first phase, the planet's mass consists primarily of solid material. The planetesimal accretion rate, which dominates that of gas, rapidly increases owing to runaway accretion, then decreases as the planet's feeding zone is depleted. During the second phase, both solid and gas accretion rates are small and nearly independent of time. The third phase, marked by runaway gas accretion, starts when the solid and gas masses are about equal. It is engendered by a strong positive feedback on the gas accretion rates, driven by the rapid contraction of the gaseous envelope and the rapid expansion of the outer boundary, which depends on the planet's total mass. The overall evolutionary time scale is generally determined by the length of the second phase. The actual rates at which the giant planets accreted small planetesimals is probably intermediate between the constant rates assumed in most previous studies and the highly variable rates that we have used. Within the context, of the adopted model of planetesimal accretion, the joint constraints of the time scale for dissipation of the solar nebula and the current high

  2. AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE SHOULDER OF GIANTS: JOVIAN PLANETS AROUND LATE K DWARF STARS AND THE TREND WITH STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, Eric; Fischer, Debra A.; Mann, Andrew W.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2013-07-01

    Analyses of exoplanet statistics suggest a trend of giant planet occurrence with host star mass, a clue to how planets like Jupiter form. One missing piece of the puzzle is the occurrence around late K dwarf stars (masses of 0.5-0.75 M{sub Sun} and effective temperatures of 3900-4800 K). We analyzed four years of Doppler radial velocity (RVs) data for 110 late K dwarfs, one of which hosts two previously reported giant planets. We estimate that 4.0% {+-} 2.3% of these stars have Saturn-mass or larger planets with orbital periods <245 days, depending on the planet mass distribution and RV variability of stars without giant planets. We also estimate that 0.7% {+-} 0.5% of similar stars observed by Kepler have giant planets. This Kepler rate is significantly (99% confidence) lower than that derived from our Doppler survey, but the difference vanishes if only the single Doppler system (HIP 57274) with completely resolved orbits is considered. The difference could also be explained by the exclusion of close binaries (without giant planets) from the Doppler but not Kepler surveys, the effect of long-period companions and stellar noise on the Doppler data, or an intrinsic difference between the two populations. Our estimates for late K dwarfs bridge those for solar-type stars and M dwarfs, and support a positive trend with stellar mass. Small sample size precludes statements about finer structure, e.g., a ''shoulder'' in the distribution of giant planets with stellar mass. Future surveys such as the Next Generation Transit Survey and the Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey will ameliorate this deficiency.

  3. Models of the collisional damping scenario for ice-giant planets and Kuiper belt formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levison, Harold F.; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2007-07-01

    Chiang et al. [Chiang, E., Lithwick, Y., Murray-Clay, R., Buie, M., Grundy, W., Holman, M., 2007. In: Protostars and Planets V, pp. 895-911] have recently proposed that the observed structure of the Kuiper belt could be the result of a dynamical instability of a system of ˜5 primordial ice-giant planets in the outer Solar System. According to this scenario, before the instability occurred, these giants were growing in a highly collisionally damped environment according to the arguments in Goldreich et al. [Goldreich, P., Lithwick, Y., Sari, R., 2004. Astrophys. J. 614, 497-507; Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 42, 549-601]. Here we test this hypothesis with a series of numerical simulations using a new code designed to incorporate the dynamical effects of collisions. We find that we cannot reproduce the observed Solar System. In particular, Goldreich et al. [Goldreich, P., Lithwick, Y., Sari, R., 2004. Astrophys. J. 614, 497-507; Annu. Rev. Astron. Astrophys. 42, 549-601] and Chiang et al. [Chiang, E., Lithwick, Y., Murray-Clay, R., Buie, M., Grundy, W., Holman, M., 2007. In: Protostars and Planets V, pp. 895-911] argue that during the instability, all but two of the ice giants would be ejected from the Solar System by Jupiter and Saturn, leaving Uranus and Neptune behind. We find that ejections are actually rare and that instead the systems spread outward. This always leads to a configuration with too many planets that are too far from the Sun. Thus, we conclude that both Goldreich et al.'s scheme for the formation of Uranus and Neptune and Chiang et al.'s Kuiper belt formation scenario are not viable in their current forms.

  4. Zonal Flow Magnetic Field Interaction in the Semi-Conducting Region of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hao; Stevenson, David J.

    2016-10-01

    All four giant planets in the Solar System feature zonal flows on the order of 100 m/s in the cloud deck, and large-scale intrinsic magnetic fields on the order of 1 Gauss near the surface. The vertical structure of the zonal flows remains obscure. The end-member scenarios are shallow flows confined in the radiative atmosphere and deep flows throughout the planet with constant velocity along the direction of the spin-axis. The electrical conductivity increases smoothly as a function of depth inside Jupiter and Saturn, while a discontinuity of electrical conductivity inside Uranus and Neptune cannot be ruled out. Deep zonal flows will inevitably interact with the magnetic field, at depth with even modest electrical conductivity. Here we investigate the interaction between zonal flows and magnetic fields in the semi-conducting region of giant planets. Employing mean-field electrodynamics, we show that the interaction will generate detectable poloidal magnetic field perturbations spatially correlated with the deep zonal flows. Assuming the peak amplitude of the dynamo α-effect to be 0.1 mm/s, deep zonal flows on the order of 0.1 - 1 m/s in the semi-conducting region of Jupiter and Saturn would generate poloidal magnetic perturbations on the order of 0.01 % - 1 % of the background dipole field. These poloidal perturbations should be detectable with the in-situ magnetic field measurements from the upcoming Juno mission and the Cassini Grand Finale. This implies that magnetic field measurements can be employed to constrain the properties of deep zonal flows in the semi-conducting region of giant planets.

  5. XUV-driven mass loss from extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Koskinen, T. T.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2015-04-01

    Upper atmospheres of Hot Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation conditions that can result in rapid atmospheric escape. The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of these planets are affected by the high-energy spectrum of the host star. This emission depends on stellar type and age, which are thus important factors in understanding the behaviour of exoplanetary atmospheres. In this study, we focus on Extrasolar Giant Planets (EPGs) orbiting K and M dwarf stars. XUV spectra for three different stars - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis and AU Microscopii - are constructed using a coronal model. Neutral density and temperature profiles in the upper atmosphere of hypothetical EGPs orbiting these stars are then obtained from a fluid model, incorporating atmospheric chemistry and taking atmospheric escape into account. We find that a simple scaling based solely on the host star's X-ray emission gives large errors in mass loss rates from planetary atmospheres and so we have derived a new method to scale the EUV regions of the solar spectrum based upon stellar X-ray emission. This new method produces an outcome in terms of the planet's neutral upper atmosphere very similar to that obtained using a detailed coronal model of the host star. Our results indicate that in planets subjected to radiation from active stars, the transition from Jeans escape to a regime of hydrodynamic escape at the top of the atmosphere occurs at larger orbital distances than for planets around low activity stars (such as the Sun).

  6. Layered semi-convection and tides in giant planet interiors. I. Propagation of internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Q.; Barker, A. J.; Mathis, S.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Layered semi-convection is a possible candidate to explain Saturn's luminosity excess and the abnormally large radius of some hot Jupiters. In giant planet interiors, it could lead to the creation of density staircases, which are convective layers separated by thin stably stratified interfaces. These are also observed on Earth in some lakes and in the Arctic Ocean. Aims: We aim to study the propagation of internal waves in a region of layered semi-convection, with the aim to predict energy transport by internal waves incident upon a density staircase. The goal is then to understand the resulting tidal dissipation when these waves are excited by other bodies such as moons in giant planets systems. Methods: We used a local Cartesian analytical model, taking into account the complete Coriolis acceleration at any latitude, thus generalising previous works. We used a model in which stably stratified interfaces are infinitesimally thin, before relaxing this assumption with a second model that assumes a piecewise linear stratification. Results: We find transmission of incident internal waves to be strongly affected by the presence of a density staircase, even if these waves are initially pure inertial waves (which are restored by the Coriolis acceleration). In particular, low-frequency waves of all wavelengths are perfectly transmitted near the critical latitude, defined by θc = sin-1(ω/ 2Ω), where ω is the wave's frequency and Ω is the rotation rate of the planet. Otherwise, short-wavelength waves are only efficiently transmitted if they are resonant with a free mode (interfacial gravity wave or short-wavelength inertial mode) of the staircase. In all other cases, waves are primarily reflected unless their wavelengths are longer than the vertical extent of the entire staircase (not just a single step). Conclusions: We expect incident internal waves to be strongly affected by the presence of a density staircase in a frequency-, latitude- and wavelength

  7. Interior Dynamics of Giant Planets: The Competing Influences of Rotation, Magnetic Fields, and Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurnou, J. M.; Soderlund, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fields are pervasive across the solar system. Despite this commonality, each planet has unique characteristics. Among the dipole-dominated gas giant planets, Jupiter has the strongest planetary magnetic field in the solar system, while Saturn's magnetic field has the smallest measured dipole tilt. In contrast, the poorly constrained magnetic fields of Uranus and Neptune have surface amplitudes comparable to the Earth's although their morphologies are multipolar with large dipole tilts away from the rotation axis. Planetary magnetic fields are driven by dynamo action, the conversion of kinetic energy into magnetic energy. Convection in the electrically conducting regions of planetary interiors is powered by thermo-compositional buoyancy and modulated by rotation and magnetic fields. The Coriolis force tends to organize the flow into axial columns, while the Lorentz force tends to inhibit the relative movement of the magnetic field and the fluid. Similarly, strong buoyancy and inertia associated with vigorous convection can destroy the columnar alignment of flows imposed by rotation. The relative importance of these competing effects are paramount for the planform of core convection and magnetic field characteristics: dynamos with dominant Coriolis forces are expected to be driven by fundamentally different fluid motions than those with co-dominant Lorentz forces and/or strong buoyancy effects. In this study, we use a suite of numerical simulations in combination with rotating convection and dynamo theory to predict the influence of rotation, magnetic fields, and buoyancy on the interior dynamics of giant planets. Our results suggest that Jupiter is strongly constrained by rotation, although the Lorentz force may be significant, i.e. within an order of magnitude of the Coriolis force. Magnetic fields become increasingly sub-dominant for the other planets, where the Coriolis force is predicted to exceed the Lorentz force by at least two orders of magnitude

  8. Challenges in forming the solar system's giant planet cores via pebble accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Kretke, K. A.; Levison, H. F.

    2014-12-01

    Though ∼10 M {sub ⊕} mass rocky/icy cores are commonly held as a prerequisite for the formation of gas giants, theoretical models still struggle to explain how these embryos can form within the lifetimes of gaseous circumstellar disks. In recent years, aerodynamic-aided accretion of 'pebbles', objects ranging from centimeters to meters in size, has been suggested as a potential solution to this long-standing problem. While pebble accretion has been demonstrated to be extremely effective in local simulations that look at the detailed behavior of these pebbles in the vicinity of a single planetary embryo, to date there have been no global simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of pebble accretion in a more complicated, multi-planet environment. Therefore, we have incorporated the aerodynamic-aided accretion physics into LIPAD, a Lagrangian code that can follow the collisional/accretional/dynamical evolution of a protoplanetary system, to investigate how pebble accretion manifests itself in the larger planet formation picture. We find that under generic circumstances, pebble accretion naturally leads to an 'oligarchic' type of growth in which a large number of planetesimals grow to similar-sized planets. In particular, our simulations tend to form hundreds of Mars- and Earth-mass objects between 4 and 10 AU. While merging of some oligarchs may grow massive enough to form giant planet cores, leftover oligarchs lead to planetary systems that cannot be consistent with our own solar system. We investigate various ideas presented in the literature (including evaporation fronts and planet traps) and find that none easily overcome this tendency toward oligarchic growth.

  9. Chemical enrichment of giant planets and discs due to pebble drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Ilee, John D.

    2017-08-01

    Chemical compositions of giant planets provide a means to constrain how and where they form. Traditionally, super-stellar elemental abundances in giant planets were thought to be possible due to accretion of metal-rich solids. Such enrichments are accompanied by oxygen-rich compositions (i.e. C/O below the disc's value, assumed to be solar, C/O = 0.54). Without solid accretion, the planets are expected to have sub-solar metallicity, but high C/O ratios. This arises because the solids are dominated by oxygen-rich species, e.g. H2O and CO2, which freeze out in the disc earlier than CO, leaving the gas metal poor but carbon rich. Here we demonstrate that super-solar metallicities can be achieved by gas accretion alone when growth and radial drift of pebbles are considered in protoplanetary discs. Through this mechanism, planets may simultaneously acquire super-solar metallicities and super-solar C/O ratios. This happens because the pebbles transport volatile species inwards as they migrate through the disc, enriching the gas at snow lines where the volatiles sublimate. Furthermore, the planet's composition can be used to constrain where it formed. Since high C/H and C/O ratios cannot be created by accreting solids, it may be possible to distinguish between formation via pebble accretion and planetesimal accretion by the level of solid enrichment. Finally, we expect that Jupiter's C/O ratio should be near or above solar if its enhanced carbon abundance came through accreting metal-rich gas. Thus, Juno's measurement of Jupiter's C/O ratio should determine whether Jupiter accreted its metals from carbon-rich gas or oxygen-rich solids.

  10. Challenges in Forming the Solar System's Giant Planet Cores via Pebble Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretke, K. A.; Levison, H. F.

    2014-12-01

    Though ~10 M ⊕ mass rocky/icy cores are commonly held as a prerequisite for the formation of gas giants, theoretical models still struggle to explain how these embryos can form within the lifetimes of gaseous circumstellar disks. In recent years, aerodynamic-aided accretion of "pebbles," objects ranging from centimeters to meters in size, has been suggested as a potential solution to this long-standing problem. While pebble accretion has been demonstrated to be extremely effective in local simulations that look at the detailed behavior of these pebbles in the vicinity of a single planetary embryo, to date there have been no global simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of pebble accretion in a more complicated, multi-planet environment. Therefore, we have incorporated the aerodynamic-aided accretion physics into LIPAD, a Lagrangian code that can follow the collisional/accretional/dynamical evolution of a protoplanetary system, to investigate how pebble accretion manifests itself in the larger planet formation picture. We find that under generic circumstances, pebble accretion naturally leads to an "oligarchic" type of growth in which a large number of planetesimals grow to similar-sized planets. In particular, our simulations tend to form hundreds of Mars- and Earth-mass objects between 4 and 10 AU. While merging of some oligarchs may grow massive enough to form giant planet cores, leftover oligarchs lead to planetary systems that cannot be consistent with our own solar system. We investigate various ideas presented in the literature (including evaporation fronts and planet traps) and find that none easily overcome this tendency toward oligarchic growth.

  11. The SOPHIE search for northern extrasolar planets. XII. Three giant planets suitable for astrometric mass determination with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, J.; Hébrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Bourrier, V.; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.; Arnold, L.; Astudillo-Defru, N.; Bonfils, X.; Borgniet, S.; Courcol, B.; Deleuil, M.; Delfosse, X.; Demangeon, O.; Díaz, R. F.; Ehrenreich, D.; Forveille, T.; Marmier, M.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Santerne, A.; Sahlmann, J.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.; Wilson, P. A.

    2017-05-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements for three low-metallicity solar-like stars observed with the SOPHIE spectrograph and its predecessor ELODIE, both installed at the 193 cm telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory, allowing the detection and characterization of three new giant extrasolar planets in intermediate periods of 1.7 to 3.7 yr. All three stars, HD 17674, HD 42012 and HD 29021 present single giant planetary companions with minimum masses between 0.9 and 2.5 MJup. The range of periods and masses of these companions, along with the distance of their host stars, make them good targets to look for astrometric signals over the lifetime of the new astrometry satellite Gaia. We discuss the preliminary astrometric solutions obtained from the first Gaia data release. Based on observations collected with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France by the SOPHIE Consortium.Tables 5-7 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A9

  12. A similarity approach to the atmospheric dynamics of giant extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2001-10-01

    We present an assessment of the most plausible dynamical regimes operating in the atmospheres of giant extrasolar planets (EGP) and cold (``methane'') brown dwarfs from the available data on a selected group of objects. The most important parameters controlling the atmospheric circulation are the rotation angular velocity and the energy balance between the internal heat source and the star's insolation. The first parameter can be reasonably constrained for some of these objects by theoretical arguments. The second is constrained by the observations. Assuming a hydrogen composition, we discuss possible scenarios for the first order atmospheric motions in terms of characteristic geophysical fluid dynamic numbers and representative time constants. The analysis is applied to the family of extrasolar giant planets classified recently by Sudarsky et al. (\\cite {sudarsky}) according to their effective temperature and Bond albedo. For completeness we extend this study to cold (``methane'') brown dwarfs. Three main dynamical regimes emerge from this analysis: (A) Close EGP (``hot jupiters'') with spin-orbit locked (slowly rotating) planets, have their atmospheres mainly under the star's radiative control. Super-rotating atmospheric motions between the heated and cooled hemispheres can be expected. (B) Atmospheres with their dynamics controlled by both the internal and external energy sources, with Coriolis forces producing zonal motions (Jupiter like objects). (C) Cold brown dwarfs, with motions controlled by the internal heat source (thermally driven turbulent convection) producing intense vertical velocities that dominate the motion field.

  13. Gas Giant Planets as Dynamical Barriers to Inward-Migrating Super-Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izidoro, André; Raymond, Sean N.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Hersant, Franck; Pierens, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Planets of 1-4 times Earth’s size on orbits shorter than 100 days exist around 30-50% of all Sun-like stars. In fact, the Solar System is particularly outstanding in its lack of “hot super-Earths” (or “mini-Neptunes”). These planets—or their building blocks—may have formed on wider orbits and migrated inward due to interactions with the gaseous protoplanetary disk. Here, we use a suite of dynamical simulations to show that gas giant planets act as barriers to the inward migration of super-Earths initially placed on more distant orbits. Jupiter’s early formation may have prevented Uranus and Neptune (and perhaps Saturn’s core) from becoming hot super-Earths. Our model predicts that the populations of hot super-Earth systems and Jupiter-like planets should be anti-correlated: gas giants (especially if they form early) should be rare in systems with many hot super-Earths. Testing this prediction will constitute a crucial assessment of the validity of the migration hypothesis for the origin of close-in super-Earths.

  14. Extreme orbital evolution from hierarchical secular coupling of two giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssandier, Jean; Naoz, Smadar; Lizarraga, Ian; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2013-12-20

    Observations of exoplanets over the last two decades have revealed a new class of Jupiter-size planets with orbital periods of a few days, the so-called 'hot Jupiters'. Recent measurements using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect have shown that many (∼50%) of these planets are misaligned; furthermore, some (∼15%) are even retrograde with respect to the stellar spin axis. Motivated by these observations, we explore the possibility of forming retrograde orbits in hierarchical triple configurations consisting of a star-planet inner pair with another giant planet, or brown dwarf, in a much wider orbit. Recently, it was shown that in such a system, the inner planet's orbit can flip back and forth from prograde to retrograde and can also reach extremely high eccentricities. Here we map a significant part of the parameter space of dynamical outcomes for these systems. We derive strong constraints on the orbital configurations for the outer perturber (the tertiary) that could lead to the formation of hot Jupiters with misaligned or retrograde orbits. We focus only on the secular evolution, neglecting other dynamical effects such as mean-motion resonances, as well as all dissipative forces. For example, with an inner Jupiter-like planet initially on a nearly circular orbit at 5 AU, we show that a misaligned hot Jupiter is likely to be formed in the presence of a more massive planetary companion (>2 M{sub J} ) within ∼140 AU of the inner system, with mutual inclination >50° and eccentricity above ∼0.25. This is in striking contrast to the test particle approximation, where an almost perpendicular configuration can still cause large-eccentricity excitations, but flips of an inner Jupiter-like planet are much less likely to occur. The constraints we derive can be used to guide future observations and, in particular, searches for more distant companions in systems containing a hot Jupiter.

  15. The World is Spinning: Constraining the Origin of Supermassive Gas Giant Planets at Wide Separations Using Planetary Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Marta; Knutson, Heather; Batygin, Konstantin; Benneke, Björn; Bowler, Brendan

    2017-01-01

    Planetary spin can inform our understanding of planet accretion histories, which determine final masses and atmospheric compositions, as well as the formation of moons and rings. At present, the physics behind how gas giant planets spin up is still very poorly understood. We know that when giant planets form, they accrete material and angular momentum via a circumplanetary disk, causing the planet to spin up. In order to prevent planet spins from reaching break-up velocity, some mechanism must regulate these spins. However, there is currently no well-formulated picture for how planet spins evolve. This is in part due to the fact that there are very few measurements of giant planet spin rates currently available. Outside the solar system, to date there has only been one published spin measurement of a directly imaged planet, beta Pic b. We use Keck/NIRSPEC to measure spin rates for a sample of bound and free-floating directly imaged planetary mass objects, providing a first look at the distribution of spin rates for these objects.

  16. Coupling between atmospheric layers in gaseous giant planets due to lightning-generated electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, A.; Dubrovin, D.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Ebert, U.; Parra-Rojas, F. C.; Yair, Y.; Price, C.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric electricity has been detected in all gaseous giants of our solar system and is therefore likely present also in extrasolar planets. Building upon measurements from Saturn and Jupiter, we investigate how the electromagnetic pulse emitted by a lightning stroke affects upper layers of a gaseous giant. This effect is probably significantly stronger than that on Earth. We find that electrically active storms may create a localized but long-lasting layer of enhanced ionization of up to 103 cm-3 free electrons below the ionosphere, thus extending the ionosphere downward. We also estimate that the electromagnetic pulse transports 107 J to 1010 J toward the ionosphere. There emissions of light of up to 108 J would create a transient luminous event analogous to a terrestrial "elve."

  17. Growing the gas-giant planets by the gradual accumulation of pebbles.

    PubMed

    Levison, Harold F; Kretke, Katherine A; Duncan, Martin J

    2015-08-20

    It is widely held that the first step in forming gas-giant planets, such as Jupiter and Saturn, was the production of solid 'cores' each with a mass roughly ten times that of the Earth. Getting the cores to form before the solar nebula dissipates (in about one to ten million years; ref. 3) has been a major challenge for planet formation models. Recently models have emerged in which 'pebbles' (centimetre-to-metre-sized objects) are first concentrated by aerodynamic drag and then gravitationally collapse to form objects 100 to 1,000 kilometres in size. These 'planetesimals' can then efficiently accrete left-over pebbles and directly form the cores of giant planets. This model is known as 'pebble accretion'; theoretically, it can produce cores of ten Earth masses in only a few thousand years. Unfortunately, full simulations of this process show that, rather than creating a few such cores, it produces a population of hundreds of Earth-mass objects that are inconsistent with the structure of the Solar System. Here we report that this difficulty can be overcome if pebbles form slowly enough to allow the planetesimals to gravitationally interact with one another. In this situation, the largest planetesimals have time to scatter their smaller siblings out of the disk of pebbles, thereby stifling their growth. Our models show that, for a large and physically reasonable region of parameter space, this typically leads to the formation of one to four gas giants between 5 and 15 astronomical units from the Sun, in agreement with the observed structure of the Solar System.

  18. Growing the gas-giant planets by the gradual accumulation of pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levison, Harold F.; Kretke, Katherine A.; Duncan, Martin J.

    2015-08-01

    It is widely held that the first step in forming gas-giant planets, such as Jupiter and Saturn, was the production of solid `cores' each with a mass roughly ten times that of the Earth. Getting the cores to form before the solar nebula dissipates (in about one to ten million years; ref. 3) has been a major challenge for planet formation models. Recently models have emerged in which `pebbles' (centimetre-to-metre-sized objects) are first concentrated by aerodynamic drag and then gravitationally collapse to form objects 100 to 1,000 kilometres in size. These `planetesimals' can then efficiently accrete left-over pebbles and directly form the cores of giant planets. This model is known as `pebble accretion' theoretically, it can produce cores of ten Earth masses in only a few thousand years. Unfortunately, full simulations of this process show that, rather than creating a few such cores, it produces a population of hundreds of Earth-mass objects that are inconsistent with the structure of the Solar System. Here we report that this difficulty can be overcome if pebbles form slowly enough to allow the planetesimals to gravitationally interact with one another. In this situation, the largest planetesimals have time to scatter their smaller siblings out of the disk of pebbles, thereby stifling their growth. Our models show that, for a large and physically reasonable region of parameter space, this typically leads to the formation of one to four gas giants between 5 and 15 astronomical units from the Sun, in agreement with the observed structure of the Solar System.

  19. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY IN GIANT PLANETS, BROWN DWARFS, AND LOW-MASS DWARF STARS. III. IRON, MAGNESIUM, AND SILICON

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, Channon; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce E-mail: lodders@wustl.ed

    2010-06-20

    We use thermochemical equilibrium calculations to model iron, magnesium, and silicon chemistry in the atmospheres of giant planets, brown dwarfs, extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), and low-mass stars. The behavior of individual Fe-, Mg-, and Si-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of temperature, pressure, and metallicity. Our equilibrium results are thus independent of any particular model atmosphere. The condensation of Fe metal strongly affects iron chemistry by efficiently removing Fe-bearing species from the gas phase. Monatomic Fe is the most abundant Fe-bearing gas throughout the atmospheres of EGPs and L dwarfs, and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. Mg- and Si-bearing gases are effectively removed from the atmosphere by forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) and enstatite (MgSiO{sub 3}) cloud formation. Monatomic Mg is the dominant magnesium gas throughout the atmospheres of EGPs and L dwarfs and in the deep atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. Silicon monoxide (SiO) is the most abundant Si-bearing gas in the deep atmospheres of brown dwarfs and EGPs, whereas SiH{sub 4} is dominant in the deep atmosphere of Jupiter and other gas giant planets. Several other Fe-, Mg-, and Si-bearing gases become increasingly important with decreasing effective temperature. In principle, a number of Fe, Mg, and Si gases are potential tracers of weather or diagnostic of temperature in substellar atmospheres.

  20. Ring formation around giant planets by tidal disruption of a single passing large Kuiper belt object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Charnoz, Sébastien; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Genda, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    The origin of rings around giant planets remains elusive. Saturn's rings are massive and made of 90-95% of water ice with a mass of ∼1019 kg. In contrast, the much less massive rings of Uranus and Neptune are dark and likely to have higher rock fraction. According to the so-called "Nice model", at the time of the Late Heavy Bombardment, giant planets could have experienced a significant number of close encounters with bodies scattered from the primordial Kuiper Belt. This belt could have been massive in the past and may have contained a larger number of big objects (Mbody =1022 kg) than what is currently observed in the Kuiper Belt. Here we investigate, for the first time, the tidal disruption of a passing object, including the subsequent formation of planetary rings. First, we perform SPH simulations of the tidal destruction of big differentiated objects (Mbody =1021 and 1023 kg) that experience close encounters with Saturn or Uranus. We find that about 0.1-10% of the mass of the passing body is gravitationally captured around the planet. However, these fragments are initially big chunks and have highly eccentric orbits around the planet. In order to see their long-term evolution, we perform N-body simulations including the planet's oblateness up to J4 starting with data obtained from the SPH simulations. Our N-body simulations show that the chunks are tidally destroyed during their next several orbits and become collections of smaller particles. Their individual orbits then start to precess incoherently around the planet's equator, which enhances their encounter velocities on longer-term evolution, resulting in more destructive impacts. These collisions would damp their eccentricities resulting in a progressive collapse of the debris cloud into a thin equatorial and low-eccentricity ring. These high energy impacts are expected to be catastrophic enough to produce small particles. Our numerical results also show that the mass of formed rings is large enough to

  1. Laser-driven shock experiments on precompressed water: Implications for "icy" giant planets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kanani K M; Benedetti, L Robin; Jeanloz, Raymond; Celliers, Peter M; Eggert, Jon H; Hicks, Damien G; Moon, Stephen J; Mackinnon, Andrew; Da Silva, Luis B; Bradley, David K; Unites, Walter; Collins, Gilbert W; Henry, Emeric; Koenig, Michel; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Pasley, John; Neely, David

    2006-07-07

    Laser-driven shock compression of samples precompressed to 1 GPa produces high-pressure-temperature conditions inducing two significant changes in the optical properties of water: the onset of opacity followed by enhanced reflectivity in the initially transparent water. The onset of reflectivity at infrared wavelengths can be interpreted as a semiconductor<-->electronic conductor transition in water, and is found at pressures above approximately 130 GPa for single-shocked samples precompressed to 1 GPa. Our results indicate that conductivity in the deep interior of "icy" giant planets is greater than realized previously because of an additional contribution from electrons.

  2. Molecular Line and Continuum Opacities for Modeling of Extrasolar Giant Planet and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, P. F.; Schweitzer, A.; Stancil, P. C.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Kirby, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Allen, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    The molecular line and continuum opacities are investigated in the atmospheres of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). Using a combination of ab inito and experimentally derived potential curves and dipole transition moments, accurate data have been calculated for rovibrationally-resolved oscillator strengths and photodissociation cross sections in the B' (sup 2)Sigma+ (left arrow) X (sup 2)Sigma+ and A (sup 2)Pi (left arrow) X (sup 2)Sigma+ band systems in MgH. We also report our progress on the study of the electronic structure of LiCl and FeH.

  3. Superionic and metallic states of water and ammonia at giant planet conditions.

    PubMed

    Cavazzoni, C; Chiarotti, G L; Scandolo, S; Tosatti, E; Bernasconi, M; Parrinello, M

    1999-01-01

    The phase diagrams of water and ammonia were determined by constant pressure ab initio molecular dynamic simulations at pressures (30 to 300 gigapascal) and temperatures (300 to 7000 kelvin) of relevance for the middle ice layers of the giant planets Neptune and Uranus. Along the planetary isentrope water and ammonia behave as fully dissociated ionic, electronically insulating fluid phases, which turn metallic at temperatures exceeding 7000 kelvin for water and 5500 kelvin for ammonia. At lower temperatures, the phase diagrams of water and ammonia exhibit a superionic solid phase between the solid and the ionic liquid. These simulations improve our understanding of the properties of the middle ice layers of Neptune and Uranus.

  4. Condensation of methane, ammonia, and water and the inhibition of convection in giant planets.

    PubMed

    Guillot, T

    1995-09-22

    The condensation of chemical species of high molecular mass such as methane, ammonia, and water can inhibit convection in the hydrogen-helium atmospheres of the giant planets. Convection is inhibited in Uranus and Neptune when methane reaches an abundance of about 15 times the solar value and in Jupiter and Saturn if the abundance of water is more than about five times the solar value. The temperature gradient consequently becomes superadiabatic, which is observed in temperature profiles inferred from radio-occultation measurements. The planetary heat flux is then likely to be transported by another mechanism, possibly radiation in Uranus, or diffusive convection.

  5. CH4 nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium in the atmospheres of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, John F.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of methane's vibrational relaxation in the Giant Planets' upper stratospheres employs a model for the thermalization of solar energy absorbed under non-LTE conditions, at the 1.7, 2.3. and 3.3 micron-centered CH4 band groups. On this basis, a range of model atmospheres was produced, reflecting current uncertainties concerning CH4 collisional excitation rates. At 0.1 mbar, all of the non-LTE models are within 2 K of the LTE reference models; the extreme non-LTE models steadily depart from reference LTE ones, however, and reach about + or - 20 K at 0,1 mbar.

  6. Constraints on the Observed Zonal Flows from the Magnetic Fields in Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. J.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2003-05-01

    The zonal winds on the surface of the giant planets are very strong ( 100m/s ) and stable (on a decadal time scale). Observations by the Galileo probe suggest that the zonal flow might be deep seated. However, the magnitude of the zonal flow must be reduced to a small value in the interior of the giant planets because the flow is defined relative to the magnetic field frame of reference (System III) and very large zonal flows can not be tolerated in a high conductivity region. The mechanisms for reducing the magnitude of the zonal flow and the coupling between the zonal flow and magnetic field are unclear. Here we use a coupled Navier-Stokes equation and the magnetic induction equation in steady state to study this. From Navier-Stokes, we find that the zonal flow vth can be expressed in three parts: vth(s,z) = a(s) + Bth2/4μ0ρ Ω s + F(grad(ρ ),Bth)/4μ0ρ Ω s, where a(s) is an arbitrary function of cylindrical radius (s) only, z is the coordinate parallel to the rotation axis, Bth is the toroidal field, μ 0 is the permeability of free space, ρ (s,z) is the density, Ω is the planetary rotation and F is a function of the density gradient (grad(ρ )) and the toroidal magnetic field. The first part is the geostrophic flow consistent with the Taylor-Proudman theorem. The second part is due to the tensile force that arises from the curvature of the toroidal field, and always leads a prograde flow. The third part comes from the density variation and meridional gradient of the toroidal field, and may lead to the prograde flow or the retrograde flow. Whether the flow observed on the surface could be reduced to small values in the interior will depend on the direction of the flow, the density gradient and also the structure of the toroidal magnetic field. It can also be shown that the magnitude of the generated toroidal magnetic field in the interior of the giant planets is very large and around 10 Tesla for consistency with the observed zonal flow on the surface of

  7. CH4 nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium in the atmospheres of the giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, J. F.

    1990-06-01

    The present consideration of methane's vibrational relaxation in the Giant Planets' upper stratospheres employs a model for the thermalization of solar energy absorbed under non-LTE conditions, at the 1.7, 2.3. and 3.3 micron-centered CH4 band groups. On this basis, a range of model atmospheres was produced, reflecting current uncertainties concerning CH4 collisional excitation rates. At 0.1 mbar, all of the non-LTE models are within 2 K of the LTE reference models; the extreme non-LTE models steadily depart from reference LTE ones, however, and reach about + or - 20 K at 0,1 mbar.

  8. Metal Hydride and Alkali Halide Opacities in Extrasolar Giant Planets and Cool Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Kirby, Kate; Schweitzer, Andreas; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of accurate and complete molecular line and continuum opacity data has been a serious limitation to developing atmospheric models of cool stars and Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs). We report our recent calculations of molecular opacities resulting from the presence of metal hydrides and alkali halides. The resulting data have been included in the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere code (Hauschildt & Baron 1999). The new models, calculated using spherical geometry for all gravities considered, also incorporate our latest database of nearly 670 million molecular lines, and updated equations of state.

  9. TMT Solar System ISDT: Giant planet atmospheres at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Marchis, Franck; de Pater, Imke

    2014-07-01

    Giant planet atmospheric research involves bright targets, so the primary advantage of TMT will be the high angular resolution made possible by its large aperture. A multi-conjugate adaptive optics experiment on the VLT in 2008 successfully demonstrated that good angular resolution could be achieved across the full Jupiter disk. This experiment ran for almost two hours, much longer than can be done on single-guidestar systems with smaller isoplanatic angles.Spectroscopy and filtered imaging in the infrared reveal a wealth of dynamical tracers, including ices and hazes, temperatures, ammonia and methane concentrations, para hydrogen fractions, and phosphine. These quantities vary spatially, tracing the direction and magnitude of vertical transport at multiple levels in the atmosphere. At the fine spatial scales possible with AO-corrected TMT observations, these dynamical tracers will reveal the detailed circulation of vortices, storms, and jets in outer planet atmospheres.

  10. Clouds in exoplanet atmospheres: comparison of two apparently similar giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giovanni; Lewis, Nikole K.; Stevenson, Kevin; Deming, Drake; Filippazzo, Joe; Fraine, Jonathan D.; Hill, Matthew; Kilpatrick, Brian; Line, Michael R.; Morley, Caroline; Wakeford, Hannah; Collins, Karen A.; Conti, Dennis M.; Garlitz, Joseph; Rodriguez, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    We present a study aimed at a better understanding of the physics of clouds, which have been shown prevalent in hot Jupiter atmospheres. We compare and contrast the atmospheric spectra of WASP-67 b and HAT-P-38 b, part of our HST/WFC3 and Spitzer observation programs of exoplanets in transmission spectroscopy and secondary eclipses. These two planets lie in a very similar region of the equilibrium temperature-surface gravity parameter space and their compared analysis is therefore particularly significant.With the help of retrieval exercises on the molecules characterizing the 1.1-1.7 microns WFC3 spectra, we discuss which conclusions can be drawn about the atmospheric processes of these two giant planets.

  11. On Stellar Activity Enhancement Due to Interactions with Extrasolar Giant Planets.

    PubMed

    Cuntz; Saar; Musielak

    2000-04-20

    We present a first attempt to identify and quantify possible interactions between recently discovered extrasolar giant planets (and brown dwarfs) and their host stars, resulting in activity enhancement in the stellar outer atmospheres. Many extrasolar planets have masses comparable to or larger than Jupiter and are within a distance of 0.5 AU, suggesting the possibility of their significant influence on stellar winds, coronae, and even chromospheres. Beyond the well-known rotational synchronization, the interactions include tidal effects (in which enhanced flows and turbulence in the tidal bulge lead to increased magnetoacoustic heating and dynamo action) and direct magnetic interaction between the stellar and planetary magnetic fields. We discuss relevant parameters for selected systems and give preliminary estimates of the relative interaction strengths.

  12. Physical Conditions and Exobiology Potential of Icy Satellites of the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, M. B.

    2017-05-01

    All giant planets of the Solar system have a big number of satellites. A small part of them consist very large bodies, quite comparable to planets of terrestrial type, but including very significant share of water ice. Galileo spacecraft has given indications, primarily from magnetometer and gravity data, of the possibility that three of Jupiter's four large moons, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto have internal oceans. Formation of such satellites is a natural phenomenon, and satellite systems definitely should exist at extrasolar planets. The most recent models of the icy satellites interior lead to the conclusion that a substantial liquid layer exists today under relatively thin ice cover inside. The putative internal water ocean provide some exobiological niches on these bodies. We can see all conditions needed for origin and evolution of biosphere - liquid water, complex organic chemistry and energy sources for support of biological processes - are on the moons. The existing of liquid water ocean within icy world can be consequences of the physical properties of water ice, and they neither require the addition of antifreeze substances nor any other special conditions. On Earth life exists in all niches where water exists in liquid form for at least a portion of the year. Possible metabolic processes, such as nitrate/nitrite reduction, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis could be suggested for internal oceans of Titan and Jovanian satellites. Excreted products of the primary chemoautotrophic organisms could serve as a source for other types of microorganisms (heterotrophes). Subglacial life may be widespread among such planetary bodies as satellites of extrasolar giant planets, detected in our Galaxy.

  13. Gas-assisted Capture of Earth-sized Moons around Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, B. L.; Williams, D. M.

    2002-03-01

    Today nearly 20 Jupiter-sized planets are known to orbit within or near the habitable zones of their parent stars [see Williams D.W. and Pollard, D. 2001. submitted Inter. J. Astrobiology]. Some of these planets might support life on their moons if their moons are able to form and hold onto sizeable atmospheres. Moons larger than 0.2 Mearth should have little trouble holding their atmospheres for billions of years [Williams D.W., Kasting, J.F., & Wade R.A. 1997. Nature 385,234]. But forming moons of this size through pair-wise accretion of small bodies in low-mass circum-planetary nebulas may be difficult; Ganymede (0.03 Mearth) was the largest moon to form out of a circum-planetary nebula in the Solar System. A more plausible scenario is for giant moons to be captured through collision of an earth-sized planetary body with a gaseous proto-planetary disk around a giant planet, as is thought to have occurred to form Triton around Neptune [McKinnon, W.B., & Leith, A.C. 1995. Icarus 118,392]. Such collisions can remove enormous amounts of energy from the impacting body and often result in a bound satellite on a near-circular orbit. Here we demonstrate that for a reasonable set of nebula parameters, permanent capture of large moons can occur. The effects of initial moon mass, and planet mass are considered as well as various impact parameters and local nebula conditions.

  14. Investigating the Orbital Period Valley of Giant Planets in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brianna P.; Birkby, Jayne L.

    2016-01-01

    Transit light curves contain a wealth of information about the basic properties of a planet, such as its radius, semi-major axis, and orbital period. For the latter property, there is a distinct lack of planets with periods between 10 to 100 days. This gap could be caused by something as simple as observational bias, or as prominent as planetary formation or migration. Here, we report an investigation into the atmosphere of planets within this orbital period valley, to search for differences that may indicate a different formation mechanism or migration path to those outside of it. We do this by searching for the secondary eclipse of planets in the valley in order to measure their albedos. We determined an optimal target for this: KOI-366 b (P ~ 75 days). However, we find that despite the exquisite precision of Kepler data, it cannot constrain the albedo for this long-orbit planet candidate. We measure a 1σ upper limit on the geometric albedo of Ag,1σ ≤ 2.0. We highlight that additional scatter in the light curve is likely caused by a ~ 2-day pulsation of the giant host star, and that further data is required to measure the secondary eclipse. KOI-366 is one of the best suited of all host stars with long period exoplanet candidates for follow-up due to its relatively bright magnitude (Kp = 11.7 mag), but the full investigation of the reflective properties of long period planets may require space-based observations from future instruments, such as WFIRST, that will be more sensitive to objects further away from their host stars. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution. This work was performed in part under contract with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) funded by NASA through the Sagan Fellowship Program executed by the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute.

  15. Decoupling of a giant planet from its disk in an inclined binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.; Picogna, G.

    According to \\cite{Triaud_2010} and \\cite{Albrecht_2012} about 40% of hot Jupiters have orbits significantly tilted respect to the equatorial plane of the star. It has been suggested \\cite{Batygin_2012} that the evolution of a protoplanetary disk under the perturbations of a binary companion may be responsible for the observed spin-orbit misalignment of these exoplanets. A fundamental requirement for this model to work is that the planet is kept within the disk during its precession. In this way the planet would continue its migration by tidal interaction with the disk and, at the same time, once the disk is dissipated it would maintain its inclination. Previous studies seem to suggest that indeed a giant planet is forced to evolve within the disks even in presence of strong perturbing forces as those induced by a companion star. By using two different SPH codes (VINE and phantom) we show that on the long term the planet definitively decouples from the disk evolution and its orbital plane significantly departs from that of the disk. For a detailed analysis an discussion we refer to \\cite{Picogna_2015}.

  16. Correlations between Compositions and Orbits Established by the Giant Impact Era of Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-05-01

    The giant impact phase of terrestrial planet formation establishes connections between super-Earths’ orbital properties (semimajor axis spacings, eccentricities, mutual inclinations) and interior compositions (the presence or absence of gaseous envelopes). Using N-body simulations and analytic arguments, we show that spacings derive not only from eccentricities, but also from inclinations. Flatter systems attain tighter spacings, a consequence of an eccentricity equilibrium between gravitational scatterings, which increase eccentricities, and mergers, which damp them. Dynamical friction by residual disk gas plays a critical role in regulating mergers and in damping inclinations and eccentricities. Systems with moderate gas damping and high solid surface density spawn gas-enveloped super-Earths with tight spacings, small eccentricities, and small inclinations. Systems in which super-Earths coagulate without as much ambient gas, in disks with low solid surface density, produce rocky planets with wider spacings, larger eccentricities, and larger mutual inclinations. A combination of both populations can reproduce the observed distributions of spacings, period ratios, transiting planet multiplicities, and transit duration ratios exhibited by Kepler super-Earths. The two populations, both formed in situ, also help to explain observed trends of eccentricity versus planet size, and bulk density versus method of mass measurement (radial velocities versus transit timing variations). Simplifications made in this study—including the limited time span of the simulations, and the approximate treatments of gas dynamical friction and gas depletion history—should be improved on in future work to enable a detailed quantitative comparison to the observations.

  17. Detecting Close-In Extrasolar Giant Planets with the Kepler Photometer via Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Doyle, L. R.; Kepler Discovery Mission Team

    2003-05-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission will be launched in 2007 primarily to search for transiting Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of solar-like stars. In addition, it will be poised to detect the reflected light component from close-in extrasolar giant planets (CEGPs) similar to 51 Peg b. Here we use the DIARAD/SOHO time series along with models for the reflected light signatures of CEGPs to evaluate Kepler's ability to detect such planets. We examine the detectability as a function of stellar brightness, stellar rotation period, planetary orbital inclination angle, and planetary orbital period, and then estimate the total number of CEGPs that Kepler will detect over its four year mission. The analysis shows that intrinsic stellar variability of solar-like stars is a major obstacle to detecting the reflected light from CEGPs. Monte Carlo trials are used to estimate the detection threshold required to limit the total number of expected false alarms to no more than one for a survey of 100,000 stellar light curves. Kepler will likely detect 100-760 51 Peg b-like planets by reflected light with orbital periods up to 7 days. LRD was supported by the Carl Sagan Chair at the Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, a division of the SETI Institute. JMJ received support from the Kepler Mission Photometer and Science Office at NASA Ames Research Center.

  18. Ammonium hydrosulfide and clouds in the atmospheres of the giant planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, K. Yu.; Solodovnik, A. A.

    The physicochemical properties of two possible compounds - ammonium hydrosulfide (NH4SH) and ammonium sulfide (NH4)2S - that may be formed in a reaction of ammonia NH3 with hydrogen sulfide H2S are discussed, and the probability of their formation is analyzed on the basis of the Le Chatelier principle. It is shown that the conditions of their formation on the basis of available data on the concentration ratio of the reagents (NH3 and H2S) in the atmospheres of giant planets make the appearance of enough NH4SH for cloud formation highly problematic. Accordingly, the authors propose as an alternative candidate for a cloud-forming role ammonium sulfide (NH4)2S, for whose formation the conditions in the atmospheres of the giant planets are more favorable. The possible spatial localization of (NH4)2S clouds is estimated, and the result is used in an attempt to identify this compound as one of the chromophores.

  19. Building the giant planet cores by convergent migration of pebble-accreting embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrenko, Ondrej; Broz, Miroslav

    2016-10-01

    An explanation of the accretion buildup of giant planet cores on rather short (~Myr) time scales remains a long-standing challenge for scenarios of planetary system formation. One of the recently proposed processes that can take part during this evolutionary stage is the convergent Type I migration of Earth-sized embryos towards the zero-torque radius, occurring at an opacity transition within the dusty-gaseous protoplanetary disk (e.g. Pierens et al. 2013). Inconveniently, simulations show that such groups of embryos do not merge easily because they often get locked in mutual mean-motion resonances and consequently form an inward-migrating convoy.We revise this possibility of merging embryos while taking into account their ongoing growth by pebble accretion. Our aim is to check whether the rapid changes of masses combined with the migration of embryos through the feeding zone can break the resonant chain and allow for the giant planet core formation.The environment of the protoplanetary disk is modeled with the 2D FARGO code (Masset 2000), which we modified in order to perform non-isothermal hydrodynamic simulations, assuming flux-limited radiative diffusion (Levermore & Pomraning 1981). The embedded massive bodies are evolved simultaneously in 3D using the hybrid Wisdom-Holman/Gauss-Radau integrator from the Rebound package (Rein & Spiegel 2015). A semi-analytic method is used to evolve the masses of embryos by pebble accretion (e.g. Levison et al. 2015).

  20. Habitability of super-Earth planets around other suns: models including Red Giant Branch evolution.

    PubMed

    von Bloh, W; Cuntz, M; Schröder, K-P; Bounama, C; Franck, S

    2009-01-01

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super-Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth-mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production and takes into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ), as determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds." Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

  1. A giant planet undergoing extreme-ultraviolet irradiation by its hot massive-star host.

    PubMed

    Gaudi, B Scott; Stassun, Keivan G; Collins, Karen A; Beatty, Thomas G; Zhou, George; Latham, David W; Bieryla, Allyson; Eastman, Jason D; Siverd, Robert J; Crepp, Justin R; Gonzales, Erica J; Stevens, Daniel J; Buchhave, Lars A; Pepper, Joshua; Johnson, Marshall C; Colon, Knicole D; Jensen, Eric L N; Rodriguez, Joseph E; Bozza, Valerio; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; D'Ago, Giuseppe; Dumont, Mary T; Ellis, Tyler; Gaillard, Clement; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kasper, David H; Fukui, Akihiko; Gregorio, Joao; Ito, Ayaka; Kielkopf, John F; Manner, Mark; Matt, Kyle; Narita, Norio; Oberst, Thomas E; Reed, Phillip A; Scarpetta, Gaetano; Stephens, Denice C; Yeigh, Rex R; Zambelli, Roberto; Fulton, B J; Howard, Andrew W; James, David J; Penny, Matthew; Bayliss, Daniel; Curtis, Ivan A; DePoy, D L; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Gould, Andrew; Joner, Michael D; Kuhn, Rudolf B; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Lund, Michael B; Marshall, Jennifer L; McLeod, Kim K; Pogge, Richard W; Relles, Howard; Stockdale, Christopher; Tan, T G; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2017-06-22

    The amount of ultraviolet irradiation and ablation experienced by a planet depends strongly on the temperature of its host star. Of the thousands of extrasolar planets now known, only six have been found that transit hot, A-type stars (with temperatures of 7,300-10,000 kelvin), and no planets are known to transit the even hotter B-type stars. For example, WASP-33 is an A-type star with a temperature of about 7,430 kelvin, which hosts the hottest known transiting planet, WASP-33b (ref. 1); the planet is itself as hot as a red dwarf star of type M (ref. 2). WASP-33b displays a large heat differential between its dayside and nightside, and is highly inflated-traits that have been linked to high insolation. However, even at the temperature of its dayside, its atmosphere probably resembles the molecule-dominated atmospheres of other planets and, given the level of ultraviolet irradiation it experiences, its atmosphere is unlikely to be substantially ablated over the lifetime of its star. Here we report observations of the bright star HD 195689 (also known as KELT-9), which reveal a close-in (orbital period of about 1.48 days) transiting giant planet, KELT-9b. At approximately 10,170 kelvin, the host star is at the dividing line between stars of type A and B, and we measure the dayside temperature of KELT-9b to be about 4,600 kelvin. This is as hot as stars of stellar type K4 (ref. 5). The molecules in K stars are entirely dissociated, and so the primary sources of opacity in the dayside atmosphere of KELT-9b are probably atomic metals. Furthermore, KELT-9b receives 700 times more extreme-ultraviolet radiation (that is, with wavelengths shorter than 91.2 nanometres) than WASP-33b, leading to a predicted range of mass-loss rates that could leave the planet largely stripped of its envelope during the main-sequence lifetime of the host star.

  2. A giant planet undergoing extreme-ultraviolet irradiation by its hot massive-star host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. Scott; Stassun, Keivan G.; Collins, Karen A.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Zhou, George; Latham, David W.; Bieryla, Allyson; Eastman, Jason D.; Siverd, Robert J.; Crepp, Justin R.; Gonzales, Erica J.; Stevens, Daniel J.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Pepper, Joshua; Johnson, Marshall C.; Colon, Knicole D.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Bozza, Valerio; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; D'Ago, Giuseppe; Dumont, Mary T.; Ellis, Tyler; Gaillard, Clement; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Kasper, David H.; Fukui, Akihiko; Gregorio, Joao; Ito, Ayaka; Kielkopf, John F.; Manner, Mark; Matt, Kyle; Narita, Norio; Oberst, Thomas E.; Reed, Phillip A.; Scarpetta, Gaetano; Stephens, Denice C.; Yeigh, Rex R.; Zambelli, Roberto; Fulton, B. J.; Howard, Andrew W.; James, David J.; Penny, Matthew; Bayliss, Daniel; Curtis, Ivan A.; Depoy, D. L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Gould, Andrew; Joner, Michael D.; Kuhn, Rudolf B.; Labadie-Bartz, Jonathan; Lund, Michael B.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; McLeod, Kim K.; Pogge, Richard W.; Relles, Howard; Stockdale, Christopher; Tan, T. G.; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    The amount of ultraviolet irradiation and ablation experienced by a planet depends strongly on the temperature of its host star. Of the thousands of extrasolar planets now known, only six have been found that transit hot, A-type stars (with temperatures of 7,300-10,000 kelvin), and no planets are known to transit the even hotter B-type stars. For example, WASP-33 is an A-type star with a temperature of about 7,430 kelvin, which hosts the hottest known transiting planet, WASP-33b (ref. 1); the planet is itself as hot as a red dwarf star of type M (ref. 2). WASP-33b displays a large heat differential between its dayside and nightside, and is highly inflated-traits that have been linked to high insolation. However, even at the temperature of its dayside, its atmosphere probably resembles the molecule-dominated atmospheres of other planets and, given the level of ultraviolet irradiation it experiences, its atmosphere is unlikely to be substantially ablated over the lifetime of its star. Here we report observations of the bright star HD 195689 (also known as KELT-9), which reveal a close-in (orbital period of about 1.48 days) transiting giant planet, KELT-9b. At approximately 10,170 kelvin, the host star is at the dividing line between stars of type A and B, and we measure the dayside temperature of KELT-9b to be about 4,600 kelvin. This is as hot as stars of stellar type K4 (ref. 5). The molecules in K stars are entirely dissociated, and so the primary sources of opacity in the dayside atmosphere of KELT-9b are probably atomic metals. Furthermore, KELT-9b receives 700 times more extreme-ultraviolet radiation (that is, with wavelengths shorter than 91.2 nanometres) than WASP-33b, leading to a predicted range of mass-loss rates that could leave the planet largely stripped of its envelope during the main-sequence lifetime of the host star.

  3. First-Principles Computer Simulations of Dense Plasmas and Application to the Interiors of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-06-01

    This presentation will review three recent applications of first-principles computer simulation techniques to study matter at extreme temperature-pressure conditions that are of relevance to astrophysics. First we report a recent methodological advance in all-electron path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) that allowed us to extend this method beyond hydrogen and helium to elements with core electrons [1]. We combine results from PIMC and with density functional molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations and derive a coherent equation of state (EOS) for water and carbon plasmas in the regime from 1-50 Mbar and 104-109 K that can be compared to laboratory shock wave experiments. Second we apply DFT-MD simulations to characterize superionic water in the interiors of Uranus and Neptune. By adopting a thermodynamic integration technique, we derive the Gibbs free energy in order to demonstrate the existence of a phase transformation from body-centered cubic to face-centered cubic superionic water [2]. Finally we again use DFT-MD to study the interiors of gas giant planets. We determine the EOS for hydrogen-helium mixtures spanning density-temperature conditions in the deep interiors of giant planets, 0.2-9.0 g/cc and 1000-80000 K [3]. We compare the simulation results with the semi-analytical EOS model by Saumon and Chabrier. We present a revision to the mass-radius relationship which makes the hottest exoplanets increase in radius by ~0.2 Jupiter radii at fixed entropy and for masses greater than 0.5 Jupiter masses. This change is large enough to have possible implications for some discrepant inflated giant exoplanets. We conclude by demonstrating that all materials in the cores of giant planets, ices, MgO, SiO2, and iron, will all dissolve into metallic hydrogen. This implies the cores of Jupiter and Saturn have been at least partially eroded. [1] K. P. Driver, B. Militzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 (2012) 115502. [2] H. F. Wilson, M. L. Wong, B. Militzer, http://arxiv.org/abs/1211

  4. Disk Evolution, Element Abundances and Cloud Properties of Young Gas Giant Planets

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Christiane; Woitke, Peter; Rimmer, Paul B.; Kamp, Inga; Thi, Wing-Fai; Meijerink, Rowin

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the effects of unusual, non-solar carbon and oxygen abundances. Large deviations between the abundances of the host star and its gas giants seem likely to occur if the planet formation follows the core-accretion scenario. These deviations stem from the separate evolution of gas and dust in the disk, where the dust forms the planet cores, followed by the final run-away accretion of the left-over gas. This gas will contain only traces of elements like C, N and O, because those elements have frozen out as ices. ProDiMo protoplanetary disk models are used to predict the chemical evolution of gas and ice in the midplane. We find that cosmic rays play a crucial role in slowly un-blocking the CO, where the liberated oxygen forms water, which then freezes out quickly. Therefore, the C/O ratio in the gas phase is found to gradually increase with time, in a region bracketed by the water and CO ice-lines. In this regions, C/O is found to approach unity after about 5 Myrs, scaling with the cosmic ray ionization rate assumed. We then explore how the atmospheric chemistry and cloud properties in young gas giants are affected when the non-solar C/O ratios predicted by the disk models are assumed. The Drift cloud formation model is applied to study the formation of atmospheric clouds under the influence of varying premordial element abundances and its feedback onto the local gas. We demonstrate that element depletion by cloud formation plays a crucial role in converting an oxygen-rich atmosphere gas into carbon-rich gas when non-solar, premordial element abundances are considered as suggested by disk models. PMID:25370190

  5. Disk evolution, element abundances and cloud properties of young gas giant planets.

    PubMed

    Helling, Christiane; Woitke, Peter; Rimmer, Paul B; Kamp, Inga; Thi, Wing-Fai; Meijerink, Rowin

    2014-04-14

    We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the effects of unusual, non-solar carbon and oxygen abundances. Large deviations between the abundances of the host star and its gas giants seem likely to occur if the planet formation follows the core-accretion scenario. These deviations stem from the separate evolution of gas and dust in the disk, where the dust forms the planet cores, followed by the final run-away accretion of the left-over gas. This gas will contain only traces of elements like C, N and O, because those elements have frozen out as ices. PRODIMO protoplanetary disk models are used to predict the chemical evolution of gas and ice in the midplane. We find that cosmic rays play a crucial role in slowly un-blocking the CO, where the liberated oxygen forms water, which then freezes out quickly. Therefore, the C/O ratio in the gas phase is found to gradually increase with time, in a region bracketed by the water and CO ice-lines. In this regions, C/O is found to approach unity after about 5 Myrs, scaling with the cosmic ray ionization rate assumed. We then explore how the atmospheric chemistry and cloud properties in young gas giants are affected when the non-solar C/O ratios predicted by the disk models are assumed. The DRIFT cloud formation model is applied to study the formation of atmospheric clouds under the influence of varying premordial element abundances and its feedback onto the local gas. We demonstrate that element depletion by cloud formation plays a crucial role in converting an oxygen-rich atmosphere gas into carbon-rich gas when non-solar, premordial element abundances are considered as suggested by disk models.

  6. MASSIVE: A Bayesian analysis of giant planet populations around low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannier, J.; Delorme, P.; Lagrange, A. M.; Borgniet, S.; Rameau, J.; Schlieder, J. E.; Gagné, J.; Bonavita, M. A.; Malo, L.; Chauvin, G.; Bonnefoy, M.; Girard, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Direct imaging has led to the discovery of several giant planet and brown dwarf companions. These imaged companions populate a mass, separation and age domain (mass >1 MJup, orbits > 5 AU, age < 1 Gyr) quite distinct from the one occupied by exoplanets discovered by the radial velocity or transit methods. This distinction could indicate that different formation mechanisms are at play. Aims: We aim at investigating correlations between the host star's mass and the presence of wide-orbit giant planets, and at providing new observational constraints on planetary formation models. Methods: We observed 58 young and nearby M-type dwarfs in L'-band with the VLT/NaCo instrument and used angular differential imaging algorithms to optimize the sensitivity to planetary-mass companions and to derive the best detection limits. We estimate the probability of detecting a planet as a function of its mass and physical separation around each target. We conduct a Bayesian analysis to determine the frequency of substellar companions orbiting low-mass stars, using a homogenous sub-sample of 54 stars. Results: We derive a frequency of for companions with masses in the range of 2-80 MJup, and % for planetary mass companions (2-14 MJup), at physical separations of 8 to 400 AU for both cases. Comparing our results with a previous survey targeting more massive stars, we find evidence that substellar companions more massive than 1 MJup with a low mass ratio Q with respect to their host star (Q < 1%), are less frequent around low-mass stars. This may represent observational evidence that the frequency of imaged wide-orbit substellar companions is correlated with stellar mass, corroborating theoretical expectations. Contrarily, we show statistical evidence that intermediate-mass ratio (1% < Q < 5%) companion with masses >2 MJup might be independent from the mass of the host star.

  7. Effect of condensate cycles in driving atmospheric circulation on brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Growing observations of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets, including properties of the L/T transition, chemical disequilibrium, brightness variability, and surface maps have provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these worlds. Previous studies that serve to understand the atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs include modeling of convection from the interior both in a two-dimensional and global fashion, a two-layer shallow water model and a global circulation model with dry thermal perturbation at the bottom of atmosphere. These models show that interactions between the stably stratified layer and the convective interior can drive an atmospheric circulation, including zonal jets and/or vortices. However, these models are dry models, not including the condensation cycles such as silicate and iron in hot dwarfs. Condensation of water has previously been shown to play an important role on driving the zonal jets on four giant planets in our solar system. As such, condensation cycles of various species is believed to be an important source in driving the atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs and directly imaged planets as well. Here we present results from three-dimensional simulations for the stably stratified atmospheres of brown dwarfs based on a general circulation model that includes the effect of a condensate cycle. Large-scale latent heating and molecular weight effect due to condensation of a single species are treated explicitly in our model. We examine the atmospheric circulation patterns of brown dwarfs caused by large-scale latent heating that results from condensation of silicates in hot dwarfs and water in the cold dwarfs. By varying the parameters such as abundances of condensates, effective temperature and rotational period, we explore possible configurations of the circulation, and determine implications for the observed cloud patchiness and brightness variability for brown dwarfs.

  8. Viscoelastic tidal dissipation in giant planets and formation of hot Jupiters through high-eccentricity migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, Natalia I.; Lai, Dong

    2014-02-01

    We study the possibility of tidal dissipation in the solid cores of giant planets and its implication for the formation of hot Jupiters through high-eccentricity migration. We present a general framework by which the tidal evolution of planetary systems can be computed for any form of tidal dissipation, characterized by the imaginary part of the complex tidal Love number, Im[{tilde{k}}_2(ω )], as a function of the forcing frequency ω. Using the simplest viscoelastic dissipation model (the Maxwell model) for the rocky core and including the effect of a non-dissipative fluid envelope, we show that with reasonable (but uncertain) physical parameters for the core (size, viscosity and shear modulus), tidal dissipation in the core can accommodate the tidal-Q constraint of the Solar system gas giants and at the same time allows exoplanetary hot Jupiters to form via tidal circularization in the high-e migration scenario. By contrast, the often-used weak friction theory of equilibrium tide would lead to a discrepancy between the Solar system constraint and the amount of dissipation necessary for high-e migration. We also show that tidal heating in the rocky core can lead to modest radius inflation of the planets, particularly when the planets are in the high-eccentricity phase (e ˜ 0.6) during their high-e migration. Finally, as an interesting by-product of our study, we note that for a generic tidal response function Im[{tilde{k}}_2(ω )], it is possible that spin equilibrium (zero torque) can be achieved for multiple spin frequencies (at a given e), and the actual pseudo-synchronized spin rate depends on the evolutionary history of the system.

  9. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE DIFFERENCES IN THE 16 CYGNI BINARY SYSTEM: A SIGNATURE OF GAS GIANT PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    RamIrez, I.; Roederer, I. U.; Fish, J. R.; Melendez, J.

    2011-10-20

    The atmospheric parameters of the components of the 16 Cygni binary system, in which the secondary has a gas giant planet detected, are measured accurately using high-quality observational data. Abundances relative to solar are obtained for 25 elements with a mean error of {sigma}([X/H]) = 0.023 dex. The fact that 16 Cyg A has about four times more lithium than 16 Cyg B is normal considering the slightly different masses of the stars. The abundance patterns of 16 Cyg A and B, relative to iron, are typical of that observed in most of the so-called solar twin stars, with the exception of the heavy elements (Z > 30), which can, however, be explained by Galactic chemical evolution. Differential (A-B) abundances are measured with even higher precision ({sigma}({Delta}[X/H]) = 0.018 dex, on average). We find that 16 Cyg A is more metal-rich than 16 Cyg B by {Delta}[M/H] = +0.041 {+-} 0.007 dex. On an element-to-element basis, no correlation between the A-B abundance differences and dust condensation temperature (T{sub C}) is detected. Based on these results, we conclude that if the process of planet formation around 16 Cyg B is responsible for the observed abundance pattern, the formation of gas giants produces a constant downward shift in the photospheric abundance of metals, without a T{sub C} correlation. The latter would be produced by the formation of terrestrial planets instead, as suggested by other recent works on precise elemental abundances. Nevertheless, a scenario consistent with these observations requires the convective envelopes of {approx_equal} 1 M{sub sun} stars to reach their present-day sizes about three times quicker than predicted by standard stellar evolution models.

  10. A new method for the determination of the mixing ratio hydrogen to helium in the giant planets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, D.; Grossman, K.

    1972-01-01

    By using a numerical iterative method, it is demonstrated that the mixing ratio H2/He on the giant planets can be inferred from spectral measurements of the intensity emitted by these planets in the far infrared range. The method is successfully applied to synthetic spectra of Saturn computed from atmospheric thermal models. The effect of random and systematic measurement errors on the determination of the mixing ratio is also studied.

  11. A new method for the determination of the mixing ratio hydrogen to helium in the giant planets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, D.; Grossman, K.

    1972-01-01

    By using a numerical iterative method, it is demonstrated that the mixing ratio H2/He on the giant planets can be inferred from spectral measurements of the intensity emitted by these planets in the far infrared range. The method is successfully applied to synthetic spectra of Saturn computed from atmospheric thermal models. The effect of random and systematic measurement errors on the determination of the mixing ratio is also studied.

  12. Connecting Young Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Gas-Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Michael; Dupuy, Trent; Allers, Katelyn; Aller, Kimberly; Best, William; Magnier, Eugene

    2015-12-01

    Direct detections of gas-giant exoplanets and discoveries of young (~10-100 Myr) field brown dwarfs from all-sky surveys are strengthening the link between the exoplanet and brown dwarf populations, given the overlapping ages, masses, temperatures, and surface gravities. In light of the relatively small number of directly imaged planets and the modest associated datasets, the large census of young field brown dwarfsprovides a compelling laboratory for enriching our understanding of both classes of objects. However, work to date on young field objects has typically focused on individual discoveries.We present a large comprehensive study of the youngest field brown dwarfs, comprising both previously known objects and our new discoveries from the latest wide-field surveys (Pan-STARRS-1 and WISE). With masses now extending down to ~5 Jupiter masses, these objects have physical properties that largely overlap young gas-giant planets and thus are promising analogs for studying exoplanet atmospheres at unparalleled S/N, spectral resolution, and wavelength coverage. We combine high-quality spectra and parallaxes to determine spectral energy distributions, luminosities, temperatures, and ages for young field objects. We demonstrate that this population spans a continuum in the color-magnitude diagram, thereby forming a bridge between the hot and cool extremes of directly imaged planets. We find that the extremely dusty properties of the planets around 2MASS J1207-39 and HR 8799 do occur in some young brown dwarfs, but these properties do not have a simple correspondence with age, perhaps contrary to expectations. We find young field brown dwarfs can have unusually low temperatures and suggest a new spectral type-temperature scale appropriate for directly imaged planets.To help provide a reference for extreme-contrast imaging surveys, we establish a grid of spectral standards and benchmarks, based on membership in nearby young moving groups, in order to calibrate gravity

  13. ON THE SURVIVAL OF BROWN DWARFS AND PLANETS ENGULFED BY THEIR GIANT HOST STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; De Marco, Orsola

    2012-11-10

    The recent discovery of two Earth-mass planets in close orbits around an evolved star has raised questions as to whether substellar companions can survive encounters with their host stars. We consider whether these companions could have been stripped of significant amounts of mass during the phase when they orbited through the dense inner envelopes of the giant. We apply the criterion derived by Murray et al. for disruption of gravitationally bound objects by ram pressure to determine whether mass loss may have played a role in the histories of these and other recently discovered low-mass companions to evolved stars. We find that the brown dwarf and Jovian-mass objects circling WD 0137-349, SDSS J08205+0008, and HIP 13044 are most unlikely to have lost significant mass during the common envelope phase. However, the Earth-mass planets found around KIC 05807616 could well be the remnants of one or two Jovian-mass planets that lost extensive mass during the common envelope phase.

  14. A desert of gas giant planets beyond tens of au: from feast to famine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    It is argued that frequency of gravitational fragmentation of young massive discs around FGK stars may be much higher than commonly believed. Numerical simulations presented here show that survival of gas giant planets at large separations from their host stars is very model dependent. Low-mass clumps in slowly cooling discs are found to accrete gas very slowly and migrate inward very rapidly in the well-known type I regime (no gap open). They are either tidally disrupted or survive as planets inwards of about 10 au. In this regime, probability of clump survival at large separations is extremely low, perhaps as low as 0.001, requiring up to a dozen clumps per star early on to explain the observed population. In contrast, initially massive clumps or low-mass clumps born in rapidly cooling discs accrete gas rapidly. Opening deep gaps in the disc, they migrate in the much slower type II regime and are more likely to survive beyond tens of au. The frequency of disc fragmentation in this case is at the per cent level if the clump growth saturates at brown dwarf masses but may be close to 100 per cent if clumps evolve into low stellar mass companions. Taking these theoretical uncertainties into account, current observations limit the number of planet mass clumps hatched by young massive discs around FGK stars to between 0.01 and ∼10. A deeper theoretical understanding of such discs is needed to narrow this uncertainty down.

  15. Possible detection of two giant extrasolar planets orbiting the eclipsing polar UZ Fornacis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Stephen B.; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Ramsay, Gavin; Crawford, Steven; Gulbis, Amanda; Barway, Sudhanshu; Zietsman, Ewald; Kotze, Marissa; Buckley, David A. H.; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Siegmund, O. H. W.; McPhate, J.; Welsh, B. Y.; Vallerga, John

    2011-09-01

    We present new high-speed, multi-observatory, multi-instrument photometry of the eclipsing polar UZ For in order to measure precise mid-eclipse times with the aim of detecting any orbital period variations. When combined with published eclipse times and archival data spanning ˜27 years, we detect departures from a linear and quadratic trend of ˜60 s. The departures are strongly suggestive of two cyclic variations of 16(3) and 5.25(25) years. The two favoured mechanisms to drive the periodicities are either two giant extrasolar planets as companions to the binary [with minimum masses of 6.3(1.5) and 7.7(1.2) MJup) or a magnetic cycle mechanism (e.g. Applegate's mechanism) of the secondary star. Applegate's mechanism would require the entire radiant energy output of the secondary and would therefore seem to be the least likely of the two, barring any further refinements in the effect of magnetic fields (e.g. those of Lanza et al.). The two-planet model can provide realistic solutions but it does not quite capture all of the eclipse times measurements. A highly eccentric orbit for the outer planet would fit the data nicely, but we find that such a solution would be unstable. It is also possible that the periodicities are driven by some combination of both mechanisms. Further observations of this system are encouraged. Based on observations made with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT)

  16. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN MODERATE- AND LONG-PERIOD GIANT PLANETS: SCATTERING EXPERIMENTS FOR SYSTEMS IN ISOLATION AND WITH STELLAR FLYBYS

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, Aaron C.; Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.

    2012-07-20

    The chance that a planetary system will interact with another member of its host star's nascent cluster would be greatly increased if gas giant planets form in situ on wide orbits. In this paper, we explore the outcomes of planet-planet scattering for a distribution of multi-planet systems that all have one of the planets on an initial orbit of 100 AU. The scattering experiments are run with and without stellar flybys. We convolve the outcomes with distributions for protoplanetary disk and stellar cluster sizes to generalize the results where possible. We find that the frequencies of large mutual inclinations and high eccentricities are sensitive to the number of planets in a system, but not strongly to stellar flybys. However, flybys do play a role in changing the low and moderate portions of the mutual inclination distributions, and erase dynamically cold initial conditions on average. Wide-orbit planets can be mixed throughout the planetary system, and in some cases, can potentially become hot Jupiters, which we demonstrate using scattering experiments that include a tidal damping model. If planets form in situ on wide orbits, then there will be discernible differences in the proper-motion distributions of a sample of wide-orbit planets compared with a pure scattering formation mechanism. Stellar flybys can enhance the frequency of ejections in planetary systems, but autoionization is likely to remain the dominant source of free-floating planets.

  17. ON THE EFFECT OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE SCATTERING OF PARENT BODIES OF IRON METEORITE FROM THE TERRESTRIAL PLANET REGION INTO THE ASTEROID BELT: A CONCEPT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2012-04-20

    In their model for the origin of the parent bodies of iron meteorites, Bottke et al. proposed differentiated planetesimals, formed in 1-2 AU during the first 1.5 Myr, as the parent bodies, and suggested that these objects and their fragments were scattered into the asteroid belt as a result of interactions with planetary embryos. Although viable, this model does not include the effect of a giant planet that might have existed or been growing in the outer regions. We present the results of a concept study where we have examined the effect of a planetary body in the orbit of Jupiter on the early scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial region into the asteroid belt. We integrated the orbits of a large battery of planetesimals in a disk of planetary embryos and studied their evolutions for different values of the mass of the planet. Results indicate that when the mass of the planet is smaller than 10 M{sub Circled-Plus }, its effects on the interactions among planetesimals and planetary embryos are negligible. However, when the planet mass is between 10 and 50 M{sub Circled-Plus }, simulations point to a transitional regime with {approx}50 M{sub Circled-Plus} being the value for which the perturbing effect of the planet can no longer be ignored. Simulations also show that further increase of the mass of the planet strongly reduces the efficiency of the scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial planet region into the asteroid belt. We present the results of our simulations and discuss their possible implications for the time of giant planet formation.

  18. Advances in the development of a Mach-Zehnder interferometric Doppler imager for seismology of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Ivan; Schmider, François-Xavier; Bresson, Yves; Dejonghe, Julien; Preis, Olivier; Robbe-Dubois, Sylvie; Appourchaux, Thierry; Boumier, Patrick; Leclec'h, Jean-Christophe; Morinaud, Gilles; Gaulme, Patrick; Jackiewicz, Jason

    2016-08-01

    The measurements of radial velocity fields on planets with a Doppler Spectro-Imager allow the study of atmospheric dynamics of giant planets and the detection of their acoustic oscillations. The frequencies of these oscillations lead to the determination of the internal structure by asteroseismology. A new imaging tachometer, based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, has been developed to monitor the Doppler shift of solar lines reflected at the surface of the planets. We present the principle of this instrument. A prototype was designed and built, following the specifications of a future space mission. The performance of the prototype, both at the laboratory and on the sky, is presented here.

  19. Search for giant planets in M67. III. Excess of hot Jupiters in dense open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucalassi, A.; Pasquini, L.; Saglia, R.; Ruiz, M. T.; Bonifacio, P.; Leão, I.; Canto Martins, B. L.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Bedin, L. R.; Biazzo, K.; Melo, C.; Lovis, C.; Randich, S.

    2016-07-01

    Since 2008 we used high-precision radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with different telescopes to detect signatures of massive planets around main-sequence and evolved stars of the open cluster (OC) M67. We aimed to perform a long-term study on giant planet formation in open clusters and determine how this formation depends on stellar mass and chemical composition. A new hot Jupiter (HJ) around the main-sequence star YBP401 is reported in this work. An update of the RV measurements for the two HJ host-stars YBP1194 and YBP1514 is also discussed. Our sample of 66 main-sequence and turnoff stars includes 3 HJs, which indicates a high rate of HJs in this cluster (5.6% for single stars and 4.5%% for the full sample). This rate is much higher than what has been discovered in the field, either with RV surveys or by transits. High metallicity is not a cause for the excess of HJs in M67, nor can the excess be attributed to high stellar masses. When combining this rate with the non-zero eccentricity of the orbits, our results are qualitatively consistent with a HJ formation scenario dominated by strong encounters with other stars or binary companions and subsequent planet-planet scattering, as predicted by N-body simulations. Based on observations collected at the ESO 3.6 m telescope (La Silla), at the 1.93 m telescope of the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP), at the Hobby Eberly Telescope (HET), at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, La Palma) and at the Euler Swiss Telescope.

  20. Trapping of giant-planet cores - I. Vortex aided trapping at the outer dead zone edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regály, Zs.; Sándor, Zs.; Csomós, P.; Ataiee, S.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper the migration of a 10 M⊕ planetary core is investigated at the outer boundary of the `dead zone' of a protoplanetary disc by means of 2D hydrodynamic simulations done with the graphics processor unit version of the FARGO code. In the dead zone, the effective viscosity is greatly reduced due to the disc self-shielding against stellar UV radiation, X-rays from the stellar magnetosphere and interstellar cosmic rays. As a consequence, mass accumulation occurs near the outer dead zone edge, which is assumed to trap planetary cores enhancing the efficiency of the core-accretion scenario to form giant planets. Contrary to the perfect trapping of planetary cores in 1D models, our 2D numerical simulations show that the trapping effect is greatly dependent on the width of the region where viscosity reduction is taking place. Planet trapping happens exclusively if the viscosity reduction is sharp enough to allow the development of large-scale vortices due to the Rossby wave instability. The trapping is only temporarily, and its duration is inversely proportional to the width of the viscosity transition. However, if the Rossby wave instability is not excited, a ring-like axisymmetric density jump forms, which cannot trap the 10 M⊕ planetary cores. We revealed that the stellar torque exerted on the planet plays an important role in the migration history as the barycentre of the system significantly shifts away from the star due to highly non-axisymmetric density distribution of the disc. Our results still support the idea of planet formation at density/pressure maximum, since the migration of cores is considerably slowed down enabling them further growth and runaway gas accretion in the vicinity of an overdense region.

  1. In for the Long Haul: Exploring Atmospheric Cycles on the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.

    2016-10-01

    Timing is everything. The churning, dynamic atmospheres of the four giant planets exhibit spectacular variability on timescales that are poorly understood, largely due to the challenges involved in acquiring multi-spectral time series over their long, slow orbits. With the notable exception of Cassini, planetary missions rarely provide more than a snapshot of the climate at a particular moment - the vast gaps between spacecraft encounters must be filled by regular Earth-based observations. Archives of infrared observations, essential for characterising the changing environmental conditions in the troposphere and stratosphere (temperatures, winds, composition and clouds), now span three Jovian years, a single Saturnian year, and only one Uranian season. Nevertheless, these have revealed the thermochemical changes associated with Jupiter's belt/zone life cycles (e.g., the 2009-10 fade and revival of the South Equatorial Belt); the seasonal evolution of Saturn's atmosphere (including the 2010 springtime storm) and polar vortices; the rise in storm activity on Uranus, and the development of a seasonal polar vortex on Neptune. Such records are vital for placing the results of new missions (NASA/Juno and ESA/JUICE) in their wider temporal context, and for disentangling the myriad radiative, dynamical and chemical processes shaping gas giant climate. The importance of moist convection has been explored via ground-based infrared observations of large cumulonimbus complexes, surrounded by broad, dry downdrafts, during both Saturn's 2010 storm and Jupiter's 2010 SEB revival. This convection spawns waves that couple the tropospheric weather to the stable stratosphere, generating longitudinal thermal waves or, in the extreme case, Saturn's enormous infrared stratospheric "beacon." But what of the distant ice giants? Long-lived orbital missions, able to provide multi-spectral sounding and in situ sampling of Uranus and/or Neptune, should be a top priority for our community. And

  2. The McDonald Observatory Planet Search: New Long-period Giant Planets and Two Interacting Jupiters in the HD 155358 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Simon, Attila E.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Caldwell, Caroline

    2012-04-01

    We present high-precision radial velocity (RV) observations of four solar-type (F7-G5) stars—HD 79498, HD 155358, HD 197037, and HD 220773—taken as part of the McDonald Observatory Planet Search Program. For each of these stars, we see evidence of Keplerian motion caused by the presence of one or more gas giant planets in long-period orbits. We derive orbital parameters for each system and note the properties (composition, activity, etc.) of the host stars. While we have previously announced the two-gas-giant HD 155358 system, we now report a shorter period for planet c. This new period is consistent with the planets being trapped in mutual 2:1 mean-motion resonance. We therefore perform an in-depth stability analysis, placing additional constraints on the orbital parameters of the planets. These results demonstrate the excellent long-term RV stability of the spectrometers on both the Harlan J. Smith 2.7 m telescope and the Hobby-Eberly telescope.

  3. Satellites of giant planets — possible sites for origin and existence of biospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Michael B.

    All giant planets of the Solar system have a big number of satellites (61 of Jupiter, 52 of Saturn, known in 2003). A small part of them consist very large bodies, quite comparable to planets of terrestrial type, but including very significant share of water ice. Some from them have an atmosphere. E.g., the mass of a column of the Titan’s atmosphere exceeds 15 times the mass of the Earth atmosphere column. Formation (or capture) of satellites is a natural phenomenon, and satellite systems definitely should exist at extrasolar planets. As an example, we can see on Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, which has a dense nitrogen atmosphere and a large quantity of liquid water under ice cover and so has a great exobiological significance. The most recent models of the Titan’s interior lead to the conclusion that a substantial liquid layer exists today under relatively thin ice cover inside Titan. The putative internal water ocean along with complex atmospheric photochemistry provide some exobiological niches on this body: (1) an upper layer of the internal water ocean; (2) pores, veins, channels and pockets filled with brines inside of the lowest part of the icy layer; (3) the places of cryogenic volcanism; (4) set of caves in icy layer connecting with cryovolcanic processes; (5) the brine-filled cracks in icy crust caused by tidal forces; (6) liquid water pools on the surface originated from meteoritic strikes; (7) the sites of hydrothermal activity on the bottom of the ocean. We can see all conditions needed for origin and evolution of biosphere — liquid water, complex organic chemistry and energy sources for support of biological processes — are on the Saturnian moon. Galileo spacecraft has given indications, primarily from magnetometer and gravity data, of the possibility that three of Jupiter’s four large moons, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto have such oceans also. The existing of liquid water ocean within icy world can be consequences of the physical

  4. The giant planets and their satellites: Report on the Cospar Symposium, Ottawa, Canada, May 18-21, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kivelson, M.G.; Behannon, K.W.; Cravens, T.E.; de Pater, I.; Johnson, T.V.; Matson, D.L.; Masursky, H.; Southwood, D.J.; Vasyliunas, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    A Symposium on the Giant Planets and Their Satellites was presented in conjunction with the Twenty-fourth Plenary Meeting of the Committee on Space Research. This paper summarizes the talks presented and places the remaining papers of this volume in context. ?? 1983.

  5. A SECOND GIANT PLANET IN 3:2 MEAN-MOTION RESONANCE IN THE HD 204313 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Caldwell, Caroline; Horner, J.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Simon, Attila E.

    2012-07-20

    We present eight years of high-precision radial velocity (RV) data for HD 204313 from the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. The star is known to have a giant planet (Msin i = 3.5 M{sub J} ) on a {approx}1900 day orbit, and a Neptune-mass planet at 0.2 AU. Using our own data in combination with the published CORALIE RVs of Segransan et al., we discover an outer Jovian (Msin i = 1.6 M{sub J} ) planet with P {approx} 2800 days. Our orbital fit suggests that the planets are in a 3:2 mean motion resonance, which would potentially affect their stability. We perform a detailed stability analysis and verify that the planets must be in resonance.

  6. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. IX. HD 59686 Ab: a massive circumstellar planet orbiting a giant star in a 13.6 au eccentric binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Mauricio; Reffert, Sabine; Trifonov, Trifon; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Mitchell, David S.; Nowak, Grzegorz; Buenzli, Esther; Zimmerman, Neil; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Skemer, Andy; Defrère, Denis; Lee, Man Hoi; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. For over 12 yr, we have carried out a precise radial velocity (RV) survey of a sample of 373 G- and K-giant stars using the Hamilton Échelle Spectrograph at the Lick Observatory. There are, among others, a number of multiple planetary systems in our sample as well as several planetary candidates in stellar binaries. Aims: We aim at detecting and characterizing substellar and stellar companions to the giant star HD 59686 A (HR 2877, HIP 36616). Methods: We obtained high-precision RV measurements of the star HD 59686 A. By fitting a Keplerian model to the periodic changes in the RVs, we can assess the nature of companions in the system. To distinguish between RV variations that are due to non-radial pulsation or stellar spots, we used infrared RVs taken with the CRIRES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. Additionally, to characterize the system in more detail, we obtained high-resolution images with LMIRCam at the Large Binocular Telescope. Results: We report the probable discovery of a giant planet with a mass of mp sin i = 6.92-0.24+0.18 MJup orbiting at ap = 1.0860-0.0007+0.0006 au from the giant star HD 59686 A. In addition to the planetary signal, we discovered an eccentric (eB = 0.729-0.003+0.004) binary companion with a mass of mB sin i = 0.5296-0.0008+0.0011 M⊙ orbiting at a close separation from the giant primary with a semi-major axis of aB = 13.56-0.14+0.18 au. Conclusions: The existence of the planet HD 59686 Ab in a tight eccentric binary system severely challenges standard giant planet formation theories and requires substantial improvements to such theories in tight binaries. Otherwise, alternative planet formation scenarios such as second-generation planets or dynamical interactions in an early phase of the system's lifetime need to be seriously considered to better understand the origin of this enigmatic planet. Based on observations collected at the Lick Observatory, University of California.Based on observations collected at the

  7. Seismology with a Fourier-transform spectrometer: applications to giant planets and stars.

    PubMed

    Maillard, J P

    1996-06-01

    A method to detect the acoustic oscillation spectrum of giant planets and stars exploits the multiplex properties of a Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS). It is based on measurement of the small Doppler shift related to the oscillation of the atmosphere measured from all the lines in a portion of the planetary or the stellar spectrum directly from the interferogram. The resulting amplitude modulation of the output signal is recorded continuously over several consecutive nights at a fixed path difference selected from criteria of optimum efficiency. Hence the Fourier transform of this signal yields the pressure-mode spectrum of the object. Applications to Jupiter, Saturn, and Procyon, observed in this mode with the step-scan FTS installed in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, are presented. Future projects are discussed.

  8. Hilda Asteroid Compositions as an Observational Test of Giant Planet Migration Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Erin L.; Woodward, Charles E.; Sharkey, Benjamin; Noll, Keith S.

    2015-11-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that planetary migration is a key part of the evolution of planetary systems. Planetary migration models of the solar system suggest that the Jupiter Trojan and Hilda stable resonances were repopulated during giant planet migration. We have completed a 4-year, multi-epoch photomteric multi-color survey of Hilda asteroids in order to determine individual object composition. The colors of ~500 Hildas are now known, a factor of 3 increase in objects with determined compositions compared to the start of our observations. We report the results of our survey in the context of the predictions from current dynamical migration models, identify the model inconsistent with the compositional results, and address future observational data that is required in addition to Hilda asteroid compositions to validate the Nice and Grand Tack models.This work supported by the University of Minnesota Undergraduate Research Scholarship Program and NASA Planetary Astronomy Grant NNX13AJ11G.

  9. THE FIRST H-BAND SPECTRUM OF THE GIANT PLANET β PICTORIS b

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcote, Jeffrey; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Larkin, James E.; Barman, Travis; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul; Macintosh, Bruce; Ingraham, Patrick; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam S.; Cardwell, Andrew; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Goodsell, Stephen J.; and others

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently installed Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), we have obtained the first H-band spectrum of the planetary companion to the nearby young star β Pictoris. GPI is designed to image and provide low-resolution spectra of Jupiter-sized, self-luminous planetary companions around young nearby stars. These observations were taken covering the H band (1.65 μm). The spectrum has a resolving power of ∼45 and demonstrates the distinctive triangular shape of a cool substellar object with low surface gravity. Using atmospheric models, we find an effective temperature of 1600-1700 K and a surface gravity of log (g) = 3.5-4.5 (cgs units). These values agree well with ''hot-start'' predictions from planetary evolution models for a gas giant with mass between 10 and 12 M {sub Jup} and age between 10 and 20 Myr.

  10. The First H-band Spectrum of the Giant Planet β Pictoris b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, Jeffrey; Barman, Travis; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Larkin, James E.; Macintosh, Bruce; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam S.; Cardwell, Andrew; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, René; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Ingraham, Patrick; Kalas, Paul; Konopacky, Quinn; Maire, Jérôme; Marchis, Franck; Marley, Mark S.; Marois, Christian; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Palmer, David; Patience, Jennifer; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Serio, Andrew; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Soummer, Rémi; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Wolff, Schuyler

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently installed Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), we have obtained the first H-band spectrum of the planetary companion to the nearby young star β Pictoris. GPI is designed to image and provide low-resolution spectra of Jupiter-sized, self-luminous planetary companions around young nearby stars. These observations were taken covering the H band (1.65 μm). The spectrum has a resolving power of ~45 and demonstrates the distinctive triangular shape of a cool substellar object with low surface gravity. Using atmospheric models, we find an effective temperature of 1600-1700 K and a surface gravity of log (g) = 3.5-4.5 (cgs units). These values agree well with "hot-start" predictions from planetary evolution models for a gas giant with mass between 10 and 12 M Jup and age between 10 and 20 Myr.

  11. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon Photochemistry: CH3 + CH3 Recombination in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory P.; Huestis, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Planetary emissions of the methyl radical CH3 were observed for the first time in 1998 on Saturn and Neptune by the ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) mission satellite. CH3 is produced by VUV photolysis of CH4 and is the key photochemical intermediate leading complex organic molecules on the giant planets and moons. The CH3 emissions from Saturn were unexpectedly weak. A suggested remedy is to increase the rate of the recombination reaction CH3 + CH3 + H2 --> C2H6 + H2 at 140 K to a value at least 10 times that measured at room temperature in rare gases, but within the range of disagreeing theoretical expressions at low temperature. We are performing laboratory experiments at low temperature and very low pressure. The experiments are supported by RRKM theoretical modeling that is calibrated using the extensive combustion literature.

  12. Sonora: A New Generation Model Atmosphere Grid for Brown Dwarfs and Young Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Morley, Caroline; Lupu, Roxana E.; Freedman, Richard; Visscher, Channon

    2017-06-01

    Brown dwarf and giant planet atmospheric structure and composition has been studied both by forward models and, increasingly so, by retrieval methods. While indisputably informative, retrieval methods are of greatest value when judged in the context of grid model predictions. Meanwhile retrieval models can test the assumptions inherent in the forward modeling procedure.In order to provide a new, systematic survey of brown dwarf atmospheric structure, emergent spectra, and evolution, we have constructed a new grid of brown dwarf model atmospheres. We ultimately aim for our grid to span substantial ranges of atmospheric metallilcity, C/O ratios, cloud properties, atmospheric mixing, and other parameters. Spectra predicted by our modeling grid can be compared to both observations and retrieval results to aid in the interpretation and planning of future telescopic observations.We thus present Sonora, a new generation of substellar atmosphere models, appropriate for application to studies of L, T, and Y-type brown dwarfs and young extrasolar giant planets. The models describe the expected temperature-pressure profile and emergent spectra of an atmosphere in radiative-convective equilibrium for ranges of effective temperatures and gravities encompassing 200 ≤ Teff ≤ 2400 K and 2.5 ≤ log g ≤ 5.5. In our poster we briefly describe our modeling methodology, enumerate various updates since our group's previous models, and present our initial tranche of models for cloudless, solar metallicity, and solar carbon-to-oxygen ratio, chemical equilibrium atmospheres. These models will be available online and will be updated as opacities and cloud modeling methods continue to improve.

  13. Magnetic Ekman Layers, Hurricanes, and Moist Convection on the Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dyudina, U. A.; Liu, J.

    2007-10-01

    Although giant planets do not have solid surfaces, they do have Ekman layers. The electrical conductivity increases exponentially with depth until the hydrogen becomes metallic, so there is a layer in the semi-conducting zone where the Lorentz force is comparable to the Coriolis force, although both will be small if the velocity is small. In this layer, the Lorentz force plays the role that friction plays in an ordinary Ekman layer, leading to convergence and upwelling in a low and divergence and downwelling in a high. In meteorology the effect is called Ekman pumping and is important in terrestrial hurricanes: The low pressure in the center drives moist inflow in the boundary layer, and the resulting upward flow around the eye releases latent heat and powers the storm. A structure with hurricane-like features exists at Saturn's south pole (Dyudina et al., BAAS, 2007). At other latitudes on both Jupiter and Saturn the cyclonic belts are the low pressure features. Upwelling there is consistent with lightning and other evidence of moist convection (Little et al., Icarus, 1999; Porco et al., Science, 2003). As in a terrestrial hurricane, the outflow from the belts takes place at high altitudes where friction with the underlying layers puts angular momentum back into the outflowing air. Moist convective towers provide the friction, so the outflow layer is near the top of the water cloud. On the giant planets, this is below the level of ammonia condensation, which explains the puzzling observation that the vertical velocity in the belts is downward at the level of the ammonia cloud and is presumably upward at the level of the water cloud, since moist convection is occurring there (Gierasch et al., Nature, 2000; Ingersoll et al., Nature, 2000).

  14. AB initio free energy calculations of the solubility of silica in metallic hydrogen and application to giant planet cores

    SciTech Connect

    González-Cataldo, F.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, B.

    2014-05-20

    By combining density functional molecular dynamics simulations with a thermodynamic integration technique, we determine the free energy of metallic hydrogen and silica, SiO{sub 2}, at megabar pressures and thousands of degrees Kelvin. Our ab initio solubility calculations show that silica dissolves into fluid hydrogen above 5000 K for pressures from 10 and 40 Mbars, which has implications for the evolution of rocky cores in giant gas planets like Jupiter, Saturn, and a substantial fraction of known extrasolar planets. Our findings underline the necessity of considering the erosion and redistribution of core materials in giant planet evolution models, but they also demonstrate that hot metallic hydrogen is a good solvent at megabar pressures, which has implications for high-pressure experiments.

  15. Kepler-432 b: a massive planet in a highly eccentric orbit transiting a red giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciceri, S.; Lillo-Box, J.; Southworth, J.; Mancini, L.; Henning, Th.; Barrado, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first disclosure of the planetary nature of Kepler-432 b (aka Kepler object of interest KOI-1299.01). We accurately constrained its mass and eccentricity by high-precision radial velocity measurements obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the CAHA 2.2-m telescope. By simultaneously fitting these new data and Kepler photometry, we found that Kepler-432 b is a dense transiting exoplanet with a mass of Mp = 4.87 ± 0.48MJup and radius of Rp = 1.120 ± 0.036RJup. The planet revolves every 52.5 d around a K giant star that ascends the red giant branch, and it moves on a highly eccentric orbit with e = 0.535 ± 0.030. By analysing two near-IR high-resolution images, we found that a star is located at 1.1'' from Kepler-432, but it is too faint to cause significant effects on the transit depth. Together with Kepler-56 and Kepler-91, Kepler-432 occupies an almost-desert region of parameter space, which is important for constraining the evolutionary processes of planetary systems. RV data (Table A.1) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/573/L5

  16. Gap formation in a self-gravitating disk and the associated migration of the embedded giant planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Hui-Gen; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Wittenmyer, Robert A.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of our recent study on the interactions between a giant planet and a self-gravitating gas disk. We investigate how the disk's self-gravity affects the gap formation process and the migration of the giant planet. Two series of 1-D and 2-D hydrodynamic simulations are performed. We select several surface densities and focus on the gravitationally stable region. To obtain more reliable gravity torques exerted on the planet, a refined treatment of the disk's gravity is adopted in the vicinity of the planet. Our results indicate that the net effect of the disk's self-gravity on the gap formation process depends on the surface density of the disk. We notice that there are two critical values, ΣI and ΣII. When the surface density of the disk is lower than the first one, Σ0 < ΣI, the effect of self-gravity suppresses the formation of a gap. When Σ0 > ΣI, the self-gravity of the gas tends to benefit the gap formation process and enlarges the width/depth of the gap. According to our 1-D and 2-D simulations, we estimate the first critical surface density to be ΣI ≈ 0.8 MMSN. This effect increases until the surface density reaches the second critical value ΣII. When Σ0 > ΣII, the gravitational turbulence in the disk becomes dominant and the gap formation process is suppressed again. Our 2-D simulations show that this critical surface density is around 3.5 MMSN. We also study the associated orbital evolution of a giant planet. Under the effect of the disk's self-gravity, the migration rate of the giant planet increases when the disk is dominated by gravitational turbulence. We show that the migration timescale correlates with the effective viscosity and can be up to 104 yr.

  17. External supply of oxygen to the atmospheres of the giant planets.

    PubMed

    Feuchtgruber, H; Lellouch, E; de Graauw, T; Bézard, B; Encrenaz, T; Griffin, M

    1997-09-11

    The atmospheres of the giant planets are reducing, being mainly composed of hydrogen, helium and methane. But the rings and icy satellites that surround these planets, together with the flux of interplanetary dust, could act as important sources of oxygen, which would be delivered to the atmospheres mainly in the form of water ice or silicate dust. Here we report the detection, by infrared spectroscopy, of gaseous H2O in the upper atmospheres of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The implied H2O column densities are 1.5 x 10(15), 9 x 10(13) and 3 x 10(14) molecules cm(-2) respectively. CO2 in comparable amounts was also detected in the atmospheres of Saturn and Neptune. These observations can be accounted for by external fluxes of 10(5)-10(7) H2O molecules cm(-2) s(-1) and subsequent chemical processing in the atmospheres. The presence of gaseous water and infalling dust will affect the photochemistry, energy budget and ionospheric properties of these atmospheres. Moreover, our findings may help to constrain the injection rate and possible activity of distant icy objects in the Solar System.

  18. PLANETARY CORE FORMATION WITH COLLISIONAL FRAGMENTATION AND ATMOSPHERE TO FORM GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Krivov, Alexander V.; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2011-09-01

    Massive planetary cores ({approx}10 Earth masses) trigger rapid gas accretion to form gas giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. We investigate the core growth and the possibilities for cores to reach such a critical core mass. At the late stage, planetary cores grow through collisions with small planetesimals. Collisional fragmentation of planetesimals, which is induced by gravitational interaction with planetary cores, reduces the amount of planetesimals surrounding them, and thus the final core masses. Starting from small planetesimals that the fragmentation rapidly removes, less massive cores are formed. However, planetary cores acquire atmospheres that enlarge their collisional cross section before rapid gas accretion. Once planetary cores exceed about Mars mass, atmospheres significantly accelerate the growth of cores. We show that, taking into account the effects of fragmentation and atmosphere, initially large planetesimals enable formation of sufficiently massive cores. On the other hand, because the growth of cores is slow for large planetesimals, a massive disk is necessary for cores to grow enough within a disk lifetime. If the disk with 100 km sized initial planetesimals is 10 times as massive as the minimum mass solar nebula, planetary cores can exceed 10 Earth masses in the Jovian planet region (>5 AU).

  19. CAN TiO EXPLAIN THERMAL INVERSIONS IN THE UPPER ATMOSPHERES OF IRRADIATED GIANT PLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Silverio, Katie; Burrows, Adam E-mail: silverio@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-07-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope infrared observations indicate that several transiting extrasolar giant planets have thermal inversions in their upper atmospheres. Above a relative minimum, the temperature appears to increase with altitude. Such an inversion probably requires a species at high altitude that absorbs a significant amount of incident optical/UV radiation. Some authors have suggested that the strong optical absorbers titanium oxide (TiO) and vanadium oxide (VO) could provide the needed additional opacity, but if regions of the atmosphere are cold enough for Ti and V to be sequestered into solids they might rain out and be severely depleted. With a model of the vertical distribution of a refractory species in gaseous and condensed form, we address the question of whether enough TiO (or VO) could survive aloft in an irradiated planet's atmosphere to produce a thermal inversion. We find that it is unlikely that VO could play a critical role in producing thermal inversions. Furthermore, we find that macroscopic mixing is essential to the TiO hypothesis; without macroscopic mixing, such a heavy species cannot persist in a planet's upper atmosphere. The amount of macroscopic mixing that is required depends on the size of condensed titanium-bearing particles that form in regions of an atmosphere that are too cold for gaseous TiO to exist. We parameterize the macroscopic mixing with the eddy diffusion coefficient K{sub zz} and find, as a function of particle size a, the values that K{sub zz} must assume on the highly irradiated planets HD 209458b, HD 149026b, TrES-4, and OGLE-TR-56b to loft enough titanium to the upper atmosphere for the TiO hypothesis to be correct. On these planets, we find that for TiO to be responsible for thermal inversions K{sub zz} must be at least a few times 10{sup 7} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, even for a = 0.1 {mu}m, and increases to nearly 10{sup 11} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} for a = 10 {mu}m. Such large values may be problematic for the TiO hypothesis

  20. Method for Calculation of Ionization Profiles Caused by Cosmic Rays in Giant Planet Ionospheres from Jovian Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P.; Kostov, V.; Ruder, H.; Mateev, L.; Buchvarova, M.

    As a continuation of our studies of cosmic ray (CR) ionization in the atmospheres and ionospheres of the planets in the Solar system we present a new method for the calculation of the full electron production rate profiles due to particles of all energy intervals (galactic and solar CR, anomalous CR component and other types of high energy particles). For giant planets which have significant oblateness in spite of the isotropic penetration of the galactic CR in their atmospheres, the trivial integration on the azimuth angle is not applicable, because of the presentation of the planets as rotational ellipsoids and the azimuth dependence of the integrand function. The differences in the electron production rates for spherical and oblate atmospheres of the terrestrial planets are small. For example, for Mars and Earth this difference does not exceed 5% and almost does not depend on altitude. For the giant planets, however, there is a considerable dependency on height in the atmosphere. The differences in the electron p oduction rate profiles for spherical and ellipsoidalr atmospheres increase significantly in the deeper atmospheric layers. This requires the introduction of a modified Chapman ( h ) function for oblate planet in theC Particle Depth Factor (PDF) while considering the CR influence and ionization- neutralization processes in the ionospheres of the giant planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Calculation of ionization by all particles from different directions requires integration over azimuth angle, instead of only over zenith angle as in the spherical planet case when the Ch function is used. For an oblate planetary body (rotational ellipsoid), the atmospheric parameters (density and optical depth) depend on particle trajectory azimuth angle, so even for CR with isotropic distributions, integration over azimuth angle, zenith angle and energy is necessary. The goal of the present paper is the application of the PDF function for rotational ellipsoid

  1. Modeling the Formation of Giant Planet Cores. I. Evaluating Key Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levison, Harold F.; Thommes, Edward; Duncan, Martin J.

    2010-04-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in our understanding of planet formation is how Jupiter and Saturn could have formed before the solar nebula dispersed. The most popular model of giant planet formation is the so-called core accretion model. In this model a large planetary embryo formed first, mainly by two-body accretion. This is then followed by a period of inflow of nebular gas directly onto the growing planet. The core accretion model has an Achilles heel, namely the very first step. We have undertaken the most comprehensive study of this process to date. In this study, we numerically integrate the orbits of a number of planetary embryos embedded in a swarm of planetesimals. In these experiments, we have included a large number of physical processes that might enhance accretion. In particular, we have included (1) aerodynamic gas drag, (2) collisional damping between planetesimals, (3) enhanced embryo cross sections due to their atmospheres, (4) planetesimal fragmentation, and (5) planetesimal-driven migration. We find that the gravitational interaction between the embryos and the planetesimals leads to the wholesale redistribution of material—regions are cleared of material and gaps open near the embryos. Indeed, in 90% of our simulations without fragmentation, the region near those embryos is cleared of planetesimals before much growth can occur. Thus, the widely used assumption that the surface density distribution of planetesimals is smooth can lead to misleading results. In the remaining 10% of our simulations, the embryos undergo a burst of outward migration that significantly increases growth. On timescales of ~105 years, the outer embryo can migrate ~6 AU and grow to roughly 30 M ⊕. This represents a largely unexplored mode of core formation. We also find that the inclusion of planetesimal fragmentation tends to inhibit growth except for a narrow range of fragment migration rates.

  2. MODELING THE FORMATION OF GIANT PLANET CORES. I. EVALUATING KEY PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Levison, Harold F.; Thommes, Edward; Duncan, Martin J.

    2010-04-15

    One of the most challenging problems we face in our understanding of planet formation is how Jupiter and Saturn could have formed before the solar nebula dispersed. The most popular model of giant planet formation is the so-called core accretion model. In this model a large planetary embryo formed first, mainly by two-body accretion. This is then followed by a period of inflow of nebular gas directly onto the growing planet. The core accretion model has an Achilles heel, namely the very first step. We have undertaken the most comprehensive study of this process to date. In this study, we numerically integrate the orbits of a number of planetary embryos embedded in a swarm of planetesimals. In these experiments, we have included a large number of physical processes that might enhance accretion. In particular, we have included (1) aerodynamic gas drag, (2) collisional damping between planetesimals, (3) enhanced embryo cross sections due to their atmospheres, (4) planetesimal fragmentation, and (5) planetesimal-driven migration. We find that the gravitational interaction between the embryos and the planetesimals leads to the wholesale redistribution of material-regions are cleared of material and gaps open near the embryos. Indeed, in 90% of our simulations without fragmentation, the region near those embryos is cleared of planetesimals before much growth can occur. Thus, the widely used assumption that the surface density distribution of planetesimals is smooth can lead to misleading results. In the remaining 10% of our simulations, the embryos undergo a burst of outward migration that significantly increases growth. On timescales of {approx}10{sup 5} years, the outer embryo can migrate {approx}6 AU and grow to roughly 30 M {sub +}. This represents a largely unexplored mode of core formation. We also find that the inclusion of planetesimal fragmentation tends to inhibit growth except for a narrow range of fragment migration rates.

  3. Methane, carbon monoxide, and ammonia in brown dwarfs and self-luminous giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Marley, Mark S. E-mail: Mark.S.Marley@NASA.gov

    2014-12-10

    We address disequilibrium abundances of some simple molecules in the atmospheres of solar composition brown dwarfs and self-luminous extrasolar giant planets using a kinetics-based one-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model. Our approach is to use the full kinetics model to survey the parameter space with effective temperatures between 500 K and 1100 K. In all of these worlds, equilibrium chemistry favors CH{sub 4} over CO in the parts of the atmosphere that can be seen from Earth, but in most disequilibrium favors CO. The small surface gravity of a planet strongly discriminates against CH{sub 4} when compared to an otherwise comparable brown dwarf. If vertical mixing is like Jupiter's, the transition from methane to CO occurs at 500 K in a planet. Sluggish vertical mixing can raise this to 600 K, but clouds or more vigorous vertical mixing could lower this to 400 K. The comparable thresholds in brown dwarfs are 1100 ± 100 K. Ammonia is also sensitive to gravity, but, unlike CH{sub 4}/CO, the NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} ratio is insensitive to mixing, which makes NH{sub 3} a potential proxy for gravity. HCN may become interesting in high-gravity brown dwarfs with very strong vertical mixing. Detailed analysis of the CO-CH{sub 4} reaction network reveals that the bottleneck to CO hydrogenation goes through methanol, in partial agreement with previous work. Simple, easy to use quenching relations are derived by fitting to the complete chemistry of the full ensemble of models. These relations are valid for determining CO, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, and CO{sub 2} abundances in the range of self-luminous worlds we have studied, but may not apply if atmospheres are strongly heated at high altitudes by processes not considered here (e.g., wave breaking).

  4. Close encounters between Chariklo and the giant planets: What about the rings?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Othon; Araujo, Rosana; Sfair, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    It is known that the Centaurs are subject to close gravitational encounters with the giant planets along their mean lifetime (10 Myrs). Thus, in the present work, we investigate the stability of the rings of Chariklo when perturbed by such encounters. Chariklo is a Centaur with semi-major axis a=15.8 AU, eccentricity e=0.175, orbital inclination I=23.4º, and with a physical radius of 124 km. The two narrow rings around Chariklo are in the equatorial plane and have circular orbits, with the orbital radii of 391 km and 405 km. The method consisted on numerically integrate for 100 Myrs a system composed by the Sun, the eight planets, and a sample of 729 objects with the same mass and radius of Chariklo, but with small deviations in the orbital elements a, e and I. All encounters of those clones within 1 Hill's radius of each planet were recorded. We found that the majority of the encounters (48.0%) happens with Uranus, 26.0% with Saturn, 16.6% with Jupiter and 9.4% with Neptune. From these encounters we selected those that take place within ten times the rupture radius to study the effect upon particles around Chariklo. The particles were distributed from 200 km to 1000 km, in equatorial and circular orbits, with a random angular distribution. We found that the effects due to the encounters with Uranus and Neptune are negligible on the dynamics of the particles, i.e., no particles are lost and the rings are not significantly disturbed. However, for Jupiter and Saturn there are some encounters able to completely remove the rings. We also analyze the variations in semi-major axis and eccentricity of the particles that compose the rings, due to the close planetary encounters. We will present a complete analysis of the characteristics and frequency of each kind of event.

  5. The first H-band spectrum of the giant planet β Pictoris b [THE FIRST H-BAND SPECTRUM OF THE MASSIVE GAS GIANT PLANET BETA PICTORIS b WITH THE GEMINI PLANET IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcote, Jeffrey; Barman, Travis; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Larkin, James E.; Macintosh, Bruce; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam S.; Cardwell, Andrew; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, René; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Ingraham, Patrick; Kalas, Paul; Konopacky, Quinn; Maire, Jérôme; Marchis, Franck; Marley, Mark S.; Marois, Christian; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Palmer, David; Patience, Jennifer; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Serio, Andrew; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Soummer, Rémi; Thomas, Sandrine; Wallace, J. Kent; Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Wolff, Schuyler

    2014-12-12

    Using the recently installed Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), we have obtained the first H-band spectrum of the planetary companion to the nearby young star β Pictoris. GPI is designed to image and provide low-resolution spectra of Jupiter-sized, self-luminous planetary companions around young nearby stars. These observations were taken covering the H band (1.65 μm). The spectrum has a resolving power of ~45 and demonstrates the distinctive triangular shape of a cool substellar object with low surface gravity. Using atmospheric models, we find an effective temperature of 1600-1700 K and a surface gravity of log (g) = 3.5-4.5 (cgs units). These values agree well with "hot-start" predictions from planetary evolution models for a gas giant with mass between 10 and 12 MJup and age between 10 and 20 Myr.

  6. Testing giant planet formation in the transitional disk of SAO 206462 using deep VLT/SPHERE imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, A.-L.; Stolker, T.; Messina, S.; Müller, A.; Biller, B. A.; Currie, T.; Dominik, C.; Grady, C. A.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Chauvin, G.; Galicher, R.; Millward, M.; Pohl, A.; Brandner, W.; Henning, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Langlois, M.; Meyer, M. R.; Quanz, S. P.; Vigan, A.; Zurlo, A.; van Boekel, R.; Buenzli, E.; Buey, T.; Desidera, S.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Ginski, C.; Giro, E.; Gratton, R.; Hubin, N.; Lannier, J.; Le Mignant, D.; Mesa, D.; Peretti, S.; Perrot, C.; Ramos, J. R.; Salter, G.; Samland, M.; Sissa, E.; Stadler, E.; Thalmann, C.; Udry, S.; Weber, L.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The SAO 206462 (HD 135344B) disk is one of the few known transitional disks showing asymmetric features in scattered light and thermal emission. Near-infrared scattered-light images revealed two bright outer spiral arms and an inner cavity depleted in dust. Giant protoplanets have been proposed to account for the disk morphology. Aims: We aim to search for giant planets responsible for the disk features and, in the case of non-detection, to constrain recent planet predictions using the data detection limits. Methods: We obtained new high-contrast and high-resolution total intensity images of the target spanning the Y to the K bands (0.95-2.3 μm) using the VLT/SPHERE near-infrared camera and integral field spectrometer. Results: The spiral arms and the outer cavity edge are revealed at high resolutions and sensitivities without the need for aggressive image post-processing techniques, which introduce photometric biases. We do not detect any close-in companions. For the derivation of the detection limits on putative giant planets embedded in the disk, we show that the knowledge of the disk aspect ratio and viscosity is critical for the estimation of the attenuation of a planet signal by the protoplanetary dust because of the gaps that these putative planets may open. Given assumptions on these parameters, the mass limits can vary from 2-5 to 4-7 Jupiter masses at separations beyond the disk spiral arms. The SPHERE detection limits are more stringent than those derived from archival NaCo/L' data and provide new constraints on a few recent predictions of massive planets (4-15 MJ) based on the spiral density wave theory. The SPHERE and ALMA data do not favor the hypotheses on massive giant planets in the outer disk (beyond 0.6''). There could still be low-mass planets in the outer disk and/or planets inside the cavity. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programmes 095.C

  7. The effect of Dead Zones on the Gas Accretion of a Giant Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Gennaro; Marzari, Francesco

    Giant planets undergo a phase of run-away gas accretion, during and beyond which the accretion rate (dMp/dt) is dictated by the ability of the protoplanetary disk to provide gas to the planet's vicinity (Lissauer et al. 2009). Once the planet's Hill radius exceeds the disk scale height, a disk forms around the planet (Kley 1999; Lubow et al. 1999). This circumplanetary disk (or CPD) is often identified as a standard accretion disk, and physical processes believed to be at work in accretion disks are sometimes thought to operate in CPDs. In particular, it has been proposed that turbulence within a CPD is driven by magneto-rotational instability (MRI), and that MRI-inactive regions (or Dead Zones) may be present in the disk's mid-plane due to poor ionization of the gas (Lubow and Martin 2012; Turner et al. 2014). The presence of a Dead Zone may affect accretion through a CPD, if most of the mass is transported along the disk's mid-plane (Rivier et al. 2012). However, 3D calculations of viscous CPDs indicate that accretion occurs predominantly at and above the CPD surface (D'Angelo et al. 2003; Bate et al. 2003; Tanigawa et al. 2012; Ayliffe and Bate 2012; Gressel et al. 2013), i.e., in regions that are generally expected to be MRI-active (Turner et al. 2014). To asses the impact on dMp/dt of the presence of Dead Zones in CPDs, we perform 3D global hydrodynamics calculations of a Jupiter-mass planet embedded in a protoplanetary disk. The CPD is resolved by means of multiple nested grids at the length scale of 0.6 Jupiter radii (Rj). We apply a local-isothermal equation of state and assume that the kinematic viscosity is constant throughout, at a level of 1e-5 a(2) Omega (a is the planet's orbital radius and Omega its frequency). To mimic the presence of a MRI-inactive region in the CPD, we modify the local viscosity so that its value is reduced by a factor of 1000 within about 60Rj of the planet. This Dead Zone extends above and below the CPD mid-plane for a few (CPD

  8. KEPLER-68: THREE PLANETS, ONE WITH A DENSITY BETWEEN THAT OF EARTH AND ICE GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard; Rowe, Jason F.; Henze, Christopher E.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rogers, Leslie; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, Francois; Desert, Jean-Michel; Lopez, Eric D.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Handberg, Rasmus; Jenkins, Jon M.; Basu, Sarbani; Metcalfe, Travis S.; Hekker, Saskia; and others

    2013-03-20

    NASA's Kepler Mission has revealed two transiting planets orbiting Kepler-68. Follow-up Doppler measurements have established the mass of the innermost planet and revealed a third Jovian-mass planet orbiting beyond the two transiting planets. Kepler-68b, in a 5.4 day orbit, has M{sub P}=8.3{sup +2.2}{sub -2.4} M{sub Circled-Plus }, R{sub P}=2.31{sup +0.06}{sub -0.09} R{sub Circled-Plus }, and {rho}{sub P}=3.32{sup +0.86}{sub -0.98} g cm{sup -3}, giving Kepler-68b a density intermediate between that of the ice giants and Earth. Kepler-68c is Earth-sized, with a radius R{sub P}=0.953{sup +0.037}{sub -0.042} R{sub Circled-Plus} and transits on a 9.6 day orbit; validation of Kepler-68c posed unique challenges. Kepler-68d has an orbital period of 580 {+-} 15 days and a minimum mass of M{sub P}sin i = 0.947 {+-} 0.035M{sub J} . Power spectra of the Kepler photometry at one minute cadence exhibit a rich and strong set of asteroseismic pulsation modes enabling detailed analysis of the stellar interior. Spectroscopy of the star coupled with asteroseismic modeling of the multiple pulsation modes yield precise measurements of stellar properties, notably T{sub eff} = 5793 {+-} 74 K, M{sub *} = 1.079 {+-} 0.051 M{sub Sun }, R{sub *} = 1.243 {+-} 0.019 R{sub Sun }, and {rho}{sub *} = 0.7903 {+-} 0.0054 g cm{sup -3}, all measured with fractional uncertainties of only a few percent. Models of Kepler-68b suggest that it is likely composed of rock and water, or has a H and He envelope to yield its density {approx}3 g cm{sup -3}.

  9. EUV-driven ionospheres and electron transport on extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Koskinen, T. T.; Miller, S.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yelle, R. V.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of their host stars from soft X-rays to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis, AU Microscopii - and the Sun. X-ray and EUV (XUV) spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric model and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation - as a result of stellar radiation deposition - is included through photo-ionisation and electron-impact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model. We find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets with upper atmospheres where H2 is not substantially dissociated (at large orbital distances) have a layer in which H3+ is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3+ undergo significant diurnal variations, with the maximum value being driven by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and the magnitude is driven by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3+ peak in EGPs with upper atmospheres where H2 is dissociated (orbiting close to their star) under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g. hydrocarbons, water). The inclusion of secondary ionisation processes produces significantly enhanced ion and electron densities at altitudes below the main EUV ionisation peak, as

  10. A KECK HIRES DOPPLER SEARCH FOR PLANETS ORBITING METAL-POOR DWARFS. II. ON THE FREQUENCY OF GIANT PLANETS IN THE METAL-POOR REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    Sozzetti, Alessandro; Torres, Guillermo; Latham, David W.; Stefanik, Robert P.; Korzennik, Sylvain G.; Boss, Alan P.; Carney, Bruce W.; Laird, John B. E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: skorzennik@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: boss@dtm.ciw.edu E-mail: laird@bgsu.edu

    2009-05-20

    We present an analysis of three years of precision radial velocity (RV) measurements of 160 metal-poor stars observed with HIRES on the Keck 1 telescope. We report on variability and long-term velocity trends for each star in our sample. We identify several long-term, low-amplitude RV variables worthy of followup with direct imaging techniques. We place lower limits on the detectable companion mass as a function of orbital period. Our survey would have detected, with a 99.5% confidence level, over 95% of all companions on low-eccentricity orbits with velocity semiamplitude K {approx}> 100 m s{sup -1}, or M{sub p} sin i {approx}> 3.0 M {sub J}(P/yr){sup (1/3)}, for orbital periods P {approx}< 3 yr. None of the stars in our sample exhibits RV variations compatible with the presence of Jovian planets with periods shorter than the survey duration. The resulting average frequency of gas giants orbiting metal-poor dwarfs with -2.0{approx}<[Fe/H]{approx}<-0.6 is f{sub p} < 0.67% (at the 1{sigma} confidence level). We examine the implications of this null result in the context of the observed correlation between the rate of occurrence of giant planets and the metallicity of their main-sequence solar-type stellar hosts. By combining our data set with the Fischer and Valenti (2005) uniform sample, we confirm that the likelihood of a star to harbor a planet more massive than Jupiter within 2 AU is a steeply rising function of the host's metallicity. However, the data for stars with -1.0{approx}<[Fe/H]{approx}<0.0 are compatible, in a statistical sense, with a constant occurrence rate f{sub p} {approx_equal} 1%. Our results can usefully inform theoretical studies of the process of giant-planet formation across two orders of magnitude in metallicity.

  11. The trends high-contrast imaging survey. IV. The occurrence rate of giant planets around M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Montet, Benjamin T.; Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-20

    Doppler-based planet surveys have discovered numerous giant planets but are incomplete beyond several AU. At larger star-planet separations, direct planet detection through high-contrast imaging has proven successful, but this technique is sensitive only to young planets and characterization relies upon theoretical evolution models. Here we demonstrate that radial velocity measurements and high-contrast imaging can be combined to overcome these issues. The presence of widely separated companions can be deduced by identifying an acceleration (long-term trend) in the radial velocity of a star. By obtaining high spatial resolution follow-up imaging observations, we rule out scenarios in which such accelerations are caused by stellar binary companions with high statistical confidence. We report results from an analysis of Doppler measurements of a sample of 111 M-dwarf stars with a median of 29 radial velocity observations over a median time baseline of 11.8 yr. By targeting stars that exhibit a radial velocity acceleration ({sup t}rend{sup )} with adaptive optics imaging, we determine that 6.5% ± 3.0% of M-dwarf stars host one or more massive companions with 1 < m/M{sub J} < 13 and 0 < a < 20 AU. These results are lower than analyses of the planet occurrence rate around higher-mass stars. We find the giant planet occurrence rate is described by a double power law in stellar mass M and metallicity F ≡ [Fe/H] such that f(M,F)=0.039{sub −0.028}{sup +0.056}M{sup 0.8{sub −}{sub 0}{sub .}{sub 9}{sup +{sup 1{sup .{sup 1}}}}}10{sup (3.8±1.2)F}. Our results are consistent with gravitational microlensing measurements of the planet occurrence rate; this study represents the first model-independent comparison with microlensing observations.

  12. How the presence of a gas giant affects the formation of mean-motion resonances between two low-mass planets in a locally isothermal gaseous disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlewska-Gaca, E.; Szuszkiewicz, E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the possibility of a migration-induced resonance locking in systems containing three planets, namely an Earth analogue (1 M⊕), a super-Earth (4 M⊕) and a gas giant (one Jupiter mass). The planets have been listed in order of increasing orbital periods. All three bodies are embedded in a locally isothermal gaseous disc and orbit around a solar mass star. We are interested in answering the following questions: will the low-mass planets form the same resonant structures with each other in the vicinity of the gas giant as in the case when the gas giant is absent? More in general, how will the presence of the gas giant affect the evolution of the two low-mass planets? When there is no gas giant in the system, it has been already shown that if the two low-mass planets undergo a convergent differential migration, they will capture each other in a mean-motion resonance. For the choices of disc parameters and planet masses made in this paper, the formation of the 5:4 resonance in the absence of the Jupiter has been observed in a previous investigation and confirmed here. In this work we add a gas giant on the most external orbit of the system in such a way that its differential migration is convergent with the low-mass planets. We show that the result of this set-up is the speeding up of the migration of the super-Earth and, after that, all three planets become locked in a triple mean-motion resonance. However, this resonance is not maintained due to the low-mass planet eccentricity excitation, a fact that leads to close encounters between planets and eventually to the ejection from the internal orbits of one or both low-mass planets. We have observed that the ejected low-mass planets can leave the system, fall into a star or become the external planet relative to the gas giant. In our simulations the latter situation has been observed for the super-Earth. It follows from the results presented here that the presence of a Jupiter-like planet

  13. Close-in planets around giant stars. Lack of hot-Jupiters and prevalence of multiplanetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Correia, A. C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Extrasolar planets abound in almost any possible configuration. However, until five years ago, there was a lack of planets orbiting closer than 0.5 au to giant or subgiant stars. Since then, recent detections have started to populated this regime by confirming 13 planetary systems. We discuss the properties of these systems in terms of their formation and evolution off the main sequence. Interestingly, we find that 70.0 ± 6.6% of the planets in this regime are inner components of multiplanetary systems. This value is 4.2σ higher than for main-sequence hosts, which we find to be 42.4 ± 0.1%. The properties of the known planets seem to indicate that the closest-in planets (a< 0.06 au) to main-sequence stars are massive (i.e., hot Jupiters) and isolated and that they are subsequently engulfed by their host as it evolves to the red giant branch, leaving only the predominant population of multiplanetary systems in orbits 0.06

  14. Shedding light on the eccentricity valley: Gap heating and eccentricity excitation of giant planets in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, David; Cumming, Andrew; Turner, Neal J.

    2014-02-20

    We show that the first order (non-co-orbital) corotation torques are significantly modified by entropy gradients in a non-barotropic protoplanetary disk. Such non-barotropic torques can dramatically alter the balance that, for barotropic cases, results in the net eccentricity damping for giant gap-clearing planets embedded in the disk. We demonstrate that stellar illumination can heat the gap enough for the planet's orbital eccentricity to instead be excited. We also discuss the 'Eccentricity Valley' noted in the known exoplanet population, where low-metallicity stars have a deficit of eccentric planets between ∼0.1 and ∼1 AU compared to metal-rich systems. We show that this feature in the planet distribution may be due to the self-shadowing of the disk by a rim located at the dust sublimation radius ∼0.1 AU, which is known to exist for several T Tauri systems. In the shadowed region between ∼0.1 and ∼1 AU, lack of gap insolation allows disk interactions to damp eccentricity. Outside such shadowed regions stellar illumination can heat the planetary gaps and drive eccentricity growth for giant planets. We suggest that the self-shadowing does not arise at higher metallicity due to the increased optical depth of the gas interior to the dust sublimation radius.

  15. Atmospheric Circulation of Brown Dwarfs and Directly Imaged Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Showman, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Growing observations of brown dwarfs (BDs) and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), such as brightness variability and surface maps have provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these worlds. Previous studies that serve to understand the atmospheric circulation of BDs include modeling of convection from the interior and its interactions with stably stratified atmospheres. These models show that such interactions can drive an atmospheric circulation, forming zonal jets and/or vortices. However, these models are dry, not including condensation of various chemical species. Condensation of water has previously been shown to play an important role on driving the zonal jets on four giant planets in our solar system. As such, condensation cycles of various chemical species are believed to be an important source in driving the atmospheric circulation of BDs and directly imaged EGPs. Here we present results from three-dimensional simulations for the stably stratified atmospheres of BDs and EGPs based on a general circulation model that includes the effect of a condensate cycle. Large-scale latent heating and molecular weight effect due to condensation of a single species are treated explicitly. We examine the circulation patterns caused by large-scale latent heating which results from condensation of silicate vapor in hot dwarfs and water vapor in the cold dwarfs. By varying the abundance of condensable vapor and the radiative timescale, we conclude that under normal conditions of BDs (near 1x solar abundance and relatively short radiative timescale), latent heating alone by silicate vapors is unable to drive a global circulation, leaving a quiescent atmosphere, because of the suppression to moist instability by downward transport of dry air. Models with high abundance of condensates (~5x solar) and relatively long radiative timescale, which may be the case of directly imaged EGPs, tend to maintain an active hydrological cycle and develop zonal

  16. Effects of latent heating on driving atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs and directly imaged giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam P.

    2015-12-01

    Growing observations of brown dwarfs (BDs) and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), such as brightness variability and surface maps have provided evidence for strong atmospheric circulation on these worlds. Previous studies that serve to understand the atmospheric circulation of BDs include modeling of convection from the interior and its interactions with stably stratified atmospheres. These models show that such interactions can drive an atmospheric circulation, forming zonal jets and/or vortices. However, these models are dry, not including condensation of various chemical species. Latent heating from condensation of water has previously been shown to play an important role on driving the zonal jets on four giant planets in our solar system. As such, condensation cycles of various chemical species are believed to be an important source in driving the atmospheric circulation of BDs and directly imaged EGPs. Here we present results from three-dimensional simulations for the atmospheres of BDs and EGPs based on a general circulation model that includes the effect of a condensate cycle. Large-scale latent heating and molecular weight effect due to condensation of a single species are treated explicitly. We examine the circulation patterns caused by large-scale latent heating which results from condensation of silicate vapor in hot dwarfs and water vapor in the cold dwarfs. By varying the abundance of condensable vapor and the radiative timescale, we conclude that under normal atmospheric conditions of BDs (hot and thus with relatively short radiative timescale), latent heating alone by silicate vapor is unable to drive a global circulation, leaving a quiescent atmosphere, because of the suppression to moist instability by downward transport of dry air. Models with relatively long radiative timescale, which may be the case for cooler bodies, tend to maintain an active hydrological cycle and develop zonal jets. Once condensation happens, storms driven by

  17. Bayesian Thermal Evolution Models for Giant Planets: Helium rain and double-diffusive convection in Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankovich, C.; Fortney, J. J.; Moore, K. L.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen and helium demix when sufficiently cool, and this bears on the thermal evolution of all cool giant planets at or below one Jupiter mass. Over the past few years, ab initio simulations have put us in the era of quantitative predictions for this H-He immiscibility at megabar pressures. We present models for the thermal evolution of Jupiter, including its evolving helium distribution following one such ab initio H-He phase diagram. After 4 Gyr of homogeneous evolution, differentiation establishes a helium gradient between 1 and 2 Mbar that dynamically stabilizes the fluid to overturning convection. The result is a region undergoing overstable double-diffusive convection (ODDC), whose relatively weak vertical heat transport maintains a superadiabatic temperature gradient. With a general parameterization for the ODDC efficiency, the models can reconcile Jupiter's intrinsic flux, atmospheric helium content, and radius at the age of the solar system if this H-He phase diagram is translated to cooler temperatures. We cast our nonadiabatic thermal evolution models in a Markov chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation framework, retrieving the total heavy element mass, the superadiabaticity in the convectively stable region, and the phase diagram temperature offset. Models using the interpolated Saumon, Chabrier and van Horn (1995) equation of state (SCvH-I) favor very inefficient ODDC, forming a thermal boundary layer that allows the molecular envelope to cool rapidly while the deeper interior (most of the planet's mass) actually heats up over time. If the overall cooling time is modulated with an additional free parameter, mimicking the effect of a colder or warmer EOS, the models favor those that are colder than SCvH-I; this class of EOS is also favored by shock experiments. The models in this scenario have more modest deep superadiabaticities such that the envelope cools more gradually, and a cooling or warming deep interior are equally likely.

  18. The Formation of Cores of Giant Planets at Convergence Zones of Planetary Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirono, Sin-iti; Katayama, Masahumi

    2016-10-01

    The formation of solid cores in giant planets of mass ∼ 10 {M}\\oplus is numerically simulated following the scenario of Sándor et al. In this scenario, there are two convergence zones, corresponding to the outer and inner edges of the dead zone, where the torque exerted on planetary embryos by the gas nebula is zero. At the outer edge of the dead zone, anticyclonic vortices accumulate infalling dust aggregates, and planetary embryos are continuously formed in this scenario. We performed N-body simulations and show that massive objects of ≃ 10 {M}\\oplus are formed in ∼2.5 Myr, starting from the embryos. The largest object is formed at the inner convergence zone, although planetary embryos are placed at the outer convergence zone. This is due to the scattering of embryos from the outer to the inner convergence zone, and the shorter damping timescale of eccentricity at the inner convergence zone compared to the outer one. We varied the migration timescale due to the torque from gas by changing the gas surface density around the convergence zones. We found that there is a critical migration timescale below which 10 {M}\\oplus -sized objects are formed. Furthermore, we conducted simulations in which the gas surface density evolves according to viscous accretion. The largest object is also formed at the inner convergence zone irrespective of the strength of turbulence. Throughout the simulations, the location of the largest mass is the inner convergence zone. We confirmed that the formation timescale of a core of a Jovian planet can be explained in this scenario.

  19. The great dichotomy of the Solar System: Small terrestrial embryos and massive giant planet cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, A.; Lambrechts, M.; Jacobson, S.; Bitsch, B.

    2015-09-01

    The basic structure of the Solar System is set by the presence of low-mass terrestrial planets in its inner part and giant planets in its outer part. This is the result of the formation of a system of multiple embryos with approximately the mass of Mars in the inner disk and of a few multi-Earth-mass cores in the outer disk, within the lifetime of the gaseous component of the protoplanetary disk. What was the origin of this dichotomy in the mass distribution of embryos/cores? We show in this paper that the classic processes of runaway and oligarchic growth from a disk of planetesimals cannot explain this dichotomy, even if the original surface density of solids increased at the snowline. Instead, the accretion of drifting pebbles by embryos and cores can explain the dichotomy, provided that some assumptions hold true. We propose that the mass-flow of pebbles is two-times lower and the characteristic size of the pebbles is approximately ten times smaller within the snowline than beyond the snowline (respectively at heliocentric distance r rice , where rice is the snowline heliocentric distance), due to ice sublimation and the splitting of icy pebbles into a collection of chondrule-size silicate grains. In this case, objects of original sub-lunar mass would grow at drastically different rates in the two regions of the disk. Within the snowline these bodies would reach approximately the mass of Mars while beyond the snowline they would grow to ∼ 20 Earth masses. The results may change quantitatively with changes to the assumed parameters, but the establishment of a clear dichotomy in the mass distribution of protoplanets appears robust provided that there is enough turbulence in the disk to prevent the sedimentation of the silicate grains into a very thin layer.

  20. Constraints on Extrasolar Planet Populations from VLT NACO/SDI and MMT SDI and Direct Adaptive Optics Imaging Surveys: Giant Planets are Rare at Large Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Eric L.; Close, Laird M.; Biller, Beth A.; Masciadri, Elena; Lenzen, Rainer

    2008-02-01

    We examine the implications for the distribution of extrasolar planets based on the null results from two of the largest direct imaging surveys published to date. Combining the measured contrast curves from 22 of the stars observed with the VLT NACO adaptive optics system by Masciadri and coworkers and 48 of the stars observed with the VLT NACO SDI and MMT SDI devices by Biller and coworkers (for a total of 60 unique stars), we consider what distributions of planet masses and semimajor axes can be ruled out by these data, based on Monte Carlo simulations of planet populations. We can set the following upper limit with 95% confidence: the fraction of stars with planets with semimajor axis between 20 and 100 AU, and mass above 4 MJup, is 20% or less. Also, with a distribution of planet mass of dN/dM propto M-1.16 in the range of 0.5-13 MJup, we can rule out a power-law distribution for semimajor axis (dN/da propto aα) with index 0 and upper cutoff of 18 AU, and index -0.5 with an upper cutoff of 48 AU. For the distribution suggested by Cumming et al., a power-law of index -0.61, we can place an upper limit of 75 AU on the semimajor axis distribution. In general, we find that even null results from direct imaging surveys are very powerful in constraining the distributions of giant planets (0.5-13 MJup) at large separations, but more work needs to be done to close the gap between planets that can be detected by direct imaging, and those to which the radial velocity method is sensitive.

  1. Large eccentricity, low mutual inclination: the three-dimensional architecture of a hierarchical system of giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Johnson, John Asher; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Buchhave, Lars A.; Cargile, Phillip A.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Hebb, Leslie; Huber, Daniel; Shporer, Avi; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2014-08-20

    We establish the three-dimensional architecture of the Kepler-419 (previously KOI-1474) system to be eccentric yet with a low mutual inclination. Kepler-419b is a warm Jupiter at semi-major axis a=0.370{sub −0.006}{sup +0.007} AU with a large eccentricity (e = 0.85{sub −0.07}{sup +0.08}) measured via the 'photoeccentric effect'. It exhibits transit timing variations (TTVs) induced by the non-transiting Kepler-419c, which we uniquely constrain to be a moderately eccentric (e = 0.184 ± 0.002), hierarchically separated (a = 1.68 ± 0.03 AU) giant planet (7.3 ± 0.4 M {sub Jup}). We combine 16 quarters of Kepler photometry, radial-velocity (RV) measurements from the HIgh Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on Keck, and improved stellar parameters that we derive from spectroscopy and asteroseismology. From the RVs, we measure the mass of the inner planet to be 2.5 ± 0.3 M {sub Jup} and confirm its photometrically measured eccentricity, refining the value to e = 0.83 ± 0.01. The RV acceleration is consistent with the properties of the outer planet derived from TTVs. We find that despite their sizable eccentricities, the planets are coplanar to within 9{sub −6}{sup +8} degrees, and therefore the inner planet's large eccentricity and close-in orbit are unlikely to be the result of Kozai migration. Moreover, even over many secular cycles, the inner planet's periapse is most likely never small enough for tidal circularization. Finally, we present and measure a transit time and impact parameter from four simultaneous ground-based light curves from 1 m class telescopes, demonstrating the feasibility of ground-based follow-up of Kepler giant planets exhibiting large TTVs.

  2. Characterizing Cold Giant Planets in Reflected Light: Lessons from 50 Years of Outer Solar System Exploration and Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Hammel, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    A space based coronagraph, whether as part of the WFIRST/AFTA mission or on a dedicated space telescope such as Exo-C or -S, will be able to obtain photometry and spectra of multiple gas giant planets around nearby stars, including many known from radial velocity detections. Such observations will constrain the masses, atmospheric compositions, clouds, and photochemistry of these worlds. Giant planet albedo models, such as those of Cahoy et al. (2010) and Lewis et al. (this meeting), will be crucial for mission planning and interpreting the data. However it is equally important that insights gleaned from decades of solar system imaging and spectroscopy of giant planets be leveraged to optimize both instrument design and data interpretation. To illustrate these points we will draw on examples from solar system observations, by both HST and ground based telescopes, as well as by Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini, to demonstrate the importance clouds, photochemical hazes, and various molecular absorbers play in sculpting the light scattered by solar system giant planets. We will demonstrate how measurements of the relative depths of multiple methane absorption bands of varying strengths have been key to disentangling the competing effects of gas column abundances, variations in cloud height and opacity, and scattering by high altitude photochemical hazes. We will highlight both the successes, such as the accurate remote determination of the atmospheric methane abundance of Jupiter, and a few failures from these types of observations. These lessons provide insights into technical issues facing spacecraft designers, from the selection of the most valuable camera filters to carry to the required capabilities of the flight spectrometer, as well as mission design questions such as choosing the most favorable phase angles for atmospheric characterization.

  3. A UNIFORM ANALYSIS OF 118 STARS WITH HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING: LONG-PERIOD EXTRASOLAR GIANT PLANETS ARE RARE AROUND SUN-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Eric L.; Close, Laird M.

    2010-07-10

    We expand on the results of Nielsen et al., using the null result for giant extrasolar planets around the 118 target stars from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) NACO H- and Ks-band planet search (conducted by Masciadri and collaborators in 2003 and 2004), the VLT and MMT Simultaneous Differential Imager survey, and the Gemini Deep Planet Survey to set constraints on the population of giant extrasolar planets. Our analysis is extended to include the planet luminosity models of Fortney et al., as well as the correlation between stellar mass and frequency of giant planets found by Johnson et al. Doubling the sample size of FGKM stars strengthens our conclusions: a model for extrasolar giant planets with power laws for mass and semimajor axis as given by Cumming et al. cannot, with 95% confidence, have planets beyond 65 AU, compared to the value of 94 AU reported by Nielsen et al., using the models of Baraffe et al. When the Johnson et al. correction for stellar mass (which gives fewer Jupiter-mass companions to M stars with respect to solar-type stars) is applied, however, this limit moves out to 82 AU. For the relatively new Fortney et al. models, which predict fainter planets across most of parameter space, these upper limits, with and without a correction for stellar mass, are 182 and 234 AU, respectively.

  4. Interaction of magnetic field and flow in the outer shells of giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junjun

    This study of the interaction of magnetic field and flow in the outer shells of giant planets consists of three parts. Part one . The atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn exhibit strong and stable zonal winds. Busse suggested that they might be the surface expression of deep flows on cylinders. However, the deep flow hypothesis experiences difficulty when account is taken of the electrical conductivity of molecular hydrogen as measured in shockwave experiments. The deep zonal flow of an electrically conducting fluid would produce a toroidal magnetic field, an associated poloidal electrical current, and Ohmic dissipation. In steady state, the total Ohmic dissipation cannot exceed the planet's net luminosity. If we assume that the observed zonal flow penetrates along cylinders until it is truncated to (near) zero at some spherical radius, the upper bound on Ohmic dissipation constrains this radius to be no smaller than 0.95 Jupiter radius and 0.87 Saturn radius. The truncation of the cylindrical flow in the convective envelope requires an appropriate force to break the Taylor-Proudman constraint. We have been unable to identify any plausible candidate. Thus we conclude that deep-seated cylindrical flows do not exist. Part two . A fluid shell with sufficient electrical conductivity and azimuthal velocity shear outside of the dynamo generation region can attenuate the non- axisymmetric component of the magnetic field. However, the interaction of the axisymmetric component of the magnetic field and the zonal flow is able to reduce the magnitude of zonal flow. The dimensionless number characterizing this reduction is the Chandrasekhar number. The smaller Saturnian field may allow a larger velocity shear and a greater attenuation of the non-axisymmetric field, thereby providing a possible explanation for the nearly axisymmetric field. Part three . Combining the study for the attenuation effect produced by the semiconducting layer and the observation of the magnetic field by

  5. The first known Uranian Trojan and the frequency of temporary giant-planet co-orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstreet, Sarah; Alexandersen, M.; Gladman, B.; Kavelaars, J.; Petit, J.; Gwyn, S.

    2013-10-01

    We report the first discovery of a Uranian Trojan (2011 QF99) in 2011-2012 CFHT Megacam imaging taken for a 20 square degree outer Solar System survey designed to detect and track Trans-Neptunian Objects and Centaurs. The orbit of the newly discovered object was constrained with 29 astrometric measurements over 7 dark runs with a total arc of 419 days. Numerical integrations of both the nominal orbit and all other orbits within the (already small) orbital uncertainties show 2011 QF99 oscillates around the L4 Lagrange point 60 degrees ahead of Uranus for >70 kyr and remains co-orbital (in 1:1 resonance) for ~1 Myr before becoming a Centaur. We performed additional orbital integrations to investigate the possibility the object could have evolved to its current orbit from a nearby, stable niche of phase-space. However, test particles started on orbits in the small region of phase-space surrounding the nominal orbit remained co-orbital for <100 Myr, most for <10 Myr. This leads to the conclusion that 2011 QF99 must be a temporary co-orbital instead of being a primordial Trojan. To investigate the frequency and duration (to factor of two accuracy) of temporary co-orbital captures with Uranus and Neptune, we construct a model of Centaurs supplied from the transneptunian region over 1 Gyr, building a relative orbital distribution for the a<34 AU region. The simulation output interval of 300 yr for the planets and all a<34 AU particles allows the 1:1 resonant argument to be well sampled; to our knowledge, this is the first time such a meticulous search for short-term co-orbitals of giant planets has been performed for an armada of incoming scattering objects. Analysis of the particle histories showed that at any given time, significant fractions (0.4% and 2.8%) of the a<34 AU Centaur population will be Uranian and Neptunian co-orbitals, respectively. We show for the first time that the high fraction 3%) of the transient co-orbital Centaurs in the IAU Minor Planet Center

  6. NH3, H2S, and the Radio Brightness Temperature Spectra of the Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent radio interferometer observations of Neptune enable comparisons of the radio brightness temperature (T(sub B)) spectra of all four giant planets. This comparison reveals evidence for fundamental differences in the compositions of Uranus' and Neptune's upper tropospheres, particularly in their ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) mixing ratios, despite those planets' outward similarities. The tropospheric abundances of these constituents yield information about their deep abundances, and ultimately about the formation of the planets from the presolar nebula (Atreya et al.). Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show the T(sub B) spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, respectively, from 0.1 to tens of cm wavelength. The data shown are collected from many observers. Data for Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus are those cataloged by de Pater and Massie (1985), plus the Saturn Very Large Array (VLA) data by Grossman et al. Figure 3, Uranus, shows only data acquired since 1973. Before 1973 Uranus' T(sub B) increased steadily as its pole moved into view, causing significant scatter in those data. Neptune data at greater than 1 cm, all taken at the VLA, are collected from de Pater and Richmond, de Pater et al., and Hofstadter. For a variety of reasons, such as susceptibility to source confusion, single-dish data at those wavelengths are much noisier than the more reliable VLA data and have been ignored. Single-dish data by Griffin and Orton shortward of 0.4 cm are shown, along with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (interferometer) datum at 0.266 cm by Muhleman and Berge. Spectra of Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune share certain gross characteristics. In each spectrum, T(sub B) at 1.3 cm is approximately 120-140 K, less than approximately 30 K different from that at 0.1 cm. All three spectra show a break in slope at or near 1.3 cm, with T(sub B) increasing fairly rapidly with wavelength longward of 1.3 cm. Visible and IR spectroscopy show that NH3, whose strong inversion

  7. Gas Accretion by Giant Planets: 3D Simulations of Gap Opening and Dynamics of the Circumplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Szulagyi, J.; Crida, A.; Tanigawa, T.; Lega, E.; Masset, F.; Bitsch, B.

    2013-10-01

    What sets the terminal mass of a giant planet once the latter enters into a runaway gas-accretion phase? The formation of a gap around the planet's orbit may be an answer, provided that the gap is wide and deep enough. A wide-spread idea is that this happens if the viscosity in the circumstellar disk is small, i.e. if planets form in the "dead zone". With 3D hydrodynamical simulations we study the formation of a gap in details. We find an interesting 4-step meridional loop in the gas dynamics: (1) the gas flows into the gap at the top layer of the disk; (2) then it falls towards the disk's midplane; (3) the planet keeps the gap open by pushing this infalling gas back into the disk; (4) the gas rises back to the disk's surface, which closes the loop. The gas flow in this loop is governed by the viscous timescale at the surface of the disk. It is generally accepted that the surface layer of the disk is MRI-active and viscous, even if a dead zone is present near the midplane. Thus, there should always be enough gas flowing into the gap for a Jupiter-mass planet to accrete at a fast rate, in absence of other regulation mechanisms. However, only a very small portion of the gas flowing into the gap is directly accreted by the planet. Most of the gas falling towards the planet forms a circumplanetary disk (CPD), due to angular momentum conservation. If the CPD is MRI-inactive, as suggested by Turner et al. (2010) and Fujii et al. (2011), it can act as a bottle-neck for planet accretion. We find that the main mechanism that allows the CPD to lose angular momentum is the torque exerted by the star via a spiral density wave. We compute that this promotes the accretion of 0.025% of the mass of the CPD per year, for a Jupiter mass planet at 5.2 AU, independent of viscosity. By balancing the pressure of the vertical inflow with that internal to the CPD, we estimate that the CPD should contain less than 1% of the planet's mass. This leads to a mass-doubling timescale for Jupiter

  8. GASEOUS MEAN OPACITIES FOR GIANT PLANET AND ULTRACOOL DWARF ATMOSPHERES OVER A RANGE OF METALLICITIES AND TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Richard S.; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Lupu, Roxana E.; Marley, Mark S.; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-10-01

    We present new calculations of Rosseland and Planck gaseous mean opacities relevant to the atmospheres of giant planets and ultracool dwarfs. Such calculations are used in modeling the atmospheres, interiors, formation, and evolution of these objects. Our calculations are an expansion of those presented in Freedman et al. to include lower pressures, finer temperature resolution, and also the higher metallicities most relevant for giant planet atmospheres. Calculations span 1 μbar to 300 bar, and 75-4000 K, in a nearly square grid. Opacities at metallicities from solar to 50 times solar abundances are calculated. We also provide an analytic fit to the Rosseland mean opacities over the grid in pressure, temperature, and metallicity. In addition to computing mean opacities at these local temperatures, we also calculate them with weighting functions up to 7000 K, to simulate the mean opacities for incident stellar intensities, rather than locally thermally emitted intensities. The chemical equilibrium calculations account for the settling of condensates in a gravitational field and are applicable to cloud-free giant planet and ultracool dwarf atmospheres, but not circumstellar disks. We provide our extensive opacity tables for public use.

  9. JUPITER WILL BECOME A HOT JUPITER: CONSEQUENCES OF POST-MAIN-SEQUENCE STELLAR EVOLUTION ON GAS GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Madhusudhan, Nikku E-mail: Nikku.Madhusudhan@yale.edu

    2012-09-10

    When the Sun ascends the red giant branch (RGB), its luminosity will increase and all the planets will receive much greater irradiation than they do now. Jupiter, in particular, might end up more highly irradiated than the hot Neptune GJ 436b and, hence, could appropriately be termed a 'hot Jupiter'. When their stars go through the RGB or asymptotic giant branch stages, many of the currently known Jupiter-mass planets in several-AU orbits will receive levels of irradiation comparable to the hot Jupiters, which will transiently increase their atmospheric temperatures to {approx}1000 K or more. Furthermore, massive planets around post-main-sequence stars could accrete a non-negligible amount of material from the enhanced stellar winds, thereby significantly altering their atmospheric chemistry as well as causing a significant accretion luminosity during the epochs of most intense stellar mass loss. Future generations of infrared observatories might be able to probe the thermal and chemical structure of such hot Jupiters' atmospheres. Finally, we argue that, unlike their main-sequence analogs (whose zonal winds are thought to be organized in only a few broad, planetary-scale jets), red-giant hot Jupiters should have multiple, narrow jets of zonal winds and efficient day-night redistribution.

  10. Gaseous Mean Opacities for Giant Planet and Ultracool Dwarf Atmospheres over a Range of Metallicities and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Richard S.; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Lupu, Roxana E.; Marley, Mark S.; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-10-01

    We present new calculations of Rosseland and Planck gaseous mean opacities relevant to the atmospheres of giant planets and ultracool dwarfs. Such calculations are used in modeling the atmospheres, interiors, formation, and evolution of these objects. Our calculations are an expansion of those presented in Freedman et al. to include lower pressures, finer temperature resolution, and also the higher metallicities most relevant for giant planet atmospheres. Calculations span 1 μbar to 300 bar, and 75-4000 K, in a nearly square grid. Opacities at metallicities from solar to 50 times solar abundances are calculated. We also provide an analytic fit to the Rosseland mean opacities over the grid in pressure, temperature, and metallicity. In addition to computing mean opacities at these local temperatures, we also calculate them with weighting functions up to 7000 K, to simulate the mean opacities for incident stellar intensities, rather than locally thermally emitted intensities. The chemical equilibrium calculations account for the settling of condensates in a gravitational field and are applicable to cloud-free giant planet and ultracool dwarf atmospheres, but not circumstellar disks. We provide our extensive opacity tables for public use.

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry in Giant Planets, Brown Dwarfs, and Low-Mass Dwarf Stars. II. Sulfur and Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Channon; Lodders, Katharina; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    2006-09-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium and kinetic calculations are used to model sulfur and phosphorus chemistry in giant planets, brown dwarfs, and extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). The chemical behavior of individual S- and P-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of pressure, temperature, and metallicity. The results are independent of particular model atmospheres, and in principle, the equilibrium composition along the pressure-temperature profile of any object can be determined. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the dominant S-bearing gas throughout substellar atmospheres and approximately represents the atmospheric sulfur inventory. Silicon sulfide (SiS) is a potential tracer of weather in substellar atmospheres. Disequilibrium abundances of phosphine (PH3) approximately representative of the total atmospheric phosphorus inventory are expected to be mixed upward into the observable atmospheres of giant planets and T dwarfs. In hotter objects, several P-bearing gases (e.g., P2, PH3, PH 2, PH, and HCP) become increasingly important at high temperatures.

  12. Structure of Iron at Giant-Planet and Exoplanet Interior Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, B. K.; Jeanloz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ab-initio molecular-dynamics (AIMD) and electronic-structure calculations using the density-functional approach show that the body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of Fe is mechanically unstable at conditions ranging from Earth's inner-core conditions (P ~ 360 GPa and T ~ 5500 K) up to pressures and temperatures of at least 1.5 TPa and 7000 K, conditions relevant to giant- and to many extrasolar-planet interiors. AIMD calculations for tetragonal distortions of Fe along the isochoric Bain path for densities of 18 and 20 g/cc at temperatures of 6000 and 7000 K indicate stresses becoming anisotropic for tetragonal distortions on either side of the lattice-parameter ratio c/a = 1, resulting in anisotropy in longitudinal stress, SL: SL > 0 for c/a < 1 and SL < 0 for c/a > 1, with SL ~ 0 within uncertainties for c/a = 1. The shear modulus BS becomes negative, violating the Born stability criterion. Variation of the longitudinal stress SL with free energy for the static lattice shows the same mechanical instability seen in the AIMD calculations, revealing the role of mechanical instability in causing the anomalies in SL. Also, based on free-energy calculations with temperature-dependent phonon and electron contributions, the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phase of Fe is found to be the most stable for pressure-temperature conditions extending beyond those of Earth's inner core to the 1.5 TPa range.

  13. Transmission Spectra Of Extrasolar Giant Planets In The Mid-ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Liang, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Yung, Y. L.

    2006-09-01

    We present here simulations of transmission spectra in the mid-IR of two extrasolar giant planets, HD209458b and HD189733b, during their transit in front of their parent star (Tinetti et al., 2006). If H2O and CO are abundant as estimated by our photochemical model (Liang et al., 2004), we expect they can be detected with the IRAC and MIPS cameras on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, and with future space-based observatories, such as James Webb Space Telescope. If water vapor were far less abundant, due to a C/O ratio different from solar, other species might be observable: among them CH4, CO2 and C2H2 are the best candidates. According to our simulations, transmission spectra of EGPs in the MIR are very sensitive to molecular abundances and less to temperature. Temperature influences the spectra above all by way of its effects on the atmospheric scale height and absorption coefficients. These considerations make transmission spectroscopy, linked with primary eclipse, an approach worth considering and complementary to emission spectroscopy, linked with secondary eclipse.

  14. Ab Initio Simulations of Water in the Interiors of Ice Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militzer, B.; Zhang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Water is one of the most prevalent substances in our solar system. Large quantities are assumed to be stored in the interiors of ice giant planets. Water has an unusually rich phase diagram with 15 solid phases that were determined experimentally and 5 additional ones that were predicted theoretically. At megabar pressures and elevated temperatures, water is predicted to assume a superionic state where the oxygen ions remain confined to lattice sites while the hydrogen ions move through the crystal like a fluid. In our recent article [Physical Review Letters 110 (2013) 151102], we predicted the oxygen sub-lattice to assume a face-centered cubic structure at pressures above 1 Mbar. In this presentation, we present results from additional density functional molecular dynamics simulations and predict the existence of new, not close packed phase. We employed a thermodynamics integration technique to derive the entropy and the Gibbs free energy. We discuss how a novel superionic state could be identified in high pressure experiments and talk about the implications for the interiors of Uranus and Neptune.

  15. Tidal dissipation in giant planets and the orbital evolution of their satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, G. I.

    2012-09-01

    Almost all the regular satellites of the giant planets in the solar system exert tidal forcing at frequencies within the range for which inertial waves can be excited inside the planet. The damping of inertial waves through their interaction with turbulent convection or magnetic fields, or through nonlinear processes, provides a mechanism of tidal dissipation and leads to the orbital migration of the satellites, allowing them in some cases to enter orbital resonances. Lainey et al. [1,2] have recently estimated the tidal dissipation in Jupiter and Saturn by fitting a dynamical model to observations of satellites over the last century or so. Using spectral numerical methods, we compute the linearized response of a uniformly rotating compressible fluid body to tidal forcing by the Y 2 2 spherical harmonic over the relevant range of tidal frequencies. Self-gravity and viscosity are included, while magnetic fields and non-adiabatic effects are neglected. The presence of convection is considered only to the extent that it establishes a (nearly) adiabatic stratification and provides an enhanced effective viscosity. Since the interior structure of giant planets is not fully understood, we use a variety of simplified and parametrized models to investigate the dependence of the dissipation rate on the interior structure. The efficiency of tidal dissipation is quantified by computing the frequency-dependent complex potential Love number k2 2(!) of the body. The negative imaginary part of this dimensionless quantity is inversely related to the tidal quality factor and bears a simple relation to the total viscous dissipation rate, which is verified numerically. The tidal response is complicated by the fact that, in the absence of viscosity, inertial waves do not form smooth eigenfunctions with a discrete spectrum, except in special cases where the density profile is smooth and the waves propagate in a full sphere. If the inertial waves are