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Sample records for proto-oncogene proteins

  1. Osteofibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma: correlation of proto-oncogene product and matrix protein expression.

    PubMed

    Maki, Masahiiko; Athanasou, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between osteofibrous dysplasia (OFD) and adamantinoma, we analyzed the expression of several proto-oncogene products and extracellular matrix proteins by immunohistochemistry and correlated our results with histological and ultrastructural findings. C-fos and c-jun, but not c-Met, were observed in OFD and in the fibrous and epithelial components of differentiated and classical adamantinomas. Staining for collagen IV, laminin and galectin-3, a laminin binding protein was seen in OFD and around cell nests in adamantinoma. E-, P-, and N-cadherin expression was found in all cases of classical adamantinoma, but not in differentiated adamantinoma or OFD. Osteonectin was detected in both the epithelial and fibrous components of adamantinomas, but osteopontin and osteocalcin were not seen in classical adamantinomas. The results show common expression of a number of oncoproteins and bone matrix proteins in adamantinoma and OFD, some of which are associated with mesenchymal-to-epithelial cell transformation. These findings would be in keeping with the hypothesis that OFD represents a precursor lesion of adamantinoma. Differential expression of a number of bone matrix protein in adamantinoma may also be of diagnostic use in distinguishing these 2 lesions immunohistochemically.

  2. Screening of mutations in the additional sex combs like 1, transcriptional regulator, tumor protein p53, and KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase/NRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase genes of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leite, Carolina; Delmonico, Lucas; Alves, Gilda; Gomes, Romario José; Martino, Mariana Rodrigues; da Silva, Aline Rodrigues; Moreira, Aline Dos Santos; Maioli, Maria Christina; Scherrer, Luciano Rios; Bastos, Elenice Ferreira; Irineu, Roberto; Ornellas, Maria Helena

    2017-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of clonal bone marrow disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, different degrees of cellular dysplasia, and increased risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. International Prognostic Scoring System is the gold standard for MDS classification; however, patients exhibiting different clinical behaviors often coexist in the same group, indicating that the currently available scoring systems are insufficient. The genes that have recently been identified as mutated in MDS, including additional sex combs like 1, transcriptional regulator (ASXL1), tumor protein p53 (TP53), and KRAS proto-oncogene and GTPase (KRAS)/NRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (NRAS), may contribute to a more comprehensive classification, as well as to the prognosis and progression of the disease. In the present study, the mutations in the ASXL1, TP53 and NRAS/KRAS genes in 50 patients were evaluated by sequencing genomic bone marrow DNA. Nine patients (18%) presented with at least one type of mutation. Mutations in TP53 were the most frequent in six patients (12%), followed by ASXL1 in two patients (4%) and NRAS in one patient (2%). The nine mutations were detected in patients with low- and high-risk MDS. The screening of mutations in MDS cases contributes to the application of personalized medicine.

  3. Inhibition of the hTERT promoter by the proto-oncogenic protein TAL1.

    PubMed

    Terme, J-M; Mocquet, V; Kuhlmann, A-S; Zane, L; Mortreux, F; Wattel, E; Duc Dodon, M; Jalinot, P

    2009-11-01

    Telomerase activity, which has fundamental roles in development and carcinogenesis, strongly depends on the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), its catalytic subunit. In this report, we show that the basic helix-loop-helix factor, TAL1 (T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia 1), is a negative regulator of the hTERT promoter. Indeed, TAL1 overexpression leads to a decrease in hTERT mRNA abundance and hence to reduced telomerase activity. Conversely, suppression of TAL1 by RNA interference in Jurkat cells increases hTERT expression. Analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TAL1 binds to the hTERT proximal promoter and recruits HDAC1. Considering the relationship recently established between TAL1 and the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein, which was confirmed in T lymphocyte clones derived from adult T-cell leukemia patients, we analyzed the effect of TAL1 with respect to the earlier characterized effects of Tax and HBZ (HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper) on hTERT expression. TAL1 was observed to reinforce the negative effect of Tax, whereas hTERT transactivation by the HBZ-JunD complex was repressed by TAL1 overexpression. Moreover, HBZ was found to induce proteasome-mediated degradation of TAL1. These observations support a model in which Tax and TAL1 by repressing hTERT would initially favor genomic instability, whereas expression of factors such as HBZ allows at a later stage an increase in hTERT production and consequently in telomerase activity.

  4. Three dimensional structure of the transmembrane region of the proto-oncogenic and oncogenic forms of the neu protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gullick, W J; Bottomley, A C; Lofts, F J; Doak, D G; Mulvey, D; Newman, R; Crumpton, M J; Sternberg, M J; Campbell, I D

    1992-01-01

    The neu proto-oncogene may be converted into a dominantly transforming oncogene by a single point mutation. Substitution of a valine residue at position 664 in the transmembrane region with glutamic acid activates the tyrosine kinase of the molecule and is associated with increased receptor dimerization. Previously we have proposed a model in which the glutamic acid side chain stabilizes receptor dimerization by hydrogen bonding. Other models have been proposed in which the mutation leads to a conformational change in the transmembrane region mimicking that assumed to occur following binding of a natural ligand. Synthetic peptides representing part of the transmembrane region were prepared. Some residues were replaced with serine in order to improve peptide solubility to allow purification and analysis. Both the peptides containing valine and glutamic acid dissolved in water and in an artificial lipid monolayer. The structures of the peptides were determined by NMR spectroscopy to be alpha-helical. No significant difference in conformation was observed between the two peptides. This result does not support the model proposing a conformational change. The receptor structures determined experimentally do allow alternative models involving receptor transmembrane region packing. Images PMID:1346763

  5. Evi9 Encodes a Novel Zinc Finger Protein That Physically Interacts with BCL6, a Known Human B-Cell Proto-Oncogene Product

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takuro; Yamazaki, Yukari; Saiki, Yuriko; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Largaespada, David A.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2000-01-01

    Evi9 is a common site of retroviral integration in BXH2 murine myeloid leukemias. Here we show that Evi9 encodes a novel zinc finger protein with three tissue-specific isoforms: Evi9a (773 amino acids [aa]) contains two C2H2-type zinc finger motifs, a proline-rich region, and an acidic domain; Evi9b (486 aa) lacks the first zinc finger motif and part of the proline-rich region; Evi9c (239 aa) lacks all but the first zinc finger motif. Proviral integration sites are located in the first intron of the gene and lead to increased gene expression. Evi9a and Evi9c, but not Evi9b, show transforming activity for NIH 3T3 cells, suggesting that Evi9 is a dominantly acting proto-oncogene. Immunolocalization studies show that Evi9c is restricted to the cytoplasm whereas Evi9a and Evi9b are located in the nucleus, where they form a speckled localization pattern identical to that observed for BCL6, a human B-cell proto-oncogene product. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments show that Evi9a and Evi9b, but not Evi9c, physically interact with BCL6, while deletion mutagenesis localized the interaction domains in or near the second zinc finger and POZ domains of Evi9 and BCL6, respectively. These results suggest that Evi9 is a leukemia disease gene that functions, in part, through its interaction with BCL6. PMID:10757802

  6. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Analysis Identifies the Proto-oncogene Tyrosine-Protein Kinase Src as a Crucial Virulence Determinant of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus in Chicken Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Wang, Fengjie; Han, Zongxi; Gao, Qi; Li, Huixin; Shao, Yuhao; Sun, Nana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Given the side effects of vaccination against infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT), novel strategies for ILT control and therapy are urgently needed. The modulation of host-virus interactions is a promising strategy to combat the virus; however, the interactions between the host and avian ILT herpesvirus (ILTV) are unclear. Using genome-wide transcriptome studies in combination with a bioinformatic analysis, we identified proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (Src) to be an important modulator of ILTV infection. Src controls the virulence of ILTV and is phosphorylated upon ILTV infection. Functional studies revealed that Src prolongs the survival of host cells by increasing the threshold of virus-induced cell death. Therefore, Src is essential for viral replication in vitro and in ovo but is not required for ILTV-induced cell death. Furthermore, our results identify a positive-feedback loop between Src and the tyrosine kinase focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which is necessary for the phosphorylation of either Src or FAK and is required for Src to modulate ILTV infection. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to identify a key host regulator controlling host-ILTV interactions. We believe that our findings have revealed a new potential therapeutic target for ILT control and therapy. IMPORTANCE Despite the extensive administration of live attenuated vaccines starting from the mid-20th century and the administration of recombinant vaccines in recent years, infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) outbreaks due to avian ILT herpesvirus (ILTV) occur worldwide annually. Presently, there are no drugs or control strategies that effectively treat ILT. Targeting of host-virus interactions is considered to be a promising strategy for controlling ILTV infections. However, little is known about the mechanisms governing host-ILTV interactions. The results from our study advance our understanding of host-ILTV interactions on a molecular level and provide experimental

  7. Evi-1, a murine zinc finger proto-oncogene, encodes a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, A S; Fishel, R; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1991-01-01

    Evi-1 was originally identified as a common site of viral integration in murine myeloid tumors. Evi-1 encodes a 120-kDa polypeptide containing 10 zinc finger motifs located in two domains 380 amino acids apart and an acidic domain located carboxy terminal to the second set of zinc fingers. These features suggest that Evi-1 is a site-specific DNA-binding protein involved in the regulation of RNA transcription. We have purified Evi-1 protein from E. coli and have employed a gel shift-polymerase chain reaction method using random oligonucleotides to identify a high-affinity binding site for Evi-1. The consensus sequence for this binding site is TGACAAGATAA. Evi-1 protein specifically protects this motif from DNase I digestion. By searching the nucleotide sequence data bases, we have found this binding site both in sequences 5' to genes in putative or known regulatory regions and within intron sequences. Images PMID:2017172

  8. Determining the Function of the fps/fes Proto-oncogene in Breast Development and Malignancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Abstract The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a 92 kDa protein tyrosine kinase. To understand the physiological...mammary tissue has revealed that Fps (and Fer) interact with protein components of the E- cadherin based adherens junction complex. Specifically, E...Introduction: The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a 92 kDa protein tyrosine kinase. To understand the biological

  9. A newly identified RET proto-oncogene polymorphism is found in a high number of endocrine tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Wolfgang; Mineva, Ivelina; Daneva, Teodora; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina; Niederle, Bruno; Vierhapper, Heinrich; Weissel, Michael; Wagner, Ludwig

    2005-07-01

    Multiple RET proto-oncogene transcripts, due to genomic variations and alternate splicing, have been described. To investigate endocrine tumor tissue characteristic RET proto-oncogene expression, we performed quantitative RT-PCR, Northern blot and Southern blot analyses of benign and malignant endocrine-derived tissues. We newly describe RET proto-oncogene expression in carcinoid-, gastrinoma- and insulinoma-derived tissue samples. In addition, the presence of a 3'-terminally truncated RET proto-oncogene mRNA variant in benign and malignant thyroid neoplasias, as well as in a pheochromocytoma, an ovarian carcinoma and a medullary thyroid carcinoma, is demonstrated. Southern blot analysis revealed no evidence of gross RET proto-oncogene rearrangements or deletions. As the underlying cause for a bi-allelic TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), a C (allele 1)/T (allele 2) transition within intron 19, was characterized. This polymorphism is close to a recently described polyadenylation site and lies within a binding site for the nucleic acid binding protein Pbx-1. Screening of healthy subjects and of patients suffering from various endocrine malignancies revealed exclusively allele 1 homozygous and allele 1/allele 2 heterozygous genotypes. Heterozygous genotypes were found in a significantly higher percentage in samples derived from endocrine tumor patients when compared with those from healthy control subjects. Homozygosity for allele 2 was found exclusively in somatic DNA derived from endocrine tumors with high malignant potential. Analysis of DNA derived from varying regions within individual anaplastic thyroid carcinomas revealed an allele 1/allele 2 switch of the RFLP banding pattern, indicating loss of heterozygosity at the RET proto-oncogene locus. In conclusion, our data demonstrate presence of a 5'-terminal RET proto-oncogene transcript in endocrine tissues and reveal a bi-allelic RET proto-oncogene polymorphism. A heterozygous genotype for

  10. Eukaryotic translation initiator protein 1A isoform, CCS-3, enhances the transcriptional repression of p21CIP1 by proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A).

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Yuri; Yu, Mi-young; Park, Jungeun; Lee, Choong-Eun; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Koh, Dong-In; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    FBI-1, a member of the POK (POZ and Kruppel) family of transcription factors, plays a role in differentiation, oncogenesis, and adipogenesis. eEF1A is a eukaryotic translation elongation factor involved in several cellular processes including embryogenesis, oncogenic transformation, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal organization. CCS-3, a potential cervical cancer suppressor, is an isoform of eEF1A. We found that eEF1A forms a complex with FBI-1 by co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and MALDI-TOF Mass analysis of the immunoprecipitate. GST fusion protein pull-downs showed that FBI-1 directly interacts with eEF1A and CCS-3 via the zinc finger and POZ-domain of FBI-1. FBI-1 co-localizes with either eEF1A or CCS-3 at the nuclear periplasm. CCS-3 enhances transcriptional repression of the p21CIP1 gene (hereafter referred to as p21) by FBI-1. The POZ-domain of FBI-1 interacts with the co-repressors, SMRT and BCoR. We found that CCS-3 also interacts with the co-repressors independently. The molecular interaction between the co-repressors and CCS-3 at the POZ-domain of FBI-1 appears to enhance FBI-1 mediated transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that CCS-3 may be important in cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and oncogenesis by interacting with the proto-oncogene FBI-1 and transcriptional co-repressors.

  11. Mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in sporadic pheochromocytomas

    SciTech Connect

    Thibodeau, S.N.; Lindor, N.M.; Honchel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the RET proto-oncogene have recently been demonstrated in kindreds with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) types 2A and 2B. Both of these autosomal dominant disorders are characterized by the development of neoplasia in cell lines of neural crest origin, such as medullary throid carcinomas and pheochromocytomas. Individuals with MEN 2B have, in addition, ganglioneuromas of the lips, tongue and colon, a marfanoid habitus, and corneal nerve thickening. Approximately 90% of patients with MEN 2A have a germline mutation in exons 10 or 11, while 95% of patients with MEN 2B have a T{yields}C transition in codon 918 of exon 16. In this study, pheochromocytomas from 29 individuals who had no clinical evidence of MEN 2A or 2B (sporadic) were examined for the presence of either germline or somatic mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the RET proto-oncogene. Of the 29 tumors examined, 3 (10%) were found to have a mutation in one of the three exons. One tumor had a G{yields}A transition in codon 609 (exon 10), another had a 6 bp deletion encompassing codons 632 & 633 (exon 11), and the final tumor had a T{yields}C transition in codon 918 (exon 16). These mutations were not found in the corresponding normal DNA from these individuals, indicating that the mutation were somatic in origin. Although we cannot exclude the possibility of mutations in other regions of the RET proto-oncogene, our data suggests that: (1) individuals presenting with apparently sporadic pheochromocytomas are not likely to have undiagnosed MEN 2A or 2B; and (2) somatic mutations in the RET proto-oncogene contribute to the process of tumorigenesis in a small percentage of sporadic pheochromocytomas.

  12. Identification of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor as the c-met proto-oncogene product

    SciTech Connect

    Bottaro, D.P.; Rubin, J.S.; Chan, A.M.L.; Aaronson, S.A. ); Faletto, D.L.; Kmiecik, T.E.; Vande Woude, G.F. )

    1991-02-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a plasminogen-like protein thought to be a humoral mediator of liver regeneration. A 145-kilodalton tyrosyl phosphoprotein observed in rapid response to HGF treatment of intact target cells was identified by immunoblot analysis as the {beta} subunit of the c-met proto-oncogene product, a membrane-spanning tyrosine kinase. Covalent cross-linking of {sup 125}I-labeled ligand to cellular proteins of appropriate size that were recognized by antibodies to c-met directly established the c-met product as the cell-surface receptor for HGF.

  13. Activation of endogenous c-fos proto-oncogene expression by human T-cell leukemia virus type I-encoded p40 sup tax protein in the human T-cell line, Jurkat

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Kinya; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Masataka; Sugamura, Kazuo )

    1989-08-01

    The authors examined the ability of the trans-acting factor p40{sup tax} of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I), which is thought to be a crucial molecule in T-cell transformation by HTLV-I, to activate expression of a set of endogenous cellular genes related to T-cell proliferation. For this purpose, they established a subclone (JPX-9) of Jurkat cells that was stably transfected with an expression plasmid containing the p40{sup tax} gene, whose expression is definitively dependent on heavy-metal ions. Expression of the interleukin-2 receptor {alpha} chain in JPX-9 cells was induced in response to the induction of p40{sup tax} expression, as has been demonstrated by others in transient transfection experiments with Jurkat cells. In addition, they found that significant enhancement of expression of the nuclear proto-oncogene c-fos was closely associated with expression of p40{sup tax}. Continuous enhancement in the level of c-fos mRNA was observed in the presence of p40{sup tax}. These results suggest that (i) in addition to the interleukin-2-interleukin-2 receptor system, cellular genes such as c-fos, which regulate normal T-cell growth, are also activated directly or indirectly by p40{sup tax} and (ii) p40{sup tax}-induced modulation of gene expression plays a crucial role in T-cell transformation by HTLV-I.

  14. Retargeted Foamy Virus Vectors Integrate Less Frequently Near Proto-oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Hocum, Jonah D.; Linde, Ian; Rae, Dustin T.; Collins, Casey P.; Matern, Lindsay K.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral gene therapy offers immense potential to treat many genetic diseases and has already shown efficacy in clinical trials. However, retroviral vector mediated genotoxicity remains a major challenge and clinically relevant approaches to reduce integration near genes and proto-oncogenes are needed. Foamy retroviral vectors have several advantages over gammaretroviral and lentiviral vectors including a potentially safer integration profile and a lower propensity to activate nearby genes. Here we successfully retargeted foamy retroviral vectors away from genes and into satellite regions enriched for trimethylated histone H3 at lysine 9 by modifying the foamy virus Gag and Pol proteins. Retargeted foamy retroviral vectors integrated near genes and proto-oncogenes less often (p < 0.001) than controls. Importantly, retargeted foamy retroviral vectors can be produced at high, clinically relevant titers (>107 transducing units/ml), and unlike other reported retargeting approaches engineered target cells are not needed to achieve retargeting. As proof of principle for use in the clinic we show efficient transduction and retargeting in human cord blood CD34+ cells. The modified Gag and Pol helper constructs we describe will allow any investigator to simply use these helper plasmids during vector production to retarget therapeutic foamy retroviral vectors. PMID:27812034

  15. Expression of hpttg proto-oncogene in lymphoid neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Carmen; Pereda, Teresa; Borrero, Juan J; Espina, Agueda; Romero, Francisco; Tortolero, María; Pintor-Toro, José A; Segura, Dolores I; Japón, Miguel A

    2002-11-21

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (pttg) is a distinct proto-oncogene which is expressed in certain normal tissues with high proliferation rate and in a variety of tumors. PTTG is the vertebrate analog of yeast securins Pds1 and Cut2 with a key role in the regulation of sister chromatid separation during mitosis. Impairment of PTTG regulated functions is expected to lead to chromosomal instability and aneuploidy. Human pttg (hpttg) is abundantly expressed in Jurkat T lymphoblastic lymphoma cells but not in normal peripheral blood leukocytes. To obtain additional data on the potential role of hpttg in lymphomagenesis we selected 150 cases of lymphoid tumors for the assessment of hpttg expression in tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical studies on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues revealed hPTTG in 38.8% of B-cell lymphomas, 70.2% of T-cell lymphomas, and 73.1% of Hodgkin's lymphomas. Among B-cell lymphomas, the most frequently immunostained tumors were plasma cell tumors, diffuse large cell lymphomas, and follicle center cell lymphomas. In Hodgkin's disease, immunoreactivity was mainly noted in Reed-Sternberg cells. In conclusion, the frequent overexpression of hpttg in many histological subtypes of lymphoma suggests the involvement of this proto-oncogene in lymphomagenesis.

  16. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  17. bcl-2 proto-oncogene expression in normal and neoplastic human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Delia, D; Aiello, A; Soligo, D; Fontanella, E; Melani, C; Pezzella, F; Pierotti, M A; Della Porta, G

    1992-03-01

    The present study provides immunobiochemical and molecular data on the differentiation-linked expression of the bcl-2 proto-oncogene in normal and neoplastic myeloid cells. Using a recently developed monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to the bcl-2 molecule, staining of normal bone marrow myeloblasts, promyelocytes, and myelocytes, but neither monocytes nor most polymorphonuclear cells, was demonstrated. By two-color flow cytometric analysis, bcl-2 was evidenced in CD33+ and CD33+/CD34+ myeloid cells as well as in the more primitive CD33-/CD34+ population. The leukemic cell lines HL-60, KG1, GM-1, and K562 were bcl-2 positive together with 11 of 14 acute myeloid leukemias (AML) and three of three chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) in blast crises; six of seven CML were negative. Among myelodysplastic cases, augmentation of the bcl-2 positive myeloblastic compartment was found in refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) and in transformation (RAEB-t). Western blots of myeloid leukemias and control lymphocytes extracts evidenced an anti-bcl-2 immunoreactive band of the expected size (26 Kd). Moreover, the HL-60 and KG1 cell lines, both positive for the bcl-2 protein, exhibited the appropriate size bcl-2 mRNA (7.5 Kb). These findings clearly indicate that the bcl-2 gene is operative in myeloid cells and that the anti-bcl-2 MoAb identifies its product and not a cross-reactive epitope. Induction of HL-60 differentiation toward the monocytic and granulocytic pathways was accompanied by a marked decrease in bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels; bivariate flow cytometric analysis showed that the fraction becoming bcl-2 negative was in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These data establish that the bcl-2 proto-oncogene is expressed on myeloid cells and their progenitors and is regulated in a differentiation-linked manner.

  18. [Nature of cancer explored from the perspective of the functional evolution of proto-oncogenes].

    PubMed

    Watari, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    The products of proto-oncogene play critical roles in the development or maintenance of multicellular societies in animals via strict regulatory systems. When these regulatory systems are disrupted, proto-oncogenes can become oncogenes, and thereby induce cell transformation and carcinogenesis. To understand the molecular basis for development of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes during evolution, we screened for ancestral proto-oncogenes from the unicellular choanoflagellate Monosiga ovata (M. ovata) by monitoring their transforming ability in mammalian cells; consequently, we isolated a Pak gene ortholog, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase as a 'primitive oncogene'. We also cloned Pak orthologs from fungi and the multicellular sponge Ephydatia fluviatilis, and compared their regulatory features with that of M. ovata Pak (MoPak). MoPak is constitutively active and induces cell transformation in mammalian cells. In contrast, Pak orthologs from multicellular animals are strictly regulated. Analyses of Pak mutants revealed that structural alterations in the auto-inhibitory domain (AID) are responsible for the enhanced kinase activity and the oncogenic activity of MoPak. Furthermore, we show that Rho family GTPases-mediated regulatory system of Pak kinase is conserved throughout the evolution from unicellular to multicellular animals, but the MoPak is more sensitive to the Rho family GTPases-mediated activation than multicellular Pak. These results show that maturation of AID function was required for the development of the strict regulatory system of the Pak proto-oncogene, and support the potential link between the development of the regulatory system of proto-oncogenes and the evolution of multicellularity. Further analysis of oncogenic functions of proto-oncogene orthologs in the unicellular genes would provide some insights into the mechanisms of the destruction of multicellular society in cancer.

  19. Primary structure of the human fgr proto-oncogene product p55/sup c-fgr/

    SciTech Connect

    Katamine, S.; Notario, V.; Rao, C.D.; Miki, T.; Cheah, M.S.C.; Tronick, S.R.; Robbins, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    Normal human c-fgr cDNA clones were constructed by using normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell mRNA as a template. Nucleotide sequence analysis of two such clones revealed a 1,587-base-pair-long open reading frame which predicted the primary amino acid sequence of the c-fgr translational product. Homology of this protein with the v-fgr translational product stretched from codons 128 to 516, where 32 differences among 388 codons were observed. Sequence similarity with human c-src, c-yes, and fyn translations products began at amino acid position 76 of the predicted c-fgr protein and extended nearly to its C-terminus. In contrast, the stretch of 75 amino acids at the N-terminus demonstrated a greatly reduced degree of relatedness to these same proteins. To verify the deduced amino acid sequence, antibodies were prepared against peptides representing amino- and carboxy-terminal regions of the predicted c-fgr translational product. Both antibodies specifically recognized a 55-kilodalton protein expressed in COS-1 cells transfected with a c-fgr cDNA expression plasmid. Moreover, the same protein was immunoprecipitated from an Epstein-Barr virus-infected Burkitt's lymphoma cell line which expressed c-fgr mRNA but not in its uninfected fgr mRNA-negative counterpart. These findings identified the 55-kilodalton protein as the product of the human fgr proto-oncogene.

  20. The bcl-2 candidate proto-oncogene product is a 24-kilodalton integral-membrane protein highly expressed in lymphoid cell lines and lymphomas carrying the t(14;18) translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Levy, Z; Nourse, J; Cleary, M L

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a 24-kilodalton protein that is the product of the human bcl-2 gene, implicated as an oncogene because of its presence at the site of t(14;18) translocation breakpoints. The Bcl-2 protein was detected by specific, highly sensitive rabbit antibodies and was shown to be present in a number of human lymphoid cell lines and tissues, as well as in mouse B cells transfected with a bcl-2 cDNA construct. Characterization of the Bcl-2 protein demonstrated that it has a lipophilic nature and is associated with membrane structures, probably by means of its hydrophobic carboxy-terminal membrane-spanning domain. In t(14;18)-carrying cell lines, the protein is predominantly localized to the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum, with a minor fraction in the plasma membrane. These properties, together with the observations that Bcl-2 does not have a characteristic signal peptide and is not glycosylated, suggest that it is an integral-membrane protein that spans the bilayer at its C-terminal hydrophobic region but is exposed only at the cytoplasmic surface. The relative abundance of the Bcl-2 protein in various human lymphoid cell lines correlated with transcription of the bcl-2 gene. The protein was abundant in all t(14;18)-carrying cell lines and lymphomas and was also found at lower levels in pre-B-cell lines and nonmalignant lymphoid tissues that do not carry t(14;18) translocations. These results suggest that the Bcl-2 protein is functional in normal B lymphocytes and that a quantitative difference in its expression may play a role in the pathogenesis of lymphomas carrying the t(14;18) translocation. Images PMID:2651903

  1. The c-mos proto-oncogene protein kinase turns on and maintains the activity of MAP kinase, but not MPF, in cell-free extracts of Xenopus oocytes and eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Nebreda, A R; Hunt, T

    1993-01-01

    During studies of the activation and inactivation of the cyclin B-p34cdc2 protein kinase (MPF) in cell-free extracts of Xenopus oocytes and eggs, we found that a bacterially expressed fusion protein between the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein and the Xenopus c-mos protein kinase (malE-mos) activated a 42 kDa MAP kinase. The activation of MAP kinase on addition of malE-mos was consistent, whereas the activation of MPF was variable and failed to occur in some oocyte extracts in which cyclin A or okadaic acid activated both MPF and MAP kinase. In cases when MPF activation was transient, MAP kinase activity declined after MPF activity was lost, and MAP kinase, but not MPF, could be maintained at a high level by the presence of malE-mos. When intact oocytes were treated with progesterone, however, the activation of MPF and MAP kinase occurred simultaneously, in contrast to the behaviour of extracts. These observations suggest that one role of c-mos may be to maintain high MAP kinase activity in meiosis. They also imply that the activation of MPF and MAP kinase in vivo are synchronous events that normally rely on an agent that has still to be identified. Images PMID:8387916

  2. Viral oncogenes, proto-oncogenes and homoeotic genes related to cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Antohi, S; Antohi-Talle, O

    1987-01-01

    Molecular studies on viral oncogenes and their products have led to the discovery of physiological proto-oncogenes, involved in the control of cell proliferation and gene activation. Other genetic and molecular investigations, initiated in Drosophila melanogaster and continued in different multicellular eukaryotes, have made evident the homoeotic genes, which are directly correlated with cell specialization, in the complex processes of differentiation and morphogenesis. Both gene classes are conserved to a high extent during evolution. They are involved in the eukaryotic mechanisms of differentiation control and proto-oncogenes, in particular, are related to malignant transformation. Some available data suggest a certain extent of relatedness between the gene products of both gene classes. A differentiation trigger model, including retroviral transposition, homoeotic genes and proto-oncogenes is discussed.

  3. Absence of RET proto-oncogene abnormalities in sporadic parathyroid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pausova, Z.; Janicic, N.; Konrad, E.

    1994-09-01

    Parathyroid tumors can occur either sporadically or as a part of inherited cancer syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 2A. Recently, development of this syndrome has been shown to be related to specific mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, a putative receptor tyrosine kinase. Activation of this proto-oncogene has been demonstrated not only in tumors of the MEN 2A syndrome, but also in other neoplasia of neuroectoderm origin, namely papillary thyroid carcinoma where a rearrangement of the RET proto-oncogene has been found. In the present study, a role of the RET proto-oncogene in the development of sporadic parathyroid tumors was investigated by analyzing DNA samples obtained from 13 parathyroid adenomas and 6 parathyroid hyperplasias. Southern blot, using BamHI restricted DNA, did not reveal any gross alteration of the gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was then employed to amplify DNA fragments corresponding to exons 10 and 11 in which all MEN 2A mutations have been identified. Amplified DNA fragments were all of expected size (exon 10, 182 bp; exon 11, 233 bp). Since a single point mutation at codon 634 has been found to be associated in close to 90% of cases with development of parathyroid tumors in patients with the MEN 2A syndrome, exon 11, containing this codon, was further examined by direct sequence analysis. Sequences obtained from all tumors tested, however, did not differ from the wild type sequence. Therefore, the mutation of the RET proto-oncogene commonly associated with parathyroid neoplasias in MEN 2A is uncommon in sporadic parathyroid tumors. This suggests that the pathogenesis of parathyroid tumors occurring sporadically may be different from those occurring in patients with the MEN 2A syndrome.

  4. Mutational activation of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene is a common event in the development of Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Koesters, R; Ridder, R; Kopp-Schneider, A; Betts, D; Adams, V; Niggli, F; Briner, J; von Knebel Doeberitz, M

    1999-08-15

    Activation of beta-catenin-mediated transcription is the nuclear end point of organ-specific Wnt signaling. In the developing kidney, Wnt-4, a secreted glycoprotein, acts as an autoinducer of the mesenchymal to epithelial transition that underlies normal nephron development. Dysregulation of this epithelial transformation process may lead to Wilms' tumors (WTs). In this study, we investigated the potential role of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene, a candidate downstream target molecule of Wnt-4 signaling, in the development of WTs. In 6 of 40 tumors (15%), mutation analysis revealed heterozygous missense mutations or small deletions that result in the loss of important regulatory phosphorylation sites within the beta-catenin protein. These findings indicate that activating beta-catenin mutations may play a significant role in the development of WTs and establish a direct link between Wilms' tumorigenesis and the Wnt signal transduction pathway governing normal kidney development.

  5. Expression of the Ets-1 proto-oncogene in human gastric carcinoma: correlation with tumor invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, T.; Ito, M.; Ohtsuru, A.; Naito, S.; Nakashima, M.; Fagin, J. A.; Yamashita, S.; Sekine, I.

    1996-01-01

    The proto-oncogene Ets-1 is a transcription factor known to control the expression of a number of genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling and has been postulated to play a role in cell migration and tumor invasion. To elucidate the involvement of Ets-1 in human gastric carcinomas, we examined 11 cases of gastric adenoma and 110 cases of gastric carcinoma by immunohistochemistry and compared the degree of Ets-1 expression with the depth of carcinoma invasion. Ets-1 was not expressed either in the normal gastric epithelium or in gastric adenomas. Among the 110 cases with gastric adenocarcinoma, 70 (63.6%) showed positive staining for the Ets-1 protein. In mucosal carcinomas, only 3 of 26 cases (11.5%) showed positive immunostaining for Ets-1. In contrast, 67 of 84 cases (79.8%) with submucosal or more invasive carcinomas showed immunopositivity and intense staining for Ets-1 in the tumor cells. The pattern of Ets-1 immunostaining in mucosal carcinomas was weak and differed from that of other local invasive carcinomas (P < 0.001). Histologically, signet-ring cell and mucinous carcinomas expressed relatively weak positivity for Ets-1. Ets-1 expression correlated significantly with the presence of lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). In situ hybridization, using an Ets-1 oligonucleotide probe, also confirmed the presence of Ets-1 mRNA in gastric carcinomas. Expression of Ets-1 mRNA was also detected in four different kinds of cultured human gastric carcinoma cell lines by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method. These findings suggest that Ets-1 is overexpressed in gastric mucosal cells that have undergone malignant conversion and that Ets-1 is one of the factors involved in the penetration of gastric carcinoma beyond the muscularis mucosa. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8952528

  6. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of fatty-acid synthase gene (FASN).

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-10-24

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of many adipogenic genes, and FBI-1 and SREBP-1 (sterol-responsive element (SRE)-binding protein 1) interact with each other directly via their DNA binding domains. FBI-1 enhanced the transcriptional activation of SREBP-1 on responsive promoters, pGL2-6x(SRE)-Luc and FASN gene. FBI-1 and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of the FASN gene by acting on the proximal GC-box and SRE/E-box. FBI-1, Sp1, and SREBP-1 can bind to all three SRE, GC-box, and SRE/E-box. Binding competition among the three transcription factors on the GC-box and SRE/E-box appears important in the transcription regulation. FBI-1 is apparently changing the binding pattern of Sp1 and SREBP-1 on the two elements in the presence of induced SREBP-1 and drives more Sp1 binding to the proximal promoter with less of an effect on SREBP-1 binding. The changes induced by FBI-1 appear critical in the synergistic transcription activation. The molecular mechanism revealed provides insight into how proto-oncogene FBI-1 may attack the cellular regulatory mechanism of FASN gene expression to provide more phospholipid membrane components needed for rapid cancer cell proliferation.

  7. A comprehensive overview of the role of the RET proto-oncogene in thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Romei, Cristina; Ciampi, Raffaele; Elisei, Rossella

    2016-04-01

    The rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene was identified in 1985 and, very soon thereafter, a rearrangement named RET/PTC was discovered in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). After this discovery, other RET rearrangements were found in PTCs, particularly in those induced by radiation. For many years, it was thought that these genetic alterations only occurred in PTC, but, in the past couple of years, some RET/PTC rearrangements have been found in other human tumours. 5 years after the discovery of RET/PTC rearrangements in PTC, activating point mutations in the RET proto-oncogene were discovered in both hereditary and sporadic forms of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). In contrast to the alterations found in PTC, the activation of RET in MTC is mainly due to activating point mutations. Interestingly, in the past year, RET rearrangements that were different to those described in PTC were observed in sporadic MTC. The identification of RET mutations is relevant to the early diagnosis of hereditary MTC and the prognosis of sporadic MTC. The diagnostic and prognostic role of the RET/PTC rearrangements in PTC is less relevant but still important in patient management, particularly for deciding if a targeted therapy should be initiated. In this Review, we discuss the pathogenic, diagnostic and prognostic roles of the RET proto-oncogene in both PTC and MTC.

  8. Elevated expression of proto-oncogenes accompany enhanced induction of heat-shock genes after exposure of rat embryos in utero to ionizing irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Higo, H.; Lee, J.Y.; Satow, Y.; Higo, K. )

    1989-01-01

    We have recently found that the effects of exposing rat embryos in utero to teratogens capable of producing cardiac anomalies were expressed later as enhanced induction of heat-shock proteins (hsp70 family) when embryonic hearts were cultured in vitro. However, it remained to be determined whether heat-shock proteins are induced in vivo after exposure to teratogens. The heat-shock response in some mammalian systems is known to be accompanied by elevated expression of proto-oncogenes. Using gene-specific DNA probes, we examined the levels of the expression (transcription) of heat-shock protein genes and two nuclear proto-oncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, in the embryos removed from irradiated pregnant mother rats 4 or 5 days after the irradiation. We found that the levels of expression in vivo of the hsp70 and c-myc genes in the irradiated embryos increased by approximately twofold as compared with those in the control. The expression in vivo of the c-fos gene was not detected in either the irradiated or non-irradiated embryos. After 0.5-hr incubation in vitro of the embryos, however, the expression of the c-fos gene in the irradiated embryos was highly enhanced whereas the control showed no changes. Although the exact functions of these gene products still remain obscure, the enhanced expression of hsp70 gene(s) and the nuclear proto-oncogenes observed in the present study may reflect repair of intracellular damages and/or regeneration of tissue by compensatory cell proliferation, processes that may disturb the normal program of organogenesis.

  9. Concordant down-regulation of proto-oncogene PML and major histocompatibility antigen HLA class I expression in high-grade prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiming; Melamed, Jonathan; Wei, Ping; Cox, Karen; Frankel, Wendy; Bahnson, Robert R; Robinson, Nikki; Pyka, Ron; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Pan

    2003-02-14

    Recognition of tumor cells by cytolytic T lymphocytes depends on cell surface MHC class I expression. As a mechanism to evade T cell recognition, many malignant cancer cells, including those of prostate cancer, down-regulate MHC class I. For the majority of human cancers, the molecular mechanism of MHC class I down regulation is unclear, although it is well established that MHC class I down-regulation is often associated with the down-regulation of multiple genes devoted to antigen presentation. Since the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) proto-oncogene controls multiple antigen-presentation genes in some murine cancer cells, we analyzed the expression of proto-oncogene PML and MHC class I in high-grade prostate cancer. We found that 30 of 37 (81%) prostate adenocarcinoma cases with a Gleason grade of 7-8 had more than 50% down-regulation of HLA class I expression. Among these, 22 cases (73.3%) had no detectable PML protein, while 4 cases (13.3%) showed partial PML down-regulation. In contrast, all 7 cases of prostate cancer with high expression of cell surface HLA class I had high levels of PML expression. Concordant down-regulation of HLA and PML was observed in different histological patterns of prostate adenocarcinoma. These results suggest that in high-grade prostate cancer, malfunction of proto-oncogene PML is a major factor in the down-regulation of cell surface HLA class I molecules, the target molecules essential for the direct recognition of cancer cells by cytolytic T lymphocytes.

  10. Hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) leads to activation of proto-oncogenes in human colorectal cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Keun; Cejas, Paloma; Feliu, Jaime; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Burgos, Emilio; Boland, C Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2014-04-01

    Hypomethylation of LINE-1 elements has emerged as a distinguishing feature in human cancers. Limited evidence indicates that some LINE-1 elements encode an additional internal antisense promoter, and increased hypomethylation of this region may lead to inadvertent activation of evolutionarily methylation-silenced downstream genes. However, the significance of this fundamental epigenetic mechanism in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been investigated previously. We analysed tissue specimens from 77 CRC patients with matched sets of normal colonic mucosa, primary CRC tissues (PC), and liver metastasis tissues (LM). LINE-1 methylation levels were determined by quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing. MET, RAB3IP and CHRM3 protein expression was determined by western blotting and IHC. MET proto-oncogene transcription and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmc) were evaluated by quantitative real-time-PCR. Global LINE-1 methylation levels in LM were significantly lower compared with the matched PC (PC=66.2% vs LM=63.8%; p<0.001). More importantly, we observed that specific LINE-1 sequences residing within the intronic regions of multiple proto-oncogenes, MET (p<0.001), RAB3IP (p=0.05) and CHRM3 (p=0.01), were significantly hypomethylated in LM tissues compared with corresponding matched PC. Furthermore, reduced methylation of specific LINE-1 elements within the MET gene inversely correlated with induction of MET expression in CRC metastases (R=-0.44; p<0.0001). Finally, increased 5-hmc content was associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation. Our results provide novel evidence that hypomethylation of specific LINE-1 elements permits inadvertent activation of methylation-silenced MET, RAB3IP and CHRM3 proto-oncogenes in CRC metastasis. Moreover, since 5-hmc content inversely correlated with LINE-1 hypomethylation in neoplastic tissues, our results provide important mechanistic insights into the fundamental processes underlying global DNA hypomethylation in human CRC.

  11. [Roles of proto-oncogene c-erbB2 during the initiation growth of rat primordial follicles].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Zheng, Li-ping; Li, Fang; Wu, Lei; Xu, Liang-quan; Xu, Ai-xia; Pan, Xiao-ling; Zheng, Yue-hui

    2010-05-01

    To study the expression and possible roles of proto-oncogene c-erbB2 during the initiation growth of primordial follicles. Ovaries were collected from 2-day-old SD rats and cultured in the Waymouth culture system. In-situ hybridization, RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed to assess the expressions of c-erbB2 mRNA and protein during the initiation growth of primordial follicles and after the effect of EGF. Western blot was used to observe the PCNA, p-ERK1/2 contents and correlation analysis was used to study the correlation relationship between contents of p-ERK1/2 and expressions of c-erbB2 mRNA at the same time of the primordial follicles growth. PCNA protein levels appeared to be more intense during the initiation growth of primordial follicles, EGF could promote the proliferation and differentiation of the primordial follicles. c-erbB2 mRNA existed in the oocytes endochylema and ErbB2 existed in the oocytes membrane, the expressions of c-erbB2 mRNA and ErbB2 appeared to be more intense when primordial follicles were cultured for 8 d than cultured for 0 d in the Waymouth culture system and were further increased with 50 ng/ml EGF for 4 d and 8 d. The same results were observed by RT-PCR, too. p-ERK1/2 protein levels were consistent with the changes of c-erbB2 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, Spearman rank correlation analysis showed there was a significant positive correlation relationship between the changes of p-ERK1/2 and the changes of c-erbB2 mRNA during the primordial follicles growth and after the effect of EGF (rs = 0.900, P < 0.05). It was suggested that proto-oncogene c-erbB2 may be play an important role during the initiation growth of primordial follicles with EGF, and it is indirectly suggested that c-erbB2 promotes the development of the primordial follicles via ERK-MAPK signal transduction.

  12. Multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2B and RET proto-oncogene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) is an autosomal dominant complex oncologic neurocristopathy including medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, gastrointestinal disorders, marphanoid face, and mucosal multiple ganglioneuromas. Medullary thyroid carcinoma is the major cause of mortality in MEN 2B syndrome, and it often appears during the first years of life. RET proto-oncogene germline activating mutations are causative for MEN 2B. The 95% of MEN 2B patients are associated with a point mutation in exon 16 (M918/T). A second point mutation at codon 883 has been found in 2%-3% of MEN 2B cases. RET proto-oncogene is also involved in different neoplastic and not neoplastic neurocristopathies. Other RET mutations cause MEN 2A syndrome, familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, or Hirschsprung's disease. RET gene expression is also involved in Neuroblastoma. The main diagnosis standards are the acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa and the molecular analysis of RET. In our protocol the rectal biopsy is, therefore, the first approach. RET mutation detection offers the possibility to diagnose MEN 2B predisposition at a pre-clinical stage in familial cases, and to perform an early total prophylactic thyroidectomy. The surgical treatment of MEN 2B is total thyroidectomy with cervical limphadenectomy of the central compartment of the neck. When possible, this intervention should be performed with prophylactic aim before 1 year of age in patients with molecular genetic diagnosis. Recent advances into the mechanisms of RET proto-oncogene signaling and pathways of RET signal transduction in the development of MEN 2 and MTC will allow new treatment possibilities. PMID:22429913

  13. Proto-Oncogenic Src Phosphorylates EB1 to Regulate the Microtubule-Focal Adhesion Crosstalk and Stimulate Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Luo, Youguang; Lyu, Rui; Chen, Jie; Liu, Ruming; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration, a complex process critical for tumor progression and metastasis, requires a dynamic crosstalk between microtubules (MTs) and focal adhesions (FAs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this event remain elusive. Herein we identify the proto-oncogenic protein Src as an important player in the regulation of the MT-FA crosstalk. Src interacts with and phosphorylates end-binding protein 1 (EB1), a member of MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs), both in cells and in vitro. Systematic mutagenesis reveals that tyrosine-247 (Y247) is the primary residue of EB1 phosphorylated by Src. Interestingly, both constitutively activated Src and Y247-phosphorylated EB1 localize to the centrosome and FAs. Src-mediated EB1 phosphorylation diminishes its interactions with other +TIPs, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and mitotic centromere associated kinesin (MCAK). In addition, EB1 phosphorylation at Y247 enhances the rate of MT catastrophe and significantly stimulates cell migration. These findings thus demonstrate that the Src-EB1 axis plays a crucial role in regulating the crosstalk between MTs and FAs to promote cell migration.

  14. Xenopus myc proto-oncogene during development: expression as a stable maternal mRNA uncoupled from cell division.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M V; Gusse, M; Evan, G I; Dathan, N; Mechali, M

    1986-01-01

    A Xenopus cDNA clone highly homologous to the proto-oncogene c-myc has been isolated and used to derive a homologous probe to study myc expression during embryonic development. Myc RNA is identified as a member of the class of maternal mRNAs expressed before fertilisation. It is highly accumulated from early oogenesis and an unfertilised egg contains 8 pg, about 10(5)-fold the myc content of proliferative somatic cells. After fertilisation a post-transcriptional regulation of the gene is induced and the accumulated myc RNA is degraded (t1/2 = 4 h 20 min) to reach a level at gastrula of 10 transcripts per cell; a value maintained during subsequent embryonic development. The Xenopus myc protein has also been identified by both myc-specific antibodies and hybrid selection experiments. Translation in vitro of Xenopus myc RNA shows that it encodes a 62-kd protein which is also recognised by myc antibodies in oocyte extracts. This protein is accumulated in late oogenesis. The results indicate an unusual uncoupling of myc expression and cell proliferation linked to a stabilisation of the RNA product. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3549280

  15. Cloning and characterization of the murine homolog of the sno proto-oncogene reveals a novel splice variant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelzer, T.; Lyons, G. E.; Kim, S.; Moreadith, R. W.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The cellular function(s) of the SNO protein remain undefined. To gain a better understanding of possible developmental roles of this cellular proto-oncogene, we have cloned two murine sno cDNAs and have investigated their expression patterns in embryonic and postnatal tissues. A single major transcript of 7.5 kb is detected in multiple tissues by Northern blot. However, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNAse protection assays revealed a novel splice variant in every tissue examined. Two isoforms, termed sno N and sno-dE3 (dE3, deletion within exon 3), were identified. The sno-dE3 isoform employs a novel 5' splice site located within the coding region of the third exon and deletes potential kinase recognition motifs. Transcripts of both sno isoforms accumulate ubiquitously but are most abundant in the developing central nervous system. The in situ hybridization patterns of sno expression during murine development suggest potential roles in tissues with a high degree of cellular proliferation. Expression in terminally differentiated tissues such as muscle and neurons indicates that SNO may have multiple functional activities.

  16. Expression and function of the novel proto-oncogene PBF in thyroid cancer: a new target for augmenting radioiodine uptake.

    PubMed

    Smith, Vicki E; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG)-binding factor (PBF; PTTG1IP) was initially identified through its interaction with the human securin, PTTG. Like PTTG, PBF is upregulated in multiple endocrine tumours including thyroid cancer. PBF is believed to induce the translocation of PTTG into the cell nucleus where it can drive tumourigenesis via a number of different mechanisms. However, an independent transforming ability has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that PBF is itself a proto-oncogene. Studied in only a limited number of publications to date, PBF is emerging as a protein with a growing repertoire of roles. Recent data suggest that PBF possesses a complex multifunctionality in an increasing number of tumour settings. For example, PBF is upregulated by oestrogen and mediates oestrogen-stimulated cell invasion in breast cancer cells. In addition to a possible role in the induction of thyroid tumourigenesis, PBF overexpression in thyroid cancers inhibits iodide uptake. PBF has been shown to repress sodium iodide symporter (NIS) activity by transcriptional regulation of NIS expression through the human NIS upstream enhancer and further inhibits iodide uptake via a post-translational mechanism of NIS governing subcellular localisation. This review discusses the current data describing PBF expression and function in thyroid cancer and highlights PBF as a novel target for improving radioiodine uptake and thus prognosis in thyroid cancer.

  17. Leukemia in Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome: a patient with a germline mutation in BRAF proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Makita, Yoshio; Narumi, Yoko; Yoshida, Makoto; Niihori, Tetsuya; Kure, Shigeo; Fujieda, Kenji; Matsubara, Yoichi; Aoki, Yoko

    2007-05-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, ectodermal abnormalities, and heart defects. Clinically, it overlaps with both Noonan syndrome and Costello syndrome, which are caused by mutations in 2 genes that encode molecules of the RAS/MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase) pathway (PTPN11 and HRAS, respectively). Recently, mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and MEK1/2 have been identified in patients with CFC syndrome. Somatic mutations in KRAS and BRAF have been identified in various tumors. In contrast, the association with malignancy has not been noticed in CFC syndrome. Here we report a 9-year-old boy diagnosed with CFC syndrome and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Sequencing analysis of the entire coding region of KRAS and BRAF showed a de novo germline BRAF E501G (1502A-->G) mutation. Molecular diagnosis and careful observations should be considered in children with CFC syndrome because they have germline mutations in proto-oncogenes and might develop malignancy.

  18. Cloning and characterization of the murine homolog of the sno proto-oncogene reveals a novel splice variant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelzer, T.; Lyons, G. E.; Kim, S.; Moreadith, R. W.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The cellular function(s) of the SNO protein remain undefined. To gain a better understanding of possible developmental roles of this cellular proto-oncogene, we have cloned two murine sno cDNAs and have investigated their expression patterns in embryonic and postnatal tissues. A single major transcript of 7.5 kb is detected in multiple tissues by Northern blot. However, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNAse protection assays revealed a novel splice variant in every tissue examined. Two isoforms, termed sno N and sno-dE3 (dE3, deletion within exon 3), were identified. The sno-dE3 isoform employs a novel 5' splice site located within the coding region of the third exon and deletes potential kinase recognition motifs. Transcripts of both sno isoforms accumulate ubiquitously but are most abundant in the developing central nervous system. The in situ hybridization patterns of sno expression during murine development suggest potential roles in tissues with a high degree of cellular proliferation. Expression in terminally differentiated tissues such as muscle and neurons indicates that SNO may have multiple functional activities.

  19. Mutation analysis of the c-mos proto-oncogene in human ovarian teratomas.

    PubMed Central

    de Foy, K. A.; Gayther, S. A.; Colledge, W. H.; Crockett, S.; Scott, I. V.; Evans, M. J.; Ponder, B. A.

    1998-01-01

    Female transgenic mice lacking a functional c-mos proto-oncogene develop ovarian teratomas, indicating that c-mos may behave as a tumour-suppressor gene for this type of tumour. We have analysed the entire coding region of the c-MOS gene in a series of human ovarian teratomas to determine whether there are any cancer-causing alterations. DNA from twenty teratomas was analysed by single-strand conformational analysis (SSCA) and heteroduplex analysis (HA) to screen for somatic and germline mutations. In nine of these tumours the entire gene was also sequenced. A previously reported polymorphism and a single new sequence variant were identified, neither of which we would predict to be disease-causing alterations. These results suggest that mutations in the coding region of the c-MOS gene do not play a significant role in the genesis of human ovarian teratomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:9635841

  20. [Advances Research on C-MYC Proto-oncogene in Multiple Myeloma -Review].

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Guo, Wen-Jian; Yao, Ron-Xin

    2016-08-01

    Multiple myeloma(MM) as one of the most common tumors of hmatologic system, is characterized by malignant proliferation of plasma cells, and the chemotherapy is the main therapeutic method. MM is an incurable disease because of drug-resistance of MM cells. Although the pathogenesis of MM remains unknown, the chromosome abnormalities exit in half of the patients, particularly the highly expressed gene C-MYC. Furthermore, plenty of clinical researches indicated a high expression level of C-MYC implied worse progression and/or poor prognosis of MM. Recently, the work exploiting the compounds targeting MYC has made substantial progress, even in the MM therapy. In this article, briefly the recent advances of the research on C-MYC proto-oncogene in multiple myeloma are reviewed.

  1. Analysis of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of the proto-oncogene SET/I2PP2A.

    PubMed

    Lam, B Daniel; Anthony, Eloise C; Hordijk, Peter L

    2012-01-01

    SET/I2PP2A is a nuclear protein that was initially identified as an oncogene in human undifferentiated acute myeloid leukemia, fused to the nuclear porin Nup-214. In addition, SET is a potent inhibitior of the phosphatase PP2A. Previously, we proposed a model in which the small GTPase Rac1 recruits SET from the nucleus to the plasma membrane to promote cell migration. This event represents an entirely novel concept in the field of cell migration. Now, fluorescent versions of the SET protein are generated to analyze its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling in live cells. Our studies showed that under steady-state conditions a fraction of the SET protein, which is primarily localized in the nucleus, translocates to the cytosol in an apparently random fashion. SET exiting the nucleus was also seen in spreading as well as dividing cells. We designed an image analysis method to quantify the frequency of nuclear exit of the SET proteins, based on 4D confocal imaging. This straightforward method was validated by analysis of SET wild-type and mutant proteins. This showed that the frequency of nuclear exit of a Ser-9 phosphomimetic mutant (S9E) is enhanced compared to wild-type SET or a S9A mutant. Thus, we have developed a novel method to analyze the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of the proto-oncogene SET dynamics in live cells. This method will also be applicable to monitor dynamic localization of other nuclear and/or cytoplasmic signaling proteins. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Cigarette Smoke Activates the Proto-Oncogene c-Src to Promote Airway Inflammation and Lung Tissue Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Patrick; Hardigan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) confers a 2-fold increased lung cancer risk even after adjusting for cigarette smoking, suggesting that common pathways are operative in both diseases. Although the role of the tyrosine kinase c-Src is established in lung cancer, less is known about its impact in other lung diseases, such as COPD. This study examined whether c-Src activation by cigarette smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke increased c-Src activity in human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells from healthy donors and in the lungs of exposed mice. Similarly, higher c-Src activation was measured in SAE cells from patients with COPD compared with healthy control subjects. In SAE cells, c-Src silencing or chemical inhibition prevented epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling in response to cigarette smoke but not EGF stimulation. Further studies showed that cigarette smoke acted through protein kinase C α to trigger c-Src to phosphorylate EGF receptor and thereby to induce mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in these cells. To further investigate the role of c-Src, A/J mice were orally administered the specific Src inhibitor AZD-0530 while they were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 months. AZD-0530 treatment blocked c-Src activation, decreased macrophage influx, and prevented airspace enlargement in the lungs of cigarette smoke–exposed mice. Moreover, inhibiting Src deterred the cigarette smoke–mediated induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -12 in alveolar macrophages and lung expression of cathepsin K, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC, all key factors in the pathogenesis of COPD. These results indicate that activation of the proto-oncogene c-Src by cigarette smoke promotes processes linked to the development of COPD. PMID:24111605

  3. Overexpression of the VAV proto-oncogene product is associated with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia displaying loss on 13q

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Sánchez, Rosario M.; Hernández, José A.; García, Juan L.; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; Miguel, Jesús San; Bustelo, Xosé R.; Hernández, Jesús M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The expression of the VAV proto-oncogene in 57 patients with chronic myeloproliferative disease (CMD), B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BALL) and B-cell non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL), and 61 with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) was analysed. VAV overexpression was observed in 19.5% of cases and 81% of VAV-positive tumours also displayed VAV phosphorylation. Overexpression was not observed in B-ALL or CMD, but 13% of B-NHL and 34.4% of B-CLL patients (P = 0.002) overexpressed VAV. The overexpression and phosphorylation of VAV was detected more frequently in 13q- chronic lymphocytic leukaemias (71.4%) versus other B-CLLs (23.4%, P = 0.001). Overexpression of VAV protein is a frequent event in patients with B-CLL displaying loss of 13q sequences. PMID:16704440

  4. Triptonide acts as a novel potent anti-lymphoma agent with low toxicity mainly through inhibition of proto-oncogene Lyn transcription and suppression of Lyn signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Dong, Fulu; Zhou, Quansheng

    2017-08-15

    Lyn is a proto-oncogene overexpressed and constitutively activated in lymphoma, and plays an important role in lymphoma initiation and malignant progression. Hence, the oncogenic Lyn has recently been targeted for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery; however, the effective Lyn-targeted drug for lymphoma treatment with low toxicity is absent in the clinical setting. The goal of this study is to explore powerful and low toxic Lyn-targeted anti-lymphoma agent. Here we show that triptonide, a small molecule purified from the herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, potently inhibits the proliferation of human B-lymphoma Raji and T-lymphoma Jurkat cells with IC50 of 5.7nM and 4.8nM, respectively. Strikingly, triptonide at a dose of 5mg/kg/day almost completely inhibited the lymphoma growth in human lymphoma cells-xenografted mice without obvious side effects, particularly; the tumors in 6 mice among the 8 xenografted mice were completely eradicated in vivo. Cell biological studies showed that triptonide at the doses of 2.5-10nM notably suppressed B-lymphoma cell colony-forming capability, and that triptonide at the dose of 20nM promoted apoptosis through activation of PARP and caspase 3, but reduction of BCL2 protein levels in the lymphoma cells. Molecular studies revealed that triptonide markedly inhibited oncogenic Lyn transcription through suppressing the promoter activity of the gene, and that it remarkably reduced both total and phosphorylated Lyn proteins, and diminished Lyn downstream ERK and ATK signal pathways. Additionally, triptonide significantly enhanced p38 phosphorylation. Together, triptonide exerts potent anti-lymphoma effect with low toxicity mainly through inhibition of proto-oncogene Lyn transcription and suppression of Lyn downstream ERK and ATK signal pathways, providing an attractive drug candidate for development of novel anti-lymphoma therapeutics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptor proto-oncogene transcription by a promoter site sensitive to S1 nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A C; Jinno, Y; Merlino, G T

    1988-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is the functional target of the mitogen EGF and the cellular homolog of the avian erythroblastosis virus erbB oncogene product. Regulation of expression of the proto-oncogene encoding the EGF receptor can be elucidated by studying the structure and function of the gene promoter outside the confines of the cell. Previously, we reported the isolation of the human EGF receptor gene promoter. The promoter is highly GC rich, contains no TATA or CAAT box, and has multiple transcription start sites. An S1 nuclease-sensitive site has now been found 80 to 110 base pairs (bp) upstream from the major in vivo transcription initiation site. Two sets of direct repeat sequences were found in this area; both conform to the motif TCCTCCTCC. When deletion mutations were made in this region of the promoter by using either Bal 31 exonuclease or S1 nuclease, we found that in vivo activity dropped three- to fivefold, on the basis of transient-transfection analysis. Examination of nuclear protein binding to normal and mutated promoter DNAs by gel retardation analysis and DNase I footprinting revealed that two specific factors bind to the direct repeat region but cannot bind to the S1 nuclease-mutated promoter. One of the specific factors is the transcription factor Sp1. The results suggest that these nuclear trans-acting factors interact with the S1 nuclease-sensitive region of the EGF receptor gene promoter and either directly or indirectly stimulate transcription. Images PMID:2847030

  6. Microsatellite instability and B-type Raf proto-oncogene mutation in colorectal cancer: Clinicopathological characteristics and effects on survival

    PubMed Central

    Batur, Sebnem; Bakkaloglu, Dogu Vuralli; Kepil, Nuray; Erdamar, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Prognostic significance of microsatellite instability (MSI) status and B-type Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF) mutation in colorectal cancer is controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and pathological characteristics associated with microsatellite stability and the effect of MSI and BRAF mutation on the survival of patients with colorectal cancer. The study included 145 colorectal cancer cases. All the patients were examined for DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins with an immunohistochemical method. Molecular assessment of MSI was available in a subset of 41 patients. In addition, BRAF mutation analysis was performed in 30 cases. Immunohistochemically, MMR deficiency was present in 28 (19.3%) patients. Female gender (p = 0.001), lesion size ≥5 cm (p = 0.013), Crohn-like response (p = 0.035), and right-sided localization (p < 0.001) were significantly more frequent among MMR-deficient patients. The overall survival was 44.1 ± 5.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 33.7-54.4). Multivariate analyses identified only high tumor grade as an independent predictor of poor overall survival: odd ratio, 6.7 (95% CI 2.1-21.7), p = 0.002. In the subset of patients with available BRAF assessment (n = 30), a negative BRAF status was associated with better survival when compared to a positive BRAF status (36.7 ± 2.1 vs. 34.1 ± 7.2 months, p = 0.048). The sensitivity and specificity of the immunohistochemical method in predicting positive MSI status, with the molecular method as a reference, were 85.7% (95% CI: 56.2%-97.5%) and 88.9% (95% CI: 69.7%-97.1%), respectively. BRAF appears to be a significant predictor of a worse outcome in patients with colorectal cancer. Further studies with a large spectrum of clinical and biological variables are warranted. PMID:27131021

  7. Proto-oncogene c-erbB2 initiates rat primordial follicle growth via PKC and MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background c-erbB2, a proto-oncogene coding epidermal growth factor receptor-like receptor, also as a chemosensitivity/prognosis marker for gynecologic cancer, may be involved in initiation of growth of rat primordial follicles. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role and signal pathway of c-erbB2 in onset of rat primordial follicle development. Methods The expression of c-erbB2 mRNA and protein in neonatal ovaries cultured 4 and 8 days with/without epidermal growth factor (EGF) were examined by in situ hybridization, RT-PCR and western blot. The function of c-erbB2 in the primordial folliculogenesis was abolished by small interfering RNA transfection. Furthermore, MAPK inhibitor PD98059 and PKC inhibitor calphostin were used to explore the possible signaling pathway of c-erbB2 in primordial folliculogenesis. Results The results showed that c-erbB2 mRNA was expressed in ooplasm and the expression of c-erbB2 decreased after transfection with c-erbB2 siRNA. Treatment with EGF at 50 ng/ml significantly increased c-erbB2 expression and primary and secondary follicle formation in ovaries. However, this augmenting effect was remarkably inhibited by c-erbB2 siRNA transfection. Furthermore, folliculogenesis offset was blocked by calphostin (5 × 10(-4) mmol/L) and PD98059 (5 × 10(-2) mmol/L), but both did not down-regulate c-erbB2 expression. In contrast, the expressions of p-ERK and p-PKC were decreased obviously by c-erbB2 siRNA transfection. Conclusions c-erbB2 initiates rat primordial follicle growth via PKC and MAPK pathways, suggesting an important role of c-erbB2 in rat primordial follicle initiation and development. PMID:20565902

  8. De novo RET proto-oncogene mutation in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    PubMed

    Chang, T J; Wu, S L; Chang, T C; Huang, S H; Chang, T J

    1999-10-01

    We report a case of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) with de novo RET proto-oncogene mutation. The patient, a 23-year-old Taiwanese woman, was admitted for treatment of recurrent medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) 7 years after a total thyroidectomy. Mucosal neuromas and marfanoid appearance were also noted. Because MEN 2B was suspected, the patient and her family members underwent genetic analysis. A heterozygous germline mutation at codon 918 (ATG-->ACG) of the proto-oncogene RET was detected in the patient. This mutation was considered de novo, as it was not detected in either of her parents or her siblings. The patient underwent surgery for removal of the recurrent tumor. Although no pheochromocytoma was noted, regular follow-up is necessary because of persistent hypercalcitoninemia.

  9. Proto-oncogene PBF/PTTG1IP regulates thyroid cell growth and represses radioiodide treatment.

    PubMed

    Read, Martin L; Lewy, Greg D; Fong, Jim C W; Sharma, Neil; Seed, Robert I; Smith, Vicki E; Gentilin, Erica; Warfield, Adrian; Eggo, Margaret C; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Leadbeater, Wendy E; Watkinson, John C; Franklyn, Jayne A; Boelaert, Kristien; McCabe, Christopher J

    2011-10-01

    Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG)-binding factor (PBF or PTTG1IP) is a little characterized proto-oncogene that has been implicated in the etiology of breast and thyroid tumors. In this study, we created a murine transgenic model to target PBF expression to the thyroid gland (PBF-Tg mice) and found that these mice exhibited normal thyroid function, but a striking enlargement of the thyroid gland associated with hyperplastic and macrofollicular lesions. Expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), a gene essential to the radioiodine ablation of thyroid hyperplasia, neoplasia, and metastasis, was also potently inhibited in PBF-Tg mice. Critically, iodide uptake was repressed in primary thyroid cultures from PBF-Tg mice, which could be rescued by PBF depletion. PBF-Tg thyroids exhibited upregulation of Akt and the TSH receptor (TSHR), each known regulators of thyrocyte proliferation, along with upregulation of the downstream proliferative marker cyclin D1. We extended and confirmed findings from the mouse model by examining PBF expression in human multinodular goiters (MNG), a hyperproliferative thyroid disorder, where PBF and TSHR was strongly upregulated relative to normal thyroid tissue. Furthermore, we showed that depleting PBF in human primary thyrocytes was sufficient to increase radioiodine uptake. Together, our findings indicate that overexpression of PBF causes thyroid cell proliferation, macrofollicular lesions, and hyperplasia, as well as repression of the critical therapeutic route for radioiodide uptake.

  10. Expression of the proto-oncogene Fos after exposure to radiofrequency radiation relevant to wireless communications.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Timothy D; Brownstein, Bernard H; Parry, Jesse J; Thompson, Dominic; Cha, Bibianna A; Moros, Eduardo G; Rogers, Buck E; Roti Roti, Joseph L

    2005-10-01

    In this study the expression levels of the proto-oncogene Fos were measured after exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation at two relatively high specific absorption rates (SARs) of 5 and 10 W/kg for three types of modulated signals: 847.74 MHz code division multiple access (CDMA), 835.62 MHz frequency division multiple access (FDMA), and 836.55 MHz time division multiple access (TDMA). This work was undertaken to confirm a previous report by Goswami et al. (Radiat. Res. 151, 300-309, 1999) that CDMA and FDMA radiation caused small but statistically significant increases in Fos levels as cells entered plateau phase during exposure. No effects on Myc or Jun levels were observed in that study. Therefore, in the present study, analyses were restricted to Fos expression during the transition from exponential growth to plateau phase. Fos expression was measured using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Serum-stimulated C3H 10T(1/2) cells were used as a positive control for Fos expression. Possible influences of final cell number or pH variability on Fos expression were evaluated. Expression of Fos mRNA in C3H 10T(1/2) cells was not significantly different from that found after sham exposure at either SAR level for any signal modulation. Therefore, the results of Goswami et al. could not be confirmed.

  11. Spectrum of mutations of the ret proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lyonnet, S.; Attie, T.; Pelet, A.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital malformation (1 in 5,000 live births) ascribed to the absence of autonomic ganglia cells in the terminal hindgut. HSCR is a neurocristopathie resulting in intestinal obstruction in neonates and in milder phenotypes in adults. Recently, we have mapped a dominant gene for familial HSCR to chromosome 10q11.2 and identified mutations of the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR families. Studying a large number of HSCR patients by DGGE analysis of the RET coding sequence we observed: (a) various RET mutations in our series of 30 HSCR families, (b) de novo mutations in several sporadic HSCR cases, (c) the variable clinical expression of RET mutations in HSCR families and the absence of genotype/phenotype correlations at the RET locus, (d) the low penetrance of RET mutations in HSCR families supporting the role of one or several modifier genes, and (e) the existence of syndromic HSCR families unlinked to the RET locus.

  12. Mutations in exon 10 of the RET proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Attie, T.; Eng, C.; Mulligan, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital malformation ascribed to the absence of autonomic ganglion cells in the terminal hindgut. Recently, we have identified mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR families. Mutations of the RET gene have also been reported in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). While RET mutations in HSCR are scattered on the whole coding sequence, MEN 2A and FMTC mutations are clustered in 5 cystein codons of exons 10 and 11. Here, we report on HSCR families carrying mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene, one of them involving a cystein codon. Germ-line mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene may contribute to either an early development defect (HSCR) or inherited predisposition to cancer (MEN 2A and FMTC), probable depending on the nature and location of the mutation. These data also suggest that HSCR patients with mutations in exon 10 might subsequently prove to be at risk for MEN 2A or FMTC since several MEN 2A/HSCR associations have been reported.

  13. Proto-oncogene PBF/PTTG1IP regulates thyroid cell growth and represses radioiodide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Read, Martin L.; Lewy, Greg D.; Fong, Jim C.W.; Sharma, Neil; Seed, Robert I.; Smith, Vicki E.; Gentilin, Erica; Warfield, Adrian; Eggo, Margaret C.; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Leadbeater, Wendy E.; Watkinson, John C.; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Boelaert, Kristien; McCabe, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    PTTG Binding Factor (PBF or PTTG1IP) is a little characterised proto-oncogene that has been implicated in the etiology of breast and thyroid tumors. In this study, we created a murine transgenic model to target PBF expression to the thyroid gland (PBF-Tg mice) and found that these mice exhibited normal thyroid function but a striking enlargement of the thyroid gland associated with hyperplastic and macrofollicular lesions. Expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), a gene essential to the radioiodine ablation of thyroid hyperplasia, neoplasia and metastasis, was also potently inhibited in PBF-Tg mice. Critically, iodide uptake was repressed in primary thyroid cultures from PBF-Tg mice, which could be rescued by PBF depletion. PBF-Tg thyroids exhibited upregulation of Akt and the TSH receptor (TSHR), each known regulators of thyrocyte proliferation, along with upregulation of the downstream proliferative marker cyclin D1. We extended and confirmed findings from the mouse model by examining PBF expression in human multinodular goitres (MNG), a hyperproliferative thyroid disorder, where PBF and TSHR was strongly upregulated relative to normal thyroid tissue. Further, we showed that depleting PBF in human primary thyrocytes was sufficient to increase radioiodine uptake. Together, our findings indicate that overexpression of PBF causes thyroid cell proliferation, macrofollicular lesions and hyperplasia, as well as repression of the critical therapeutic route for radioiodide uptake. PMID:21844185

  14. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  15. The proto-oncogene C-KIT maps to canid B-chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Kukekova, Anna V; Yudkin, Dmitry V; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Vorobieva, Nadezhda V; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Perelman, Polina L; Graphodatskaya, Daria A; Trut, Lyudmila N; Yang, Fengtang; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2005-01-01

    Plant and animal karyotypes sometimes contain variable elements, that are referred to as additional or B-chromosomes. It is generally believed that B-chromosomes lack major genes and represent parasitic and selfish elements of a genome. Here we report, for the first time, the localization of a gene to B-chromosomes of mammals: red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and two subspecies of raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides). Identification of the proto-oncogene C-KIT on B-chromosomes of two Canidae species that diverged from a common ancestor more than 12.5 million years ago argues against the current view of B-chromosomes. Analyses of fox B-chromosomal C-KIT gene from a flow-sorted fox B-chromosome-specific library revealed the presence of intron-exon boundaries and high identity between sequenced regions of canine and fox B-chromosomal C-KIT copies. Identification of C-KIT gene on all B-chromosomes of two canid species provides new insight into the origin and evolution of supernumeraries and their potential role in the genome.

  16. Exclusion of the RET proto-oncogene as candidate for total colonic aganglionsis in the spotting lethal (sl) rat strain

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccherini, I.; Matera, I.; Devoto, M.

    1994-09-01

    Causative germline mutations and deletions of the RET proto-oncogene have been demonstrated in a number of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) patients showing either short- or long-segment intestinal aganglionosis, including both sporadic and familial cases with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The spotting lethal (sl) rats show autosomal recessive recurrence of total colonic aganglionosis which resembles the long-segment HSCR type in humans with 100% mortality of the homozygotes at 4-5 weeks of age. Heterozygotes were backcrossed with DA rats and the F2 offspring was used to test the possible cosegregation of the aganglionosis and the RET proto-oncogene. A genomic DNA fragment of the rat RET gene was amplified using degenerated oligonucleotides, subcloned and sequenced. The coding portion of this DNA fragment (300bp) shares 93% and 81% of its amino acids with the murine and human RET proto-oncogene, respectively. An A{yields}G transition in the third nucleotide of the alanine codon corresponding to amino acid Glu90 of the human RET gene was identified in the sl but not in the wild type DA strain. This mutation creates a Bsp 1286I restriction site. Restriction analysis performed on 57 affected rats (mutated homozygotes) of the F2 generation revealed independent segregation between the rat colonic aganglionosis gene and RET, thus allowing the exclusion of the latter proto-oncogene as candidate for the mutation present in the sl rat strain. Several different candidate rat chromosomal regions are being analyzed in order to proceed with the mapping of the genetic defect in the sl rats.

  17. Control of c-fos and c-myc proto-oncogene induction in rat thyroid cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Isozaki, O.; Kohn, L.D. )

    1987-11-01

    Removal of TSH, insulin, and cortisol from the medium, and decreasing the serum content to 0.2%, abolishes both the proliferate and differentiated state of FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in culture. In these basal conditions, the individual addition of TSH, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), alpha 1-adrenergic agents, or A23187, increase c-myc and/or c-fos proto-oncogene expression. Under the same conditions, only the addition of TSH increased cAMP levels; 8-bromo-cAMP can increase c-myc or c-fos mRNA levels. Pretreatment of cells with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, an agent which down regulates the C-kinase, completely inhibits the effect of TPA on proto-oncogene expression but has no affect on the A23187 induced-increase. The sum of these results indicate that at least four separate signal systems independently increase c-myc or c-fos gene expression in FRTL-5 cells cAMP (TSH), C-kinase (TPA), Ca++/phosphoinositide (A23187), and that influenced by insulin/IGF-I. None of the ligands, when individually returned to cells in basal medium (no TSH, insulin, or cortisol and only 0.2% serum), increases cell number; norepinephrine, and A23187 do not increase (3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA under these conditions; and combinations of the ligands can be more than additive in effecting (3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA but are only additive in effecting proto-oncogene expression. Insulin/IGF-I plus TSH or insulin/IGF-I plus norepinephrine can increase both proto-oncogene expression and (3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA to the same extent; however, the former combination can increase cell number whereas the latter cannot. There is therefore no simple correlation between the ability of the above ligands to increase proto-oncogene expression and their ability to increase cell number or induce DNA synthesis.

  18. Microarray screening for target genes of the proto-oncogene PLAG1.

    PubMed

    Voz, Marianne L; Mathys, Janick; Hensen, Karen; Pendeville, Hélène; Van Valckenborgh, Isabelle; Van Huffel, Christophe; Chavez, Marcela; Van Damme, Boudewijn; De Moor, Bart; Moreau, Yves; Van de Ven, Wim J M

    2004-01-08

    PLAG1 is a proto-oncogene whose ectopic expression can trigger the development of pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands and of lipoblastomas. As PLAG1 is a transcription factor, able to activate transcription through the binding to the consensus sequence GRGGC(N)(6-8)GGG, its ectopic expression presumably results in the deregulation of target genes, leading to uncontrolled cell proliferation. The identification of PLAG1 target genes is therefore a crucial step in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in PLAG1-induced tumorigenesis. To this end, we analysed the changes in gene expression caused by the conditional induction of PLAG1 expression in fetal kidney 293 cell lines. Using oligonucleotide microarray analyses of about 12 000 genes, we consistently identified 47 genes induced and 12 genes repressed by PLAG1. One of the largest classes identified as upregulated PLAG1 targets consists of growth factors such as the insulin-like growth factor II and the cytokine-like factor 1. The in silico search for PLAG1 consensus sequences in the promoter of the upregulated genes reveals that a large proportion of them harbor several copies of the PLAG1-binding motif, suggesting that they represent direct PLAG1 targets. Our approach was complemented by the comparison of the expression profiles of pleomorphic adenomas induced by PLAG1 versus normal salivary glands. Concordance between these two sets of experiments pinpointed 12 genes that were significantly and consistently upregulated in pleomorphic adenomas and in PLAG1-expressing cells, identifying them as putative PLAG1 targets in these tumors.

  19. Salivary gland tumors in transgenic mice with targeted PLAG1 proto-oncogene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Jeroen; Van Dyck, Frederik; Braem, Caroline V; Van Valckenborgh, Isabelle C; Voz, Marianne; Wassef, Michel; Schoonjans, Luc; Van Damme, Boudewijn; Fiette, Laurence; Van de Ven, Wim J M

    2005-06-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) proto-oncogene overexpression is implicated in various human neoplasias, including salivary gland pleomorphic adenomas. To further assess the oncogenic capacity of PLAG1, two independent PLAG1 transgenic mouse strains were established, PTMS1 and PTMS2, in which activation of PLAG1 overexpression is Cre mediated. Crossbreeding of PTMS1 or PTMS2 mice with MMTV-Cre transgenic mice was done to target PLAG1 overexpression to salivary and mammary glands, in the P1-Mcre/P2-Mcre offspring. With a prevalence of 100% and 6%, respectively, P1-Mcre and P2-Mcre mice developed salivary gland tumors displaying various pleomorphic adenoma features. Moreover, histopathologic analysis of salivary glands of 1-week-old P1-Mcre mice pointed at early tumoral stages in epithelial structures. Malignant characteristics in the salivary gland tumors and frequent lung metastases were found in older tumor-bearing mice. PLAG1 overexpression was shown in all tumors, including early tumoral stages. The tumors revealed an up-regulation of the expression of two distinct, imprinted gene clusters (i.e., Igf2/H19 and Dlk1/Gtl2). With a latency period of about 1 year, 8% of the P2-Mcre mice developed mammary gland tumors displaying similar histopathologic features as the salivary gland tumors. In conclusion, our results establish the strong and apparently direct in vivo tumorigenic capacity of PLAG1 and indicate that the transgenic mice constitute a valuable model for pleomorphic salivary gland tumorigenesis and potentially for other glands as well.

  20. Pro-invasive Effect of Proto-oncogene PBF Is Modulated by an Interaction with Cortactin

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Rachel J.; Imruetaicharoenchoke, Waraporn; Read, Martin L.; Sharma, Neil; Poole, Vikki L.; Gentilin, Erica; Bansal, Sukhchain; Bosseboeuf, Emy; Fletcher, Rachel; Nieto, Hannah R.; Mallick, Ujjal; Hackshaw, Allan; Mehanna, Hisham; Boelaert, Kristien; Smith, Vicki E.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Metastatic disease is responsible for the majority of endocrine cancer deaths. New therapeutic targets are urgently needed to improve patient survival rates. Objective: The proto-oncogene PTTG1-binding factor (PBF/PTTG1IP) is overexpressed in multiple endocrine cancers and circumstantially associated with tumor aggressiveness. This study aimed to understand the role of PBF in tumor cell invasion and identify possible routes to inhibit its action. Design, Setting, Patients, and Interventions: Thyroid, breast, and colorectal cells were transfected with PBF and cultured for in vitro analysis. PBF and cortactin (CTTN) expression was determined in differentiated thyroid cancer and The Cancer Genome Atlas RNA-seq data. Primary Outcome Measure: Pro-invasive effects of PBF were evaluated by 2D Boyden chamber, 3D organotypic, and proximity ligation assays. Results: Our study identified that PBF and CTTN physically interact and co-localize, and that this occurs at the cell periphery, particularly at the leading edge of migrating cancer cells. Critically, PBF induces potent cellular invasion and migration in thyroid and breast cancer cells, which is entirely abrogated in the absence of CTTN. Importantly, we found that CTTN is over-expressed in differentiated thyroid cancer, particularly in patients with regional lymph node metastasis, which significantly correlates with elevated PBF expression. Mutation of PBF (Y174A) or pharmacological intervention modulates the PBF: CTTN interaction and attenuates the invasive properties of cancer cells. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate a unique role for PBF in regulating CTTN function to promote endocrine cell invasion and migration, as well as identify a new targetable interaction to block tumor cell movement. PMID:27603901

  1. Comparative analysis of ras proto-oncogene mutations in selected mammalian tumors.

    PubMed

    Watzinger, F; Mayr, B; Gamerith, R; Vetter, C; Lion, T

    2001-04-01

    Point mutations within ras proto-oncogenes are frequently detected in human malignancies and in different types of experimentally induced tumors in animals. In contrast to findings in experimental animal models of carcinogenesis, little is known about the incidence of ras mutations in naturally occurring animal tumors. In the present study, we investigated whether point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot-spot codons 12, 13, and 61, occur at comparable frequencies in human malignancies and spontaneously occurring tumors in other mammalian species. Two hundred seventy-nine of the most frequent canine and feline neoplasms were analyzed for changes in mutational hot-spot regions of the N-, Ki-, and Ha-ras genes. DNA fragments from exons 1 and 2 of all three ras genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the presence of point mutations was assessed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing of amplified products. Only one sample, a case of canine melanoma, exhibited an Ha-ras mutation. Thus, our data strongly suggested that ras mutations at the hot-spot loci are apparently very rare and do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of the spontaneously occurring canine and feline tumors investigated. These observations were in marked contrast to those in experimental rodent models of carcinogen-induced mammary and skin tumors that described a consistent association with Ha- or Ki-ras activation. The role of ras oncogene activation in related human malignancies therefore cannot be readily inferred from studies of experimental carcinogenesis in animal models.

  2. The BCL6 proto-oncogene: a leading role during germinal center development and lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Fabrice; Ruminy, Philippe; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé

    2007-02-01

    The BCL6 proto-oncogene encodes a nuclear transcriptional repressor, with pivotal roles in germinal center (GC) formation and regulation of lymphocyte function, differentiation, and survival. BCL6 suppresses p53 in GCB-cells and its constitutive expression can protect B-cell lines from apoptosis induced by DNA damage. BCL6-mediated expression may allow GCB-cells to sustain the low levels of physiological DNA breaks related to somatic mutation (SM) and immunoglobulin class switch recombination which physiologically occur in GCB-cells. Three types of genetic events occur in the BCL6 locus and involve invariably the 5' non-coding region and include translocations, deletions and SM actively targeted to the 5' untranslated region. These acquired mutations occur independently of translocations but may be involved in the deregulation of the gene and/or translocation mechanisms. The favorable prognostic value of high levels of BCL6 gene expression in NHL seems well-established. By contrast, the relevance of SM or translocation of the gene remains unclear. However, it is likely that non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) harboring the most frequent translocation involving BCL6, i.e. t(3;14), are characterized by a common cell of origin and similar oncogenic mechanisms. Several experiments and mouse models mimicking BCL6 translocation occurring in human lymphoma have demonstrated the oncogenic role of BCL6 and constitute a rational to consider BCL6 as a new therapeutic target in NHL. BCL6 blockade can be achieved by different strategies which include siRNA, interference by specific peptides or regulation of BCL6 acetylation by pharmacological agents such as SAHA or niacinamide and would be applicable to most type of B-cell NHL.

  3. The proto-oncogene PKCι regulates the alternative splicing of Bcl-x pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Jacqueline C.; Vu, Ngoc; Shultz, Michael D.; Mba, Uzoma; Shapiro, Brian A.; Chalfant, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Two splice variants derived from the BCL-x gene via alternative 5′ splice site selection (5′SS) are pro-apoptotic Bcl-x(s) and anti-apoptotic Bcl-x(L). Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that apoptotic signaling pathways regulated the alternative 5′SS selection via protein phosphatase-1 and de novo ceramide. In this study, we examined the elusive pro-survival signaling pathways that regulate the 5′SS selection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA in cancer cells. Taking a broad-based approach by utilizing a number of small molecule inhibitors of various mitogenic/survival pathways, we found that only treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 (50 μM) or the pan-PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 (25 μM) decreased the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(s) mRNA ratio. Pan-PKC inhibitors that did not target the atypical PKCs, PKCι and PKCζ, had no effect on the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(s) mRNA ratio. Additional studies demonstrated that downregulation of the proto-oncogene, PKCι, in contrast to PKCζ, also resulted in a decrease in the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(s) mRNA ratio. Furthermore, downregulation of PKCι correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of SAP155, an RNA trans-acting factor that regulates the 5′SS selection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA. Inhibition of the PI3K or atypical PKC pathway induced a dramatic loss of SAP155 complex formation at ceramide-responsive RNA cis-element 1. Lastly, forced expression of Bcl-x(L) “rescued” the loss of cell survival induced by PKCι siRNA. In summary, the PI3K/PKCι regulates the alternative splicing of Bcl-x pre-mRNA with implications in the cell survival of NSCLC cells. PMID:22522453

  4. Search for NTRK1 proto-oncogene rearrangements in human thyroid tumours originated after therapeutic radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bounacer, A; Schlumberger, M; Wicker, R; Du-Villard, J A; Caillou, B; Sarasin, A; Suárez, H G

    2000-01-01

    Rearrangements of NTRK1 proto-oncogene were detected in ‘spontaneous’ papillary thyroid carcinomas with a frequency varying from 5 to 25% in different studies. These rearrangements result in the formation of chimaeric genes composed of the tyrosine kinase domain of NTRK1 fused to 5′ sequences of different genes. To investigate if the NTRK1 gene plays a role in radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis, we looked for the presence of NTRK1 -activating rearrangements in 32 human thyroid tumours (16 follicular adenomas, 14 papillary carcinomas and two lymph-node metastases of papillary thyroid carcinomas) from patients who had received external radiation, using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Southern blot and direct sequencing techniques. These data were compared with those obtained in a series of 28 ‘spontaneous’ benign and malignant thyroid tumours, collected from patients without a history of radiation exposure and four in vitro culture cell lines derived from ‘spontaneous’ thyroid cancers. Our results concerning the radiation-associated tumours showed that only rearrangements between NTRK1 and TPM3 genes (TRK oncogene) were detected in 2/14 papillary carcinomas and in one lymph-node metastasis of one of these papillary thyroid carcinomas. All the radiation-associated adenomas were negative. In the ‘spontaneous’ tumours, only one of the 14 papillary carcinomas and one of the four in vitro culture cell lines, derived from a papillary carcinoma, presented a NTRK1 rearrangement also with the TPM3 gene. Twenty-five of this series of radiation-associated tumours were previously studied for the ras and RET/PTC oncogenes. In conclusion, our data: (a) show that the overall frequency of NTRK1 rearrangements is similar between radiation-associated (2/31: 6%) and ‘spontaneous’ epithelial thyroid tumours (2/32: 6%). The frequency, if we consider exclusively the papillary carcinomas, is in both cases 12%; (b) show that the TRK oncogene

  5. Activation of the Lbc Rho Exchange Factor Proto-Oncogene by Truncation of an Extended C Terminus That Regulates Transformation and Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Sterpetti, Paola; Hack, Andrew A.; Bashar, Mariam P.; Park, Brian; Cheng, Sou-De; Knoll, Joan H. M.; Urano, Takeshi; Feig, Larry A.; Toksoz, Deniz

    1999-01-01

    The human lbc oncogene product is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that specifically activates the Rho small GTP binding protein, thus resulting in biologically active, GTP-bound Rho, which in turn mediates actin cytoskeletal reorganization, gene transcription, and entry into the mitotic S phase. In order to elucidate the mechanism of onco-Lbc transformation, here we report that while proto- and onco-lbc cDNAs encode identical N-terminal dbl oncogene homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains, proto-Lbc encodes a novel C terminus absent in the oncoprotein that includes a predicted α-helical region homologous to cyto-matrix proteins, followed by a proline-rich region. The lbc proto-oncogene maps to chromosome 15, and onco-lbc represents a fusion of the lbc proto-oncogene N terminus with a short, unrelated C-terminal sequence from chromosome 7. Both onco- and proto-Lbc can promote formation of GTP-bound Rho in vivo. Proto-Lbc transforming activity is much reduced compared to that of onco-Lbc, and a significant increase in transforming activity requires truncation of both the α-helical and proline-rich regions in the proto-Lbc C terminus. Deletion of the chromosome 7-derived C terminus of onco-Lbc does not destroy transforming activity, demonstrating that it is loss of the proto-Lbc C terminus, rather than gain of an unrelated C-terminus by onco-Lbc, that confers transforming activity. Mutations of onco-Lbc DH and PH domains demonstrate that both domains are necessary for full transforming activity. The proto-Lbc product localizes to the particulate (membrane) fraction, while the majority of the onco-Lbc product is cytosolic, and mutations of the PH domain do not affect this localization. The proto-Lbc C-terminus alone localizes predominantly to the particulate fraction, indicating that the C terminus may play a major role in the correct subcellular localization of proto-Lbc, thus providing a mechanism for regulating Lbc oncogenic potential. PMID:9891067

  6. Structure, chromosome location, and expression of the mouse zinc finger gene Krox-20: multiple gene products and coregulation with the proto-oncogene c-fos.

    PubMed Central

    Chavrier, P; Janssen-Timmen, U; Mattéi, M G; Zerial, M; Bravo, R; Charnay, P

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the structure and the regulation of Krox-20, a mouse zinc finger-encoding gene which is transiently activated following serum stimulation of quiescent fibroblast cells in culture. The gene is localized on chromosome 10, band B5, in the mouse, and the homologous human gene also maps to chromosome 10 (region q21.1 to q22.1). Alternative splicing of the 5'-most intron of the Krox-20 gene gives rise to mRNAs encoding putative zinc finger proteins with different N termini. The first exon contains a sequence element with strong similarity to the c-fos proto-oncogene serum response element (SRE). This element can functionally substitute for the c-fos SRE, and it binds the same nuclear protein. It is probably responsible for the serum induction of Krox-20, possibly in combination with a weaker SRE located in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Our findings suggest that c-fos, Krox-20, and a number of immediate-early serum response genes are coregulated and that the SRE and its cognate protein are essential components of this regulatory pathway. Images PMID:2496302

  7. The gep proto-oncogene Gα13 mediates lysophosphatidic acid-mediated migration of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jacob A; Ha, Ji Hee; Jayaraman, Muralidharan; Dhanasekaran, Danny N

    2013-07-01

    Tumor microenvironment, defined by a variety of growth factors including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), whose levels are increased in pancreatic cancer patients, plays a major role in the genesis and progression of pancreatic cancer. Because the gep proto-oncogenes, Gα12 and Gα13, are implicated in LPA-stimulated oncogenic signaling, this study is focused on evaluating the role of these proto-oncogenes in LPA-stimulated invasive migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Effect of LPA on the migration and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells was assessed using BxPC3, Dan-G, MDAPanc-28, Panc-1, and PaCa-2 cell lines. The role of Gα13 in the migration of pancreatic cancer cells was interrogated by disrupting lysophosphatidic acid receptor-Gα13 interaction using CT13, a dominant negative mutant of Gα13, and by silencing the expression of Gα13. Results indicate that LPA stimulates the migration of pancreatic cancer cells and such LPA-stimulated migratory response is mediated by Gα13. Furthermore, the results establish that the silencing of Gα13, but not Gα12, abrogates LPA-stimulated invasive migration of pancreatic cancer cells. These results report for the first time a critical role for Gα13 in LPA-stimulated invasive migration of pancreatic cancer cells. These findings identify LPA-lysophosphatidic acid receptor-Gα13 signaling node as a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment and control.

  8. Gene expression profiling to define the cell intrinsic role of the SKI proto-oncogene in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian J J; Walkley, Carl R; Singbrant, Sofie

    2014-12-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced gene signatures associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation. Here we provide detailed experimental methods and analysis for the gene expression profiling described in our recently published study of Singbrant et al. (2014) in Haematologica. Our data sets (available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE39457) provide a resource for exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms of the involvement of the proto-oncogene SKI in hematopoietic stem cell function and development of myeloid neoplasms.

  9. A mutation in the RET proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung's disease affects the tyrosine kinase activity associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A and 2B.

    PubMed Central

    Cosma, M P; Panariello, L; Quadro, L; Dathan, N A; Fattoruso, O; Colantuoni, V

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate that a Hirschsprung (HSCR) mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the RET proto-oncogene abolishes in cis the tyrosine-phosphorylation associated with the activating mutation in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) in transiently transfected Cos cells. Yet the double mutant RET2AHS retains the ability to form stable dimers, thus dissociating the dimerization from the phosphorylation potential. Co-transfection experiments with single and double mutants carrying plasmids RET2A and RET2AHS in different ratios drastically reduced the phosphorylation levels of the RET2A protein, suggesting a dominant-negative effect of the HSCR mutation. Also, the phosphorylation associated with the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) allele was affected in experiments with single and double mutants carrying plasmids co-transfected under the same conditions. Finally, analysis of the enzymic activity of MEN2A and MEN2B tumours confirmed the relative levels of tyrosine phosphorylation observed in Cos cells, indicating that this condition, in vivo, may account for the RET transforming potential. PMID:8670046

  10. Expression of the nuclear factor-kappaB and proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun are induced by low extracellular Mg2+ in aortic and cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: possible links to hypertension, atherogenesis, and stroke.

    PubMed

    Altura, Burton M; Kostellow, Adele B; Zhang, Aimin; Li, Wenyan; Morrill, Gene A; Gupta, Raj K; Altura, Bella T

    2003-09-01

    Proto-oncogene (c-fos, c-jun) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) expression, as well as DNA synthesis, in aortic and cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were upregulated by a decrease in extracellular magnesium ions ([Mg2+]o). Upregulation of these transcriptional factors was inversely proportional to the [Mg2+]o and occurred over the pathophysiologic range of serum Mg2+ found in patients presenting with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o), use of nifedipine or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors prevented the upregulation of the proto-oncogenes and DNA synthesis in VSMCs. These data show that [Mg2+]o may be an important, heretofore, overlooked natural modulator of proto-oncogene and NF-kappaB expression in VSMCs and that Ca2+ and PKC may play critical roles in induction of c-fos and c-jun in VSMCs induced by a decrease in [Mg2+]o. These results point to a role for low serum Mg2+ in potential development of hypertension, atherogenesis, vascular disease, and stroke.

  11. MicroRNA-193b regulates c-Kit proto-oncogene and represses cell proliferation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-ning; Lin, Ji; Gao, Li; Li, Yong-hui; Wang, Li-li; Yu, Li

    2011-09-01

    Mutations and/or overexpression of c-Kit proto-oncogene frequently occur in subsets of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and contribute to abnormal cell proliferation and poor outcomes. We showed that c-Kit expression was subject to post-transcriptional regulation by microRNA (miRNA)-193b. Notably, miR-193b was significantly down-regulated in the examined AML cells and its levels were inversely correlated with c-Kit levels. Restoration of miR-193b expression in AML cells resulted in distinctly reduced c-Kit expression and inhibited cell growth. These data reveal a role for miR-193b dysregulation in myeloid leukemogenesis and the therapeutic promise of regulating miR-193b expression for c-Kit-positive AML.

  12. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  13. Absence of RET proto-oncogene point mutations in sporadic hyperplastic and neoplastic lesions of the parathyroid gland.

    PubMed Central

    Padberg, B. C.; Schröder, S.; Jochum, W.; Kastendieck, H.; Roth, J.; Heitz, P. U.; Komminoth, P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the possible role of RET proto-oncogene mutations in the development of sporadic hyperplastic, benign, and malignant parathyroid lesions. DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded specimens of forty parathyroid lesions was screened for RET proto-oncogene point mutations in exons 10, 11, and 16 by nonisotopic polymerase chain reaction-based single-strand conformation polymorphism and heteroduplex gel electrophoresis. The nucleotide sequence of samples with aberrant band patterns was identified by nonisotopic direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA. Parathyroids of seven patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) and MEN 2B served as positive controls. None of the eight hyperplastic lesions, three cases of parathyromatosis, ten parathyroid adenomas, eleven carcinomas or one normal parathyroid gland contained mutations in each of the three RET exons tested. Six MEN-2A-associated hyperplastic glands exhibited identical band shifts in the polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of exon 11, which corresponded to a Cys 634-->Arg substitution in the nucleotide sequence analysis (TGC-->CGC), whereas in the MEN 2B parathyroid specimen a point mutation was found at codon 918 of exon 16 (ATG-->ACG), causing a Met 918-->Thr substitution. Our data indicate that RET mutations of the MEN 2 loci in exons 10, 11, and 16 are not involved in the development of sporadically occurring benign or malignant parathyroid lesions. Furthermore, our results are in accordance with the observation that MEN 2A patients with Cys 634-->Arg (germline) mutations have a higher risk of developing parathyroid disease than those with other mutations at codon 634. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7495285

  14. Targeted disruption of the murine fps/fes proto-oncogene reveals that Fps/Fes kinase activity is dispensable for hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Senis, Y; Zirngibl, R; McVeigh, J; Haman, A; Hoang, T; Greer, P A

    1999-11-01

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase that is functionally implicated in the survival and terminal differentiation of myeloid progenitors and in signaling from several members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. To gain further insight into the physiological function of fps/fes, we targeted the mouse locus with a kinase-inactivating missense mutation. Mutant Fps/Fes protein was expressed at normal levels in these mice, but it lacked detectable kinase activity. Homozygous mutant animals were viable and fertile, and they showed no obvious defects. Flow cytometry analysis of bone marrow showed no statistically significant differences in the levels of myeloid, erythroid, or B-cell precursors. Subtle abnormalities observed in mutant mice included slightly elevated total leukocyte counts and splenomegaly. In bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cell colony-forming assays, mutant mice gave slightly elevated numbers and variable sizes of CFU-granulocyte macrophage in response to interleukin-3 (IL-3) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat3 and Stat5A in bone marrow-derived macrophages was dramatically reduced in response to GM-CSF but not to IL-3 or IL-6. This suggests a distinct nonredundant role for Fps/Fes in signaling from the GM-CSF receptor that does not extend to the closely related IL-3 receptor. Lipopolysaccharide-induced Erk1/2 activation was also reduced in mutant macrophages. These subtle molecular phenotypes suggest a possible nonredundant role for Fps/Fes in myelopoiesis and immune responses.

  15. Initial Segment Differentiation Begins During a Critical Window and Is Dependent upon Lumicrine Factors and SRC Proto-Oncogene (SRC) in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingfang; Washington, Angela M; Hinton, Barry T

    2016-07-01

    Without a fully developed and functioning initial segment, the most proximal region of the epididymis, male infertility results. Therefore, it is important to understand the development of the initial segment. During postnatal development of the epididymis, many cellular processes of the initial segment are regulated by lumicrine factors, which are produced by the testis and enter the epididymis with testicular luminal fluid. In this report, we showed that prior to Postnatal Day 15 (P15), the initial segment was lumicrine factor independent in the mouse. However, from P19 onward, lumicrine factors were essential for the proliferation and survival of initial segment epithelial cells. Therefore, P15 to P19 was a critical window that established the dependency of lumicrine factors in the initial segment epithelium. The initial segment-specific kinase activity profile, a marker of initial segment differentiation, was also established during this window. The SFK (SRC proto-oncogene family kinases), ERK pathway (known as the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway) components, and AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinases) pathway components had increased activities from P15 to P19, suggesting that lumicrine factors regulated SFK/ERK/AMPK signaling to initiate differentiation of the initial segment from P15 to P19. Compared with litter mate controls, juvenile Src null mice displayed lower levels of MAPK3/1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 3/1) activity and a reduced level of differentiation in the initial segment epithelium, a similar phenotype resulting from inhibition of SRC activity within the window of P15 to P19. Therefore, lumicrine factor-dependent SRC activity signaling through MAPK3/1 is important for the initiation of initial segment differentiation during a critical window of development.

  16. The proto-oncogene c-src is involved in primordial follicle activation through the PI3K, PKC and MAPK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background C-src is an evolutionarily conserved proto-oncogene that regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In our previous studies, we have reported that another proto-oncogene, c-erbB2, plays an important role in primordial follicle activation and development. We also found that c-src was expressed in mammalian ovaries, but its functions in primordial follicle activation remain unclear. The objective of this study is to investigate the role and mechanism of c-src during the growth of primordial follicles. Methods Ovaries from 2-day-old rats were cultured in vitro for 8 days. Three c-src-targeting and one negative control siRNA were designed and used in the present study. PCR, Western blotting and primordial follicle development were assessed for the silencing efficiency of the lentivirus c-src siRNA and its effect on primordial follicle onset. The expression of c-src mRNA and protein in primordial follicle growth were examined using the PCR method and immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, the MAPK inhibitor PD98059, the PKC inhibitor Calphostin and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 were used to explore the possible signaling pathways of c-src in primordial folliculogenesis. Results The results showed that Src protein was distributed in the ooplasmic membrane and the granulosa cell membrane in the primordial follicles, and c-src expression level increased with the growth of primordial follicle. The c-src -targeting lentivirus siRNAs had a silencing effect on c-src mRNA and protein expression. Eight days after transfection of rat ovaries with c-src siRNA, the GFP fluorescence in frozen ovarian sections was clearly discernible under a fluorescence microscope, and its relative expression level was 5-fold higher than that in the control group. Furthermore, the c-src-targeting lentivirus siRNAs lowered its relative expression level 1.96 times. We also found that the development of cultured primordial follicles was completely arrested after c-src si

  17. The proto-oncogene c-src is involved in primordial follicle activation through the PI3K, PKC and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Yu; Huang, Jian; Xu, Liang-Quan; Tang, Dan-Feng; Wu, Lei; Zhang, Li-Xia; Pan, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Wei-Yun; Zheng, Li-Ping; Zheng, Yue-Hui

    2012-08-20

    C-src is an evolutionarily conserved proto-oncogene that regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In our previous studies, we have reported that another proto-oncogene, c-erbB2, plays an important role in primordial follicle activation and development. We also found that c-src was expressed in mammalian ovaries, but its functions in primordial follicle activation remain unclear. The objective of this study is to investigate the role and mechanism of c-src during the growth of primordial follicles. Ovaries from 2-day-old rats were cultured in vitro for 8 days. Three c-src-targeting and one negative control siRNA were designed and used in the present study. PCR, Western blotting and primordial follicle development were assessed for the silencing efficiency of the lentivirus c-src siRNA and its effect on primordial follicle onset. The expression of c-src mRNA and protein in primordial follicle growth were examined using the PCR method and immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, the MAPK inhibitor PD98059, the PKC inhibitor Calphostin and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 were used to explore the possible signaling pathways of c-src in primordial folliculogenesis. The results showed that Src protein was distributed in the ooplasmic membrane and the granulosa cell membrane in the primordial follicles, and c-src expression level increased with the growth of primordial follicle. The c-src -targeting lentivirus siRNAs had a silencing effect on c-src mRNA and protein expression. Eight days after transfection of rat ovaries with c-src siRNA, the GFP fluorescence in frozen ovarian sections was clearly discernible under a fluorescence microscope, and its relative expression level was 5-fold higher than that in the control group. Furthermore, the c-src-targeting lentivirus siRNAs lowered its relative expression level 1.96 times. We also found that the development of cultured primordial follicles was completely arrested after c-src siRNA knockdown of c

  18. MicroRNA 10b promotes abnormal expression of the proto-oncogene c-Jun in metastatic breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Knirsh, Revital; Ben-Dror, Iris; Modai, Shira; Shomron, Noam; Vardimon, Lily

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been shown to act as oncogenes or tumor suppressers via various cellular pathways. Specifically, in breast cancer, upregulation of miR-10b is positively associated with aggressiveness of tumors. However, the mechanism by which miR-10b contributes to cell malignancy is largely unknown. Here we show that at the receiving end of the miR-10b pathway is the proto-oncogene c-Jun, a transcription factor that plays a critical role in stimulation of cell proliferation and tumor progression. c-Jun is known to be translationally activated by loss of cell contacts or restructuring of the cytoskeleton. A comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression exhibited a significant increase in miR-10b expression. This was supported by analysis of breast cancer cells, which showed that loss of E-cadherin in metastatic cells is accompanied by elevation of miR-10b and interestingly, by a marked increase in accumulation of c-Jun. Silencing miR-10b in metastatic breast cancer cells leads to a decline in c-Jun expression, whereas overexpression of miR-10b in HaCaT cells is sufficient to elevate the accumulation of c-Jun. The increase in c-Jun protein accumulation in metastatic cells is not accompanied by an increase in c-Jun mRNA and is not dependent on MAPK activity. Knockdown and overexpression experiments revealed that the increase is mediated by NF1 and RhoC, downstream targets of miR-10b that affect cytoskeletal dynamics through the ROCK pathway. Overall, we show the ability of miR-10b to activate the expression of c-Jun through RhoC and NF1, which represents a novel pathway for promoting migration and invasion of human cancer cells. PMID:27494896

  19. Mutagenesis in monkey cells of a vector containing a single d(GPG) cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) adduct placed on codon 13 of the human H-ras proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Pillaire, M J; Margot, A; Villani, G; Sarasin, A; Defais, M; Gentil, A

    1994-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2]) is a widely used antitumor agent whose mutagenic activity raises the possibility of the induction of secondary cancer as a result of treatment. Mutation of the proto-oncogene H-ras is found in more than 30% of all human tumors, where it has been postulated to contribute to the initiation and progression of human cancers. Activating mutations in the H-ras gene are predominantly single-base substitutions, most frequently at codons 12, 13 and 61. In the present work we have studied the mutational spectra induced by a single cis-[Pt(NH3)2d(GpG)] adduct, the most frequent DNA crosslink formed by cisplatin. We have constructed a 25-mer-Pt oligonucleotide singly modified at codon 13 (GGT) within the human H-ras DNA sequence and we have inserted it into a single-stranded SV40-based shuttle vector able to replicate in simian COS7 cells. After replication in the mammalian host, vectors were extracted, amplified in bacteria and DNA from 124 randomly chosen colonies was sequenced. The observed mutation frequency was 21%. Base substitutions were the most frequent modification. 92% of the mutagenic events occurred at one or both of the platinated guanines of codon 13. The single G-->T transversion accounted for 65% of the total mutations scored. All single base substitutions were located at the G in the 3' position showing, for the first time, that the guanine at the 3' side of a cis-[Pt(NH3)2d(GpG)] adduct may be a preferential site for cisplatin induced mutations. The substitution G-->T at this position of the codon 13 of the H-ras proto-oncogene is known to induce the oncogenic properties of the p21ras protein. Images PMID:8041613

  20. C-myc proto-oncogene amplification detected by polymerase chain reaction in archival human ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, G.; Dubeau, L.

    1990-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology was used to examine the state of amplification of the proto-oncogene c-myc in archival ovarian carcinomas. Sequences from the c-myc gene and from a control gene were amplified simultaneously by PCR and the ratios of the two products measured. The results provided an accurate measurement of the relative number of copies of the two genes in each tumor genome if the control and test sequences amplified by PCR were of equal lengths. The results were not affected by the number of PCR cycles used. This technique should facilitate gene amplification studies in clinical medicine. Increased c-myc copy number was found in 17% of the 30 cases examined when a control from the same chromosome as c-myc was used, but in 37% of cases if a control from another chromosome was used. This underlines the importance of the genetic location of the selected control genes for such studies. Images Figure 2 PMID:2205100

  1. Derepression of an endogenous long terminal repeat activates the CSF1R proto-oncogene in human lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Björn; Walter, Korden; Kreher, Stephan; Kumar, Raman; Hummel, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Köchert, Karl; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Richter, Julia; Soler, Eric; Stadhouders, Ralph; Jöhrens, Korinna; Wurster, Kathrin D; Callen, David F; Harte, Michael F; Giefing, Maciej; Barlow, Rachael; Stein, Harald; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Janz, Martin; Cockerill, Peter N; Siebert, Reiner; Dörken, Bernd; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    Mammalian genomes contain many repetitive elements, including long terminal repeats (LTRs), which have long been suspected to have a role in tumorigenesis. Here we present evidence that aberrant LTR activation contributes to lineage-inappropriate gene expression in transformed human cells and that such gene expression is central for tumor cell survival. We show that B cell-derived Hodgkin's lymphoma cells depend on the activity of the non-B, myeloid-specific proto-oncogene colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R). In these cells, CSF1R transcription initiates at an aberrantly activated endogenous LTR of the MaLR family (THE1B). Derepression of the THE1 subfamily of MaLR LTRs is widespread in the genome of Hodgkin's lymphoma cells and is associated with impaired epigenetic control due to loss of expression of the corepressor CBFA2T3. Furthermore, we detect LTR-driven CSF1R transcripts in anaplastic large cell lymphoma, in which CSF1R is known to be expressed aberrantly. We conclude that LTR derepression is involved in the pathogenesis of human lymphomas, a finding that might have diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  2. The SKI proto-oncogene enhances the in vivo repopulation of hematopoietic stem cells and causes myeloproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Singbrant, Sofie; Wall, Meaghan; Moody, Jennifer; Karlsson, Göran; Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian; Russell, Megan R; Walkley, Carl R; Karlsson, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced a gene signature associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation, as well as hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to what has generally been assumed, the significant impact of SKI on hematopoiesis is independent of its ability to inhibit TGF-beta signaling. Instead, myeloid progenitors expressing SKI are partially dependent on functional hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Collectively our results demonstrate that SKI is an important regulator of hematopoietic stem cell activity and its overexpression leads to myeloproliferative disease.

  3. Mutations of codon 918 in the RET proto-oncogene correlate to poor prognosis in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Zedenius, J.; Svensson, A.; Baeckdahl, M.; Wallin, G.

    1995-10-01

    The hereditary multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes types 2A and B (MEN 2A and B) were recently linked to germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene, altering one of five cysteine residues in exon 10 or 11 (MEN 2A), or substituting a methionine for a threonine at codon 918 in exon 16 (MEN 2B). The latter mutation also occurs somatically in some sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC), and has in a previous study been correlated with a less favorable clinical outcome. In the present study, 46 MTCs were selected for investigation of the codon 918 mutation. The mutation was found in 29 tumors (63%), and was significantly correlated with a poor outcome, with regard to distant metastasis or tumor recurrence (p<10{sup 4}). Two tumors showed multifocal growth and C-cell hyperplasia, and these patients were therefore also investigated for germline mutations in exons 10, 11 and 16. The codon 918 mutation was found only in the tumors, thus of somatic origin. The RET codon 918 mutation may have prognostic impact, and therefore preoperative assessment may influence decision-making in the treatment of patients suffering from MTC. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Prognostic value of codon 918 (ATG-->ACG) RET proto-oncogene mutations in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schilling, T; Bürck, J; Sinn, H P; Clemens, A; Otto, H F; Höppner, W; Herfarth, C; Ziegler, R; Schwab, M; Raue, F

    2001-01-20

    We have determined the frequency of 918 RET proto-oncogene mutations (ATG-->ACG) in primary MTC tumors and metastases and correlated the presence or absence of this mutation with the clinical outcome of patients suffering from sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). A total of 197 samples, consisting of both primary tumors and lymph node metastases from 34 patients with sporadic MTC, were collected for PCR analysis of the RET 918 mutation. In 75 of the samples (38%), codon 918 (ATG-->ACG) mutations could be detected. The mutations showed a heterogeneous distribution: 21/34 patients (62%) had mutations in at least 1 tumor sample, and in 13 patients (38%) the mutation was present in all examined samples. Patients were considered 918mt when at least 1 tumor sample showed the RET 918 mutation. These 918mt and 918 wild-type (918wt) patients did not differ significantly concerning sex, age at diagnosis, TNM stage at diagnosis, number of examined tumor samples or follow-up time. However, 918mt patients showed more aggressive development of distant metastases during follow-up (p = 0.032, Fisher's exact test) with decreased metastases-free survival (p < 0.005, log-rank test). Furthermore, 918mt patients had a significantly lower survival rate than 918wt patients (p = 0.048, log-rank test). These data show that the RET codon 918 mutation has a prognostic impact on patients with sporadic MTC which may influence follow-up treatment.

  5. High prevalence of the C634Y mutation in the RET proto-oncogene in MEN 2A families in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, B.; Robledo, M.; Biarnes, J.; Saez, M.; Volpini, V.; Benitez, J.; Navarro, E.; Ruiz, A.; Antinolo, G.; Borrego, S.

    1999-01-01

    The RET proto-oncogene encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in neural crest derived tissues. Germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene are responsible for three different dominantly inherited cancer syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A), type 2B (MEN 2B), and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). MTC can also occur sporadically. Molecular characterisation of the RET proto-oncogene has been performed by PCR-SSCP analysis, direct DNA sequencing, and restriction enzyme analysis in 49 unrelated, Spanish, MEN 2 families: 30 MEN 2A families, six FMTC families, and 13 families classified as "other". Germline missense mutations in one of six cysteine codons (609, 611, 618, and 620 in exon 10, and codons 630 and 634 in exon 11), which encode part of the extracellular cysteine rich domain of RET, have been detected in the majority of these families: 100% of MEN 2A families, 67% of FMTC families, and 54% of families classified as "other". No RET mutations in exons 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, or 16 were detected in the remaining families. The most frequent RET mutation in MEN 2A Spanish families is C634Y, occurring in 73% of cases. Haplotype analysis does not exclude the possibility of founder effects in Spanish MEN 2A families with the C634Y mutation.


Keywords: medullary thyroid carcinoma; RET proto-oncogene; molecular analysis PMID:9950371

  6. Inhibition of carcinogen induced c-Ha-ras and c-fos proto-oncogenes expression by dietary curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Limtrakul, Porn-ngarm; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Lipigorngoson, Suwiwek; Dunn, Floyd W

    2001-01-01

    Background We investigated the chemopreventive action of dietary curcumin on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12,0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted skin tumor formation in Swiss albino mice. Curcumin, a yellow coloring matter isolated from roots of Curcuma longa Linn, is a phenolic compound possessing antioxidant, free radical scavenger, and antiinflammatory properties. It has been shown by previously reported work that TPA-induced skin tumors were inhibited by topical application of curcumin, and curcumin has been shown to inhibit a variety of biological activities of TPA. Topical application of curcumin was reported to inhibit TPA-induced c-fos, c-jun and c-myc gene expression in mouse skin. This paper reports the effects of orally administered curcumin, which was consumed as a dietary component at concentrations of 0.2 % or 1 %, in ad libitum feeding. Results Animals in which tumors had been initiated with DMBA and promoted with TPA experienced significantly fewer tumors and less tumor volume if they ingested either 0.2% or 1% curcumin diets. Also, the dietary consumption of curcumin resulted in a significantly decreased expression of ras and fos proto-oncogenes in the tumorous skin, as measured by enhanced chemiluminesence Western blotting detection system (Amersham). Conclusions Whereas earlier work demonstrated that topical application of curcumin to mouse skin inhibited TPA-induced expression of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc oncogenes, our results are the first to show that orally consumed curcumin significantly inhibited DMBA- and TPA-induced ras and fos gene expression in mouse skin. PMID:11231886

  7. The gene structure of the Drosophila melanogaster proto-oncogene, kayak, and its nested gene, fos-intronic gene.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Stephanie Gidget; Goldstein, Elliott S

    2008-08-15

    We present herein a new model for the structure of the Drosophila kayak gene as well as preliminary data on the functional differences of its various isoforms. kayak is a homolog of the human proto-oncogene, c-fos. kayak has three different starts of transcription, and therefore promoters (P)kay-alpha, (P)kay-beta and (P)kay-gamma. These three promoters lead to four different transcripts: kay-alpha, kay(sro), kay-beta and kay-gamma. (P)kay-alpha produces two different transcripts: kay-alpha and kay(sro) where the other two promoters, (P)kay-beta and (P)kay-gamma, produce a single transcript each. The transcripts kay-alpha, beta and gamma all splice into the mainbody of the kay gene, which codes for the DNA binding domain and leucine zipper; kay(sro) is not spliced. Also, within this region is a nested gene, fos-intronic gene (fig) which is transcribed in the opposite direction. fig codes for a predicted PP2C phosphatase. fig has two different promoters which produce two different transcripts, both in the same reading frame, fig-alpha and beta. This is an unusual gene structure for Drosophila. Only 13% of Drosophila genes have multiple promoters and only 7% have a nested gene. RT-PCR was performed on each transcript to determine the relative amounts of each RNA produced. All spliced kay transcripts appear to have equal abundance. The unspliced kay(sro) transcript has a lower abundance than kay-alpha. Both fig transcripts are also detected in all stages tested. Lethal phase analysis and complementation testing suggest that the three isoforms of kayak may have different functions.

  8. Diversity of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene and its oncogenic mechanism in medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Zarif Yeganeh, Marjan; Sheikholeslami, Sara; Afsari, Farinaz

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for nearly 1% of all of human cancer. Thyroid cancer has four main histological types: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Papillary, follicular, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas are derived from follicular thyroid cells, whereas medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the neural crest parafollicular cells or C-cells of the thyroid gland. MTC represents a neuroendocrine tumor and differs considerably from differentiated thyroid carcinoma. MTC is one of the aggressive types of thyroid cancer, which represents 3-10% of all thyroid cancers. It occurs in hereditary (25%) and sporadic (75%) forms. The hereditary form of MTC has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. According to the present classification, hereditary MTC is classified as a multiple endocrine neoplasi type 2 A & B (MEN2A & MEN2B) and familial MTC (FMTC). The RET proto-oncogene is located on chromosome 10q11.21. It is composed of 21 exons and encodes a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase. RET regulates a complex network of signal transduction pathways during development, survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of the enteric nervous system progenitor cells. Gain of function mutations in RET have been well demonstrated in MTC development. Variants of MTC result from different RET mutations, and they have a good genotype-phenotype correlation. Various MTC related mutations have been reported in different exons of the RET gene. We proposed that RET genetic mutations may be different in distinct populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find a geographical pattern of RET mutations in different populations.

  9. The functional mapping of long-range transcription control elements of the HOX11 proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Brake, Rachael L; Chatterjee, Pradeep K; Kees, Ursula R; Watt, Paul M

    2004-01-09

    Mapping of transcriptional control elements normally depends on the generation of a series of deletion mutants. The consequences of particular deletions are then functionally assessed by their ability to alter gene expression. The information derived from such investigations provides a general regulatory profile of the gene of interest, as well as generating a focus for future experiments. Due to the limitations of conventional DNA cloning methods, it has previously not been possible to use such an approach to rapidly assess the role of long-range regulatory elements that frequently lie further than 20 kb away from the coding region. In order to identify regulatory elements of the proto-oncogene HOX11 that may be mutated in a subset of childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia specimens, we generated nested deletions from a P1 artificial chromosome (PAC). This clone contained 95 kilobases (kb) of the HOX11 locus at 10q24; including 63 kb of 5' regulatory DNA. The deletion series was produced by the use of a recombination based cloning system and clones were subsequently transfected into mammalian cells. We have identified several long-range regulatory elements that mediate transcriptional control of HOX11. This approach is simple, rapid, and inexpensive. Furthermore, it generates multiple deletion clones in a single experiment. This novel approach opens up a new avenue for investigating long-range transcription control. Additionally, by allowing analysis of these elements in the natural context of large integrants the approach does not require the use of artificial extrachromosomal elements. This methodology can be applied to any gene cloned into a PAC or BAC vector and could also be useful in identifying appropriately sized deletion mutants for functional testing in transgenic models.

  10. The proto-oncogene c-Src and its downstream signaling pathways are inhibited by the metastasis suppressor, NDRG1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wensheng; Yue, Fei; Zheng, Minhua; Merlot, Angelica; Bae, Dong-Hun; Huang, Michael; Lane, Darius; Jansson, Patric; Lui, Goldie Yuan Lam; Richardson, Vera; Sahni, Sumit; Kalinowski, Danuta; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2015-04-20

    N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor that plays a key role in regulating signaling pathways involved in mediating cancer cell invasion and migration, including those derived from prostate, colon, etc. However, the mechanisms and molecular targets through which NDRG1 reduces cancer cell invasion and migration, leading to inhibition of cancer metastasis, are not fully elucidated. In this investigation, using NDRG1 over-expression models in three tumor cell-types (namely, DU145, PC3MM and HT29) and also NDRG1 silencing in DU145 and HT29 cells, we reveal that NDRG1 decreases phosphorylation of a key proto-oncogene, cellular Src (c-Src), at a well-characterized activating site (Tyr416). NDRG1-mediated down-regulation of EGFR expression and activation were responsible for the decreased phosphorylation of c-Src (Tyr416). Indeed, NDRG1 prevented recruitment of c-Src to EGFR and c-Src activation. Moreover, NDRG1 suppressed Rac1 activity by modulating phosphorylation of a c-Src downstream effector, p130Cas, and its association with CrkII, which acts as a "molecular switch" to activate Rac1. NDRG1 also affected another signaling molecule involved in modulating Rac1 signaling, c-Abl, which then inhibited CrkII phosphorylation. Silencing NDRG1 increased cell migration relative to the control and inhibition of c-Src signaling using siRNA, or a pharmacological inhibitor (SU6656), prevented this increase. Hence, the role of NDRG1 in decreasing cell migration is, in part, due to its inhibition of c-Src activation. In addition, novel pharmacological agents, which induce NDRG1 expression and are currently under development as anti-metastatic agents, markedly increase NDRG1 and decrease c-Src activation. This study leads to important insights into the mechanism involved in inhibiting metastasis by NDRG1 and how to target these pathways with novel therapeutics.

  11. From reptilian phylogenomics to reptilian genomes: analyses of c-Jun and DJ-1 proto-oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Y; Braun, E L; Guillette, L J; Iguchi, T

    2009-01-01

    Genome projects have revolutionized our understanding of both molecular biology and evolution, but there has been a limited collection of genomic data from reptiles. This is surprising given the pivotal position of reptiles in vertebrate phylogeny and the potential utility of information from reptiles for understanding a number of biological phenomena, such as sex determination. Although there are many potential uses for genomic data, one important and useful approach is phylogenomics. Here we report cDNA sequences for the c-Jun(JUN) and DJ-1(PARK7) proto-oncogenes from 3 reptiles (the American alligator, Nile crocodile, and Florida red-belly turtle), show that both genes are expressed in the alligator, and integrate them into analyses of their homologs from other organisms. With these taxa it was possible to conduct analyses that include all major vertebrate lineages. Analyses of c-Jun revealed an unexpected but well-supported frog-turtle clade while analyses of DJ-1 revealed a topology largely congruent with expectation based upon other data. The conflict between the c-Jun topology and expectation appears to reflect the overlap between c-Jun and a CpG island in most taxa, including crocodilians. This CpG island is absent in the frog and turtle, and convergence in base composition appears to be at least partially responsible for the signal uniting these taxa. Noise reduction approaches can eliminate the unexpected frog-turtle clade, demonstrating that multiple signals are present in the c-Jun alignment. We used phylogenetic methods to visualize these signals; we suggest that examining both historical and non-historical signals will prove important for phylogenomic analyses. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Pokemon proto-oncogene in oral cancer: potential role in the early phase of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sartini, D; Lo Muzio, L; Morganti, S; Pozzi, V; Di Ruscio, G; Rocchetti, R; Rubini, C; Santarelli, A; Emanuelli, M

    2015-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents about 90% of all oral neoplasms with a poor clinical prognosis. To improve survival of OSCC patients, it is fundamental to understand the basic molecular mechanisms characterizing oral carcinogenesis. Dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes seems to play a central role in tumorigenesis, including malignant transformation of the oral cavity. We analyzed the expression levels of the pro-oncogenic transcription factor Pokemon through real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry in tumor, and normal oral tissue samples obtained from 22 patients with OSCC. The relationship between tumor characteristics and the level of Pokemon intratumor expression was also analyzed. Pokemon was significantly downregulated in OSCC. In particular, both mRNA and protein levels (tumor vs normal tissue) inversely correlated with histological grading, suggesting its potential role as a prognostic factor for OSCC. Moreover, a significant inverse correlation was found between Pokemon protein expression levels (OSCC vs normal oral mucosa) and tumor size, supporting the hypothesis that Pokemon could play an important role in the early phase of tumor expansion. This work shows that reduced expression of Pokemon is a peculiar feature of OSCC. Additional studies may establish the effective role of Pokemon in oral tumorigenesis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Loss of Vav2 Proto-Oncogene Causes Tachycardia and Cardiovascular Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Jerkic, Mirjana; López-Novoa, José M.

    2007-01-01

    The Vav family is a group of signal transduction molecules that activate Rho/Rac GTPases during cell signaling. Experiments using knockout mice have indicated that the three Vav proteins present in mammals (Vav1, Vav2, and Vav3) are essential for proper signaling responses in hematopoietic cells. However, Vav2 and Vav3 are also highly expressed in nonhematopoietic tissues, suggesting that they may have additional functions outside blood cells. Here, we report that this is the case for Vav2, because the disruption of its locus in mice causes tachycardia, hypertension, and defects in the heart, arterial walls, and kidneys. We also provide physiological and pharmacological evidence demonstrating that the hypertensive condition of Vav2-deficient mice is due to a chronic stimulation of the renin/angiotensin II and sympathetic nervous systems. Together, these results indicate that Vav2 plays crucial roles in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis in mice. PMID:17202406

  14. Axotomized neonatal motoneurons overexpressing the bcl2 proto-oncogene retain functional electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Alberi, S; Raggenbass, M; de Bilbao, F; Dubois-Dauphin, M

    1996-01-01

    Bcl2 overexpression prevents axotomy-induced neuronal death of neonatal facial motoneurons, as defined by morphological criteria. However, the functional properties of these surviving lesioned transgenic neurons are unknown. Using transgenic mice overexpressing the protein Bcl2, we have investigated the bioelectrical properties of transgenic facial motoneurons from 7 to 20 days after neonatal unilateral axotomy using brain-stem slices and whole cell patch-clamp recording. Nonaxotomized facial motoneurons from wild-type and transgenic mice had similar properties; they had an input resistance of 38 +/- 6 M omega and fired repetitively after injection of positive current pulses. When cells were voltage-clamped at or near their resting membrane potential, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), or vasopressin generated sustained inward currents. In transgenic axotomized mice, facial motoneurons could be found located ipsilaterally to the lesion; they had an input resistance of 150 +/- 30 M omega, indicating that they were smaller in size, fired repetitively, and were also responsive to AMPA, NMDA, and vasopressin. Morphological measurements achieved 1 week after the lesion have shown that application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevented the reduction in size of axotomized transgenic motoneurons. These data indicate that Bcl2 not only prevents morphological apoptotic death of axotomized neonatal transgenic motoneurons but also permits motoneurons to conserve functional electrophysiological properties. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8633001

  15. DEK Proto-Oncogene Expression Interferes with the Normal Epithelial Differentiation Program

    PubMed Central

    Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Morreale, Richard J.; Morris, Teresa A.; Mintz-Cole, Rachael A.; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Balsitis, Scott J.; Husseinzadeh, Nader; Witte, David P.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Lambert, Paul F.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the DEK gene is associated with multiple human cancers, but its specific roles as a putative oncogene are not well defined. DEK transcription was previously shown to be induced by the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncogene via E2F and Rb pathways. Transient DEK overexpression was able to inhibit both senescence and apoptosis in cultured cells. In at least the latter case, this mechanism involved the destabilization of p53 and the decreased expression of p53 target genes. We show here that DEK overexpression disrupts the normal differentiation program in a manner that is independent of either p53 or cell death. DEK expression was distinctly repressed upon the differentiation of cultured primary human keratinocytes, and stable DEK overexpression caused epidermal thickening in an organotypic raft model system. The observed hyperplasia involved a delay in keratinocyte differentiation toward a more undifferentiated state, and expansion of the basal cell compartment was due to increased proliferation, but not apoptosis. These phenotypes were accompanied by elevated p63 expression in the absence of p53 destabilization. In further support of bona fide oncogenic DEK activities, we report here up-regulated DEK protein levels in both human papilloma virus-positive hyperplastic murine skin and a subset of human squamous cell carcinomas. We suggest that DEK up-regulation may contribute to carcinoma development at least in part through increased proliferation and retardation of differentiation. PMID:19036808

  16. Long-term cultivation of in vitro Apis mellifera cells by gene transfer of human c-myc proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Kitagishi, Yasuko; Okumura, Naoko; Yoshida, Hitomi; Nishimura, Yuri; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Matsuda, Satoru

    2011-08-01

    Establishment of cell lines representative of honeybee character would greatly assist in their analysis. Here, we show that immortalized cell line, designated as MYN9, has been generated from honeybee embryo by the gene transfer of human c-myc proto-oncogene. The morphology of the cell is characteristic of embryonic stem cell, although the cell is stable and does not spontaneously differentiate. Polymerase chain reaction analyses show that the cell is originated from authentic honeybee cell. It is proposed that the integration of human c-myc gene into honeybee precursor populations results in the establishment of stable cell line suitable for cellular and molecular studies.

  17. Detection of RET proto-oncogene point mutations in paraffin-embedded pheochromocytoma specimens by nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Komminoth, P.; Kunz, E.; Hiort, O.; Schröder, S.; Matias-Guiu, X.; Christiansen, G.; Roth, J.; Heitz, P. U.

    1994-01-01

    The suitability of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor material was evaluated for molecular analysis of the RET proto-oncogene. We analyzed exons 10, 11, and 16 for point mutations in seven sporadic and six multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A-associated pheochromocytomas by a nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism assay followed by nonradioactive direct sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA using an automated DNA sequencer. All MEN 2A-associated pheochromocytomas contained a heterozygous missense germline mutation within cystine codons of the cysteine-rich extracellular domain encoded by exons 10 and 11. Mutations were located in codon 619 (TGC-->TCC; Cys-->Ser) in one, in codon 635 (TGC-->CGC; Cys--Arg) in three, and in codon 635 (TGC-->TAC; Cys-->Tyr) in two pheochromocytomas. No tumor-specific (somatic) mutations were detected in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the sporadic pheochromocytomas. These data support recent findings that germline point mutations that are clustered in distinct cysteine codons of the RET proto-oncogene are involved in the neoplastic phenotype of the MEN 2A syndrome. Our results demonstrate that both nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing are suitable methods to detect single base substitutions in DNA extracted from archival material. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7943181

  18. Interstitial telomeric sequences in human chromosomes cluster with common fragile sites, mutagen sensitive sites, viral integration sites, cancer breakpoints, proto-oncogenes and breakpoints involved in primate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Adekunle, S.S.A.; Wyandt, H.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Recently we mapped the telomeric repeat sequences to 111 interstitial sites in the human genome and to sites of gaps and breaks induced by aphidicolin and sister chromatid exchange sites detected by BrdU. Many of these sites correspond to conserved fragile sites in man, gorilla and chimpazee, to sites of conserved sister chromatid exchange in the mammalian X chromosome, to mutagenic sensitive sites, mapped locations of proto-oncogenes, breakpoints implicated in primate evolution and to breakpoints indicated as the sole anomaly in neoplasia. This observation prompted us to investigate if the interstitial telomeric sites cluster with these sites. An extensive literature search was carried out to find all the available published sites mentioned above. For comparison, we also carried out a statistical analysis of the clustering of the sites of the telomeric repeats with the gene locations where only nucleotide mutations have been observed as the only chromosomal abnormality. Our results indicate that the telomeric repeats cluster most with fragile sites, mutagenic sensitive sites and breakpoints implicated in primate evolution and least with cancer breakpoints, mapped locations of proto-oncogenes and other genes with nucleotide mutations.

  19. Detection of cytosine and CpG density in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in promoter sequences of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Senol; Cilic, Anis; Marjanovic, Damir; Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina

    2017-03-21

    Aberrant methylation is one of the driving forces of cancer genome development. Although the rate of methylation appears massively variable across the genome, it is mainly observed in histone modification, chromatin organization, DNA accessibility, or promoter sequence. Methylation of promoter sequence occurs mostly to cytosine nucleotides, which can affect transcription factors' binding affinities. In this study, we demonstrated that cytosine repeats (C types density), consisting of CC, CCC, CCCC, CCCCC, CCCCCC, CCCCCCC motifs and CpG islands density in 25 proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and control genes may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. The promoter sequences were divided into a 100 nucleotide window from -500 to +100 nucleotides and 20 nucleotide window from -100 to +100. Each window is analyzed to find the higher C type and CpG islands density, which may cause the increased methylation in the promoter sequence. Our novel findings show that promoter sequence cytosine repeats and CpG density increase closer to transcription sites, especially just before and after the transcription start site (TSS). The results demonstrate that cytosine density increases while proto-oncogenes and TSG promoter sequences are closer to TSS 50.8% and 41.0% respectively, if (-500 to -200) and (-100 to +100) windows of the nucleotide sequences are compared. This proves that around TSS location has special nucleotide motifs and could be an important implication for our understanding of potential methylating locations in promoters.

  20. A rapid screening method for the detection of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma families

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, D.J.; Andrew, S.; Richardson, A.L. |

    1994-09-15

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are autosomal dominant inherited cancer syndromes with incomplete penetrance. Following the identification of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene that segregate with the disease phenotype in MEN2A, MEN2B, and FMTC, genetic screening of individuals with mutations in RET may be performed. The authors have employed restriction endonuclease digestion of polymerase chain reaction products as an alternative to sequence analysis for rapid identification of mutant gene carriers in families in which MEN2A and RMTC are segregating. Twenty-one Australasian MEN2A and FMTC families have been screened for mutations in a cysteine-rich region of the RET proto-oncogene. Seven independent mutations were identified in key individuals in 16 of these families. The authors have identified a mutation in codon 620, 2053 T {r_arrow}C (Cys620Arg), and two mutations in codon 634 of exon 11 of RET, 2095 T {r_arrow} C (Cys634Arg) and 2096 G {r_arrow} A (Cys634Tyr), all three of which were present in both MEN2A and FMTC families. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. A promising hypothesis of c-KIT methylation/ expression paradox in c-KIT (+) squamous cell carcinoma of uterine cervix ----- CTCF transcriptional repressor regulates c-KIT proto-oncogene expression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Wen; Chao, Wan-Ru; Ruan, Alexandra; Wang, Po-Hui; Lin, Jau-Chen; Han, Chih-Ping

    2015-11-25

    We recently reported one interesting case showing mutation-free c-KIT proto-oncogene overexpression and paradoxical hypermethylation in 54 cases of primary squamous cell carcinoma of uterine cervix (SCC). However, its molecular mechanisms still remain unknown. We propose the hypothesis that increased methylation at the CpG islands on the promoter near the first exon region might interfere with the binding of CTCF repressor with c-KIT promoter that regulates c-KIT proto-oncogene expression in such case. Further studies focusing on the status of epigenetic modifications of mutation-free c-KIT (+) tumors are encouraged.

  2. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) represses transcription of the tumor suppressor Rb gene via binding competition with Sp1 and recruitment of co-repressors.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-11-28

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp -308 to -188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp -65 to -56) and GC-box 2 (bp -18 to -9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp -244 to -236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression.

  3. Dominant negative and loss of function mutations of the c-kit (mast/stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Giebel, L.B.; Holmes, S.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development and is characterized by congenital white parches of skin and hair from which melanocytes are completely absent. A similar disorder of the mouse, 'dominant white spotting' (W), results from mutations of the c-kit proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular tyrosine kinases receptor for the mast/stem cell growth factor. The authors have identified c-kit gene mutations in three patients with piebaldism. A missense substitution (Phe[r arrow]Leu) at codon 584, within the tyrosine kinases domain, is associated with a severe piebald phenotype, whereas two different frameshifts, within codons 561 and 642, are both associated with a variable and relatively mild piebald phenotype. This is consistent with a possible 'dominant negative' effect of missense c-kit polypeptides on the function of the dimeric receptor.

  4. Mutations of the KIT (Mast/Stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene account for a continuous range of phenotypes in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Holmes, S.A. ); Ramesar, R.; Greenberg, J.; Beighton, P.; Curtis, D.

    1992-11-01

    Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of pigmentation, characterized by congenital patches of white skin and hair from which melanocytes are absent. The authors have previously shown that piebaldism can result from missense and frameshift mutations of the KIT proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular receptor tyrosine kinase for the mast/stem cell growth factor. Here, the authors report two novel KIT mutations associated with human piebaldism. A proximal frameshift is associated with a mild piebald phenotype, and a splice-junction mutation is associated with a highly variable piebald phenotype. They discuss the apparent relationship between the predicted impact of specific KIT mutations on total KIT-dependent signal transduction and the severity of the resultant piebald phenotypes. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Specific polymorphisms in the RET proto-oncogene are over-represented in patients with Hirschsprung disease and may represent loci modifying phenotypic expression

    PubMed Central

    Borrego, S.; Saez, M. E.; Ruiz, A.; Gimm, O.; Lopez-Alonso, M.; Antinolo, G.; Eng, C.

    1999-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a common genetic disorder presenting with functional intestinal obstruction secondary to enteric aganglionosis. HSCR can be familial or sporadic. Although five putative susceptibility genes have been identified, only germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene account for a significant minority (up to 50%) of familial HSCR; 3% of sporadic HSCR in a population based series carry RET mutations. From 1998 to February 1999, we prospectively ascertained 64 cases of sporadic HSCR from the western Andalusia region. To determine if polymorphic sequence variants within RET could act as low penetrance predisposing alleles, we examined allelic frequencies at seven polymorphic loci in this population based series. Whether allele frequencies differed from those in the control population were determined by either chi-squared analysis or Fisher's exact test. For two sequence variants, A45A (c 135G→A) (exon 2) and L769L (c 2307T→G) (exon 13), the rarer polymorphic allele was over-represented among HSCR cases versus controls (p<0.0006). In contrast, two other polymorphisms, G691S (c 2071C→A) (exon 11) and S904S (c 2712C→G) (exon 15), were under-represented in the HSCR patients compared to controls (p=0.02). Polymorphisms in the RET proto-oncogene appear to predispose to HSCR in a complex, low penetrance fashion and may also modify phenotypic expression.


Keywords: polymorphism; low penetrance alleles; neurocristopathy; chromosome 10 PMID:10528857

  6. The proto-oncogene product c-Crk associates with insulin receptor substrate-1 and 4PS. Modulation by insulin growth factor-I (IGF) and enhanced IGF-I signaling.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Blakesley, V A; Shen-Orr, Z; Jimenez, M; Stannard, B; Wang, L M; Pierce, J; LeRoith, D

    1996-04-19

    The Crk proto-oncogene product is an SH2 and SH3 domain-containing adaptor protein which we have previously shown to become rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated in response to stimulation with insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in NIH-3T3 cells. In order to further characterize the role of Crk in the IGF-I signaling pathway, NIH-3T3 and 293 cells were stably transfected with an expression vector containing the Crk cDNA. The various resultant 3T3-Crk clones expressed Crk at approximately 2-15-fold higher levels than parental 3T3 cells. In 3T3-Crk cells, Crk immunoreactivity was detected in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) immunoprecipitates. Stimulation with IGF-I resulted in a dissociation of Crk protein from IRS-1. In contrast, the association of the related adaptor protein Grb2 with IRS-1 was enhanced by IGF-I stimulation. Similar results were obtained in stably transfected 293-Crk cells, which express both IRS-1 and the IRS-1-related signaling protein 4PS. In these cells, IRS-1 and 4PS both associated with Crk, and this association was also decreased by IGF-I treatment, whereas the association of Grb2 with IRS-1 and 4PS was enhanced by IGF-I. Overexpression of Crk also enhanced IGF-I-induced mitogenesis of NIH-3T3 cells, as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. The levels of IGF-I-induced mitogenesis were proportional to the level of Crk expression. These results suggest that Crk is a positive effector of IGF-I signaling, and may mediate its effects via interaction with IRS-1 and/or 4PS.

  7. A PCR-mutagenesis strategy for rapid detection of mutations in codon 634 of the ret proto-oncogene related to MEN 2A.

    PubMed Central

    Roqué, María; Pusiol, Eduardo; Perinetti, Héctor; Godoy, Clara Pott; Mayorga, Luis S

    2002-01-01

    Background Multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2A (MEN 2A) is a dominantly inherited cancer syndrome. Missence mutations in the codon encoding cysteine 634 of the ret proto-oncogene have been found in 85% of the MEN 2A families. The main tumour type always present in MEN 2A is medullar thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Only 25% of all MTC are hereditary, and generally they are identified by a careful family history. However, some familial MTCs are not easily detected by this means and underdiagnosis of MEN 2A is suspected. Methods DNA samples from MEN 2A patients were amplified by PCR. The products were incubated with the restriction enzyme Bst ApI or Bgl I. The samples were loaded in non-denaturing 10% Polyacrilamyde Gel and run at 120 volts for 40 min. The gels were stained with 10 μg/ml ethidium bromide, and the bands were visualized under a UV lamp. Results We developed a PCR-mutagenic method to check the integrity of the three bases of the cysteine 634 codon. Conclusion The method can be used to detect inherited mutations in MTC patients without a clear family history. The method is relatively simple to use as a routine test in these patients to decrease the underdiagnosis of MEN 2A. In addition, the assay can be used to screen affected families with any mutation in cysteine 634. PMID:12033991

  8. Pediatric medullary carcinoma of the thyroid with point mutation of RET proto-oncogene associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia and initially diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chai, Chiling; Lemos, Luciano B; Kaelbling, Margot; Baliga, Mithra

    2003-03-01

    A 7-year-old girl presented with a thyroid mass, elevated serum levels of calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen, as well as multiple mucosal nodules in the upper lip and tongue. Cytologic material obtained by fine-needle aspiration biopsy from the thyroid mass was diagnosed as medullary carcinoma and confirmed by immunohistochemical studies in the cell-block sections. Subsequent histopathologic examination showed involvement of both thyroid lobes by medullary carcinoma, and electron microscopic studies further confirmed the diagnosis. Molecular studies showed a point mutation in amino acid 918 in exon 16 of the RET proto-oncogene. Biopsies from the upper lip and tongue showed mucosal neuromas. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy is frequently used in the initial evaluation of thyroid nodules. This case illustrates the value of fine-needle aspiration biopsy as a safe and accurate diagnostic modality in the workup of pediatric thyroid nodules. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy should always be considered for the investigation of thyroid nodules in pediatric patients.

  9. Germline mutations of the RET proto-oncogene in pedigree with MEN type 2A: DNA analysis and its implications for pediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Shimotake, T; Iwai, N; Inoue, K; Inazawa, J; Nishisho, I

    1996-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of screening for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A), the authors used DNA sequence analysis to evaluate the RET proto-oncogene in a kindred with MEN 2A. The kindred consisted of 95 members (1 to 79 years of age) and their spouses, and spanned five generations. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes or lymphoblastoid cell lines established from the family members, and the RET gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using RET-specific primers (10q 11.2) and was sequenced. Periodic endocrine screening also was performed, by measuring the plasma calcitonin concentration after provocation with pentagastrin (0.5 microgram/kg intravenously) to assess its reliability for detecting the associated neoplasms. Nineteen patients were confirmed to have MEN 2A by medical records or the screening program. The DNA sequence of the PCR products from clinically established MEN 2A patients showed a mutation at codon 634 (TGC-->CGC) that resulted in an amino acid change from cysteine to arginine. Endocrine screening tests showed that six other family members had a mutated RET protooncogene. DNA sequencing can detect high-risk cases at a preclinical stage of the disease. The establishment of mutated MEN 2A gene carriers allows pediatric surgeons to consider total thyroidectomy at a very early stage of neoplasm development (C-cell hyperplasia) or even prophylactically.

  10. Up-regulation of human cervical cancer proto-oncogene contributes to hepatitis B virus-induced malignant transformation of hepatocyte by down-regulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Dai, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Hongfei; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Shihui; Gao, Tongtong; Kou, Zhihua; Yu, Hong; Guo, Yan; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Jianying; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most fatal human malignancies, Human cervical cancer proto-oncogene (HCCR) aberrantly expressed in a number of malignant tumors, including HCC. HCC is associated with Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a large percentage of cases. To explore the regulation and function of HCCR expression in the development of HCC, we detected HCCR expression in HBV expressing hepatocytes. Results showed that the expression of HCCR was higher in HBV-expressing hepatocytes than that in control cells. Examining different components of HBV revealed that the HBx promotes HCCR expression in hepatocytes via the T-cell factor (TCF)/β-catenin pathway. HCCR expression in HBx transgenic mice increased with as the mice aged and developed tumors. We also found that overexpression of HCCR in hepatocytes promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and reduced cell adhesion. Suppressing HCCR expression abolished the effect of HBx-induced hepatocyte growth. In addition, HCCR represses the expression of E-cadherin by inhibition its promoter activity, which might correlate with the effects of HCCR in hepatocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HBx-HCCR-E-cadherin regulation pathway might play an important role in HBV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. They also imply that HCCR is a potential risk marker for HCC and/or a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26470691

  11. Tissue Specific Activation and Inactivation of the Neu Proto-Oncogene in Transgenic Mice Using Cre Recombinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    132:6-13. P. G. Pelicci, and 0. Segatto . 1995. Analysis of protein-protein interactions 11. Gale, N. W., S. Kaplan, E. J. Lowenstein, J. Schlessinger...Grazia Cell. Biol. 18:2344-2359. Borrello, 0. Segatto , P. P. Di Fiore, and P. G. Pelicci. 1995. Constitutive 49. Yip, S. S., A. J. Crew, J. M. W. Gee

  12. Regulation and Mechanism of Action of the c-Myc Proto-Oncogene in Human Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    ubiquitously expressed nuclear phosphoprotein (1-3). Despite clear evidence that c-Myc is important in the control of cellular proliferation, differentiation... physically associate in vitro and in the yeast two-hybrid system with transcription protein YY1 (19). YY1 is a ubiquitiously expressed zinc finger...protein B23 (36), p 3 0 0 (37) and transcription factor TFE3 (A. Shrivastava and K. Calame, unpublished); YY1 has also been identified as a nuclear

  13. Genome-wide analysis of the rat colon reveals proximal-distal differences in histone modifications and proto-oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Triff, Karen; Konganti, Kranti; Gaddis, Sally; Zhou, Beiyan; Ivanov, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Since disease susceptibility of the intestine exhibits an anatomical bias, we propose that the chromatin landscape, especially the site-specific epigenetic differences in histone modification patterns throughout the colonic longitudinal axis, contributes to the differential incidence of site-specific pathology. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the chromatin structure associated with gene expression profiles in the rat proximal and distal colon by globally correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation next-generation sequencing analysis (ChIP-Seq) with mRNA transcription (RNA-Seq) data. Crypts were isolated from the proximal and distal colonic regions from rats maintained on a semipurified diet, and mRNA gene expression profiles were generated by RNA-Seq. The remaining isolated crypts were formaldehyde-cross-linked and chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and RNA polymerase II. Globally, RNA-Seq results indicate that 9,866 genes were actively expressed, of which 540 genes were differentially expressed between the proximal and distal colon. Gene ontology analysis indicates that crypt location significantly affected both chromatin and transcriptional regulation of genes involved in enterocyte movement, lipid metabolism, lymphatic development, and immune cell trafficking. Gene function analysis indicates that the PI3-kinase signaling pathway was regulated in a site-specific manner, e.g., proto-oncogenes, JUN, FOS, and ATF, were upregulated in the distal colon. Middle and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) were also detected in the colon, including select lncRNAs formerly only detected in the rat nervous system. In summary, distinct combinatorial patterns of histone modifications exist in the proximal versus distal colon. These site-specific differences may explain the differential effects of chemoprotective agents on cell transformation in the ascending (proximal) and descending (distal) colon. PMID:24151245

  14. ras proto-oncogene activation in dichloroacetic acid-, trichloroethylene- and tetrachloroethylene-induced liver tumors in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Anna, C H; Maronpot, R R; Pereira, M A; Foley, J F; Malarkey, D E; Anderson, M W

    1994-10-01

    The frequency and mutation spectra of proto-oncogene activation in hepatocellular neoplasms induced by tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene and dichloroacetic acid were examined to help define the molecular basis for their carcinogenicity. H-ras codon 61 activation was not significantly different among dichloroacetic acid- and trichloroethylene-induced and combined historical and concurrent control hepatocellular tumors (62%, 51% and 69% respectively). The mutation spectra of H-ras codon 61 mutations showed a significant decrease in AAA and increase in CTA mutations for dichloroacetic acid- and trichloroethylene-induced tumors when compared to combined controls. The H-ras codon 61 mutation frequency for tetrachloroethylene-induced tumors was significantly lower (24%) than that of combined controls and also that of the two other chemicals. Mutations at codons 13 and 117 plus a second exon insert contributed 4% to the total H-ras frequencies for trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene. There was also a higher incidence of K-ras activation (13%) in tetrachloroethylene-induced tumors than in the other chemically induced or control tumors. Four liver tumors were found to contain insertions of additional bases within the second exon of K- or H-ras. These findings suggest that exposure to dichloroacetic acid, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene provides a selective growth advantage to spontaneously occurring mutations in codon 61 of H-ras and, at the same time, is responsible for a small number of unique molecular lesions suggestive of either a random genotoxic mode of action or a non-specific result of secondary DNA damage. However, the absence of ras activation in many of the liver neoplasms suggests that alternative mechanisms are also important in B6C3F1 mouse hepatocarcinogenesis.

  15. miR-23b represses proto-oncogene Src kinase and functions as methylation-silenced tumor suppressor with diagnostic and prognostic significance in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Majid, Shahana; Dar, Altaf A; Saini, Sharanjot; Arora, Sumit; Shahryari, Varahram; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Chang, Inik; Yamamura, Soichiro; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-12-15

    The miRNAs have great potential as biomarkers and therapeutic agents owing to their ability to control multiple genes and potential to influence cellular behavior. Here, we identified that miR-23b is a methylation-silenced tumor suppressor in prostate cancer. We showed that miR-23b expression is controlled by promoter methylation and has great promise as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in prostate cancer. High levels of miR-23b expression are positively correlated with higher overall and recurrence-free survival in patients with prostate cancer. Furthermore, we elucidated the tumor suppressor role of miR-23b using in vitro and in vivo models. We showed that proto-oncogene Src kinase and Akt are direct targets of miR-23b. Increased expression of miR-23b inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration/invasion, and triggered G(0)-G(1) cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in prostate cancer. Overexpression of miR-23b inhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) causing a decline in mesenchymal markers Vimentin and Snail and increasing the epithelial marker, E-cadherin. Depletion of Src by RNA interference conferred similar functional effects as that of miR-23b reconstitution. miR-23b expression caused a dramatic decrease in tumor growth in nude mice and attenuated Src expression in excised tumors compared with a control miR. These findings suggest that miR-23b is a methylation-silenced tumor suppressor that may be a useful biomarker in prostate cancer. Loss of miR-23b may confer proliferative advantage and promote prostate cancer migration and invasion, and reexpression of miR-23b may contribute to the epigenetic therapy for prostate cancer.

  16. MicroRNA-23b represses proto-oncogene Src kinase and functions as methylation-silenced tumor suppressor with diagnostic and prognostic significance in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Shahana; Dar, Altaf A; Saini, Sharanjot; Arora, Sumit; Shahryari, Varahram; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Chang, Inik; Yamamura, Soichiro; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have great potential as biomarkers and therapeutic agents owing to their ability to control multiple genes and potential to influence cellular behavior. Here we identified that miR-23b is a methylation-silenced tumor suppressor in prostate cancer (PCa). We demonstrated that miR-23b expression is controlled by promoter methylation and has great promise as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in PCa. High levels of miR-23b expression are positively correlated with higher overall and recurrence-free survival in PCa patients. Further we elucidated the tumor suppressor role of miR-23b using in vitro and in vivo models. We demonstrated that proto-oncogene Src kinase and Akt are direct targets of miR-23b. Increased expression of miR-23b inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration/invasion and triggered G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in PCa. Over-expression of miR-23b inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) causing a decline in mesenchymal markers Vimentin and Snail and increasing the epithelial marker, E-cadherin. Depletion of Src by RNA interference conferred similar functional effects as that of miR-23b reconstitution. miR-23b expression caused a dramatic decrease in tumor growth in nude mice and attenuated Src expression in excised tumors compared to a control miR. These findings suggest that miR-23b is a methylation-silenced tumor suppressor that may be useful biomarker in PCa. Loss of miR-23b may confer proliferative advantage and promote PCa migration and invasion and re-expression of miR-23b may contribute to the epigenetic therapy for PCa. PMID:23074286

  17. High-resolution three-dimensional NMR structure of the KRAS proto-oncogene promoter reveals key features of a G-quadruplex involved in transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Kerkour, Abdelaziz; Marquevielle, Julien; Ivashchenko, Stefaniia; Yatsunyk, Liliya A; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Salgado, Gilmar F

    2017-05-12

    Non-canonical base pairing within guanine-rich DNA and RNA sequences can produce G-quartets, whose stacking leads to the formation of a G-quadruplex (G4). G4s can coexist with canonical duplex DNA in the human genome and have been suggested to suppress gene transcription, and much attention has therefore focused on studying G4s in promotor regions of disease-related genes. For example, the human KRAS proto-oncogene contains a nuclease-hypersensitive element located upstream of the major transcription start site. The KRAS nuclease-hypersensitive element (NHE) region contains a G-rich element (22RT; 5'-AGGGCGGTGTGGGAATAGGGAA-3') and encompasses a Myc-associated zinc finger-binding site that regulates KRAS transcription. The NEH region therefore has been proposed as a target for new drugs that control KRAS transcription, which requires detailed knowledge of the NHE structure. In this study, we report a high-resolution NMR structure of the G-rich element within the KRAS NHE. We found that the G-rich element forms a parallel structure with three G-quartets connected by a four-nucleotide loop and two short one-nucleotide double-chain reversal loops. In addition, a thymine bulge is found between G8 and G9. The loops of different lengths and the presence of a bulge between the G-quartets are structural elements that potentially can be targeted by small chemical ligands that would further stabilize the structure and interfere or block transcriptional regulators such as Myc-associated zinc finger from accessing their binding sites on the KRAS promoter. In conclusion, our work suggests a possible new route for the development of anticancer agents that could suppress KRAS expression. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. High frequency of BRAF proto-oncogene hot spot mutation V600E in cohort of colorectal cancer patients from Ahvaz City, southwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Asl, Javad Mohammadi; Almasi, Shekoufeh; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common forms of cancer around the world. Sporadic CRCs are caused by accumulation of mutations in essential genes regulating normal proliferation and differentiation of cells. The proto-oncogene BRAF encoded by the BRAF gene is involved in the RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway of signal transduction during cell growth. Acquired mutations in BRAF have been found at high frequencies in adult patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma and sporadic CRC. One of the predominant hot spot point mutations is T1799A (V600E) mutation among a cohort of CRC patients from Ahvaz city, southwest Iran. The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of V600E mutation in CRC patients from Ahvaz city, southwest Iran. We analyzed exon 15 of the BRAF gene in isolated DNA from 80 Formalin Fixed Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) CRC tumor tissues using PCR-RFLP method. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical program. According to our results 37 out of 80 cases (46.25%) were heterozygous for the mutation while the remaining 43 cases (53.75%) had normal homozygous genotype. No homozygous mutant genotype was found. Based on our findings, the frequency of V600E mutation appears to be significantly increased among CRC patients of the studied population but there was no significant relationship between genotypes and age and sex. In conclusion, these findings might prove the effect of V600E mutation on CRC pathogenesis. However, the exact effect of the mutation in CRC progression requires further work.

  19. Deregulated expression of the PCPH proto-oncogene in rat mammary tumors induced with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene.

    PubMed

    Solanas, Montserrat; Escrich, Eduard; Rouzaut, Ana; Costa, Irmgard; Martínez, Alfredo; Notario, Vicente

    2002-04-01

    The PCPH proto-oncogene was identified by its frequent activation in Syrian hamster fetal cells exposed to 3-methylcholanthrene. We previously isolated human PCPH cDNA and studied its expression in normal human tissues. We report herein the pattern of PCPH expression in normal rat tissues. Each tissue expressed one major PCPH polypeptide that varied in molecular mass in different tissues. Normal mammary gland expressed a single PCPH polypeptide of 27 kDa. This PCPH form also was expressed in lactating mammary glands but at significantly greater levels. These results suggest the existence of tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms for PCPH expression that may be influenced by the differentiation stage. Our previous studies on the involvement of PCPH in human cancer showed that human breast tumor cell lines have frequent alterations in PCPH, including multiple PCPH polypeptide forms that are not expressed in normal cells. These cell lines also have frequent loss of a 27-kDa form identified as the only PCPH polypeptide expressed by normal human breast epithelial cells. In this study, we found that these same alterations occurred in vivo during mammary carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, in both benign and malignant tumors, indicating that stable changes in PCPH expression took place early in the neoplastic process. Results showed that this experimental system is relevant to human breast carcinogenesis and provides an excellent model to study the molecular basis of the regulation of PCPH expression during normal differentiation and pathologic stages of neoplasia of the mammary gland and to analyze the role of PCPH in the carcinogenic process. Furthermore, the detection of atypical PCPH polypeptides in tumors suggests that PCPH immunodetection may be applied as a diagnostic tool for the early identification of neoplastic breast epithelial cells. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Prevalence of exon 11 internal tandem duplications in the C-KIT proto-oncogene in Australian canine mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Tamlin, V S; Kessell, A E; Mccoy, R J; Dobson, E C; Smith, T S; Hebart, M; Brown, L; Mitrovic, D; Peaston, A E

    2017-10-01

    To measure the prevalence of internal tandem duplications (ITDs) in exon 11 of the proto-oncogene C-KIT in a sample of Australian cutaneous canine mast cell tumours (MCTs) drawn from general practice and to evaluate relationships between tumour mutation status and prognostic factors including signalment, tumour histological grade, tumour anatomical location and tumour size. C-KIT exon 11 ITDs were detected by PCR in DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded canine MCTs sourced from three veterinary diagnostic laboratories in Adelaide and Melbourne. Tumours were graded according to two different systems (Patnaik and Kiupel systems) by board-certified anatomical pathologists blinded to the PCR results. Relationships between tumour mutation status and prognostic factors were evaluated using a generalised binary logistic regression analysis. ITDs were identified in 13 of 74 cutaneous canine MCT samples, giving an overall prevalence of 17.6% (95% confidence interval: 8.9-26.2%). ITDs were detected in 10 of 18 Patnaik grade III MCTs (55.6%) and 11 of 22 Kiupel high-grade MCTs (50%). Wald chi-square analysis revealed that detection of tumour ITDs was significantly associated with both Patnaik's and Kiupel's histologic grading systems (each: P < 0.001). The presence of the ITDs in MCTs was not associated with signalment, tumour anatomical location or tumour size. The prevalence of C-KIT exon 11 ITDs in Australian canine MCTs is similar to the prevalence in overseas canine populations (overall prevalence in Australia approximately 18%). ITDs were more frequently identified in higher grade MCTs. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  1. Therapeutic potential of a synthetic lethal interaction between the MYC proto-oncogene and inhibition of aurora-B kinase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dun; Liu, Hong; Goga, Andrei; Kim, Suwon; Yuneva, Mariia; Bishop, J Michael

    2010-08-03

    The Myc protein and proteins that participate in mitosis represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. However, their potential is presently compromised by the threat of side effects and by a lack of pharmacological inhibitors of Myc. Here we report that a circumscribed exposure to the aurora kinase inhibitor, VX-680, selectively kills cells that overexpress Myc. This synthetic lethal interaction is attributable to inhibition of aurora-B kinase, with consequent disabling of the chromosomal passenger protein complex (CPPC) and ensuing DNA replication in the absence of cell division; executed by sequential apoptosis and autophagy; not reliant on the tumor suppressor protein p53; and effective against mouse models for B-cell and T-cell lymphomas initiated by transgenes of MYC. Our findings cast light on how inhibitors of aurora-B kinase may kill tumor cells, implicate Myc in the induction of a lethal form of autophagy, indicate that expression of Myc be a useful biomarker for sensitivity of tumor cells to inhibition of the CPPC, dramatize the virtue of bimodal killing by a single therapeutic agent, and suggest a therapeutic strategy for killing tumor cells that overexpress Myc while sparing normal cells.

  2. G2 arrest and impaired nucleocytoplasmic transport in mouse embryos lacking the proto-oncogene CAN/Nup214.

    PubMed Central

    van Deursen, J; Boer, J; Kasper, L; Grosveld, G

    1996-01-01

    The vertebrate nucleopore complex (NPC) is a 125 MDa multiprotein assembly that mediates nucleocytoplasmic transport. One of its components, CAN/Nup214, is an FXFG repeat-containing protein known to be involved in myeloid leukemia in humans. We have devised a powerful genetic approach, using maternally derived protein in murine null embryos, to show that CAN/ Nup214 is essential for NPC function in vivo. We demonstrate that CAN-/- mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are not viable and that CAN-/- embryos die in utero between 4.0 and 4.5 days postcoitum, following the depletion of their CAN from maternal sources. In 3.5-day-old mutant embryos, cultured in vitro, progressive depletion of CAN leads to cell cycle arrest in G2 phase, and eventually to blastocoel collapse, impaired NLS-mediated protein uptake and nuclear accumulation of polyadenylated RNA. Remarkably, these defective CAN-depleted embryos do not display any gross morphological abnormalities in their nuclear envelopes or NPCs. Our data suggest that CAN is critical to cell cycle progression and required for both nuclear protein import and mRNA export. Images PMID:8896451

  3. The Cbl Proto-Oncogene Product Negatively Regulates the Src-Family Tyrosine Kinase Fyn by Enhancing Its Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Andoniou, Christopher E.; Lill, Nancy L.; Thien, Christine B.; Lupher, Mark L.; Ota, Satoshi; Bowtell, David D. L.; Scaife, Robin M.; Langdon, Wallace Y.; Band, Hamid

    2000-01-01

    Fyn is a prototype Src-family tyrosine kinase that plays specific roles in neural development, keratinocyte differentiation, and lymphocyte activation, as well as roles redundant with other Src-family kinases. Similar to other Src-family kinases, efficient regulation of Fyn is achieved through intramolecular binding of its SH3 and SH2 domains to conserved regulatory regions. We have investigated the possibility that the tyrosine kinase regulatory protein Cbl provides a complementary mechanism of Fyn regulation. We show that Cbl overexpression in 293T embryonic kidney and Jurkat T-lymphocyte cells led to a dramatic reduction in the active pool of Fyn; this was seen as a reduction in Fyn autophosphorylation, reduced phosphorylation of in vivo substrates, and inhibition of transcription from a Src-family kinase response element linked to a luciferase reporter. Importantly, a Fyn mutant (FynY528F) relieved of intramolecular repression was still negatively regulated by Cbl. The Cbl-dependent negative regulation of Fyn did not appear to be mediated by inhibition of Fyn kinase activity but was correlated with enhanced protein turnover. Consistent with such a mechanism, elevated levels of Fyn protein were observed in cell lines derived from Cbl−/− mice compared to those in wild-type controls. The effects of Cbl on Fyn were not observed when the 70ZCbl mutant protein was analyzed. Taken together, these observations implicate Cbl as a component in the negative regulation of Fyn and potentially other Src-family kinases, especially following kinase activation. These results also suggest that protein degradation may be a general mechanism for Cbl-mediated negative regulation of activated tyrosine kinases. PMID:10629042

  4. A 2-nt RNA enhancer on exon 11 promotes exon 11 inclusion of the Ron proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heegyum; Cho, Sunghee; Loh, Tiing Jen; Zhou, Jianhua; Ghigna, Claudia; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Green, Michael R; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2014-01-01

    Ron is a human receptor for the macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP). Exon 11 skipping of Ron pre-mRNA produces the Ron∆165 protein that has a deletion of a 49 amino acid region in the β-chain extracellular domain. Ron∆165 is constitutively active even in the absence of its ligand. Through stepwise deletion analysis, we identified a 2-nt RNA enhancer, which is located 74 nt upstream from the 5' splice site of exon 11, for exon 11 inclusion. Through double-base and single-base substitution analysis of the 2-nt RNA, we demonstrated that the GA, CC, UG and AC dinucleotides on exon 11, in addition to the wild-type AG sequence, function as enhancers for exon 11 inclusion of the Ron pre-mRNA.

  5. The proto-oncogene PBF binds p53 and is associated with prognostic features in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, Martin L; Seed, Robert I; Modasia, Bhavika; Kwan, Perkin P K; Sharma, Neil; Smith, Vicki E; Watkins, Rachel J; Bansal, Sukhchain; Gagliano, Teresa; Stratford, Anna L; Ismail, Tariq; Wakelam, Michael J O; Kim, Dae S; Ward, Stephen T; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A; Turnell, Andrew S; McCabe, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The PTTG1-binding factor (PBF) is a transforming gene capable of eliciting tumor formation in xenograft models. However, the precise role of PBF in tumorigenesis and its prognostic value as a cancer biomarker remain largely uncharacterised, particularly in malignancies outside the thyroid. Here, we provide the first evidence that PBF represents a promising prognostic marker in colorectal cancer. Examination of a total of 39 patients demonstrated higher PBF expression at both the mRNA (P = 0.009) and protein (P < 0.0001) level in colorectal tumors compared to matched normal tissue. Critically, PBF was most abundant in colorectal tumors associated with Extramural Vascular Invasion (EMVI), increased genetic instability (GI) and somatic TP53 mutations, all features linked with recurrence and poorer patient survival. We further demonstrate by glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation that PBF binds to the tumor suppressor protein p53, as well as to p53 mutants (Δ126-132, M133K, V197E, G245D, I255F and R273C) identified in the colorectal tumors. Importantly, overexpression of PBF in colorectal HCT116 cells interfered with the transcriptional activity of p53-responsive genes such as mdm2, p21 and sfn. Diminished p53 stability (> 90%; P < 0.01) was also evident with a concurrent increase in ubiquitinated p53. Human colorectal tumors with wild-type TP53 and high PBF expression also had low p53 protein levels (P < 0.05), further emphasizing a putative interaction between these genes in vivo. Overall, these results demonstrate an emerging role for PBF in colorectal tumorigenesis through regulating p53 activity, with implications for PBF as a prognostic indicator for invasive tumors.

  6. Proto-oncogene ACTR/AIB1 promotes cancer cell invasion by up-regulating specific matrix metalloproteinase expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Li B; Louie, Maggie C; Chen, H-W; Zou, June X

    2008-03-08

    Overexpression of ACTR/AIB1 is frequently found in different cancers with distant metastasis. To address its possible involvement in tumor metastasis, we performed invasion assays to examine the effect of ACTR alteration on the invasiveness of breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 or T-47D) and found that high levels of ACTR are required for their strong invasiveness. Molecular analysis indicates that ACTR functions as a coactivator of AP-1 to up-regulate the expression of matrix metalloproteinases such as MMP-7 and MMP-10 and reduce cell adhesion to specific extracellular matrix proteins. These novel findings provide a mechanistic link between ACTR and MMPs, and suggest that ACTR may also play an important role in cancer progression by facilitating tumor invasion.

  7. Do products of the myc proto-oncogene play a role in transcriptional regulation of the prothymosin alpha gene?

    PubMed Central

    Mol, P C; Wang, R H; Batey, D W; Lee, L A; Dang, C V; Berger, S L

    1995-01-01

    The Myc protein has been reported to activate transcription of the rat prothymosin alpha gene by binding to an enhancer element or E box (CACGTG) located in the first intron (S. Gaubatz et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 14:3853-3862, 1994). The human prothymosin alpha gene contains two such motifs: in the promoter region at kb -1.2 and in intron 1, approximately 2 kb downstream of the transcriptional start site in a region which otherwise bears little homology to the rat gene. Using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter constructs driven either by the 5-kb human prothymosin alpha promoter or by a series of truncated promoters, we showed that removal of the E-box sequence had no effect on transient expression of CAT activity in mouse L cells. When intron 1 of the prothymosin alpha gene was inserted into the most extensive promoter construct downstream of the CAT coding region, a diminution in transcription, which remained virtually unchanged upon disruption of the E boxes, was observed. CAT constructs driven by the native prothymosin alpha promoter or the native promoter and intron were indifferent to Myc; equivalent CAT activity was observed in the presence of ectopic normal or mutant Myc genes. Similarly, expression of a transiently transfected wild-type prothymosin alpha gene as the reporter was not affected by a repertoire of myc-derived genes, including myc itself and dominant or recessive negative myc mutants. In COS-1 cells, equivalent amounts of the protein were produced from transfected prothymosin alpha genes regardless of whether genomic E boxes were disrupted, intron 1 was removed, or a repertoire of myc-derived genes was included in the transfection cocktail. More importantly, cotransfection of a dominant negative Max gene failed to reduce transcription of the endogenous prothymosin alpha gene in COS cells or the wild-type transfected gene in COS or L cells. Taken together, the data do not support the idea that Myc activates transcription of the

  8. Modulation of c-fms proto-oncogene in an ovarian carcinoma cell line by a hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Y.; Morishita, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Tamaya, T.

    1997-01-01

    Co-expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and its receptor (c-fms) is often found in ovarian epithelial carcinoma, suggesting the existence of autocrine regulation of cell growth by M-CSF. To block this autocrine loop, we have developed hammerhead ribozymes against c-fms mRNA. As target sites of the ribozyme, we chose the GUC sequence in codon 18 and codon 27 of c-fms mRNA. Two kinds of ribozymes were able to cleave an artificial c-fms RNA substrate in a cell-free system, although the ribozyme against codon 18 was much more efficient than that against codon 27. We next constructed an expression vector carrying a ribozyme sequence that targeted the GUC sequence in codon 18 of c-fms mRNA. It was introduced into TYK-nu cells that expressed M-CSF and its receptor. Its transfectant showed a reduced growth potential. The expression levels of c-fms protein and mRNA in the transfectant were clearly decreased with the expression of ribozyme RNA compared with that of an untransfected control or a transfectant with the vector without the ribozyme sequence. These results suggest that the ribozyme against GUC in codon 18 of c-fms mRNA is a promising tool for blocking the autocrine loop of M-CSF in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9376277

  9. Crystal Structures of Proto-oncogene Kinase Pim1: A Target of Aberrant Somatic Hypermutations in Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Abhinav; Mandiyan, Valsan; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Zhang, Chao; Rice, Julie; Tsai, James; Artis, Dean R.; Ibrahim, Prabha; Bremer, Ryan

    2010-07-19

    Pim1, a serine/threonine kinase, is involved in several biological functions including cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. While pim1 has been shown to be involved in several hematopoietic cancers, it was also recently identified as a target of aberrant somatic hypermutation in diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL), the most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The crystal structures of Pim1 in apo form and bound with AMPPNP have been solved and several unique features of Pim1 were identified, including the presence of an extra {beta}-hairpin in the N-terminal lobe and an unusual conformation of the hinge connecting the two lobes of the enzyme. While the apo Pim1 structure is nearly identical with that reported recently, the structure of AMPPNP bound to Pim1 is significantly different. Pim1 is unique among protein kinases due to the presence of a proline residue at position 123 that precludes the formation of the canonical second hydrogen bond between the hinge backbone and the adenine moiety of ATP. One crystal structure reported here shows that changing P123 to methionine, a common residue that offers the backbone hydrogen bond to ATP, does not restore the ATP binding pocket of Pim1 to that of a typical kinase. These unique structural features in Pim1 result in novel binding modes of AMP and a known kinase inhibitor scaffold, as shown by co-crystallography. In addition, the kinase activities of five Pim1 mutants identified in DLCL patients have been determined. In each case, the observed effects on kinase activity are consistent with the predicted consequences of the mutation on the Pim1 structure. Finally, 70 co-crystal structures of low molecular mass, low-affinity compounds with Pim1 have been solved in order to identify novel chemical classes as potential Pim1 inhibitors. Based on the structural information, opportunities for optimization of one specific example are discussed.

  10. An integrated genomic-transcriptomic approach supports a role for the proto-oncogene BCL3 in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Giovanna; Girelli, Domenico; Zerbinati, Carlotta; Lunghi, Barbara; Friso, Simonetta; Meneghetti, Silvia; Coen, Matteo; Gagliano, Teresa; Guastella, Giuseppe; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Pizzolo, Francesca; Mascoli, Francesco; Malerba, Giovanni; Bovolenta, Matteo; Ferracin, Manuela; Olivieri, Oliviero; Bernardi, Francesco; Martinelli, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Data with border-line statistical significance, copiously generated in genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD), could include functionally relevant associations. We propose an integrated genomic and transcriptomic approach for unravelling new potential genetic signatures of atherosclerosis. Fifteen among 91 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were first selected for association in a sex- and age-adjusted model by examining 510 patients with CAD and myocardial infarction and 388 subjects with normal coronary arteries (CAD-free) in the replication stages of a genome-wide association study. We investigated the expression of 71 genes proximal to the 15 tag-SNPs by two subsequent steps of microarray-based mRNA profiling, the former in vascular smooth muscle cell populations, isolated from non-atherosclerotic and atherosclerotic human carotid portions, and the latter in whole carotid specimens. BCL3 and PVRL2, contiguously located on chromosome 19, and ABCA1, extensively investigated before, were found to be differentially expressed. BCL3 and PVRL2 SNPs were genotyped within a second population of CAD patients (n=442) and compared with CAD-free subjects (n=393). The carriership of the BCL3 rs2965169 G allele was more represented among CAD patients and remained independently associated with CAD after adjustment for all the traditional cardiovascular risk factors (odds ratio=1.70 with 95% confidence interval 1.07-2.71), while the BCL3 rs8100239 A allele correlated with metabolic abnormalities. The up-regulation of BCL3 mRNA levels in atherosclerotic tissue samples was consistent with BCL3 protein expression, which was detected by immunostaining in the intima-media of atherosclerotic specimens, but not within non-atherosclerotic ones. Our integrated approach suggests a role for BCL3 in cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Functional consequences of the first reported mutations of the proto-oncogene PTTG1IP/PBF

    PubMed Central

    Imruetaicharoenchoke, W; Fletcher, A; Lu, W; Watkins, R J; Modasia, B; Poole, V L; Nieto, H R; Thompson, R J; Boelaert, K; Read, M L; Smith, V E

    2017-01-01

    Pituitary tumor-transforming gene 1-binding factor (PTTG1IP; PBF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein, which is overexpressed in a wide range of tumours, and significantly associated with poorer oncological outcomes, such as early tumour recurrence, distant metastasis, extramural vascular invasion and decreased disease-specific survival. PBF transforms NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and induces tumours in nude mice, while mice harbouring transgenic thyroidal PBF expression show hyperplasia and macrofollicular lesions. Our assumption that PBF becomes an oncogene purely through increased expression has been challenged by the recent report of mutations in PBF within the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database. We therefore sought to determine whether the first 10 PBF missense substitutions in human cancer might be oncogenic. Anisomycin half-life studies revealed that most mutations were associated with reduced protein stability compared to wild-type (WT) PBF. Proliferation assays narrowed our interest to two mutational events which significantly altered cell turnover: C51R and R140W. C51R was mainly confined to the endoplasmic reticulum while R140W was apparent in the Golgi apparatus. Both C51R and R140W lost the capacity to induce cellular migration and significantly reduced cell invasion. Colony formation and soft agar assays demonstrated that, in contrast to WT PBF, both mutants were unable to elicit significant colony formation or anchorage-independent growth. However, C51R and R140W retained the ability to repress radioiodide uptake, a functional hallmark of PBF. Our data reveal new insight into PBF function and confirm that, rather than being oncogenic, mutations in PBF are likely to be passenger effects, with overexpression of PBF the more important aetiological event in human cancer. PMID:28676500

  12. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and RET proto-oncogene: mutation spectrum in the familial cases and a meta-analysis of studies on the sporadic form.

    PubMed

    Figlioli, Gisella; Landi, Stefano; Romei, Cristina; Elisei, Rossella; Gemignani, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is an uncommon malignant tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells (C cells) of thyroid. It accounts for 5-10% of all thyroid cancers, and it mostly occurs as a sporadic entity (sMTC), but a familial pattern (fMTC) is also possible. RET proto-oncogene germline mutations are crucial for the onset and the progression of fMTC, and the occurrence of single nucleotide polymorphisms could predispose to the sporadic form. In order to clarify the role of this gene in MTC, we carefully reviewed the PubMed database using appropriate terms. First, we summarized current knowledge of the germline RET mutations, mutation spectrum, and prevalence. We then performed a meta-analysis on the available case-control association studies for sMTC. Finally, we carried out in silico predictions of the best associated variants in the attempt to better define their role in the disease. To date, a total of 39 different RET germline mutations have been identified in fMTC families. The most affected codons are 609, 611, 618, 620 (exon 10) and 634 (exon 11), encoding for the extracellular cysteine-rich domain, and codons 768 (exon 13) and 804 (exon 14) of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Six polymorphisms with at least three studies were included in the meta-analysis (A45A [rs1800858], G691S [rs1799939], L769L [rs1800861], S836S [rs1800862], S904S [rs1800863], and IVS1-126G>T [rs2565206]). The meta-analysis demonstrated a modest association of sMTC susceptibility with S836S and a strong association with the IVS1-126G>T polymorphism. Besides RET polymorphisms, we also investigated the role of a few other low-penetrance alleles of genes involved in the RET pathway or in xenobiotic metabolism, but none of these were confirmed. Thus, despite the well-known molecular basis of fMTC, the genetic variants of the sporadic form are still poorly understood, and functional analyses are needed to better understand the consequence of such RET

  13. Magnesium deficiency upregulates sphingomyelinases in cardiovascular tissues and cells: cross-talk among proto-oncogenes, Mg(2+), NF-κB and ceramide and their potential relationships to resistant hypertension, atherogenesis and cardiac failure.

    PubMed

    Altura, Burton M; Shah, Nilank C; Shah, Gatha J; Li, Wenyan; Zhang, Aimin; Zheng, Tao; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Perez-Albela, Jose Luis; Altura, Bella T

    2013-01-01

    The present study tested the hypotheses that 1) short-term (ST) dietary deficiency of magnesium (MgD; 21 days) in rats would result in the upregulation of neutral-, acid-, and alkaline- sphingomyelinases SMases) in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles (VSMCs), 2) ST MgD would result in an upregulation of proto-oncogenes, i.e., c-Fos and c-Jun, as well as the p65 and c-Rel components of NF-κB in cardiac and VSMCs, 3) low levels of Mg(2+) added to drinking water would either prevent or greatly reduce the upregulation of the SMases and proto-oncogene expression, 4) exposure of primary cultured VSMCs to low extracellular Mg(2+) concentration would lead to release of ceramide in both cerebral and aortic VSMCs, 5) specific inhibitors of neutral- and acid-SMAs would reduce the release of ceramide in cultured VSMCs exposed to low extracellular Mg(2+), and 6) specific inhibitors of neutral- and acid-SMases would lead to reductions in the expression of c-fos, c-Jun, and NF-κB components. The data indicate that neutral-, acid-and alkaline-SMases exist in rat cardiac and VSMCs. ST MgD resulted in over 150% increases in SMase activity and proto-oncogene expression in left and right ventricular muscle, atrial muscle, and abdominal aortic smooth muscle; even very low levels of Mg(2+) added to drinking water either prevented or ameliorated the activation of all 3-SMases as well as expression of c-Fos and c-Jun; scyphostatin and desipramine reduced the low Mg(2+) - induced expression of the proto-oncogenes as well as p65 and c-Rel in VSMCs. Exposure of the VSMCs to low Mg(2+) resulted in more than a 100% increase in release of ceramide; scyphostatin and desipramine reduced greatly the release of ceramide from the VSMCs. We believe when the present data are viewed in light of our previous, recent findings on the effects of Mg deficiency on most of the major enzymes in the sphingomyelin-ceramide pathway, that they could provide a rational basis for the treatment and prevention of

  14. Proto-oncogene HER-2 in normal, dysplastic and tumorous feline mammary glands: an immunohistochemical and chromogenic in situ hybridization study

    PubMed Central

    Ordás, Javier; Millán, Yolanda; Dios, Rafaela; Reymundo, Carlos; Martín de las Mulas, Juana

    2007-01-01

    Background Feline mammary carcinoma has been proposed as a natural model of highly aggressive, hormone-independent human breast cancer. To further explore the utility of the model by adding new similarities between the two diseases, we have analyzed the oncogene HER-2 status at both the protein and the gene levels. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 30 invasive carcinomas, 7 benign lesions and two normal mammary glands were analyzed. Tumour features with prognostic value were recorded. The expression of protein HER-2 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and the number of gene copies by means of DNA chromogenic in situ hybridization. Results Immunohistochemical HER-2 protein overexpression was found in 40% of feline mammary carcinomas, a percentage higher to that observed in human breast carcinoma. As in women, feline tumours with HER-2 protein overexpression had pathological features of high malignancy. However, amplification of HER-2 was detected in 16% of carcinomas with protein overexpression, a percentage much lower than that observed in their human counterpart. Conclusion Feline mammary carcinoma would be a suitable natural model of that subset of human breast carcinomas with HER-2 protein overexpression without gene amplification. PMID:17880730

  15. Proto-oncogene HER-2 in normal, dysplastic and tumorous feline mammary glands: an immunohistochemical and chromogenic in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Ordás, Javier; Millán, Yolanda; Dios, Rafaela; Reymundo, Carlos; de Las Mulas, Juana Martín

    2007-09-20

    Feline mammary carcinoma has been proposed as a natural model of highly aggressive, hormone-independent human breast cancer. To further explore the utility of the model by adding new similarities between the two diseases, we have analyzed the oncogene HER-2 status at both the protein and the gene levels. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 30 invasive carcinomas, 7 benign lesions and two normal mammary glands were analyzed. Tumour features with prognostic value were recorded. The expression of protein HER-2 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and the number of gene copies by means of DNA chromogenic in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemical HER-2 protein overexpression was found in 40% of feline mammary carcinomas, a percentage higher to that observed in human breast carcinoma. As in women, feline tumours with HER-2 protein overexpression had pathological features of high malignancy. However, amplification of HER-2 was detected in 16% of carcinomas with protein overexpression, a percentage much lower than that observed in their human counterpart. Feline mammary carcinoma would be a suitable natural model of that subset of human breast carcinomas with HER-2 protein overexpression without gene amplification.

  16. Effects of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate [corrected] and sodium lauryl sulfate on the production and expression of cytokines and proto-oncogenes in photoaged and intrinsically aged human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Suh, D H; Youn, J I; Eun, H C

    2001-11-01

    Skin aging may be divided into photoaging and intrinsic aging. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate and sodium lauryl sulfate on the production and expression of cytokines and proto-oncogenes in photoaged and intrinsically aged skin, compared with young skin. Keratinocytes were taken from newborns, young adults in their twenties, and from the forearm and thigh of volunteers in their fifties and seventies. Interleukin-1alpha and -6, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, c-fos and c-myc were measured after cultured keratinocytes had been treated with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate and sodium lauryl sulfate. There has been no report concerning the dependence of cytokine production by sodium lauryl sulfate upon photoaging and intrinsic aging. This study also involves the first investigation of the effects of aging on c-myc expression by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate treatment. Cytokine production decreased markedly with age. These results suggest the progressive decline of cellular function with age. The ratio of cytokine production in the irritant-treated group compared with that in the control group showed a different pattern in photoaging and intrinsic aging. With the significant difference between photoaging and intrinsic aging, T/C ratio decreased in interleukin-1alpha and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist upon aging, whereas it increased in interleukin-6. S/C ratio was uniquely elevated on photoaged skin in the 50 y age group. It is suggested that photoaged skin shows an exaggerated reaction to surfactant. Compared with the control, c-fos expression in 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate-treated keratinocytes decreased with age in the thigh, but increased in the photoaged skin of forearm. The increased c-fos expression in 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate-treated keratinocytes could be relevant for the predisposition of photoaged keratinocytes to malignant transformation.

  17. Very early prophylactic thyroid surgery for infants with a mutation of the RET proto-oncogene at codon 634: evaluation of the implementation of international guidelines for MEN type 2 in a single centre.

    PubMed

    Piolat, Christian; Dyon, Jean-François; Sturm, Nathalie; Pinson, Stéphane; Bost, Michel; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Plantaz, Dominique; Chabre, Olivier

    2006-07-01

    Genetic diagnosis available since 1993 established germinal mutations of the RET proto-oncogene at codon 634 as the main cause of inherited medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). International guidelines established in 1999 recommend that children with such mutations undergo a total thyroidectomy before age 5, with unspecified cervical neck dissection. Since 1993, only 41 of 275 thyroidectomies reported in RET 634 children were performed before age 5 (15%). The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation of these guidelines in a single centre. Genetic diagnosis was proposed to the parents of all eight children born after 1992 from two RET 634 families. Total thyroidectomy was proposed before age 5 if the child carried a mutation. Genetic diagnosis was performed in all the children (aged 1-3) and thyroidectomy in the five who carried a mutation (aged 2-5). Cervical lymph node dissection varied from lymphadenectomy of central and lateral compartments in the eldest child to pickings in the youngest. There was no permanent hypoparathyroidism or recurrent nerve paralysis. C-cell hyperplasia, medullary thyroid carcinoma and lymph node metastasis were present in 5/5, 3/5 and 0/5, respectively. Undetectable pentagastrin-stimulated CT levels were achieved and maintained postoperatively in all five children (average follow-up 3.6 years). MEN 2 guidelines on thyroidectomy can be efficiently and safely implemented by a multidisciplinary team operating in a single centre. The lack of guidelines on cervical neck dissection remains a problem; this could be solved by determining an age under which this procedure would be deemed unnecessary.

  18. Degradation of the proto-oncogene product p39mos is not necessary for cyclin proteolysis and exit from meiotic metaphase: requirement for a Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent event.

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, T; Galas, S; Fesquet, D; Devault, A; Cavadore, J C; Dorée, M

    1991-01-01

    Exit from M phase, which requires cyclin degradation, is prevented from occurring in unfertilized eggs of vertebrates arrested at second meiotic metaphase due to a cytostatic factor recently identified as p39mos, the product of the proto-oncogene c-mos. Calpain can destroy both p39mos and cyclin in vitro in extracts prepared from metaphase-arrested Xenopus eggs, but only when free Ca2+ concentration is raised to the millimolar range. When free Ca2+ concentration is raised for only 30 s to the micromolar range, as occurs in physiological conditions after fertilization, cyclin degradation is induced, byt p39mos is not degraded. Cyclin proteolysis at micromolar free Ca2+, is not inhibited by calpastatin, and therefore does not involve calpain. A cyclin mutant modified in the destruction box is found to be resistant at micromolar, but not millimolar free Ca2+, suggesting that the ubiquitin pathway mediates cyclin degradation at micromolar Ca2+ concentration whereas calpain is involved at the millimolar level. A synthetic peptide which binds Ca(2+)-calmodulin with high affinity suppresses cyclin degradation at micromolar but not millimolar free Ca2+, and this only when it is present in the extract during the first 30 s after raising free Ca2+ concentration. The inhibition of the cyclin degradation pathway by the Ca(2+)-calmodulin binding peptide can be overcome by adding calmodulin. These results strongly suggest that a Ca(2+)-calmodulin process is required as an early event following fertilization to release the cyclin degradation pathway from inhibition in metaphase-arrested eggs. In contrast, p39mos degradation is not required. Images PMID:1829675

  19. Dynamic regulation of c-Myc proto-oncogene expression during lymphocyte development revealed by a GFP-c-Myc knock-in mouse.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Yu; Bredemeyer, Andrea L; Walker, Laura M; Bassing, Craig H; Sleckman, Barry P

    2008-02-01

    c-Myc induces widely varying cellular effects, including cell proliferation and cell death. These different cellular effects are determined, in part, by c-Myc protein expression levels, which are regulated through several transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways. c-Myc transcripts can be detected in cells at all stages of B and T lymphocyte development. However, little is known about c-Myc protein expression, and how it varies, in developing lymphocytes. Here mice have been generated in which the endogenous c-Myc locus has been modified (c-Myc(G)) so that it encodes a GFP-c-Myc fusion protein. c-Myc(G/G) mice are viable, appear normal and exhibit grossly normal lymphocyte development. Flow cytometric analyses revealed significant heterogeneity in c-Myc protein expression levels in developing c-Myc(G/G) B and T lymphocytes. GFP-c-Myc expression levels were highest in proliferating lymphocytes, suggesting that c-Myc up-regulation is important for promoting lymphocyte cell division, and demonstrating that GFP-c-Myc expression is a marker of proliferating lymphocytes in vivo.

  20. The cell survival pathways of the primordial RNA–DNA complex remain conserved in the extant genomes and may function as proto-oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Malignantly transformed (cancer) cells of multicellular hosts, including human cells, operate activated biochemical pathways that recognizably derived from unicellular ancestors. The descendant heat shock proteins of thermophile archaea now chaperon oncoproteins. The ABC cassettes of toxin-producer zooxantella Symbiodinia algae pump out the cytoplasmic toxin molecules; malignantly transformed cells utilize the derivatives of these cassettes to get rid of chemotherapeuticals. High mobility group helix–loop–helix proteins, protein arginine methyltransferases, proliferating cell nuclear antigens, and Ki-67 nuclear proteins, that protect and repair DNA in unicellular life forms, support oncogenes in transformed cells. The cell survival pathways of Wnt–β-catenin, Hedgehog, PI3K, MAPK–ERK, STAT, Ets, JAK, Pak, Myb, achaete scute, circadian rhythms, Bruton kinase and others, which are physiological in uni- and early multicellular eukaryotic life forms, are constitutively encoded in complex oncogenic pathways in selected single cells of advanced multicellular eukaryotic hosts. Oncogenes and oncoproteins in advanced multicellular hosts recreate selected independently living and immortalized unicellular life forms, which are similar to extinct and extant protists. These unicellular life forms are recognized at the clinics as autologous “cancer cells”. PMID:25883792

  1. Mei-P26 Mediates Tissue-Specific Responses to the Brat Tumor Suppressor and the dMyc Proto-Oncogene in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana; Boulan, Laura; Perez, Lidia; Milán, Marco

    2014-01-01

    TRIM-NHL proteins are a family of translational regulators that control cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation during development. Drosophila Brat and Mei-P26 TRIM-NHL proteins serve as tumor suppressors in stem cell lineages and have been proposed to exert this action, in part, via the repression of the protooncogene dMyc. Here we analyze the role of Brat, Mei-P26, and dMyc in regulating growth in Drosophila imaginal discs. As in stem cell lineages, Brat and Mei-P26 repress dMyc in epithelial cells by acting at the post-transcriptional and protein level, respectively. Analysis of cell and organ size unravel that Mei-P26 mediates tissue-specific responses to Brat and dMyc activities. Loss-of-function of brat and overexpression of dMyc induce overgrowth in stem cell lineages and eventually can participate in tumor formation. In contrast, an increase in Mei-P26 levels inhibits growth of epithelial cells in these two conditions. Upon depletion of Brat, Mei-P26 up-regulation prevents an increase in dMyc protein levels and leads to tissue undergrowth. This mechanism appears to be tissue-specific since Mei-P26 is not upregulated in brain tumors resulting from brat loss-of-function. Driving Mei-P26 expression in these tumors —mimicking the situation in epithelial cells— is sufficient to prevent dMyc accumulation, thus rescuing the overgrowth. Finally, we show that Mei-P26 upregulation mediates dMyc-induced apoptosis and limits dMyc growth potential in epithelial cells. These findings shed light on the tumor suppressor roles of TRIM-NHL proteins and underscore a new mechanism that maintains tissue homeostasis upon dMyc deregulation. PMID:24990993

  2. c-ets1 proto-oncogene is a transcription factor expressed in endothelial cells during tumor vascularization and other forms of angiogenesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Wernert, N; Raes, M B; Lassalle, P; Dehouck, M P; Gosselin, B; Vandenbunder, B; Stehelin, D

    1992-01-01

    The c-ets1 proteins are transcriptional activators expressed within endothelial cells during blood vessel development in chick embryos. The authors show by in situ hybridization that c-ets1 is transcribed in the endothelia during angiogenesis in human embryos, in granulation tissue, and especially during tumor vascularization. c-ets1 mRNAs were also detected in the fibrocytes of tumor stroma and in the spindle cells of Kaposi's sarcomas, regarded as cells of endothelial origin. It has been shown that the c-ets proteins activate transcription through a PEA3 motif that plays a role in the stimulation of transcription of urokinase-type plasminogen-activator (u-PA), stromelysin and collagenase genes. The authors demonstrate in vitro that the angiogenic factor TNF alpha increases transiently the amount of both c-ets1 and u-PA mRNA in confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Therefore, the authors suggest that the c-ets1 proteins might regulate the transcription of the genes coding for matrix-degrading proteases, which are necessary for both angiogenesis and tumor invasion.

  3. DNA repair in the c-myc proto-oncogene locus: Possible involvement in susceptibility or resistance to plasmacytoma induction in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Beecham, E.J.; Mushinski, J.F.; Shacter, E.; Potter, M.; Bohr, V.A. )

    1991-06-01

    This report describes an unexpected difference in the efficiency of removal of UV-induced DNA damage in the c-myc locus in splenic B lymphoblasts from two inbred strains of mice. In cells from plasmacytoma-resistant DBA/2N mice, 35% of UV-induced damage in the regulatory and 5{prime} flank of c-myc is removed by 12 h. However, in cells from plasmacytoma-susceptible BALB/cAn mice, damage is not removed from this region. In the protein-encoding region and 3{prime} flank of c-myc as well as in two dihydrofolate reductase gene fragments, UV damage is repaired with similar efficiency in B lymphoblasts from both strains of mice. Furthermore, in the protein-encoding portion and 3{prime} flank of c-myc, damage is selectively removed from only the transcribed strand. No repair is detected in the nontranscribed strand. In contrast, DNA repair in the 5{prime} flank of c-myc is not strand specific; in DNA from DBA/2N cells, UV damage is rapidly removed from both the transcribed and nontranscribed strands. In BALB/cAn cells no repair was detected in either strand in the 5'flank, consistent with the results with double-stranded, nick-translated probes to this region of c-myc. In addition to the repair studies, we have detected post-UV-damage formation: in most of the genes studied, we find that additional T4 endonuclease-sensitive sites are formed in the DNA 2 h after irradiation. Our findings provide new insights into the details of gene-specific and strand-specific DNA repair and suggest that there may be close links between DNA repair and B-cell neoplastic development.

  4. Down-regulation of the PTTG1 proto-oncogene contributes to the melanoma suppressive effects of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor PHA-848125.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Simona; Alvino, Ester; Levati, Lauretta; Esposito, Alessia I; Ciomei, Marina; Brasca, Maria G; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Desideri, Marianna; Bonmassar, Enzo; Pfeffer, Ulrich; D'Atri, Stefania

    2012-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that PHA-848125, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor presently under Phase II clinical investigation, impairs melanoma cell growth. In this study, gene expression profiling showed that PHA-848125 significantly modulated the expression of 128 genes, predominantly involved in cell cycle control, in the highly drug-sensitive GL-Mel (p53 wild-type) melanoma cells. Up-regulation of 4 selected genes (PDCD4, SESN2, DDIT4, DEPDC6), and down-regulation of 6 selected genes (PTTG1, CDC25A, AURKA, AURKB, PLK1, BIRC5) was confirmed at protein levels. The same protein analysis performed in PHA-848125-treated M10 melanoma cells - p53 mutated and less sensitive to the drug than GL-Mel cells - revealed no DEPDC6 expression and no changes of PTTG1, PDCD4 and BIRC5 levels. Upon PHA-848125 treatment, a marked PTTG1 down-modulation was also observed in A375 cells (p53 wild-type) but not in CN-Mel cells (p53 mutated). PTTG1 silencing significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and induced senescence, with effects less pronounced in p53 mutated cells. PTTG1 silencing increased PHA-848125 sensitivity of p53 mutated cells but not that of A375 or GL-Mel cells. Accordingly, in M10 but not in A375 cells a higher level of senescence was detected in PHA-848125-treated/PTTG1-silenced cells with respect to PHA-848125-treated controls. In A375 and GL-Mel cells, TP53 silencing attenuated PHA-848125-induced down-modulation of PTTG1 and decreased cell sensitivity to the drug. These findings indicate that PHA-848125-induced down-regulation of PTTG1 depends, at least in part, on p53 function and contributes to the antiproliferative activity of the drug. Our study provides further molecular insight into the antitumor mechanism of PHA-848125. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Transfection of TF-1 cell line with human bcl-2 proto-oncogene provides short-term survival in absence of GM-CSF without changing the phenotype].

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Moreno, J A; Nieves-Ramírez, M E; Cáceres-Cortés, J R

    2000-01-01

    Apoptosis is a process genetically controlled. The produce of the bcl-2 gene, bcl-2, is an anti apoptotic protein that is linked to the external membrane of the mitochondria. To explore the possibility that bcl-2 transfection could change phenotype, response to mitogenic factor, and cell morphology on the TF-1 parental cell line and the bcl-2 transfectant TB-1 or TF-1neo. We look at the expression of CD13, CD34 and c-Kit surface markers by flow cytometry. We have measured cell proliferation in response to GM-CSF and cell survival after GM-CSF withdrawal by the MTT assay on the same cell lines. Apoptosis was evaluated by the apoptotic membrane blebbing set up at different times after serum and survival factor removal or tolerance to cytotoxic compounds from Justicia spicigera. According with our results, ectopic expression of the bcl-2 gene prevented apoptosis without changes in morphology or phenotype in the absence of GM-CSF and serum or the presence of the extract from Justicia spicigera. Consisting with the Bcl-2 function, we found that Bcl-2 did not change response to GM-CSF. Serum deprivation or GM-CSF withdrawal induces cell death at 36 hours in TF-1 and TF-1neo cells, whereas TB-1 cells undergo apoptotic membrane blebbing after 96 hours under the same conditions. Taken together, our data indicate that Bcl-2 is a short term anti apoptotic protein in TB-1 cell line, that does not affect response to GM-CSF neither CD13, CD34 nor c-Kit antigen expression.

  6. Toward operative in vivo fluorescence imaging of the c-Met proto-oncogene for personalization of therapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shujuan; Zheng, Yong; Volpi, Davide; El-Kasti, Muna; Klotz, Daniel; Tullis, Iain; Henricks, Andrea; Campo, Leticia; Myers, Kevin; Laios, Alex; Thomas, Peter; Ng, Tony; Dhar, Sunanda; Becker, Christian; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Ahmed, Ahmed Ashour

    2015-01-15

    Standard biomarker testing of a single macroscopic disease site is unlikely to be sufficient because of tumor heterogeneity. A focus on examining global biomarker expression or activity, particularly in microscopic residual chemotherapy-resistant disease, is needed for the appropriate selection of targeted therapies. This study was aimed at establishing a technique for the assessment of biomarkers of ovarian cancer peritoneal spread. An in-house developed fluorescent imaging device was used to detect the expression of the c-Met oncogene in ovarian cancer. A modified cyanine 5-tagged peptide, GE137, with a high in vitro affinity for the human c-Met protein, was tested in a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines. Finally, the feasibility of detecting submillimeter ovarian cancer cell peritoneal metastases in vivo was tested through the intravenous injection of GE137 into mice with tumor xenografts. Using optical imaging it was possible to detect c-Met expression in submillimeter peritoneal metastases that were freshly excised from a human high-grade serous ovarian cancer. GE137 selectively bound to the c-Met tyrosine kinase without activating survival signaling pathways (AKT or extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation) downstream of c-Met. GE137 specifically accumulated in SKOv3 ovarian cancer cells expressing c-Met via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and emitted a fluorescent signal that lasted for at least 8 hours in tumor xenografts in vivo with a sustained high signal-to-noise ratio. Our results suggest that intraoperative optical imaging could provide a new paradigm for selecting cancer patients for appropriate targeted therapies, particularly after initial chemotherapy. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  7. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 represses transcription of p21CIP1 by inhibition of transcription activation by p53 and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-05-08

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1-3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target.

  8. An animal model for the rapid induction of tongue neoplasms in human c-Ha-ras proto-oncogene transgenic rats by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide: its potential use for preclinical chemoprevention studies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Rikako; Kohno, Hiroyuki; Suzui, Masumi; Yoshimi, Naoki; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Tanaka, Takuji

    2006-03-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common human neoplasms, and prevention of this malignancy requires a better understanding of its carcinogenesis process. To this end, we tried to establish an animal model using the human c-Ha-ras proto-oncogene-carrying transgenic (Tg) rats and the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO). 4-NQO (20 p.p.m.) was administered to Tg and non-Tg rats for 8 weeks in their drinking water, and then the occurrence of tongue carcinogenesis was compared during the experimental period of 22 weeks. In addition, we determined the DNA ploidy in tongue lesions and examined the immunohistochemical expression of five biomarkers such as cyclin D1, glutathione S-transferase placental form, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and beta-catenin. Next, the cancer chemopreventive effects of nimesulide, pioglitazone and a synthetic geranylated derivative, which have been reported to be inhibitors of tongue carcinogenesis, were examined in Tg rats treated with 4-NQO. Either during or after treatment with 4-NQO in the drinking water, tongue dysplasia and tumors were observed on the tongues of both Tg and non-Tg rats, with a greater incidence and multiplicity in Tg rats. Histopathologically, squamous cell dysplasia, papilloma and carcinoma with or without invasion were present in the tongue. Immunohistochemistry revealed that expression levels against five biomarkers increase with disease progression, and the changes correlated with those of the DNA ploidy pattern. Interestingly, a strong expression of COX-2, iNOS and beta-catenin was observed on the invasive front of squamous cell carcinomas. A subsequent chemoprevention study using Tg rats showed that the chemicals tested suppressed the occurrence of tongue carcinomas when they were administered after 4-NQO-exposure. These results may thus indicate that our 4-NQO-induced Tg rat tongue carcinogenesis model simulates many aspects of human oral carcinogenesis and it

  9. Analysis of cDNAs of the proto-oncogene c-src: heterogeneity in 5' exons and possible mechanism for the genesis of the 3' end of v-src.

    PubMed Central

    Dorai, T; Levy, J B; Kang, L; Brugge, J S; Wang, L H

    1991-01-01

    To further characterize the gene structure of the proto-oncogene c-src and the mechanism for the genesis of the v-src sequence in Rous sarcoma virus, we have analyzed genomic and cDNA copies of the chicken c-src gene. From a cDNA library of chicken embryo fibroblasts, we isolated and sequenced several overlapping cDNA clones covering the full length of the 4-kb c-src mRNA. The cDNA sequence contains a 1.84-kb sequence downstream from the 1.6-kb pp60c-src coding region. An open reading frame of 217 amino acids, called sdr (src downstream region), was found 105 nucleotides from the termination codon for pp60c-src. Within the 3' noncoding region, a 39-bp sequence corresponding to the 3' end of the RSV v-src was detected 660 bases downstream of the pp60c-src termination codon. The presence of this sequence in the c-src mRNA exon supports a model involving an RNA intermediate during transduction of the c-src sequence. The 5' region of the c-src cDNA was determined by analyzing several cDNA clones generated by conventional cloning methods and by polymerase chain reaction. Sequences of these chicken embryo fibroblast clones plus two c-src cDNA clones isolated from a brain cDNA library show that there is considerable heterogeneity in sequences upstream from the c-src coding sequence. Within this region, which contains at least 300 nucleotides upstream of the translational initiation site in exon 2, there exist at least two exons in each cDNA which fall into five cDNA classes. Four unique 5' exon sequences, designated exons UE1, UE2, UEX, and UEY, were observed. All of them are spliced to the previously characterized c-src exons 1 and 2 with the exception of type 2 cDNA. In type 2, the exon 1 is spliced to a novel downstream exon, designated exon 1a, which maps in the region of the c-src DNA defined previously as intron 1. Exon UE1 is rich in G+C content and is mapped at 7.8 kb upstream from exon 1. This exon is also present in the two cDNA clones from the brain c

  10. Cigarette smoke extracts induce overexpression of the proto-oncogenic gene interleukin-13 receptor α2 through activation of the PKA-CREB signaling pathway to trigger malignant transformation of lung vascular endothelial cells and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Mei; Liao, Huaidong; Zhang, Bin; Pan, Yanyan; Kong, Ying; Liu, Wenming; Yang, Ping; Huo, Zihe; Cao, Zhifei; Zhou, Quansheng

    2017-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major cause of lung cancer. Tumor-associated endothelial cells (TAECs) play important roles in tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. However, whether cigarette smoking can trigger genesis of lung TAECs has not been reported yet. In the current study, we used lung endothelial cell (EC) lines as a model to study the pathological effect of cigarette smoke extracts (CSEs) on human lung ECs, and found that a lower dose of 4% CSEs obviously caused abnormal morphological changes in ECs, increased the permeability of endothelial monolayer, while a higher concentration of 8% CSEs caused EC apoptosis. Strikingly, CSEs induced a 117-fold overexpression of a pro-tumorigenic interleukin-13 receptor α2 gene (IL-13Rα2, also named as CT-19) through activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling pathway. A PKA specific inhibitor H89 completely abolished CSEs-induced IL-13Rα2 overexpression. The overexpression of IL-13Rα2 in lung ECs significantly increased the tumorigenic, migratory, and angiogenic capabilities of the cells, suggesting that IL-13Rα2 promotes genesis of lung TAECs. Together, our data show that CSEs activate the PKA, CREB, and IL-13Rα2 axis in lung ECs, and IL-13Rα2 promotes the malignant transformation of lung ECs and genesis of TAECs with robust angiogenic and oncogenic capabilities. Our study provides new insight into the mechanism of CSEs-triggered lung cancer angiogenesis and tumorigenesis, suggesting that the PKA-CREB-IL-13Rα2 axis is a potential target for novel anti-lung tumor angiogenesis and anti-lung cancer drug discovery.

  11. Drosophila photoreceptor axon guidance and targeting requires the dreadlocks SH2/SH3 adapter protein.

    PubMed

    Garrity, P A; Rao, Y; Salecker, I; McGlade, J; Pawson, T; Zipursky, S L

    1996-05-31

    Mutations in the Drosophila gene dreadlocks (dock) disrupt photoreceptor cell (R cell) axon guidance and targeting. Genetic mosaic analysis and cell-type-specific expression of dock transgenes demonstrate dock is required in R cells for proper innervation. Dock protein contains one SH2 and three SH3 domains, implicating it in tyrosine kinase signaling, and is highly related to the human proto-oncogene Nck. Dock expression is detected in R cell growth cones in the target region. We propose Dock transmits signals in the growth cone in response to guidance and targeting cues. These findings provide an important step for dissection of signaling pathways regulating growth cone motility.

  12. Proteins that interact with calgranulin B in the human colon cancer cell line HCT-116

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Shin, Daye; Kim, Jong Heon; Cho, Jae Youl; Yoo, Byong Chul

    2017-01-01

    Calgranulin B is released from immune cells and can be internalized into colon cancer cells to prevent proliferation. The present study aimed to identify proteins that interact with calgranulin B to suppress the proliferation of colon cancer cells, and to obtain information on the underlying anti-tumor mechanism(s) of calgranulin B. Calgranulin B expression was induced in colon cancer cell line HCT-116 by infection with calgranulin B-FLAG expressing lentivirus, and it led to a significant suppression of cell proliferation. Proteins that interacted with calgranulin B were obtained by immunoprecipitation using whole homogenate of lentivirus-infected HCT-116 cells which expressing calgranulin B-FLAG, and identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 454 proteins were identified that potentially interact with calgranulin B, and most identified proteins were associated with RNA processing, post-transcriptional modifications and the EIF2 signaling pathway. Direct interaction of calgranulin B with flotillin-1, dynein intermediate chain 1, and CD59 glycoprotein has been confirmed, and the molecules N-myc proto-oncogene protein, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, and myc proto-oncogene protein were shown to regulate calgranulin B-interacting proteins. Our results provide new insight and useful information to explain the possible mechanism(s) underlying the role of calgranulin B as an anti-tumor effector in colon cancer cells. PMID:28036279

  13. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in cancer: biochemical interactions and drug design.

    PubMed

    Audigier, Yves; Picault, François-Xavier; Chaves-Almagro, Carline; Masri, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) share the same topology made of seven-transmembrane segments and represent the largest family of membrane receptors. Initially associated with signal transduction in differentiated cells, GPCRs and heterotrimeric G proteins were shown to behave as proto-oncogenes whose overexpression or activating mutations confer transforming properties. The first part of this review focuses on the link between biochemical interactions of a GPCR with other receptors, such as dimerization or multiprotein complexes, and their oncogenic properties. Alteration of these interactions or deregulation of transduction cascades can promote uncontrolled cell proliferation or cell transformation that leads to tumorigenicity and malignancy. The second part concerns the design of drugs specifically targeting these complex interactions and their promise in cancer therapy.

  14. c-Myb protein interacts with Rcd-1, a component of the CCR4 transcription mediator complex.

    PubMed

    Haas, Martin; Siegert, Michaela; Schürmann, André; Sodeik, Beate; Wolfes, Heiner

    2004-06-29

    Transcriptional initiation of eukaryotic genes depends on the cooperative interaction of various transcription factors. Using the yeast two-hybrid assay, we have identified the murine Rcd-1 protein as a cofactor of the c-myb proto-oncogene product. Rcd-1 is evolutionarily conserved among many species, and moreover the yeast homologue CAF40 is part of the carbon catabolite repressor protein transcriptional mediator thought to be involved in the negative regulation of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Rcd-1 is located mainly in the nucleus, and it interacts with c-Myb both in vitro and in vivo. The activation of the myeloid c-myb-specific mim-1 promoter is repressed by Rcd-1. Interestingly, rcd-1 is an erythropoietin regulated gene, which also represses the action of the AP-1 transcription factor on its target genes.

  15. C-erbB-2 gene product, a membrane protein commonly expressed on human fetal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Akiyama, T; Yamada, Y; Morishita, Y; Sugawara, I; Toyoshima, K; Yamamoto, T

    1989-07-01

    C-erbB-2 is a human proto-oncogene which has homologies with the well known proto-oncogene c-erbB. The c-erbB-2 gene is amplified and overexpressed in some human adenocarcinomas. Its expression, in terms of RNA levels in normal human fetal kidney, lung and liver, has also been reported. In the present study, various fetal tissues from three human abortuses obtained at 9, 14 and 24 weeks of gestation, were studied immunohistologically by the ABC method and immunochemically by Western blot analysis for the distribution of c-erbB-2 gene product at the protein level. A polyclonal antibody raised in rabbit by immunization with a synthetic polypeptide corresponding to part of the predicted intracytoplasmic domain was used. Strong immunoreactivity was observed on the membrane of most of the epithelial cells examined, including transitional cells of the renal pelvis and ureter, glandular cells of the gastrointestinal tract, renal tubuli, bronchi and pancreas, and stratified epithelium of the oral cavity, trachea and esophagus in this gestational period. A much more intense reaction was observed on the basolateral sides than on the apical side of these cells. No immunoreactivity was found in the liver, adrenal gland, striated and smooth muscles, brain, endothelium or fibroblasts. Western blot analysis confirmed increased expression of the c-erbB-2 gene product in fetal kidney and intestine but not in the brain. As the protein seems to be poorly expressed in normal adult epithelial cells except for renal tubuli, the present results suggest that the protein is a membrane-associated receptor protein which controls some specific reaction of fetal epithelium.

  16. HindIII polymorphism in the human c-sis proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Fourney, R.M.; Dietrich, K.D.; Aubin, R.A.; Paterson, M.C. )

    1988-08-25

    The 2.0 kb BamH1 restriction fragment corresponding to a cDNA insert encoding the human c-sis PDGF A chain and nucleotide sequences homologous to the v-sis gene was isolated from plasmid pSM-1. An identical polymorphism was noted using the 1.2 kb PstI fragment or the 1.0 kb PstI/XbaI fragment isolated from the v-sis sequence subcloned in the plasmid pV-sis. HindIII identifies a single bi-allelic polymorphism with bands at 22.6 kb and 19.4 kb. Co-dominant segregation was demonstrated in 1 family. This polymorphism is not easily detected unless the restricted DNA is separated on 0.6-0.8% agarose gels. Resolution was optimal if gels were run until the bromophenol blue tracking dye had migrated 14 cm from the origin and Southern blotting was performed under alkaline conditions.

  17. B Lymphocyte commitment program is driven by the proto-oncogene c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Vallespinós, Mireia; Fernández, David; Rodríguez, Lorena; Alvaro-Blanco, Josué; Baena, Esther; Ortiz, Maitane; Dukovska, Daniela; Martínez, Dolores; Rojas, Ana; Campanero, Miguel R; Moreno de Alborán, Ignacio

    2011-06-15

    c-Myc, a member of the Myc family of transcription factors, is involved in numerous biological functions including the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in various cell types. Of all of its functions, the role of c-Myc in cell differentiation is one of the least understood. We addressed the role of c-Myc in B lymphocyte differentiation. We found that c-Myc is essential from early stages of B lymphocyte differentiation in vivo and regulates this process by providing B cell identity via direct transcriptional regulation of the ebf-1 gene. Our data show that c-Myc influences early B lymphocyte differentiation by promoting activation of B cell identity genes, thus linking this transcription factor to the EBF-1/Pax-5 pathway.

  18. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor-Dependent Transformation by a Human EGF Receptor Proto-Oncogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velu, Thierry J.; Beguinot, Laura; Vass, William C.; Willingham, Mark C.; Merlino, Glenn T.; Pastan, Ira; Lowy, Douglas R.

    1987-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor gene EGFR has been placed in a retrovirus vector to examine the growth properties of cells that experimentally overproduce a full-length EGF receptor. NIH 3T3 cells transfected with the viral DNA or infected with the corresponding rescued retrovirus developed a fully transformed phenotype in vitro that required both functional EGFR expression and the presence of EGF in the growth medium. Cells expressing 4 × 105 EGF receptors formed tumors in nude mice, while control cells did not. Therefore, the EGFR retrovirus, which had a titer on NIH 3T3 cells that was greater than 107 focus-forming units per milliliter, can efficiently transfer and express this gene, and increased numbers of EGF receptors can contribute to the transformed phenotype.

  20. c-Kit proto-oncogene expression in endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ercan; Celik, Onder; Simsek, Yavuz; Turkcuoglu, Ilgin; Celik, Ebru; Gül, Mehmet; Hascalik, Seyma; Aydin, Nasuhi Engin; Aydin, Engin

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the expression of c-kit (CD117) in endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer. Expression of c-kit in 10 normal endometrium, 18 simple endometrial hyperplasia, 16 complex endometrial hyperplasia (10 cases with atypia and 6 cases without atypia), and 6 endometrial cancer were investigated by immunohistochemistry. c-Kit expression decreased as the lesion progressed to endometrial cancer. Immunostaining was mostly focal and weak in the normal endometrium and was mostly diffuse and strong in the simple and complex endometrial hyperplasia. Simple and complex hyperplastic endometrial tissues express diffuse cytoplasmic staining for c-kit and the expression decreases with the progression of the lesion.

  1. Vav3 proto-oncogene deficiency leads to sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiovascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Sevilla, María A; Rivas-Elena, Juan V; de Alava, Enrique; Montero, María J; López-Novoa, José M; Bustelo, Xosé R

    2006-07-01

    Although much is known about environmental factors that predispose individuals to hypertension and cardiovascular disease, little information is available regarding the genetic and signaling events involved. Indeed, few genes associated with the progression of these pathologies have been discovered despite intensive research in animal models and human populations. Here we identify Vav3, a GDP-GTP exchange factor that stimulates Rho and Rac GTPases, as an essential factor regulating the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. Vav3-deficient mice exhibited tachycardia, systemic arterial hypertension and extensive cardiovascular remodeling. These mice also showed hyperactivity of sympathetic neurons from the time of birth. The high catecholamine levels associated with this condition led to the activation of the renin-angiotensin system, increased levels of kidney-related hormones and the progressive loss of cardiovascular and renal homeostasis. Pharmacological studies with drugs targeting sympathetic and renin-angiotensin responses confirmed the causative role and hierarchy of these events in the development of the Vav3-null mouse phenotype. These observations uncover the crucial role of Vav3 in the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and cardiovascular physiology, and reveal a signaling pathway that could be involved in the pathophysiology of human disease states involving tachycardia and sympathetic hyperactivity with unknown etiologies.

  2. Regulation of proto-oncogene expression in adult and developing lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Molinar-Rode, R; Smeyne, R J; Curran, T; Morgan, J I

    1993-01-01

    Activation of immediate-early gene expression has been associated with mitogenesis, differentiation, nerve cell depolarization, and recently, terminal differentiation processes and programmed cell death. Previous evidence also suggested that immediate-early genes play a role in the physiology of the lungs (J. I. Morgan, D. R. Cohen, J. L. Hempstead, and T. Curran, Science 237:192-197, 1987). Therefore, we analyzed c-fos expression in adult and developing lung tissues. Seizures elicited by chemoconvulsants induced expression of mRNA for c-fos, c-jun, and junB and Fos-like immunoreactivity in lung tissue. The use of pharmacological antagonists and adrenalectomy indicated that this increased expression was neurogenic. Interestingly, by using a fos-lacZ transgenic mouse, it was shown that Fos-LacZ expression in response to seizure occurred preferentially in clusters of epithelial cells at the poles of the bronchioles. This was the same location of Fos-LacZ expression detected during early lung development. These data imply that pharmacological induction of immediate-early gene expression in adult mice recapitulates an embryological program of gene expression. Images PMID:8497249

  3. Uncommon association of germline mutations of RET proto-oncogene and CDKN2A gene.

    PubMed

    Foppiani, L; Forzano, F; Ceccherini, I; Bruno, W; Ghiorzo, P; Caroli, F; Quilici, P; Bandelloni, R; Arlandini, A; Sartini, G; Cabria, M; Del Monte, P

    2008-03-01

    Calcitonin measurement is advised in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules, as it is an accurate marker of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). C-cell hyperplasia (CCH)-induced hypercalcitoninemia cannot be distinguished from that induced by MTC, unless surgery is performed. We report the clinical and biological features of a patient with a family history of cancer, including melanoma and pancreatic cancer, who had previously undergone surgery for melanoma. He presented the unusual association of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), normocalcemic hyperparathyroidism, and hypercalcitoninemia with a pathological response to pentagastrin, which was histologically deemed secondary to CCH. Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A was diagnosed. RET gene analysis showed a p.V804M missense mutation in exon 14, a low- but variably penetrant defect found in both sporadic and MEN2A-associated MTC/CCH, and a p.G691S polymorphism in exon 11. Furthermore, the germline P48T mutation was found in the CDKN2A gene exon 1, which is known to be associated with melanoma and pancreatic cancer. The patient showed the uncommon coexistence of a germline mutation in two suppressor genes, RET and CDKN2A; this finding, deemed to be a mere coincidence, did not modify the phenotype expected by each single mutation. CCH associated with V804M RET mutation is a precancerous condition and surgery is recommended. In order to exclude MTC, surgery is advised in patients with a pathological calcitonin response to pentagastrin, in the absence of thyroid autoimmunity. CCH-induced hypercalcitoninemia can be associated with thyroid cancers other than MTC (e.g., PTC). Family history is important in scheduling specific genetic screening in high-risk patients and their relatives.

  4. Vav3 proto-oncogene deficiency leads to sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiovascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Sevilla, María A; Rivas-Elena, Juan V; de Álava, Enrique; Montero, María J; López-Novoa, José M; Bustelo, Xosé R

    2007-01-01

    Although much is known about environmental factors that predispose individuals to hypertension and cardiovascular disease, little information is available regarding the genetic and signaling events involved1-3. Indeed, few genes associated with the progression of these pathologies have been discovered despite intensive research in animal models and human populations1-3. Here we identify Vav3, a GDP-GTP exchange factor that stimulates Rho and Rac GTPases4, as an essential factor regulating the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system.Vav3-deficient mice exhibited tachycardia, systemic arterial hypertension and extensive cardiovascular remodeling. These mice also showed hyperactivity of sympathetic neurons from the time of birth. The high catecholamine levels associated with this condition led to the activation of the renin-angiotensin system, increased levels of kidney-related hormones and the progressive loss of cardiovascular and renal homeostasis. Pharmacological studies with drugs targeting sympathetic and renin-angiotensin responses confirmed the causative role and hierarchy of these events in the development of theVav3-null mouse phenotype. These observations uncover the crucial role of Vav3 in the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and cardiovascular physiology, and reveal a signaling pathway that could be involved in the pathophysiology of human disease states involving tachycardia and sympathetic hyperactivity with unknown etiologies2,5,6. PMID:16767097

  5. The use of protein-DNA, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transcriptome arrays to describe transcriptional circuits in the dehydrated male rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jing; Kleineidam, Anna; Gouraud, Sabine; Yao, Song Tieng; Greenwood, Mingkwan; Hoe, See Ziau; Hindmarch, Charles; Murphy, David

    2014-11-01

    The supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus is responsible for maintaining osmotic stability in mammals through its elaboration of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin. Upon dehydration, the SON undergoes a function-related plasticity, which includes remodeling of morphology, electrical properties, and biosynthetic activity. This process occurs alongside alterations in steady state transcript levels, which might be mediated by changes in the activity of transcription factors. In order to identify which transcription factors might be involved in changing patterns of gene expression, an Affymetrix protein-DNA array analysis was carried out. Nuclear extracts of SON from dehydrated and control male rats were analyzed for binding to the 345 consensus DNA transcription factor binding sequences of the array. Statistical analysis revealed significant changes in binding to 26 consensus elements, of which EMSA confirmed increased binding to signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 1/Stat3, cellular Myelocytomatosis virus-like cellular proto-oncogene (c-Myc)-Myc-associated factor X (Max), and pre-B cell leukemia transcription factor 1 sequences after dehydration. Focusing on c-Myc and Max, we used quantitative PCR to confirm previous transcriptomic analysis that had suggested an increase in c-Myc, but not Max, mRNA levels in the SON after dehydration, and we demonstrated c-Myc- and Max-like immunoreactivities in SON arginine vasopressin-expressing cells. Finally, by comparing new data obtained from Roche-NimbleGen chromatin immunoprecipitation arrays with previously published transcriptomic data, we have identified putative c-Myc target genes whose expression changes in the SON after dehydration. These include known c-Myc targets, such as the Slc7a5 gene, which encodes the L-type amino acid transporter 1, ribosomal protein L24, histone deactylase 2, and the Rat sarcoma proto-oncogene (Ras)-related nuclear GTPase.

  6. STAT5-Interacting Proteins: A Synopsis of Proteins that Regulate STAT5 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Able, Ashley A.; Burrell, Jasmine A.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.

    2017-01-01

    Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STATs) are key components of the JAK/STAT pathway. Of the seven STATs, STAT5A and STAT5B are of particular interest for their critical roles in cellular differentiation, adipogenesis, oncogenesis, and immune function. The interactions of STAT5A and STAT5B with cytokine/hormone receptors, nuclear receptors, transcriptional regulators, proto-oncogenes, kinases, and phosphatases all contribute to modulating STAT5 activity. Among these STAT5 interacting proteins, some serve as coactivators or corepressors to regulate STAT5 transcriptional activity and some proteins can interact with STAT5 to enhance or repress STAT5 signaling. In addition, a few STAT5 interacting proteins have been identified as positive regulators of STAT5 that alter serine and tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5 while other proteins have been identified as negative regulators of STAT5 via dephosphorylation. This review article will discuss how STAT5 activity is modulated by proteins that physically interact with STAT5. PMID:28287479

  7. p95vav associates with the nuclear protein Ku-70.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, F; Dargemont, C; Pozo, F; Reeves, W H; Camonis, J; Gisselbrecht, S; Fischer, S

    1996-01-01

    The proto-oncogene vav is expressed solely in hematopoietic cells and plays an important role in cell signaling, although little is known about the proteins involved in these pathways. To gain further information, the Src homology 2 (SH2) and 3 (SH3) domains of Vav were used to screen a lymphoid cell cDNA library by the yeast two-hybrid system. Among the positive clones, we detected a nuclear protein, Ku-70, which is the DNA-binding element of the DNA-dependent protein kinase. In Jurkat and UT7 cells, Vav is partially localized in the nuclei, as judged from immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy studies. By using glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins derived from Ku-70 and coimmunoprecipitation experiments with lysates prepared from human thymocytes and Jurkat and UT7 cells, we show that Vav associates with Ku-70. The interaction of Vav with Ku-70 requires only the 150-residue carboxy-terminal portion of Ku-70, which binds to the 25 carboxy-terminal residues of the carboxy SH3 domain of Vav. A proline-to-leucine mutation in the carboxy SH3 of Vav that blocks interaction with proline-rich sequences does not modify the binding of Ku-70, which lacks this motif. Therefore, the interaction of Vav with Ku-70 may be a novel form of protein-protein interaction. The potential role of Vav/Ku-70 complexes is discussed. PMID:8524317

  8. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the chicken cysteine-rich protein, a developmentally regulated LIM-domain protein that is associated with the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Crawford, A W; Pino, J D; Beckerle, M C

    1994-01-01

    LIM domains are present in a number of proteins including transcription factors, a proto-oncogene product, and the adhesion plaque protein zyxin. The LIM domain exhibits a characteristic arrangement of cysteine and histidine residues and represents a novel zinc binding sequence (Michelsen et al., 1993). Previously, we reported the identification of a 23-kD protein that interacts with zyxin in vitro (Sadler et al., 1992). In this report, we describe the purification and characterization of this 23-kD zyxin-binding protein from avian smooth muscle. Isolation of a cDNA encoding the 23-kD protein has revealed that it consists of 192 amino acids and exhibits two copies of the LIM motif. The 23-kD protein is 91% identical to the human cysteine-rich protein (hCRP); therefore we refer to it as the chicken cysteine-rich protein (cCRP). Examination of a number of chick embryonic tissues by Western immunoblot analysis reveals that cCRP exhibits tissue-specific expression. cCRP is most prominent in tissues that are enriched in smooth muscle cells, such as gizzard, stomach, and intestine. In primary cell cultures derived from embryonic gizzard, differentiated smooth muscle cells exhibit the most striking staining with anti-cCRP antibodies. We have performed quantitative Western immunoblot analysis of cCRP, zyxin, and alpha-actinin levels during embryogenesis. By this approach, we have demonstrated that the expression of cCRP is developmentally regulated.

  9. Novel interactions between erythroblast macrophage protein and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Javan, Gulnaz T; Can, Ismail; Yeboah, Fred; Lee, Youngil; Soni, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein is a novel protein known to mediate attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages to form erythroblastic islands in bone marrow during erythropoiesis. Emp-null macrophages are small with round morphologies, and lack cytoplasmic projections which imply immature structure. The role of Emp in macrophage development and function is not fully elucidated. Macrophages perform varied functions (e.g. homeostasis, erythropoiesis), and are implicated in numerous pathophysiological conditions such as cellular malignancy. The objective of the current study is to investigate the interaction of Emp with cytoskeletal- and cell migration-associated proteins involved in macrophage functions. A short hairpin RNA lentiviral system was use to down-regulate the expression of Emp in macrophage cells. A cell migration assay revealed that the relocation of macrophages was significantly inhibited when Emp expression was decreased. To further analyze changes in gene expression related to cell motility, PCR array was performed by down-regulating Emp expression. The results indicated that expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 were significantly higher when Emp was down-regulated. The results implicate Emp in abnormal cell motility, thus, warrants to assess its role in cancer where tumor cell motility is required for invasion and metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Team work in protein processing.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Gerhard

    2007-07-01

    MetAP substrates and their physiological roles have remained elusive. In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Hu and colleagues [1] employ a small molecule approach to study the impact of MetAP inhibition on the molecular regulation and cellular functions of the proto-oncogene c-Src.

  11. MiRNA need a TRIM regulation of miRNA activity by Trim-NHL proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interactiondomain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology.

  12. miRNAs Need a Trim : Regulation of miRNA Activity by Trim-NHL Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interaction domain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology.

  13. Tumor promotion by depleting cells of protein kinase C delta.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Z; Hornia, A; Jiang, Y W; Zang, Q; Ohno, S; Foster, D A

    1997-01-01

    Tumor-promoting phorbol esters activate, but then deplete cells of, protein kinase C (PKC) with prolonged treatment. It is not known whether phorbol ester-induced tumor promotion is due to activation or depletion of PKC. In rat fibroblasts overexpressing the c-Src proto-oncogene, the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced anchorage-independent growth and other transformation-related phenotypes. The appearance of transformed phenotypes induced by TPA in these cells correlated not with activation but rather with depletion of expressed PKC isoforms. Consistent with this observation, PKC inhibitors also induced transformed phenotypes in c-Src-overexpressing cells. Bryostatin 1, which inhibited the TPA-induced down-regulation of the PKCdelta isoform specifically, blocked the tumor-promoting effects of TPA, implicating PKCdelta as the target of the tumor-promoting phorbol esters. Consistent with this hypothesis, expression of a dominant negative PKCdelta mutant in cells expressing c-Src caused transformation of these cells, and rottlerin, a protein kinase inhibitor with specificity for PKCdelta, like TPA, caused transformation of c-Src-overexpressing cells. These data suggest that the tumor-promoting effect of phorbol esters is due to depletion of PKCdelta, which has an apparent tumor suppressor function. PMID:9154841

  14. TrkA and TrkC neurotrophin receptor-like proteins in the lizard gut.

    PubMed

    Lucini, C; de Girolamo, P; Lamanna, C; Botte, V; Vega, J A; Castaldo, L

    2001-03-01

    The tyrosine kinase proteins (Trk), encoded by the trk family of proto-oncogenes, mediate, in mammals, the action of neurotrophins, a family of growth factors acting on the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Neurotrophins and their specific receptors, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, seem to be phylogenetically well preserved but, in reptiles, data regarding the occurrence of Trk-like proteins are very scarce, especially in non-nervous organs. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the lizard gut contains TrkA- and TrkC-like, but not TrkB-like, proteins. Consistently, TrkA- and TrkC-like immunoreactivity were both observed in neurons of the anterior intestine, whereas endocrine cells of the stomach and anterior intestine only displayed TrkA-like immunoreactivity. These results demonstrate for the first time the occurrence of Trk-like proteins in non-neuronal tissues of reptilians and provide further evidence for the evolutionary preservation of the molecular mass and cell distribution of Trk neurotrophin receptor-like proteins in the gut of vertebrates.

  15. Deregulated cell death and lymphocyte homeostasis cause premature lethality in mice lacking the BH3-only proteins Bim and Bmf

    PubMed Central

    Labi, Verena; Woess, Claudia; Tuzlak, Selma; Erlacher, Miriam; Bouillet, Philippe; Strasser, Andreas; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2014-01-01

    BH3 domain-only proteins (BH3-only) proteins are members of the Bcl-2 family that play crucial roles in embryogenesis and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis by triggering apoptotic cell death. The BH3-only protein Bim is critical for developmental apoptosis of lymphocytes, securing establishment of tolerance and for the termination of immune responses. Bim is believed to act in concert with other BH3-only proteins or members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family in getting rid of unwanted cells. Bmf, a related BH3-only protein, was shown to play a role in B-cell homeostasis and to mediate cell death in response to certain apoptotic triggers, including glucocorticoid, histone deacetylase inhibitors, and overexpression of the c-Myc proto-oncogene. Here we show that Bim and Bmf have overlapping functions during mouse development and coregulate lymphocyte homeostasis and apoptosis in a nonredundant manner. Double deficiency of Bim and Bmf caused more B lymphadenopathy than loss of either BH3-only protein alone, and this was associated with autoimmune glomerulonephritis and a range of malignancies in aged mice. Thus, our results demonstrate that Bim and Bmf act in concert to prevent autoimmunity and malignant disease, strengthening the rational for the development of BH3-only protein mimicking therapeutics for the treatment of such disorders. PMID:24632712

  16. Induction of a chicken small heat shock (stress) protein: evidence of multilevel posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Edington, B V; Hightower, L E

    1990-01-01

    A novel form of regulation of expression of a vertebrate heat shock gene is described. A cDNA clone encoding human Hsp27 was shown to specifically recognize chicken Hsp23 RNA by Northern (RNA) blot analysis and hybrid-select translation. This probe was then used to measure chicken hsp23 gene activity in control and heat-stressed cells. The hsp23 gene(s) was transcriptionally active in non-heat-stressed cells, and its rate of transcription did not increase significantly upon heat shock. Cytoplasmic Hsp23 mRNA, which was metabolically very stable in nonstressed cells, underwent a fourfold increase in amount after a 1-h heat shock, resulting in a twofold increase in Hsp23 mRNA in polysomes. Hsp23 mRNA was relatively abundant and translationally active even in non-heat-shocked cells. Taken together, these data implicated posttranscriptional nuclear events as an important control point for induction of Hsp23 RNA transcripts. The protein half-life of Hsp23 increased from approximately 2 h in control cultures to 13 h in heat-shocked cells, revealing a second major control point. Hsp23 which was synthesized prior to heat shock also increased in stability and contributed to the overall accumulation of Hsp23 in heat-shocked cells. Cycloheximide had no effect on this change in Hsp23 half-life, while dactinomycin blocked the stabilization of Hsp23, suggesting a need for newly synthesized RNA. These data indicated that stabilization of Hsp23 protein and posttranscriptional nuclear events resulting in increased production of Hsp23 mRNA were primarily responsible for a 13-fold increase in the accumulation of newly synthesized Hsp23 after 1 h of heat shock. The regulation of the hsp23 gene is discussed in comparison with several other posttranscriptionally regulated genes, including the proto-oncogene c-fos, the developmentally regulated chicken delta-crystallin gene, and regulation of cellular gene expression by the proto-oncogene c-myc. Images PMID:2388629

  17. Netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activities through enhancing Yes-associated protein stability.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qi; Li, Dean Y; Luo, Hongbo R; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-06-09

    Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcription coactivator, is the major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size control and cancer development. However, how YAP is regulated by extracellular stimuli in tumorigenesis remains incompletely understood. Netrin-1, a laminin-related secreted protein, displays proto-oncogenic activity in cancers. Nonetheless, the downstream signaling mediating its oncogenic effects is not well defined. Here we show that netrin-1 via its transmembrane receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer and uncoordinated-5 homolog, up-regulates YAP expression, escalating YAP levels in the nucleus and promoting cancer cell proliferation and migration. Inactivating netrin-1, deleted in colorectal cancer, or uncoordinated-5 homolog B (UNC5B) decreases YAP protein levels, abrogating cancer cell progression by netrin-1, whereas knockdown of mammalian STE20-like protein kinase 1/2 (MST1/2) or large tumor suppressor kinase 1/2 (Lats1/2), two sets of upstream core kinases of the Hippo pathway, has no effect in blocking netrin-1-induced up-regulation of YAP. Netrin-1 stimulates phosphatase 1A to dephosphorylate YAP, which leads to decreased ubiquitination and degradation, enhancing YAP accumulation and signaling. Hence, our findings support that netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activity through YAP signaling, providing a mechanism coupling extracellular signals to the nuclear YAP oncogene.

  18. The WSTF-SNF2h chromatin remodeling complex interacts with several nuclear proteins in transcription.

    PubMed

    Cavellán, Erica; Asp, Patrik; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Ostlund

    2006-06-16

    The WSTF (Williams syndrome transcription factor) protein is involved in vitamin D-mediated transcription and replication as a component of two distinct ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes, WINAC and WICH, respectively. We show here that the WICH complex (WSTF-SNF2h) interacts with several nuclear proteins as follows: Sf3b155/SAP155, RNA helicase II/Gualpha, Myb-binding protein 1a, CSB, the proto-oncogene Dek, and nuclear myosin 1 in a large 3-MDa assembly, B-WICH, during active transcription. B-WICH also contains RNAs, 45 S rRNA, 5 S rRNA, 7SL RNA, and traces of the U2 small nuclear RNA. The core proteins, WSTF, SNF2h, and nuclear myosin 1, are associated with the RNA polymerase III genes 5 S rRNA genes and 7SL, and post-transcriptional silencing of WSTF reduces the levels of these transcripts. Our results show that a WSTF-SNF2h assembly is involved in RNA polymerase III transcription, and we suggest that WSTF-SNF2h-NM1 forms a platform in transcription while providing chromatin remodeling.

  19. Host proteins that bind to or mimic SV40 large T antigen: using antibodies to look at protein interactions and their significance

    PubMed Central

    Mole, S. E.; Gannon, J. V.; Anton, I. A.; Ford, M. J.; Lane, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The papovavirus SV40 is able to induce tumours in susceptible hosts and will transform cells in vitro. Its major early protein, large T antigen, is required for viral DNA synthesis, both in vivo and in vitro, and is also responsible for the oncogenic action of the virus. We have made use of an extensive library of anti-T monoclonal antibodies to investigate the cellular effects of T. Large T shares an antigenic determinant with a growth-regulated host protein, p68, which is a member of an expanding super-family of helicases with particular homology to the translation initiation factor elF-4A. We have also studied the binding and interaction of large T with two particular host components: the replicative enzyme DNA polymerase α and the proto-oncogene p53. These two proteins bind to similar regions of T and exert similar effects on its antigenic structure. We found that p53 can block the binding of DNA polymerase α to T as well as co-existing with DNA polymerase α in a trimeric complex with T. This suggests that these interactions may be important in the oncogenic and replicative action of large T.

  20. Hepatitis B virus surface proteins accelerate cholestatic injury and tumor progression in Abcb4-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Churin, Yuri; Herebian, Diran; Mayatepek, Ertan; Köhler, Kernt; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Stinn, Anne; Tschuschner, Annette; Roderfeld, Martin; Roeb, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Understanding of the pathophysiology of cholestasis associated carcinogenesis could challenge the development of new personalized therapeutic approaches and thus improve prognosis. Simultaneous damage might aggravate hepatic injury, induce chronic liver disease and even promote carcinogenesis. We aimed to study the effect of Hepatitis B virus surface protein (HBsAg) on cholestatic liver disease and associated carcinogenesis in a mouse model combining both impairments. Hybrids of Abcb4−/− and HBsAg transgenic mice were bred on fibrosis susceptible background BALB/c. Liver injury, serum bile acid concentration, hepatic fibrosis, and carcinogenesis were enhanced by the combination of simultaneous damage in line with activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), proto-oncogene c-Jun, and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Activation of Protein Kinase RNA-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase (PERK) and Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2α) indicated unfolded protein response (UPR) in HBsAg-expressing mice and even in Abcb4−/− without HBsAg-expression. CONCLUSION: Cholestasis-induced STAT3- and JNK-pathways may predispose HBsAg-associated tumorigenesis. Since STAT3- and JNK-activation are well characterized critical regulators for tumor promotion, the potentiation of their activation in hybrids suggests an additive mechanism enhancing tumor incidence. PMID:28881751

  1. Antitumor response elicited by a superantigen-transmembrane sequence fusion protein anchored onto tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wahlsten, J L; Mills, C D; Ramakrishnan, S

    1998-12-15

    Superantigens stimulate T cells bearing certain TCR beta-chain variable regions when bound to MHC II molecules. We investigated whether the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST1) could induce an antitumor immune response when anchored onto MHC II-negative tumor cells. Our approach was to facilitate association of TSST1 with cell membranes by fusing its coding region to the transmembrane region (TM) sequence of the proto-oncogene c-erb-B-2. TSST1-TM was expressed in bacteria with an N-terminal histidine tag and purified using nickel-agarose affinity chromatography. Purified TSST1-TM added to cultures of several different MHC II-negative tumor cells spontaneously associated with cell membranes, as detected by flow cytometry. Because superantigens can direct cell-mediated cytotoxicity against MHC II-positive cells, a TM fusion protein lacking the TSST1 MHC II binding domain (TSST(88-194)-TM) was also constructed. Tumor cells precoated with TSST1-TM or TSST(88-194)-TM stimulated proliferation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro whereas uncoated tumor cells did not. Mice preimmunized with TSST1-TM- or TSST(88-194)-TM-coated tumor cells mounted a systemic response that resulted in significant antitumor immunity as measured by regression of a parental tumor challenge. TSST1-TM and TSST(88-194)-TM fusion proteins represent a useful new strategy for attaching superantigens or potentially other proteins onto tumor cell surfaces without genetic manipulation.

  2. Tristetraprolin (TTP): Interactions with mRNA and proteins, and current thoughts on mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Seth A.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in mRNA stability and translation are critical control points in the regulation of gene expression, particularly genes encoding growth factors, inflammatory mediators, and proto-oncogenes. Adenosine and uridine (AU)-rich elements (ARE), often located in the 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR) of mRNAs, are known to target transcripts for rapid decay. They are also involved in the regulation of mRNA stability and translation in response to extracellular cues. This review focuses on one of the best characterized ARE binding proteins, tristetraprolin (TTP), the founding member of a small family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins. In this survey, we have reviewed the current status of TTP interactions with mRNA and proteins, and discussed current thinking about TTP's mechanism of action to promote mRNA decay. We also review the proposed regulation of TTP's functions by phosphorylation. Finally, we have discussed emerging evidence for TTP operating as a translational regulator. PMID:23428348

  3. Overcoming resistance to fulvestrant (ICI182,780) by downregulating the c-ABL proto-oncogene in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huajun; Lo, Yuan-Hung; Yu, Ling; Wang, Shao-Chun

    2011-05-01

    Inhibiting estrogen receptor (ER) function with specific estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) can achieve a primary response in cancer patients; however, intrinsic or subsequently acquired resistance to the therapy remains a major obstacle in treatment. The pure anti-estrogen fulvestrant has been shown to be a promising antagonist of ERα in treating advanced breast cancer. However, our knowledge of the mechanisms governing cellular responsiveness to this agent is limited. Here we show that down-regulation of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-ABL enhanced sensitization to fulvestrant in breast cancer cells. Blocking c-ABL kinase activity with the inhibitor imatinib further increased ERα downregulation induced by fulvestrant, decreased the number of proliferating cells entering the cell cycle, and increased cellular sensitivity to fulvestrant treatment. Conversely, introducing kinase-activated c-ABL can rescue fulvestrant-induced ERα downregulation. Consistent with the effects of imatinib, the silencing of endogenous c-ABL increased the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to fulvestrant treatment. These results demonstrate a role for c-ABL in mediating resistance to the pure anti-estrogen fulvestrant.

  4. Tissue Specific Activation and Inactivation of the Neu Proto-Oncogene in Transgenic Mice Using Cre Recombinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    the spindle 8 apparatus prior to cell division and nucleates the proper assembly of microtubules whose attachment to the kinetochore at each...to form. 3. Hormonal Regulation of ErbB2 mediated tumorigenesis. Although not extensively described in the scope of the main report, a minor goal...addressed in the original statement of work was the examination of hormonal regulation of ErbB2 mediated tumorigenesis. The conditional activation of

  5. Association between proto-oncogene mutations and clinicopathologic characteristics and overall survival in colorectal cancer in East Azerbaijan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Bonyadi, Morteza; Sepehri, Bita; Boostani, Kamal; Azadbakht, Saleh; Fotouhi, Nikou; Farassati, Faris; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third-most common cancer in Iran. The increasing incidence of CRC in the past three decades has made it a major public health burden in the country. This study aimed to determine any relationship of specific mutations in CRCs with clinicopathologic aspects and outcome of patients. Materials and methods This study was conducted on 100 CRC patients by the case-only method. Polymerase chain-reaction products were analyzed by Sanger sequencing, and sequence results were compared with the significant KRAS and BRAF gene mutations in the My Cancer Genome database. Logistic regression models were used to detect associations of clinicopathologic characteristics with each of the mutations. Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression models were constructed to estimate overall survival in patients. Results A total of 26 subjects (26%) had heterozygote-mutant KRAS, and mutations were not detected in the amplified exon of BRAF in both tumor and normal tissues of the 100 CRCs. Rectal tumors had 1.53-fold higher likelihood of KRAS mutations than colon tumors, and men had 1.37-fold higher odds than women. The presence of metastasis increased the likelihood of KRAS mutations 2.36-fold over those with nonmetastatic CRCs. Compared to patients with KRAS wild-type cancers, those with KRAS mutations had significantly higher mortality (hazard ratio 3.74, 95% confidence interval 1.44–9.68; log-rank P=0.003). Conclusion Better understanding of the causality of CRC can be established by combining epidemiology and research on molecular mechanisms of the disease. PMID:27994469

  6. Characterization of Putative Proto-Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes that are Transcriptionally Deregulated in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    for Alzheimer disease . Both alterations resulted in amino acid substitutions. Using a well-published assay for presenilins that involved C. elegans...functionally mutated in Alzheimer disease . Several studies suggest that presenilins may also have a role in cancer- related pathways. Work in C...patients’ normal tissue DNA, and lead to amino acid substitutions at codons distinct from the Alzheimer disease - associated mutations. In an in vivo assay

  7. The vav proto-oncogene is required early in embryogenesis but not for hematopoietic development in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Zmuidzinas, A; Fischer, K D; Lira, S A; Forrester, L; Bryant, S; Bernstein, A; Barbacid, M

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the vav protooncogene plays an important role in hematopoiesis. To study this further, we have ablated the vav protooncogene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Homozygous vav (-/-) ES clones differentiate normally in culture and generate cells of erythroid, myeloid and mast cell lineages. Mice heterozygous for the targeted vav allele do not display any obvious abnormalities. However, homozygous embryos die very early during development. Crosses of vav (+/-) heterozygous mice yield apparently normal vav (-/-) E3.5 embryos but not post-implantation embryos (> or = E7.5). Furthermore, homozygous vav (-/-) blastocysts do not hatch in vitro. These results indicate that vav is essential for an early developmental step(s) that precedes the onset of hematopoiesis. Consistent with the phenotypic analysis of vav (-/-) embryos, we have identified Vav immunoreactivity in the extra-embryonic trophoblastic cell layer but not in the inner embryonic cell mass of E3.5 preimplantation embryos or in the egg cylinder of E6.5 and E7.5 post-implantation embryos. These results suggest that the vav gene is essential for normal trophoblast development and for implantation of the developing embryo. Images PMID:7828581

  8. The Dioxin Receptor Regulates the Constitutive Expression of the Vav3 Proto-Oncogene and Modulates Cell Shape and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose M.; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Roman, Angel Carlos; Sauzeau, Vincent; Merino, Jaime M.; Bustelo, Xose R.

    2009-01-01

    The dioxin receptor (AhR) modulates cell plasticity and migration, although the signaling involved remains unknown. Here, we report a mechanism that integrates AhR into these cytoskeleton-related functions. Immortalized and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking AhR (AhR−/−) had increased cell area due to spread cytoplasms that reverted to wild-type morphology upon AhR re-expression. The AhR-null phenotype included increased F-actin stress fibers, depolarized focal adhesions, and enhanced spreading and adhesion. The cytoskeleton alterations of AhR−/− cells were due to down-regulation of constitutive Vav3 expression, a guanosine diphosphate/guanosine triphosphate exchange factor for Rho/Rac GTPases and a novel transcriptional target of AhR. AhR was recruited to the vav3 promoter and maintained constitutive mRNA expression in a ligand-independent manner. Consistently, AhR−/− fibroblasts had reduced Rac1 activity and increased activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase (Rock) pathway. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 shifted AhR+/+ fibroblasts to the null phenotype, whereas Rock inhibition changed AhR-null cells to the AhR+/+ morphology. Knockdown of vav3 transcripts by small interfering RNA induced cytoskeleton defects and changes in adhesion and spreading mimicking those of AhR-null cells. Moreover, vav3−/− MEFs, as AhR−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts, had increased cell area and enhanced stress fibers. By modulating Vav3-dependent signaling, AhR could regulate cell shape, adhesion, and migration under physiological conditions and, perhaps, in certain pathological states. PMID:19158396

  9. Convergence and divergence of tumor-suppressor and proto-oncogenes in chimpanzee from human chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, R.S.; Ramesh, K.H.

    1994-09-01

    Due to the emergence of molecular technology, the phylogenetic evolution of the human genome via apes has become a saltatory even. In the present investigation, cosmid probes for P53, Charcot-Marie-Tooth [CMTIA], HER-2/NEU and myeloperoxidase [MPO] were used. Probes mapping to these genetic loci are well-defined on human chromosome 17 [HSA 17]. We localized these genes on chimpanzee [Pan troglodyte] chromosomes by FISH technique employing two different cell lines. Our results indicate that chimpanzee chromosome 19 [PTR 19] differs from HSA 17 by a pericentric inversion. The P53 gene assigned to HSA 17p13.1 is localized on PTR 19p15 and the MPO sequence of HSA 17q21.3-23 hybridized to PTR 19q23. Perplexing enough, HER-2/NEU assigned to HSA 17q11.2 localized to PTR 19p12. Obviously, there is convergence of P53 and MPO regions and distinctive divergence of HER-2/NEU and CMT1A regions of human and chimpanzee. This investigation has demonstrated the pronounced genetic shuffling which occurred during the origin of HSA 17. Molecular markers should serve as evolutionary punctuations in defining the precise sequence of genetic events that led to the evolution of other chromosomes whose genomic synteny, although similar, have surprisingly evolved through different mechanisms.

  10. Tissue Specific Activation and Inactivation of the Neu Proto-Oncogene in Transgenic Mice Using Cre Recombinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    now acquired the training and skills required to purify recombinant adenovirus and infect cells with an adenovirus containing Cre recombinase to... infection . Reportable Outcomes Papers Published Centrosome abnormalities, recurring deletions of chromosome 4, and genomic amplification of HER2/neu define...Differentiated maam. gl. marker 11.3 WAP 8.9 Glycaml Elevated in tumor model! 8.6 Glycoprotein 8.3 Connexin -30 Differentiation Marker 4.8 Connexin -26

  11. c-Kit-kinase induces a cascade of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in normal human melanocytes in response to mast cell growth factor and stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase but is down-regulated in melanomas.

    PubMed Central

    Funasaka, Y; Boulton, T; Cobb, M; Yarden, Y; Fan, B; Lyman, S D; Williams, D E; Anderson, D M; Zakut, R; Mishima, Y

    1992-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Kit, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is an important regulator of cell growth whose constitutively active oncogenic counterpart, v-kit, induces sarcomas in cats. Mutations in murine c-kit that reduce the receptor tyrosine kinase activity cause deficiencies in the migration and proliferation of melanoblasts, hematopoietic stem cells, and primordial germ cells. We therefore investigated whether c-Kit regulates normal human melanocyte proliferation and plays a role in melanomas. We show that normal human melanocytes respond to mast cell growth factor (MGF), the Kit-ligand that stimulates phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in c-Kit and induces sequential phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in several other proteins. One of the phosphorylated intermediates in the signal transduction pathway was identified as an early response kinase (mitogen-activated protein [MAP] kinase). Dephosphorylation of a prominent 180-kDa protein suggests that MGF also activates a phosphotyrosine phosphatase. In contrast, MGF did not induce proliferation, the cascade of protein phosphorylations, or MAP kinase activation in the majority of cells cultured from primary nodular and metastatic melanomas that grow independently of exogenous factors. In the five out of eight human melanoma lines expressing c-kit mRNAs, c-Kit was not constitutively activated. Therefore, although c-Kit-kinase is a potent growth regulator of normal human melanocytes, its activity is not positively associated with malignant transformation. Images PMID:1372524

  12. 5-Azacytidine-induced Protein 2 (AZI2) Regulates Bone Mass by Fine-tuning Osteoclast Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Uematsu, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Kondo, Takeshi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Martino, Mikaël M.; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) is a TNF receptor (TNFR)-associated factor family member-associated NF-κB activator-binding kinase 1-binding protein that regulates the production of IFNs. A previous in vitro study showed that AZI2 is involved in dendritic cell differentiation. However, the roles of AZI2 in immunity and its pleiotropic functions are unknown in vivo. Here we report that AZI2 knock-out mice exhibit normal dendritic cell differentiation in vivo. However, we found that adult AZI2 knock-out mice have severe osteoporosis due to increased osteoclast longevity. We revealed that the higher longevity of AZI2-deficient osteoclasts is due to an augmented activation of proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (c-Src), which is a critical player in osteoclast survival. We found that AZI2 inhibits c-Src activity by regulating the activation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone involved in c-Src dephosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AZI2 indirectly inhibits c-Src by interacting with the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37. Strikingly, administration of a c-Src inhibitor markedly prevented bone loss in AZI2 knock-out mice. Together, these findings indicate that AZI2 regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival. PMID:25691576

  13. Assignment of the human protein tyrosine phosphatase epsilon (PTPRE) gene to chromosome 10q26 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M. van den; Hurk, H.H. van den; Wieringa, B.

    1995-11-01

    Phosphorylation of cellular protein tyrosine residues is an important mechanism for the transduction of external signals to the intracellular compartment. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) act in concert with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) to regulate the level of tyrosine phosphorylation in these proteins. PTKs have been studied in detail, and many have been shown to be proto-oncogenes. Because PTPases can be considered functional antagonists of PTKs it has been postulated that these PTPases might act as tumor suppressors. Over 30 different PTPase genes have been isolated so far, and the chromosomal localization has been determined for many of them. Comparison of such mapping data with temporal and spatial expression patterns of individual PTPase genes and losses of heterozygosity (LOH) in relevant tumor types could be indicative of their proposed tumor suppressive activity. Until now, chromosomal deletions have been reported only for the PTPRG gene in primary renal and lung carcinomas and cancer-derived cell lines, but a causal role for a loss of PTPase activity in tumor formation remains to be determined. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Association of a new c-Cbl related protein with the very first stages of apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Corsois, Laurent; Quatannens, Brigitte; Dumont, Patrick; Aumercier, Marc; Defresne, Marie-Paule; Régnier, Daniel C L

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates the involvement of the c-cbl proto-oncogene during the first stages of the apoptotic process. We have already shown that a c-Cbl aptotosis-related protein of 90 kDa (CARP 90) is detected very rapidly in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus of murine thymocytes after hydrocortisone (HC) treatment. We report here that this protein appeared as well after in vivo treatment of mice by gamma-irradiation or injection of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, two potent thymic apoptosis inductors, providing a close relationship between the occurrence of apoptosis and the appearance of CARP 90. We showed that CARP 90 and p120(cbl) share numerous epitopes strikingly suggesting that CARP 90 is coded by c-cbl. In addition, KO mice do not sustain CARP 90 appearance. We finally showed that CARP 90 contains N- and C-terminal end epitopes of p120(cbl), which suggests that CARP 90 is an alternative spliced form of c-cbl. This protein was also observed under gamma-irradiation in tissues of different origin, which enlarges the physiological significance of this phenomenon. The very rapid CARP 90 appearance under apoptotic conditions in the nucleus of cells originating in different tissues makes this protein if not a possible new actor of the apoptotic process, at least an interesting marker of this process.

  15. Deletion mutants of Harvey ras p21 protein reveal the absolute requirement of at least two distant regions for GTP-binding and transforming activities.

    PubMed Central

    Lacal, J C; Anderson, P S; Aaronson, S A

    1986-01-01

    Deletions of small sequences from the viral Harvey ras gene have been generated, and resulting ras p21 mutants have been expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification of each deleted protein allowed the in vitro characterization of GTP-binding, GTPase and autokinase activity of the proteins. Microinjection of the highly purified proteins into quiescent NIH/3T3 cells, as well as transfection experiments utilizing a long terminal repeat (LTR)-containing vector, were utilized to analyze the biological activity of the deleted proteins. Two small regions located at 6-23 and 152-165 residues are shown to be absolutely required for in vitro and in vivo activities of the ras product. By contrast, the variable region comprising amino acids 165-184 was shown not to be necessary for either in vitro or in vivo activities. Thus, we demonstrate that: (i) amino acid sequences at positions 5-23 and 152-165 of ras p21 protein are probably directly involved in the GTP-binding activity; (ii) GTP-binding is required for the transforming activity of ras p21 and by extension for the normal function of the proto-oncogene product; and (iii) the variable region at the C-terminal end of the ras p21 molecule from amino acids 165 to 184 is not required for transformation. Images Fig.2. Fig.4. PMID:3011420

  16. Identification and analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper homeostasis gene encoding a homeodomain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, S A; Tamai, K T; Kosman, D J; Thiele, D J

    1994-01-01

    Yeast metallothionein, encoded by the CUP1 gene, and its copper-dependent transcriptional activator ACE1 play a key role in mediating copper resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant of a yeast strain in which CUP1 and ACE1 were deleted, we isolated a gene, designated CUP9, which permits yeast cells to grow at high concentrations of environmental copper, most notably when lactate is the sole carbon source. Disruption of CUP9, which is located on chromosome XVI, caused a loss of copper resistance in strains which possessed CUP1 and ACE1, as well as in the cup1 ace1 deletion strain. Measurement of intracellular copper levels of the wild-type and cup9-1 mutant demonstrated that total intracellular copper concentrations were unaffected by CUP9. CUP9 mRNA levels were, however, down regulated by copper when yeast cells were grown with glucose but not with lactate or glycerol-ethanol as the sole carbon source. This down regulation was independent of the copper metalloregulatory transcription factor ACE1. The DNA sequence of CUP9 predicts an open reading frame of 306 amino acids in which a 55-amino-acid sequence showed 47% identity with the homeobox domain of the human proto-oncogene PBX1, suggesting that CUP9 is a DNA-binding protein which regulates the expression of important copper homeostatic genes. Images PMID:7969120

  17. Protein Kinase C Iota is Required for Pancreatic Cancer Cell Transformed Growth and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Michele L.; Bamlet, William R.; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Fields, Alan P.; Murray, Nicole R.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States with an overall 5-year survival rate of <5%. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer, is highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies underscoring the critical need for new molecular targets for pancreatic cancer chemotherapy. The KRAS proto-oncogene is mutated in >90% of PDAC. Protein kinase C iota (PKCι) is required for oncogenic Ras-mediated transformed growth in lung cancer and intestinal epithelial cells. However, little is known about the role of PKCι in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we evaluated the expression of PKCι in human pancreatic cancer and the requirement for PKCι for the transformed growth and tumorigenicity of PDAC cells. We find that PKCι is significantly over-expressed in human pancreatic cancer and high PKCι expression correlates with poor patient survival. Inhibition of PKCι expression blocks PDAC cell transformed growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Inhibition of PKCι expression in pancreatic tumors also significantly reduces tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Analysis of downstream PKCι effectors implicates the Rac1-MEK/ERK1/2 signaling axis in PKCι-mediated transformed growth and cellular invasion. Taken together, our data demonstrate a required role for PKCι in the transformed growth of pancreatic cancer cells and reveal a novel role for PKCι in pancreatic cancer cell metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo. Our results strongly indicate that PKCι will be an effective target for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:20179210

  18. Cell-type-specific transactivation of the parathyroid hormone-related protein gene promoter by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) tax and HTLV-II tax proteins.

    PubMed

    Ejima, E; Rosenblatt, J D; Massari, M; Quan, E; Stephens, D; Rosen, C A; Prager, D

    1993-02-15

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) and HTLV-II Tax proteins are potent transactivators of viral and cellular gene expression. Using deletion mutants, the downstream parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) promoter is shown to be responsive to both HTLV-I and HTLV-II Tax as well as the AP1/c-jun proto-oncogene. Transactivation of PTHrP by Tax was seen in T cells but not in B-cell lines or fibroblasts. A carboxy terminal Tax deletion mutant was deficient in transactivation of both the PTHrP and IL2R alpha promoters but not the HTLV-I long terminal repeat (LTR). Exogenous provision of NFkB rescued IL2R alpha expression but not the PTHrP promoter. Thus, HTLV-I Tax, HTLV-II Tax, and c-jun transactivate PTHrP and may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypercalcemia in adult T-cell leukemia.

  19. Structural polymorphism within a regulatory element of the human KRAS promoter: formation of G4-DNA recognized by nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cogoi, Susanna; Paramasivam, Manikandan; Spolaore, Barbara; Xodo, Luigi E.

    2008-01-01

    The human KRAS proto-oncogene contains a critical nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) upstream of the major transcription initiation site. In this article, we demonstrate by primer-extension experiments, PAGE, chemical footprinting, CD, UV and FRET experiments that the G-rich strand of NHE (32R) folds into intra-molecular G-quadruplex structures. Fluorescence data show that 32R in 100 mM KCl melts with a biphasic profile, showing the formation of two distinct G-quadruplexes with Tm of ∼55°C (Q1) and ∼72°C (Q2). DMS-footprinting and CD suggest that Q1 can be a parallel and Q2 a mixed parallel/antiparallel G-quadruplex. When dsNHE (32R hybridized to its complementary) is incubated with a nuclear extract from Panc-1 cells, three DNA–protein complexes are observed by EMSA. The complex of slower mobility is competed by quadruplex 32R, but not by mutant oligonucleotides, which cannot form a quadruplex structure. Using paramagnetic beads coupled with 32R, we pulled down from the Panc-1 extract proteins with affinity for quadruplex 32R. One of these is the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1, which was previously reported to unfold quadruplex DNA. Our study suggests a role of quadruplex DNA in KRAS transcription and provides the basis for the rationale design of molecular strategies to inhibit the expression of KRAS. PMID:18490377

  20. Microcystin-LR stabilizes c-myc protein by inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huihui; Cai, Yan; Xie, Ping; Xiao, Wuhan; Chen, Jun; Ji, Wei; Zhao, Sujuan

    2014-05-07

    Microcystin-LR is the most toxic and the most frequently encountered toxin produced by the cyanobacteria in the contaminated aquatic environment. Previous studies have demonstrated that Microcystin-LR is a potential carcinogen for animals and humans, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified Microcystin-LR as a possible human carcinogen. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of Microcystin-LR-induced carcinogenesis remain a mystery. C-myc is a proto-oncogene, abnormal expression of which contributes to the tumor development. Although several studies have demonstrated that Microcystin-LR could induce c-myc expression at the transcriptional level, the exact connection between Microcystin-LR toxicity and c-myc response remains unclear. In this study, we showed that the c-myc protein increased in HEK293 cells after exposure to Microcystin-LR. Coexpression of protein phosphatase 2A and two stable c-myc protein point mutants (either c-myc(T58A) or c-myc(S62A)) showed that Microcystin-LR increased c-myc protein level mainly through inhibiting protein phosphatase 2A activity which altered the phosphorylation status of serine 62 on c-myc. In addition, we also showed that Microcystin-LR could increase c-myc promoter activity as revealed by luciferase reporter assay. And the TATA box for P1 promoter of c-myc might be involved. Our results suggested that Microcystin-LR can stimulate c-myc transcription and stabilize c-myc protein, which might contribute to hepatic tumorigenesis in animals and humans.

  1. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the chicken cysteine-rich protein, a developmentally regulated LIM-domain protein that is associated with the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    LIM domains are present in a number of proteins including transcription factors, a proto-oncogene product, and the adhesion plaque protein zyxin. The LIM domain exhibits a characteristic arrangement of cysteine and histidine residues and represents a novel zinc binding sequence (Michelsen et al., 1993). Previously, we reported the identification of a 23-kD protein that interacts with zyxin in vitro (Sadler et al., 1992). In this report, we describe the purification and characterization of this 23-kD zyxin-binding protein from avian smooth muscle. Isolation of a cDNA encoding the 23-kD protein has revealed that it consists of 192 amino acids and exhibits two copies of the LIM motif. The 23-kD protein is 91% identical to the human cysteine-rich protein (hCRP); therefore we refer to it as the chicken cysteine-rich protein (cCRP). Examination of a number of chick embryonic tissues by Western immunoblot analysis reveals that cCRP exhibits tissue-specific expression. cCRP is most prominent in tissues that are enriched in smooth muscle cells, such as gizzard, stomach, and intestine. In primary cell cultures derived from embryonic gizzard, differentiated smooth muscle cells exhibit the most striking staining with anti-cCRP antibodies. We have performed quantitative Western immunoblot analysis of cCRP, zyxin, and alpha-actinin levels during embryogenesis. By this approach, we have demonstrated that the expression of cCRP is developmentally regulated. PMID:8294495

  2. Protein hnRNP A1 and its derivative Up1 unfold quadruplex DNA in the human KRAS promoter: implications for transcription

    PubMed Central

    Paramasivam, Manikandan; Membrino, Alexandro; Cogoi, Susanna; Fukuda, Hirokazu; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Xodo, Luigi E.

    2009-01-01

    The promoter of the human KRAS proto-oncogene contains a structurally polymorphic nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) whose purine strand forms a parallel G-quadruplex structure (called 32R). In a previous work we reported that quadruplex 32R is recognized by three nuclear proteins: PARP-1, Ku70 and hnRNP A1. In this study we describe the interaction of recombinant hnRNP A1 (A1) and its derivative Up1 with the KRAS G-quadruplex. Mobility-shift experiments show that A1/Up1 binds specifically, and also with a high affinity, to quadruplex 32R, while CD demonstrates that the proteins strongly reduce the intensity of the 260 nm-ellipticity—the hallmark for parallel G4-DNA—and unfold the G-quadruplex. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer melting experiments reveal that A1/Up1 completely abrogates the cooperative quadruplex-to-ssDNA transition that characterizes the KRAS quadruplex and facilitates the association between quadruplex 32R and its complementary polypyrimidine strand. When quadruplex 32R is stabilized by TMPyP4, A1/Up1 brings about only a partial destabilization of the G4-DNA structure. The possible role played by hnRNP A1 in the mechanism of KRAS transcription is discussed. PMID:19282454

  3. Expression of I2PP2A, an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, induces c-Jun and AP-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Murrani, S W; Woodgett, J R; Damuni, Z

    1999-01-01

    Transient expression of I2PP2A, a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), in HEK-293 cells increased the concentration and DNA binding of the proto-oncogene c-Jun. In contrast, expression of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2AC) markedly decreased the concentration and DNA binding of c-Jun. Expression of I2PP2A also increased the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1, and this effect was diminished in a dose-dependent manner by expression of PP2AC. Densitometric analysis following Western blotting of extracts with antibodies specific for phospho-Ser63 and Ser73 suggests that the effects of I2PP2A and PP2AC expression might be mediated, in part, by changes in the phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser63. The results indicate that I2PP2A elicits effects that are consistent with it acting as an inhibitor of PP2A in intact cells, and suggest that PP2A might exhibit site selectivity with respect to c-Jun phosphorylation. PMID:10393085

  4. Expression of I2PP2A, an inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, induces c-Jun and AP-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Murrani, S W; Woodgett, J R; Damuni, Z

    1999-07-15

    Transient expression of I2PP2A, a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), in HEK-293 cells increased the concentration and DNA binding of the proto-oncogene c-Jun. In contrast, expression of the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2AC) markedly decreased the concentration and DNA binding of c-Jun. Expression of I2PP2A also increased the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1, and this effect was diminished in a dose-dependent manner by expression of PP2AC. Densitometric analysis following Western blotting of extracts with antibodies specific for phospho-Ser63 and Ser73 suggests that the effects of I2PP2A and PP2AC expression might be mediated, in part, by changes in the phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser63. The results indicate that I2PP2A elicits effects that are consistent with it acting as an inhibitor of PP2A in intact cells, and suggest that PP2A might exhibit site selectivity with respect to c-Jun phosphorylation.

  5. Utility of LRF/Pokemon and NOTCH1 protein expression in the distinction between nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Olga; Maeda, Takahiro; Filatov, Alexander; Lunardi, Andrea; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie

    2014-02-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) are considered separate entities with different prognosis and treatment. However, morphologic features can be similar and immunohistochemical studies are essential in the distinction; thus, determination of additional biomarkers is of utmost importance. LRF/Pokemon is a proto-oncogene, an interacting partner co-expressed with BCL6 in germinal centers and highly expressed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. Conversely, loss of the LRF gene in mouse hematopoietic stem cells results in complete block of early B cell development with concomitant Notch de-repression, indicating its critical role in B versus T cell fate decision at the hematopoietic stem cell stage. For the first time, we show that LRF/Pokemon is predominantly expressed in NLPHL cases as is BCL6 with low to absent NOTCH1 protein expression; while Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in CHL show low to absent BCL6 and LRF/Pokemon expression with higher NOTCH1 expression. We illustrate a potential functional interaction between LRF and BCL6 in NLPHL pathogenesis, and differential expression of LRF/Pokemon and NOTCH1 proteins in CHL thus showing differential expression, making for an additional diagnostic marker and therapeutic target.

  6. Modification of fos proteins: phosphorylation of c-fos, but not v-fos, is stimulated by 12-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, J R; Verma, I M

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the covalent modification of the proteins encoded by the murine fos proto-oncogene (c-fos) and that of the corresponding gene product of FBJ murine osteosarcoma virus (v-fos). Both proteins are posttranslationally processed in the cell, resulting in forms with lower electrophoretic mobilities than that of the initial translation product on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Treatment with alkaline phosphatase indicates that most, if not all, of this electrophoretic shift is due to phosphoesterification of both proteins. These phosphoryl groups stoichiometrically modify the v-fos and c-fos proteins on serine residues and turn over rapidly in vivo in the presence of protein kinase inhibitors (half-life, less than 15 min). Direct quantitative comparison of steady-state labeling studies with L-[35S]methionine and [32P]phosphate reveals that the c-fos protein is four- to fivefold more highly phosphorylated than the v-fos protein is. Comparison of tryptic fragments from [32P]phosphate-labeled proteins indicates that although the two proteins have several tryptic phosphopeptides in common, the c-fos protein contains unique major tryptic phosphopeptides that the v-fos protein lacks. These unique sites of c-fos phosphorylation have been tentatively localized to the carboxy-terminal 20 amino acid residues of the protein. Phosphorylation of the c-fos protein, but not the v-fos protein, can be stimulated at least fivefold in vivo by the addition of either 12-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate or serum. This increase in the steady-state degree of phosphorylation of c-fos appears to be independent of protein kinase C since phosphorylation is Ca2+ and diacylglycerol independent. The possible role of phosphorylation of these proteins in cellular transformation is discussed. Images PMID:3110603

  7. Distinct regulation of c-myb gene expression by HoxA9, Meis1 and Pbx proteins in normal hematopoietic progenitors and transformed myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Dassé, E; Volpe, G; Walton, D S; Wilson, N; Del Pozzo, W; O'Neill, L P; Slany, R K; Frampton, J; Dumon, S

    2012-06-01

    The proto-oncogenic protein c-Myb is an essential regulator of hematopoiesis and is frequently deregulated in hematological diseases such as lymphoma and leukemia. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the aberrant expression of c-Myb in myeloid leukemia, we analyzed and compared c-myb gene transcriptional regulation using two cell lines modeling normal hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and transformed myelomonocytic blasts. We report that the transcription factors HoxA9, Meis1, Pbx1 and Pbx2 bind in vivo to the c-myb locus and maintain its expression through different mechanisms in HPCs and leukemic cells. Our analysis also points to a critical role for Pbx2 in deregulating c-myb expression in murine myeloid cells cotransformed by the cooperative activity of HoxA9 and Meis1. This effect is associated with an intronic positioning of epigenetic marks and RNA polymerase II binding in the orthologous region of a previously described alternative promoter for c-myb. Taken together, our results could provide a first hint to explain the abnormal expression of c-myb in leukemic cells.

  8. Phylogenetic and genomewide analyses suggest a functional relationship between kayak, the Drosophila fos homolog, and fig, a predicted protein phosphatase 2c nested within a kayak intron.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Stephanie G; Garrett, Matthew J; Carlson, Joseph W; Micklem, Gos; Celniker, Susan E; Goldstein, Elliott S; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2007-11-01

    A gene located within the intron of a larger gene is an uncommon arrangement in any species. Few of these nested gene arrangements have been explored from an evolutionary perspective. Here we report a phylogenetic analysis of kayak (kay) and fos intron gene (fig), a divergently transcribed gene located in a kay intron, utilizing 12 Drosophila species. The evolutionary relationship between these genes is of interest because kay is the homolog of the proto-oncogene c-fos whose function is modulated by serine/threonine phosphorylation and fig is a predicted PP2C phosphatase specific for serine/threonine residues. We found that, despite an extraordinary level of diversification in the intron-exon structure of kay (11 inversions and six independent exon losses), the nested arrangement of kay and fig is conserved in all species. A genomewide analysis of protein-coding nested gene pairs revealed that approximately 20% of nested pairs in D. melanogaster are also nested in D. pseudoobscura and D. virilis. A phylogenetic examination of fig revealed that there are three subfamilies of PP2C phosphatases in all 12 species of Drosophila. Overall, our phylogenetic and genomewide analyses suggest that the nested arrangement of kay and fig may be due to a functional relationship between them.

  9. Acute Morphine, Chronic Morphine, and Morphine Withdrawal Differently Affect Pleiotrophin, Midkine, and Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β/ζ Regulation in the Ventral Tegmental Area.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Daniel; Laorden, M Luisa; Milanés, M Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) and midkine (MK) are secreted growth factors and cytokines, proposed to be significant neuromodulators with multiple neuronal functions. PTN and MK are generally related with cell proliferation, growth, and differentiation by acting through different receptors. PTN or MK, signaling through receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β/ζ (RPTPβ/ζ), lead to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and thymoma viral proto-oncogene (Akt), which induce morphological changes and modulate addictive behaviors. Besides, there is increasing evidence that during the development of drug addiction, astrocytes contribute to the synaptic plasticity by synthesizing and releasing substances such as cytokines. In the present work, we studied the effect of acute morphine, chronic morphine, and morphine withdrawal on PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ expression and on their signaling pathways in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Present results indicated that PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ levels increased after acute morphine injection, returned to basal levels during chronic opioid treatment, and were upregulated again during morphine withdrawal. We also observed an activation of astrocytes after acute morphine injection and during opiate dependence and withdrawal. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis revealed that PTN, but not MK, was overexpressed in astrocytes and that dopaminergic neurons expressed RPTPβ/ζ. Interestingly, p-ERK 1/2 levels during chronic morphine and morphine withdrawal correlated RPTPβ/ζ expression. All these observations suggest that the neuroprotective and behavioral adaptations that occur during opiate addiction could be, at least partly, mediated by these cytokines.

  10. Regulation of Pleiotrophin, Midkine, Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β/ζ, and Their Intracellular Signaling Cascades in the Nucleus Accumbens During Opiate Administration.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Daniel; Laorden, María Luisa; Milanés, María Victoria

    2015-07-11

    Most classes of addictive substances alter the function and structural plasticity of the brain reward circuitry. Midkine (MK) and pleiotrophin (PTN) are growth/differentiation cytokines which, similarly to neurotrophins, play an important role in repair, neurite outgrowth, and cell differentiation. PTN or MK signaling through receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β/ζ (RPTPβ/ζ), leads to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and thymoma viral proto-oncogene. This activation induces morphological changes and modulates addictive behaviors. Besides, there is increasing evidence that during the development of drug addiction, astrocytes contribute to the synaptic plasticity by synthesizing and releasing substances such as cytokines. In the present work we studied the effect of acute morphine administration, chronic morphine administration, and morphine withdrawal on PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ expression and on their signaling pathways in the nucleus accumbens. Present results indicated that PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ levels increased after acute morphine injection, returned to basal levels during chronic opioid treatment, and were up-regulated again during morphine withdrawal. We also observed an activation of astrocytes after acute morphine injection and during opiate dependence and withdrawal. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis revealed that PTN, but not MK, was overexpressed in astrocytes and that dopaminoceptive neurons expressed RPTPβ/ζ. All these observations suggest that the neurotrophic and behavioral adaptations that occur during opiate addiction could be, at least partly, mediated by cytokines. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  11. Regulation of Pleiotrophin, Midkine, Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β/ζ, and Their Intracellular Signaling Cascades in the Nucleus Accumbens During Opiate Administration

    PubMed Central

    Laorden, María Luisa; Milanés, María Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most classes of addictive substances alter the function and structural plasticity of the brain reward circuitry. Midkine (MK) and pleiotrophin (PTN) are growth/differentiation cytokines which, similarly to neurotrophins, play an important role in repair, neurite outgrowth, and cell differentiation. PTN or MK signaling through receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β/ζ (RPTPβ/ζ), leads to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and thymoma viral proto-oncogene. This activation induces morphological changes and modulates addictive behaviors. Besides, there is increasing evidence that during the development of drug addiction, astrocytes contribute to the synaptic plasticity by synthesizing and releasing substances such as cytokines. Methods: In the present work we studied the effect of acute morphine administration, chronic morphine administration, and morphine withdrawal on PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ expression and on their signaling pathways in the nucleus accumbens. Results: Present results indicated that PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ levels increased after acute morphine injection, returned to basal levels during chronic opioid treatment, and were up-regulated again during morphine withdrawal. We also observed an activation of astrocytes after acute morphine injection and during opiate dependence and withdrawal. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis revealed that PTN, but not MK, was overexpressed in astrocytes and that dopaminoceptive neurons expressed RPTPβ/ζ. Conclusions: All these observations suggest that the neurotrophic and behavioral adaptations that occur during opiate addiction could be, at least partly, mediated by cytokines. PMID:26164717

  12. Oncogenic K-Ras and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Prevent FAS-Mediated Apoptosis in Fibroblasts through Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Hirotaka; Yonehara, Shin

    2000-01-01

    By an expression cloning method using Fas-transgenic Balb3T3 cells, we tried to obtain inhibitory genes against Fas-mediated apoptosis and identified proto-oncogene c-K-ras. Transient expression of K-Ras mutants revealed that oncogenic mutant K-Ras (RasV12) strongly inhibited, whereas dominant-inhibitory mutant K-Ras (RasN17) enhanced, Fas-mediated apoptosis by inhibiting Fas-triggered activation of caspases without affecting an expression level of Fas. Among the target molecules of Ras, including Raf (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase [MAPKKK]), phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI-3) kinase, and Ral guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RalGDS), only the constitutively active form of Raf (Raf-CAAX) could inhibit Fas-mediated apoptosis. In addition, the constitutively active form of MAPKK (SDSE-MAPKK) suppressed Fas-mediated apoptosis, and MKP-1, a phosphatase specific for classical MAPK, canceled the protective activity of oncogenic K-Ras (K-RasV12), Raf-CAAX, and SDSE-MAPKK. Furthermore, physiological activation of Ras by basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) protected Fas-transgenic Balb3T3 cells from Fas-mediated apoptosis. bFGF protection was also dependent on the activation of the MAPK pathway through Ras. All the results indicate that the activation of MAPK through Ras inhibits Fas-mediated apoptosis in Balb3T3 cells, which may play a role in oncogenesis. PMID:10662780

  13. Cellular nucleic-acid-binding protein, a transcriptional enhancer of c-Myc, promotes the formation of parallel G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Borgognone, Mariana; Armas, Pablo; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2010-05-27

    G-rich sequences that contain stretches of tandem guanines can form four-stranded, intramolecular stable DNA structures called G-quadruplexes (termed G4s). Regulation of the equilibrium between single-stranded and G4 DNA in promoter regions is essential for control of gene expression in the cell. G4s are highly stable structures; however, their folding kinetics are slow under physiological conditions. CNBP (cellular nucleic-acid-binding protein) is a nucleic acid chaperone that binds the G4-forming G-rich sequence located within the NHE (nuclease hypersensitivity element) III of the c-Myc proto-oncogene promoter. Several reports have demonstrated that CNBP enhances the transcription of c-Myc in vitro and in vivo; however, none of these reports have assessed the molecular mechanisms responsible for this control. In the present study, by means of Taq polymerase stop assays, electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and CD spectroscopy, we show that CNBP promotes the formation of parallel G4s to the detriment of anti-parallel G4s, and its nucleic acid chaperone activity is required for this effect. These findings are the first to implicate CNBP as a G4-folding modulator and, furthermore, assign CNBP a novel mode-of-action during c-Myc transcriptional regulation.

  14. Requirement of protein kinase C zeta for stimulation of protein synthesis by insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, R; Kollmorgen, G; White, M F; Rhoads, R E

    1997-01-01

    The ability of insulin to stimulate protein synthesis and cellular growth is mediated through the insulin receptor (IR), which phosphorylates Tyr residues in the insulin receptor substrate-signaling proteins (IRS-1 and IRS-2), Gab-1, and Shc. These phosphorylated substrates directly bind and activate enzymes such as phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K) and the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for p21Ras (GRB-2/SOS), which are in turn required for insulin-stimulated protein synthesis, cell cycle progression, and prevention of apoptosis. We have now shown that one or more members of the atypical protein kinase C group, as exemplified by the zeta isoform (PKC zeta), are downstream of IRS-1 and P13K and mediate the effect of insulin on general protein synthesis. Ectopic expression of constitutively activated PKC zeta eliminates the requirement of IRS-1 for general protein synthesis but not for insulin-stimulated activation of 70-kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K), synthesis of growth-regulated proteins (e.g., c-Myc), or mitogenesis. The fact that PKC zeta stimulates general protein synthesis but not activation of p70S6K indicates that PKC zeta activation does not involve the proto-oncogene Akt, which is also activated by PI3K. Yet insulin is still required for the stimulation of general protein synthesis in the presence of constitutively active PKC zeta and in the absence of IRS-1, suggesting a requirement for the convergence of the IRS-1/PI3K/PKC zeta pathway with one or more additional pathways emanating from the IR, e.g., Shc/SOS/p21Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase. Thus, PI3K appears to represent a bifurcation in the insulin signaling pathway, one branch leading through PKC zeta to general protein synthesis and one, through Akt and the target of rapamycin (mTOR), to growth-regulated protein synthesis and cell cycle progression. PMID:9271396

  15. Dynamic and Differential in vivo Modifications of the Isoform HMGA1a and HMGA1b Chromatin Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Edberg, Dale D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Springer, David L.; Reeves, Raymond C.

    2005-03-01

    Most naturally occurring mammalian cancers and immortalized tissue culture cell lines share a common characteristic, the over-expression of full-length high mobility group A1 (HMGA1) proteins. The HMGA1 proto-oncogene codes for two closely related isoform proteins, HMGA1a and HMGA1b, and causes cancerous cellular transformation when over-expressed in either transgenic mice or ''normal'' cultured cell lines. Previous work has suggested that the in vivo types and patterns of the HMGA1 post-translational modifications (PTMs) differ between normal and malignant cells. The present study focuses on the important question of whether HMGA1a and HMGA1b proteins isolated from the same cell type have identical or different PTM patterns and also whether these isoform patterns differ between non-malignant and malignant cells. Two independent mass spectrometry methods were used to identify the types of PTMs found on specific amino acid residues on the endogenous HMGA1a and HMGA1b proteins isolated from a non-metastatic, human mammary epithelial cell line, MCF-7, and a malignant, metastatic cell line derived from MCF-7 cells that over-expressed transgenic HMGA1a protein. While some of the PTMs were the same on both the HMGA1a and HMGA1b proteins isolated from a given cell type, many other modifications were present on one but not the other isoform. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both HMGA1 isoforms are dimethylated on arginine and lysine residues. Most importantly, however, the PTM patterns on the endogenous HMGA1a and HMGA1b proteins isolated from nonmetastatic and metastatic cells were consistently different, suggesting that the isoforms likely exhibit differences in their biological functions/activities in these cell types.

  16. Activation of Ras in vitro and in intact fibroblasts by the Vav guanine nucleotide exchange protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gulbins, E; Coggeshall, K M; Langlet, C; Baier, G; Bonnefoy-Berard, N; Burn, P; Wittinghofer, A; Katzav, S; Altman, A

    1994-01-01

    We recently identified Vav, the product of the vav proto-oncogene, as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Ras. Vav is enzymatically activated by lymphocyte antigen receptor-coupled protein tyrosine kinases or independently by diglycerides. To further evaluate the physiological role of Vav, we assessed its GDP-GTP exchange activity against several Ras-related proteins in vitro and determined whether Vav activation in transfected NIH 3T3 fibroblasts correlates with the activity status of Ras and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. In vitro translated purified Vav activated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or phosphorylation with recombinant p56lck displayed GEF activity against Ras but not against recombinant RacI, RacII, Ral, or RhoA proteins. Expression of vav or proto-vav in stably transfected NIH 3T3 cells led to a approximately 10-fold increase in basal or PMA-stimulated Ras exchange activity, respectively, in total-cell lysates and Vav immunoprecipitates. Elevated GEF activity was paralleled in each case by a significant increase in the proportion of active, GTP-bound Ras. PMA had a minimal effect on the low Ras. GTP level in untransfected control fibroblasts but increased it from 20 to 37% in proto-vav-transfected cells. vav-transfected cells displayed a constitutively elevated Ras. GTP level (35%), which was not increased further by PMA treatment. MAP kinases, known downstream intermediates in Ras-dependent signaling pathways, similarly exhibited increased basal or PMA-stimulated activity in Vav-expressing cells by comparison with normal NIH 3T3 cells. These results demonstrate a physiologic interaction between Vav and its target, Ras, leading to MAP kinase activation. Images PMID:8289830

  17. Developmental regulation of the Bcl-2 protein and susceptibility to cell death in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Merino, R; Ding, L; Veis, D J; Korsmeyer, S J; Nuñez, G

    1994-01-01

    Cell death is a prominent feature of B cell development. For example, a large population of B cells dies at the pre-B cell stage presumably due to the failure to express a functional immunoglobulin receptor. In addition, developing B cells expressing antigen receptors for self are selectively eliminated at the immature B cell stage. The molecular signals that control B cell survival are largely unknown. The product of the bcl-2 proto-oncogene may be involved as its overexpression inhibits apoptotic cell death in a variety of biological systems. However, the physiological role of the endogenous Bcl-2 protein during B cell development is undetermined. Here we show a striking developmental regulation of the Bcl-2 protein in B lymphocytes. Bcl-2 is highly expressed in CD43+ B cell precursors (pro-B cells) and mature B cells but downregulated at the pre-B and immature B cell stages of development. We found that Bcl-2 expressed by B cells is a long-lived protein with a half-life of approximately 10 h. Importantly, susceptibility to apoptosis mediated by the glucocorticoid hormone dexamethasone is stage-dependent in developing B cells and correlates with the levels of Bcl-2 protein. Furthermore, expression of a bcl-2 transgene rescued pre-B and immature B cells from dexamethasone-induced cell death, indicating that Bcl-2 can inhibit the apoptotic cell death of progenitors and early B cells. Taken together, these findings argue that Bcl-2 is a physiological signal controlling cell death during B cell development. Images PMID:8313913

  18. Hepatitis B viral core protein disrupts human host gene expression by binding to promoter regions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The core protein (HBc) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been implicated in the malignant transformation of chronically-infected hepatocytes and displays pleiotropic functions, including RNA- and DNA-binding activities. However, the mechanism by which HBc interacts with the human genome to exert effects on hepatocyte function remains unknown. This study investigated the distribution of HBc binding to promoters in the human genome and evaluated its effects on the related genes’ expression. Results Whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray (ChIP-on-chip) analysis was used to identify HBc-bound human gene promoters. Gene Ontology and pathway analyses were performed on related genes. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was used to verify ChIP-on-chip results. Five novel genes were selected for luciferase reporter assay evaluation to assess the influence of HBc promoter binding. The HBc antibody immunoprecipitated approximately 3100 human gene promoters. Among these, 1993 are associated with known biological processes, and 2208 regulate genes with defined molecular functions. In total, 1286 of the related genes mediate primary metabolic processes, and 1398 encode proteins with binding activity. Sixty-four of the promoters regulate genes related to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and 41 regulate Wnt/beta-catenin pathway genes. The reporter gene assay indicated that HBc binding up-regulates proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (SRC), type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R), and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2), and down-regulates v-Ha-ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene (HRAS). Conclusion HBc has the ability to bind a large number of human gene promoters, and can disrupt normal host gene expression. Manipulation of the transcriptional profile in HBV-infected hepatocytes may represent a key pathogenic mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:23088787

  19. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  20. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin. PMID:8552082

  1. High density lipoproteins induce cell cycle entry in vascular smooth muscle cells via mitogen activated protein kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Nofer, J R; Junker, R; Pulawski, E; Fobker, M; Levkau, B; von Eckardstein, A; Seedorf, U; Assmann, G; Walter, M

    2001-04-01

    In this study we found that HDL acts as a potent and specific mitogen in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) by stimulating entry into S-phase and DNA synthesis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, induction of cyclins D1, E, and A, as well as activation of cyclin D-dependent kinases as inferred from phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). Moreover, HDL induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway including Raf-, MEK-1, and ERK1/2, as well as the expression of proto-oncogen c-fos, which is controlled by ERK1/2. PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK-1 blocked the mitogenic activity of HDL and cyclin D1 expression. HDL-induced VSMC proliferation, cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 expression, and activation of the Raf-1/MEK-1/ERK1/2 cascade were blocked by preincubation of cells with pertussis toxin indicating involvement of trimeric G-protein. By contrast, none of these responses was inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitor, GF109203X. The mitogenic effects of native HDL were not mimicked by apo A-I, reconstituted HDL containing apo A-I, or cholesterol-containing liposomes. In conclusion, HDL possesses an intrinsic property to induce G-protein- and MAP-kinase-dependent proliferation and cell cycle progression in VSMC. The strong and specific mitogenic effect of HDL should be taken into account, when therapeutic strategies to elevate the plasma level of these lipoproteins are developed.

  2. Interplay between TAp73 Protein and Selected Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) Family Members Promotes AP-1 Target Gene Activation and Cellular Growth.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Deepa; Bunjobpol, Wilawan; Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2015-07-24

    Unlike p53, which is mutated at a high rate in human cancers, its homologue p73 is not mutated but is often overexpressed, suggesting a possible context-dependent role in growth promotion. Previously, we have shown that co-expression of TAp73 with the proto-oncogene c-Jun can augment cellular growth and potentiate transactivation of activator protein (AP)-1 target genes such as cyclin D1. Here, we provide further mechanistic insights into the cooperative activity between these two transcription factors. Our data show that TAp73-mediated AP-1 target gene transactivation relies on c-Jun dimerization and requires the canonical AP-1 sites on target gene promoters. Interestingly, only selected members of the Fos family of proteins such as c-Fos and Fra1 were found to cooperate with TAp73 in a c-Jun-dependent manner to transactivate AP-1 target promoters. Inducible expression of TAp73 led to the recruitment of these Fos family members to the AP-1 target promoters on which TAp73 was found to be bound near the AP-1 site. Consistent with the binding of TAp73 and AP-1 members on the target promoters in a c-Jun-dependent manner, TAp73 was observed to physically interact with c-Jun specifically at the chromatin via its carboxyl-terminal region. Furthermore, co-expression of c-Fos or Fra1 was able to cooperate with TAp73 in potentiating cellular growth, similarly to c-Jun. These data together suggest that TAp73 plays a vital role in activation of AP-1 target genes via direct binding to c-Jun at the target promoters, leading to enhanced loading of other AP-1 family members, thereby leading to cellular growth.

  3. p16INK4a hypermethylation and p53, p16 and MDM2 protein expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Noushin; Biramijamal, Firouzeh; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Khademi, Hooman; Malekzadeh, Reza; Moaven, Omeed; Memar, Bahram; A'rabi, Azadeh; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2010-04-13

    Tumor suppressor genes p53 and p16INK4a and the proto-oncogene MDM2 are considered to be essential G1 cell cycle regulatory genes whose loss of function is associated with ESCC carcinogenesis. We assessed the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene and its impact on p16INK4a protein expression and correlations with p53 and MDM2 protein expressions in patients with ESCC in the Golestan province of northeastern Iran in which ESCC has the highest incidence of cancer, well above the world average. Cancerous tissues and the adjacent normal tissue obtained from 50 ESCC patients were assessed with Methylation-Specific-PCR to examine the methylation status of p16. The expression of p16, p53 and MDM2 proteins was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Abnormal expression of p16 and p53, but not MDM2, was significantly higher in the tumoral tissue. p53 was concomitantly accumulated in ESCC tumor along with MDM2 overexpression and p16 negative expression. Aberrant methylation of the p16INK4a gene was detected in 31/50 (62%) of esophageal tumor samples, while two of the adjacent normal mucosa were methylated (P < 0.001). p16INK4a aberrant methylation was significantly associated with decreased p16 protein expression (P = 0.033), as well as the overexpression of p53 (P = 0.020). p16 hypermethylation is the principal mechanism of p16 protein underexpression and plays an important role in ESCC development. It is associated with p53 protein overexpression and may influence the accumulation of abnormally expressed proteins in p53-MDM2 and p16-Rb pathways, suggesting a possible cross-talk of the involved pathways in ESCC development.

  4. p16INK4a hypermethylation and p53, p16 and MDM2 protein expression in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumor suppressor genes p53 and p16INK4a and the proto-oncogene MDM2 are considered to be essential G1 cell cycle regulatory genes whose loss of function is associated with ESCC carcinogenesis. We assessed the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene and its impact on p16INK4a protein expression and correlations with p53 and MDM2 protein expressions in patients with ESCC in the Golestan province of northeastern Iran in which ESCC has the highest incidence of cancer, well above the world average. Methods Cancerous tissues and the adjacent normal tissue obtained from 50 ESCC patients were assessed with Methylation-Specific-PCR to examine the methylation status of p16. The expression of p16, p53 and MDM2 proteins was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Results Abnormal expression of p16 and p53, but not MDM2, was significantly higher in the tumoral tissue. p53 was concomitantly accumulated in ESCC tumor along with MDM2 overexpression and p16 negative expression. Aberrant methylation of the p16INK4a gene was detected in 31/50 (62%) of esophageal tumor samples, while two of the adjacent normal mucosa were methylated (P < 0.001). p16INK4a aberrant methylation was significantly associated with decreased p16 protein expression (P = 0.033), as well as the overexpression of p53 (P = 0.020). Conclusions p16 hypermethylation is the principal mechanism of p16 protein underexpression and plays an important role in ESCC development. It is associated with p53 protein overexpression and may influence the accumulation of abnormally expressed proteins in p53-MDM2 and p16-Rb pathways, suggesting a possible cross-talk of the involved pathways in ESCC development. PMID:20388212

  5. Genistein affects HER2 protein concentration, activation, and promoter regulation in BT-474 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sakla, Mary S; Shenouda, Nader S; Ansell, Pete J; Macdonald, Ruth S; Lubahn, Dennis B

    2007-08-01

    The HER2 proto-oncogene, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, is overexpressed in 20-30% of breast cancers. Genistein, the main soy isoflavone, interacts with estrogen receptors (ER) and it is also a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Previously, our laboratory found that genistein delayed mammary tumor onset in transgenic mice that overexpress HER2 gene. Our goal was to define the mechanism through which genistein affects mammary tumorigenesis in HER2 overexpressing mice. We hypothesized that genistein inhibits HER2 activation and expression through ER-dependent and ER-independent mechanisms. Genistein inhibited total HER2 protein expression and tyrosine phosphorylation in BT-474, an ERalpha (-) and ERbeta (+) human breast cancer cell line, however, E2 had no effect. Taken together, these data suggest that genistein has an ER-independent inhibitory effect, presumably, through tyrosine kinase inhibition activity. Genistein at 1.0 microM mimicked E2 and down-regulated HER2 protein phosphorylation when BT-474 was co-transfected with ERalpha, but not ERbeta. Although E2 and overexpression of HER2 can promote mammary tumorigenesis, an inverse relationship between ER expression and HER2 overexpression has been found in human breast cancer. We cloned a 500-bp promoter region upstream of the HER2 transcription initiation site. Co-transfection with ERalpha, but not with ERbeta, down-regulated HER2 promoter reporter in BT-474. At concentrations > or =1 microM, genistein inhibited HER2 promoter reporter in the absence of ERalpha. In conclusion, genistein at > or =1 microM inhibited HER2 protein expression, phosphorylation, and promoter activity through an ER-independent mechanism. In the presence of ERalpha, genistein mimicked E2 and inhibited HER2 protein phosphorylation. These data support genistein's chemo-prevention and potential chemo-therapeutic roles in breast cancer.

  6. Protein profiling of isolated leukocytes, myofibroblasts, epithelial, Basal, and endothelial cells from normal, hyperplastic, cancerous, and inflammatory human prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Khamis, Zahraa I; Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Sahab, Ziad J; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2010-06-15

    In situ neoplastic prostate cells are not lethal unless they become invasive and metastatic. For cells to become invasive, the prostate gland must undergo degradation of the basement membrane and disruption of the basal cell layer underneath the luminal epithelia. Although the roles of proteinases in breaking down the basement membrane have been well-studied, little is known about the factors that induce basal cell layer disruption, degeneration, and its eventual disappearance in invasive cancer. It is hypothesized that microenvironmental factors may affect the degradation of the basal cell layer, which if protected may prevent tumor progression and invasion. In this study, we have revealed differential protein expression patterns between epithelial and stromal cells isolated from different prostate pathologies and identified several important epithelial and stromal proteins that may contribute to inflammation and malignant transformation of human benign prostate tissues to cancerous tissues using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and proteomics methods. Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 was downregulated in basal cells of benign prostate. Caspase-1 and interleukin-18 receptor 1 were highly expressed in leukocytes of prostate cancer. Proto-oncogene Wnt-3 was downregulated in endothelial cells of prostatitis tissue and tyrosine phosphatase non receptor type 1 was only found in normal and benign endothelial cells. Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 14 was downregulated in myofibroblasts of prostatitis tissue. Interestingly, integrin alpha-6 was upregulated in epithelial cells but not detected in myofibroblasts of prostate cancer. Further validation of these proteins may generate new strategies for the prevention of basal cell layer disruption and subsequent cancer invasion.

  7. Functionalized immunostimulating complexes with protein A via lipid vinyl sulfones to deliver cancer drugs to trastuzumab-resistant HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando; Mut-Salud, Nuria; Cruz-Bustos, Teresa; Gomez-Samblas, Mercedes; Carrasco, Esther; Garrido, Jose Manuel; López-Jaramillo, F Javier; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Osuna, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Around 20%–30% of breast cancers overexpress the proto-oncogene human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2), and they are characterized by being very invasive. Therefore, many current studies are focused on testing new therapies against tumors that overexpress this receptor. In particular, there exists major interest in new strategies to fight breast cancer resistant to trastuzumab (Tmab), a humanized antibody that binds specifically to HER2 interfering with its mitogenic signaling. Our team has previously developed immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) as nanocapsules functionalized with lipid vinyl sulfones, which can incorporate protein A and bind to G immunoglobulins that makes them very flexible nanocarriers. Methods and results The aim of this in vitro study was to synthesize and evaluate a drug delivery system based on protein A-functionalized ISCOMs to target HER2-overexpressing cells. We describe the preparation of ISCOMs, the loading with the drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, the binding of ISCOMs to alkyl vinyl sulfone-protein A, the coupling of Tmab, and the evaluation in both HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells (HCC1954) and non-overexpressing cells (MCF-7) by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Results show that the uptake is dependent on the level of overexpression of HER2, and the analysis of the cell viability reveals that targeted drugs are selective toward HCC1954, whereas MCF-7 cells remain unaffected. Conclusion Protein A-functionalized ISCOMs are versatile carriers that can be coupled to antibodies that act as targeting agents to deliver drugs. When coupling to Tmab and loading with paclitaxel or doxorubicin, they become efficient vehicles for the selective delivery of the drug to Tmab-resistant HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. These nanoparticles may pave the way for the development of novel therapies for poor prognosis resistant patients. PMID:27698563

  8. The MAR-binding protein SATB1 orchestrates temporal and spatial expression of multiple genes during T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, John D.; Yasui, Dag H.; Niida, Hiroyuki; Joh, Tadashi; Loh, Dennis Y.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2000-01-01

    SATB1 is expressed primarily in thymocytes and can act as a transcriptional repressor. SATB1 binds in vivo to the matrix attachment regions (MARs) of DNA, which are implicated in the loop domain organization of chromatin. The role of MAR-binding proteins in specific cell lineages is unknown. We generated SATB1-null mice to determine how SATB1 functions in the T-cell lineage. SATB1-null mice are small in size, have disproportionately small thymi and spleens, and die at 3 weeks of age. At the cellular level, multiple defects in T-cell development were observed. Immature CD3−CD4−CD8− triple negative (TN) thymocytes were greatly reduced in number, and thymocyte development was blocked mainly at the DP stage. The few peripheral CD4+ single positive (SP) cells underwent apoptosis and failed to proliferate in response to activating stimuli. At the molecular level, among 589 genes examined, at least 2% of genes including a proto-oncogene, cytokine receptor genes, and apoptosis-related genes were derepressed at inappropriate stages of T-cell development in SATB1-null mice. For example, IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα genes were ectopically transcribed in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. SATB1 appears to orchestrate the temporal and spatial expression of genes during T-cell development, thereby ensuring the proper development of this lineage. Our data provide the first evidence that MAR-binding proteins can act as global regulators of cell function in specific cell lineages. PMID:10716941

  9. Nuclear expression of the RNA-binding protein RBM3 is associated with an improved clinical outcome in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Annika; Brennan, Donal J; Rydén, Lisa; Magnusson, Kristina; Fernö, Mårten; Stål, Olle; Borgquist, Signe; Uhlen, Mathias; Landberg, Göran; Påhlman, Sven; Pontén, Fredrik; Jirström, Karin

    2009-12-01

    Single-strand RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are involved in many aspects of RNA metabolism and in the regulation of gene transcription. The RBP RBM3 was recently suggested to be a proto-oncogene in colorectal cancer; however, such a role has not been corroborated by previous studies in the colon or other tumor types, and the prognostic implications of tumor-specific RBM3 expression remain unclear. Mono-specific antibodies against RBM3 were generated. Antibody specificity was confirmed using siRNA gene silencing, western blotting and immunohistochemistry on a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Using tissue microarrays and IHC, RBM3 protein expression was examined in 48 normal tissues and in 20 common cancers. Additional analysis in two independent breast cancer cohorts (n=1016) with long-term follow-up was also carried out. RBM3 was upregulated in cancer compared to normal tissues. The nuclear expression of RBM3 in breast cancer was associated with low grade (P<0.001), small tumors (P<0.001), estrogen receptor (ER) positivity (P<0.001) and Ki-67 negativity (P<0.001) in both the breast cancer cohorts. An increased nuclear expression of RBM3 was associated with a prolonged overall and recurrence-free survival. The prognostic value was particularly pronounced in hormone receptor-positive tumors and remained significant in multivariate interaction analysis after controlling for tamoxifen treatment (HR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.30-0.79, P=0.004). These data strongly indicate that nuclear RBM3 is an independent favorable prognostic factor in breast cancer, and seems to have a specific role in ER-positive tumors.

  10. Long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 ORF-1 protein promotes proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells through enhancing ETS-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Li, M Y; Zhu, M; Feng, F; Cai, F Y; Fan, K C; Jiang, H; Wang, Z Q; Linghu, E Q

    2014-04-14

    The human proto-oncogene long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 (LINE-1) open reading frame-1 protein (ORF-1p) is involved in the progress of several cancers. The transcription factor ETS-1 can mediate the transcription of some downstream genes that play specific roles in the regulation of cancerous cell invasion and metastasis. In this study, the effects of LINE-1 ORF-1p on ETS-1 activity and on the proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells were investigated. Results showed that the overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p enhanced the transcription of ETS-1 downstream genes and increased their protein levels, and downregulation of the LINE-1 ORF-1p level by small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the transcriptional activation of ETS-1. In addition, overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted LoVo cell proliferation and anchor-independent growth, and a knockdown of the LINE-1 protein level by siRNA reduced the proliferation and anchor-independent growth ability of LoVo cells. In vivo data revealed that LINE-1 ORF-1p overexpression increased LoVo tumor growth in nude mice, whereas the siRNA knockdown of endogenous LINE-1 ORF-1p expression decreased LoVo cell growth in nude mice. Therefore, LINE- 1 ORF-1p could promote LoVo cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it might be a useful molecular target for the treatment of human colorectal cancer.

  11. The cnidarian origin of the proto-oncogenes NF-κB/STAT and WNT-like oncogenic pathway drives the ctenophores (Review).

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2015-10-01

    The cell survival pathways of the diploblastic early multicellular eukaryotic hosts contain and operate the molecular machinery resembling those of malignantly transformed individual cells of highly advanced multicellular hosts (including Homo). In the present review, the STAT/NF-κB pathway of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis is compared with that of human tumors (malignant lymphomas, including Reed-Sternberg cells) pointing out similarities, including possible viral initiation in both cases. In the ctenophore genome and proteome, β-catenin gains intranuclear advantages due to a physiologically weak destructive complex in the cytoplasm, and lack of natural inhibitors (the dickkopfs). Thus, a scenario similar to what tumor cells initiate and achieve is presented through several constitutive loss-of-function type mutations in the destructive complex and in the elimination of inhibitors. Vice versa, malignantly transformed individual cells of advanced multicellular hosts assume pheno-genotypic resemblance to cells of unicellular or early multicellular hosts, and presumably to their ancient predecessors, by returning to the semblance of immortality and to the resumption of the state of high degree of resistance to physicochemical insults. Human leukemogenic and oncogenic pathways are presented for comparisons. The supreme bioengineers RNA/DNA complex encoded both the malignantly transformed immortal cell and the human cerebral cortex. The former generates molecules for the immortality of cellular life in the Universe. The latter invents the inhibitors of the process in order to gain control over it.

  12. Characterization and localization of cis-diamminedichloro-platinum(II) adducts on a purified oligonucleotide containing the codons 12 and 13 of H-ras proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Pillaire, M J; Villani, G; Hoffmann, J S; Mazard, A M; Defais, M

    1992-01-01

    The use of substrates containing well defined adducts at precise sites, is required to perform a careful analysis of the toxic and mutagenic potential of a lesion. As a first step in this direction the octamer 5'-d(CCGGCGGT), containing the sequence of the codons 12 d(GGC) and 13 d(GGT) of the human H-ras gene, was reacted with the antitumoral drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II). The platinated products have been purified by HPLC. A first set of experiments, including enzymatic digestions with nuclease P1 followed by alkaline phosphatase and acid-catalysed hydrolysis, allowed us to determine which bases were engaged in the cis-DDP lesions. Our results indicate that only guanine residues were chelated with cisplatin to yield bifunctional adducts. Furthermore, by performing enzymatic digestions with phosphodiesterases, we have located the adducts with respect to the 5' end of the octamer. Among the purified and characterized platinated oligonucleotides, three present a particular interest, since we have shown here that the cis-d(GpG) adduct is precisely situated either at the d(GGC) or at the d(GGT) or at both sites of their sequence. Images PMID:1480469

  13. [Erratum] The cnidarian origin of the proto-oncogenes NF-κB/STAT and WNT-like oncogenic pathway drives the ctenophores (Review).

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2017-01-01

    After the publication of the article, the author noted that there was an error on page 1212, right column, paragraph entitled 'Virus carrier algal symbionts'. The word Hydra virilis should be written as Hydra viridis/viridissima. [the original article was published in the International Journal of Oncology 47: 1211-1229, 2015; DOI: 10.3892/ijo.2015.3102].

  14. Non-covalent interactions of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras proto-oncogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge H.; Deligkaris, Christos

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the complementary, but different, effects of physical (non-covalent) and chemical (covalent) mutagen-DNA and carcinogen-DNA interactions is important for understanding possible mechanisms of development and prevention of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. A highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ α]pyrene, namely (+)-anti-BPDE, is known to undergo both physical and chemical complexation with DNA. The major covalent adduct, a promutagenic, is known to be an external (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N2-dGuanosine configuration whose origins are not fully understood. Thus, it is desirable to study the mechanisms of external non-covalent BPDE-DNA binding and their possible relationships to external covalent trans adduct formation. We present a detailed codon-by-codon computational study of the non-covalent interactions of (+)-anti-BPDE with DNA which explains and correctly predicts preferential (+)-anti-BPDE binding at minor groove guanosines. Due to its relevance to carcinogenesis, the interaction of (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras gene has been studied in detail. Present address: Department of Physics, Drury University

  15. Effect of teicoplanin on the expression of c-myc and c-fos proto-oncogenes in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Ashouri, Saeideh; Khujin, Maryam Hosseindokht; Kazemi, Mohammad; Kheirollahi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Teicoplanin is a member of vancomycin-ristocetin family of glycopeptide antibiotics. It mediated wound healing by increasing neovascularization possibly through activation of MAP kinase signaling pathway. The aim of this study is an evaluation of c-myc and c-fos genes expression after treatment of cells by teicoplanin and determines whether this glycopeptide antibiotic exerts its proliferation effects by influencing the expression of these genes. Hence, this study was designed to elucidate one possible mechanism underlying teicoplanin effects on cell proliferation using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Materials and Methods: Breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was cultured, and three different concentrations of teicoplanin were added to the plates. We measured the cell proliferation rate by MTT assay. After cell harvesting, total RNA was extracted to synthesize single-stranded cDNA. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed, and the data were analyzed. Results: It was observed that the level of c-fos and c-myc genes’ expressions was decreased at all three different concentrations of teicoplanin. Conclusion: it could be concluded that although teicoplanin is considered as an enhancing cell growth and proliferation, but probably its effect is not through MAP kinase signaling pathway or perhaps even has inhibitory effect on the expression of some genes such as c-myc and c-fos in this pathway. Hence, the mechanism of action of teicoplanin for increasing cell propagation, through cell signaling pathways or chromosomal abnormalities, remains unclear, and further studies should be conducted. PMID:28028512

  16. Cytotoxic activity of Justicia spicigera is inhibited by bcl-2 proto-oncogene and induces apoptosis in a cell cycle dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Cortés, J R; Cantú-Garza, F A; Mendoza-Mata, M T; Chavez-González, M A; Ramos-Mandujano, G; Zambrano-Ramírez, I R

    2001-12-01

    Identification of organic compounds from plants is of clinical significance because of the effect that they might have in patients with haematopoietic disorders. We studied the effect of the plant extract Justicia spicigera (Acanthaceae) in different haematopoietic cells: human leukaemic cell lines, umbilical cord blood cells, and mouse bone marrow cells. By examining colony formation and performing the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay it was shown that the plant extract of Justicia spicigera contains cytotoxic factors for leukaemic cells and has no proliferative activity on normal haematopoietic progenitor cells. Our results show that this plant extract induces apoptosis in the human leukaemia cell line TF-1, but not in the bcl-2 transfectant cell line TB-1. Similar results were obtained using a haemopoietic cell line 32D and 32DBcl2. The cultures of umbilical cord blood cells and mouse bone marrow that contain granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) do not proliferate or become terminally differentiated in the presence of the infusion of Justicia spicigera. GM-CSF that acts by abrogating programmed cell death is not sufficient to inhibit the apoptotic stimulus in TF-1 and 32D cells. Moreover mouse fibroblasts (3T3) and two cervical carcinoma cell lines CALO and INBL, undergo apoptosis in the presence of different concentrations of an infusion from the plant. Our data show that there is a strong correlation between the cytotoxic effect and cell proliferation. Together, these results indicate that the plant infusion of Justicia spicigera does not contain any haematopoietic activity, induces apoptosis inhibited by bcl-2 and is linked to cell proliferation. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Sequencing and G-Quadruplex Folding of the Canine Proto-Oncogene KIT Promoter Region: Might Dog Be Used as a Model for Human Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Da Ros, Silvia; Zorzan, Eleonora; Giantin, Mery; Zorro Shahidian, Lara; Palumbo, Manlio; Dacasto, Mauro; Sissi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Downregulation of gene expression by induction of non-canonical DNA structures at promotorial level is a novel attractive anticancer strategy. In human, two guanine-rich sequences (h_kit1 and h_kit2) were identified in the promotorial region of oncogene KIT. Their stabilization into G-quadruplex structures can find applications in the treatment of leukemias, mastocytosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and lung carcinomas which are often associated to c-kit mis-regulation. Also the most common skin cancer in domestic dog, mast cell tumor, is linked to a mutation and/or to an over-expression of c-kit, thus supporting dog as an excellent animal model. In order to assess if the G-quadruplex mediated mechanism of regulation of c-kit expression is conserved among the two species, herein we cloned and sequenced the canine KIT promoter region and we compared it with the human one in terms of sequence and conformational equilibria in physiologically relevant conditions. Our results evidenced a general conserved promotorial sequence between the two species. As experimentally confirmed, this grants that the conformational features of the canine kit1 sequence are substantially shared with the human one. Conversely, two isoforms of the kit2 sequences were identified in the analyzed dog population. In comparison with the human counterpart, both of them showed an altered distribution among several folded conformations. PMID:25084283

  18. Developmental regulation of early mouse embryogenesis. A. Onset of insulin and related growth factor binding. B. Expression of selected proto-oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence suggest a role for insulin and related growth factors in fetal growth. It was therefore of interest to determine the onset of insulin binding to cells of early embryos. These studies are the first to demonstrate stage-specific insulin binding during mouse preimplantation embryogenesis. Insulin binding was detected at the morula, blastocyst, and blastocyst outgrowth stages using indirect immunofluorescence and light microscopic autoradiographic techniques. No evidence of insulin binding was seen on unfertilized oocytes, two-, four-, or eight-cell embryos. Results of competitive inhibition studies using unlabeled insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) suggest binding of /sup 125/I-insulin to type I IGF receptors as well. Further studies are needed to confirm the presence of an IGF receptor in preimplantation embryos.

  19. Surgical and clinical strategies in the management of thyroid medullary carcinoma in children with and without ret proto-oncogene mutations.

    PubMed

    Boybeyi-Türer, Özlem; Vurallı, Doğuş; Karnak, İbrahim; Gönç, Nazlı; Yalçın, Emel Şule; Orhan, Diclehan; Kandemir, Nurgün; Tanyel, Feridun Cahit

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) may arise sporadically or in familial manner. We presented sporadic and familial cases with MTC in order to raise awareness on management of such patients. Three medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cases were presented. Case 1 had RET634 mutation; managed with total thyroidectomy (TT) and cervical lymph node dissection (CLND). Case 2 had RET804 mutation; managed with prophylactic TT. Case 3 had thyroid nodule; managed with TT and CLND. Case 1 had micro-carcinomatosis foci, Case 2 had normal thyroid tissue in histopathological examination and Case 3 had medullary thyroid carcinoma with tumor negative surgical borders. Case 1 was re-operated for persisting focus of disease. Follow-up of cases were uneventful. Clinicians and surgeons should be aware of critical timing for surgery and various surgical and clinical strategies in the management of MTC in children.

  20. The cnidarian origin of the proto-oncogenes NF-κB/STAT and WNT-like oncogenic pathway drives the ctenophores (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SINKOVICS, JOSEPH G.

    2015-01-01

    The cell survival pathways of the diploblastic early multicellular eukaryotic hosts contain and operate the molecular machinery resembling those of malignantly transformed individual cells of highly advanced multicellular hosts (including Homo). In the present review, the STAT/NF-κB pathway of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis is compared with that of human tumors (malignant lymphomas, including Reed-Sternberg cells) pointing out similarities, including possible viral initiation in both cases. In the ctenophore genome and proteome, β-catenin gains intranuclear advantages due to a physiologically weak destructive complex in the cytoplasm, and lack of natural inhibitors (the Dickkopfs). Thus, a scenario similar to what tumor cells initiate and achieve is presented through several constitutive loss-of-function type mutations in the destructive complex and in the elimination of inhibitors. Vice versa, malignantly transformed individual cells of advanced multicellular hosts assume pheno-genotypic resemblance to cells of unicellular or early multicellular hosts, and presumably to their ancient predecessors, by returning to the semblance of immortality and to the resumption of the state of high degree of resistance to physicochemical insults. Human leukemogenic and oncogenic pathways are presented for comparisons. The supreme bioengineers RNA/DNA complex encoded both the malignantly transformed immortal cell and the human cerebral cortex. The former generates molecules for the immortality of cellular life in the Universe. The latter invents the inhibitors of the process in order to gain control over it. PMID:26239915

  1. Case report: a p.C618S RET proto-oncogene germline mutation in a large Chinese pedigree with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qi, X-P; Ying, R-B; Ma, J-M; Liu, W-T; Du, Z-F; Fei, J; Yang, C-P; Song, Q-Z; Jin, H-Y; Chen, Z-G; Han, J-S; Wang, J-Q; Chen, X-L; Zhao, Y; Lu, J-J; Zhang, X-N

    2012-03-01

    We report a Chinese pedigree with familial medullary thyroid carcinoma. Direct sequencing of the entire coding sequences of Rearranged during Transfection (RET) identified a recurrent c.T1852A (p.C618S) mutation in 13 of 23 members. The polymorphisms c.A135G (p.A45A), c.A1296G (p.A432A), c.T2307G (p.L769L) and IVS19 + 15T > C were also found in 13 carriers, and c.G2073A (p.G691S) was found in 1 carrier. Of the 13 carriers, seven (mean age: 42.6 years, range: 27-64) presented MTC as the isolated clinical phenotype, with elevated basal serum calcitonin (average: 1077.9 ng/L, range: 504-2,652) and a mean diameter of thyroid nodules of 2.97 cm (range: 1.6-4.3); they underwent a total thyroidectomy with modified bilateral/unilateral neck dissection and/or level VI lymph node dissection. The other 6 carriers did not accept surgery (4 rejected, 2 awaited). These were 2 older patients (63 and 32 years) with elevated calcitonin (1359 and 41.4 ng/L) and multi-centric hypoechoic nodules (1.5 and 0.6 cm) with calcifications in both/left thyroid lobes; and Doppler ultrasound showed normal bilateral thyroids in 4 younger carriers (median age: 8.3 years, range: 4-12) but with increased calcitonin (average: 9.7 ng/L, range: 7.87-12.2) in 3 of them. The phenotype here is consistent with the clinical symptoms reported worldwide. We recommend that screening of hotspot regions of RET should be preferentially carried out, while whole-exon sequencing should be performed when clinical signs fail to reveal hotspot mutations or different phenotype discrepancies. Moreover, we strongly suggest prophylactic thyroidectomy should be performed before age 5 in carriers with p.C618S to prevent the occurrence and metastasis of MTC.

  2. Transcriptional Factor Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (Ahr) Controls Cardiovascular and Respiratory Functions by Regulating the Expression of the Vav3 Proto-oncogene*

    PubMed Central

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Carvajal-González, José M.; Riolobos, Adelaida S.; Sevilla, María A.; Menacho-Márquez, Mauricio; Román, Ángel C.; Abad, Antonio; Montero, María J.; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2011-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) is a transcriptional factor involved in detoxification responses to pollutants and in intrinsic biological processes of multicellular organisms. We recently described that Vav3, an activator of Rho/Rac GTPases, is an Ahr transcriptional target in embryonic fibroblasts. These results prompted us to compare the Ahr−/− and Vav3−/− mouse phenotypes to investigate the implications of this functional interaction in vivo. Here, we show that Ahr is important for Vav3 expression in kidney, lung, heart, liver, and brainstem regions. This process is not affected by the administration of potent Ahr ligands such as benzo[a]pyrene. We also report that Ahr- and Vav3-deficient mice display hypertension, tachypnea, and sympathoexcitation. The Ahr gene deficiency also induces the GABAergic transmission defects present in the Vav3−/− ventrolateral medulla, a main cardiorespiratory brainstem center. However, Ahr−/− mice, unlike Vav3-deficient animals, display additional defects in fertility, perinatal growth, liver size and function, closure, spleen size, and peripheral lymphocytes. These results demonstrate that Vav3 is a bona fide Ahr target that is in charge of a limited subset of the developmental and physiological functions controlled by this transcriptional factor. Our data also reveal the presence of sympathoexcitation and new cardiorespiratory defects in Ahr−/− mice. PMID:21115475

  3. Loss of the SKI proto-oncogene in individuals affected with 1p36 deletion syndrome is predicted by strain-dependent defects in Ski-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Colmenares, Clemencia; Heilstedt, Heidi A; Shaffer, Lisa G; Schwartz, Stuart; Berk, Michael; Murray, Jeffrey C; Stavnezer, Ed

    2002-01-01

    Experiments involving overexpression of Ski have suggested that this gene is involved in neural tube development and muscle differentiation. In agreement with these findings, Ski-/- mice display a cranial neural tube defect that results in exencephaly and a marked reduction in skeletal muscle mass. Here we show that the penetrance and expressivity of the phenotype changes when the null mutation is backcrossed into the C57BL6/J background, with the principal change involving a switch from a neural tube defect to midline facial clefting. Other defects, including depressed nasal bridge, eye abnormalities, skeletal muscle defects and digit abnormalities, show increased penetrance in the C57BL6/J background. These phenotypes are interesting because they resemble some of the features observed in individuals diagnosed with 1p36 deletion syndrome, a disorder caused by monosomy of the short arm of human chromosome 1p (refs. 6-9). These similarities prompted us to re-examine the chromosomal location of human SKI and to determine whether SKI is included in the deletions of 1p36. We found that human SKI is located at distal 1p36.3 and is deleted in all of the individuals tested so far who have this syndrome. Thus, SKI may contribute to some of the phenotypes common in 1p36 deletion syndrome, and particularly to facial clefting.

  4. Changes in the phenotype of human small cell lung cancer cell lines after transfection and expression of the c-myc proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, B E; Battey, J; Linnoila, I; Becker, K L; Makuch, R W; Snider, R H; Carney, D N; Minna, J D

    1986-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer growing in cell culture possesses biologic properties that allow classification into two categories: classic and variant. Compared with classic small cell lung cancer cell lines, variant lines have altered large cell morphology, shorter doubling times, higher cloning efficiencies in soft agarose, and very low levels of L dopa decarboxylase production and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. C-myc is amplified and expressed in some small cell lung cancer cell lines and all c-myc amplified lines studied to date display the variant phenotype. To investigate if c-myc amplification and expression is responsible for the variant phenotype, a normal human c-myc gene was transfected into a cloned classic small cell lung cancer cell line not amplified for or expressing detectable c-myc messenger RNA (mRNA). Clones were isolated with one to six copies of c-myc stably integrated into DNA that expressed c-myc mRNA. In addition, one clone with an integrated neo gene but a deleted c-myc gene was isolated and in this case c-myc was not expressed. C-myc expression in transfected clones was associated with altered large cell morphology, a shorter doubling time, and increased cloning efficiency, but no difference in L dopa decarboxylase levels and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. We conclude increased c-myc expression observed here in transfected clones correlates with some of the phenotypic properties distinguishing c-myc amplified variants from unamplified classic small cell lung cancer lines. Images PMID:3016030

  5. Dose dependency of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ binding on human high molecular weight DNA in the activation of proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.S.; Taub, J.V.; Modali, R.; Vieira, W.; Yasei, P.; Yang, G.C.

    1985-10-01

    The binding of aflatoxin B/sub 1/, AFB/sub 1/, a potent hepatocarcinogen, to various high molecular weight (HMW) DNAs from human normal liver and two liver cancer cell lines, Alexander primary liver carcinoma (PLC) and Mahlavu hepatocellular carcinoma (hHC) and from NIH/3T3 cell have been investigated. The kinetics of AFB/sub 1/ binding to these DNAs showed similar initial rates but the extents of binding to the PLC and hHC DNAs seemed to be slightly higher. Preferential AFB/sub 1/ bindings were identified in both PLC and hHC DNAs compared to normal liver DNA. A critical AFB/sub 1/ binding dosage, ranging 100 to 460 fmole/..mu..g DNA, was found to activate the carcinogenic effect of the Mahlavu hHC HMW DNA, but not normal liver HMW DNA, rendering it capable of inducting focal transformation in NIH/3T3 cell. Excessive AFB/sub 1/ binding on the hHC and PLC HMW DNAs resulted in an over-kill of both cell transformation capability and templating activity of the DNA.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by the proto-oncogene, c-myc, in the pathogenesis of inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, M; Pilli, V S; Aradhyam, G K; Doble, M

    2017-01-22

    Pro-inflammatory molecules play a key role in the progression of various types of cancers highlighting the importance of studying the pathways that regulate the inflammatory cytokine production. To this end, prostaglandins have been reported to correlate with exacerbated cancer phenotypes that may be prevented by using anti-inflammatory drugs in humans. To understand how the prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES1) may be regulated we analyzed its promoter sequence and identified myc-binding sites. Functional validation was performed by mutating the sites that led to attenuated promoter activation of mPGES1. The known c-myc inhibitor (10058-F4) also blocked PGE2 activity, indicating the importance of c-Myc in PGE2 synthesis. Isocoumarin analogs were able to reduce the expressions of both c-myc as well as mPGES1 and also inhibit the production of PGE2. Based on these data and the well-established role of c-myc in oncogenesis, we have demonstrated an additional role of c-myc in exacerbating cancers via PGE2 production, which may provide a therapeutic opportunity to treat these diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. c-Myc Alters Substrate Utilization and O-GlcNAc Protein Posttranslational Modifications without Altering Cardiac Function during Early Aortic Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli cause transcription of the proto-oncogene c-Myc (Myc). Prior work showed that myocardial knockout of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we assessed the interplay between Myc, substrate oxidation and cardiac function during early pressure overload hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc knockout (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n = 7/group). Additional groups underwent sham surgery (Cont-Sham and MycKO-Sham, n = 5 per group). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. In sham hearts, Myc knockout did not affect cardiac function or substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle. However, Myc knockout altered fractional contributions during TAC. The unlabeled fractional contribution increased in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC, whereas ketone and free fatty acid fractional contributions decreased. Additionally, protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc were significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Cont-Sham and MycKO-TAC. In conclusion, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy, which may regulate Myc-induced metabolic changes. PMID:26266538

  8. Upregulation of Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 (FUBP1) Promotes Tumor Proliferation and Tumorigenesis of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Junyao; Bao, Xu; Ma, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Ni, Dong; Wang, Hanfeng; Zhang, Fan; Du, Qingshan; Fan, Yang; Chen, Jianwen; Wu, Shengpan; Li, Xintao; Gao, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Objective The far upstream element (FUSE)-binding protein 1 (FUBP1) is a transactivator of human c-myc proto-oncogene transcription, with important roles in carcinogenesis. However, the expression pattern and potential biological function of FUBP1 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is yet to be established. Methods FUBP1 expression was detected in ccRCC tissues and cell lines by real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. The correlations of FUBP1 mRNA expression levels with clinicopathological factors were evaluated. The biological function of FUBP1 during tumor cell proliferation was studied by MTS, colony formation, and soft-agar colony formation. The effects of FUBP1 on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to identify the potential mechanism of FUBP1 regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Results The levels of FUBP1 mRNA and protein expression were upregulated in human ccRCC tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues. High levels of FUBP1 mRNA expression were associated with higher tumor stage and tumor size. FUBP1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Meanwhile, the expression levels of c-myc and p21 mRNA were correlated with that of FUBP1 mRNA. Conclusions FUBP1 acts as a potential oncogene in ccRCC and may be considered as a novel biomarker or an attractive treatment target of ccRCC. PMID:28076379

  9. Generation of a novel Fli-1 protein by gene targeting leads to a defect in thymus development and a delay in Friend virus-induced erythroleukemia.

    PubMed

    Mélet, F; Motro, B; Rossi, D J; Zhang, L; Bernstein, A

    1996-06-01

    The proto-oncogene Fli-1 is a member of the ets family of transcription factor genes. Its activation by either chromosomal translocation or proviral insertion leads to Ewing's sarcoma in humans or erythroleukemia in mice, respectively, Fli-1 is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic and endothelial cells. This expression pattern resembled that of c-ets-1, another ets gene closely related and physically linked to Fli-1. We also generated a germ line mutation in Fli-1 by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Homozygous mutant mice exhibit thymic hypocellularity which is not related to a defect in a specific subpopulation of thymocytes or to increased apoptosis, suggesting that Fli-1 is an important regulator of a prethymic T-cell progenitor. This phenotype was corrected by crossing the Fli-1 deficient mice expressing Fli-1 cDNA. Homozygous mutant mice remained susceptible to erythroleukemia induction by Friend murine leukemia virus, although the latency period was significantly increased. Surprisingly, the mutant Fli-1 allele was still a target for Friend murine leukemia virus integration, and leukemic spleens with a rearranged Fli-1 gene expressed a truncated Fli-1 protein that appears to arise from an internal translation initiation site and alternative splicing around the neo cassette used in the gene targeting. The fortuitous discovery of the mutant Fli-1 protein, revealed only as the result of the clonal expansion of leukemic cells harboring a rearranged Fli-1 gene, suggests caution in the interpretation of gene-targeting experiments that result in either no or only a subtle phenotypic alteration.

  10. Characterization of GTP-binding proteins in Golgi-associated membrane vesicles from rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, A; Rosenthal, W; Schultz, G; Joost, H G

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that guanine nucleotides inhibit glucose transport activity reconstituted from adipocyte membrane fractions. In order to further investigate the hypothetical involvement of guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (GTP-binding proteins) in the regulation of insulin-sensitive glucose transport activity, we studied their subcellular distribution in adipocytes treated or not with insulin. Adipocytes were homogenized and fractionated to yield plasma membranes (PM) and a Golgi-enriched fraction of intracellular membranes (low-density microsomes, LDM). In these membrane fractions, total guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding, alpha- and beta-subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins, proto-oncogenes Ha-ras and K-ras, and 23-28 kDa GTP-binding proteins were assayed. The levels of alpha s and alpha i (the alpha-subunits of Gs and Gi) were approx. 8-fold lower in LDM than in PM; beta-subunits, Ha-ras and K-ras were not detectable in LDM. Total GTP[S]-binding sites and 23-28 kDa GTP-binding proteins were present in LDM in approximately the same concentrations as in PM. Insulin gave rise to the characteristic translocation of glucose transporters, but failed to alter the subcellular distribution of any of the GTP-binding proteins. Fractionation of the LDM on a discontinuous sucrose gradient revealed that alpha s and alpha i, as detected with antiserum against a common peptide sequence (alpha common), and the bulk of the 23-28 kDa G-proteins sedimented at different sucrose densities. None of the GTP-binding proteins co-sedimented with glucose transporters. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of GTP[S] on the reconstituted transport activity was lost in the peak fractions of glucose transporters partially purified on the sucrose gradient. These data indicate that LDM from adipocytes contain several GTP-binding proteins in discrete vesicle populations. However, the intracellular GTP-binding proteins are not tightly associated with the

  11. Novel Targets for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer Identified by Genomic Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    without functional annotation, HCCR1 is a putative proto-oncogene, fucosyltransferase 8 is thought to contribute to malignancy, “G protein-coupled...Cholinephosphotransferase 1 Membrane protein 1.356 203988_s_at NM_004480 FUT8 Fucosyltransferase 8 (alpha (1,6) fucosyltransferase ) Membrane protein (by similarity

  12. Functional analysis of the AUG- and CUG-initiated forms of the c-Myc protein.

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, E M; Lugo, T G; Kretzner, L; King, M W; Street, A J; Witte, O N; Eisenman, R N

    1994-01-01

    Activation of the c-myc proto-oncogene by chromosomal translocation or proviral insertion frequently results in the separation of the c-myc coding region from its normal regulatory elements. Such rearrangements are often accompanied by loss or mutation of c-myc exon 1 sequences. These genetic alterations do not affect synthesis of the major c-myc protein, p64, which is initiated from the first AUG codon in exon 2. However they can result in mutation or loss of the CUG codon located in exon 1 that normally serves as an alternative translational initiation codon for synthesis of an N-terminally extended form of c-Myc (p67). It has been hypothesized that p67 is a functionally distinct form of c-Myc whose specific loss during c-myc rearrangements confers a selective growth advantage. Here we describe experiments designed to test the functional properties of the two c-Myc protein forms. We introduced mutations within the translational initiation codons of a normal human c-myc cDNA that alter the pattern of Myc protein synthesis (p64 vs. p67). The functions of each of these proteins were experimentally addressed using co-transformation and transcriptional activation assays. Both the p64 and p67 c-Myc proteins were independently able to collaborate with bcr-abl in the transformation of Rat-1 fibroblasts. In addition, both the exon 1- and exon 2-initiated forms of the c-Myc protein stimulated transcription of a Myc/Max-responsive reporter construct to a similar level. Given the apparent absence of functional differences between p64 and p67, we conclude that the basis for c-Myc oncogenic activation lies primarily in the overall deregulation of its expression and not in alterations in the protein. The existence of the CUG translational initiator may reflect a mechanism for the continued synthesis of c-Myc protein under conditions where AUG initiation is inhibited. Images PMID:7919540

  13. Differences in cellular function and viral protein expression between IgMhigh and IgMlow B-cells in bovine leukemia virus-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Konnai, Satoru; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Nishimori, Asami; Nakahara, Ayako; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) induces abnormal B-cell proliferation and B-cell lymphoma in cattle, where the BLV provirus is integrated into the host genome. BLV-infected B-cells rarely express viral proteins in vivo, but short-term cultivation augments BLV expression in some, but not all, BLV-infected B-cells. This observation suggests that two subsets, i.e. BLV-silencing cells and BLV-expressing cells, are present among BLV-infected B-cells, although the mechanisms of viral expression have not been determined. In this study, we examined B-cell markers and viral antigen expression in B-cells from BLV-infected cattle to identify markers that may discriminate BLV-expressing cells from BLV-silencing cells. The proportions of IgM(high) B-cells were increased in blood lymphocytes from BLV-infected cattle. IgM(high) B-cells mainly expressed BLV antigens, whereas IgM(low) B-cells did not, although the provirus load was equivalent in both subsets. Several parameters were investigated in these two subsets to characterize their cellular behaviour. Real-time PCR and microarray analyses detected higher expression levels of some proto-oncogenes (e.g. Maf, Jun and Fos) in IgM(low) B-cells than those in IgM(high) B-cells. Moreover, lymphoma cells obtained from the lymph nodes of 14 BLV-infected cattle contained IgM(low) or IgM(-) B-cells but no IgM(high) B-cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that IgM(high) B-cells mainly comprise BLV-expressing cells, whereas IgM(low) B-cells comprise a high proportion of BLV-silencing B-cells in BLV-infected cattle. © 2014 The Authors.

  14. Far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FUBP1) is a potential c-Myc regulator in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its expression promotes ESCC progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Jun-Ya; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Bao, Bo-Jun; Guan, Cheng-Qi; Yang, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Yan-Hua; Huang, Yue-Jiao; Ni, Run-Zhou; Ji, Li-Li

    2016-03-01

    The human far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein 1 (FUBP1) belongs to an ancient family which is required for proper regulation of the c-Myc proto-oncogene. Although c-Myc plays an important role in development of various carcinomas, the relevance of FUBP1 and their contribution to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) development remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between FUBP1 and c-Myc as well as their contribution to ESCC development. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate FUBP1 expression. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis was performed to explore the correlation between FUBP1 and c-Myc in ESCC. In addition, the role of FUBP1 in ESCC proliferation was studied in ESCC cells through knocking FUBP1 down. The regulation of FUBP1 on proliferation was confirmed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, flow cytometric assays, and clone formation assays. The expressions of FUBP1 and c-Myc were both upregulated in ESCC tissues. In addition to correlation between expression of FUBP1 and tumor grade, we also confirmed the correlation of FUBP1, c-Myc, and Ki-67 expression by twos. Moreover, upregulation of FUBP1 and c-Myc in ESCC was associated with poor survival. FUBP1 was confirmed to activate c-Myc in ESCC tissues and cells. FUBP1 was demonstrated to promote proliferation of ESCC cells. Moreover, downregulation of both FUBP1 and c-Myc was confirmed to inhibit proliferation of ESCC cells. Our results indicated that FUBP1 may potentially stimulate c-Myc expression in ESCC and its expression may promote ESCC progression.

  15. 3'UTR AU-Rich Elements (AREs) and the RNA-Binding Protein Tristetraprolin (TTP) Are Not Required for the LPS-Mediated Destabilization of Phospholipase-Cβ-2 mRNA in Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Smita; Elson, Genie; Blackshear, Perry J; Lutz, Carol S; Leibovich, S Joseph

    2017-04-01

    We have shown previously that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated suppression of phospholipase-Cβ-2 (PLCβ-2) expression is involved in M1 (inflammatory) to M2-like (wound healing) phenotypic switching of macrophages triggered by adenosine. This suppression is mediated post-transcriptionally by destabilization of PLCβ-2 mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid). To investigate the mechanism of this LPS-mediated destabilization, we examined the roles of RNA-binding agents including microRNAs and RNA-binding proteins that are involved in regulating stability of mRNAs encoding growth factors, inflammatory mediators, and proto-oncogenes. Adenylate and uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) in 3'UTRs are specific recognition sites for RNA-binding proteins including tristetraprolin (TTP), HuR, and AUF1 and for microRNAs that are involved in regulating mRNA stability. In this study, we investigated the role of TTP and AREs in regulating PLCβ-2 mRNA stability. The 3'UTR of the PLCβ-2 gene was inserted into the pLightswitch luciferase reporter plasmid and transfected into RAW264.7 cells. LPS suppressed luciferase expression from this reporter. Luciferase expression from mutant 3'UTR constructs lacking AREs was similarly downregulated, suggesting that these regions are not required for LPS-mediated suppression of PLCβ-2. TTP was rapidly upregulated in both primary murine macrophages and RAW264.7 cells in response to LPS. Suppression of PLCβ-2 by LPS was examined using macrophages from mice lacking TTP (TTP(-/-)). LPS suppressed PLCβ-2 expression to the same extent in wild type (WT) and TTP(-/-) macrophages. Also, the rate of decay of PLCβ-2 mRNA in LPS-treated macrophages following transcriptional blockade was similar in WT and TTP(-/-) macrophages, clearly indicating that TTP is not involved in LPS-mediated destabilization of PLCβ-2 mRNA in macrophages.

  16. Genes for human general transcription initiation factors TFIIIB, TFIIIB-associated proteins, TFIIIC2 and PTF/SNAPC: functional and positional candidates for tumour predisposition or inherited genetic diseases?

    PubMed

    Purrello, M; Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Amico, V; Giunta, V; Engel, H; Stevens, S; Hsieh, Y; Teichman, M; Wang, Z; Sichel, G; Roeder, R; Grzeschik, K H

    2001-08-09

    TFIIIB, TFIIIC2, and PTF/SNAPC are heteromultimeric general transcription factors (GTFs) needed for expression of genes encoding small cytoplasmic (scRNAs) and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). Their activity is stimulated by viral oncogenes, such as SV40 large T antigen and Adenovirus E1A, and is repressed by specific transcription factors (STFs) acting as anti-oncogenes, such as p53 and pRb. GTFs role as final targets of critical signal transduction pathways, that control cell proliferation and differentiation, and their involvement in gene expression regulation suggest that the genes encoding them are potential proto-oncogenes or anti-oncogenes or may be otherwise involved in the pathogenesis of inherited genetic diseases. To test our hypothesis through the positional candidate gene approach, we have determined the physical localization in the human genome of the 11 genes, encoding the subunits of these GTFs, and of three genes for proteins associated with TFIIIB (GTF3BAPs). Our data, obtained by chromosomal in situ hybridization, radiation hybrids and somatic cell hybrids analysis, demonstrate that these genes are present in the human genome as single copy sequences and that some cluster to the same cytogenetic band, alone or in combination with class II GTFs. Intriguingly, some of them are localized within chromosomal regions where recurrent, cytogenetically detectable mutations are seen in specific neoplasias, such as neuroblastoma, uterine leyomioma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the salivary glands and hemangiopericytoma, or where mutations causing inherited genetic diseases map, such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Their molecular function and genomic position make these GTF genes interesting candidates for causal involvement in oncogenesis or in the pathogenesis of inherited genetic diseases.

  17. What Has Cancer Taught Us about the Cell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Mary E.; Hatton, Mark P.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses what is cancer; proto-oncogenes that encode four classes of proteins including growth factors, growth factor receptors, intracellular signaling messengers, and transcription factors; tumor suppressors; and cancer therapy including metabolic inhibitors, alkylating agents and antibiotics, mitotic inhibitors, and hormone-related therapy.…

  18. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  19. Problem-Solving Test: Southwestern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2014-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: Southern blotting, Western blotting, restriction endonucleases, agarose gel electrophoresis, nitrocellulose filter, molecular hybridization, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proto-oncogene, c-abl, Src-homology domains, tyrosine protein kinase, nuclear localization signal, cDNA,…

  20. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  1. What Has Cancer Taught Us about the Cell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Mary E.; Hatton, Mark P.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses what is cancer; proto-oncogenes that encode four classes of proteins including growth factors, growth factor receptors, intracellular signaling messengers, and transcription factors; tumor suppressors; and cancer therapy including metabolic inhibitors, alkylating agents and antibiotics, mitotic inhibitors, and hormone-related therapy.…

  2. Problem-Solving Test: Southwestern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2014-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: Southern blotting, Western blotting, restriction endonucleases, agarose gel electrophoresis, nitrocellulose filter, molecular hybridization, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proto-oncogene, c-abl, Src-homology domains, tyrosine protein kinase, nuclear localization signal, cDNA,…

  3. Pim-1 Kinase Regulating Dynamics Related Protein 1 Mediates Sevoflurane Postconditioning-induced Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Dong; Chen, Hui-Juan; Wang, Da-Liang; Wang, Hui; Deng, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Background: It is well documented that sevoflurane postconditioning (SP) has a significant myocardial protection effect. However, the mechanisms underlying SP are still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the hypothesis that the Pim-1 kinase played a key role in SP-induced cardioprotection by regulating dynamics-related protein 1 (Drp1). Methods: A Langendorff model was used in this study. Seventy-two rats were randomly assigned into six groups as follows: CON group, ischemia reperfusion (I/R) group, SP group, SP+proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (Pim-1) inhibitor II group, SP+dimethylsufoxide group, and Pim-1 inhibitor II group (n = 12, each). Hemodynamic parameters and infarct size were measured to reflect the extent of myocardial I/R injury. The expressions of Pim-1, B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and cytochrome C (Cyt C) in cytoplasm and mitochondria, the Drp1 in mitochondria, and the total Drp1 and p-Drp1ser637 were measured by Western blotting. In addition, transmission electron microscope was used to observe mitochondrial morphology. The experiment began in October 2014 and continued until July 2016. Results: SP improved myocardial I/R injury-induced hemodynamic parametric changes, cardiac function, and preserved mitochondrial phenotype and decreased myocardial infarct size (24.49 ± 1.72% in Sev group compared with 41.98 ± 4.37% in I/R group; P < 0.05). However, Pim-1 inhibitor II significantly (P < 0.05) abolished the protective effect of SP. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that, compared with I/R group, the expression of Pim-1 and Bcl-2 in cytoplasm and mitochondria as well as the total p-Drp1ser637 in Sev group (P < 0.05) were upregulated. Meanwhile, SP inhibited Drp1 compartmentalization to the mitochondria followed by a reduction in the release of Cyt C. Pretreatment with Pim-1 inhibitor II significantly (P < 0.05) abolished SP-induced Pim-1/p-Drp1ser637 signaling activation. Conclusions: These findings suggested

  4. A Network of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Links G Protein-Coupled Receptors to the c-jun Promoter: a Role for c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase, p38s, and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Marinissen, Maria Julia; Chiariello, Mario; Pallante, Michael; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    1999-01-01

    The expression of the c-jun proto-oncogene is rapidly induced in response to mitogens acting on a large variety of cell surface receptors. The resulting functional activity of c-Jun proteins appears to be critical for cell proliferation. Recently, we have shown that a large family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represented by the m1 muscarinic receptor, can initiate intracellular signaling cascades that result in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK) and that the activation of JNK but not of MAPK correlated with a remarkable increase in the expression of c-jun mRNA. Subsequently, however, we obtained evidence that GPCRs can potently stimulate the activity of the c-jun promoter through MEF2 transcription factors, which do not act downstream from JNK. In view of these observations, we set out to investigate further the nature of the signaling pathway linking GPCRs to the c-jun promoter. Utilizing NIH 3T3 cells, we found that GPCRs can activate the c-jun promoter in a JNK-independent manner. Additionally, we demonstrated that these GPCRs can elevate the activity of novel members of the MAPK family, including ERK5, p38α, p38γ, and p38δ, and that the activation of certain kinases acting downstream from MEK5 (ERK5) and MKK6 (p38α and p38γ) is necessary to fully activate the c-jun promoter. Moreover, in addition to JNK, ERK5, p38α, and p38γ were found to stimulate the c-jun promoter by acting on distinct responsive elements. Taken together, these results suggest that the pathway linking GPCRs to the c-jun promoter involves the integration of numerous signals transduced by a highly complex network of MAPK, rather than resulting from the stimulation of a single linear protein kinase cascade. Furthermore, our findings suggest that each signaling pathway affects one or more regulatory elements on the c-jun promoter and that the transcriptional response most likely results from the temporal integration

  5. ERBB2 in Cat Mammary Neoplasias Disclosed a Positive Correlation between RNA and Protein Low Expression Levels: A Model for erbB-2 Negative Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Rui M. V.; Bastos, Estela; Amorim, Irina; Gut, Ivo G.; Gärtner, Fátima; Chaves, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Human ERBB2 is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 epithelial growth factor receptor. In human breast cancer (HBC), erbB-2 protein overexpression has been repeatedly correlated with poor prognosis. In more recent works, underexpression of this gene has been described in HBC. Moreover, it is also recognised that oncogenes that are commonly amplified or deleted encompass point mutations, and some of these are associated with HBC. In cat mammary lesions (CMLs), the overexpression of ERBB2 (27%–59.6%) has also been described, mostly at the protein level and although cat mammary neoplasias are considered to be a natural model of HBC, molecular information is still scarce. In the present work, a cat ERBB2 fragment, comprising exons 10 to 15 (ERBB2_10–15) was achieved for the first time. Allelic variants and genomic haplotype analyses were also performed, and differences between normal and CML populations were observed. Three amino acid changes, corresponding to 3 non-synonymous genomic sequence variants that were only detected in CMLs, were proposed to damage the 3D structure of the protein. We analysed the cat ERBB2 gene at the DNA (copy number determination), mRNA (expression levels assessment) and protein levels (in extra- and intra protein domains) in CML samples and correlated the last two evaluations with clinicopathological features. We found a positive correlation between the expression levels of the ERBB2 RNA and erbB-2 protein, corresponding to the intracellular region. Additionally, we detected a positive correlation between higher mRNA expression and better clinical outcome. Our results suggest that the ERBB2 gene is post-transcriptionally regulated and that proteins with truncations and single point mutations are present in cat mammary neoplastic lesions. We would like to emphasise that the recurrent occurrence of low erbB-2 expression levels in cat mammary tumours, suggests the cat mammary neoplasias as a valuable model for erbB-2 negative HBC

  6. ERBB2 in cat mammary neoplasias disclosed a positive correlation between RNA and protein low expression levels: a model for erbB-2 negative human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sara; Baptista, Cláudia S; Abreu, Rui M V; Bastos, Estela; Amorim, Irina; Gut, Ivo G; Gärtner, Fátima; Chaves, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Human ERBB2 is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 epithelial growth factor receptor. In human breast cancer (HBC), erbB-2 protein overexpression has been repeatedly correlated with poor prognosis. In more recent works, underexpression of this gene has been described in HBC. Moreover, it is also recognised that oncogenes that are commonly amplified or deleted encompass point mutations, and some of these are associated with HBC. In cat mammary lesions (CMLs), the overexpression of ERBB2 (27%-59.6%) has also been described, mostly at the protein level and although cat mammary neoplasias are considered to be a natural model of HBC, molecular information is still scarce. In the present work, a cat ERBB2 fragment, comprising exons 10 to 15 (ERBB2_10-15) was achieved for the first time. Allelic variants and genomic haplotype analyses were also performed, and differences between normal and CML populations were observed. Three amino acid changes, corresponding to 3 non-synonymous genomic sequence variants that were only detected in CMLs, were proposed to damage the 3D structure of the protein. We analysed the cat ERBB2 gene at the DNA (copy number determination), mRNA (expression levels assessment) and protein levels (in extra- and intra protein domains) in CML samples and correlated the last two evaluations with clinicopathological features. We found a positive correlation between the expression levels of the ERBB2 RNA and erbB-2 protein, corresponding to the intracellular region. Additionally, we detected a positive correlation between higher mRNA expression and better clinical outcome. Our results suggest that the ERBB2 gene is post-transcriptionally regulated and that proteins with truncations and single point mutations are present in cat mammary neoplastic lesions. We would like to emphasise that the recurrent occurrence of low erbB-2 expression levels in cat mammary tumours, suggests the cat mammary neoplasias as a valuable model for erbB-2 negative HBC.

  7. Preclinical efficacy of a RAF inhibitor that evades paradoxical MAPK pathway activation in protein kinase BRAF-mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Okimoto, Ross A; Lin, Luping; Olivas, Victor; Chan, Elton; Markegard, Evan; Rymar, Andrey; Neel, Dana; Chen, Xiao; Hemmati, Golzar; Bollag, Gideon; Bivona, Trever G

    2016-11-22

    Oncogenic activation of protein kinase BRAF drives tumor growth by promoting mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signaling. Because oncogenic mutations in BRAF occur in ∼2-7% of lung adenocarcinoma (LA), BRAF-mutant LA is the most frequent cause of BRAF-mutant cancer mortality worldwide. Whereas most tumor types harbor predominantly the BRAF(V600E)-mutant allele, the spectrum of BRAF mutations in LA includes BRAF(V600E) (∼60% of cases) and non-V600E mutant alleles (∼40% of cases) such as BRAF(G469A) and BRAF(G466V) The presence of BRAF(V600E) in LA has prompted clinical trials testing selective BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib in BRAF(V600E)-mutant patients. Despite promising clinical efficacy, both innate and acquired resistance often result from reactivation of MAPK pathway signaling, thus limiting durable responses to the current BRAF inhibitors. Further, the optimal therapeutic strategy to block non-V600E BRAF-mutant LA remains unclear. Here, we report the efficacy of the Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine protein kinase (RAF) inhibitor, PLX8394, that evades MAPK pathway reactivation in BRAF-mutant LA models. We show that PLX8394 treatment is effective in both BRAF(V600E) and certain non-V600 LA models, in vitro and in vivo. PLX8394 was effective against treatment-naive BRAF-mutant LAs and those with acquired vemurafenib resistance caused by an alternatively spliced, truncated BRAF(V600E) that promotes vemurafenib-insensitive MAPK pathway signaling. We further show that acquired PLX8394 resistance occurs via EGFR-mediated RAS-mTOR signaling and is prevented by upfront combination therapy with PLX8394 and either an EGFR or mTOR inhibitor. Our study provides a biological rationale and potential polytherapy strategy to aid the deployment of PLX8394 in lung cancer patients.

  8. Northwestern profiling of potential translation-regulatory proteins in human breast epithelial cells and malignant breast tissues: evidence for pathological activation of the IGF1R IRES.

    PubMed

    Blume, Scott W; Jackson, Nateka L; Frost, Andra R; Grizzle, William E; Shcherbakov, Oleg D; Choi, Hyoungsoo; Meng, Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and survival (those genes most important to cancer pathogenesis) are often specifically regulated at the translational level, through RNA-protein interactions involving the 5'-untranslated region of the mRNA. IGF1R is a proto-oncogene strongly implicated in human breast cancer, promoting survival and proliferation of tumor cells, as well as metastasis and chemoresistance. Our lab has focused on the molecular mechanisms regulating IGF1R expression at the translational level. We previously discovered an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within the 5'-untranslated region of the human IGF1R mRNA, and identified and functionally characterized two individual RNA-binding proteins, HuR and hnRNP C, which bind the IGF1R 5'-UTR and differentially regulate IRES activity. Here we have developed and implemented a high-resolution northwestern profiling strategy to characterize, as a group, the full spectrum of sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins potentially regulating IGF1R translational efficiency through interaction with the 5'-untranslated sequence. The putative IGF1R IRES trans-activating factors (ITAFs) are a heterogeneous group of RNA-binding proteins including hnRNPs originating in the nucleus as well as factors tightly associated with ribosomes in the cytoplasm. The IGF1R ITAFs can be categorized into three distinct groups: (a) high molecular weight external ITAFs, which likely modulate the overall conformation of the 5'-untranslated region of the IGF1R mRNA and thereby the accessibility of the core functional IRES; (b) low molecular weight external ITAFs, which may function as general chaperones to unwind the RNA, and (c) internal ITAFs which may directly facilitate or inhibit the fundamental process of ribosome recruitment to the IRES. We observe dramatic changes in the northwestern profile of non-malignant breast cells downregulating IGF1R expression in association with acinar differentiation in 3-D culture

  9. Unique presentation of cutis laxa with Leigh-like syndrome due to ECHS1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, S; Riley, L G; Bratkovic, D; Ketteridge, D; Manton, N; Cowley, M J; Gayevskiy, V; Roscioli, T; Mohamed, M; Gardeitchik, T; Morava, E; Christodoulou, J

    2017-04-13

    Clinical finding of cutis laxa, characterized by wrinkled, redundant, sagging, nonelastic skin, is of growing significance due to its occurrence in several different inborn errors of metabolism (IEM). Metabolic cutis laxa results from Menkes syndrome, caused by a defect in the ATPase copper transporting alpha (ATP7A) gene; congenital disorders of glycosylation due to mutations in subunit 7 of the component of oligomeric Golgi (COG7)-congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) complex; combined disorder of N- and O-linked glycosylation, due to mutations in ATPase H+ transporting V0 subunit a2 (ATP6VOA2) gene; pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 deficiency; pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase deficiency; macrocephaly, alopecia, cutis laxa, and scoliosis (MACS) syndrome, due to Ras and Rab interactor 2 (RIN2) mutations; transaldolase deficiency caused by mutations in the transaldolase 1 (TALDO1) gene; Gerodermia osteodysplastica due to mutations in the golgin, RAB6-interacting (GORAB or SCYL1BP1) gene; and mitogen-activated pathway (MAP) kinase defects, caused by mutations in several genes [protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor-type 11 (PTPN11), RAF, NF, HRas proto-oncogene, GTPase (HRAS), B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF), MEK1/2, KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (KRAS), SOS Ras/Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2 (SOS2), leucine rich repeat scaffold protein (SHOC2), NRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (NRAS), and Raf-1 proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (RAF1)], which regulate the Ras-MAPK cascade. Here, we further expand the list of inborn errors of metabolism associated with cutis laxa by describing the clinical presentation of a 17-month-old girl with Leigh-like syndrome due to enoyl coenzyme A hydratase, short chain, 1, mitochondria (ECHS1) deficiency, a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the second step of the beta-oxidation spiral of fatty acids and plays an important role in amino acid catabolism, particularly valine.

  10. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  11. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  12. Protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  13. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Email People Departments Calendar Careers Give my.harvard ... Nutrition Source Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health > The Nutrition Source > What Should I Eat? > Protein ...

  14. Oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Compans, R.W.; Cooper, M.; Koprowski, H.; McConell, I.; Melchers, F.; Nussenzweig, V.; Oldstone, M.; Olsnes, S.; Saedler, H.; Vogt, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Roles of drosophila proto-oncogenes and growth factor homologs during development of the fly; Interaction of oncogenes with differentiation programs; Genetics of src: structure and functional organization of a protein tyrosine kinase; Structures and activities of activated abl oncogenes; Eukaryotic RAS proteins and yeast proteins with which they interact. This book presents up-to-data review articles on oncogenes. The editor includes five contributions which critically evaluate recent research in the field.

  15. Protein kinase C modulates Aurora-kinase inhibition induced by CCT129202 in HMC-1⁵⁶⁰,⁸¹⁶ cell line.

    PubMed

    Tobío, Araceli; Alfonso, Amparo; Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Alonso, Eva; Botana, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    The human mast cell line HMC-1⁵⁶⁰,⁸¹⁶ carries activating mutations in the proto-oncogene of c-kit that cause autophosphorylation and permanent c-kit receptor activation. The compound CCT129202 is a new and selective inhibitor of Aurora kinase A and B that decreases the viability of a variety of human tumor cell lines. The effect of Aurora kinase inhibition was assessed in the HMC-1⁵⁶⁰,⁸¹⁶ line in order to find a suitable tool for mastocytosis treatment. CCT129202 treatment induces a significant decrease in cell viability in HMC-1⁵⁶⁰,⁸¹⁶ cells after 48 hours of treatment. Moreover, caspase-3 and caspase-8 activation was induced after incubation of HMC-1⁵⁶⁰,⁸¹⁶ cells in the presence of CCT129202. It has been demonstrated that Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a crucial role in mast cell activation as well as cell migration, adhesion and apoptotic cell death. Co-treatment of Ca²⁺-independent PKCs (δ ε and θ) inhibitor GF109203X with CCT129202, reduces caspase-3 activation which controls cell levels. In contrast, Go6976, an inhibitor of Ca²⁺-dependent PKCs, increases caspase-3 activation. Oppositely, GF109203X does not modify CCT129202-induced apoptosis through the caspase-8 pathway whereas Go6976 treatment abolishes the increase on caspase-8 activity due to CCT129202. This implies that Ca²⁺-independent PKC isoforms seems to be related with CCT129202-induced apoptosis through the caspase- 3 pathway, whereas Ca²⁺-dependent PKC isoforms are related with the CCT129202 effect on the caspase-8 pathway. Interestingly, CCT129202 cytotoxic effect remains even though Ca²⁺-dependent PKCs are inhibited, which shows that the Aurora kinase inhibitor effect is acting through the caspase-3 pathway. On the other hand, Ca²⁺-independent PKCs inhibition does not affect the final apoptotic CCT129202 effect because this seems to be mediated by the caspase-8 pathway. Moreover, CCT129202 does not affect PKCδ and Ca

  16. SMAD4--molecular gladiator of the TGF-beta signaling is trampled upon by mutational insufficiency in colorectal carcinoma of Kashmiri population: an analysis with relation to KRAS proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Sameer, A Syed; Chowdri, Nissar A; Syeed, Nidda; Banday, Mujeeb Z; Shah, Zaffar A; Siddiqi, Mushtaq A

    2010-06-17

    The development and progression of colorectal cancer has been extensively studied and the genes responsible have been well characterized. However the correlation between the SMAD4 gene mutations with KRAS mutant status has not been explored by many studies so far. Here, in this study we aimed to investigate the role of SMAD4 gene aberrations in the pathogenesis of CRC in Kashmir valley and to correlate it with various clinicopathological variables and KRAS mutant genotype. We examined the paired tumor and normal tissue specimens of 86 CRC patients for the occurrence of aberrations in MCR region of SMAD4 and exon 1 of KRAS by PCR-SSCP and/or PCR-Direct sequencing. The overall mutation rate of mutation cluster region (MCR) region of SMAD4 gene among 86 patients was 18.6% (16 of 86). 68.75% (11/16) of the SMAD4 gene mutants were found to have mutations in KRAS gene as well. The association between the KRAS mutant genotype with SMAD4 mutants was found to be significant (P = or < 0.05). Further more, we found a significant association of tumor location, tumor grade, node status, occupational exposure to pesticides and bleeding PR/Constipation with the mutation status of the SMAD4 gene (P = or < 0.05). Our study suggests that SMAD4 gene aberrations are the common event in CRC development but play a differential role in the progression of CRC in higher tumor grade (C+D) and its association with the KRAS mutant status suggest that these two molecules together are responsible for the progression of the tumor to higher/advanced stage.

  17. MET — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: The proto-oncogene MET product is the hepatocyte growth factor receptor and encodes tyrosine-kinase activity. The primary single chain precursor protein is post-translationally cleaved to produce the alpha and beta subunits, which are disulfide linked to form the mature receptor. Various mutations in the MET gene are associated with papillary renal carcinoma. Two transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008

  18. Human gene control by vital oncogenes: revisiting a theoretical model and its implications for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Willis, Rudolph E

    2012-01-01

    An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model predicted the

  19. Evi-2, a common integration site involved in murine myeloid leukemogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Buchberg, A M; Bedigian, H G; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G

    1990-01-01

    BXH-2 mice have the highest incidence of spontaneous retrovirally induced myeloid leukemia of any known inbred strain and, as such, represent a valuable model system for identifying cellular proto-oncogenes involved in myeloid disease. Chronic murine leukemia viruses often induce disease by insertional activation or mutation of cellular proto-oncogenes. These loci are identified as common viral integration sites in tumor DNAs. Here we report on the characterization of a novel common viral integration site in BXH-2 myeloid leukemias, designated Evi-2. Within the cluster of viral integration sites that define Evi-2, we identified a gene that has the potential for encoding a novel protein of 223 amino acids. This putative proto-oncogene possesses all of the structural features of a transmembrane protein. Within the transmembrane domain is a "leucine zipper," suggesting that Evi-2 is involved in either homopolymer or heteropolymer formation, which may play an important role in the normal functioning of Evi-2. Interestingly, the human homolog of Evi-2 has recently been shown to be tightly linked to the von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis locus, suggesting a role for Evi-2 in human disease as well. Images PMID:2167436

  20. Effects of SCH 59228, an orally bioavailable farnesyl protein transferase inhibitor, on the growth of oncogene-transformed fibroblasts and a human colon carcinoma xenograft in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Bryant, M S; Chen, J; Lee, S; Yaremko, B; Li, Z; Dell, J; Lipari, P; Malkowski, M; Prioli, N; Rossman, R R; Korfmacher, W A; Nomeir, A A; Lin, C C; Mallams, A K; Doll, R J; Catino, J J; Girijavallabhan, V M; Kirschmeier, P; Bishop, W R

    1999-01-01

    The products of the Ha-, Ki-, and N-ras proto-oncogenes comprise a family of 21 kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins which play a crucial role in growth factor signal transduction and in the control of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Activating mutations in the ras oncogenes occur in a wide variety of human tumors. Ras proteins undergo a series of posttranslational processing events. The first modification is addition of the 15-carbon isoprene, farnesyl, to a Cys residue near the carboxy-terminus of Ras. Prenylation allows the Ras oncoprotein to localize to the plasma membrane where it can initiate downstream signalling events leading to cellular transformation. Inhibitors of the enzyme which catalyzes this step, farnesyl protein transferase (FPT), are a potential class of novel anticancer drugs which interfere with Ras function. SCH 59228 is a tricyclic FPT inhibitor which inhibits the farnesylation of purified Ha-Ras with an IC50 of 95 nM and blocks the processing of Ha-Ras in Cos cells with an IC50 of 0.6 microM. SCH 59228 has favorable pharmacokinetic properties upon oral dosing in nude mice. The in vivo efficacy of SCH 59228 was evaluated using a panel of tumor models grown in nude mice. These included several rodent fibroblast lines expressing mutationally-activated (val12) forms of the Ha-Ras oncogene. In some cases, these proteins contain their native C-terminal sequence (CVLS) which directs farnesylation. In one model, the C-terminal sequence was altered to CVLL, making the expressed protein a substrate for a distinct prenyl transferase, geranylgeranyl protein transferase-1. When dosed orally at 10 and 50 mg/kg (four times a day, 7 days a week) SCH 59228 significantly inhibited tumor growth of cells expressing farnesylated Ha-Ras in a dose-dependent manner; over 90% growth inhibition was observed at the 50 mg/kg dose. Tumor growth of cells expressing the geranylgeranylated form of Ha-Ras was less potently inhibited. Growth of tumors derived

  1. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax induces expression of the Rel-related family of kappa B enhancer-binding proteins: evidence for a pretranslational component of regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Arima, N; Molitor, J A; Smith, M R; Kim, J H; Daitoku, Y; Greene, W C

    1991-01-01

    The Tax protein of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) serves as a potent transcriptional activator of its own long terminal repeat as well as select cellular genes, including interleukin-2 and the alpha subunit of the interleukin-2 receptor. Tax activation of these two growth-related genes appears to involve the induced nuclear expression of DNA-binding proteins that specifically engage related kappa B enhancer elements present in the 5' regulatory regions of these genes. In human T cells, kappa B enhancer-binding activity has been discerned as an unexpectedly large family of UV cross-linked nucleoprotein adducts, termed p50, p55, p75, and p85. The protein components of each of these DNA-protein adducts have been shown to share structural similarity with the v-rel oncogene product. The p55 adduct is composed of the 50-kDa subunit of NF-kappa B derived from a 105-kDa precursor polypeptide, while the p50 adduct contains a smaller protein that is closely related to NF-kappa B p50. The p75 adduct contains the 65-kDa subunit of NF-kappa B, while the p85 adduct is composed of the human c-rel proto-oncogene product. We now demonstrate that HTLV-I Tax, in the absence of other viral pX gene products, is capable of inducing the nuclear expression of all four of these kappa B-binding proteins in human T cells, with most marked effects involving c-Rel and NF-kappa B p65. Tax induction of the nuclear expression of c-Rel and NF-kappa B p50 is regulated, at least in part, at a pretranslational level involving increases in c-rel and NF-kappa B p105 mRNA expression. To study the pattern of expression of these kappa B-specific proteins in cells infected with the whole HTLV-I, seven cloned HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines were established from the peripheral blood of patients with adult T-cell leukemia. Of note, only three of these seven cell lines produced Tax, and c-rel mRNA and nuclear protein expression was confined to these three cell lines. In contrast, NF-kappa B p50

  2. Induction of transcription of {open_quotes}Immediate early genes{close_quotes} by low-dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, A.V.; Mohan, N.; Chandrasekar, B.; Meltz, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    The induction of transition of specific genes after exposure to ionizing radiation has previously been reported after lethal doses of radiation (2-50 Gy). Little attention has been focused on expression of {open_quotes}immediate early genes{close_quotes} after low doses of ionizing radiation, where cell viability remains high. This dose range (0.25-2.0 Gy) is above the diagnostic dose level but at or below the doses typical for a single exposure in fractionated radiotherapy treatment of cancer. In this study, it was observed that doses in the range of 0.25-2.0 Gy induced different amounts of the mRNAs of the proto-oncogenes c-fos, c-jun, c-myc and c-Ha-ras at a given dose and time in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human lymphoblastoid 244B cells. A maximum response was seen after a dose of 0.5 Gy for all but c-fos, which showed a maximum response after exposure to 0.25 Gy. Time-course studies demonstrated that the induction was transient, reaching a maximum at 1 h and declining to the constitutive level at 4 h after irradiation. Using second-messenger specific inhibitors, the signaling pathways involved in the induction of these proto-oncogenes was also investigated. The results showed that all four of the proto-oncogenes induced after 0.5 Gy shared a common pathway of tyrosine kinase activation. Other signaling pathways included protein kinase C, reactive oxygen intermediates and calcium-dependent kinases; these were found to be differentially involved in the induction of transcription of the individual proto-oncogenes. In summary, this study suggests that low-dose ionizing radiation (0.25-2.0 Gy) can modulate expression of immediate early genes. Secondly, the activation of immediate early genes after low-dose exposure involves multiple second-messenger signaling pathways. Third, the magnitude of involvement of the different signaling pathways after low-dose radiation is different for each proto-oncogene expressed. 43 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Novel Membrane-Associated Targets for Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    annotation, HCCRI is a putative proto-oncogene, fucosyltransferase 8 is thought to contribute to malignancy, "G protein-coupled receptor 126" contains a...Membrane 221675_s_at NM_020244 LOC56994 cholinephosphotransferase 1 protein 1.356 Membrane fucosyltransferase 8 (alpha protein (by 203988_s_at NM_004480...FUT8 (1,6) fucosyltransferase ) similarity). 1.206 MAD2 (mitotic arrest deficient, 203362 s at NM 002358 MAD2L1 yeast, homolog)-like 1 Nucleus 1.112 Table

  4. Ras trafficking, localization and compartmentalized signalling.

    PubMed

    Prior, Ian A; Hancock, John F

    2012-04-01

    Ras proteins are proto-oncogenes that are frequently mutated in human cancers. Three closely related isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are expressed in all cells and have overlapping but distinctive functions. Recent work has revealed how differences between the Ras isoforms in their trafficking, localization and protein-membrane orientation enable signalling specificity to be determined. We review the various strategies used to characterize compartmentalized Ras localization and signalling. Localization is an important contextual modifier of signalling networks and insights from the Ras system are of widespread relevance for researchers interested in signalling initiated from membranes.

  5. Isolation of a complementary DNA that encodes the mammalian splicing factor SC35.

    PubMed

    Fu, X D; Maniatis, T

    1992-04-24

    The mammalian splicing factor SC35 is required for the first step in the splicing reaction and for spliceosome assembly. The cloning and characterization of a complementary DNA encoding this protein revealed that it is a member of a family of splicing factors that includes mammalian SF2/ASF. This family of proteins is characterized by the presence of a ribonucleoprotein (RNP)-type RNA binding motif and a carboxyl-terminal serine-arginine-rich (SR) domain. A search of the DNA sequence database revealed that the thymus-specific exon (ET) of the c-myb proto-oncogene is encoded on the antisense strand of the SC35 gene.

  6. HIF and c-Myc: sibling rivals for control of cancer cell metabolism and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gordan, John D; Thompson, Craig B; Simon, M Celeste

    2007-08-01

    O(2) deprivation (hypoxia) and cellular proliferation engage opposite cellular pathways, yet often coexist during tumor growth. The ability of cells to grow during hypoxia results in part from crosstalk between hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) and the proto-oncogene c-Myc. Acting alone, HIF and c-Myc partially regulate complex adaptations undertaken by tumor cells growing in low O(2). However, acting in concert these transcription factors reprogram metabolism, protein synthesis, and cell cycle progression, to "fine tune" adaptive responses to hypoxic environments.

  7. Oncogenic and oncosuppressive signal transduction at mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Oparka, Monika; Duszynski, Jerzy; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Pinton, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The different mechanisms employed by proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors to regulate cell death pathways are strictly linked to their localization. In addition to the canonical control of apoptosis at a transcriptional/nuclear level, intracellular zones are emerging as pivotal sites for the activities of several proapoptotic and antiapoptotic factors. Here, we review the function of the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interface as a primary platform for decoding danger signals as well as a structural accommodation for several regulator or effector proteins. PMID:27308328

  8. Human Gene Control by Vital Oncogenes: Revisiting a Theoretical Model and Its Implications for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Rudolph E.

    2012-01-01

    An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model predicted the

  9. Comprehensive translational control of tyrosine kinase expression by upstream open reading frames

    PubMed Central

    Wethmar, K; Schulz, J; Muro, E M; Talyan, S; Andrade-Navarro, M A; Leutz, A

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control has emerged as a major regulatory event in gene expression and often occurs at the level of translation initiation. Although overexpression or constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs) through gene amplification, translocation or mutation are well-characterized oncogenic events, current knowledge about translational mechanisms of TK activation is scarce. Here, we report the presence of translational cis-regulatory upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the majority of transcript leader sequences of human TK mRNAs. Genetic ablation of uORF initiation codons in TK transcripts resulted in enhanced translation of the associated downstream main protein-coding sequences (CDSs) in all cases studied. Similarly, experimental removal of uORF start codons in additional non-TK proto-oncogenes, and naturally occurring loss-of-uORF alleles of the c-met proto-oncogene (MET) and the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), was associated with increased CDS translation. Based on genome-wide sequence analyses we identified polymorphisms in 15.9% of all human genes affecting uORF initiation codons, associated Kozak consensus sequences or uORF-related termination codons. Together, these data suggest a comprehensive role of uORF-mediated translational control and delineate how aberrant induction of proto-oncogenes through loss-of-function mutations at uORF initiation codons may be involved in the etiology of cancer. We provide a detailed map of uORFs across the human genome to stimulate future research on the pathogenic role of uORFs. PMID:26096937

  10. Comprehensive translational control of tyrosine kinase expression by upstream open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Wethmar, K; Schulz, J; Muro, E M; Talyan, S; Andrade-Navarro, M A; Leutz, A

    2016-03-31

    Post-transcriptional control has emerged as a major regulatory event in gene expression and often occurs at the level of translation initiation. Although overexpression or constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs) through gene amplification, translocation or mutation are well-characterized oncogenic events, current knowledge about translational mechanisms of TK activation is scarce. Here, we report the presence of translational cis-regulatory upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the majority of transcript leader sequences of human TK mRNAs. Genetic ablation of uORF initiation codons in TK transcripts resulted in enhanced translation of the associated downstream main protein-coding sequences (CDSs) in all cases studied. Similarly, experimental removal of uORF start codons in additional non-TK proto-oncogenes, and naturally occurring loss-of-uORF alleles of the c-met proto-oncogene (MET) and the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), was associated with increased CDS translation. Based on genome-wide sequence analyses we identified polymorphisms in 15.9% of all human genes affecting uORF initiation codons, associated Kozak consensus sequences or uORF-related termination codons. Together, these data suggest a comprehensive role of uORF-mediated translational control and delineate how aberrant induction of proto-oncogenes through loss-of-function mutations at uORF initiation codons may be involved in the etiology of cancer. We provide a detailed map of uORFs across the human genome to stimulate future research on the pathogenic role of uORFs.

  11. Early regulation of membrane excitability by ras oncogene proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Collin, C; Papageorge, A G; Sakakibara, M; Huddie, P L; Lowy, D R; Alkon, D L

    1990-01-01

    Two electrode voltage clamp conditions were used to study the early effects on ionic membrane channels of the intracellularly injected proto-oncogenic form of c-Ha-ras (c-ras) and its oncogenic counterpart v-Ha-ras (v-ras). These experiments were conducted on isolated somata of identified fully differentiated neurons of the sea snail Hermissenda. 20 min after c-ras, and 10 min after v-ras intracellular injections into type B medial photoreceptors of Hermissenda, the peak amplitude of two outward potassium currents (IA and IC), across the isolated Type B soma membrane begin to decrease. These two currents have been previously isolated by differences in activation and inactivation kinetics and their response to pharmacological blockers. c- or v-ras injections did not have any effect on a voltage-dependent inward calcium current. Reduction of IA preceded that of IC. Current reductions due to c-ras, but not to v-ras injection reversed spontaneously after 40 min. The voltage dependence of the steady state inactivation of IA shifted toward more negative potentials with ras injections. Ras-mediated cell transformations therefore, could involve, perhaps as initial events, prolonged modification of membrane currents. PMID:2207264

  12. Immunohistochemical expression of Bcl-2 in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Juneja, S; Chaitanya, N Babu; Agarwal, M

    2015-01-01

    The B cell lymphoma-2 gene is a proto-oncogene whose protein product inhibits apoptosis. Its role is associated with keeping cells alive, but not by stimulating them to proliferation, as other proto-oncogenes do. Increased expression of protein product of Bcl-2 gene appears in the early phase of carcinogenesis leading to apoptosis impairment and in consequence to the progression of neoplastic changes. To evaluate and compare the expression of Bcl-2 protein in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Sixty cases of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival specimens comprising of 30 cases of leukoplakia with oral epithelial dysplasia and 30 cases of OSCC were taken for immunohistochemical analysis using monoclonal antibody against anti-human Bcl-2 oncoprotein. Immunostaining for Bcl-2 protein was identified in basal and parabasal layers as granular cytoplasmic staining in oral epithelial dysplasia. In OSCC, Bcl-2 immunoreactivity was most prominent in the peripheral cells of the infiltrating tumor islands which diminished toward the center in well-differentiated and moderately differentiated OSCC, whereas stronger and more diffuse expression of Bcl-2 oncoprotein was seen in poorly differentiated OSCC. Overall positivity of 26.7% (8/30) was observed in oral epithelial dysplasia and 30% (9/30) in OSCC in this study. Altered expression of Bcl-2 oncoprotein may be an early molecular event which leads to prolonged cell survival, increased chances of accumulation of genetic alterations, and subsequent increase in malignant transformation potential.

  13. Identification of a provirally activated c-Ha-ras oncogene in an avian nephroblastoma via a novel procedure: cDNA cloning of a chimaeric viral-host transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Westaway, D; Papkoff, J; Moscovici, C; Varmus, H E

    1986-01-01

    Retrovirus without oncogenes often exert their neoplastic potential as insertional mutagens of cellular proto-oncogenes. This may be associated with the production of chimaeric viral-host transcripts; in these cases; activated cellular genes can be identified by obtaining cDNA clones of bipartite RNAs. This approach was used in the analysis of chicken nephroblastomas induced by myeloblastosis-associated virus (MAV). One tumor contained a novel mRNA species initiated within a MAV LTR. cDNA cloning revealed that this mRNA encodes a protein of 189 amino acids, identical to that of normal human Ha-ras-1 at 185 positions, including positions implicated in oncogenic activation of ras proto-oncogenes; there are no differences between the coding sequences of presumably normal Ha-ras cDNA clones from chicken lymphoma RNA and the tumor-derived cDNAs. The chimaeric mRNA in the nephroblastoma is at least 25-fold more abundant than c-Ha-ras mRNA in normal kidney tissue, and a 21-kd ras-related protein is present in relatively large amounts in the tumor. We conclude that a quantitative change in c-Ha-ras gene expression results from an upstream insertion mutation and presumably contributes to tumorigenesis in this single case. Little or no increase in c-Ha-ras RNA or protein was observed in other nephroblastomas. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 10. PMID:3011401

  14. Binding site identification and role of permanent water molecule of PIM-3 kinase: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Gul, Sana; Usmani, Saman; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-11-01

    The kinome is a protein kinase complement of the human genome, categorized as serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. These kinases catalyze phosphorylation reaction by using ATP as phosphoryl donor. Proviral Integration Site for Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (PIM) kinase encodes serine/threonine protein kinases that recognized as proto-oncogene, responsible for rapid growth of cancerous cells. It is implicated in cell survival and function via cell cycle progression and its metabolism. PIM-3, sub-member of PIM kinases is a proto-oncogene, its overexpression inhibits apoptosis, and results in progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. PIM-3 is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop its specific inhibitors is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure by any experimental technique. In silico techniques generally facilitate scientist to explore hidden structural features in order to improve drug discovery. In the present study, homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation techniques were utilized to explore the structure and dynamics of PIM-3 kinase. Induction of water molecules during molecular docking simulation explored differences in the hinge region between PIM-1 and PIM-3 kinases that may be responsible for specificity. Furthermore, role of water molecules in the active site was also explored via radial distribution function (RDF) after a 10 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Generated RDF plots exhibited the importance of water for inhibitor binding through their bridging capability that links the ligand with binding site residues.

  15. Accumulation of diacylglycerol in the liver membrane of the Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat with hepatitis: FT-IR spectroscopic and HPLC detection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S; Kazusaka, A; Fujita, S

    2000-04-03

    Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats develop severe hepatitis and subsequent hepatoma with excess accumulation of copper in the liver with increasing age. Lipids extracted from the LEC rat liver membrane were studied using FT-IR spectroscopy and an HPLC technique at the stages of pre-hepatitis and hepatitis, i.e. at 10 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. The 10-week-old rats exhibited an IR spectrum characteristic of a phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine mixture with a ratio of 2:1. The 16-week-old rats developed new absorption bands at 1161 and 1070 cm(-1), which were assigned to the spectra of triglyceride, neutral lipid, and diacylglycerol, an endogenous activator of protein kinase C, respectively. The diacylglycerol was estimated to amount to ca. 10% (w/w) of phospholipid extract by comparing the spectrum with those of model compounds. This was confirmed using an HPLC assay. Previously, we found that a serum response factor is activated by copper in the LEC rat liver, and suggested that it must mediate proto-oncogene c-fos induction. The results obtained here suggest that accumulation of diacylglycerol plays an important role in development of hepatoma in LEC rats by mediating proto-oncogene c-fos induction.

  16. Gender Differences in Response to Prolonged Every-Other-Day Feeding on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Tarnowski, Maciej; Zgutka, Katarzyna; Pawlik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent fasting decreases glucose and insulin levels and increases insulin sensitivity and lifespan. Decreased food intake influences the liver. Previous studies have shown gender differences in response to various types of caloric restriction, including every-other-day (EOD) feeding, in humans and rodents. Our goal was to show the influence of prolonged EOD feeding on the morphology, proliferation and apoptosis of livers from male and female mice. After nine months of an EOD diet, the livers from male and female mice were collected. We examined their morphology on histological slides using the Hematoxilin and Eosine (H_E) method and Hoechst staining of cell nuclei to evaluate the nuclear area of hepatocytes. We also evaluated the expression of mRNA for proto-oncogens, pro-survival proteins and apoptotic markers using Real Time Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR). We noted increased lipid content in the livers of EOD fed female mice. EOD feeding lead to a decrease of proliferation and apoptosis in the livers of female and male mice, which suggest that tissue maintenance occurred during EOD feeding. Our experiment revealed sex-specific expression of mRNA for proto-oncogenes and pro-survival and pro-apoptotic genes in mice as well as sex-specific responses to the EOD treatment. PMID:27007393

  17. Direct regulation of GAS6/AXL signaling by HIF promotes renal metastasis through SRC and MET

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Erinn B.; Fuh, Katherine C.; Castellini, Laura; Viswanathan, Kartik; Finger, Elizabeth C.; Diep, Anh N.; LaGory, Edward L.; Kariolis, Mihalis S.; Chan, Andy; Lindgren, David; Axelson, Håkan; Miao, Yu R.; Krieg, Adam J.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the von Hippel–Lindau/hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) signaling pathway promotes clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) progression and metastasis. The protein kinase GAS6/AXL signaling pathway has recently been implicated as an essential mediator of metastasis and receptor tyrosine kinase crosstalk in cancer. Here we establish a molecular link between HIF stabilization and induction of AXL receptor expression in metastatic ccRCC. We found that HIF-1 and HIF-2 directly activate the expression of AXL by binding to the hypoxia-response element in the AXL proximal promoter. Importantly, genetic and therapeutic inactivation of AXL signaling in metastatic ccRCC cells reversed the invasive and metastatic phenotype in vivo. Furthermore, we define a pathway by which GAS6/AXL signaling uses lateral activation of the met proto-oncogene (MET) through SRC proto-oncogene nonreceptor tyrosine kinase to maximize cellular invasion. Clinically, AXL expression in primary tumors of ccRCC patients correlates with aggressive tumor behavior and patient lethality. These findings provide an alternative model for SRC and MET activation by growth arrest-specific 6 in ccRCC and identify AXL as a therapeutic target driving the aggressive phenotype in renal clear cell carcinoma. PMID:25187556

  18. HTLV-I Tax-Mediated Inactivation of Cell Cycle Checkpoints and DNA Repair Pathways Contribute to Cellular Transformation: “A Random Mutagenesis Model”

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    To achieve cellular transformation, most oncogenic retroviruses use transduction by proto-oncogene capture or insertional mutagenesis, whereby provirus integration disrupts expression of tumor suppressors or proto-oncogenes. In contrast, the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) has been classified in a separate class referred to as “transactivating retroviruses”. Current views suggest that the viral encoded Tax protein transactivates expression of cellular genes leading to deregulated growth and transformation. However, if Tax-mediated transactivation was indeed sufficient for cellular transformation, a fairly high frequency of infected cells would eventually become transformed. In contrast, the frequency of transformation by HTLV-I is very low, likely less than 5%. This review will discuss the current understanding and recent discoveries highlighting critical functions of Tax in cellular transformation. HTLV-I Tax carries out essential functions in order to override cell cycle checkpoints and deregulate cellular division. In addition, Tax expression is associated with increased DNA damage and genome instability. Since Tax can inhibit multiple DNA repair pathways and stimulate unfaithful DNA repair or bypass checkpoints, these processes allow accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome. Given this, a “Random Mutagenesis” transformation model seems more suitable to characterize the oncogenic activities of HTLV-I. PMID:26835512

  19. [Neuronal differentiation of human small cell lung cancer cell line PC-6 by Solcoseryl].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T

    1997-11-01

    Solcoseryl is composed of extracts from calf blood, and is a drug known to activate tissue respiration. In the present study, I demonstrated the cell biological effects of Solcoseryl on a human small cell lung cancer cell line, PC-6, by analyzing cell morphology, cell growth, expression of neuronal differentiation markers, and the ras proto-oncogene product(ras p21). Exposure of PC-6 cells to Solcoseryl at the concentration of 200 microliters/ml induced (1) cell morphological changes, including neurodendrite-like projections from the cell surface, and (2) complete inhibition of cell growth, that was shown by the loss of Ki-67 expression. Solcoseryl also induced the expression of neurofilament protein and acetylcholinesterase, both of which are markers of neuronal differentiation. Moreover, it upregulated the expression of the ras proto-oncogene product, ras p21. Taken together, these data suggest that Solcoseryl is composed of component(s) which can induce neuronal differentiation of the human small cell lung cancer cell line, PC-6.

  20. Bioactive peptide design using the Resonant Recognition Model.

    PubMed

    Cosic, Irena; Pirogova, Elena

    2007-07-19

    of oncogene and proto-oncogene proteins. The results obtained have shown that the RRM is capable of identifying the differences between the oncogenic and proto-oncogenic proteins with the possibility of identifying the "cancer-causing" features within their protein primary structure. In addition, the rational design of bioactive peptide analogues displaying oncogenic or proto-oncogenic-like activity is presented here.

  1. Giant hub Src and Syk tyrosine kinase thermodynamic profiles recapitulate evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Thermodynamic scaling theory, previously applied mainly to small proteins, here analyzes quantitative evolution of the titled functional network giant hub enzymes. The broad domain structure identified homologically is confirmed hydropathically using amino acid sequences only. The most surprising results concern the evolution of the tyrosine kinase globular surface roughness from avians to mammals, which is first order, compared to the evolution within mammals from rodents to humans, which is second order. The mystery of the unique amide terminal region of proto oncogene tyrosine protein kinase is resolved by the discovery there of a rare hydroneutral septad targeting cluster, which is paralleled by an equally rare octad catalytic cluster in tyrosine kinase in humans and a few other species (cat and dog). These results, which go far towards explaining why these proteins are among the largest giant hubs in protein interaction networks, use no adjustable parameters.

  2. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    PubMed

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis.

  3. Viral immunoreceptor-associated tyrosine-based activation motifs: potential players in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grande, Shannon M; Ross, Susan R; Monroe, John G

    2006-04-01

    Cancer is thought to arise as a consequence of multiple insults to a cell. Mutations that lead to increased expression or activity of proto-oncogenes or decreased expression of tumor suppressors are common insults that have been identified to date. However, when considering tumor viruses, viral proteins that modify cellular gene expression, alter host immune surveillance, or affect signaling pathways are also common players. Notably, several of these tumor viruses encode proteins containing an immunoreceptor-associated tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), a signaling motif recently implicated in epithelial cell oncogenesis. As expression of proteins bearing this motif is normally restricted to hematopoietic cells, recent work highlighting the consequences of ITAM expression in epithelial cells suggests it may play a role in solid tumor formation.

  4. [Systemic treatment of melanoma brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Mateus, C; Mortier, L; Dhermain, F; Guillot, B; Grob, J-J; Lebbe, C; Thomas, M; Jouary, T; Leccia, M-T; Robert, C

    2015-02-01

    Melanomas have a high rate of brain metastases. Both the functional prognosis and the overall survival are poor in these patients. Until now, surgery and radiotherapy represented the two main modalities of treatment. Nevertheless, due to the improvement in the management of the extracerebral melanoma, the systemic treatment may be an option in patients with brain metastases. Immunotherapy with anti-CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4) - ipilimumab - or BRAF (serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf) inhibitors - vemurafenib, dabrafenib - has shown efficacy in the management of brain metastases in a- or pauci-symptomatic patients. Studies are ongoing with anti-PD1 (programmed cell death 1) and combinations of targeted therapies associating anti-RAF (raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase) and anti-MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase).

  5. Splicing factor SRSF6 promotes hyperplasia of sensitized skin

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mads A.; Wilkinson, John E.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many biological processes involve gene-expression regulation by alternative splicing. Here, we identify the splicing factor SRSF6 as a regulator of wound healing and tissue homeostasis in skin. We show that SRSF6 is a proto-oncogene that is frequently overexpressed in human skin cancer. Overexpressing it in transgenic mice induces hyperplasia of sensitized skin and promotes aberrant alternative splicing. We identify 139 target genes of SRSF6 in skin, and show that this SR protein binds to alternative exons of the extracellular-matrix protein tenascin C pre-mRNA, promoting the expression of isoforms characteristic of invasive and metastatic cancer in a cell-type-independent manner. SRSF6 overexpression additionally results in depletion of Lgr6+ stem cells, and excessive keratinocyte proliferation and response to injury. Furthermore, the effects of SRSF6 in wound healing assayed in vitro depend on the TNC isoforms. Thus, abnormal SR-protein expression can perturb tissue homeostasis. PMID:24440982

  6. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  7. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  8. Can clues to the molecular defects in chronic myelogenous leukemia come from genetic studies on the Abelson tyrosine kinase in fruit flies?

    PubMed

    Comer, A R; Liebl, E C; Hoffmann, F M

    1995-06-01

    Translocations affecting the structure of the c-abl proto-oncogene are involved in the development or progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Leukemic cells from patients with CML show alterations in adhesive properties that may play a part in the pathology of these diseases. Mutations in the Drosophila Abl homolog are lethal and indicate that Abl may mediate processes involving differential cell adhesion. These observations suggest that Abl may regulate similar adhesive processes in human beings and Drosophila. Genetic analysis of Abl function in Drosophila has identified novel proteins that function in Abl-related processes. Analysis of the functions of these new molecules may provide insight into mechanisms by which oncogenic abl proteins participate in the etiology of CML and ALL.

  9. Genetic analysis of a Drosophila neural cell adhesion molecule: interaction of fasciclin I and Abelson tyrosine kinase mutations.

    PubMed

    Elkins, T; Zinn, K; McAllister, L; Hoffmann, F M; Goodman, C S

    1990-02-23

    Drosophila fasciclin I is a homophilic cell adhesion molecule expressed in the developing embryo on the surface of a subset of fasciculating CNS axons, all PNS axons, and some nonneuronal cells. We have identified protein-null mutations in the fasciclin I (fas I) gene, and show that these mutants are viable and do not display gross defects in nervous system morphogenesis. The Drosophila Abelson (abl) proto-oncogene homolog encodes a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is expressed during embryogenesis primarily in developing CNS axons; abl mutants show no gross defects in CNS morphogenesis. However, embryos doubly mutant for fas I and abl display major defects in CNS axon pathways, particularly in the commissural tracts where expression of these two proteins normally overlaps. The double mutant shows a clear defect in growth cone guidance; for example, the RP1 growth cone (normally fas I positive) does not follow its normal path across the commissure.

  10. Characteristics of the mouse genomic histamine H1 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Isao; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kitamura, Daisuke

    1996-08-15

    We report here the molecular cloning of a mouse histamine H1 receptor gene. The protein deduced from the nucleotide sequence is composed of 488 amino acid residues with characteristic properties of GTP binding protein-coupled receptors. Our results suggest that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene is a single locus, and no related sequences were detected. Interspecific backcross analysis indicated that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene (Hrh1) is located in the central region of mouse Chromosome 6 linked to microphthalmia (Mitfmi), ras-related fibrosarcoma oncogene 1 (Raf1), and ret proto-oncogene (Ret) in a region of homology with human chromosome 3p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  11. AMBRA1 links autophagy to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by promoting c-Myc dephosphorylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Cianfanelli, Valentina; Fuoco, Claudia; Lorente, Mar; Salazar, Maria; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Gherardini, Pier Federico; De Zio, Daniela; Nazio, Francesca; Antonioli, Manuela; D'Orazio, Melania; Skobo, Tatjana; Bordi, Matteo; Rohde, Mikkel; Dalla Valle, Luisa; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Gretzmeier, Christine; Dengjel, Joern; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina; Velasco, Guillermo; Cecconi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of a main regulator of cell metabolism, the protein kinase mTOR, induces autophagy and inhibits cell proliferation. However, the molecular pathways involved in the cross-talk between these two mTOR-dependent cell processes are largely unknown. Here we show that the scaffold protein AMBRA1, a member of the autophagy signalling network and a downstream target of mTOR, regulates cell proliferation by facilitating the dephosphorylation and degradation of the proto-oncogene c-Myc. We found that AMBRA1 favours the interaction between c-Myc and its phosphatase PP2A and that, when mTOR is inhibited, it enhances PP2A activity on this specific target, thereby reducing the cell division rate. As expected, such a de-regulation of c-Myc correlates with increased tumorigenesis in AMBRA1-defective systems, thus supporting a role for AMBRA1 as a haploinsufficient tumour suppressor gene.

  12. AMBRA1 links autophagy to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by promoting c-MYC dephosphorylation and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Cianfanelli, Valentina; Fuoco, Claudia; Lorente, Mar; Salazar, Maria; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Gherardini, Pier Federico; De Zio, Daniela; Nazio, Francesca; Antonioli, Manuela; D’Orazio, Melania; Skobo, Tatjana; Bordi, Matteo; Rohde, Mikkel; Dalla Valle, Luisa; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Gretzmeier, Christine; Dengjel, Joern; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina; Velasco, Guillermo; Cecconi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of a main regulator of cell metabolism, the protein kinase mTOR, induces autophagy and inhibits cell proliferation. However, the molecular pathways involved in the cross-talk between these two mTOR-dependent cell processes are largely unknown. Here we show that the scaffold protein AMBRA1, a member of the autophagy signalling network and a downstream target of mTOR, regulates cell proliferation by facilitating the dephosphorylation and degradation of the proto-oncogene C-MYC. We found that AMBRA1 favors the interaction between C-MYC and its phosphatase PP2A and that, when mTOR is inhibited, it enhances PP2A activity on this specific target, thereby reducing the cell division rate. As expected, such a de-regulation of C-MYC correlates with increased tumorigenesis in AMBRA1-defective systems, thus supporting a role for AMBRA1 as a haploinsufficient tumour suppressor gene. PMID:25438055

  13. Functional divergence of duplicated c-myc genes in a tetraploid fish, the common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Futami, Kunihiko; Zhang, Huan; Okamoto, Nobuaki

    2005-12-19

    The proto-oncogene c-myc is thought to be one of the most important genes in controlling cell proliferation. In a tetraploid fish, two c-myc genes (CAM1 and CAM2) were previously isolated from the common carp, Cyprinus carpio, and were shown to have different expression patterns in adult tissues. Here we found that CAM1 and CAM2 proteins had distinct properties in terms of their transcription regulation system, formation of the transcription activator complex Myc/Max, and transcriptional activation of the target gene. These results showed that the two carp c-Myc proteins have overlapping but distinct functions, suggesting that CAM1 and CAM2 are evolving to acquire different functions after an earlier tetraploidization event.

  14. NDR proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alan M

    2010-01-01

    N-myc downregulated (NDR) genes were discovered more than fifteen years ago. Indirect evidence support a role in tumor progression and cellular differentiation, but their biochemical function is still unknown. Our detailed analyses on Arabidopsis NDR proteins (deisgnated NDR-like, NDL) show their involvement in altering auxin transport, local auxin gradients and expression level of auxin transport proteins. Animal NDL proteins may be involved in membrane recycling of E-cadherin and effector for the small GTPase. In light of these findings, we hypothesize that NDL proteins regulate vesicular trafficking of auxin transport facilitator PIN proteins by biochemically alterating the local lipid environment of PIN proteins. PMID:20724844

  15. p53, erbB-2 and K-ras gene alterations are rare in spontaneous and plutonium-239-induced canine lung neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, L.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1996-02-01

    Inhalation of high-linear energy transfer radiation in the form of radon progeny is a suspected cause of human lung cancer. To gain insight into the types of genetic derangements caused by this type of radiation, lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} and those arising in animals with no known carcinogen exposure were examined for evidence of aberrations in genes known to be altered in lung tumors. Altered expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene and proto-oncogene erbB-2 proteins (p185{sup erbB2}) was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of 117 tumors representing different histological types in exposed (n = 80) and unexposed (n = 37) animals. Twenty-eight tumors were analyzed for K-ras proto-oncogene mutations by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Fourteen percent (16/116) of all lung neoplasms showed elevated nuclear accumulation of p53 protein. Regardless of exposure history, adenosquamous and squamous cell cancers comprised 94% of all tumors with p53 abnormalities. Eighteen percent (21/117) of all tumors had evidence of erbB-2 protein overexpression. K-ras mutations were not detected in codons 12, 13 or 61 of tumors from unexposed (n = 9) or plutonium-exposed dogs (n = 19). These data indicate that p53 and K-ras gene abnormalities as a result of missense mutation are infrequent events in spontaneous and {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}-induced lung neoplasia in this colony of beagle dogs. Alternative mechanisms of gene alteration may be involved in canine pulmonary carcinogenesis. 45 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. PLK1 is a binding partner and a negative regulator of FOXO3 tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, Octavian; Stancu, Andreea Lucia; Muraru, Maria Sinziana; Melet, Armelle; Petrescu, Stefana Maria; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2015-01-01

    FOXO family members (FOXOs: FOXO1, FOXO3, FOXO4 and FOXO6) are important transcription factors and tumor suppressors controlling cell homeostasis and cell fate. They are characterized by an extraordinary functional diversity, being involved in regulation of cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, oxidative detoxification, cell differentiation and stem cell maintenance, cell metabolism, angiogenesis, cardiac and other organ’s development, aging, and other critical cellular processes. FOXOs are tightly regulated by reversible phosphorylation, ubiquitination, acetylation and methylation. Interestingly, the known kinases phosphorylate only a small percentage of the known or predicted FOXOs phosphorylation sites, suggesting that additional kinases that phosphorylate and control FOXOs activity exist. In order to identify novel regulators of FOXO3, we have employed a proteomics screening strategy. Using HeLa cancer cell line and a Tandem Affinity Purification followed by Mass Spectrometry analysis, we identified several proteins as binding partners of FOXO3. Noteworthy, Polo Like Kinase 1 (PLK1) proto-oncogene was one of the identified FOXO3 binding partners. PLK1 plays a critical role during cell cycle (G2-M transition and all phases of mitosis) and in maintenance of genomic stability. Our experimental results presented in this manuscript demonstrate that FOXO3 and PLK1 exist in a molecular complex through most of the phases of the cell cycle, with a higher occurrence in the G2-M cell cycle phases. PLK1 induces translocation of FOXO3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and suppresses FOXO3 activity, measured by the decrease in the pro-apoptotic Bim protein levels and in the cell cycle inhibitor protein p27. Furthermore, PLK1 can directly phosphorylate FOXO3 in an in vitro kinase assay. These results present the discovery of PLK1 proto-oncogene as a binding partner and a negative regulator of FOXO3 tumor suppressor. PMID:26280018

  17. PLK1 is a binding partner and a negative regulator of FOXO3 tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Octavian; Stancu, Andreea Lucia; Muraru, Maria Sinziana; Melet, Armelle; Petrescu, Stefana Maria; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2014-01-01

    FOXO family members (FOXOs: FOXO1, FOXO3, FOXO4 and FOXO6) are important transcription factors and tumor suppressors controlling cell homeostasis and cell fate. They are characterized by an extraordinary functional diversity, being involved in regulation of cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, oxidative detoxification, cell differentiation and stem cell maintenance, cell metabolism, angiogenesis, cardiac and other organ's development, aging, and other critical cellular processes. FOXOs are tightly regulated by reversible phosphorylation, ubiquitination, acetylation and methylation. Interestingly, the known kinases phosphorylate only a small percentage of the known or predicted FOXOs phosphorylation sites, suggesting that additional kinases that phosphorylate and control FOXOs activity exist. In order to identify novel regulators of FOXO3, we have employed a proteomics screening strategy. Using HeLa cancer cell line and a Tandem Affinity Purification followed by Mass Spectrometry analysis, we identified several proteins as binding partners of FOXO3. Noteworthy, Polo Like Kinase 1 (PLK1) proto-oncogene was one of the identified FOXO3 binding partners. PLK1 plays a critical role during cell cycle (G2-M transition and all phases of mitosis) and in maintenance of genomic stability. Our experimental results presented in this manuscript demonstrate that FOXO3 and PLK1 exist in a molecular complex through most of the phases of the cell cycle, with a higher occurrence in the G2-M cell cycle phases. PLK1 induces translocation of FOXO3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and suppresses FOXO3 activity, measured by the decrease in the pro-apoptotic Bim protein levels and in the cell cycle inhibitor protein p27. Furthermore, PLK1 can directly phosphorylate FOXO3 in an in vitro kinase assay. These results present the discovery of PLK1 proto-oncogene as a binding partner and a negative regulator of FOXO3 tumor suppressor.

  18. Pituitary tumor-transforming gene and its binding factor in endocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Vicki E; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2010-12-03

    The pituitary tumor-transforming gene (PTTG1) encodes a multifunctional protein (PTTG) that is overexpressed in numerous tumours, including pituitary, thyroid, breast and ovarian carcinomas. PTTG induces cellular transformation in vitro and tumourigenesis in vivo, and several mechanisms by which PTTG contributes to tumourigenesis have been investigated. Also known as the human securin, PTTG is involved in cell cycle regulation, controlling the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis. This review outlines current information regarding PTTG structure, expression, regulation and function in the pathogenesis of neoplasia. Recent progress concerning the use of PTTG as a prognostic marker or therapeutic target will be considered. In addition, the PTTG binding factor (PBF), identified through its interaction with PTTG, has also been established as a proto-oncogene that is upregulated in several cancers. Current knowledge regarding PBF is outlined and its role both independently and alongside PTTG in endocrine and related cancers is discussed.

  19. Bilateral peripheral facial palsy and mastoid infiltration as symptoms of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Leite da Silveira, P; Gonçalves Silva, V; Rizzato Paschoal, J; Nizam Pfeilsticker, L

    2015-02-01

    Although Bell's palsy (BP) is the most common cause of peripheral facial palsy (PFP), other etiologies merit investigation. A 60-year-old female patient presented with recurrent bilateral PFP. Although the patient had a history of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), she had initially been diagnosed with BP-related PFP and had been treated accordingly. When the PFP recurred, additional diagnostic tests were performed. The resulting immunohistochemical profile included CD3 positivity in a few reactive T lymphocytes; positivity for myeloperoxidase in atypical cells; and focal positivity for CD34 and proto-oncogene c-kit proteins in neoplastic cells, thus confirming the suspicion of mastoid infiltration caused by relapsed AML. In patients with neoplastic disease, a finding of PFP calls for extensive investigation in order to rule out the involvement of the temporal bone. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. PLAG1 expression is maintained in recurrent pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    de Brito, Beatriz Samara; Gaspar, Natália Giovanelli; Egal, Erika Said Abu; Sanchez-Romero, Celeste; Martins, Antonio Santos; Tincani, Álfio José; de Oliveira Gondak, Rogério; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Altemani, Albina; Mariano, Fernanda Viviane

    2016-10-01

    The proto-oncogene (pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1)) is immunohistochemically overexpressed in pleomorphic adenoma (PA). Its expression in recurrent pleomorphic adenoma (RPA), however, has not been investigated. Since complex mechanisms are involved in tumor recurrence, the aim of this study was to investigate whether PLAG1 overexpression occurs in RPA. We studied PLAG1 protein expression in 40 PAs and 36 RPAs by immunohistochemistry. Cases with immunopositive cells were classified into two categories, between 10 and 50 % and >50 %. In both groups, PLAG1 expression was observed in both epithelial and myoepithelial cells. Of PAs, 37 cases (93 %) were positive, while this was the case in 34 RPA cases (94 %). Our findings suggest that in addition to morphological similarity, PA and RPA express PLAG1, which might play a role in tumor recurrence. Furthermore, as for PA, expression of PLAG1 can be considered a valuable diagnostic marker for RPA.

  1. Molecular screening strategies for NF1-like syndromes with café-au-lait macules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Li, Ming; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) are usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), one of the most common hereditary disorders. However, a group of genetic disorders presenting with CALM have mutations that are involved in human skin pigmentation regulation signaling pathways, including KIT ligand/KIT proto-oncogene receptor tyrosine kinase and Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase. These disorders, which include Legius syndrome, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines or LEOPARD syndrome, and familial progressive hyperpigmentation) are difficult to distinguish from NF1 at early stages, using skin appearance alone. Furthermore, certain syndromes are clinically overlapping and molecular testing is a vital diagnostic method. The present review aims to provide an overview of these ‘NF1-like’ inherited diseases and recommend a cost-effective strategy for making a clear diagnosis among these diseases with an ambiguous borderline. PMID:27666661

  2. Prolonged expression of the c-kit receptor in germ cells of intersex fetal testes.

    PubMed

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Jørgensen, N; Müller, J; Skakkebaek, N E

    1996-02-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and its receptor Kit encoded by the c-kit proto-oncogene are crucial for the development and migration of primordial germ cells in rodents. The expression of Kit has been examined immunohistochemically in gonads obtained from five specimens of fetal tissues with intersex conditions which included 45,X/46,XY mosaicism; androgen insensitivity syndrome; and 46,XY/iso(p)Y mosaicism. Individuals with such disorders of sexual differentiation and Y-chromosome material carry a very high risk of developing testicular neoplasms. Fetal testicular germ cells of the intersex subjects expressed Kit at a later developmental age than controls, in which no Kit protein was detectable beyond the 15th week of gestation. This finding may indicate a disturbance of the chronology of germ cell development, or it may suggest a change of the regulation of c-kit expression in subjects with disorders of gonadal development.

  3. Therapeutic Approaches Targeting MYC-Driven Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Richard J.; Pearson, Richard B.; Hannan, Ross D.; Furic, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The transcript encoding the proto-oncogene MYC is commonly overexpressed in prostate cancer (PC). MYC protein abundance is also increased in the majority of cases of advanced and metastatic castrate-resistant PC (mCRPC). Accordingly, the MYC-directed transcriptional program directly contributes to PC by upregulating the expression of a number of pro-tumorigenic factors involved in cell growth and proliferation. A key cellular process downstream of MYC activity is the regulation of ribosome biogenesis which sustains tumor growth. MYC activity also cooperates with the dysregulation of the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway to promote PC cell survival. Recent advances in the understanding of these interactions through the use of animal models have provided significant insight into the therapeutic efficacy of targeting MYC activity by interfering with its transcriptional program, and indirectly by targeting downstream cellular events linked to MYC transformation potential. PMID:28212321

  4. HGF — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: Hepatocyte growth factor regulates cell growth, cell motility, and morphogenesis by activating a tyrosine kinase signaling cascade after binding to the proto-oncogenic c-Met receptor. Hepatocyte growth factor is secreted by mesenchymal cells and acts as a multi-functional cytokine on cells of mainly epithelial origin. Its ability to stimulate mitogenesis, cell motility, and matrix invasion gives it a central role in angiogenesis, tumorogenesis, and tissue regeneration. It is secreted as a single inactive polypeptide and is cleaved by serine proteases into a 69-kDa alpha-chain and 34-kDa beta-chain. A disulfide bond between the alpha and beta chains produces the active, heterodimeric molecule. The protein belongs to the plasminogen subfamily of S1 peptidases but has no detectable protease activity. Alternative splicing of this gene produces multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008

  5. Enhanced endotoxin sensitivity in fps/fes-null mice with minimal defects in hematopoietic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zirngibl, Ralph A; Senis, Yotis; Greer, Peter A

    2002-04-01

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase implicated in growth factor and cytokine receptor signaling and thought to be essential for the survival and terminal differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Fps/Fes-null mice were healthy and fertile, displayed slightly reduced numbers of bone marrow myeloid progenitors and circulating mature myeloid cells, and were more sensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These phenotypes were rescued using a fps/fes transgene. This confirmed that Fps/Fes is involved in, but not required for, myelopoiesis and that it plays a role in regulating the innate immune response. Bone marrow-derived Fps/Fes-null macrophages showed no defects in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-, interleukin 6 (IL-6)-, or IL-3-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and Stat5A or LPS-induced degradation of I kappa B or activation of p38, Jnk, Erk, or Akt.

  6. Nucleophosmin: from structure and function to disease development.

    PubMed

    Box, Joseph K; Paquet, Nicolas; Adams, Mark N; Boucher, Didier; Bolderson, Emma; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; Richard, Derek J

    2016-08-24

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) is a critical cellular protein that has been implicated in a number of pathways including mRNA transport, chromatin remodeling, apoptosis and genome stability. NPM1 function is a critical requirement for normal cellular biology as is underlined in cancer where NPM1 is commonly overexpressed, mutated, rearranged and sporadically deleted. Consistent with a multifunctional role within the cell, NPM1 can function not only as a proto-oncogene but also as a tumor suppressor. The aim of this review is to look at the less well-described role of NPM1 in the DNA repair pathways as well as the role of NPM1 in the regulation of apoptosis and its mutation in cancers.

  7. Role of the c-fos gene expression on the mitogenic response in EL2 rat fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, P; Liboi, E

    1988-01-01

    Stimulation of the growth of quiescent fibroblasts by polypeptide growth factors is accompanied by the rapid induction of the c-fos proto-oncogene. To investigate whether there exists a relationship between mitogenic activity and c-fos expression, we analysed cellular responses (DNA synthesis and cell growth) and c-fos gene induction (mRNA and proteins) in a rat embryo fibroblast line (EL2) stimulated with epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), 12-O-tetradodecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta). Our results suggest that the susceptibility of EL2 cells to a growth factor could be predicted as a function of the c-fos expression caused by the same growth factor. These also indicate that the c-fos gene expression may have contributed to moving our cells out of the quiescent state, but it is not the only essential event required to effect EL2 cell growth.

  8. Coexistence of Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Choriocarcinoma: Complete Response to Trastuzumab and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Seyda; Elpek, Gulsum Ozlem; Uysal, Mukremin; Goksu, Sema Sezgin; Tatli, Murat; Arslan, Deniz; Coskun, Hasan Senol; Bozcuk, Hakan; Savas, Burhan; Ozdogan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Gastric choriocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm and usually accompanies gastric adenocarcinoma. The prognosis is poor due to the aggressive course of the disease. A 57-year-old female patient with weight loss and abdominal pain was examined. The patient was operated following the examination, and pathological analysis revealed the presence of a gastric adenocarcinoma associated with choriocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a positive reaction with antibodies to beta-human chorionic gonadotropin and overexpression of the cErbB2 proto-oncogene. Staging revealed multiple metastases in the liver. A complete response was obtained with a combination of trastuzumab and chemotherapy. The diagnosis of gastric choriocarcinomas without pathological examination is difficult due to their rare occurrence. A complete response can be obtained with trastuzumab in the treatment of cases with overexpression of the cErbB2 protein. PMID:23525369

  9. Gene network dynamics controlling keratinocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Hauke; Camacho-Trullio, David; Rogon, Zbigniew; Breuhahn, Kai; Angel, Peter; Eils, Roland; Szabowski, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Translation of large-scale data into a coherent model that allows one to simulate, predict and control cellular behavior is far from being resolved. Assuming that long-term cellular behavior is reflected in the gene expression kinetics, we infer a dynamic gene regulatory network from time-series measurements of DNA microarray data of hepatocyte growth factor-induced migration of primary human keratinocytes. Transferring the obtained interactions to the level of signaling pathways, we predict in silico and verify in vitro the necessary and sufficient time-ordered events that control migration. We show that pulse-like activation of the proto-oncogene receptor Met triggers a responsive state, whereas time sequential activation of EGF-R is required to initiate and maintain migration. Context information for enhancing, delaying or stopping migration is provided by the activity of the protein kinase A signaling pathway. Our study reveals the complex orchestration of multiple pathways controlling cell migration. PMID:18594517

  10. Induced differentiation of erythroleukemia cells by hexamethylene bisacetamide: a model for cytodifferentiation of transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, P A; Rifkind, R A

    1989-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that malignant transformation need not eliminate the potential for a cell to express its developmental capabilities. This review explores the process whereby polar compounds, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) in particular, induce murine erythroid leukemoid cells (MELC) to express the differentiated erythroid phenotype, including hemoglobin production and cessation of cell division. This is a multi-step process which, although the mechanisms of action of HMBA are not yet fully understood, is amenable to experimental definition and analysis. Early effects, including changes in protein kinase C activity, in ion transport, and in expression of certain nuclear proto-oncogenes, have been examined in relation to the onset of terminal cell differentiation. This experimental experience has formed the context for initiating preliminary clinical studies designed to examine the pharmacology of HMBA and to explore its potential for modifying the natural history of cancer. PMID:2647479

  11. Evidence for a novel signal transduction pathway activated by platelet-derived growth factor and by double-stranded RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.J.; Jones, S.D.; Rollins, B.J.; Stiles, C.D. ); Stiles, C.D. ); Kaplan, D.R.; Whitman, M. )

    1989-04-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and the synthetic double-stranded RNA poly(I) x poly(C) (poly(I x C)) stimulate transcription of the JE gene in BALB/c-3T3 fibroblasts. The response of JE to poly(I x C) does not appear to be channeled through any known component of the PDGF receptor signal transduction apparatus. In addition, JE sequences upstream of the transcription start site are devoid of previously identified poly(I x C)-responsive elements, such as those found in the beta-interferon gene. These data suggest that a novel signal transduction pathway regulates the JE response to PDGF and double-stranded RNA. The c-myc and c-fos proto-oncogenes also respond to this pathway but with poor efficiency. However, this pathway operates very efficiently on other PDGF-inducible genes that encode the secretory proteins KC and M-CSF.

  12. Detection and characterization of the fibroblast growth factor-related oncoprotein INT-2.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, M; Deed, R; Acland, P; Moore, R; Whyte, A; Peters, G; Dickson, C

    1989-01-01

    Products of the fibroblast growth factor-related proto-oncogene int-2 have been detected by using a monoclonal antibody and polyclonal antisera raised against synthetic peptides predicted from the DNA sequence. COS-1 monkey cells transfected with int-2 DNA linked to the simian virus 40 early promoter contained at least four int-2-specific proteins, presumably representing modified forms of the expected 27-kilodalton primary translation product. The level of expression was increased approximately six- to eightfold by mutation of sequences around the presumed initiation codon, negating their capacity to encode a short oligopeptide in the +1 reading frame. Both tunicamycin inhibition and in vitro translation experiments indicated that some of the modifications correspond to asparagine-linked glycosylation, for which the sequence predicts a single site. In line with the similarities between INT-2 and other fibroblast growth factors, the in vitro translation products functioned as weak mitogens for mammary epithelial cells. Images PMID:2557543

  13. Updating the Wnt pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jia; Virshup, David M.

    2014-01-01

    In the three decades since the discovery of the Wnt1 proto-oncogene in virus-induced mouse mammary tumours, our understanding of the signalling pathways that are regulated by the Wnt proteins has progressively expanded. Wnts are involved in an complex signalling network that governs multiple biological processes and cross-talk with multiple additional signalling cascades, including the Notch, FGF (fibroblast growth factor), SHH (Sonic hedgehog), EGF (epidermal growth factor) and Hippo pathways. The Wnt signalling pathway also illustrates the link between abnormal regulation of the developmental processes and disease manifestation. Here we provide an overview of Wnt-regulated signalling cascades and highlight recent advances. We focus on new findings regarding the dedicated Wnt production and secretion pathway with potential therapeutic targets that might be beneficial for patients with Wnt-related diseases. PMID:25208913

  14. A G-Rich Sequence within the c-kit Oncogene Promoter Forms a Parallel G-Quadruplex Having Asymmetric G-Tetrad Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Varnai, Peter; Bugaut, Anthony; Reszka, Anthony P.; Neidle, Stephen; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Guanine-rich DNA sequences with the ability to form quadruplex structures are enriched in the promoter regions of protein-coding genes, particularly those of proto-oncogenes. G-quadruplexes are structurally polymorphic and their folding topologies can depend on the sample conditions. We report here on a structural study using solution state NMR spectroscopy of a second G-quadruplex-forming motif (c-kit2) that has been recently identified in the promoter region of the c-kit oncogene. In the presence of potassium ions, c-kit2 exists as an ensemble of structures that share the same parallel-stranded propeller-type conformations. Subtle differences in structural dynamics have been identified using hydrogen–deuterium exchange experiments by NMR spectroscopy, suggesting the coexistence of at least two structurally similar but dynamically distinct substates, which undergo slow interconversion on the NMR timescale. PMID:19705869

  15. KIT — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    SCF-sR, also known as KIT, is the human homolog of the proto-oncogene c-kit. C-kit was first identified as the cellular homolog of the feline sarcoma viral oncogene v-kit. Human KIT is a tyrosine-protein kinase that acts as cell-surface receptor for the cytokine KITLG/SCF and plays an essential role in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation, hematopoiesis, stem cell maintenance, gametogenesis, mast cell development, migration and function, and in melanogenesis. KIT is a type 3 transmembrane receptor for MGF (mast cell growth factor, also known as stem cell factor). Mutations in this gene are associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors, mast cell disease, acute myelogenous lukemia, and piebaldism. Multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene.

  16. Proteins (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an important nutrient that builds muscles and bones and provides energy. Protein can help with weight control because it helps you feel full and satisfied from your meals. The healthiest proteins are the leanest. This means ...

  17. Dietary Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... and maintain bones, muscles and skin. We get proteins in our diet from meat, dairy products, nuts, and certain grains ... level of physical activity. Most Americans eat enough protein in their diet.

  18. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  19. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  20. Possible involvement of queuine in regulation of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chandramani; Jaiswal, Yogesh K; Vinayak, Manjula

    2007-01-01

    An increase in cell number is one of the most prominent characteristics of cancer cells. This may be caused by an increase in cell proliferation or decrease in cell death. Queuine is one of the modified base which is found at first anticodon position of specific tRNAs. It is ubiquitously present throughout the living system except mycoplasma and yeast. The tRNAs of Q-family are completely modified to Q-tRNAs in terminally differentiated somatic cells, however hypomodification of Q-tRNA is closely associated with cell proliferation and malignancy. Queuine participates at various cellular functions such as regulation of cell proliferation, cell signaling and alteration in the expression of growth associated proto-oncogenes. Like other proto-oncogenes bcl2 is known to involve in cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis. Queuine or Q-tRNA is suggested to inhibit cell proliferation but the mechanism of regulation of cell proliferation by queuine or Q-tRNA is not well understood. Therefore, in the present study regulation in cell proliferation by queuine in vivo and in vitro as well as the expression of cell death regulatory protein Bcl2 are investigated. For this DLAT cancerous mouse, U87 cell line and HepG2 cell line are treated with different concentrations of queuine and the effect of queuine on cell proliferation and apoptosis are studied. The results indicate that queuine down regulates cell proliferation and expression of Bcl2 protein, suggesting that queuine promotes cell death and participates in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  1. Role of progesterone and estrogen in the preparation of the uterus and induction of implantation in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Huet-Hudson, Y.M.

    1989-01-01

    The implantation of the embryo into the uterine wall and subsequent decidualization of the uterine endometrium requires ovarian progesterone and estrogen. Prerequisites for implantation include (1) the preparation of the uterus for embryo implantation and (2) increase stromal capillary permeability at the site of embryo attachment. During the first three days of pregnancy, epithelial cells undergo proliferation, death and differentiation, in response to preovaluatory estrogen. These events occur in stromal cells in response to progesterone on days 4 and 5. The mechanism by which the steroid hormones modulate their functions and how estrogen initiates implantation in a progesterone-primed (P{sub 4}) uterus in not clearly understood. The author shows that 24h of P{sub 4}-priming is adequate for induction of implantation in the mouse. In addition, following this initial exposure of the uterus to P{sub 4} a long lasting effect is induced i.e. 24h of priming is no longer required for the induction of implantation. The uterine cell proliferation and differentiation that occurs in response to steroid hormones could be through their modulation of the expression of proto-oncogenes and growth factors. Results show that the proto-oncogene, c-myc and the growth factor, EGF are expressed in a cell-type specific manner in the uterus and are regulated by P{sub 4} and estrogen in a spatial and temporal manner during early pregnancy. It is apparent that c-myc protein in epithelia is primarily regulated by estrogen, while in the stroma by P{sub 4}. {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation in specific uterine cell-types correlated with expression of the c-myc protein. On the other hand, EGF is always localized to the epithelia and is primarily regulated by estrogen.

  2. Nifurtimox reduces N-Myc expression and aerobic glycolysis in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Bruchelt, Gernot; Handgretinger, Rupert; Holzer, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common solid tumors in childhood and usually accompanied with poor prognosis and rapid tumor progression when diagnosed with amplification of the proto-oncogene N-Myc. The amplification of N-Myc has major influence on the maintenance of aerobic glycolysis, also known as the Warburg effect. This specific switch in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate instead of the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A even in the presence of oxygen has important benefits for the tumor, e.g. increased production of enzymes and enzyme substrates that are involved in tumor progression, angiogenesis and inhibition of apoptosis. The antiprotozoal drug nifurtimox, which is generally used for the treatment of infections with the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has been reported to have cytotoxic properties in the therapy of neuroblastoma. However, its action of mechanism has not been described in detail yet. The presented in vitro study on the neuroblastoma cell lines LA-N-1, IMR-32, LS and SK-N-SH shows an increased production of oxidative stress, a reduced lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity and reduced lactate production after nifurtimox treatment. Furthermore, nifurtimox leads to reduced mRNA and protein levels of the proto-oncogene protein N-Myc. Thus, the current work gives new insights into the effect of nifurtimox on tumor metabolism revealing a shifted glucose metabolism from production of lactate to oxidative phosphorylation and a reduced expression of the major molecular prognostic factor in neuroblastoma N-Myc, presenting nifurtimox as a possible adjuvant therapeutic agent against (high risk) neuroblastoma. PMID:26177922

  3. Therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-01-01

    Protein-based therapeutics are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential. More than 100 genuine and similar number of modified therapeutic proteins are approved for clinical use in the European Union and the USA with 2010 sales of US$108 bln; monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) accounted for almost half (48%) of the sales. Based on their pharmacological activity, they can be divided into five groups: (a) replacing a protein that is deficient or abnormal; (b) augmenting an existing pathway; (c) providing a novel function or activity; (d) interfering with a molecule or organism; and (e) delivering other compounds or proteins, such as a radionuclide, cytotoxic drug, or effector proteins. Therapeutic proteins can also be grouped based on their molecular types that include antibody-based drugs, Fc fusion proteins, anticoagulants, blood factors, bone morphogenetic proteins, engineered protein scaffolds, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, interferons, interleukins, and thrombolytics. They can also be classified based on their molecular mechanism of activity as (a) binding non-covalently to target, e.g., mAbs; (b) affecting covalent bonds, e.g., enzymes; and (c) exerting activity without specific interactions, e.g., serum albumin. Most protein therapeutics currently on the market are recombinant and hundreds of them are in clinical trials for therapy of cancers, immune disorders, infections, and other diseases. New engineered proteins, including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs, and proteins with optimized pharmacokinetics, are currently under development. However, in the last several decades, there are no conceptually new methodological developments comparable, e.g., to genetic engineering leading to the development of recombinant therapeutic proteins. It appears that a paradigm change in methodologies and understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major

  4. The PTTG1-Binding Factor (PBF/PTTG1IP) regulates p53 activity in thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Read, Martin L.; Seed, Robert I.; Fong, Jim C.W.; Modasia, Bhavika; Ryan, Gavin A.; Watkins, Rachel J; Gagliano, Teresa; Smith, Vicki E.; Stratford, Anna L.; Kwan, Perkin K; Sharma, Neil; Dixon, Olivia M.; Watkinson, John C.; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Turnell, Andrew S.; McCabe, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The PTTG1-Binding Factor (PBF/PTTG1IP) has an emerging repertoire of roles, especially in thyroid biology, and functions as a proto-oncogene. High PBF expression is independently associated with poor prognosis and lower disease-specific survival in human thyroid cancer. However, the precise role of PBF in thyroid tumorigenesis is unclear. Here, we present extensive evidence demonstrating that PBF is a novel regulator of p53, a tumor suppressor protein with a key role in maintaining genetic stability, which is infrequently mutated in differentiated thyroid cancer. By coimmunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays, we show that PBF binds specifically to p53 in thyroid cells, and significantly represses transactivation of responsive promoters. Further, we identify that PBF decreases p53 stability by enhancing ubiquitination, which appears dependent on the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2. Impaired p53 function was evident in a transgenic mouse model with thyroid-specific PBF over-expression (PBF-Tg), which had significantly increased genetic instability as indicated by FISSR-PCR analysis. Consistent with this, ~40% of all DNA repair genes examined were repressed in PBF-Tg primary cultures, including genes with critical roles in maintaining genomic integrity such as Mgmt, Rad51 and Xrcc3. Our data also revealed that PBF induction resulted in upregulation of the E2 enzyme Rad6 in murine thyrocytes, and was associated with Rad6 expression in human thyroid tumors. Overall, this work provides novel insights into the role of the proto-oncogene PBF as a negative regulator of p53 function in thyroid tumorigenesis, where PBF is generally over-expressed and p53 mutations are rare compared to other tumor types. PMID:24506068

  5. Absence of tpr-met and expression of c-met in human gastric mucosa and carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Heideman, D A; Snijders, P J; Bloemena, E; Meijer, C J; Offerhaus, G J; Meuwissen, S G; Gerritsen, W R; Craanen, M E

    2001-08-01

    The c-met proto-oncogene, encoding the hepatocyte growth factor receptor, can be activated by various mechanisms. These include, among others, gene amplification with concomitant overexpression and the tpr-met oncogenic rearrangement. In the case of gastric cancer, contradictory results on the presence of the tpr-met oncogenic rearrangement have been published. The current study aimed therefore to assess the prevalence of tpr-met expression in Caucasian gastric adenocarcinomas, to evaluate the importance of this oncogene in their carcinogenesis. In addition, the level of c-met expression was determined, to evaluate the role of this alternative mode of activation of the proto-oncogene. A series of Caucasian gastric adenocarcinomas (n=43) and normal gastric mucosal samples (n=14) was analysed for tpr-met and c-met expression. Expression of tpr-met mRNA in the samples was performed by two reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, with excellent correlation. The specificity of both methods was confirmed by direct sequencing of the PCR products of the MNNG-HOS cell line, which is known to contain the rearrangement. The level of c-met expression was assessed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR assays and immunohistochemistry (IHC). None of the normal gastric mucosal or gastric adenocarcinoma samples expressed tpr-met mRNA, as determined by both RT-PCR assays. Seventy per cent of the adenocarcinomas showed overexpression of c-met, according to elevated c-met mRNA levels, compared with the expression level of normal gastric mucosa. A significant correlation was found between the level of c-met mRNA and protein expression. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that tpr-met activation does not play a role in Caucasian gastric carcinogenesis, while overexpression of the c-met gene occurs in the majority of Caucasian gastric adenocarcinomas. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Fra-1 is downregulated in cervical cancer tissues and promotes cervical cancer cell apoptosis by p53 signaling pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Songshu; Zhou, Yanhong; Yi, Wei; Luo, Guijuan; Jiang, Bin; Tian, Qi; Li, Yueran; Xue, Min

    2015-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a potentially preventable disease; however, it is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide. Cervical cancer is thought to develop through a multistep process involving virus, tumor suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes and immunological factors. It is known that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is necessary but insufficient to cause malignancy. At present, the etiology of cervical carcinoma remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that the expression of FOS-like antigen-1 (Fra-1) gene was downregulated in cervical cancer compared with the adjacent non-cancerous tissues by RT-qPCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blotting techniques. To uncover the effect of Fra-1 on cervical cancer, we tested and confirmed that Fra-1 significantly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells by MMT assays in vitro. At the same time, overexpression of Fra-1 promoted apoptosis of HeLa cells. To explore the possible mechanism of Fra-1 in cervical cancer, we tested the expression levels of key molecules in p53 signaling pathway by western blotting technology. The results showed that p53 was downregulated in cervical cancer compared with the adjacent non-cancerous tissues, but MDM2 proto-oncogene, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (MDM2) was upregulated in cervical cancer. In vitro, the p53 was upregulated and MDM2 was downregulated in HeLa cells with Fra-1 overexpression. In summary, our results suggested that Fra-1 expression is low in cervical cancer tissues and promotes apoptosis of cervical cancer cells by p53 signaling pathway.

  7. Genetic alteration and mutation profiling of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) for diagnosis and targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weixin; Zhang, Aiguo; Powell, Michael J

    2016-07-21

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have been recognized as a biologically distinctive type of tumor, different from smooth muscle and neural tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The identification of genetic aberrations in proto-oncogenes that drive the growth of GISTs is critical for improving the efficacy of cancer therapy by matching targeted drugs to specific mutations. Research into the oncogenic mechanisms of GISTs has found that these tumors frequently contain activating gene mutations in either platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) or a receptor tyrosine protein associated with a mast cell growth factor receptor encoded by the KIT gene. Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to disrupt durable patient responses to molecularly targeted therapy for GISTs, yet the prevalence and size of subpopulations remain largely unexplored. Detection of the cancer subpopulations that harbor low-frequency mutant alleles of target proto-oncogenes through the use of molecular genetic methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) target amplification technology, is hampered by the high abundance of wild-type alleles, which limit the sensitivity of detection of these minor mutant alleles. This is especially true in the case of mutant tumor DNA derived "driver" and "drug-resistant" alleles that are present in the circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) in the peripheral blood circulation of GIST patients. So-called "liquid biopsy" allows for the dynamic monitoring of the patients' tumor status during treatment using minimally invasive sampling. New methodologies, such as a technology that employs a xenonucleic acid (XNA) clamping probe to block the PCR amplification of wild-type templates, have allowed improved molecular detection of these low-frequency alleles both in tissue biopsy samples and in cfDNA. These new methodologies could be widely applied for minimally invasive molecular testing in the therapeutic management of GISTs.

  8. Protein tentacles.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2017-05-27

    Virus structures were among the earliest illustrations of how regulated protein assembly can proceed by folding of polypeptide-chain segments into complementary sites on partner proteins. I draw on Caspar's image of protein "tentacles" and his metaphor of SV40 pentamers as five-legged, aquatic organisms ("pentopuses") to suggest a helpful vocabulary. "Tentacular interactions" among component subunits organize most subcellular molecular machines. Their selective advantages include facile regulation of both assembly and disassembly by modifying enzymes and by folding chaperones. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016:chap 215. Read More Agammaglobulinemia Albumin - blood (serum) test Amino acids Antibody Burns Chronic Congenital nephrotic syndrome Fibrinogen blood test Glomerulonephritis Hemoglobin Liver disease Malabsorption Multiple myeloma Polycythemia vera Protein in diet ...

  10. Protein Crystallizability.

    PubMed

    Smialowski, Pawel; Wong, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining diffracting quality crystals remains a major challenge in protein structure research. We summarize and compare methods for selecting the best protein targets for crystallization, construct optimization and crystallization condition design. Target selection methods are divided into algorithms predicting the chance of successful progression through all stages of structural determination (from cloning to solving the structure) and those focusing only on the crystallization step. We tried to highlight pros and cons of different approaches examining the following aspects: data size, redundancy and representativeness, overfitting during model construction, and results evaluation. In summary, although in recent years progress was made and several sequence properties were reported to be relevant for crystallization, the successful prediction of protein crystallization behavior and selection of corresponding crystallization conditions continue to challenge structural researchers.

  11. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  12. Detecting protein-protein interactions using Renilla luciferase fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Kisailus, Adam E; Peck, Jeremy W

    2002-11-01

    We have developed a novel system designated the luciferase assay for protein detection (LAPD) to study protein-protein interactions. This method involves two protein fusions, a soluble reporter fusion and a fusion for immobilizing the target protein. The soluble reporter is an N-terminal Renilla luciferase fusion protein that exhibits high Renilla luciferase activity. Crude cleared lysates from transfected Cos1 cells that express the Renilla luciferase fusion protein can be used in binding assays with immobilized target proteins. Following incubation and washing, target-bound Renilla luciferase fusion proteins produce light from the coelenterazine substrate, indicating an interaction between the two proteins of interest. As proof of the principle, we reproduced known, transient protein-protein interactions between the Cdc42 GTPase and its effector proteins. GTPase Renilla fusion proteins produced in Cos1 cells were tested with immobilized recombinant GST-N-WASP and CEP5 effector proteins. Using this assay, we could detect specific interactions of Cdc42 with these effector proteins in approximately 50 min. The specificity of these interactions was demonstrated by showing that they were GTPase-specific and GTP-dependent and not seen with other unrelated target proteins. These results suggest that the LAPD method, which is both rapid and sensitive, may have research and practical applications.

  13. Interaction entropy for protein-protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhaoxi; Yan, Yu N.; Yang, Maoyou; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the heart of signal transduction and are central to the function of protein machine in biology. The highly specific protein-protein binding is quantitatively characterized by the binding free energy whose accurate calculation from the first principle is a grand challenge in computational biology. In this paper, we show how the interaction entropy approach, which was recently proposed for protein-ligand binding free energy calculation, can be applied to computing the entropic contribution to the protein-protein binding free energy. Explicit theoretical derivation of the interaction entropy approach for protein-protein interaction system is given in detail from the basic definition. Extensive computational studies for a dozen realistic protein-protein interaction systems are carried out using the present approach and comparisons of the results for these protein-protein systems with those from the standard normal mode method are presented. Analysis of the present method for application in protein-protein binding as well as the limitation of the method in numerical computation is discussed. Our study and analysis of the results provided useful information for extracting correct entropic contribution in protein-protein binding from molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Learning about Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Learning About Proteins KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Proteins A A ... the foods you eat. continue Different Kinds of Protein Protein from animal sources, such as meat and ...

  15. Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David A.; Ptacek, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Protein chips have emerged as a promising approach for a wide variety of applications including the identification of protein-protein interactions, protein-phospholipid interactions, small molecule targets, and substrates of proteins kinases. They can also be used for clinical diagnostics and monitoring disease states. This article reviews current methods in the generation and applications of protein microarrays. PMID:17126887

  16. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  17. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  18. DNA replication, development and cancer: a homeotic connection?

    PubMed

    Falaschi, Arturo; Abdurashidova, Gulnara; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    The homeotic proteins are transcription factors, highly conserved in metazoan organisms, exerting a pivotal role in development and differentiation. They individually display a loose specificity for the DNA sequence they can bind, but operate mainly in multi-molecular associations that assure their target and function specificity. Homeotic proteins are known to play a role in the positive or negative regulation of cell proliferation. Furthermore, many homeotic proteins are actually proto-oncogenes, since different translocations involving their genes cause tumors, particularly in the hematopoietic system. A one-hybrid screen to detect proteins with affinity for the lamin B2 replication origin identified three homeotic proteins, namely HoxA13, HoxC10 and HoxC13. Recent data demonstrate that the HoxC13 oncoprotein specifically associates with replication foci and binds in vitro and in vivo to several human DNA replication origins. Moreover, Hox proteins interact with geminin, a regulator of cell cycle progression, and control the interaction of this protein with the DNA replication licensing factor Ctd1. Thus, the homeotic proteins, by participating directly in the function of DNA replication origins, may provide a direct link between the accurate regulation of DNA replication required by the morphogenetic program and the deregulation of this process typical of cancer.

  19. [From ovocyte to biochemistry of the cell cycle].

    PubMed

    Ozon, R

    1991-01-01

    The cell division cycle in eukaryotes contains up to three major transition points; the conversion of quiescent cells to a stage of active proliferation, the initiation of DNA synthesis (S phase) and the induction of mitosis in cells with newly replicated genome (M phase). Within the past years two strategies, have converged to identify, genetically and biochemically a key protein kinase p34 cdc2 that governs the entry into mitosis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe a number of mutants in the mitotic regulatory circuit have been isolated. A central gene in the network is cdc2 which is essential for the proper execution of mitosis. The cdc2 gene interacts with a number of other genes for correct mitotic control. The Amphibian oocyte, the oocyte from Xenopus laevis particularly, is arrested at the G2 phase of the first meiotic division; when it enters M phase, it contains a dominant regulatory factor known as MPF (M-phase or maturation promoting factor). Purified MPF is an heterodimer formed of two polypeptides p34cdc2 an homologue of the product of the gene cdc2 and p45cdc13 or cyclin an homologue of the product of the gene cdc13. Biochemical studies have revealed that p34cdc2 is a phosphotyrosine protein during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, both mitotic and meiotic. The tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2 is regulated by the gradual accumulation of cyclin. At the onset of M phase, the complex p34cdc2/cyclin is activated as an histone H1 kinase, and p34cdc2 is tyrosine dephosphorylated. The mechanism of activation of p34cdc2 is negatively regulated by a form of protein phosphatase 2A. Ovulated vertebrate oocytes are arrested at metaphase of the second meiotic division (M II) under the control of the proto-oncogene c-mos a protein kinase. The exit of M II phase and the initiation of early embryonic mitotic cell cycles are physiologically induced by the spermatozoa at the time of fertilization. They requires the degradation of c-mos by a Ca2+ dependent

  20. The ENL moiety of the childhood leukemia-associated MLL-ENL oncoprotein recruits human Polycomb 3.

    PubMed

    García-Cuéllar, M P; Zilles, O; Schreiner, S A; Birke, M; Winkler, T H; Slany, R K

    2001-01-25

    The translocation t(11;19) is frequently found in acute leukemia in infants. This event truncates the proto-oncogene MLL and fuses the 5' end of MLL in frame with the ENL gene. ENL contributes a crucial protein-protein interaction domain to the resulting oncoprotein MLL-ENL. Here we show by yeast two-hybrid assays, GST-pull-down experiments and in a far western blot analysis that this domain is necessary and sufficient to recruit a novel member of the human Polycomb protein family (hPc3). hPc3 RNA was detected throughout the human hematopoietic system. Similar to other Polycomb proteins hPc3 acts as a transcriptional repressor. The ENL-hPc3 interaction was verified by mutual co-precipitation of the proteins from cell extracts. ENL and hPc3 tagged with fluorescent proteins co-localized in living cells in a nuclear dot pattern. An internal region of hPc3 was responsible for binding to ENL. Finally, hPc3 binds to the C-terminus of AF9, another common MLL fusion partner. The recruitment of a repressive function by ENL opens up a new insight into a possible mechanism of leukemogenesis by the fusion protein MLL-ENL.

  1. Physical association with WWOX suppresses c-Jun transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Eugenio; Palamarchuk, Alexey; Palumbo, Tiziana; Trapasso, Francesco; Pekarsky, Yuri; Croce, Carlo M; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2006-12-15

    WWOX is a tumor suppressor that functions as a modular protein partner of transcription factors. WWOX contains two WW domains that mediate protein-protein interactions. In this report, we show that WWOX, via its first WW domain, specifically associates with the proline-rich motif of c-Jun proto-oncogene. Our data show that phosphorylation of c-Jun caused by overexpression of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (Mekk1), an upstream activator of c-Jun, enhances the interaction of c-Jun with WWOX. Furthermore, exposure of HaCaT keratinocytes to UVC radiation resulted in the association of endogenous WWOX and c-Jun. The WWOX-c-Jun complexes mainly occur in the cytoplasm. Expression of WWOX attenuates the ability of MEKK1 to increase the activity of a c-Jun-driven activating protein-1 (AP-1)-luciferase reporter plasmid. In contrast, a point mutation in the first WW domain of WWOX has no effect on transactivation of AP-1 when coexpressed with c-Jun protein. Our findings reveal a novel functional cross-talk between c-Jun transcription factor and WWOX tumor suppressor protein.

  2. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  3. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  4. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  5. Protein and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Protein and Heart Health Updated:May 5,2015 Protein ... said. What’s the harm in getting too much protein? The main problem is that often the extra ...

  6. The Highly Conserved β-Hairpin of the Paired DNA-Binding Domain Is Required for Assembly of Pax-Ets Ternary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, William; Fitzsimmons, Daniel; Lennox, Heidi; Krautkramer, Susan R.; Gentile, Lisa N.; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Hagman, James

    1999-01-01

    Pax family transcription factors bind DNA through the paired domain. This domain, which is comprised of two helix-turn-helix motifs and a β-hairpin structure, is a target of mutations in congenital disorders of mice and humans. Previously, we showed that Pax-5 (B-cell-specific activator protein) recruits proteins of the Ets proto-oncogene family to bind a composite DNA site that is essential for efficient transcription of the early-B-cell-specific mb-1 promoter. Here, evidence is provided for specific interactions between Ets-1 and the amino-terminal subdomains of Pax proteins. By tethering deletion fragments of Pax-5 to a heterologous DNA-binding domain, we show that 73 amino acids (amino acids 12 to 84) of its amino-terminal subdomain can recruit the ETS domain of Ets-1 to bind the composite site. Furthermore, an amino acid (Gln22) within the highly conserved β-hairpin motif of Pax-5 is essential for efficient recruitment of Ets-1. The ability to recruit Ets proteins to bind DNA is a shared property of Pax proteins, as demonstrated by cooperative DNA binding of Ets-1 with sequences derived from the paired domains of Pax-2 and Pax-3. The strict conservation of sequences required for recruitment of Ets proteins suggests that Pax-Ets interactions are important for regulating transcription in diverse tissues during cellular differentiation. PMID:10022910

  7. Protein splicing: selfish genes invade cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Neff, N F

    1993-12-01

    Protein splicing is a series of enzymatic events involving intramolecular protein breakage, rejoining and intron homing, in which introns are able to promote the recombinative transposition of their own coding sequences. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic spliced proteins have conserved similar gene structure, but little amino acid identity. The genes coding for these spliced proteins contain internal in-frame introns that encode polypeptides that apparently self-excise from the resulting host protein sequences. Excision of the 'protein intron' is coupled with joining of the two flanking protein regions encoded by exons of the host gene. Some introns of this type encode DNA endonucleases, related to Group I RNA intron gene products, that stimulate gene conversion and self-transmission.

  8. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures.

  9. PREFACE: Protein protein interactions: principles and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung

    2005-06-01

    Proteins are the `workhorses' of the cell. Their roles span functions as diverse as being molecular machines and signalling. They carry out catalytic reactions, transport, form viral capsids, traverse membranes and form regulated channels, transmit information from DNA to RNA, making possible the synthesis of new proteins, and they are responsible for the degradation of unnecessary proteins and nucleic acids. They are the vehicles of the immune response and are responsible for viral entry into the cell. Given their importance, considerable effort has been centered on the prediction of protein function. A prime way to do this is through identification of binding partners. If the function of at least one of the components with which the protein interacts is known, that should let us assign its function(s) and the pathway(s) in which it plays a role. This holds since the vast majority of their chores in the living cell involve protein-protein interactions. Hence, through the intricate network of these interactions we can map cellular pathways, their interconnectivities and their dynamic regulation. Their identification is at the heart of functional genomics; their prediction is crucial for drug discovery. Knowledge of the pathway, its topology, length, and dynamics may provide useful information for forecasting side effects. The goal of predicting protein-protein interactions is daunting. Some associations are obligatory, others are continuously forming and dissociating. In principle, from the physical standpoint, any two proteins can interact, but under what conditions and at which strength? The principles of protein-protein interactions are general: the non-covalent interactions of two proteins are largely the outcome of the hydrophobic effect, which drives the interactions. In addition, hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions play important roles. Thus, many of the interactions observed in vitro are the outcome of experimental overexpression. Protein disorder

  10. A Systems Biology Approach to Reveal Putative Host-Derived Biomarkers of Periodontitis by Network Topology Characterization of MMP-REDOX/NO and Apoptosis Integrated Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gürsoy, Mervi; Neves de Oliveira, Ben-Hur; Özdemir, Vural; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, a formidable global health burden, is a common chronic disease that destroys tooth-supporting tissues. Biomarkers of the early phase of this progressive disease are of utmost importance for global health. In this context, saliva represents a non-invasive biosample. By using systems biology tools, we aimed to (1) identify an integrated interactome between matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-REDOX/nitric oxide (NO) and apoptosis upstream pathways of periodontal inflammation, and (2) characterize the attendant topological network properties to uncover putative biomarkers to be tested in saliva from patients with periodontitis. Hence, we first generated a protein-protein network model of interactions ("BIOMARK" interactome) by using the STRING 10 database, a search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins, with "Experiments" and "Databases" as input options and a confidence score of 0.400. Second, we determined the centrality values (closeness, stress, degree or connectivity, and betweenness) for the "BIOMARK" members by using the Cytoscape software. We found Ubiquitin C (UBC), Jun proto-oncogene (JUN), and matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP14) as the most central hub- and non-hub-bottlenecks among the 211 genes/proteins of the whole interactome. We conclude that UBC, JUN, and MMP14 are likely an optimal candidate group of host-derived biomarkers, in combination with oral pathogenic bacteria-derived proteins, for detecting periodontitis at its early phase by using salivary samples from patients. These findings therefore have broader relevance for systems medicine in global health as well.

  11. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Shaddox, Kent F; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri R; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Rivers, Robert C; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, R Reid; Ellis, Matthew J C; Carr, Steven A; Tabb, David L; Coffey, Robert J; Slebos, Robbert J C; Liebler, Daniel C

    2014-09-18

    Extensive genomic characterization of human cancers presents the problem of inference from genomic abnormalities to cancer phenotypes. To address this problem, we analysed proteomes of colon and rectal tumours characterized previously by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and perform integrated proteogenomic analyses. Somatic variants displayed reduced protein abundance compared to germline variants. Messenger RNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein abundance differences between tumours. Proteomics identified five proteomic subtypes in the TCGA cohort, two of which overlapped with the TCGA 'microsatellite instability/CpG island methylation phenotype' transcriptomic subtype, but had distinct mutation, methylation and protein expression patterns associated with different clinical outcomes. Although copy number alterations showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA abundance, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. The chromosome 20q amplicon was associated with the largest global changes at both mRNA and protein levels; proteomics data highlighted potential 20q candidates, including HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha), TOMM34 (translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34) and SRC (SRC proto-oncogene, non-receptor tyrosine kinase). Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords a new paradigm for understanding cancer biology.

  12. Ionizing Radiation and Glioblastoma Exosomes: Implications in Tumor Biology and Cell Migration12

    PubMed Central

    Arscott, W Tris; Tandle, Anita T; Zhao, Shuping; Shabason, Jacob E; Gordon, Ira K; Schlaff, Cody D; Zhang, Guofeng; Tofilon, Philip J; Camphausen, Kevin A

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized lipid vesicles released ubiquitously by cells, which have been shown to have a normal physiological role, as well as influence the tumor microenvironment and aid metastasis. Recent studies highlight the ability of exosomes to convey tumor-suppressive and oncogenic mRNAs, microRNAs, and proteins to a receiving cell, subsequently activating downstream signaling pathways and influencing cellular phenotype. Here, we show that radiation increases the abundance of exosomes released by glioblastoma cells and normal astrocytes. Exosomes derived from irradiated cells enhanced the migration of recipient cells, and their molecular profiling revealed an abundance of molecules related to signaling pathways important for cell migration. In particular, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) mRNA and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) protein levels were elevated, and coculture of nonirradiated cells with exosomes isolated from irradiated cells increased CTGF protein expression in the recipient cells. Additionally, these exosomes enhanced the activation of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (TrkA), focal adhesion kinase, Paxillin, and proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (Src) in recipient cells, molecules involved in cell migration. Collectively, our data suggest that radiation influences exosome abundance, specifically alters their molecular composition, and on uptake, promotes a migratory phenotype. PMID:24466366

  13. Protein Structure Prediction by Protein Threading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Zhijie; Cai, Liming; Xu, Dong

    The seminal work of Bowie, Lüthy, and Eisenberg (Bowie et al., 1991) on "the inverse protein folding problem" laid the foundation of protein structure prediction by protein threading. By using simple measures for fitness of different amino acid types to local structural environments defined in terms of solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure, the authors derived a simple and yet profoundly novel approach to assessing if a protein sequence fits well with a given protein structural fold. Their follow-up work (Elofsson et al., 1996; Fischer and Eisenberg, 1996; Fischer et al., 1996a,b) and the work by Jones, Taylor, and Thornton (Jones et al., 1992) on protein fold recognition led to the development of a new brand of powerful tools for protein structure prediction, which we now term "protein threading." These computational tools have played a key role in extending the utility of all the experimentally solved structures by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), providing structural models and functional predictions for many of the proteins encoded in the hundreds of genomes that have been sequenced up to now.

  14. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  15. Whey protein fractionation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concentrated whey protein products from cheese whey, such as whey protein concentrate (WPC) and whey protein isolate (WPI), contain more than seven different types of proteins: alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG), bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulins (Igs), lactoferrin ...

  16. Circulating-free DNA Mutation Associated with Response of Targeted Therapy in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Qi, Fan; Bian, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Tao; Jiang, Ze-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Background: The addition of anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted drugs, such as trastuzumab, lapatinib, and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), to chemotherapy significantly improved prognosis of HER2-positive breast cancer patients. However, it was confused that metastatic patients vary in the response of targeted drug. Therefore, methods of accurately predicting drug response were really needed. To overcome the spatial and temporal limitations of biopsies, we aimed to develop a more sensitive and less invasive method of detecting mutations associated with anti-HER2 therapeutic response through circulating-free DNA (cfDNA). Methods: From March 6, 2014 to December 10, 2014, 24 plasma samples from 20 patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer who received systemic therapy were eligible. We used a panel for detection of hot-spot mutations from 50 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, and then used targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify somatic mutation of these samples in those 50 genes. Samples taken before their first trastuzumab administration and subsequently proven with clinical benefit were grouped into sensitive group. The others were collected after disease progression of the trastuzumab-based therapy and were grouped into the resistant group. Results: A total of 486 single-nucleotide variants from 46 genes were detected. Of these 46 genes, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA), proto-oncogene c-Kit (KIT), and tumor protein p53 (TP53) were the most common mutated genes. Seven genes, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), G protein subunit alpha S (GNAS), HRas proto-oncogene (HRAS), mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), cadherin 1 (CDH1), neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), and NOTCH1, that only occurred mutations in the resistant group were associated with the resistance of targeted therapy. In addition, we detected a HER2 S855I mutation in two patients who had

  17. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Samira; Hojati, Zohreh; Tabatabaeian, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    The overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), a proto-oncogene, affects progression, treatment, and diagnosis of many adenocarcinomas. C-myc has been shown to be a downstream target of EpCAM and is also one of the most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer. However, cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes has not been investigated in breast cancer tissues, particularly in Iranian population. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast cancer tissues using reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) followed by analyses of the association between the outcomes. In this study, 122 fresh tissues, including 104 malignant and 18 benign samples, were disrupted by mortar and pestle, and then the RNA was isolated from the samples and converted to cDNA. The relative expression levels of EpCAM and c-myc genes were measured by 2(-ΔΔCt) method using RT-qPCR. EpCAM protein level was also assessed in 66 cases using Western blot technique. Using RT-qPCR method, our results showed that EpCAM was overexpressed in 48% of malignant and 11.1% of benign samples. Evaluating EpCAM protein overexpression in a portion of samples depicted the fully concordance rate between Western blot and RT-qPCR techniques. C-myc expression was first evaluated by RT-qPCR method, showing the overexpression rate of 39% and 28% in malignant and benign samples, respectively. These data were also quite concordant with the clinically available immunohistochemistry reports of the same samples studied in this study. Importantly, overexpression of EpCAM and c-myc was significantly associated and showed an agreement of 57.3%. This study demonstrated the cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc in breast tumours collected from breast cancer patients of the Iranian population. EpCAM and c-myc positive cases were significantly associated with reduced and enhanced risk of ER/PR positivity

  18. Mirror Image Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Le; Lu, Wuyuan

    2017-01-01

    Proteins composed entirely of unnatural D-amino acids and the achiral amino acid glycine are mirror image forms of their native L-protein counterparts. Recent advances in chemical protein synthesis afford unique and facile synthetic access to domain-sized mirror image D-proteins, enabling protein research to be conducted through “the looking glass” and in a way previously unattainable. D-proteins can facilitate structure determination of their native L-forms that are difficult to crystallize (racemic X-ray crystallography); D-proteins can serve as the bait for library screening to ultimately yield pharmacologically superior D-peptide/D-protein therapeutics (mirror image phage display); D-proteins can also be used as a powerful mechanistic tool for probing molecular events in biology. This review examines recent progress in the application of mirror image proteins to structural biology, drug discovery, and immunology. PMID:25282524

  19. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  20. Occurrence of phaeochromocytoma tumours in RET mutation carriers - a single-centre study.

    PubMed

    Kotecka-Blicharz, Agnieszka; Hasse-Lazar, Kornelia; Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Pawlaczek, Agnieszka; Oczko-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Bugajska, Beata; Ledwon, Aleksandra; Król, Aleksandra; Michalik, Barbara; Jarząb, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is an autosomal dominant genetic syndrome caused by germline mutation in RET proto-oncogene. The most common mutations are in a cysteine rich domain. Phaeochromocytoma will develop in approximately 50% of RET proto-oncogene carriers. The studied population consisted of 228 RET proto-oncogene mutation carriers. Monitoring for the diagnosis of phaeochromocytoma was carried out in all patients with established genetic status. Mean time of follow up was 138 months. Surveillance consisted of periodically performed clinical evaluation, 24-hour urinary determinations of total metanephrines complementary with imaging (CT, MR, MIBG scintigraphy). Phaeochromocytoma developed in 41 patients (18% of all RET proto-oncogene mutations carriers). The mean age of diagnosis for the whole cohort was 43 years. In eight cases phaeochromocytoma was the first manifestation of the MEN 2 syndrome. Only eight (20%) patients were symptomatic at diagnosis of phaeochromocytoma. The mean size of the tumour was 4.3 cm. There was no extra-adrenal localisation. We observed one case of malignant phaeochromocytoma. In patients with MEN 2 syndrome phaeochromocytomas are usually benign adrenal tumours with high risk of bilateral development. Taking to account the latter risk and non-specific clinical manifestation of the neoplasm it is mandatory to screen all RET proto-oncogene mutations carriers for phaeochromocytoma.

  1. Molecular modelling of protein-protein/protein-solvent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchko, Tyler

    The inner workings of individual cells are based on intricate networks of protein-protein interactions. However, each of these individual protein interactions requires a complex physical interaction between proteins and their aqueous environment at the atomic scale. In this thesis, molecular dynamics simulations are used in three theoretical studies to gain insight at the atomic scale about protein hydration, protein structure and tubulin-tubulin (protein-protein) interactions, as found in microtubules. Also presented, in a fourth project, is a molecular model of solvation coupled with the Amber molecular modelling package, to facilitate further studies without the need of explicitly modelled water. Basic properties of a minimally solvated protein were calculated through an extended study of myoglobin hydration with explicit solvent, directly investigating water and protein polarization. Results indicate a close correlation between polarization of both water and protein and the onset of protein function. The methodology of explicit solvent molecular dynamics was further used to study tubulin and microtubules. Extensive conformational sampling of the carboxy-terminal tails of 8-tubulin was performed via replica exchange molecular dynamics, allowing the characterisation of the flexibility, secondary structure and binding domains of the C-terminal tails through statistical analysis methods. Mechanical properties of tubulin and microtubules were calculated with adaptive biasing force molecular dynamics. The function of the M-loop in microtubule stability was demonstrated in these simulations. The flexibility of this loop allowed constant contacts between the protofilaments to be maintained during simulations while the smooth deformation provided a spring-like restoring force. Additionally, calculating the free energy profile between the straight and bent tubulin configurations was used to test the proposed conformational change in tubulin, thought to cause microtubule

  2. Exosomal miR-940 maintains SRC-mediated oncogenic activity in cancer cells: a possible role for exosomal disposal of tumor suppressor miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Rashed, Mohammed H; Kanlikilicer, Pinar; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Pichler, Martin; Bayraktar, Recep; Bayraktar, Emine; Ivan, Cristina; Filant, Justyna; Silva, Andreia; Aslan, Burcu; Denizli, Merve; Mitra, Rahul; Ozpolat, Bulent; Calin, George A; Sood, Anil K; Abd-Ellah, Mohamed F; Helal, Gouda K; Berestein, Gabriel Lopez

    2017-03-21

    Exosomes have emerged as important mediators of diverse biological functions including tumor suppression, tumor progression, invasion, immune escape and cell-to-cell communication, through the release of molecules such as mRNAs, miRNAs, and proteins. Here, we identified differentially expressed exosomal miRNAs between normal epithelial ovarian cell line and both resistant and sensitive ovarian cancer (OC) cell lines. We found miR-940 as abundant in exosomes from SKOV3-IP1, HeyA8, and HeyA8-MDR cells. The high expression of miR-940 is associated with better survival in patients with ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. Ectopic expression of miR-940 inhibited proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and migration and triggered G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in OC cells. Overexpression of miR-940 also inhibited tumor cell growth in vivo. We showed that proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (SRC) is directly targeted by miR-940 and that miR-940 inhibited SRC expression at mRNA and protein levels. Following this inhibition, the expression of proteins downstream of SRC, such as FAK, paxillin and Akt was also reduced. Collectively, our results suggest that OC cells secrete the tumor-suppressive miR-940 into the extracellular environment via exosomes, to maintain their invasiveness and tumorigenic phenotype.

  3. Exosomal miR-940 maintains SRC-mediated oncogenic activity in cancer cells: a possible role for exosomal disposal of tumor suppressor miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rashed, Mohammed H; Kanlikilicer, Pinar; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Pichler, Martin; Bayraktar, Recep; Bayraktar, Emine; Ivan, Cristina; Filant, Justyna; Silva, Andreia; Aslan, Burcu; Denizli, Merve; Mitra, Rahul; Ozpolat, Bulent; Calin, George A.; Sood, Anil K.; Abd-Ellah, Mohamed F.; Helal, Gouda K.; Berestein, Gabriel Lopez

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes have emerged as important mediators of diverse biological functions including tumor suppression, tumor progression, invasion, immune escape and cell-to-cell communication, through the release of molecules such as mRNAs, miRNAs, and proteins. Here, we identified differentially expressed exosomal miRNAs between normal epithelial ovarian cell line and both resistant and sensitive ovarian cancer (OC) cell lines. We found miR-940 as abundant in exosomes from SKOV3-IP1, HeyA8, and HeyA8-MDR cells. The high expression of miR-940 is associated with better survival in patients with ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. Ectopic expression of miR-940 inhibited proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and migration and triggered G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in OC cells. Overexpression of miR-940 also inhibited tumor cell growth in vivo. We showed that proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (SRC) is directly targeted by miR-940 and that miR-940 inhibited SRC expression at mRNA and protein levels. Following this inhibition, the expression of proteins downstream of SRC, such as FAK, paxillin and Akt was also reduced. Collectively, our results suggest that OC cells secrete the tumor-suppressive miR-940 into the extracellular environment via exosomes, to maintain their invasiveness and tumorigenic phenotype. PMID:28423620

  4. Competitive binding of AUF1 and TIAR to MYC mRNA controls its translation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Baisong; Hu, Yan; Brewer, Gary

    2007-06-01

    (A+U)-rich elements (AREs) within 3' untranslated regions are signals for rapid degradation of messenger RNAs encoding many oncoproteins and cytokines. The ARE-binding protein AUF1 contributes to their degradation. We identified MYC proto-oncogene mRNA as a cellular AUF1 target. Levels of MYC translation and cell proliferation were proportional to AUF1 abundance but inversely proportional to the abundance of the ARE-binding protein TIAR, a MYC translational suppressor. Both AUF1 and TIAR affected MYC translation via the ARE without affecting mRNA abundance. Altering association of one ARE-binding protein with MYC mRNA in vivo reciprocally affected mRNA association with the other protein. Finally, genetic experiments revealed that AUF1 and TIAR control proliferation by a MYC-dependent pathway. Together, these observations suggest a novel regulatory mechanism where tuning the ratios of AUF1 and TIAR bound to MYC mRNA permits dynamic control of MYC translation and cell proliferation.

  5. Age-associated changes in basal c-fos transcription factor binding activity in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tsou, H; Azhar, G; Lu, X G; Kovacs, S; Peacocke, M; Wei, J Y

    1996-12-15

    The early response proto-oncogene c-fos is expressed at very low levels in the mammalian heart at baseline. To further investigate the mechanism of altered c-fos expression with age, we studied in the basal state the binding of five transcription proteins to their cognate sites in the c-fos promoter/enhancer region, in adult and old F344 rats. Our results show a reduced binding of E2F and AP1 proteins to the c-fos promoter in aging hearts. The major calcium/cyclic AMP response element (CRE) and SP1 binding was unchanged. The only increase seen with age was in the serum response element (SRE) binding proteins. SRE is the point of convergence of different signal transduction pathways (via MAP kinases and the Rho family of GTPases) at the c-fos promoter. Increased SRE binding may reflect a compensation for a decreased binding of other transcription proteins to the c-fos promoter, alteration in the phosphorylation status of SRF, or a change in the ternary complex factors Elk 1 or SAP 1. Other possibilities include defects in the signal transduction pathways with aging, which combine to produce an overall negative balance in the function of the c-fos promoter despite the increased SRE binding activity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have shown decreased c-fos expression with age. This may be due partly to alterations in the basal levels of transcription factor binding.

  6. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies on the catalytic region of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Fes

    SciTech Connect

    Gnemmi, Ilaria; Scotti, Claudia; Cappelletti, Donata; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Condorelli, Fabrizio; Rosano, Camillo

    2007-01-01

    The catalytic domain of human Fes tyrosine kinase has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase c-fps/fes encodes a structurally unique protein (Fes) of the nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) family. Its expression has been demonstrated in myeloid haematopoietic cells, vascular endothelial cells and in neurons. In human-derived and murine-derived cell lines, the activated form of this kinase can induce cellular transformation; moreover, it has been shown that Fes is involved in the regulation of cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions mediated by adherens junctions and focal adhesions. The N-terminus of Fes contains the FCH (Fps/Fes/Fer/CIP4 homology) domain, which is unique to the Fes/Fer kinase family. It is followed by three coiled-coil domains and an SH2 (Src-homology 2) domain. The catalytic region (Fes-CR) is located at the C-terminus of the protein. The successful expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic part of Fes (Fes-CR) are described.

  7. Regulation of Mcl-1 by SRSF1 and SRSF5 in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gautrey, Hannah L.; Tyson-Capper, Alison J.

    2012-01-01

    Up-regulation of the apoptosis-regulatory gene Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1) occurs in different cancer types and is linked with drug resistance to cancer therapies. It is well known that Mcl-1 pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing events to produce two functionally distinct proteins, Mcl-1S (pro-apoptotic) and Mcl-lL (anti-apoptotic); the latter isoform is predominant in different cancers including breast and ovarian cancer cells. In the present study we report that the RNA-binding protein (RBP) and proto-oncogene SRSF1 (serine and arginine-rich splicing factor 1) influences splicing of Mcl-1 in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and JAR choriocarcinoma cells; we also show for the first time that another RBP SRSF5 affects splicing of Mcl-1 in the MCF-7 cells. Moreover, we report that SRSF1 is involved in other aspects of Mcl-1 regulation with knockdown of SRSF1, by RNAi, resulting in a significant decrease in Mcl-1 protein levels in MCF-7 cells but an increase in JAR cells, respectively, by potentially affecting protein stability and translation of Mcl-l. The key findings from this study highlight the importance of the cellular context of different cancer cells for the function of multifunctional RBPs like SRSF1 and have implications for therapeutic approaches employed to target Mcl-1. PMID:23284704

  8. Regulation of Mcl-1 by SRSF1 and SRSF5 in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gautrey, Hannah L; Tyson-Capper, Alison J

    2012-01-01

    Up-regulation of the apoptosis-regulatory gene Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1) occurs in different cancer types and is linked with drug resistance to cancer therapies. It is well known that Mcl-1 pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing events to produce two functionally distinct proteins, Mcl-1(S) (pro-apoptotic) and Mcl-l(L) (anti-apoptotic); the latter isoform is predominant in different cancers including breast and ovarian cancer cells. In the present study we report that the RNA-binding protein (RBP) and proto-oncogene SRSF1 (serine and arginine-rich splicing factor 1) influences splicing of Mcl-1 in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and JAR choriocarcinoma cells; we also show for the first time that another RBP SRSF5 affects splicing of Mcl-1 in the MCF-7 cells. Moreover, we report that SRSF1 is involved in other aspects of Mcl-1 regulation with knockdown of SRSF1, by RNAi, resulting in a significant decrease in Mcl-1 protein levels in MCF-7 cells but an increase in JAR cells, respectively, by potentially affecting protein stability and translation of Mcl-l. The key findings from this study highlight the importance of the cellular context of different cancer cells for the function of multifunctional RBPs like SRSF1 and have implications for therapeutic approaches employed to target Mcl-1.

  9. Combinatorial protein reagents to manipulate protein function.

    PubMed

    Colas, P

    2000-02-01

    The design and use of combinatorial protein libraries has become a fast moving field in molecular biology. Different experimental systems supporting various selection schemes are now available. The latest breakthroughs include evolutionary experiments to improve existing binding surfaces, selections of homodimerizing peptides, the use of peptide aptamers to disrupt protein interactions inside living cells, and functional selections of aptamers to probe regulatory networks.

  10. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  11. NTRK fusion oncogenes in pediatric papillary thyroid carcinoma in northeast United States.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manju L; Vyas, Monika; Horne, Matthew J; Virk, Renu K; Morotti, Raffaella; Liu, Zongzhi; Tallini, Giovanni; Nikiforova, Marina N; Christison-Lagay, Emily R; Udelsman, Robert; Dinauer, Catherine A; Nikiforov, Yuri E

    2016-04-01

    An increase in thyroid cancers, predominantly papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), has been recently reported in children. The histopathology of 28 consecutive PTCs from the northeast United States was reviewed. None of the patients (ages 6-18 years; 20 females, 8 males) had significant exposure to radiation. Nucleic acid from tumors was tested for genetic abnormalities (n = 27). Negative results were reevaluated by targeted next-generation sequencing. Seven of 27 PTCs (26%) had neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor (NTRK) fusion oncogenes (NTRK type 3/ets variant 6 [NTRK3/ETV6], n =5; NTRK3/unknown, n = 1; and NTRK type 1/translocated promoter region, nuclear basket protein [NTRK1/TPR], n = 1), including 5 tumors that measured >2 cm and 3 that diffusely involved the entire thyroid or lobe. All 7 tumors had lymphatic invasion, and 5 had vascular invasion. Six of 27 PTCs (22%) had ret proto-oncogene (RET) fusions (RET/PTC1, n = 5; RET/PTC3, n = 1); 2 tumors measured >2 cm and diffusely involved the thyroid, and 5 had lymphatic invasion, with vascular invasion in 2. Thirteen PTCs had the B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) valine-to-glutamic acid mutation at position 600 (BRAF(V) (600E)) (13 of 27 tumors; 48%), 11 measured <2 cm, and 6 had lymphatic invasion (46%), with vascular invasion in 3. Fusion oncogene tumors, compared with BRAF(V) (600E) PTCs, were associated with large size (mean, 2.2 cm vs 1.5 cm, respectively; P = .05), solid and diffuse variants (11 of 13 vs 0 of 13 tumors, respectively; P < .001), and lymphovascular invasion (12 of 13 vs 6 of 13 tumors, respectively; P = .02); BRAF(V) (600E) PTCs were predominantly the classic variant (12 of 13 vs 1 of 13 tumors). Two tumors metastasized to the lung, and both had fusion oncogenes (NTRK1/TPR, n = 1; RET/PTC1, n = 1). Fusion oncogene PTC presents with more extensive disease and aggressive pathology than BRAF(V) (600E) PTC in the pediatric population. The high prevalence of the NTRK1/NTRK3

  12. Beside P53 and PTEN: Identification of molecular alterations of the RAS/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas to determine potential novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuhui; Cavazza, Elisa; Barlier, Catherine; Salleron, Julia; Filhine-Tresarrieu, Pierre; Gavoilles, Céline; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Harlé, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Despite great histological and molecular heterogeneity, the clinical management of high-grade ovarian carcinomas remains unspecialized. As a major subgroup, high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs) require novel therapies. In addition to utilizing conventional histological prognostic markers and performing oncogenetic investigations, the molecular diagnostic method of next generation sequencing (NGS) was performed to identify ‘druggable’ targets that could provide access to innovative therapy. The present study was performed in 45 HGSOC patients (mean age, 59.1 years; range, 25–87 years) with histologically proven HGSOC. Breast cancer 1/2 (BRCA1/2) germline mutations were screened in 17 patients with a familial or personal history of cancer, which was justified by oncogenetic investigations. Tumor protein 53 (P53) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression were assessed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using immunohistochemistry. Somatic mutations of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog, neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA) and MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase (MET) were screened using NGS on DNA extracts from frozen tumor specimens obtained at diagnosis. With a median follow-up of 38 months (range, 6–93 months), 20 patients are alive, 10 patients are disease-free and 14 patients progressed within 6 months following platinum-based therapy. P53 overexpression was detected in 67% of patients and PTEN loss was detected in 38% of the patients. The overexpression of mutant P53 was found to be associated with a longer progression-free and overall survival. In total, 2 NRAS (exon 3), 3 PIK3CA (exon 5 and 10) and 5 MET mutations (exons 14 and 18) were detected. In HGSOCs, in addition to P53 and PTEN alterations, somatic genetic abnormalities can be detected using NGS and provide molecular

  13. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  14. Rab1b overexpression modifies Golgi size and gene expression in HeLa cells and modulates the thyrotrophin response in thyroid cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Romero, Nahuel; Dumur, Catherine I; Martinez, Hernán; García, Iris A; Monetta, Pablo; Slavin, Ileana; Sampieri, Luciana; Koritschoner, Nicolas; Mironov, Alexander A; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Alvarez, Cecilia

    2013-03-01

    Rab1b belongs to the Rab-GTPase family that regulates membrane trafficking and signal transduction systems able to control diverse cellular activities, including gene expression. Rab1b is essential for endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi transport. Although it is ubiquitously expressed, its mRNA levels vary among different tissues. This work aims to characterize the role of the high Rab1b levels detected in some secretory tissues. We report that, in HeLa cells, an increase in Rab1b levels induces changes in Golgi size and gene expression. Significantly, analyses applied to selected genes, KDELR3, GM130 (involved in membrane transport), and the proto-oncogene JUN, indicate that the Rab1b increase acts as a molecular switch to control the expression of these genes at the transcriptional level, resulting in changes at the protein level. These Rab1b-dependent changes require the activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein consensus binding site in those target promoter regions. Moreover, our results reveal that, in a secretory thyroid cell line (FRTL5), Rab1b expression increases in response to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Additionally, changes in Rab1b expression in FRTL5 cells modify the specific TSH response. Our results show, for the first time, that changes in Rab1b levels modulate gene transcription and strongly suggest that a Rab1b increase is required to elicit a secretory response.

  15. Stressing out over long noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Audas, Timothy E; Lee, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have revealed that humans possess far fewer protein-encoding genes than originally predicted. These over-estimates were drawn from the inherent developmental and stimuli-responsive complexity found in humans and other mammals, when compared to lower eukaryotic organisms. This left a conceptual void in many cellular networks, as a new class of functional molecules was necessary for "fine-tuning" the basic proteomic machinery. Transcriptomics analyses have determined that the vast majority of the genetic material is transcribed as noncoding RNA, suggesting that these molecules could provide the functional diversity initially sought from proteins. Indeed, as discussed in this review, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), the largest family of noncoding transcripts, have emerged as common regulators of many cellular stressors; including heat shock, metabolic deprivation and DNA damage. These stimuli, while divergent in nature, share some common stress-responsive pathways, notably inhibition of cell proliferation. This role intrinsically makes stress-responsive lncRNA regulators potential tumor suppressor or proto-oncogenic genes. As the list of functional RNA molecules continues to rapidly expand it is becoming increasingly clear that the significance and functionality of this family may someday rival that of proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Transactivation Domain of Human c-Myc Is Essential to Alleviate Poly(Q)-Mediated Neurotoxicity in Drosophila Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Raj, Kritika; Sarkar, Surajit

    2017-03-18

    Polyglutamine (poly(Q)) disorders, such as Huntington's disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxias, represent a group of neurological disorders which arise due to an atypically expanded poly(Q) tract in the coding region of the affected gene. Pathogenesis of these disorders inside the cells begins with the assembly of these mutant proteins in the form of insoluble inclusion bodies (IBs), which progressively sequester several vital cellular transcription factors and other essential proteins, and finally leads to neuronal dysfunction and apoptosis. We have shown earlier that targeted upregulation of Drosophila myc (dmyc) dominantly suppresses the poly(Q) toxicity in Drosophila. The present study examines the ability of the human c-myc proto-oncogene and also identifies the specific c-Myc isoform which drives the mitigation of poly(Q)-mediated neurotoxicity, so that it could be further substantiated as a potential drug target. We report for the first time that similar to dmyc, tissue-specific induced expression of human c-myc also suppresses poly(Q)-mediated neurotoxicity by an analogous mechanism. Among the three isoforms of c-Myc, the rescue potential was maximally manifested by the full-length c-Myc2 protein, followed by c-Myc1, but not by c-MycS which lacks the transactivation domain. Our study suggests that strategies focussing on the transactivation domain of c-Myc could be a very useful approach to design novel drug molecules against poly(Q) disorders.

  17. Regulatory functional territory of PLK-1 and their substrates beyond mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shiv; Sharma, Garima; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Kim, Jaebong

    2017-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK-1) is a well-known (Ser/Thr) mitotic protein kinase and is considered as a proto-oncogene. As hyper-activation of PLK-1 is broadly associated with poor prognosis and cancer progression, it is one of the most extensively studied mitotic kinases. During mitosis, PLK-1 regulates various cell cycle events, such as spindle pole maturation, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. However, studies have demonstrated that the role of PLK-1 is not only restricted to mitosis, but PLK-1 can also regulate other vital events beyond mitosis, including transcription, translation, ciliogenesis, checkpoint adaptation and recovery, apoptosis, chromosomes dynamics etc. Recent reviews have tried to define the regulatory role of PLK-1 during mitosis progression and tumorigenesis, but its’ functional role beyond mitosis is still largely unexplored. PLK-1 can regulate the activity of many proteins that work outside of its conventional territory. The dysregulation of these proteins can cause diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, tumorigenesis etc. and may also lead to drug resistance. Thus, in this review, we discussed the versatile role of PLK-1 and tried to collect data to validate its’ functional role in cell cycle regulation apart from mitosis. PMID:28415805

  18. CBL enhances breast tumor formation by inhibiting tumor suppressive activity of TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Kang, J M; Park, S; Kim, S J; Hong, H Y; Jeong, J; Kim, H-S; Kim, S-J

    2012-12-13

    Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (CBL) protein family functions as multifunctional adaptor proteins and E3 ubiquitin ligases that are implicated as regulators of signaling in various cell types. Recent discovery revealed mutations of proto-oncogenic CBL in the linker region and RING finger domain in human acute myeloid neoplasm, and these transforming mutations induced carcinogenesis. However, the adaptor function of CBL mediated signaling pathway during tumorigenesis has not been well characterized. Here, we show that CBL is highly expressed in breast cancer cells and significantly inhibits transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) tumor suppressive activity. Knockdown of CBL expression resulted in the increased expression of TGF-β target genes, PAI-I and CDK inhibitors such as p15(INK4b) and p21(Cip1). Furthermore, we demonstrate that CBL is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer tissues, and the loss of CBL decreases the tumorigenic activity of breast cancer cells in vivo. CBL directly binds to Smad3 through its proline-rich motif, thereby preventing Smad3 from interacting with Smad4 and blocking nuclear translocation of Smad3. CBL-b, one of CBL protein family, also interacted with Smad3 and knockdown of both CBL and CBL-b further enhanced TGF-β transcriptional activity. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which oncogenic CBL can block TGF-β tumor suppressor activity.

  19. Quercetin-induced apoptosis of HT-29 colon cancer cells via inhibition of the Akt-CSN6-Myc signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Mei; Qian, Yayun; Dong, Xiaoyun; Gu, Hao; Wang, Haibo; Guo, Shiyu; Hisamitsu, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive photomorphogenesis 9 signalosome (CSN) consists of a total of eight subunits (CSN1-CSN8) in mammalian cells. CSN6 may promote carcinogenesis by positively regulating v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (Myc) and MDM2 proto-oncogene stability, and is regarded as a potential target for cancer therapy. Quercetin has a substantial anticancer effect on various human cancer cells. The present study investigated the effects of quercetin on HT-29 human colorectal cancer cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest using an MTT assay, flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy and western blotting. It was determined that quercetin inhibited HT-29 cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and nuclear collapse were observed in the 50, 100 and 200 µM quercetin groups. The exposure of HT-29 cells to quercetin led to significant cell cycle arrest in the S-phase. Western blot analysis revealed that quercetin reduced the protein expression levels of phosphorylated-Akt and increased CSN6 protein degradation; therefore, affecting the expression levels of Myc, p53, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2 associated X protein. The overexpression of CSN6 reduced the effect of quercetin treatment on HT-29 cells, suggesting that quercetin-induced apoptosis may involve the Akt-CSN6-Myc signaling axis in HT-29 cells. PMID:27748879

  20. Oncogenic forms of the neu/HER2 tyrosine kinase are permanently coupled to phospholipase C gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Peles, E; Levy, R B; Or, E; Ullrich, A; Yarden, Y

    1991-01-01

    The neu/HER2 proto-oncogene encodes a transmembrane tyrosine kinase homologous to receptors for polypeptide growth factors. The oncogenic potential for the presumed receptor is released through multiple genetic mechanisms including a specific point mutation, truncation at the extracellular domain and overexpression of the protooncogene. Here we show that all these modes of oncogenic activation result in a constitutively phosphorylated neu protein and an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase (PLC gamma). The examined transforming neu/HER2 proteins, unlike the normal gene product, also co-immunoprecipitated with PLC gamma molecules. A kinase-defective mutant of a transforming neu failed to mediate both tyrosine phosphorylation and association with PLC gamma, suggesting direct interaction of the neu kinase with PLC gamma. This possibility was examined by employing a chimeric protein composed of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the neu cytoplasmic portion. The chimeric receptor mediated rapid ligand-dependent modification of PLC gamma on tyrosine residues. It also physically associated, in a ligand-dependent manner, with the phosphoinositidase. Based on the presented results we suggest that the mechanism of cellular transformation by the neu/HER2 receptor involves tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of PLC gamma. Images PMID:1676673

  1. P2A-Fluorophore Tagging of BRAF Tightly Links Expression to Fluorescence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The Braf proto-oncogene is a key component of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade and is a critical regulator of both normal development and tumorigenesis in a variety of tissues. In order to elucidate BRAF’s differing roles in varying cell types, it is important to understand both the pattern and timing of BRAF expression. Here we report the production of a mouse model that links the expression of Braf with the bright red fluorescent protein, tdTomato. We have utilized a P2A knock-in strategy, ensuring that BRAF and the fluorophore are expressed from the same endogenous promoter and from the same bicistronic mRNA transcript. This mouse model (BrafTOM) shows bright red fluorescence in organs and cell types known to be sensitive to BRAF perturbation. We further show that on a cell-by-cell basis, fluorescence correlates with BRAF protein levels. Finally, we extend the utility of this mouse by demonstrating that the remnant P2A fragment attached to BRAF acts as a suitable epitope for immunoprecipitation and biochemical characterization of BRAF in vivo. PMID:27348307

  2. A novel oncogene, ost, encodes a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that potentially links Rho and Rac signaling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Y; Beeler, J F; Sakaguchi, K; Tachibana, M; Miki, T

    1994-01-01

    Transfection of NIH3T3 cells with an osteosarcoma expression cDNA library led to the appearance of foci of morphologically transformed cells which were found to harbor a novel oncogene, ost. The ost product was activated by truncation of the N-terminal domain of the ost proto-oncogene and was highly tumorigenic in nude mouse assays. The proto-ost cDNA, isolated subsequently, encodes a predicted protein of 100 kDa containing DH (Db1 homology) and PH (pleckstrin homology) domains. Ost is mainly phosphorylated on serine and localized in the cytoplasm. Purified Ost protein catalyzed guanine nucleotide exchange on RhoA and Cdc42 among the Rho and Ras family members tested, indicating that Ost can activate these small GTP-binding proteins. Ost did not detectably associate with RhoA or Cdc42, but interacted specifically with the GTP-bound form of Rac1, suggesting that Ost can function as an effector of Rac1. These results suggest that Ost is a critical regulatory component which links pathways that signal through Rac1, RhoA and Cdc42. Of the tissues examined, expression of ost was the highest in brain and could be localized to neurons and alpha-tanycytes, suggesting that Ost may participate in axonal transport in these specialized cells. Images PMID:7957046

  3. The Homothorax homeoprotein activates the nuclear localization of another homeoprotein, Extradenticle, and suppresses eye development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Chi-Yun; Kuo, Tung-Sheng; Jaw, Thomas J.; Kurant, Estee; Chen, Cheng-Tse; Bessarab, Dmitri A.; Salzberg, Adi; Sun, Y. Henry

    1998-01-01

    The Extradenticle (Exd) protein in Drosophila acts as a cofactor to homeotic proteins. Its nuclear localization is regulated. We report the cloning of the Drosophila homothorax (hth) gene, a homolog of the mouse Meis1 proto-oncogene that has a homeobox related to that of exd. Comparison with Meis1 finds two regions of high homology: a novel MH domain and the homeodomain. In imaginal discs, hth expression coincides with nuclear Exd. hth and exd also have virtually identical, mutant clonal phenotypes in adults. These results suggest that hth and exd function in the same pathway. We show that hth acts upstream of exd and is required and sufficient for Exd protein nuclear localization. We also show that hth and exd are both negative regulators of eye development; their mutant clones caused ectopic eye formation. Targeted expression of hth, but not of exd, in the eye disc abolished eye development completely. We suggest that hth acts with exd to delimit the eye field and prevent inappropriate eye development. PMID:9450936

  4. Molecular Bases of Cutaneous and Uveal Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaudi, Sudeep; Messina, Jane L.

    2011-01-01

    Intensive research in recent years has begun to unlock the mysteries surrounding the molecular pathogenesis of melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers. The high-penetrance, low-frequency susceptibility gene CDKN2A produces tumor suppressor proteins that function in concert with p53 and retinoblastoma protein to thwart melanomagenesis. Aberrant CDKN2A gene products have been implicated in a great many cases of familial cutaneous melanoma. Sporadic cases, on the other hand, often involve constitutive signal transduction along the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, with particular focus falling upon mutated RAS and RAF protooncogenes. The proliferative effects of the MAPK pathway may be complemented by the antiapoptotic signals of the PI3K/AKT pathway. After skin, melanoma most commonly affects the eye. Data for the constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway in uveal melanoma exists as well, however, not through mutations of RAS and RAF. Rather, evidence implicates the proto-oncogene GNAQ. In the following discussion, we review the major molecular pathways implicated in both familial and sporadic cutaneous melanomagenesis, the former accounting for approximately 10% of cases. Additionally, we discuss the molecular pathways for which preliminary evidence suggests a role in uveal melanomagenesis. PMID:21876842

  5. A subdomain in the transmembrane domain is necessary for p185neu* activation.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, H; Bangalore, L; Bormann, B J; Stern, D F

    1992-01-01

    The neu proto-oncogene encodes a protein highly homologous to the epidermal growth factor receptor. The neu protein (p185) has a molecular weight of 185,000 Daltons and, like the EGF receptor, possesses tyrosine kinase activity. neu is activated in chemically induced rat neuro/glioblastomas by substitution of valine 664 with glutamic acid within the transmembrane domain. The activated neu* protein (p185*) has an elevated tyrosine kinase activity and a higher propensity to dimerize, but the mechanism of this activation is still unknown. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to explore the role of specific amino acids within the transmembrane domain in this activation. We found that the lateral position and rotational orientation of the glutamic acid in the transmembrane domain does not correlate with transformation. However, the primary structure in the vicinity of Glu664 plays a significant role in this activation. Our results suggest that the Glu664 activation involves highly specific interactions in the transmembrane domain of p185. Images PMID:1347745

  6. Emerging functions of SRSF1, splicing factor and oncoprotein, in RNA metabolism and cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Shipra; Krainer, Adrian R

    2014-09-01

    Serine/Arginine Splicing Factor 1 (SRSF1) is the archetype member of the SR protein family of splicing regulators. Since its discovery over two decades ago, SRSF1 has been repeatedly surprising and intriguing investigators by the plethora of complex biologic pathways it regulates. These include several key aspects of mRNA metabolism, such as mRNA splicing, stability, and translation, as well as other mRNA-independent processes, such as miRNA processing, protein sumoylation, and the nucleolar stress response. In this review, the structural features of SRSF1 are discussed as they relate to the intricate mechanism of splicing and the multiplicity of functions it performs. Similarly, a list of relevant alternatively spliced transcripts and SRSF1 interacting proteins is provided. Finally, emphasis is given to the deleterious consequences of overexpression of the SRSF1 proto-oncogene in human cancers, and the complex mechanisms and pathways underlying SRSF1-mediated transformation. The accumulated knowledge about SRSF1 provides critical insight into the integral role it plays in maintaining cellular homeostasis and suggests new targets for anticancer therapy. Mol Cancer Res; 12(9); 1195-204. ©2014 AACR.

  7. Tocotrienol improves learning and memory deficit of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaneai, Nozomi; Sumitani, Kazumi; Fukui, Koji; Koike, Taisuke; Takatsu, Hirokatsu; Urano, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    To define whether tocotrienol (T-3) improves cognitive deficit during aging, effect of T-3 on learning and memory functions of aged rats was assessed. It was found that T-3 markedly counteracts the decline in learning and memory function in aged rats. Quantitative analysis of T-3 content in the rat brain showed that the aged rats fed T-3 mixture-supplemented diet revealed the transport of α- and γ-T-3 to the brain. In contrast, normal young rats fed the same diet did not exhibit brain localization. Furthermore, the T-3 inhibited age-related decreases in the expression of certain blood brain barrier (BBB) proteins, including caludin-5, occludin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM). It was found that the activation of the cellular proto-oncogene c-Src and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cell signaling pathway for neuronal cell death, was markedly inhibited by T-3. These results may reveal that aging induces partial BBB disruption caused by oxidative stress, thereby enabling the transport of T-3 through the BBB to the central nervous system, whereupon neuronal protection may be mediated by inhibition of c-Src and/or ERK activation, resulting in an improvement in age-related cognitive deficits. PMID:27013777

  8. Closing the Phenotypic Gap between Transformed Neuronal Cell Lines in Culture and Untransformed Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Tereance A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Ott, C. Mark; HonerzuBentrup, Kerstin; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Nelman-Gonzales, Mayra; Pierson, Duane L.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of neuronal dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS) are frequently limited by the failure of primary neurons to propagate in vitro. Neuronal cell lines can be substituted for primary cells but they often misrepresent normal conditions. We hypothesized that a dimensional (3-D) cell culture system would drive the phenotype of transformed neurons closer to that of untransformed cells. In our studies comparing 3-D versus 2-dimensional (2-D) culture, neuronal SH-SY5Y (SY) cells underwent distinct morphological changes combined with a significant drop in their rate of cell division. Expression of the proto-oncogene N-myc and the RNA binding protein HuD was decreased in 3-D culture as compared to standard 2-D conditions. We observed a decline in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in 3-D culture, coupled with increased expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak. Moreover, thapsigargin (TG)-induced apoptosis was enhanced in the 3-D cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly differing mRNA levels for over 700 genes in the cells of each culture type. These results indicate that a 3-D culture approach narrows the phenotypic gap between neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. The resulting cells may readily be used for in vitro research of neuronal pathogenesis.

  9. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  10. Learning about Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, and protecting you from disease. All About Amino Acids When you eat foods that contain protein, the ... called amino (say: uh-MEE-no) acids. The amino acids then can be reused to make the proteins ...

  11. Protein C blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in the body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... history of blood clots. Protein C helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  12. Protein S blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... a normal substance in your body that prevents blood clotting. A blood test can be done to see ... family history of blood clots. Protein S helps control blood clotting. A lack of this protein or problem with ...

  13. Protein and older adults.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, Ronni

    2004-12-01

    Body composition changes as people get older. One of the noteworthy alterations is the reduction in total body protein. A decrease in skeletal muscle is the most noticeable manifestation of this change but there is also a reduction in other physiologic proteins such as organ tissue, blood components, and immune bodies as well as declines in total body potassium and water. This contributes to impaired wound healing, loss of skin elasticity, and an inability to fight infection. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for adults for protein is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. Protein tissue accounts for 30% of whole-body protein turnover but that rate declines to 20% or less by age 70. The result of this phenomenon is that older adults require more protein/kilogram body weight than do younger adults. Recently, it has become clear that the requirement for exogenous protein is at least 1.0 gram/kilogram body weight. Adequate dietary intake of protein may be more difficult for older adults to obtain. Dietary animal protein is the primary source of high biological value protein, iron, vitamin B(12), folic acid, biotin and other essential nutrients. In fact, egg protein is the standard against which all other proteins are compared. Compared to other high-quality protein sources like meat, poultry and seafood, eggs are the least expensive. The importance of dietary protein cannot be underestimated in the diets of older adults; inadequate protein intake contributes to a decrease in reserve capacity, increased skin fragility, decreased immune function, poorer healing, and longer recuperation from illness.

  14. Modeling Protein Self Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton Buck; Hull, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of proteins is an important part of the standards-based science curriculum. Proteins serve vital roles within the cell and malfunctions in protein self assembly are implicated in degenerative diseases. Experience indicates that this topic is a difficult one for many students. We have found that the concept…

  15. Overview of Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Reymond Sutandy, FX; Qian, Jiang; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarray is an emerging technology that provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput way. Two major classes of protein microarrays are defined to describe their applications: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be fractionated and spotted on a slide to form a reverse-phase protein microarray. While the fabrication technology is maturing, applications of protein microarrays, especially functional protein microarrays, have flourished during the past decade. Here, we will first review recent advances in the protein microarray technologies, and then present a series of examples to illustrate the applications of analytical and functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. The research areas will include detection of various binding properties of proteins, study of protein posttranslational modifications, analysis of host-microbe interactions, profiling antibody specificity, and identification of biomarkers in autoimmune diseases. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:23546620

  16. CSF total protein

    MedlinePlus

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  17. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  18. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  19. Texturized dairy proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dairy proteins are amenable to structural modifications induced by high temperature, shear and moisture; in particular, whey proteins can change conformation to new unfolded states. The change in protein state is a basis for creating new foods. The dairy products, nonfat dried milk (NDM), whey prote...

  20. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  1. SAMPyling Proteins in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Darwin, K. Heran; Hofmann, Kay

    2010-01-01

    For some time post-translational small protein modifications were found only in eukaryotes; much later, such modifications were identified in some species of bacteria. The recent discovery of ubiquitin-like proteins that form polymeric chains and covalently modify proteins in archaea finally closes the evolutionary gap among the domains of life. PMID:20547064

  2. The E5 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Daniel; Petti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The E5 proteins are short transmembrane proteins encoded by many animal and human papillomaviruses. These proteins display transforming activity in cultured cells and animals, and they presumably also play a role in the productive virus life cycle. The E5 proteins are thought to act by modulating the activity of cellular proteins. Here, we describe the biological activities of the best-studied E5 proteins and discuss the evidence implicating specific protein targets and pathways in mediating these activities. The primary target of the 44-amino acid BPV1 E5 is the PDGF β receptor, whereas the EGF receptor appears to be an important target of the 83-amino acid HPV16 E5 protein. Both E5 proteins also bind to the vacuolar ATPase and affect MHC class I expression and cell-cell communication. Continued studies of the E5 proteins will elucidate important aspects of transmembrane protein-protein interactions, cellular signal transduction, cell biology, virus replication, and tumorigenesis. PMID:23731971

  3. Protein-protein interactions in multienzyme megasynthetases.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Kira J; Müller, Rolf

    2008-04-14

    The multienzyme polyketide synthases (PKSs), nonribosomal polypeptide synthetases (NRPSs), and their hybrids are responsible for the construction in bacteria of numerous natural products of clinical value. These systems generate high structural complexity by using a simple biosynthetic logic--that of the assembly line. Each of the individual steps in building the metabolites is designated to an independently folded domain within gigantic polypeptides. The domains are clustered into functional modules, and the modules are strung out along the proteins in the order in which they act. Every metabolite results, therefore, from the successive action of up to 100 individual catalysts. Despite the conceptual simplicity of this division-of-labor organization, we are only beginning to decipher the molecular details of the numerous protein-protein interactions that support assembly-line biosynthesis, and which are critical to attempts to re-engineer these systems as a tool in drug discovery. This review aims to summarize the state of knowledge about several aspects of protein-protein interactions, including current architectural models for PKS and NRPS systems, the central role of carrier proteins, and the structural basis for intersubunit recognition.

  4. Protopia: a protein-protein interaction tool

    PubMed Central

    Real-Chicharro, Alejandro; Ruiz-Mostazo, Iván; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Kerzazi, Amine; Chniber, Othmane; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions can be considered the basic skeleton for living organism self-organization and homeostasis. Impressive quantities of experimental data are being obtained and computational tools are essential to integrate and to organize this information. This paper presents Protopia, a biological tool that offers a way of searching for proteins and their interactions in different Protein Interaction Web Databases, as a part of a multidisciplinary initiative of our institution for the integration of biological data . Results The tool accesses the different Databases (at present, the free version of Transfac, DIP, Hprd, Int-Act and iHop), and results are expressed with biological protein names or databases codes and can be depicted as a vector or a matrix. They can be represented and handled interactively as an organic graph. Comparison among databases is carried out using the Uniprot codes annotated for each protein. Conclusion The tool locates and integrates the current information stored in the aforementioned databases, and redundancies among them are detected. Results are compatible with the most important network analysers, so that they can be compared and analysed by other world-wide known tools and platforms. The visualization possibilities help to attain this goal and they are especially interesting for handling multiple-step or complex networks. PMID:19828077

  5. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  6. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  7. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  8. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  9. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  10. Protein Complexes in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Caufield, J. Harry; Abreu, Marco; Wimble, Christopher; Uetz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale analyses of protein complexes have recently become available for Escherichia coli and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, yielding 443 and 116 heteromultimeric soluble protein complexes, respectively. We have coupled the results of these mass spectrometry-characterized protein complexes with the 285 “gold standard” protein complexes identified by EcoCyc. A comparison with databases of gene orthology, conservation, and essentiality identified proteins conserved or lost in complexes of other species. For instance, of 285 “gold standard” protein complexes in E. coli, less than 10% are fully conserved among a set of 7 distantly-related bacterial “model” species. Complex conservation follows one of three models: well-conserved complexes, complexes with a conserved core, and complexes with partial conservation but no conserved core. Expanding the comparison to 894 distinct bacterial genomes illustrates fractional conservation and the limits of co-conservation among components of protein complexes: just 14 out of 285 model protein complexes are perfectly conserved across 95% of the genomes used, yet we predict more than 180 may be partially conserved across at least half of the genomes. No clear relationship between gene essentiality and protein complex conservation is observed, as even poorly conserved complexes contain a significant number of essential proteins. Finally, we identify 183 complexes containing well-conserved components and uncharacterized proteins which will be interesting targets for future experimental studies. PMID:25723151

  11. Protein and vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Kate A; Munn, Elizabeth A; Baines, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    A vegetarian diet can easily meet human dietary protein requirements as long as energy needs are met and a variety of foods are eaten. Vegetarians should obtain protein from a variety of plant sources, including legumes, soy products, grains, nuts and seeds. Eggs and dairy products also provide protein for those following a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet. There is no need to consciously combine different plant proteins at each meal as long as a variety of foods are eaten from day to day, because the human body maintains a pool of amino acids which can be used to complement dietary protein. The consumption of plant proteins rather than animal proteins by vegetarians may contribute to their reduced risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.

  12. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  13. Protein Folding: Detailed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Vijay

    Proteins play a fundamental role in biology. With their ability to perform numerous biological roles, including acting as catalysts, antibodies, and molecular signals, proteins today realize many of the goals that modern nanotechnology aspires to. However, before proteins can carry out these remarkable molecular functions, they must perform another amazing feat — they must assemble themselves. This process of protein self-assembly into a particular shape, or "fold" is called protein folding. Due to the importance of the folded state in the biological activity of proteins, recent interest from misfolding related diseases [1], as well as a fascination of just how this process occurs [2-4], there has been much work performed in order to unravel the mechanism of protein folding [5].

  14. [Atypical ubiquitination of proteins].

    PubMed

    Buneeva, O A; Medvedev, A E

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquitination is a type of posttranslational modification of intracellular proteins characterized by covalent attachment of one (monoubiquitination) or several (polyubiquitination) of ubiquitin molecules to target proteins. In the case of polyubiquitination, linear or branched polyubiquitin chains are formed. Their formation involves various lysine residues of monomeric ubiquitin. The best studied is Lys48-polyubiquitination, which targets proteins for proteasomal degradation. In this review we have considered examples of so-called atypical polyubiquitination, which mainly involves other lysine residues (Lys6, Lys11, Lys27, Lys29, Lys33, Lys63) and also N-terminal methionine. The considered examples convincingly demonstrate that polyubiquitination of proteins not necessarily targets proteins for their proteolytic degradation in proteasomes. Atypically polyubiquitinated proteins are involved in regulation of various processes and altered polyubiquitination of certain proteins is crucial for development of serious diseases.

  15. The Protein Folding Problem

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Ken A.; Ozkan, S. Banu; Shell, M. Scott; Weikl, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    The “protein folding problem” consists of three closely related puzzles: (a) What is the folding code? (b) What is the folding mechanism? (c) Can we predict the native structure of a protein from its amino acid sequence? Once regarded as a grand challenge, protein folding has seen great progress in recent years. Now, foldable proteins and nonbiological polymers are being designed routinely and moving toward successful applications. The structures of small proteins are now often well predicted by computer methods. And, there is now a testable explanation for how a protein can fold so quickly: A protein solves its large global optimization problem as a series of smaller local optimization problems, growing and assembling the native structure from peptide fragments, local structures first. PMID:18573083

  16. Protein solubility modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, J. C.; Clark, A. H.; Regan, L.; O'Hern, C. S.

    2017-07-01

    Proteins are biological polymers that underlie all cellular functions. The first high-resolution protein structures were determined by x-ray crystallography in the 1960s. Since then, there has been continued interest in understanding and predicting protein structure and stability. It is well-established that a large contribution to protein stability originates from the sequestration from solvent of hydrophobic residues in the protein core. How are such hydrophobic residues arranged in the core; how can one best model the packing of these residues, and are residues loosely packed with multiple allowed side chain conformations or densely packed with a single allowed side chain conformation? Here we show that to properly model the packing of residues in protein cores it is essential that amino acids are represented by appropriately calibrated atom sizes, and that hydrogen atoms are explicitly included. We show that protein cores possess a packing fraction of φ ≈ 0.56 , which is significantly less than the typically quoted value of 0.74 obtained using the extended atom representation. We also compare the results for the packing of amino acids in protein cores to results obtained for jammed packings from discrete element simulations of spheres, elongated particles, and composite particles with bumpy surfaces. We show that amino acids in protein cores pack as densely as disordered jammed packings of particles with similar values for the aspect ratio and bumpiness as found for amino acids. Knowing the structural properties of protein cores is of both fundamental and practical importance. Practically, it enables the assessment of changes in the structure and stability of proteins arising from amino acid mutations (such as those identified as a result of the massive human genome sequencing efforts) and the design of new folded, stable proteins and protein-protein interactions with tunable specificity and affinity.

  18. Effects of PTCs on nonsense-mediated mRNA decay are dependent on PTC location.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heegyum; Zheng, Xuexiu; Loh, Tiing Jen; Jang, Ha Na; Liu, Yongchao; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Shen, Haihong

    2017-03-01

    The récepteur d'origine nantais (RON) gene is a proto-oncogene that is responsible for encoding the human macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP) 1 receptor. MSP activation induces RON-mediated cell dissociation, migration and matrix invasion. Isoforms of RON that exclude exons 5 and 6 encode the RONΔ160 protein, which promotes cell transformation in vitro and tumor metastasis in vivo. Premature termination codons (PTCs) in exons activate the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) signaling pathway. The present study demonstrated that PTCs at various locations in the alternative exons 5 and 6 could induce NMD of the majority of the spliced, or partially spliced, isoforms. However, the isoforms that excluded exon 6 or exons 5 and 6 were markedly increased when produced from mutated minigenes with inserted PTCs. Furthermore, the unspliced isoform of intron 5 was not observed to be decreased by the presence of PTCs. Notably, these effects may be dependent on the location of the PTCs. The current study demonstrated a novel mechanism underlying the regulation of NMD in alternative splicing.

  19. The Mos/MAP kinase pathway stabilizes c-Fos by phosphorylation and augments its transforming activity in NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, K; Sagata, N

    1995-01-01

    The c-mos proto-oncogene product, Mos, is a serine/threonine kinase that can activate ERK1 and 2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases by direct phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK). ERK activation is essential for oncogenic transformation of NIH 3T3 cells by Mos. In this study, we examined how mitogenic and oncogenic signalling from the Mos/MEK/ERK pathway reaches the nucleus to activate downstream target genes. We show that c-Fos (the c-fos protooncogene product), which is an intrinsically unstable nuclear protein, is metabolically highly stabilized, and greatly enhances the transforming efficiency of NIH 3T3 cells, by Mos. This stabilization of c-Fos required Mos-induced phosphorylation of its C-terminal region on Ser362 and Ser374, and double replacements of these serines with acidic (Asp) residues markedly increased the stability and transforming efficiency of c-Fos even in the absence of Mos. Moreover, activation of the ERK pathway was necessary and sufficient for the c-Fos phosphorylation and stabilization by Mos. These results indicate that c-Fos undergoes stabilization, and mediates at least partly the oncogenic signalling, by the Mos/MEK/ERK pathway. The present findings also suggest that, in general, the ERK pathway may regulate the cell fate and function by affecting the metabolic stability of c-Fos. Images PMID:7588633

  20. Identification by cDNA microarray technology of genes modulated by artificial ultraviolet radiation in normal human melanocytes: relation to melanocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valéry, C; Grob, J J; Verrando, P

    2001-12-01

    Target genes of ultraviolet stress response in cutaneous melanocytes, potentially associated with solar-induced melanocarcinogenesis, were characterized by cDNA microarray technology. In cultured normal human melanocytes, 198 genes out of approximately 9000 arrayed were found modulated > or = 1.9 times following artificial ultraviolet minus sign mainly ultraviolet-B minus sign irradiation (100 mJ per cm(2)). Among them, 159 corresponded to known sequences, the encoded proteins being mostly involved in DNA or RNA binding/synthesis/modification, or ribosomal proteins. The others were transcription factors, receptors, tumor suppressors, and (proto)oncogenes. Members of these families have already been linked to melanoma. In addition, some of the modulated genes were borne by chromosomes harboring candidate melanoma loci. Comparisons with genes modified in melanoma samples reported in previous studies with similar microarray platform showed that 59% of the known genes sensitive to ultraviolet were modulated in the same way. Furthermore, 39 expressed sequence tags were modulated, and preliminary experiments showed that two expressed sequence tags displayed differential expressions both in melanoma cell lines and in melanoma tumors. These results provide a basis for further studies on the role of modulated genes in ultraviolet-induced melanoma. Because some of these genes are potential markers of the disease, they might help for developing new molecular-based strategies for risk prediction in patients.

  1. The PRE and PQ box are functionally distinct yeast pheromone response elements.

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, P; Cochran, B H

    1990-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromones function by binding to cell surface receptors and activating signal transduction processes which regulate gene expression. In this report, we have analyzed the minimum sequence requirements for conferring both a and alpha mating pheromone inducibilities onto a heterologous promoter. Here we show that the repetitive pheromone response element (PRE) which binds to STE12 protein is sufficient to confer pheromone responsiveness only when present in multiple copies. Moreover, by itself, it is preferentially responsive to alpha factor in a cells. In contrast, a single copy of the PQ box of the STE3 upstream activation sequence (UAS) is sufficient to confer a-factor responsiveness in alpha cells. The PQ box binds both MCM1 and MAT alpha 1 in a cooperative manner, and neither the P nor Q site alone is sufficient to confer a-factor responsiveness. In a cells, however, even multiple copies of the PQ box fail to confer alpha-factor responsiveness. Therefore, the PRE and the PQ box are functionally distinct pheromone-responsive elements with opposite cell type specificities. Moreover, these results indicate that the MCM1 protein functions in a signal transduction pathway in a manner analogous to that of its mammalian homolog, the serum response factor, which regulates the expression of the c-fos proto-oncogene in mammals. PMID:2247085

  2. Rab27A Regulates Transport of Cell Surface Receptors Modulating Multinucleation and Lysosome-Related Organelles in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Shimada-Sugawara, Megumi; Sakai, Eiko; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Izumi, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Noriaki; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Rab27A regulates transport of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) and release of secretory granules in various types of cells. Here, we identified up-regulation of Rab27A during differentiation of osteoclasts (OCLs) from bone-marrow macrophages (BMMs), by DNA microarray analysis. Rab27A deficiency in OCLs, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown in RAW-D cell line or BMMs derived from ashen mice, which display genetic defects in Rab27A expression, induced multinucleated and giant cells. Upon stimulation with macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), essential cytokines for OCL differentiation, phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (Src), and p-38 were slightly enhanced in ashen BMMs than in wild-type BMMs. The cell surface level of c-fms, an M-CSF receptor, was slightly higher in ashen BMMs than in wild-type BMMs, and down-regulation of RANK, a RANKL receptor, was delayed. In addition to receptors, OCLs derived from ashen mice exhibited aberrant actin ring formation, abnormal subcellular localization of lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP2) and cathepsin K (CTSK), and marked reduction in resorbing activity. Thus, these findings suggest that Rab27A regulates normal transport of cell surface receptors modulating multinucleation and LROs in OCLs. PMID:25882854

  3. Overexpression of c-Jun contributes to sorafenib resistance in human hepatoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Yuki; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Sasaki, Reina; Takahashi, Koji; Wu, Shuang; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in treatment strategies, it is still difficult to cure patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sorafenib is the only approved multiple kinase inhibitor for systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced HCC. The majority of advanced HCC patients are resistant to sorafenib. The mechanisms of sorafenib resistance are still unknown. Methods The expression of molecules involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in human hepatoma cell lines was examined in the presence or absence of sorafenib. Apoptosis of human hepatoma cells treated with sorafenib was investigated, and the expression of Jun proto-oncogene (c-Jun) was measured. Results The expression and phosphorylation of c-Jun were enhanced in human hepatoma cell lines after treatment with sorafenib. Inhibiting c-Jun enhanced sorafenib-induced apoptosis. The overexpression of c-Jun impaired sorafenib-induced apoptosis. The expression of osteopontin, one of the established AP-1 target genes, was enhanced after treatment with sorafenib in human hepatoma cell lines. Conclusions The protein c-Jun plays a role in sorafenib resistance in human hepatoma cell lines. The modulation and phosphorylation of c-Jun could be a new therapeutic option for enhancing responsiveness to sorafenib. Modulating c-Jun may be useful for certain HCC patients with sorafenib resistance. PMID:28323861

  4. Differential gene expression during multistage carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G.T. ); Krieg, P. )

    1991-06-01

    The use of the mouse skin multistage model of carcinogenesis has aided our understanding of critical target genes in chemical carcinogenesis. The mutagenic activation of the Harvey-ras proto-oncogene has been found to be an early event associated with the initiation of mouse skin tumors by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene and the pure initiator ethyl carbamate (urethane). In contrast to chemical initiation of mouse skin tumors, ionizing radiation-initiated malignant skin tumors have been shown to possess distinct non-ras transforming gene(s). Differential screening of cDNA libraries made from chemically initiated malignant skin tumors has been used to identify a number of cellular gene transcripts that are overexpressed during mouse skin tumor progression. These differentially expressed genes include {beta}-actin, ubiquitin, a hyperproliferative keratin (K6), a gene whose product is a member of a fatty acid or lipid-binding protein family, and a gene called transin or stromelysin. The overexpression of the stromelysin gene, which encodes a metalloproteinase that degrades proteins in the basement membrane, is hypothesized to play a functional role in malignant tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The authors believe that the cloning, identification, and characterization of gene sequences that are differentially expressed during tumor progression could lead to the discovery of gene products that either play functional roles in skin tumor progression or in the maintenance of various progressive tumor phenotypes.

  5. Kr-pok increases FASN expression by modulating the DNA binding of SREBP-1c and Sp1 at the proximal promoter[S

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Won-Il; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Benjamin; Paik, Philip Dong-Hyun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2012-01-01

    Kr-pok (kidney cancer-related POZ domain and Krüppel-like protein) is a new proto-oncogenic POZ-domain transcription factor. Fatty acid synthase gene (FASN) encodes one of the key enzymes in fatty acids synthesis and is the only enzyme that synthesizes fatty acids in cancer cells. Sp1 and SREBP-1c are the two major transcription activators of FASN. We investigated whether Kr-pok modulates transcription of the FASN. FASN expression is significantly decreased in Kr-pok knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts. Coimmunoprecipitation, GST fusion protein pull-down, and immunocytochemistry assays show that the zinc-finger domain of Kr-pok interacts directly with the bZIP DNA binding domain of SREBP-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, oligonucleotide pull-down, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Kr-pok changes the transcription factor binding dynamics of Sp1 and SREBP-1c to the SRE/E-box elements of the proximal promoter. We found that Kr-pok expression increased during 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and that FASN expression is decreased by the knockdown of Kr-pok. Kr-pok facilitates the SREBP-1c-mediated preadipocyte differentiation and/or fatty acid synthesis. Kr-pok may act as an important regulator of fatty acid synthesis and may induce rapid cancer cell proliferation by increasing palmitate synthesis. PMID:22331133

  6. Kr-pok increases FASN expression by modulating the DNA binding of SREBP-1c and Sp1 at the proximal promoter.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Won-Il; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Benjamin; Paik, Philip Dong-Hyun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2012-04-01

    Kr-pok (kidney cancer-related POZ domain and Krüppel-like protein) is a new proto-oncogenic POZ-domain transcription factor. Fatty acid synthase gene (FASN) encodes one of the key enzymes in fatty acids synthesis and is the only enzyme that synthesizes fatty acids in cancer cells. Sp1 and SREBP-1c are the two major transcription activators of FASN. We investigated whether Kr-pok modulates transcription of the FASN. FASN expression is significantly decreased in Kr-pok knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts. Coimmunoprecipitation, GST fusion protein pull-down, and immunocytochemistry assays show that the zinc-finger domain of Kr-pok interacts directly with the bZIP DNA binding domain of SREBP-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, oligonucleotide pull-down, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Kr-pok changes the transcription factor binding dynamics of Sp1 and SREBP-1c to the SRE/E-box elements of the proximal promoter. We found that Kr-pok expression increased during 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and that FASN expression is decreased by the knockdown of Kr-pok. Kr-pok facilitates the SREBP-1c-mediated preadipocyte differentiation and/or fatty acid synthesis. Kr-pok may act as an important regulator of fatty acid synthesis and may induce rapid cancer cell proliferation by increasing palmitate synthesis.

  7. Differential occurrence of CSF-like activity and transforming activity of Mos during the cell cycle in fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, K; Nishizawa, M; Furuno, N; Yasuda, H; Sagata, N

    1992-01-01

    The Xenopus c-mos proto-oncogene product, Mosxe, possesses cytostatic factor (CSF) activity to arrest maturing oocytes in metaphase II and has weak transforming activity in mouse NIH3T3 cells. We show that Mosxe mutants bearing 'stabilizing' penultimate N-terminal amino acids are strongly transforming and can retard progression through the G2-M phases in Mosxe-transformed cells, probably via their CSF activity. On the other hand, a cyclin-Mosxe fusion protein, which undergoes abrupt degradation at the end of mitosis and is restored to its normal levels only after the G1 phase, transforms cells much less efficiently than a mutated cyclin-Mosxe fusion protein that is stable during M-G1 transition. Moreover, in low-serum medium, cells transformed by the unstable cyclin-Mosxe require a long period to enter the S phase, in contrast with the rapid entry into the S phase of cells transformed by the stable cyclin-Mosxe. These results provide strong evidence that unlike the physiological CSF activity, the transforming activity of Mos is exerted in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Images PMID:1385775

  8. Anticancer activity of CX-3543: a direct inhibitor of rRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Drygin, Denis; Siddiqui-Jain, Adam; O'Brien, Sean; Schwaebe, Michael; Lin, Amy; Bliesath, Josh; Ho, Caroline B; Proffitt, Chris; Trent, Katy; Whitten, Jeffrey P; Lim, John K C; Von Hoff, Daniel; Anderes, Kenna; Rice, William G

    2009-10-01

    Hallmark deregulated signaling in cancer cells drives excessive ribosome biogenesis within the nucleolus, which elicits unbridled cell growth and proliferation. The rate-limiting step of ribosome biogenesis is synthesis of rRNA (building blocks of ribosomes) by RNA Polymerase I (Pol I). Numerous kinase pathways and products of proto-oncogenes can up-regulate Pol I, whereas tumor suppressor proteins can inhibit rRNA synthesis. In tumorigenesis, activating mutations in certain cancer-associated kinases and loss-of-function mutations in tumor suppressors lead to deregulated signaling that stimulates Pol I transcription with resultant increases in ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Certain anticancer therapeutics, such as cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, reportedly exert, at least partially, their activity through disruption of ribosome biogenesis, yet many prime targets for anticancer drugs within the ribosome synthetic machinery of the nucleolus remain largely unexploited. Herein, we describe CX-3543, a small molecule nucleolus-targeting agent that selectively disrupts nucleolin/rDNA G-quadruplex complexes in the nucleolus, thereby inhibiting Pol I transcription and inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. CX-3543 is the first G-quadruplex interactive agent to enter human clinical trials, and it is currently under evaluation against carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumors in a phase II clinical trial.

  9. CAP defines a second signalling pathway required for insulin-stimulated glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Baumann, C A; Ribon, V; Kanzaki, M; Thurmond, D C; Mora, S; Shigematsu, S; Bickel, P E; Pessin, J E; Saltiel, A R

    2000-09-14

    Insulin stimulates the transport of glucose into fat and muscle cells. Although the precise molecular mechanisms involved in this process remain uncertain, insulin initiates its actions by binding to its tyrosine kinase receptor, leading to the phosphorylation of intracellular substrates. One such substrate is the Cbl proto-oncogene product. Cbl is recruited to the insulin receptor by interaction with the adapter protein CAP, through one of three adjacent SH3 domains in the carboxy terminus of CAP. Upon phosphorylation of Cbl, the CAP-Cbl complex dissociates from the insulin receptor and moves to a caveolin-enriched, triton-insoluble membrane fraction. Here, to identify a molecular mechanism underlying this subcellular redistribution, we screened a yeast two-hybrid library using the amino-terminal region of CAP and identified the caveolar protein flotillin. Flotillin forms a ternary complex with CAP and Cbl, directing the localization of the CAP-Cbl complex to a lipid raft subdomain of the plasma membrane. Expression of the N-terminal domain of CAP in 3T3-L1 adipocytes blocks the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin, without affecting signalling events that depend on phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase. Thus, localization of the Cbl-CAP complex to lipid rafts generates a pathway that is crucial in the regulation of glucose uptake.

  10. The tumour suppressor C/EBPδ inhibits FBXW7 expression and promotes mammary tumour metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, Kuppusamy; Wang, Ju-Ming; Tsai, Hsin-Hwa; Sharan, Shikha; Anver, Miriam; Leighty, Robert; Sterneck, Esta

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation and hypoxia are known to promote the metastatic progression of tumours. The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ (C/EBPδ, CEBPD) is an inflammatory response gene and candidate tumour suppressor, but its physiological role in tumourigenesis in vivo is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a tumour suppressor function of C/EBPδ using transgenic mice overexpressing the Neu/Her2/ERBB2 proto-oncogene in the mammary gland. Unexpectedly, this study also revealed that C/EBPδ is necessary for efficient tumour metastasis. We show that C/EBPδ is induced by hypoxia in tumours in vivo and in breast tumour cells in vitro, and that C/EBPδ-deficient cells exhibit reduced glycolytic metabolism and cell viability under hypoxia. C/EBPδ supports CXCR4 expression. On the other hand, C/EBPδ directly inhibits expression of the tumour suppressor F-box and WD repeat-domain containing 7 gene (FBXW7, FBW7, AGO, Cdc4), encoding an F-box protein that promotes degradation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Consequently, C/EBPδ enhances mTOR/AKT/S6K1 signalling and augments translation and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which is necessary for hypoxia adaptation. This work provides new insight into the mechanisms by which metastasis-promoting signals are induced specifically under hypoxia. PMID:21076392

  11. Localization of the c-ets-2 transactivation domain.

    PubMed Central

    Chumakov, A M; Chen, D L; Chumakova, E A; Koeffler, H P

    1993-01-01

    The human ets-2 proto-oncogene is one of the homologs of the v-ets gene, found in avian acutely transforming retrovirus E26 (D. Leprince, A. Gegonne, J. Call, C. de Taisne, A. Schneeberger, C. Lagrou, and D. Stehelin, Nature [London] 306:395-397, 1983; M. F. Nunn, P. H. Seeburg, C. Moscovici, and P. H. Duesberg, Nature [London] 306:391-395, 1983), which causes leukemia in chickens. We used the DNA-binding domain of yeast transcriptional activator GAL4 to locate the transactivation region of human ets-2. The transactivation domain of ets-2 was found in the N-terminal part of the protein, which is homologous to ets-1, and can be disrupted by deletion of a stretch of acidic amino acid residues. A transactivation-deficient mutant of ets-2 failed to transform Rat-1 cells and suppressed the transforming activity of coexpressed wild-type ets-2. A mutation in the putative DNA-binding region of ets-2 abolished transforming activity. We show that the motif crucial for ets-2 transactivation capability is necessary for transforming activity in Rat-1 cells. Mutant ets-2 protein that lacks the transactivation domain has a dominant negative effect on transformation by wild-type ets-2. We were unable to detect ets-2-dependent transcriptional regulation of several enhancers containing ets-binding motifs. Images PMID:8445738

  12. Spontaneous Remission of an Untreated, MYC and BCL2 Coexpressing, High-Grade B-Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Potts, D. Alan; Fromm, Jonathan R.; Gopal, Ajay K.

    2017-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies typically treated with multiagent chemotherapy. Rarely, spontaneous remissions can be observed, particularly in more indolent subtypes. The prognosis of aggressive NHL can be predicted using clinical and histopathologic factors. In aggressive B-cell NHL, the importance of MYC and BCL2 proto-oncogene coexpression (as assessed by immunohistochemistry) and high-grade histologic features are particularly noteworthy. We report a unique case of spontaneous remission in a patient with an aggressive B-cell NHL which harbored high-risk histopathologic features, including MYC protein expression at 70–80%, BCL2 protein expression, and morphologic features suggestive of high-grade B-cell lymphoma, NOS (formerly B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma [BCLU]). After undergoing a biopsy to confirm this diagnosis, he opted to forego curative-intent chemotherapy. The single, yet relatively large area of involvement noted on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography steadily resolved on subsequent follow-up studies. He remained without evidence of recurrence one year later, having never received treatment. This case emphasizes the potential for spontaneous remission in NHL and demonstrates that this phenomenon can be observed despite contemporary high-risk histopathologic features. PMID:28321348

  13. Involvement of the transcription factor PU.1/Spi-1 in myeloid cell-restricted expression of an interferon-inducible gene encoding the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, C; Coeffier, E; Moreau-Gachelin, F; Wietzerbin, J; Benech, P D

    1994-01-01

    Induction by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) of the gene encoding the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor (Fc gamma R1) in myeloid cells requires an IFN-gamma response region (GRR) and a myeloid cell-activating transcription element (MATE). GRR and MATE interact with factors to form, respectively, an IFN-gamma-activating complex (GIRE-BP), depending on the phosphorylation of the 91-kDa protein (subunit of ISGF3), and a cell-type-specific complex (MATE-BP). Although GIRE-BP is detected in cells of different origins after IFN-gamma treatment, the presence of MATE-BP was found to be restricted to B- and myeloid cell lines. Sequence analysis of a cDNA encoding a polypeptide recognizing specifically the MATE motif led to the identification of this product as the proto-oncogene PU.1/Spi-1, a transcriptional activator expressed in myeloid and B cells. Expression of this factor in nonhematopoietic cells allowed IFN-gamma-induced expression of a reporter gene under control of the GRR and MATE sequences. The presence of these motifs in other gene promoters indicates that the binding of PU.1/Spi-1 and IFN regulatory proteins to their respective motifs could be part of a general mechanism leading to cell-type-restricted and IFN-induced gene expression. Images PMID:8035786

  14. Molecular mechanisms of cell cycle control in the mouse Y1 adrenal cell line.

    PubMed

    Costa, Erico T; Forti, Fábio L; Rocha, Kátia M; Moraes, Miriam S; Armelin, Hugo A

    2004-11-01

    Y1 adrenocortical tumor cells possess amplified and overexpressed c-Ki-ras proto-oncogene, displaying chronic high levels of the c-Ki-Ras-GTP protein. Despite this oncogenic lesion, we previously reported that Y1 cells retain tight regulatory mechanisms of cell cycle control typified by the mitogenic response triggered by FGF2 in G0/G1-arrested cells. ACTH, on the other hand, elicits cAMP/PKA-mediated antimitogenic mechanisms involving Akt/PKB dephosphorylation/deactivation and c-Myc protein degradation, blocking G1 phase progression stimulated by FGF2. In this paper we report that ACTH does not directly antagonize any of the early or late sequential steps comprising the mitogenic response triggered by FGF2. In effect, ACTH targets deactivation of constitutively phosphorylated-Akt, restraining the potential of c-Ki-Ras-GTP to subvert Y1 cell cycle control. Thus, we can consider ACTH a tumor suppressor rather than an antimitogenic hormone. In addition, we present initial results showing that high constitutive levels of c-Ki-Ras-GTP render Y1 cells susceptible to dye upon FGF2 treatment. This surprising FGF2 death-effect, that is independent of the well known FGF2-mitogenic activity, might involve a natural unsuspected mechanism for restraining oncogene-induced proliferation.

  15. Comprehensive Analysis of NRG1 Common and Rare Variants in Hirschsprung Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luzón-Toro, Berta; Torroglosa, Ana; Núñez-Torres, Rocío; Enguix-Riego, María Valle; Fernández, Raquel María; de Agustín, Juan Carlos; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Borrego, Salud

    2012-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, OMIM 142623) is a developmental disorder characterized by the absence of ganglion cells along variable lengths of the distal gastrointestinal tract, which results in tonic contraction of the aganglionic gut segment and functional intestinal obstruction. The RET proto-oncogene is the major gene for HSCR with differential contributions of its rare and common, coding and noncoding mutations to the multifactorial nature of this pathology. Many other genes have been described to be associated with the pathology, as NRG1 gene (8p12), encoding neuregulin 1, which is implicated in the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS), and seems to contribute by both common and rare variants. Here we present the results of a comprehensive analysis of the NRG1 gene in the context of the disease in a series of 207 Spanish HSCR patients, by both mutational screening of its coding sequence and evaluation of 3 common tag SNPs as low penetrance susceptibility factors, finding some potentially damaging variants which we have functionally characterized. All of them were found to be associated with a significant reduction of the normal NRG1 protein levels. The fact that those mutations analyzed alter NRG1 protein would suggest that they would be related with HSCR disease not only in Chinese but also in a Caucasian population, which reinforces the implication of NRG1 gene in this pathology. PMID:22574178

  16. fps/fes knockout mice display a lactation defect and the fps/fes tyrosine kinase is a component of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions in breast epithelial cells during lactation.

    PubMed

    Truesdell, Peter F; Zirngibl, Ralph A; Francis, Sarah; Sangrar, Waheed; Greer, Peter A

    2009-10-15

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase implicated in vesicular trafficking and cytokine and growth factor signaling in hematopoietic, neuronal, vascular endothelial and epithelial lineages. Genetic evidence has suggested a tumor suppressor role for Fps/Fes in breast and colon. Here we used fps/fes knockout mice to investigate potential roles for this kinase in development and function of the mammary gland. Fps/Fes expression was induced during pregnancy and lactation, and its kinase activity was dramatically enhanced. Milk protein and fat composition from nursing fps/fes-null mothers was normal; however, pups reared by them gained weight more slowly than pups reared by wild-type mothers. Fps/Fes displayed a predominantly dispersed punctate intracellular distribution which was consistent with vesicles within the luminal epithelial cells of lactating breast, while a small fraction co-localized with beta-catenin and E-cadherin on their basolateral surfaces. Fps/Fes was found to be a component of the E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) complex; however, the phosphotyrosine status of beta-catenin and core AJ components in fps/fes-null breast tissue was unaltered, and epithelial cell AJs and gland morphology were intact. We conclude that Fps/Fes is not essential for the maintenance of epithelial cell AJs in the lactating breast but may instead play important roles in vesicular trafficking and milk secretion.

  17. The 5S RNP Couples p53 Homeostasis to Ribosome Biogenesis and Nucleolar Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Katherine E.; Bohnsack, Markus T.; Watkins, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Several proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors regulate the production of ribosomes. Ribosome biogenesis is a major consumer of cellular energy, and defects result in p53 activation via repression of mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) homolog by the ribosomal proteins RPL5 and RPL11. Here, we report that RPL5 and RPL11 regulate p53 from the context of a ribosomal subcomplex, the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). We provide evidence that the third component of this complex, the 5S rRNA, is critical for p53 regulation. In addition, we show that the 5S RNP is essential for the activation of p53 by p14ARF, a protein that is activated by oncogene overexpression. Our data show that the abundance of the 5S RNP, and therefore p53 levels, is determined by factors regulating 5S complex formation and ribosome integration, including the tumor suppressor PICT1. The 5S RNP therefore emerges as the critical coordinator of signaling pathways that couple cell proliferation with ribosome production. PMID:24120868

  18. Functional interdependence of NHE1 and merlin in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Frontzek, Fabian; Nitzlaff, Svenja; Horstmann, Malte; Schwab, Albrecht; Stock, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Upregulation of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) has been correlated with tumor malignancy. In contrast, moesin-radixin-ezrin-like protein (merlin) is a tumor suppressor that protects from cancerogenesis. Merlin is highly related to the members of the ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) protein family that are directly attached to and functionally linked with NHE1. In addition, merlin inhibits the MAPK cascade and the Rho-GTPases known to activate NHE1 activity. The present study investigates whether NHE1 expression and activity affect merlin or, conversely, whether merlin has an impact on NHE1 in human melanoma (MV3) cells. Indeed, features of merlin-deficient MV3 cells point to a functional link: merlin-deficient cells showed a decreased NHE1 expression and, paradoxically, an increase in NHE1 activity as measured upon cytosolic acidification (NH4Cl prepulse method). Loss of merlin also led to an elevated cell motility that could be further increased by NHE1 overexpression, whereas NHE1 overexpression alone had no effect on migration. In contrast, neither NHE1 expression nor its activity had an impact on merlin expression. These results suggest a novel tumor suppressor function of merlin in melanoma cells: the inhibition of the proto-oncogenic NHE1 activity, possibly including its downstream signaling pathways.

  19. Mechanically induced c-fos expression is mediated by cAMP in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    In serum-deprived MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts, mechanical stimulation caused by mild (287 x g) centrifugation induced a 10-fold increase in mRNA levels of the proto-oncogene, c-fos. Induction of c-fos was abolished by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H-89, suggesting that the transient c-fos mRNA increase is mediated by cAMP. Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by chronic TPA treatment failed to significantly reduce c-fos induction, suggesting that TPA-sensitive isoforms of PKC are not responsible for c-fos up-regulation. In addition, 287 x g centrifugation increased intracellular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels 2.8-fold (P<0. 005). Since we have previously shown that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can induce c-fos expression via a cAMP-mediated mechanism, we asked whether the increase in c-fos mRNA was due to centrifugation-induced PGE2 release. Pretreatment with the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and flurbiprofen did not hinder the early induction of c-fos by mechanical stimulation. We conclude that c-fos expression induced by mild mechanical loading is dependent primarily on cAMP, not PKC, and initial induction of c-fos is not necessarily dependent on the action of newly synthesized PGE2.

  20. Anti-proliferative activity of the NPM1 interacting natural product avrainvillamide in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Vibeke; Erikstein, Bjarte S; Mukherjee, Herschel; Sulen, André; Popa, Mihaela; Sørnes, Steinar; Reikvam, Håkon; Chan, Kok-Ping; Hovland, Randi; McCormack, Emmet; Bruserud, Øystein; Myers, Andrew G; Gjertsen, Bjørn T

    2016-12-01

    Mutated nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) acts as a proto-oncogene and is present in ~30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we examined the in vitro and in vivo anti-leukemic activity of the NPM1 and chromosome region maintenance 1 homolog (CRM1) interacting natural product avrainvillamide (AVA) and a fully syntetic AVA analog. The NPM1-mutated cell line OCI-AML3 and normal karyotype primary AML cells with NPM1 mutations were significantly more sensitive towards AVA than cells expressing wild-type (wt) NPM1. Furthermore, the presence of wt p53 sensitized cells toward AVA. Cells exhibiting fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) internal tandem duplication mutations also displayed a trend toward increased sensitivity to AVA. AVA treatment induced nuclear retention of the NPM1 mutant protein (NPMc+) in OCI-AML3 cells and primary AML cells, caused proteasomal degradation of NPMc+ and the nuclear export factor CRM1 and downregulated wt FLT3 protein. In addition, both AVA and its analog induced differentiation of OCI-AML3 cells together with an increased phagocytotic activity and oxidative burst potential. Finally, the AVA analog displayed anti-proliferative activity against subcutaneous xenografted HCT-116 and OCI-AML3 cells in mice. Our results demonstrate that AVA displays enhanced potency against defined subsets of AML cells, suggesting that therapeutic intervention employing AVA or related compounds may be feasible.

  1. Connexin43 recruits PTEN and Csk to inhibit c-Src activity in glioma cells and astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    González-Sánchez, Ana; Jaraíz-Rodríguez, Myriam; Domínguez-Prieto, Marta; Herrero-González, Sandra; Medina, José M.; Tabernero, Arantxa

    2016-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43), the major protein forming gap junctions in astrocytes, is reduced in high-grade gliomas, where its ectopic expression exerts important effects, including the inhibition of the proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (c-Src). In this work we aimed to investigate the mechanism responsible for this effect. The inhibition of c-Src requires phosphorylation at tyrosine 527 mediated by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and dephosphorylation at tyrosine 416 mediated by phosphatases, such as phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Our results showed that the antiproliferative effect of Cx43 is reduced when Csk and PTEN are silenced in glioma cells, suggesting the involvement of both enzymes. Confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that Cx43, in addition to c-Src, binds to PTEN and Csk in glioma cells transfected with Cx43 and in astrocytes. Pull-down assays showed that region 266–283 in Cx43 is sufficient to recruit c-Src, PTEN and Csk and to inhibit the oncogenic activity of c-Src. As a result of c-Src inhibition, PTEN was increased with subsequent inactivation of Akt and reduction of proliferation of human glioblastoma stem cells. We conclude that the recruitment of Csk and PTEN to the region between residues 266 and 283 within the C-terminus of Cx43 leads to c-Src inhibition. PMID:27391443

  2. Cell type-specific roles of Jak3 in IL-2-induced proliferative signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Hodaka . E-mail: hodaka@med.nyu.edu

    2007-03-16

    Binding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to its specific receptor induces activation of two members of Jak family protein tyrosine kinases, Jak1 and Jak3. An IL-2 receptor (IL-2R)-reconstituted NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell line proliferates in response to IL-2 only when hematopoietic lineage-specific Jak3 is ectopically expressed. However, the mechanism of Jak3-dependent proliferation in the fibroblast cell line is not known. Here, I showed that Jak3 expression is dispensable for IL-2-induced activation of Jak1 and Stat proteins and expression of nuclear proto-oncogenes in the IL-2R-reconstituted fibroblast cell line. Jak3 expression markedly enhanced these IL-2-induced signaling events. In contrast, Jak3 expression was essential for induction of cyclin genes involved in the G1-S transition. These data suggest a critical role of Jak3 in IL-2 signaling in the fibroblast cell line and may provide further insight into the cell type-specific mechanism of cytokine signaling.

  3. Signal transduction-associated and cell activation-linked antigens expressed in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Ghannadan, Minoo; Hauswirth, Alexander W; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Arock, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are multifunctional hematopoietic effector cells that produce and release an array of biologically active mediator substances. Growth and functions of MCs are regulated by cytokines, other extracellular factors, surface and cytoplasmic receptors, oncogene products, and a complex network of signal transduction cascades. Key regulators of differentiation of MCs appear to be stem cell factor (SCF) and its tyrosine kinase receptor KIT (c-kit proto-oncogene product=CD117), downstream-acting elements, and the mi transcription factor (MITF). Signaling through KIT is negatively regulated by the signal regulatory protein (SIRP)-alpha (CD172a)-SHP-1-pathway that is disrupted in neoplastic MCs in MC proliferative disorders. Both KIT and FcepsilonRI are involved in MC activation and mediator release. Activation of MCs through FcepsilonRI is associated with increased expression of activation-linked membrane antigens as well as with signaling events involving Lyn and Syk kinases, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-pathway, Ras pathway, and the phospholipase C-protein kinase C pathway. A similar network of signaling is found in SCF-activated MCs. The current article gives an overview on signal transduction-associated and activation-linked antigens expressed in human MCs. Wherever possible the functional implication of signaling pathways and antigen expression are discussed.

  4. Self-inactivating alpharetroviral vectors with a split-packaging design.

    PubMed

    Suerth, Julia D; Maetzig, Tobias; Galla, Melanie; Baum, Christopher; Schambach, Axel

    2010-07-01

    Accidental insertional activation of proto-oncogenes and potential vector mobilization pose serious challenges for human gene therapy using retroviral vectors. Comparative analyses of integration sites of different retroviral vectors have elucidated distinct target site preferences, highlighting vectors based on the alpharetrovirus Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) as those with the most neutral integration spectrum. To date, alpharetroviral vector systems are based mainly on single constructs containing viral coding sequences and intact long terminal repeats (LTR). Even though they are considered to be replication incompetent in mammalian cells, the transfer of intact viral genomes is unacceptable for clinical applications, due to the risk of vector mobilization and the potentially immunogenic expression of viral proteins, which we minimized by setting up a split-packaging system expressing the necessary viral proteins in trans. Moreover, intact LTRs containing transcriptional elements are capable of activating cellular genes. By removing most of these transcriptional elements, we were able to generate a self-inactivating (SIN) alpharetroviral vector, whose LTR transcriptional activity is strongly reduced and whose transgene expression can be driven by an internal promoter of choice. Codon optimization of the alpharetroviral Gag/Pol expression construct and further optimization steps allowed the production of high-titer self-inactivating vector particles in human cells. We demonstrate proof of principle for the versatility of alpharetroviral SIN vectors for the genetic modification of murine and human hematopoietic cells at a low multiplicity of infection.

  5. Context-dependent signal integration by the GLI code: the oncogenic load, pathways, modifiers and implications for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Aberger, Fritz; Ruiz I Altaba, Ariel

    2014-09-01

    Canonical Hedgehog (HH) signaling leads to the regulation of the GLI code: the sum of all positive and negative functions of all GLI proteins. In humans, the three GLI factors encode context-dependent activities with GLI1 being mostly an activator and GLI3 often a repressor. Modulation of GLI activity occurs at multiple levels, including by co-factors and by direct modification of GLI structure. Surprisingly, the GLI proteins, and thus the GLI code, is also regulated by multiple inputs beyond HH signaling. In normal development and homeostasis these include a multitude of signaling pathways that regulate proto-oncogenes, which boost positive GLI function, as well as tumor suppressors, which restrict positive GLI activity. In cancer, the acquisition of oncogenic mutations and the loss of tumor suppressors - the oncogenic load - regulates the GLI code toward progressively more activating states. The fine and reversible balance of GLI activating GLI(A) and GLI repressing GLI(R) states is lost in cancer. Here, the acquisition of GLI(A) levels above a given threshold is predicted to lead to advanced malignant stages. In this review we highlight the concepts of the GLI code, the oncogenic load, the context-dependency of GLI action, and different modes of signaling integration such as that of HH and EGF. Targeting the GLI code directly or indirectly promises therapeutic benefits beyond the direct blockade of individual pathways.

  6. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Tim; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel is activated by PKA phosphorylation of a regulatory domain that interacts dynamically with multiple CFTR domains and with other proteins. The large number of consensus sequences for phosphorylation by PKA has naturally focused most attention on regulation by this kinase. We report here that human CFTR is also phosphorylated by the tyrosine kinases p60c-Src (proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase) and the proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and they can also cause robust activation of quiescent CFTR channels. In excised patch-clamp experiments, CFTR activity during exposure to Src or Pyk2 reached ∼80% of that stimulated by PKA. Exposure to PKA after Src or Pyk2 caused a further increase to the level induced by PKA alone, implying a common limiting step. Channels became spontaneously active when v-Src or the catalytic domain of Pyk2 was coexpressed with CFTR and were further stimulated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor dephostatin. Exogenous Src also activated 15SA-CFTR, a variant that lacks 15 potential PKA sites and has little response to PKA. PKA-independent activation by tyrosine phosphorylation has implications for the mechanism of regulation by the R domain and for the physiologic functions of CFTR.—Billet, A., Jia, Y., Jensen, T., Riordan, J. R., Hanrahan, J. W. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:26062600

  7. Identification of cyclin A/Cdk2 phosphorylation sites in B-Myb.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, O; Horstmann, S; Toprak, K; Klempnauer, K H; Ferrari, S

    1999-03-01

    B-myb is a highly conserved member of the myb proto-oncogene family that encodes a ubiquitously expressed 110-kDa sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. Transactivation of Myb-inducible promoters by B-Myb is repressed by a regulatory domain located at the C-terminus of the protein. Cyclin A/Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation apparently releases the negative constraint and triggers B-Myb transactivation potential. Two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide analysis indicated that the majority of the sites phosphorylated in vivo are targeted in vitro by cyclin A/Cdk2. Six sites in B-Myb fulfil the requirements for recognition by Cdk2. Using point mutation of the phosphorylation sites to nonphosphorylatable amino acids, we show that five of these sites are targets for Cdk2 in vivo. Mutation of one of these residues (T524) to alanine diminished the ability of B-Myb to promote transcription of a reporter gene, suggesting that phosphorylation of B-Myb at this site is important for the regulation of its activity by cyclin A/Cdk2.

  8. Anti-proliferative activity of the NPM1 interacting natural product avrainvillamide in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Vibeke; Erikstein, Bjarte S; Mukherjee, Herschel; Sulen, André; Popa, Mihaela; Sørnes, Steinar; Reikvam, Håkon; Chan, Kok-Ping; Hovland, Randi; McCormack, Emmet; Bruserud, Øystein; Myers, Andrew G; Gjertsen, Bjørn T

    2016-01-01

    Mutated nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) acts as a proto-oncogene and is present in ~30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we examined the in vitro and in vivo anti-leukemic activity of the NPM1 and chromosome region maintenance 1 homolog (CRM1) interacting natural product avrainvillamide (AVA) and a fully syntetic AVA analog. The NPM1-mutated cell line OCI-AML3 and normal karyotype primary AML cells with NPM1 mutations were significantly more sensitive towards AVA than cells expressing wild-type (wt) NPM1. Furthermore, the presence of wt p53 sensitized cells toward AVA. Cells exhibiting fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) internal tandem duplication mutations also displayed a trend toward increased sensitivity to AVA. AVA treatment induced nuclear retention of the NPM1 mutant protein (NPMc+) in OCI-AML3 cells and primary AML cells, caused proteasomal degradation of NPMc+ and the nuclear export factor CRM1 and downregulated wt FLT3 protein. In addition, both AVA and its analog induced differentiation of OCI-AML3 cells together with an increased phagocytotic activity and oxidative burst potential. Finally, the AVA analog displayed anti-proliferative activity against subcutaneous xenografted HCT-116 and OCI-AML3 cells in mice. Our results demonstrate that AVA displays enhanced potency against defined subsets of AML cells, suggesting that therapeutic intervention employing AVA or related compounds may be feasible. PMID:27906185

  9. The Role of c-KIT in Tumorigenesis: Evaluation in Canine Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Joshua D; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Kaneene, John B; Miller, RoseAnn; Resau, James H; Kiupel, Matti

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The c-KIT proto-oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neoplastic diseases, including gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mastocytosis in humans, and mast cell tumors (MCTs) in canines. Cutaneous MCTs are common neoplasms in dogs and have a variable biologic behavior. The goal of this study was to define the prognostic significance of c-KIT mutations identified in canine MCTs and the associations between c-KIT mutations, KIT localization, and KIT expression levels. Microdissection and polymerase chain reaction were performed on 60 MCTs to identify c-KIT mutations. Anti-KIT antibodies were used for immunohistochemical evaluation of KIT localization. Forty-two MCTs were included in a tissue microarray, and KIT expression was quantified using immunofluorescence. Canine MCTs with c-KIT mutations were significantly associated with an increased incidence of recurrent disease and death. c-KIT mutations were also significantly associated with aberrant protein localization; however, the level of KIT expression did not correlate with either c-KIT mutations or changes in protein localization. Considering the high prevalence of canine MCTs and the central role of c-KIT in the tumorigenesis of certain tumors, canine MCTs are an excellent model for characterizing the role of c-KIT in neoplastic diseases and is a potential target for novel therapeutic agents in clinical trials. PMID:16611403

  10. The role of c-KIT in tumorigenesis: evaluation in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Webster, Joshua D; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Kaneene, John B; Miller, RoseAnn; Resau, James H; Kiupel, Matti

    2006-02-01

    The c-KIT proto-oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neoplastic diseases, including gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mastocytosis in humans, and mast cell tumors (MCTs) in canines. Cutaneous MCTs are common neoplasms in dogs and have a variable biologic behavior. The goal of this study was to define the prognostic significance of c-KIT mutations identified in canine MCTs and the associations between c-KIT mutations, KIT localization, and KIT expression levels. Microdissection and polymerase chain reaction were performed on 60 MCTs to identify c-KIT mutations. Anti-KIT antibodies were used for immunohistochemical evaluation of KIT localization. Forty-two MCTs were included in a tissue microarray, and KIT expression was quantified using immunofluorescence. Canine MCTs with c-KIT mutations were significantly associated with an increased incidence of recurrent disease and death. c-KIT mutations were also significantly associated with aberrant protein localization; however, the level of KIT expression did not correlate with either c-KIT mutations or changes in protein localization. Considering the high prevalence of canine MCTs and the central role of c-KIT in the tumorigenesis of certain tumors, canine MCTs are an excellent model for characterizing the role of c-KIT in neoplastic diseases and is a potential target for novel therapeutic agents in clinical trials.

  11. The 5S RNP couples p53 homeostasis to ribosome biogenesis and nucleolar stress.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Katherine E; Bohnsack, Markus T; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2013-10-17

    Several proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors regulate the production of ribosomes. Ribosome biogenesis is a major consumer of cellular energy, and defects result in p53 activation via repression of mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) homolog by the ribosomal proteins RPL5 and RPL11. Here, we report that RPL5 and RPL11 regulate p53 from the context of a ribosomal subcomplex, the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). We provide evidence that the third component of this complex, the 5S rRNA, is critical for p53 regulation. In addition, we show that the 5S RNP is essential for the activation of p53 by p14(ARF), a protein that is activated by oncogene overexpression. Our data show that the abundance of the 5S RNP, and therefore p53 levels, is determined by factors regulating 5S complex formation and ribosome integration, including the tumor suppressor PICT1. The 5S RNP therefore emerges as the critical coordinator of signaling pathways that couple cell proliferation with ribosome production. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of neoplastic gene regulatory pathways by the RNA-binding factor AUF1

    PubMed Central

    Zucconi, Beth E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    The mRNA-binding protein AUF1 regulates the expression of many key players in cancer including proto-oncogenes, regulators of apoptosis and the cell cycle, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, principally by directing the decay kinetics of their encoded mRNAs. Most studies support an mRNA-destabilizing role for AUF1, although other findings suggest additional functions for this factor. In this review, we explore how changes in AUF1 isoform distribution, subcellular localization, and post-translational protein modifications can influence the metabolism of targeted mRNAs. However, several lines of evidence also support a role for AUF1 in the initiation and/or development of cancer. Many AUF1-targeted transcripts encode products that control pro- and anti-oncogenic processes. Also, overexpression of AUF1 enhances tumorigenesis in murine models, and AUF1 levels are enhanced in some tumors. Finally, signaling cascades that modulate AUF1 function are deregulated in some cancerous tissues. Together, these features suggest that AUF1 may play a prominent role in regulating the expression of many genes that can contribute to tumorigenic phenotypes, and that this post-transcriptional regulatory control point may be subverted by diverse mechanisms in neoplasia. PMID:21622178

  13. Mechanically induced c-fos expression is mediated by cAMP in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    In serum-deprived MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts, mechanical stimulation caused by mild (287 x g) centrifugation induced a 10-fold increase in mRNA levels of the proto-oncogene, c-fos. Induction of c-fos was abolished by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H-89, suggesting that the transient c-fos mRNA increase is mediated by cAMP. Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by chronic TPA treatment failed to significantly reduce c-fos induction, suggesting that TPA-sensitive isoforms of PKC are not responsible for c-fos up-regulation. In addition, 287 x g centrifugation increased intracellular prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels 2.8-fold (P<0. 005). Since we have previously shown that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can induce c-fos expression via a cAMP-mediated mechanism, we asked whether the increase in c-fos mRNA was due to centrifugation-induced PGE2 release. Pretreatment with the cyclooxygenase inhibitors indomethacin and flurbiprofen did not hinder the early induction of c-fos by mechanical stimulation. We conclude that c-fos expression induced by mild mechanical loading is dependent primarily on cAMP, not PKC, and initial induction of c-fos is not necessarily dependent on the action of newly synthesized PGE2.

  14. Predictions of Protein-Protein Interfaces within Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Asadabadi, Ebrahim Barzegari; Abdolmaleki, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    Background Prediction of interaction sites within the membrane protein complexes using the sequence data is of a great importance, because it would find applications in modification of molecules transport through membrane, signaling pathways and drug targets of many diseases. Nevertheless, it has gained little attention from the protein structural bioinformatics community. Methods In this study, a wide variety of prediction and classification tools were applied to distinguish the residues at the interfaces of membrane proteins from those not in the interfaces. Results The tuned SVM model achieved the high accuracy of 86.95% and the AUC of 0.812 which outperforms the results of the only previous similar study. Nevertheless, prediction performances obtained using most employed models cannot be used in applied fields and needs more effort to improve. Conclusion Considering the variety of the applied tools in this study, the present investigation could be a good starting point to develop more efficient tools to predict the membrane protein interaction site residues. PMID:23919118

  15. Toxic proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Elisa; Calvert, Valerie; Hodge, Alex; VanMeter, Amy; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2017-01-01

    While genes and RNA encode information about cellular status, proteins are considered the engine of the cellular machine, as they are the effective elements that drive all cellular functions including proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis. Consequently, investigations of the cellular protein network are considered a fundamental tool for understanding cellular functions.Alteration of the cellular homeostasis driven by elaborate intra- and extracellular interactions has become one of the most studied fields in the era of personalized medicine and targeted therapy. Increasing interest has been focused on developing and improving proteomic technologies that are suitable for analysis of clinical samples. In this context, reverse-phase protein microarrays (RPPA) is a sensitive, quantitative, high-throughput immunoassay for protein analyses of tissue samples, cells, and body fluids.RPPA is well suited for broad proteomic profiling and is capable of capturing protein activation as well as biochemical reactions such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, protein cleavage, and conformational alterations across hundreds of samples using a limited amount of biological material. For these reasons, RPPA represents a valid tool for protein analyses and generates data that help elucidate the functional signaling architecture through protein-protein interaction and protein activation mapping for the identification of critical nodes for individualized or combinatorial targeted therapy.

  17. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  18. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  19. A modified Lowry protein test for dilute protein solutions

    Treesearch

    Garold F. Gregory; Keith F. Jensen

    1971-01-01

    A modified Lowry protein test for dilute protein solutions modified Lowry protein test was compared with the standard Lowry protein test. The modified test was found to give estimates of protein concentration that were as good as the standard test and has the advange that