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Sample records for protocols lymphatic system

  1. Imaging the lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P

    2014-11-01

    Visualization of the lymphatic system is clinically necessary during diagnosis or treatment of many conditions and diseases; it is used for identifying and monitoring lymphedema, for detecting metastatic lesions during cancer staging and for locating lymphatic structures so they can be spared during surgical procedures. Imaging lymphatic anatomy and function also plays an important role in experimental studies of lymphatic development and function, where spatial resolution and accessibility are better. Here, we review technologies for visualizing and imaging the lymphatic system for clinical applications. We then describe the use of lymphatic imaging in experimental systems as well as some of the emerging technologies for improving these methodologies.

  2. Spleen and Lymphatic System

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Spleen and Lymphatic System KidsHealth > For Teens > Spleen and Lymphatic System A A A What's in this article? Why ... español El bazo y el sistema linfático The lymphatic system is an extensive drainage network that helps keep ...

  3. Spleen and Lymphatic System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Weight Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Spleen and Lymphatic System KidsHealth > For Teens > Spleen and Lymphatic System Print A A A What's in this article? Why They're Important Basic Anatomy How It Works Things That Can ...

  4. Spleen and Lymphatic System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Spleen and Lymphatic System KidsHealth > For Parents > Spleen and Lymphatic System A ... help fight off infection. About the Spleen and Lymphatic System One of the lymphatic system's major jobs is ...

  5. Spleen and Lymphatic System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Spleen and Lymphatic System KidsHealth > For Parents > Spleen and Lymphatic System Print ... help fight off infection. About the Spleen and Lymphatic System One of the lymphatic system's major jobs is ...

  6. Lymphatic System in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Robciuc, Marius R; Karaman, Sinem; Makinen, Taija; Alitalo, Kari

    2016-02-05

    The mammalian circulatory system comprises both the cardiovascular system and the lymphatic system. In contrast to the blood vascular circulation, the lymphatic system forms a unidirectional transit pathway from the extracellular space to the venous system. It actively regulates tissue fluid homeostasis, absorption of gastrointestinal lipids, and trafficking of antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes to lymphoid organs and on to the systemic circulation. The cardinal manifestation of lymphatic malfunction is lymphedema. Recent research has implicated the lymphatic system in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including obesity and metabolic disease, dyslipidemia, inflammation, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and myocardial infarction. Here, we review the most recent advances in the field of lymphatic vascular biology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease.

  7. Lymphatic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood from the upper body into the heart. Lymphatic System: Helping Defend Against Infection The lymphatic system is ... the neck, armpits, and groin. Disorders of the lymphatic system The lymphatic system may not carry out its ...

  8. [Lymphatic system and water homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Borodin, Iu I; Golubeva, I A; Mashak, A N

    2005-01-01

    Using the methods of light and electron microscopy as well as histochemistry, the complex study of structural-cellular state of the wall of small intestine and its grouped lymphoid nodules, mesenterial and iliac lymph nodes and thymus was performed in rats subjected to the changes of a type of drinking water. Tap, distilled and radon waters were used. The organism was found to respond to the changes in the type of drinking water by both non-specific (increase in sectional area of lymphatic vessels and the number of eosinophilic granulocytes in the wall of small intestine, in lymphoid nodule number containing germinal centers in lymph nodes, in proportion of thymus connective tissue component, increased lymphocyte dehydrogenase activity) and specific reactions, which were characteristic only to a given type of water. The latter, for example, included the activation of the function of protein synthesis in endothelial cells of lymphatic capillaries of the small intestine and increased numbers of plasma cells and dividing cells in lymphoid organs in rats consuming distilled water; increased proportion of blood capillaries in the wall of the small intestine, accompanied by the ultrastructural signs of reduction of plastic processes in them in animals drinking radon water. The response of the wall of the small intestine and lymphoid organs of an animal to the effect of drinking waters, different in their mineral content and radon concentrations, was subjected to general biological regularities and took place in two phases of an adaptation process, functional stress and resistivity.

  9. Lymphatic Education & Research Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphatic disease FAQs About Lymphedema FAQs About the Lymphatic System Ask The Experts Lymphedema and Lymphatic Diseases Affect ... Lymphatic Disease FAQs About Lymphedema FAQs About the Lymphatic System Ask The Experts Lymphedema and Lymphatic Diseases Affect ...

  10. Breast cancer metastasis and the lymphatic system

    PubMed Central

    RAHMAN, MUNAZZAH; MOHAMMED, SULMA

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, despite a significant decline in death rates due to early detection. The majority of cancer mortalities are due to the metastasis of tumor cells to other organs. Metastasis or tumor cell dissemination occurs via the hematogenous and lymphatic systems. For many carcinomas, the dissemination of tumor cells via lymphatic drainage of the tumor is the most common metastatic route. Such lymphatic drainage collects at the regional lymph nodes and the dissection and pathological examination of these nodes for lodged cancer cells is the gold standard procedure to detect metastasis. The present report provides an overview of the lymphatic system and its clinical significance as a prognostic factor, in addition to the interactions between the primary tumor and its microenvironment, and the influence of genomic subtypes on the resulting organ-specific pattern of tumor cell dissemination. It also examines the seemingly protracted asymptomatic period, during which the disseminated cells remain dormant, leading to the manifestation of metastasis decades after the successful treatment of the primary tumor. PMID:26622656

  11. Development of the lymphatic vascular system: a mystery unravels.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young-Kwon; Shin, Jay W; Detmar, Michael

    2004-11-01

    The blood vascular and the lymphatic system play complementary roles in tissue perfusion and fluid reabsorption. Despite its critical role in mediating tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal lipid absorption, and the immune response, the lymphatic system has not received as much attention as the blood vascular system, largely due to a lack of lymphatic-specific markers and to the dearth of knowledge about the molecular regulation of lymphatic development and function. A series of recent landmark studies now significantly has advanced our understanding of the lymphatic system. Based upon the discovery and characterization of lymphatic-specific growth factors, receptors, and transcriptional regulators, the mystery of lymphatic vascular system development begins to be unraveled. The successful isolation and cultivation of blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells has enabled comparative molecular and cellular analyses of these two genetically and developmentally closely related cell lineages. Moreover, studies of several genetic mouse models have set the framework for a new molecular model of embryonic lymphatic vascular development and have identified molecular pathways whose mutational inactivation leads to human diseases associated with lymphedema. Although these rapid advances already have led to development of the first lymphatic-targeted molecular therapies, there still remain many unanswered questions regarding almost every aspect of lymphatic vascular biology, making the lymphatic system a highly exciting and rewarding field of study.

  12. Development of the lymphatic system: new questions and paradigms.

    PubMed

    Semo, Jonathan; Nicenboim, Julian; Yaniv, Karina

    2016-03-15

    The lymphatic system is a blind-ended network of vessels that plays important roles in mediating tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal lipid absorption and the immune response. A profound understanding of the development of lymphatic vessels, as well as of the molecular cues governing their formation and morphogenesis, might prove essential for our ability to treat lymphatic-related diseases. The embryonic origins of lymphatic vessels have been debated for over a century, with a model claiming a venous origin for the lymphatic endothelium being predominant. However, recent studies have provided new insights into the origins of lymphatic vessels. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms controlling lymphatic specification and sprouting, and we discuss exciting findings that shed new light on previously uncharacterized sources of lymphatic endothelial cells.

  13. Lymphatic system: an active pathway for immune protection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shan; von der Weid, P Y

    2015-02-01

    Lymphatic vessels are well known to participate in the immune response by providing the structural and functional support for the delivery of antigens and antigen presenting cells to draining lymph nodes. Recent advances have improved our understanding of how the lymphatic system works and how it participates to the development of immune responses. New findings suggest that the lymphatic system may control the ultimate immune response through a number of ways which may include guiding antigen/dendritic cells (DC) entry into initial lymphatics at the periphery; promoting antigen/DC trafficking through afferent lymphatic vessels by actively facilitating lymph and cell movement; enabling antigen presentation in lymph nodes via a network of lymphatic endothelial cells and lymph node stroma cell and finally by direct lymphocytes exit from lymph nodes. The same mechanisms are likely also important to maintain peripheral tolerance. In this review we will discuss how the morphology and gene expression profile of the lymphatic endothelial cells in lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes provides a highly efficient pathway to initiate immune responses. The fundamental understanding of how lymphatic system participates in immune regulation will guide the research on lymphatic function in various diseases.

  14. The lymphatic vascular system of the mouse head.

    PubMed

    Lohrberg, Melanie; Wilting, Jörg

    2016-12-01

    Histological studies of the lymphatic vascular system in adult mice are hampered because bones cannot be sectioned properly. Here, we decalcified the heads of 14-day-old mice, embedded them in paraffin and stained resultant serial sections with the lymphendothelial-specific antibodies Lyve-1 and Podoplanin. We show that the tissues with the highest lymphatic vascular density are the dermis and the oral mucous membranes. In contrast, the nasal mucous membrane is devoid of lymphatics, except for its most basal parts below the vomeronasal organ. The inferior nasal turbinate contains numerous lymphatics and is connected to the nasolacrimal duct (NLD), which is ensheathed by a dense network of lymphatics. The lymphatics of the eye lids and conjunctiva are connected to those of the inferior nasal turbinate. We suggest that cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can drain via the optic nerve and NLD lymphatics, whereas CSF drained via the Fila olfactoria into the nasal mucous membrane is used for moisturization of the respiratory air. Tongue, palatine and buccal mucous membranes possess numerous lymphatics, whereas the dental pulp has none. Lymphatics are present in the maxillary gland and close to the temporomandibular joint, suggesting the augmentation of lymph flow by chewing and yawning. Lymphatics can also be found in the dura mater and in the dural septae entering into deeper parts of the brain. Our findings are discussed with regard to CSF drainage and potential routes for ocular tumor dissemination.

  15. Communication between lymphatic and venous systems in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lenan; Takeda, Kazu; Kato, Shigeki; Mori, Shiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    The lymphatic system in mice consists of lymphatic vessels and 22 types of lymph nodes. Metastatic tumor cells in the lymphatic system spread to distant organs through the venous system. However, the communication routes between the lymphatic and venous systems have not been fully elucidated. Here, we identify the communication routes between the lymphatic and venous systems in the axillary and subiliac regions of MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr inbred mice, which develop systemic swelling of lymph nodes up to 10mm in diameter, allowing investigation of the topography of the lymph nodes and lymphatic vessels. Using a gross anatomy dissection approach, the efferent lymphatic vessels of the proper axillary lymph node were shown to communicate with the subclavian vein. Furthermore, we found that the thoracoepigastric vein, which connects the subclavian vein and inferior vena cava, runs adjacent to the subiliac and proper axillary lymph nodes, and receives venous blood from these lymph nodes routed through small branches. The direction of blood flow in the thoracoepigastric vein occurred in two directions in the intermediate region between the proper axillary lymph node and subiliac lymph node; one to the subclavian vein, the other to the inferior vena cava. This paper reveals the anatomy of the communication between the lymphatic and venous systems in the axillary and subiliac regions of the mouse, and provides new insights relevant to the investigation of the mechanisms of lymph node metastasis and cancer immunology, and the development of diagnostic and treatment methods for lymph node metastasis, including drug delivery systems.

  16. Heterogeneity in the lymphatic vascular system and its origin

    PubMed Central

    Ulvmar, Maria H.; Mäkinen, Taija

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels have historically been viewed as passive conduits for fluid and immune cells, but this perspective is increasingly being revised as new functions of lymphatic vessels are revealed. Emerging evidence shows that lymphatic endothelium takes an active part in immune regulation both by antigen presentation and expression of immunomodulatory genes. In addition, lymphatic vessels play an important role in uptake of dietary fat and clearance of cholesterol from peripheral tissues, and they have been implicated in obesity and arteriosclerosis. Lymphatic vessels within different organs and in different physiological and pathological processes show a remarkable plasticity and heterogeneity, reflecting their functional specialization. In addition, lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) of different organs were recently shown to have alternative developmental origins, which may contribute to the development of the diverse lymphatic vessel and endothelial functions seen in the adult. Here, we discuss recent developments in the understanding of heterogeneity within the lymphatic system considering the organ-specific functional and molecular specialization of LECs and their developmental origin. PMID:27357637

  17. Lymphosome concept: Anatomical study of the lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Suami, Hiroo

    2017-01-01

    The gross anatomical study of the lymphatic system in humans and animals has been suspended for almost 100 years. This article introduces the author's technique for investigating the lymphatic system using the concept of the lymphosome. In revisiting the anatomical study of the lymphatic system, our updated knowledge can potentially be utilized either to reassure surgeons about their current procedures in the surgical management of cancers and lymphedema or assist them to refine them. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:13-17. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Lymphatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs. It is made up of Lymph - a fluid that contains ... They are part of the system, too. The lymphatic system clears away infection and keeps your body fluids ...

  19. An investigation of the topography of the lymphatic system of the grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). 1. The superficial lymphatic system.

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, P R

    1988-01-01

    The superficial lymphatic system of the grey kangaroo, Macropus giganteus is described. The description is based on dissections of 130 eastern grey kangaroos. The most significant difference found between the superficial lymphatic drainage pattern of kangaroos and that of the domestic species was the existence of large inguino-axillary lymphatic trunks in the kangaroo. Thus in the kangaroo, instead of lymph passing from the inguinal lymphocentre to the lumbar lymphatic trunks as is the situation in the domestic animals, lymph passes from the inguinal lymphocentre to the axillary lymphocentre. Apart from the lymph draining from the head and ventral neck (which passes to the superficial cervical lymphocentre) and lymph which may pass from the superficial lymphatic vessels to deeper lymphatic vessels, all the superficial lymphatic drainage of the kangaroo passes through the axillary lymphocentre. From the viewpoint of the meat inspection of the carcasses of kangaroos taken as game meat animals, pathology of the axillary lymphocentre may reflect disease in a much wider range of body regions than it would in a domestic animal. PMID:3198478

  20. Lymphatic obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain directions based on the structure of the lymphatic system. This helps the lymph fluid drain through the ... always appropriate or effective. Alternative Names Lymphedema Images Lymphatic system Yellow nail syndrome References Kurklinsky AK, Rooke TW. ...

  1. Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Louveau, Antoine; Smirnov, Igor; Keyes, Timothy J; Eccles, Jacob D; Rouhani, Sherin J; Peske, J David; Derecki, Noel C; Castle, David; Mandell, James W; Lee, Kevin S; Harris, Tajie H; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-07-16

    One of the characteristics of the central nervous system is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage system. Although it is now accepted that the central nervous system undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the central nervous system remain poorly understood. In searching for T-cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the cerebrospinal fluid, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the central nervous system. The discovery of the central nervous system lymphatic system may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and sheds new light on the aetiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune system dysfunction.

  2. Structural and functional features of central nervous system lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Louveau, Antoine; Smirnov, Igor; Keyes, Timothy J.; Eccles, Jacob D.; Rouhani, Sherin J.; Peske, J. David; Derecki, Noel C.; Castle, David; Mandell, James W.; Kevin, S. Lee; Harris, Tajie H.; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    One of the characteristics of the CNS is the lack of a classical lymphatic drainage system. Although it is now accepted that the CNS undergoes constant immune surveillance that takes place within the meningeal compartment1–3, the mechanisms governing the entrance and exit of immune cells from the CNS remain poorly understood4–6. In searching for T cell gateways into and out of the meninges, we discovered functional lymphatic vessels lining the dural sinuses. These structures express all of the molecular hallmarks of lymphatic endothelial cells, are able to carry both fluid and immune cells from the CSF, and are connected to the deep cervical lymph nodes. The unique location of these vessels may have impeded their discovery to date, thereby contributing to the long-held concept of the absence of lymphatic vasculature in the CNS. The discovery of the CNS lymphatic system may call for a reassessment of basic assumptions in neuroimmunology and shed new light on the etiology of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases associated with immune system dysfunction. PMID:26030524

  3. 38 CFR 4.117 - Schedule of ratings-hemic and lymphatic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and lymphatic systems. 4.117 Section 4.117 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems § 4.117 Schedule of ratings—hemic and lymphatic systems. Rating 7700Anemia, hypochromic-microcytic...

  4. 38 CFR 4.117 - Schedule of ratings-hemic and lymphatic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and lymphatic systems. 4.117 Section 4.117 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems § 4.117 Schedule of ratings—hemic and lymphatic systems. Rating 7700Anemia, hypochromic-microcytic...

  5. 38 CFR 4.117 - Schedule of ratings-hemic and lymphatic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and lymphatic systems. 4.117 Section 4.117 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems § 4.117 Schedule of ratings—hemic and lymphatic systems. Rating 7700Anemia, hypochromic-microcytic...

  6. 38 CFR 4.117 - Schedule of ratings-hemic and lymphatic systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and lymphatic systems. 4.117 Section 4.117 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Hemic and Lymphatic Systems § 4.117 Schedule of ratings—hemic and lymphatic systems. Rating 7700Anemia, hypochromic-microcytic...

  7. From sewer to saviour - targeting the lymphatic system to promote drug exposure and activity.

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, Natalie L; Kaminskas, Lisa M; Porter, Christopher J H

    2015-11-01

    The lymphatic system serves an integral role in fluid homeostasis, lipid metabolism and immune control. In cancer, the lymph nodes that drain solid tumours are a primary site of metastasis, and recent studies have suggested intrinsic links between lymphatic function, lipid deposition, obesity and atherosclerosis. Advances in the current understanding of the role of the lymphatics in pathological change and immunity have driven the recognition that lymph-targeted delivery has the potential to transform disease treatment and vaccination. In addition, the design of lymphatic delivery systems has progressed from simple systems that rely on passive lymphatic access to sophisticated structures that use nanotechnology to mimic endogenous macromolecules and lipid conjugates that 'hitchhike' onto lipid transport processes. Here, we briefly summarize the lymphatic system in health and disease and the varying mechanisms of lymphatic entry and transport, as well as discussing examples of lymphatic delivery that have enhanced therapeutic utility. We also outline future challenges to effective lymph-directed therapy.

  8. The New Era of the Lymphatic System: No Longer Secondary to the Blood Vascular System

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inho; Lee, Sunju; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    The blood and lymphatic systems are the two major circulatory systems in our body. Although the blood system has been studied extensively, the lymphatic system has received much less scientific and medical attention because of its elusive morphology and mysterious pathophysiology. However, a series of landmark discoveries made in the past decade has begun to change the previous misconception of the lymphatic system to be secondary to the more essential blood vascular system. In this article, we review the current understanding of the development and pathology of the lymphatic system. We hope to convince readers that the lymphatic system is no less essential than the blood circulatory system for human health and well-being. PMID:22474611

  9. Orofacial lymphatic malformation: management with a three steps diode laser protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccoli, Simona; Tempesta, Angela; Limongelli, Luisa; Caporusso, Concetta; Di Venere, Daniela; Petruzzi, Massimo; Lacaita, Mariagrazia; Maiorano, Eugenio; Favia, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic Malformation (LM) according to ISSVA Classification, is a rare benign disorder with unknown aetiology. LM may grow slowly over years or develop rapidly over the course of days becoming a bulky lump, infected or bleeding. We propose our three steps Diode Laser protocol for LM management, based on its persistent vascular blood component. 1. Histological and cytological examination, to evaluate the vascular blood component (10-40%), shows mature lymphocytes with red blood cells and endothelial cells. 2. Diode Laser Photocoagulation (DLP) in pulsed mode (on 100ms / off 400ms) at 10W and 800nm with a 300μm fibre kept 2-3mm from the tissues, to reduce the lesion. 3. Diode Laser surgical excision in pulsed mode (on 50ms / off 200ms) at 8W and 800nm with a 300 μm fibre in close contact with tissues, and histological intraoperative margins control on frozen sections. Even if it has inconstant results (lesions decreasing rate is 10% to 40% proportionally to vascular blood component), DLP simplifies the last and the most important step. Use of Diode Laser also in surgical excision reduces intra and postoperatory complications.

  10. The lymphatic vascular system in liver diseases: its role in ascites formation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chuhan; Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2013-06-01

    The lymphatic system is part of the circulatory system and plays a key role in normal vascular function. Its failure plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of various diseases including liver diseases. Lymphangiogenesis (the growth of lymphatic vessels) and changes in the properties of lymphatic vessels are associated with pathogenesis of tumor metastases, ascites formation, liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Despite its significant role in liver diseases and its importance as a potential therapeutic target for those diseases, the lymphatic vascular system of the liver is poorly understood. Therefore, how the lymphatic vascular system in general and lymphangiogenesis in particular are mechanistically related to the pathogenesis and maintenance of liver diseases are largely unknown. This article summarizes: 1) the lymphatic vascular system; 2) its role in liver tumors, liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and portal hypertension; and 3) its role in ascites formation.

  11. Angiopoietin–Tie signalling in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, Lauri; Kangas, Jaakko; Saharinen, Pipsa

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells that form the inner layer of blood and lymphatic vessels are important regulators of vascular functions and centrally involved in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. In addition to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor pathway, the angiopoietin (Ang)–Tie system is a second endothelial cell specific ligand–receptor signalling system necessary for embryonic cardiovascular and lymphatic development. The Ang–Tie system also regulates postnatal angiogenesis, vessel remodelling, vascular permeability and inflammation to maintain vascular homoeostasis in adult physiology. This system is implicated in numerous diseases where the vasculature has an important contribution, such as cancer, sepsis, diabetes, atherosclerosis and ocular diseases. Furthermore, mutations in the TIE2 signalling pathway cause defects in vascular morphogenesis, resulting in venous malformations and primary congenital glaucoma. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the Ang–Tie signalling system, including cross-talk with the vascular endothelial protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP) and the integrin cell adhesion receptors, focusing on the Ang–Tie system in vascular development and pathogenesis of vascular diseases. PMID:27941161

  12. [The lens of the eye and its relation to the lymphatic system].

    PubMed

    Fabian, G

    1986-12-01

    On the basis of well-tried methods of investigation with vital dyes (patent blue violet and Japanese ink) and in combination with the drug (Conjunctisan A), the natural pathways of resorption through the lymphatics of the eye in the mouse, were displayed and this permitted the transport mechanisms to be followed. It was possible gradually to understand the morphology of the lymphatic drainage and, in this way evidence was produced regarding the relationships of the lymphatic system and the regional lymph nodes.

  13. [Lymphatic system of the tongue and its role in glositis of odontogenic origin].

    PubMed

    Chkhikvishvili, M Dzh

    2005-02-01

    In aged persons reduction of diameter of tongue lymphatic capillaries precedes thinning of the Kaarl net. In the process of tongue inflammation, lymphogenic way of inclusion in 6|6 and 8|8 teeth lower area should be stuck out with existence of alleged "Integration Centers". Lymphatic knots and lymphatic ducts are in prevailed placed in corresponding tissues of lower-chin and lower teeth. Lymphatic-muscular system and its anatomical links and age-related changeability raise the special interest during odontogenic infections with tongue inflammation.

  14. The lymphatic system in the dorsal skinfold chamber of the Syrian golden hamster in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schacht, Vivien; Berens von Rautenfeld, Dirk; Abels, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    The lymphatic network contributes to maintaining tissue homeostasis and immunological function by transporting fluid, plasma protein and cells from peripheral tissue via the lymph nodes into the blood vascular system. In contrast to the blood circulatory system, little is known about the lymphatic system. In particular, suitable animal models are lacking. Therefore, the dorsal skinfold chamber model was used to investigate the existence of a lymphatic system. To analyze the lymphatic network Syrian golden hamsters (n=12) fitted with titanium chambers were used. FITC-dextran of different concentrations (5% or 25%) and different molecular weights (4, 40 or 150 kDa) was used to contrast lymphatic vessels and measure initial lymph flow velocity. Intravital fluorescence microscopy enabled the quantification of diameter, velocity and branching order. Histology and electron microscopy supported the in vivo findings. Immediately after intradermal injection of FITC-dextran the lymphatics including valves were visible. The diameters of the lymphatic vessels (n=189) ranged from 133+/-5.4 microm (branching order 1) to 26+/-4.0 microm (branching order 5). Using different molecular weights of FITC-dextran, no significant differences in velocity were measured (327+/-157 microm/s with 4 kDa, 391+/-126 microm/s with 40 kDa, and 378+/-175 microm/s with 150 kDa). Blood and lymphatic vessels could not be differentiated clearly by H&E staining. However, endothelial cells of vessels with an irregularly shaped lumen containing no erythrocytes in cross section showed a weaker signal for CD31 staining as compared to endothelial cells of vessels containing erythrocytes. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy identified the dye-containing vessels as lymphatics after intradermal injection of Berlin Blue. In conclusion, a lymphatic network was characterized in the dorsal skinfold chamber model of the Syrian golden hamster. Thus, this well-established animal model for intravital microscopy

  15. Recent approaches of lipid-based delivery system for lymphatic targeting via oral route.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Shilpa; Garg, Tarun; Murthy, R S R; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-12-01

    Lymphatic system is a key target in research field due to its distinctive makeup and huge contributing functions within the body. Intestinal lymphatic drug transport (chylomicron pathway) is intensely described in research field till date because it is considered to be the best for improving oral drug delivery by avoiding first pass metabolism. The lymphatic imaging techniques and potential therapeutic candidates are engaged for evaluating disease states and overcoming these conditions. The novel drug delivery systems such as self-microemulsifying drug delivery system, nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-lipid carriers, solid lipid carriers are employed for delivering drugs through lymphatic system via various routes such as subcutaneous route, intraperitoneal route, pulmonary route, gastric sub-mucosal injection, intrapleural and intradermal. Among these colloidal particles, lipid-based delivery system is considered to be the best for lymphatic delivery. From the last few decades, mesenteric lymph duct cannulation and thoracic lymph duct cannulation are followed to assess lymphatic uptake of drugs. Due to their limitations, chylomicrons inhibitors and in-vitro models are employed, i.e. lipolysis model and permeability model. Currently, research on this topic still continues and drainage system used to deliver the drugs against lymphatic disease as well as targeting other organs by modulating the chylomicron pathway.

  16. A dural lymphatic vascular system that drains brain interstitial fluid and macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T.; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease. PMID:26077718

  17. Afferent lymphatic cannulation as a model system to study innate immune responses to infection and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Neeland, Melanie R; Meeusen, Els N T; de Veer, Michael J

    2014-03-15

    The afferent lymphatics consist of the cells and immunomodulatory signals that are involved in the early response to peripheral stimuli. Examination of this compartment in both homeostatic and stimulatory conditions permits the analysis of the innate biological pathways responsible for the generation of an adaptive immune response in the lymph node. Afferent lymphatic cannulation is therefore an ideal model system to study cellular migration and antigen dispersal kinetics during infection and vaccination. Utilisation of these lymphatic cannulation models has demonstrated the ability to both increase current understanding of infectious diseases, vaccine delivery systems and has the potential to target effector cells and molecules that may be used as novel therapeutic or vaccine targets.

  18. Olfactory route for cerebrospinal fluid drainage into the cervical lymphatic system in a rabbit experimental model☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haisheng; Ni, Zhili; Chen, Yetao; Wang, Dong; Qi, Yan; Zhang, Qiuhang; Wang, Shijie

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzed the anatomical association between intracranial subarachnoid space and the cervical lymphatic system. X-ray contrast medium and Microfil® (Microfil compounds fill and opacify microvascular and other spaces of non-surviving animals and post-mortem tissue under physiological injection pressure) were injected into the cisterna magna of the rabbit, and perineural routes of cerebrospinal fluid outflow into the lymphatic system were visualized. Under a surgical operating microscope, Microfil was found within the subarachnoid space and along the olfactory nerves. At the nasal mucosa, a lymphatic network was identified near the olfactory nerves, which crossed the nasopharyngeal region and finally emptied into the superficial and deep cervical lymph nodes. Under a light microscope, Microfil was visible around the olfactory nerves and within lymphatic vessels. These results suggested that cerebrospinal fluid drained from the subarachnoid space along the olfactory nerves to nasal lymphatic vessels, which in turn, emptied into the cervical lymph nodes. This anatomical route, therefore, allowed connection between the central nervous system and the lymphatic system. PMID:25737700

  19. Current Status of Optical Imaging for Evaluating Lymph Nodes and Lymphatic System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Seong; Kim, Tae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques use visual and near infrared rays. Despite their considerably poor penetration depth, they are widely used due to their safe and intuitive properties and potential for intraoperative usage. Optical imaging techniques have been actively investigated for clinical imaging of lymph nodes and lymphatic system. This article summarizes a variety of optical tracers and techniques used for lymph node and lymphatic imaging, and reviews their clinical applications. Emerging new optical imaging techniques and their potential are also described. PMID:25598672

  20. The lymphatic system of the major head and neck glands in rats.

    PubMed

    Dünne, Anja A; Steinke, Lars; Teymoortash, Afshin; Kuropkat, Christiane; Folz, Benedikt J; Werner, Jochen A

    2004-01-01

    Many studies concerning therapy and also investigations on lymphogenic metastatic spread of head and neck malignancies require animal models. This article completes the existing findings with regard to the lymphatic system of the head and neck region of the rat. Investigations (light microscopy, immuno-histochemistry, enzyme histochemistry, lympho-graphy) on architecture, distribution and density of the intraglandular lymphatic flow of the major head and neck glands (infraorbital lacrimal gland, extraorbital lacrimal gland, Harderian gland, parotid gland, major sublingual gland, mandibular gland and thyroid gland) in rats were performed. Architecture of the seven major head and neck glands in rats do not differ from other regions of the upper aerodigestive tract. While the Harderian gland shows the highest density of lymphatics, within the major sublingual gland only scare lymph vessels could be identified. Distribution and density of initial lymphatics influence directly the transmission of inflammatory and malignant diseases. The presented results are the morphologically and anatomically basis to initiate further investigations in the rat animal model emphasizing special questions concerning the lymphatic system of the major head and neck glands e.g. lymphatic drainage and new treatment concepts in cases of lymphogenic metastatic spread.

  1. Pelvic irradiation modulates the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin in the plasma and lymphatic system

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tung-Hu; Chen, Yu-Jen; Hou, Mei-Ling; Wang, Li-Ying; Tai, Hung-Chi; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (CDDP) is employed to enhance radiotherapy’s (RT) effect for various cancers. However, the effects of local RT on chemotherapeutics in the plasma and lymphatic system remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the influence of pelvic irradiation on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of CDDP using rats as an experimental model. Methods and Materials: RT with 2 Gy and 0.5 Gy were delivered to the whole pelvis of Sprague-Dawley rats. CDDP at 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg was intravenously infused 24 hours after radiation for the plasma and lymphatic system, respectively. The pharmacokinetics of CDDP in the plasma and lymphatic system were calculated. Results: Compared with sham-irradiated controls, the whole pelvic irradiation increased the area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) of CDDP (5 mg/kg) in the plasma by 80% at 0.5 Gy and 87% at 2 Gy, respectively. In contrast, the AUC of CDDP decreased in bile by 13% at both dose levels. Intriguingly, RT could also increase the AUC of CDDP (10 mg/kg) in the lymphatic fluid by 87% at 2 Gy. In addition, the AUC in CDDP without and with RT was 2.8-fold and 3.4-fold greater for the lymph system than for the plasma, respectively. Conclusions: A local pelvic RT could modulate the systemic PK of CDDP in both the plasma and lymphatic fluids of the rats. The RT-PK phenomena are worth further investigation. PMID:25901204

  2. Essential role of the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in development of the lymphatic system in mice.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Momina; Pang, Mei-Fong; Zaini, Mohamad Amr; Haiko, Paula; Tammela, Tuomas; Alitalo, Kari; Philipson, Lennart; Fuxe, Jonas; Sollerbrant, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule predominantly associated with epithelial tight junctions in adult tissues. CAR is also expressed in cardiomyocytes and essential for heart development up to embryonic day 11.5, but not thereafter. CAR is not expressed in vascular endothelial cells but was recently detected in neonatal lymphatic vessels, suggesting that CAR could play a role in the development of the lymphatic system. To address this, we generated mice carrying a conditional deletion of the CAR gene (Cxadr) and knocked out CAR in the mouse embryo at different time points during post-cardiac development. Deletion of Cxadr from E12.5, but not from E13.5, resulted in subcutaneous edema, hemorrhage and embryonic death. Subcutaneous lymphatic vessels were dilated and structurally abnormal with gaps and holes present at lymphatic endothelial cell-cell junctions. Furthermore, lymphatic vessels were filled with erythrocytes showing a defect in the separation between the blood and lymphatic systems. Regionally, erythrocytes leaked out into the interstitium from leaky lymphatic vessels explaining the hemorrhage detected in CAR-deficient mouse embryos. The results show that CAR plays an essential role in development of the lymphatic vasculature in the mouse embryo by promoting appropriate formation of lymphatic endothelial cell-cell junctions.

  3. Monitoring the primo vascular system in lymphatic vessels by using window chambers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungdae; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Gil, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Kim, Young-Il; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a window chamber system in the skin of rats and to monitor the primo vascular system (PVS) inside the lymphatic vessels along the superficial epigastric vessels. The PVS in lymphatic vessels has been observed through many experiments under in vivo conditions, but monitoring the in vivo PVS in situ inside lymphatic vessels for a long time is difficult. To overcome the obstacles, we adapted the window chamber system for monitoring the PVS and Alcian blue (AB) staining dye solution for the contrast agent. The lymphatic vessels in the skin on the lateral side of the body, connecting the inguinal lymph nodes to the axillary lymph nodes, were the targets for setting the window system. After AB had been injected into the inguinal lymph nodes with a glass capillary, the morphological changes of the stained PVS were monitored through the window system for up to twenty hours, and the changes in the AB intensity in the PVS were quantified by using image processing. The results and histological images are presented in this study. PMID:27446651

  4. Monitoring the primo vascular system in lymphatic vessels by using window chambers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdae; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Gil, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Seung Zhoo; Kim, Young-Il; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to develop a window chamber system in the skin of rats and to monitor the primo vascular system (PVS) inside the lymphatic vessels along the superficial epigastric vessels. The PVS in lymphatic vessels has been observed through many experiments under in vivo conditions, but monitoring the in vivo PVS in situ inside lymphatic vessels for a long time is difficult. To overcome the obstacles, we adapted the window chamber system for monitoring the PVS and Alcian blue (AB) staining dye solution for the contrast agent. The lymphatic vessels in the skin on the lateral side of the body, connecting the inguinal lymph nodes to the axillary lymph nodes, were the targets for setting the window system. After AB had been injected into the inguinal lymph nodes with a glass capillary, the morphological changes of the stained PVS were monitored through the window system for up to twenty hours, and the changes in the AB intensity in the PVS were quantified by using image processing. The results and histological images are presented in this study.

  5. Roles of dextrans on improving lymphatic drainage for liposomal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linglin; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Min; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chenyu; Gu, Bing; Liu, Yu; Wei, Gang; Zhong, Gaoren; Lu, Weiyue

    2010-04-01

    Our aim was to develop a novel liposomal drug delivery system containing dextrans to reduce undesirable retention of antineoplastic agents and thus alleviate local tissue damage. At the cell level, diethylaminoethyl-dextran (DEAE-Dx) showed the strongest inhibiting effect on liposome uptake by macrophages among tested dextrans. The distribution of radiolabeled liposomes mixed with dextrans in injection site and draining lymph node was investigated in rats after subcutaneous injection. DEAE-Dx substantially reduced the undesired local retention and promoted the draining of liposome into lymphatics, which was further confirmed by confocal microscopy images revealing the substantial prevention of rhodamine B-labelled liposome sequestration by macrophages in normal lymph node in rats. Pharmacokinetic data indicated the accelerated drainage of liposome through lymphatics back to systemic circulation by mixing with DEAE-Dx. In the toxicological study in rabbits, DEAE-Dx alleviated the local tissue damage caused by liposomal doxorubicin. In conclusion, dextrans, particularly DEAE-Dx, could efficiently enhanced liposomes drainage into lymphatics, which proves themselves as promising adjuvants for lymphatic-targeted liposomal drug delivery system.

  6. An in situ optical imaging system for measuring lipid uptake, vessel contraction, and lymph flow in small animal lymphatic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassis, Timothy; Weiler, Michael J.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-03-01

    All dietary lipids are transported to venous circulation through the lymphatic system, yet the underlying mechanisms that regulate this process remain unclear. Understanding how the lymphatics functionally respond to changes in lipid load is important in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid and lymphatic related diseases such as obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and lymphedema. Therefore, we sought to develop an in situ imaging system to quantify and correlate lymphatic function as it relates to lipid transport. A custom-built optical set-up provides us with the capability of dual-channel imaging of both high-speed bright-field video and fluorescence simultaneously. This is achieved by dividing the light path into two optical bands. Utilizing high-speed and back-illuminated CCD cameras and post-acquisition image processing algorithms, we have the potential quantify correlations between vessel contraction, lymph flow and lipid concentration of mesenteric lymphatic vessels in situ. Local flow velocity is measured through lymphocyte tracking, vessel contraction through measurements of the vessel walls and lipid uptake through fluorescence intensity tracking of a fluorescent long chain fatty acid analogue, Bodipy FL C16. This system will prove to be an invaluable tool for both scientists studying lymphatic function in health and disease, and those investigating strategies for targeting the lymphatic system with orally delivered drugs.

  7. Dual-channel in-situ optical imaging system for quantifying lipid uptake and lymphatic pump function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassis, Timothy; Kohan, Alison B.; Weiler, Michael J.; Nipper, Matthew E.; Cornelius, Rachel; Tso, Patrick; Brandon Dixon, J.

    2012-08-01

    Nearly all dietary lipids are transported from the intestine to venous circulation through the lymphatic system, yet the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unclear. Elucidating the mechanisms involved in the functional response of lymphatics to changes in lipid load would provide valuable insight into recent implications of lymphatic dysfunction in lipid related diseases. Therefore, we sought to develop an in situ imaging system to quantify and correlate lymphatic function as it relates to lipid transport. The imaging platform provides the capability of dual-channel imaging of both high-speed bright-field video and fluorescence simultaneously. Utilizing post-acquisition image processing algorithms, we can quantify correlations between vessel pump function, lymph flow, and lipid concentration of mesenteric lymphatic vessels in situ. All image analysis is automated with customized LabVIEW virtual instruments; local flow is measured through lymphocyte velocity tracking, vessel contraction through measurements of the vessel wall displacement, and lipid uptake through fluorescence intensity tracking of an orally administered fluorescently labelled fatty acid analogue, BODIPY FL C16. This system will prove to be an invaluable tool for scientists studying intestinal lymphatic function in health and disease, and those investigating strategies for targeting the lymphatics with orally delivered drugs to avoid first pass metabolism.

  8. Lymphatic absorption of quercetin and rutin in rat and their pharmacokinetics in systemic plasma.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Lin; Tsai, Yung-Jen; Huang, Chih-Min; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2010-01-13

    Substances and macromolecules absorbed by the lymphatic system avoid hepatic first-pass effect and directly enter the blood circulation system. In this study, an anesthetized, mesenteric lymphatic/duodenum-cannulated rat model was used to investigate the role of lymphatic absorption with intraduodenally administered drugs. Quercetin and rutin were administered, respectively, at dosages of 30 and 300 mg/kg intraduodenally. Lymph and plasma samples were collected every 30 min. These samples were prepared by protein precipitation and then analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with a photodiode array detector (HPLC-PDA) and verified by LC tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Quercetin was separated by a C18 reversed-phase column, and rutin was separated by a phenyl reverse-phase column. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the software WinNonlin Standard Edition Version. The maximum concentration (Cmax) of quercetin recovered in lymph, 1.97+/-0.96 microg/mL, was about 5-fold higher than that in plasma, 0.41+/-0.08 microg/mL. The time to reach the highest concentration (Tmax) of quercetin in lymph was 30 min longer than that in plasma. The maximum concentration (Cmax) of rutin recovered in lymph, 0.86+/-0.13 microg/mL, was slightly lower than that in plasma, 1.35+/-0.37 microg/mL. The area under curve (AUC) of rutin recovered in lymph, 359+/-41 min microg/mL, was about 2-fold higher than the AUC of rutin in plasma, 150+/-22 min microg/mL. This phenomenon was due to the milder concentration decline of rutin in the lymphatic system. These results demonstrate the pharmacokinetic data of lymphatic and systemic absorption after intraduodenally administered quercetin and rutin. It is also the first report revealing the lymphatic absorption of rutin. Although both quercetin and rutin are absorbed and transported mainly via the blood circulation system, the AUC of these two drugs in lymph fluid appeared higher than their respective AUC in plasma.

  9. Use of a whole-slide imaging system to assess the presence and alteration of lymphatic vessels in joint sections of arthritic mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, J X; Liang, Q Q; Wang, Y J; Mooney, R A; Boyce, B F; Xing, L

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the presence and alteration of lymphatic vessels in joints of arthritic mice using a whole-slide imaging system. Joints and long bone sections were cut from paraffin blocks of two mouse models of arthritis: meniscal-ligamentous injury (MLI)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) and TNF transgene (TNF-Tg)-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MLI-OA mice were fed a high fat diet to accelerate OA development. TNF-Tg mice were treated with lymphatic growth factor VEGF-C virus to stimulate lymphangiogenesis. Sections were double immunofluorescence stained with anti-podoplanin and alpha-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The area and number of lymphatic capillaries and mature lymphatic vessels were determined using a whole-slide imaging system and its associated software. Lymphatic vessels in joints were distributed in soft tissues mainly around the joint capsule, ligaments, fat pads and muscles. In long bones, enriched lymphatic vessels were present in the periosteal areas adjacent to the blood vessels. Occasionally, lymphatic vessels were observed in the cortical bone. Increased lymphatic capillaries, but decreased mature lymphatic vessels, were detected in both OA and RA joints. VEGF-C treatment increased lymphatic capillary and mature vessel formation in RA joints. Our findings suggest that the lymphatic system may play an important role in arthritis pathogenesis and treatment.

  10. Mechanobiology of lymphatic contractions.

    PubMed

    Munn, Lance L

    2015-02-01

    The lymphatic system is responsible for controlling tissue fluid pressure by facilitating flow of lymph (i.e. the plasma and cells that enter the lymphatic system). Because lymph contains cells of the immune system, its transport is not only important for fluid homeostasis, but also immune function. Lymph drainage can occur via passive flow or active pumping, and much research has identified the key biochemical and mechanical factors that affect output. Although many studies and reviews have addressed how tissue properties and fluid mechanics (i.e. pressure gradients) affect lymph transport [1-3] there is less known about lymphatic mechanobiology. As opposed to passive mechanical properties, mechanobiology describes the active coupling of mechanical signals and biochemical pathways. Lymphatic vasomotion is the result of a fascinating system affected by mechanical forces exerted by the flowing lymph, including pressure-induced vessel stretch and flow-induced shear stresses. These forces can trigger or modulate biochemical pathways important for controlling the lymphatic contractions. Here, I review the current understanding of lymphatic vessel function, focusing on vessel mechanobiology, and summarize the prospects for a comprehensive understanding that integrates the mechanical and biomechanical control mechanisms in the lymphatic system.

  11. The discovery of lymphatic system in the seventeenth century. Part I: the early history.

    PubMed

    Suy, Raphael; Thomis, Sarah; Fourneau, Inge

    2016-08-01

    The early history of lymphatic anatomy from Hippocrates (ca. 460-377 B.C.) to Eustachius (1510-1574). The presence of lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes was reported by ancient anatomists without any accurate knowledge of their true functions. Lymph nodes were described as spongy structures, spread over the whole body for the support of vulnerable body parts. Digestion was explained as being the resorption of clear chyle from digested food by the open endings of chyle vessels. The first insights into the place of lymphatic components within nutrition emanated from the medical school of Alexandria (fourth century B.C.) where vivisection was a common practice. Herophilus and Erasistratus described mesenteric veins full of clear liquid, air or milk. For Galen of Pergamum, (104-210) mesenteric lymph nodes also had a nutritional function. He described three different types of mesenteric vessels, namely, the arterial vessels, for the transport of spirituous blood to the intestines; the venous side branches of the portal vein, for the transport of nutritive blood from the liver to the intestines; and small vessels, from the intestines to the mesenteric lymph nodes (serous lymph vessels?). According to Galen, chyle was transported via the above-mentioned mesenteric venous vessels from the intestines to the portal vein and liver, where it was transformed into nutritive blood. This doctrine would be obliterated in the seventeenth century by the discovery of systemic circulation and of the drainage of chyle through a thoracic duct to the subclavian veins.

  12. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Lymphatic Imaging of a Toddler With Congenital Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Greives, Matthew R; Aldrich, Melissa B; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Rasmussen, John C

    2017-03-29

    Primary lymphedema in the pediatric population remains poorly diagnosed and misunderstood due to a lack of information on the causation and underlying anatomy of the lymphatic system. Consequently, therapeutic protocols for pediatric patients remain sparse and with little evidence to support them. In an effort to better understand the causation of primary pediatric lymphedema and to better inform clinical care, we report the use of near-infrared fluorescence lymphatic imaging on the extremities of an alert, 21-month-old boy who presented with unilateral right arm and hand lymphedema at birth. The imaging results indicated an intact, apparently normal lymphatic anatomy with no obvious malformation, but with decreased lymphatic contractile function of the affected upper extremity relative to the contralateral and lower extremities. We hypothesized that the lack of contraction of the lymphatic vessels rather than an anatomic malformation was the source of the unilateral extremity swelling, and that compression and manual lymphatic drainage could be effective treatments.

  13. Ex-Vivo Lymphatic Perfusion System for Independently Controlling Pressure Gradient and Transmural Pressure in Isolated Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2015-01-01

    In addition to external forces, collecting lymphatic vessels intrinsically contract to transport lymph from the extremities to the venous circulation. As a result, the lymphatic endothelium is routinely exposed to a wide range of dynamic mechanical forces, primarily fluid shear stress and circumferential stress, which have both been shown to affect lymphatic pumping activity. Although various ex-vivo perfusion systems exist to study this innate pumping activity in response to mechanical stimuli, none are capable of independently controlling the two primary mechanical forces affecting lymphatic contractility: transaxial pressure gradient, ΔP, which governs fluid shear stress; and average transmural pressure, Pavg, which governs circumferential stress. Hence, the authors describe a novel ex-vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling these two outputs using a linear, explicit model predictive control (MPC) algorithm. The ELPS is capable of reproducing arbitrary waveforms within the frequency range observed in the lymphatics in vivo, including a time-varying ΔP with a constant Pavg, time-varying ΔP and Pavg, and a constant ΔP with a time-varying Pavg. In addition, due to its implementation of syringes to actuate the working fluid, a post-hoc method of estimating both the flow rate through the vessel and fluid wall shear stress over multiple, long (5 sec) time windows is also described. PMID:24809724

  14. Lymphatics and the breast

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... lymphatic system called lymph nodes are distributed at specific locations throughout the body. There is also an ... result in the formation of a secondary cancer mass in a different location of the body. Regular ...

  15. Mapping superficial lymphatic territories in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Soto-Miranda, Miguel A; Suami, Hiroo; Chang, David W

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the anatomy of the lymphatic system in the rabbit with regard to relationships between the lymphatic vessel and lymph node. According to our previous studies in human cadavers and canines, the superficial lymphatic system could be divided into lymphatic territories. The aim of this study was to completely map the superficial lymphatic system in the rabbit. We used our microinjection technique and histological analysis for dissecting studies and recently developed indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent lymphography for demonstrating dynamic lymph flow in living rabbits. Real-time ICG fluorescent lymphography was performed in two living New Zealand White rabbits, and direct dye microinjection of the lymphatic vessels was performed in eight dead rabbits. To assess the relationships between the vascular and lymphatic systems in rabbits, we performed radiocontrast injection into arteries in two dead rabbits prior to the lymphatic injection. The ICG fluorescent lymphography revealed eight lymphatic territories in the preauricular, submandibular, root of the lateral neck, axillary, lumbar, inguinal, root of the tail, and popliteal regions. We injected blue acrylic dye into every lymphatic vessel 0.1 mm in diameter or larger. We then dissected and chased the stained lymphatic vessels proximally until the vessels connected to the first tier lymph node. This procedure was repeated throughout the body until all the relationships between the lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes were defined. The lymphatic system of the rabbit could be defined as eight lymphatic territories, each with its own lymphatic vessels and lymph node.

  16. Flow cytometry-based isolation of dermal lymphatic endothelial cells from newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Thiele, W; Rothley, M; Schmaus, A; Plaumann, D; Sleeman, J

    2014-12-01

    The lymphatic system plays a key role in tissue homeostasis, fatty acid transport, and immune surveillance. Pathologically, dysfunction of the lymphatic system results in edema, and increased lymphangiogenesis can contribute to tumor metastasis. Lymphatic vessels are composed of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) that can be identified by distinct marker molecules such as Prox-1, podoplanin, VEGFR-3 and LYVE-1. Primary LECs represent a valuable tool for the study of basic functions of the lymphatic system. However, their isolation remains a challenge, particularly if rodent tissues are used as a source. We developed a method for the isolation of rat dermal LECs from the skin of newborn rats based on sequential enzymatic digestion with trypsin and Liberase followed by flow cytometric sorting using LYVE-1 specific antibodies. Cells isolated according to this protocol expressed the lymphatic markers Prox-1, podoplanin, LYVE-1 and VEGFR-3, and displayed an endothelial-like morphology when taken into culture. These primary cells can be used for studying lymphatic biology in rat models, and the protocol we describe here therefore represents an important extension of the experimental repertoire available for rats and for modeling the human lymphatic system.

  17. Visualization of fluid drainage pathways in lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes using a mouse model to test a lymphatic drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Hatakeyama, Yuriko; Kato, Shigeki; Mori, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Curing/preventing micrometastasis to lymph nodes (LNs) located outside the surgically resected area is essential for improving the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer and head and neck cancer. However, no lymphatic therapy system exists that can deliver drugs to LNs located outside the dissection area. Here, we demonstrate proof of concept for a drug delivery system using MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr mice that exhibit systemic lymphadenopathy, with some peripheral LNs being as large as 10 mm in diameter. We report that a fluorescent solution injected into the subiliac LN (defined as the upstream LN within the dissection area) was delivered successfully to the proper axillary LN (defined as the downstream LN outside the dissection area) through the lymphatic vessels. Our results suggest that this approach could be used before surgical resection to deliver drugs to downstream LNs outside the dissection area. We anticipate that our methodology could be applied clinically, before surgical resection, to cure/prevent micrometastasis in LNs outside the dissection area, using techniques such as ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein catheterization. PMID:25657881

  18. Visualization of fluid drainage pathways in lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes using a mouse model to test a lymphatic drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Hatakeyama, Yuriko; Kato, Shigeki; Mori, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Curing/preventing micrometastasis to lymph nodes (LNs) located outside the surgically resected area is essential for improving the morbidity and mortality associated with breast cancer and head and neck cancer. However, no lymphatic therapy system exists that can deliver drugs to LNs located outside the dissection area. Here, we demonstrate proof of concept for a drug delivery system using MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr mice that exhibit systemic lymphadenopathy, with some peripheral LNs being as large as 10 mm in diameter. We report that a fluorescent solution injected into the subiliac LN (defined as the upstream LN within the dissection area) was delivered successfully to the proper axillary LN (defined as the downstream LN outside the dissection area) through the lymphatic vessels. Our results suggest that this approach could be used before surgical resection to deliver drugs to downstream LNs outside the dissection area. We anticipate that our methodology could be applied clinically, before surgical resection, to cure/prevent micrometastasis in LNs outside the dissection area, using techniques such as ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein catheterization.

  19. Absence of Lymphatic Vessels in PCNSL May Contribute to Confinement of Tumor Cells to the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Deckert, Martina; Brunn, Anna; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Siebert, Reiner

    2016-06-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma (PCNSL) is a mature lymphoma of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) type confined to the CNS. Despite cytomorphological similarities between PCNSL and systemic DLBCL, molecular differences between both entities have been identified. The exclusively topographical restriction of PCNSL to the CNS is an unexplained mystery. To address the question of whether the unique lymphatic drainage system of the CNS, which differs from that of other organs, may play a role for this peculiar behavior, we investigated a series of 20 PCNSLs for the presence of lymphatic vessels by immunohistochemistry for Lyve-1, podoplanin, and Prox-1 expression. All PCNSLs lacked lymphatic vessels and, in this regard, were similar to 20 glioblastoma multiforme samples. In contrast to these tumors, all of which were located in the deep brain parenchyma, dural and meningeal DLBCL harbored lymphatic vessels that expressed Lyve-1 (3/8 tumors), podoplanin (5/8 tumors), and Prox-1 (5/8 tumors) in areas where the tumors had invaded the fibrous tissue of the dura. These data indicate that local topographical characteristics of the specific lymphatic drainage system may contribute to confinement of the tumor cells in PCNSL and malignant gliomas.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of the Lymphatic System of the Teeth and Jaws

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Alexander

    1936-01-01

    A review of the literature is given, followed by a consideration of the available methods of demonstrating the lymphatic system in the area of the teeth and jaws. A new method of demonstrating this system by the injection or application of lead acetate intra vitam, is described, and the technique is explained. The method can be employed to reveal macroscopic or microscopic lymph channels in any part of the body, and is especially of value where decalcification of the hard tissues has to be carried out in the preparation of the sections. The various types of experiments which have been performed are described, and the macroscopic and microscopic results dealt with separately. Among the macroscopic results, the lymphatic drainage of various parts the jaws is described, and the large amount of anastomosis and cross anastomosis between the vessels is shown. A comparison of the lymphatic system in this region in the guinea-pig, cat, dog, and monkey is given, and it is demonstrated that the guinea-pig and monkey possess submental and supraclavicular lymph nodes which assist in the drainage of this area in addition to the submaxillary and cervical groups of nodes possessed by the cat and the dog. Among the microscopic results, the way in which the mass makes its way from the gingival tissues through the bone, and is found in the pulp, dentine, and cementum of the tooth, even where no pressure is applied, is described. The communication of the lymphatic vessels of the pulp with those of the periodontal membrane and the path of the mass down the periodontal membrane from the gingival trough, and its entry into the alveolar bone from this situation are demonstrated, and the way in which the mass reaches the pulp, dentine, and cementum of the tooth from the gingival tissues is discussed. The significance of various concentrations of the mass in the tissues, particularly the dentine, is also discussed. Control experiments are described, the conclusions which have been reached

  1. The lymphatic vasculature in disease.

    PubMed

    Alitalo, Kari

    2011-11-07

    Blood vessels form a closed circulatory system, whereas lymphatic vessels form a one-way conduit for tissue fluid and leukocytes. In most vertebrates, the main function of lymphatic vessels is to collect excess protein-rich fluid that has extravasated from blood vessels and transport it back into the blood circulation. Lymphatic vessels have an important immune surveillance function, as they import various antigens and activated antigen-presenting cells into the lymph nodes and export immune effector cells and humoral response factors into the blood circulation. Defects in lymphatic function can lead to lymph accumulation in tissues, dampened immune responses, connective tissue and fat accumulation, and tissue swelling known as lymphedema. This review highlights the most recent developments in lymphatic biology and how the lymphatic system contributes to the pathogenesis of various diseases involving immune and inflammatory responses and its role in disseminating tumor cells.

  2. Targeted delivery of a model immunomodulator to the lymphatic system: comparison of alkyl ester versus triglyceride mimetic lipid prodrug strategies.

    PubMed

    Han, Sifei; Quach, Tim; Hu, Luojuan; Wahab, Anisa; Charman, William N; Stella, Valentino J; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Simpson, Jamie S; Porter, Christopher J H

    2014-03-10

    A lipophilic prodrug approach has been used to promote the delivery of a model immunomodulator, mycophenolic acid (MPA), to the lymphatic system after oral administration. Lymphatic transport was employed to facilitate enhanced drug uptake into lymphocytes, as recent studies demonstrate that targeted drug delivery to lymph resident lymphocytes may enhance immunomodulatory effects. Two classes of lymph-directing prodrugs were synthesised. Alkyl chain derivatives (octyl mycophenolate, MPA-C8E; octadecyl mycophenolate, MPA-C18E; and octadecyl mycophenolamide, MPA-C18AM), to promote passive partitioning into lipids in lymphatic transport pathways, and a triglyceride mimetic prodrug (1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-mycophenoloyl glycerol, 2-MPA-TG) to facilitate metabolic integration into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. Lymphatic transport, lymphocyte uptake and plasma pharmacokinetics were assessed in mesenteric lymph and carotid artery cannulated rats following intraduodenal infusion of lipid-based formulations containing MPA or MPA prodrugs. Patterns of prodrug hydrolysis in rat digestive fluid, and cellular re-esterification in vivo, were evaluated to examine the mechanisms responsible for lymphatic transport. Poor enzyme stability and low absorption appeared to limit lymphatic transport of the alkyl derivatives, although two of the three alkyl chain prodrugs - MPA-C18AM (6-fold) and MPA-C18E (13-fold) still increased lymphatic drug transport when compared to MPA. In contrast, 2-MPA-TG markedly increased lymphatic drug transport (80-fold) and drug concentrations in lymphocytes (103-fold), and this was achieved via biochemical incorporation into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. The prodrug was hydrolysed rapidly to 2-mycophenoloyl glycerol (2-MPA-MG) in the presence of rat digestive fluid, and 2-MPA-MG was subsequently re-esterified in the enterocyte with oleic acid (most likely originating from the co-administered formulation) prior to accessing the

  3. Application of geographical information system for lymphatic filariasis and malaria control in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okorie, P N

    2014-06-01

    Geographical Information System (GIS) is defined as an information system used to capture, store, edit, retrieve, analyze and visualize geographically referenced data. The use of GIS is one technology that is very useful in the prevention and control of Vector Borne Diseases (VBDs) such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and malaria which cause high morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. This paper focuses on how the use of Geographical Information System (GIS) can be harnessed for surveillance, prevention and control of LF and malaria in Nigeria. GIS can be used as an operational tool to assist with resource allocation, as a monitoring and evaluation tool and as a tool to investigate various research projects on spatial aspects of LF and malaria epidemiology. This paper provides information on the benefits and potential of using GIS as a tool for the national malaria and LF control programmes with particular reference to Nigeria.

  4. lyve1 expression reveals novel lymphatic vessels and new mechanisms for lymphatic vessel development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Kazuhide S; Astin, Jonathan W; Misa, June P; Flores, Maria V; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S

    2012-07-01

    We have generated novel transgenic lines that brightly mark the lymphatic system of zebrafish using the lyve1 promoter. Facilitated by these new transgenic lines, we generated a map of zebrafish lymphatic development up to 15 days post-fertilisation and discovered three previously uncharacterised lymphatic vessel networks: the facial lymphatics, the lateral lymphatics and the intestinal lymphatics. We show that a facial lymphatic vessel, termed the lateral facial lymphatic, develops through a novel developmental mechanism, which initially involves vessel growth through a single vascular sprout followed by the recruitment of lymphangioblasts to the vascular tip. Unlike the lymphangioblasts that form the thoracic duct, the lymphangioblasts that contribute to the lateral facial lymphatic vessel originate from a number of different blood vessels. Our work highlights the additional complexity of lymphatic vessel development in the zebrafish that may increase its versatility as a model of lymphangiogenesis.

  5. Vascular, glial, and lymphatic immune gateways of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Britta; Carare, Roxana O; Bechmann, Ingo; Flügel, Alexander; Laman, Jon D; Weller, Roy O

    2016-09-01

    Immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has been ascribed to the presence of a blood-brain barrier and the lack of lymphatic vessels within the CNS parenchyma. However, immune reactions occur within the CNS and it is clear that the CNS has a unique relationship with the immune system. Recent developments in high-resolution imaging techniques have prompted a reassessment of the relationships between the CNS and the immune system. This review will take these developments into account in describing our present understanding of the anatomical connections of the CNS fluid drainage pathways towards regional lymph nodes and our current concept of immune cell trafficking into the CNS during immunosurveillance and neuroinflammation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid are the two major components that drain from the CNS to regional lymph nodes. CSF drains via lymphatic vessels and appears to carry antigen-presenting cells. Interstitial fluid from the CNS parenchyma, on the other hand, drains to lymph nodes via narrow and restricted basement membrane pathways within the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries that do not allow traffic of antigen-presenting cells. Lymphocytes targeting the CNS enter by a two-step process entailing receptor-mediated crossing of vascular endothelium and enzyme-mediated penetration of the glia limitans that covers the CNS. The contribution of the pathways into and out of the CNS as initiators or contributors to neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, will be discussed. Furthermore, we propose a clear nomenclature allowing improved precision when describing the CNS-specific communication pathways with the immune system.

  6. Alginate/chitosan microparticles for tamoxifen delivery to the lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Coppi, G; Iannuccelli, V

    2009-02-09

    Oral administration of the nonsteroidal anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TMX) is the treatment of choice for metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. With the aim to improve TMX oral bioavailability and decrease its side effects, crosslinked alginate microparticles for the targeting to the lymphatic system by Peyer's patch (PP) uptake were developed and in vitro characterized. TMX was molecularly dispersed inside the microparticles and an electrostatic interaction involving the TMX tertiary amine was detected by rheological and FT-IR assays. Microparticles showed a size less than 3mum, then suitability to be taken up by M cells in PP and a positive surface charge. Moreover, TMX loading level as well as in vitro release behaviour was affected by the polymer network connected with the mannuronic/guluronic ratio of the alginate chains.

  7. Design of lipid-based delivery systems for improving lymphatic transport and bioavailability of delta-tocopherol and nobiletin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Chunxin

    Lymphatic drug transport can confer bioavailability advantage by avoiding the first-pass metabolism normally observed in the portal vein hepatic route. It was reported that long chain lipid-based delivery systems can stimulate the formation of chylomicron and thus promote the lymphatic transport of drugs. In this study, a novel delta-tocopherol (delta-T) loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticle (SLN) system was developed to investigate its effect on promoting the lymphatic transport of delta-T. The delta-T SLN was prepared with hot melt emulsification method by using glyceryl behenate (compritol RTM888) as the lipid phase and lecithin (PC75) as the emulsifier. Formula configuration, processing condition and loading capacity were carefully optimized. Physicochemical properties (particle size, surface charge, morphology) were also characterized. Moreover, excellent stability of the developed delta-T SLN in the gastrointestinal environment was observed by using an in vitro digestion model. Further investigations of the SLN in stimulating delta-T lymphatic transport were performed on mice without cannulation. Compared with the control group (delta-T corn oil dispersion), much lower delta-T levels in both blood and liver indicated reduced portal vein and hepatic transport of delta-T in the form of SLN. On the other hand, significantly higher concentrations of delta-T were observed in thymus, a major lymphatic tissue, indicating improved lymphatic transport of delta-T with the SLN delivery system. Finally, the far less excreted delta-T level in feces further confirmed improved lymphatic transport and overall bioavailability of delta-T by using SLN system. Nobiletin (NOB), one of most abundant polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) found in Citrus genus, has a low solubility in both water and oil at ambient temperatures. Thus it tends to form crystals when the loading exceeds its saturation level in the carrier system. This character greatly impaired its bioavailability and application. To

  8. Fluid-solid modeling of lymphatic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulk, Alexander; Ballard, Matthew; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Dixon, Brandon; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The lymphatic system performs important physiological functions such as the return of interstitial fluid to the bloodstream to maintain tissue fluid balance, as well as the transport of immune cells in the body. It utilizes contractile lymphatic vessels, which contain valves that open and close to allow flow in only one direction, to directionally pump lymph against a pressure gradient. We develop a fluid-solid model of geometrically representative lymphatic valves. Our model uses a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann lattice spring method to capture fluid-solid interactions with two-way coupling between a viscous fluid and lymphatic valves in a lymphatic vessel. We use this model to investigate the opening and closing of lymphatic valves, and its effect on lymphatic pumping. This helps to broaden our understanding of the fluid dynamics of the lymphatic system.

  9. TGF-β1-induced EMT promotes targeted migration of breast cancer cells through the lymphatic system by the activation of CCR7/CCL21-mediated chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Pang, M-F; Georgoudaki, A-M; Lambut, L; Johansson, J; Tabor, V; Hagikura, K; Jin, Y; Jansson, M; Alexander, J S; Nelson, C M; Jakobsson, L; Betsholtz, C; Sund, M; Karlsson, M C I; Fuxe, J

    2016-02-11

    Tumor cells frequently disseminate through the lymphatic system during metastatic spread of breast cancer and many other types of cancer. Yet it is not clear how tumor cells make their way into the lymphatic system and how they choose between lymphatic and blood vessels for migration. Here we report that mammary tumor cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1) become activated for targeted migration through the lymphatic system, similar to dendritic cells (DCs) during inflammation. EMT cells preferentially migrated toward lymphatic vessels compared with blood vessels, both in vivo and in 3D cultures. A mechanism of this targeted migration was traced to the capacity of TGF-β1 to promote CCR7/CCL21-mediated crosstalk between tumor cells and lymphatic endothelial cells. On one hand, TGF-β1 promoted CCR7 expression in EMT cells through p38 MAP kinase-mediated activation of the JunB transcription factor. Blockade of CCR7, or treatment with a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, reduced lymphatic dissemination of EMT cells in syngeneic mice. On the other hand, TGF-β1 promoted CCL21 expression in lymphatic endothelial cells. CCL21 acted in a paracrine fashion to mediate chemotactic migration of EMT cells toward lymphatic endothelial cells. The results identify TGF-β1-induced EMT as a mechanism, which activates tumor cells for targeted, DC-like migration through the lymphatic system. Furthermore, it suggests that p38 MAP kinase inhibition may be a useful strategy to inhibit EMT and lymphogenic spread of tumor cells.

  10. A novel interactive electronic protocol review system.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T W; Herbert, J H; Barrett, J; Lamprecht, E G

    2001-09-01

    This report describes a new protocol review system which was designed as a Lotus Notes database. This system encompasses all elements of investigator protocol generation, review and approval by the laboratory animal veterinarian and institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC), and notification of approval to personnel responsible for animal ordering. Unique features of the system are interactive dialog between IACUC members and the investigator and confidential protocol discussion among IACUC members. The advantages of the system are multiple: 1. it allows for interactive protocol discussion online; 2. it is an essentially paperless process; 3. inclusion of the outside IACUC member is easily accomplished by using an offsite personal computer and secure remote local-area network access; 4. the time required for protocol generation, review, and approval is streamlined due to the automatic features of the database and the speed of e-mail; and 5. all documentation relating to the protocol and the approval process is archived online.

  11. Lymphatic Anomalies Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic Anomaly; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis

  12. The role of the lymphatic system in drainage of cerebrospinal fluid and aqueous humour.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, M W; Cole, D F

    1980-02-01

    1. The jugular lymphatic trunks were cannulated in anaesthetized rabbits and cats. Over 6-8 hr, the mean lymph flow was 2.3 microliters min-1 in the rabbit (one side only) and 5.0 microliters min-1 in the cat (sum of both sides). 2. After a single injection of radio-iodinated albumin into a lateral cerebral ventricle without significant rise in pressure, a mean of 14.4% of the radioactivity was recovered in deep cervical lymph of one side in the rabbit and of 12.9% in that of both sides in the cat. 3. During slow infusion of [125I]albumin and fluorescent dextran of 150,000 mol. wt. into a lateral ventricle of the cat at 20 microliters min-1, radioactivity and fluorescence reached plateaus in deep cervical lymph at 47.4 and 50.0% of their concentrations in cisternal c.s.f. respectively. 4. No significant radioactivity, other than from blood, was detected in superficial cervical lymph after intraventricular injection of radio-iodinated albumin in the cat. 5. No significant radioactivity, other than from blood, was detected in deep cervical lymph of the rabbit or in deep and superficial cervical lymph of the cat within 6 hr after injection of radio-iodinated albumin into the aqueous humour or orbital fat. 6. Gradients of radioactivity in tissues within the orbit suggested that there is a small flow of c.s.f., 0.05-0.15 microliters min-1 in the rabbit, passing centrifugally along the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve, through the posterior part of the globe and into the orbital tissue. Also a small proportion of aqueous humour, 1-2% or more, drains through the anterior sclera into the surrounding tissue. 7. A substantial quantity of cerebrospinal fluid drains into the deep cervical lymphatic system of the rabbit, 30% or more, and of the cat, 10-15% or more. The small component of aqueous humour drainage passing through the wall of the glove does not enter cervical lymph within 6 hr, if at all.

  13. Clear-cut observation of clearance of sustainable upconverting nanoparticles from lymphatic system of small living mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye Sun; Nam, Sang Hwan; Kim, Jongwoo; Shin, Hyung Seon; Suh, Yung Doug; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-06-01

    The significance of lymphatic system has gathered great attention for immunotechnology related to cancer metastasis and immunotherapy. To develop innovative immunodiagnostics and immunotherapy in in vivo environments, it is very important to understand excretion pathways and clearance of injected cargoes. Herein, we employed Tm3+-doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) with versatile advantages suitable for long-term non-invasive in vivo optical imaging and tracking. Transport and retention of the UCNPs in the lymphatic system were evaluated with high-quality NIR-to-NIR upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging. We obtained their kinetic luminescence profiles for the injection site and sentinel lymph node (SLN) and observed luminescence signals for one month; we also examined UCL images in SLN tissues, organs, and faeces at each time point. We speculate that the injected UCNPs in a footpad of a small mouse are transported rapidly from the lymphatic system to the blood system and then eventually result in an efficient excretion by the hepatobiliary route. These results will support development of novel techniques for SLN biopsy as well as immunotechnology.

  14. Clear-cut observation of clearance of sustainable upconverting nanoparticles from lymphatic system of small living mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Sun; Nam, Sang Hwan; Kim, Jongwoo; Shin, Hyung Seon; Suh, Yung Doug; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-01-01

    The significance of lymphatic system has gathered great attention for immunotechnology related to cancer metastasis and immunotherapy. To develop innovative immunodiagnostics and immunotherapy in in vivo environments, it is very important to understand excretion pathways and clearance of injected cargoes. Herein, we employed Tm3+-doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) with versatile advantages suitable for long-term non-invasive in vivo optical imaging and tracking. Transport and retention of the UCNPs in the lymphatic system were evaluated with high-quality NIR-to-NIR upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging. We obtained their kinetic luminescence profiles for the injection site and sentinel lymph node (SLN) and observed luminescence signals for one month; we also examined UCL images in SLN tissues, organs, and faeces at each time point. We speculate that the injected UCNPs in a footpad of a small mouse are transported rapidly from the lymphatic system to the blood system and then eventually result in an efficient excretion by the hepatobiliary route. These results will support development of novel techniques for SLN biopsy as well as immunotechnology. PMID:27265267

  15. Data Base Management System for Lymphatic Filariasis - A Neglected Tropical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyayula, Suryanaryana Murty; Mutheneni, Srinivasa Rao; Kadiri, Madhusudhan Rao; Kumaraswamy, Sriram; Nelaturu, Sarat Chandra Babu

    2012-01-01

    Background Researchers working in the area of Public Health are being confronted with large volumes of data on various aspects of entomology and epidemiology. To obtain the relevant information out of these data requires particular database management system. In this paper, we have described about the usages of our developed database on lymphatic filariasis. Methods This database application is developed using Model View Controller (MVC) architecture, with MySQL as database and a web based interface. We have collected and incorporated the data on filariasis in the database from Karimnagar, Chittoor, East and West Godavari districts of Andhra Pradesh, India. Conclusion The importance of this database is to store the collected data, retrieve the information and produce various combinational reports on filarial aspects which in turn will help the public health officials to understand the burden of disease in a particular locality. This information is likely to have an imperative role on decision making for effective control of filarial disease and integrated vector management operations. PMID:22792200

  16. Dynamics of some parameters of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats during cold adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Yu.I.; Sedova, L.A.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Shorin, Yu.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper examines the combined behavior of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats at stages of long-term adaptation of the animals to moderate cold. After decapitation of male Wister rats, the corticosterone concentration in the blood plasma was determined by saturation analysis and serum levels of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) were determined by radioimmunoassay. The thymus was weighed and the structure of the popliteal lymph nodes (LN) was studied in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with azure II-eosin. Morphometry of the structural components of LN was undertaken and the numbers of the various cell forms per 1000 cells were counted in different zones of LN. The increase in activity of the lymphoid tissue in the phase of adaptation may be connected with intensification of the peripheral action of thyroid hormones. During long-term adaptation, in the phase of consistently increased specific resistance, a new type of endocrine-lymphoid relation is formed, and it differs significantly both in the original state and in the acute phase of stress.

  17. Anatomical Mercury: Changing Understandings of Quicksilver, Blood, and the Lymphatic System, 1650-1800.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Marieke M A

    2015-10-01

    The use of mercury as an injection mass in anatomical experiments and preparations was common throughout Europe in the long eighteenth century, and refined mercury-injected preparations as well as plates of anatomical mercury remain today. The use and meaning of mercury in related disciplines such as medicine and chemistry in the same period have been studied, but our knowledge of anatomical mercury is sparse and tends to focus on technicalities. This article argues that mercury had a distinct meaning in anatomy, which was initially influenced by alchemical and classical understandings of mercury. Moreover, it demonstrates that the choice of mercury as an anatomical injection mass was deliberate and informed by an intricate cultural understanding of its materiality, and that its use in anatomical preparations and its perception as an anatomical material evolved with the understanding of the circulatory and lymphatic systems. By using the material culture of anatomical mercury as a starting point, I seek to provide a new, object-driven interpretation of complex and strongly interrelated historiographical categories such as mechanism, vitalism, chemistry, anatomy, and physiology, which are difficult to understand through a historiography that focuses exclusively on ideas.

  18. Functional imaging in tumor-associated lymphatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in cancer cell dissemination; however whether lymphatic drainage pathways and function change during tumor progression and metastasis remains to be elucidated. In this report, we employed a non-invasive, dynamic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging technique for functional lymphatic imaging. Indocyanine green (ICG) was intradermally injected into tumor-free mice and mice bearing C6/LacZ rat glioma tumors in the tail or hindlimb. Our imaging data showed abnormal lymphatic drainage pathways and reduction/loss of lymphatic contractile function in mice with lymph node (LN) metastasis, indicating that cancer metastasis to the draining LNs is accompanied by transient changes of the lymphatic architectural network and its function. Therefore, functional lymphatic imaging may provide a role in the clinical staging of cancer.

  19. Communication protocol standards for space data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, Adrian J.; Desjardins, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The main elements and requirements of advanced space data networks are identified. The communication protocol standards for use on space missions during the coming decades are described. In particular, the blending of high-performance space-unique data transmission techniques with off-the-shelf open systems interconnection (OSI) protocols is described.

  20. Gastrointestinal Lymphatics in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J.S.; Ganta, Vijay C.; Jordan, P.A.; Witte, Marlys H.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatics perform essential transport and immune cell regulatory functions to maintain homeostasis in the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although blood and lymphatic vessels function as parallel and integrated systems, our understanding of lymphatic structure, regulation and functioning lags far behind that of the blood vascular system. This chapter reviews lymphatic flow, differences in lymphangiogenic and hemangiogenic factors, lymphatic fate determinants and structural features, and examines how altered molecular signaling influences lymphatic function in organs of the GI system. Innate errors in lymphatic development frequently disturb GI functioning and physiology. Expansion of lymphatics, a prominent feature of GI inflammation, may also play an important role in tissue restitution following injury. Destruction or dysregulation of lymphatics, following injury, surgery or chronic inflammation also appears to exacerbate GI disease activity and morbidity. Understanding the physiological roles played by GI lymphatics is essential to elucidating their underlying contributions to forms of congenital and acquired forms of GI pathology, and will provide novel approaches for treatment of these conditions. PMID:20022228

  1. An overview of lymphatic vessels and their emerging role in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dennis; Min, Wang

    2011-07-01

    Over the past decade, molecular details of lymphatic vessels (lymphatics) have been rapidly acquired due to the identification of lymphatic endothelial-specific markers. Separate from the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system is also an elaborate network of vessels that are important in normal physiology. Lymphatic vessels have the unique task to regulate fluid homeostasis, assist in immune surveillance, and transport dietary lipids. However, dysfunctional lymphatic vessels can cause pathology, while normal lymphatics can exacerbate pathology. This review summarizes the development and growth of lymphatic vessels in addition to highlighting their critical roles in physiology and pathology. Also, we discuss recent work that suggests a connection between lymphatic dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

  2. Oral delivery system prolongs blood circulation of docetaxel nanocapsules via lymphatic absorption.

    PubMed

    Attili-Qadri, Suha; Karra, Nour; Nemirovski, Alina; Schwob, Ouri; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Nassar, Taher; Benita, Simon

    2013-10-22

    An original oral formulation of docetaxel nanocapsules (NCs) embedded in microparticles elicited in rats a higher bioavailability compared with the i.v. administration of the commercial docetaxel solution, Taxotere. In the present study, various animal studies were designed to elucidate the absorption process of docetaxel from such a delivery system. Again, the docetaxel NC formulation elicited a marked enhanced absorption compared with oral Taxotere in minipigs, resulting in relative bioavailability and Cmax values 10- and 8.4-fold higher, respectively, confirming the previous rat study results. It was revealed that orally absorbed NCs altered the elimination and distribution of docetaxel, as shown in the organ biodistribution rat study, due to their reinforced coating, while transiting through the enterocytes by surface adsorption of apoproteins and phospholipids. These findings were demonstrated by the cryogenic-temperature transmission electron microscopy results and confirmed by the use of a chylomicron flow blocker, cycloheximide, that prevented the oral absorption of docetaxel from the NC formulation in an independent pharmacokinetic study. The lipoproteinated NCs reduced the docetaxel release in plasma and its distribution among the organs. The improved anticancer activity compared with i.v. Taxotere, observed in the metastatic lung cancer model in Severe Combined Immune Deficiency-beige (SCID-bg) mice, should be attributed to the extravasation effect, leading to the lipoproteinated NC accumulation in lung tumors, where they exert a significant therapeutic action. To the best of our knowledge, no study has reported that the absorption of NCs was mediated by a lymphatic process and reinforced during their transit.

  3. Lymphatic regulation in nonmammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Michael S; Hillman, Stanley S; Drewes, Robert C; Withers, Philip C

    2013-08-01

    All vertebrate animals share in common the production of lymph through net capillary filtration from their closed circulatory system into their tissues. The balance of forces responsible for net capillary filtration and lymph formation is described by the Starling equation, but additional factors such as vascular and interstitial compliance, which vary markedly among vertebrates, also have a significant impact on rates of lymph formation. Why vertebrates show extreme variability in rates of lymph formation and how nonmammalian vertebrates maintain plasma volume homeostasis is unclear. This gap hampers our understanding of the evolution of the lymphatic system and its interaction with the cardiovascular system. The evolutionary origin of the vertebrate lymphatic system is not clear, but recent advances suggest common developmental factors for lymphangiogenesis in teleost fishes, amphibians, and mammals with some significant changes in the water-land transition. The lymphatic system of anuran amphibians is characterized by large lymphatic sacs and two pairs of lymph hearts that return lymph into the venous circulation but no lymph vessels per se. The lymphatic systems of reptiles and some birds have lymph hearts, and both groups have extensive lymph vessels, but their functional role in both lymph movement and plasma volume homeostasis is almost completely unknown. The purpose of this review is to present an evolutionary perspective in how different vertebrates have solved the common problem of the inevitable formation of lymph from their closed circulatory systems and to point out the many gaps in our knowledge of this evolutionary progression.

  4. Optimal protocols for slowly driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkowski, Patrick R.; DeWeese, Michael R.

    2015-09-01

    The design of efficient quantum information processing will rely on optimal nonequilibrium transitions of driven quantum systems. Building on a recently developed geometric framework for computing optimal protocols for classical systems driven in finite time, we construct a general framework for optimizing the average information entropy for driven quantum systems. Geodesics on the parameter manifold endowed with a positive semidefinite metric correspond to protocols that minimize the average information entropy production in finite time. We use this framework to explicitly compute the optimal entropy production for a simple two-state quantum system coupled to a heat bath of bosonic oscillators, which has applications to quantum annealing.

  5. Implementation and evaluation of a protocol management system for automated review of CT protocols.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Joshua; Leng, Shuai; Zhang, Yi; Vrieze, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia

    2016-09-08

    Protocol review is important to decrease the risk of patient injury and increase the consistency of CT image quality. A large volume of CT protocols makes manual review labor-intensive, error-prone, and costly. To address these challenges, we have developed a software system for automatically managing and monitoring CT proto-cols on a frequent basis. This article describes our experiences in the implementation and evaluation of this protocol monitoring system. In particular, we discuss various strategies for addressing each of the steps in our protocol-monitoring workflow, which are: maintaining an accurate set of master protocols, retrieving protocols from the scanners, comparing scanner protocols to master protocols, reviewing flagged differences between the scanner and master protocols, and updating the scanner and/or master protocols. In our initial evaluation focusing only on abdo-men and pelvis protocols, we detected 309 modified protocols in a 24-week trial period. About one-quarter of these modified protocols were determined to contain inappropriate (i.e., erroneous) protocol parameter modifications that needed to be corrected on the scanner. The most frequently affected parameter was the series description, which was inappropriately modified 47 times. Two inappropriate modifications were made to the tube current, which is particularly important to flag as this parameter impacts both radiation dose and image quality. The CT protocol changes detected in this work provide strong motivation for the use of an automated CT protocol quality control system to ensure protocol accuracy and consistency.

  6. Role of lymphatic vasculature in regional and distant metastases.

    PubMed

    Podgrabinska, Simona; Skobe, Mihaela

    2014-09-01

    In cancer, lymphatic vasculature has been traditionally viewed only as a transportation system for metastatic cells. It has now become clear that lymphatics perform many additional functions which could influence cancer progression. Lymphangiogenesis, induced at the primary tumor site and at distant sites, potently augments metastasis. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) control tumor cell entry and exit from the lymphatic vessels. LECs also control immune cell traffic and directly modulate adaptive immune responses. This review highlights advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which lymphatic vessels, and in particular lymphatic endothelium, impact metastasis.

  7. Protocol for the observation of the primo vascular system in the lymph vessels of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Cho, Sang Yeon; Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Hwang, Sun Hee; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Kim, Sungchul; Kwon, Byoung Se; Kwon, Hee Min; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2012-10-01

    Molecular-level understanding of the structure and the functions of the lymphatic system has greatly enhanced the importance of this second circulation system, especially in connection with cancer metastasis and inflammation. Recently, a third circulatory system, the primo vascular system (PVS) was found in various parts of an animal's body, especially as threadlike structures floating in the lymphatic flow in lymph vessels. Although the medical significance of this emerging system will require much work in the future, at present, several important suggestions in connection with immune cells, stem cells, and cancer metastasis have already appeared. Experiments to observe the PVS in the lymph vessels near the caudal vena cava of rabbits and rats have been performed by several independent teams, but reproduction requires considerable skill and technical know-how. In this article, we provide a detailed protocol to detect the PVS inside the lymph vessels of a rabbit. Detection and isolation are the first steps in unraveling the physiological functions of the PVS, which awaits intensive research.

  8. Organization and developmental aspects of lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Osamu; Ohtani, Yuko

    2008-05-01

    The lymphatic system plays important roles in maintaining tissue fluid homeostasis, immune surveillance of the body, and the taking up dietary fat and fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. The lymphatic system is involved in many pathological conditions, including lymphedema, inflammatory diseases, and tumor dissemination. A clear understanding of the organization of the lymphatic vessels in normal conditions would be critically important to develop new treatments for diseases involving the lymphatic vascular system. Therefore, the present paper reviews the organization of the lymphatic vascular system of a variety of organs, including the thyroid gland, lung and pleura, small intestine, cecum and colon in the rat, the diaphragm in the rat, monkey, and human, Peyer's patches and the appendix in the rabbit, and human tonsils. Methods employed include scanning electron microscopy of lymphatic corrosion casts and tissues with or without treatment of alkali maceration technique, transmission electron microscopy of intact tissues, confocal microscopy in conjunction with immunohistochemistry to some lymphatic-specific markers (i.e., LYVE-1 and VEGFR-3), and light microscopy in conjunction with enzyme-histochemistry to 5'-nucleotidase. Some developmental aspects of the lymphatic vessels and lymphedema are also discussed.

  9. Rapid Lymphatic Dissemination of Encapsulated Group A Streptococci via Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor-1 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lynskey, Nicola N; Banerji, Suneale; Johnson, Louise A; Holder, Kayla A; Reglinski, Mark; Wing, Peter A C; Rigby, David; Jackson, David G; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-09-01

    The host lymphatic network represents an important conduit for pathogen dissemination. Indeed, the lethal human pathogen group A streptococcus has a predilection to induce pathology in the lymphatic system and draining lymph nodes, however the underlying basis and subsequent consequences for disease outcome are currently unknown. Here we report that the hyaluronan capsule of group A streptococci is a crucial virulence determinant for lymphatic tropism in vivo, and further, we identify the lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 as the critical host receptor for capsular hyaluronan in the lymphatic system. Interference with this interaction in vivo impeded bacterial dissemination to local draining lymph nodes and, in the case of a hyper-encapsulated M18 strain, redirected streptococcal entry into the blood circulation, suggesting a pivotal role in the manifestation of streptococcal infections. Our results reveal a novel function for bacterial capsular polysaccharide in directing lymphatic tropism, with potential implications for disease pathology.

  10. Rapid Lymphatic Dissemination of Encapsulated Group A Streptococci via Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor-1 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Louise A.; Holder, Kayla A.; Reglinski, Mark; Wing, Peter A. C.; Rigby, David; Jackson, David G.; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-01-01

    The host lymphatic network represents an important conduit for pathogen dissemination. Indeed, the lethal human pathogen group A streptococcus has a predilection to induce pathology in the lymphatic system and draining lymph nodes, however the underlying basis and subsequent consequences for disease outcome are currently unknown. Here we report that the hyaluronan capsule of group A streptococci is a crucial virulence determinant for lymphatic tropism in vivo, and further, we identify the lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 as the critical host receptor for capsular hyaluronan in the lymphatic system. Interference with this interaction in vivo impeded bacterial dissemination to local draining lymph nodes and, in the case of a hyper-encapsulated M18 strain, redirected streptococcal entry into the blood circulation, suggesting a pivotal role in the manifestation of streptococcal infections. Our results reveal a novel function for bacterial capsular polysaccharide in directing lymphatic tropism, with potential implications for disease pathology. PMID:26352587

  11. Lymphatic pumping: mechanics, mechanisms and malfunction.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Zawieja, Scott D; Castorena-Gonzalez, Jorge A; Davis, Michael J

    2016-10-15

    A combination of extrinsic (passive) and intrinsic (active) forces move lymph against a hydrostatic pressure gradient in most regions of the body. The effectiveness of the lymph pump system impacts not only interstitial fluid balance but other aspects of overall homeostasis. This review focuses on the mechanisms that regulate the intrinsic, active contractions of collecting lymphatic vessels in relation to their ability to actively transport lymph. Lymph propulsion requires not only robust contractions of lymphatic muscle cells, but contraction waves that are synchronized over the length of a lymphangion as well as properly functioning intraluminal valves. Normal lymphatic pump function is determined by the intrinsic properties of lymphatic muscle and the regulation of pumping by lymphatic preload, afterload, spontaneous contraction rate, contractility and neural influences. Lymphatic contractile dysfunction, barrier dysfunction and valve defects are common themes among pathologies that directly involve the lymphatic system, such as inherited and acquired forms of lymphoedema, and pathologies that indirectly involve the lymphatic system, such as inflammation, obesity and metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Emerging Roles of Lymphatic Vasculature in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic vasculature has been regarded as a passive conduit for interstitial fluid and responsible for the absorption of macromolecules such as proteins or lipids and transport of nutrients from food. However, emerging data show that the lymphatic vasculature system plays an important role in immune modulation. One of its major roles is to coordinate antigen transport and immune-cell trafficking from peripheral tissues to secondary lymphoid organs, lymph nodes. This perspective was recently updated with the notion that the interaction between lymphatic endothelial cells and leukocytes controls the immune-cell migration and immune responses by regulating lymphatic flow and various secreted molecules such as chemokines and cytokines. In this review, we introduce the lymphatic vasculature networks and genetic transgenic models for research on the lymphatic vasculature system. Next, we discuss the contribution of lymphatic endothelial cells to the control of immune-cell trafficking and to maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Finally, the physiological roles and features of the lymphatic vasculature system are further discussed regarding inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis in a pathological condition, especially in mucosal tissues such as the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract. PMID:28261022

  13. Lymphatic Lipid Transport: Sewer or Subway?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J. Brandon

    2010-01-01

    The lymphatics began receiving attention in the scientific community as early as 1622, when Gasparo Aselli noted the appearance of milky white vessels in the mesentery of a well-fed dog. Since this time, the lymphatic system has been historically regarded as the sewer of the vasculature, passively draining fluid and proteins from the interstitial spaces (along with lipid from the gut) into the blood. Recent reports, however, suggest that the lymphatic role in lipid transport is an active and intricate process and when lymphatic function is compromised, there are systemic consequences to lipid metabolism and transport. This review highlights these recent findings and suggests future directions for understanding the interplay between lymphatic and lipid biology in health and disease. PMID:20541951

  14. The embryonic origins of lymphatic vessels: an historical review.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2010-06-01

    Work on the lymphatic system began in the 17th century, and by the beginning of the 19th century the anatomy of most of the lymphatic system had been described. One of the most important questions in this field has been the determination of the embryological origin of the lymphatic endothelium. Two theories were proposed. The first suggested that lymphatic endothelium derived by sprouting from venous endothelium, the so-called centrifugal theory. The second, the so-called centripetal theory, suggested that lymphatic endothelium differentiates in situ from primitive mesenchyme, and secondarily acquires connection with the vascular system. More recent evidence has provided support for both hypotheses.

  15. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow.

  16. Lymphatics in lymphangioleiomyomatosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Connie G.; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Moss, Joel

    2013-01-01

    The primary function of the lymphatic system is absorbing and transporting macromolecules and immune cells to the general circulation, thereby regulating fluid, nutrient absorption and immune cell trafficking. Lymphangiogenesis plays an important role in tissue inflammation and tumour cell dissemination. Lymphatic involvement is seen in lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). LAM, a disease primarily affecting females, involves the lung (cystic destruction), kidney (angiomyolipoma) and axial lymphatics (adenopathy and lymphangioleiomyoma). LAM occurs sporadically or in association with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Cystic lung destruction results from proliferation of LAM cells, which are abnormal smooth muscle-like cells with mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 gene. Lymphatic abnormalities arise from infiltration of LAM cells into the lymphatic wall, leading to damage or obstruction of lymphatic vessels. Benign appearing LAM cells possess metastatic properties and are found in the blood and other body fluids. IPF is a progressive lung disease resulting from fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition. Lymphangiogenesis is associated with pulmonary destruction and disease severity. A macrophage subset isolated from IPF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) express lymphatic endothelial cell markers in vitro, in contrast to the same macrophage subset from normal BALF. Herein, we review lymphatic involvement in LAM and IPF. PMID:22941884

  17. Characterization of the Primo-Vascular System in the Abdominal Cavity of Lung Cancer Mouse Model and Its Differences from the Lymphatic System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Bae; Zhang, Wei-bo; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2010-01-01

    Cancer growth and dissemination have been extensively studied for a long time. Nevertheless, many new observations on anatomy and histopathology of cancer events are still reported such as formation of a vasculogenic-like network inside aggressive tumors. In this research, new kinds of micro-conduits, named primo-vessels, were found inside the abdominal cavity of NCI-H460 lung cancer murine xenograft models. These vascular threads were largely distributed on the surfaces of various organs and were often connected to peritoneal tumor nodules. Histological and immunofluorescent investigations showed that the primo-vessels had characteristic features that were distinctively different from those of similar-looking lymphatic vessels. They had multiple channels surrounded with loose collageneous matrices, which is in contrast to the single-channel structure of other vascular systems. The rod-shaped nuclei aligned longitudinally along the channels were assumed to be the endothelial cells of the primo-vessels, but LYVE-1, a specific marker of lymphatics, was not expressed, which indicates a clear difference from lymphatic endothelial cells. Taken together these findings on and characterization of the novel threadlike vascular structures in cancer models may have important implications for cancer prognosis and for therapy. PMID:20376343

  18. Characterization of the primo-vascular system in the abdominal cavity of lung cancer mouse model and its differences from the lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jung Sun; Ayati, M Hossein; Kim, Hong Bae; Zhang, Wei-bo; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2010-04-01

    Cancer growth and dissemination have been extensively studied for a long time. Nevertheless, many new observations on anatomy and histopathology of cancer events are still reported such as formation of a vasculogenic-like network inside aggressive tumors. In this research, new kinds of micro-conduits, named primo-vessels, were found inside the abdominal cavity of NCI-H460 lung cancer murine xenograft models. These vascular threads were largely distributed on the surfaces of various organs and were often connected to peritoneal tumor nodules. Histological and immunofluorescent investigations showed that the primo-vessels had characteristic features that were distinctively different from those of similar-looking lymphatic vessels. They had multiple channels surrounded with loose collageneous matrices, which is in contrast to the single-channel structure of other vascular systems. The rod-shaped nuclei aligned longitudinally along the channels were assumed to be the endothelial cells of the primo-vessels, but LYVE-1, a specific marker of lymphatics, was not expressed, which indicates a clear difference from lymphatic endothelial cells. Taken together these findings on and characterization of the novel threadlike vascular structures in cancer models may have important implications for cancer prognosis and for therapy.

  19. [Morphogenesis, structure and properties of lymphatic vessels].

    PubMed

    Ratajska, Anna; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Flaht, Aleksandra; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota

    2012-11-19

    In this paper, we present literature results related to structure and various manners of lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development and in pathological events, such as tumorigenesis, wound healing, and other diseases. The functions of the lymphatic system include the collection of fluids that enter tissues from the circulation, absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins from the intestine and their subsequent transport, participation in antigen, dendritic cell, and lymphocyte migration. The lymphatic system is also a route for tumor cell and inflammatory cell transport. Native lymphatic capillaries differ from blood capillaries by having an irregular lumen, a discontinuous basement membrane, absence of pericytes, and a strong anchorage of their endothelial cells to the extracellular matrix via microfibrils built of emilin and fibrillin. Lymphatic endothelial cells express surface antigens such as Lyve-1, podoplanin, VEGFR3 (Flk4) and transcription factor Prox-1, as well as molecules which are common for blood endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (CD31, CD34, Flk-1, Tie-1, Tie-2, neuropilin 2). Lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development starts with the occurrence of lymphatic sacs sprouting from systemic jugular veins and/or by co-option of lymphangioblasts or hematopoietic-derived cells. It can also proceed by dedifferentiation of venous endothelial cells after their detachment from the venous system, migration to the target places within the body and assembly in the lymphatic lumen. Mechanisms of lymphatic vessel formation during embryonic development and in pathological conditions, such as tumorigenesis, wound healing, and metastasis, is regulated by a plethora of growth factors and molecules, among which the most important are VEGF-C, VEGF-D, HGF, FGF, retinoic acid, IL-3, and IL-7. Macrophages and cells bearing CD45 phenotype seem to take part in the formation of lymphatics. Macrophages might act as a source of growth

  20. Immunopathogenesis of lymphatic filarial disease.

    PubMed

    Babu, Subash; Nutman, Thomas B

    2012-11-01

    Although two thirds of the 120 million people infected with lymph-dwelling filarial parasites have subclinical infections, ~40 million have lymphedema and/or other pathologic manifestations including hydroceles (and other forms of urogenital disease), episodic adenolymphangitis, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, lymphedema, and (in its most severe form) elephantiasis. Adult filarial worms reside in the lymphatics and lymph nodes and induce changes that result in dilatation of lymphatics and thickening of the lymphatic vessel walls. Progressive lymphatic damage and pathology results from the summation of the effect of tissue alterations induced by both living and nonliving adult parasites, the host inflammatory response to the parasites and their secreted antigens, the host inflammatory response to the endosymbiont Wolbachia, and those seen as a consequence of secondary bacterial or fungal infections. Inflammatory damage induced by filarial parasites appears to be multifactorial, with endogenous parasite products, Wolbachia, and host immunity all playing important roles. This review will initially examine the prototypical immune responses engendered by the parasite and delineate the regulatory mechanisms elicited to prevent immune-mediated pathology. This will be followed by a discussion of the proposed mechanisms underlying pathogenesis, with the central theme being that pathogenesis is a two-step process-the first initiated by the parasite and host innate immune system and the second propagated mainly by the host's adaptive immune system and by other factors (including secondary infections).

  1. Aged lymphatic contractility: recent answers and new questions.

    PubMed

    Gashev, Anatoliy A; Chatterjee, Victor

    2013-03-01

    Abstract An overview is presented of recent findings related to biology of aging of the lymph transport system. The authors discuss recently obtained data on the aging-associated alterations of lymphatic contractility in thoracic duct and mesenteric lymphatic vessels; on comparisons of function of aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels in situ versus isolated specimens and important conclusions which arose from these studies; on aging-associated changes in functional status of mast cells located close to aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels; on evidence of presence of oxidative stress in aged lymphatic vessels and changes in arrangement of muscle cells in their walls. The authors conclude that future continuation of the research efforts in this area is necessary and will be able to provide not only novel fundamental knowledge on the biology of lymphatic aging, but also will create solid foundation for the subsequent developments of lymphatic-oriented therapeutic interventions in many diseases of the elderly.

  2. Reconstructive microsurgery of lymph vessels: the personal method of lymphatic-venous-lymphatic (LVL) interpositioned grafted shunt.

    PubMed

    Campisi, C; Boccardo, F; Tacchella, M

    1995-01-01

    Our clinical observations in 64 patients affected by chronic obstructive lymphedema (either arm or leg) undergoing interposition autologous lymphatic-venous-lymphatic (LVL) anastomoses are reported. This microsurgical technique is an alternative to other lymphatic shunting methods, especially when venous dysfunction coexists in the same limb and, therefore, when direct lymphatic-venous anastomosis is accordingly inadequate. Preoperative diagnostic evaluation (including lymphatic and venous isotopic scintigraphy, Doppler venous flowmetrics, and pressure manometry) plays an essential role in assessing the conditions of both the lymphatic and venous systems and in establishing which microsurgical procedure, if any, is indicated. Our microsurgical technique consists of inserting suitably large and lengthy autologous venous grafts between lymphatic collectors above and below the site of obstruction to lymph flow. The data show that, using this technique, both limb function and edema improved, and in all patients followed up for over 5 years edema regression was permanent.

  3. Short time effects of radiotherapy on lymphatic vessels and restorative lymphatic pathways: experimental approaches ina mouse model.

    PubMed

    Pastouret, F; Lievens, P; Leduc, O; Bourgeois, P; Tournel, K; Lamote, J; Zirak, C; Leduc, A

    2014-06-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is an important component in the therapeutic approach to oncologic conditions. This study presents the investigative results on the impact of RT on lymphatic vessels and on the regenerative response of the lymphatic system in a mouse model. We first irradiated 3 groups of ten mice using brachytherapy in a single treatment of 20 Gy. We then performed morphological examination of the irradiated lymphatic vessels using an in vivo microscopic transillumination technique at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Next we evaluated lymphatic flow using lymphoscintigraphy and in vivo microscopy at 6 to 11 weeks in: 10 additional mice following irradiation as above (IR), in 10 mice following incision of a lymphatic vessel (I), and in a non-treated control group of 10 mice (N). Intact lymphatic vessels were observed in all mice at 2, 4, and 8 weeks following the single dose of radiotherapy in the first group of mice and normal lymphatic flow was fully restored in the irradiated (IR) and incised (I) mice indicating that the reparative substitution lymphatic pathways are functioning normally. We found that following irradiation with one dose of 20 Gy, lymphatic vessels were not visibly damaged and also that lymphatic flow was consistently restored and substitutive lymphatic pathways formed.

  4. Comparison of approaches for microscopic imaging of skin lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Yu, Zheyuan; Liu, Ningfei

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of skin lymphatic vessels is of great significance in understanding their roles in many pathological conditions. Our aim was to identify the optimal approach for investigation of cutaneous lymphatic system. We performed comparative studies on skin lymphatic vessels using immunohistochemistry of tissue sections, computer graphic reconstruction method together with immunohistochemically stained serial sections and whole mount fluorescence in human lower limb. Lymphatic vessels were identified with podoplanin antibody. The relative merits and drawbacks of each method in evaluation of structure, spatial organization, and distribution of cutaneous lymphatic vessels were described. Immunohistology of tissue sections enabled the investigation of the structure and distribution of the whole cutaneous lymphatic system in two-dimensional slices, whereas three-dimensional morphology of only the most superficial lymph capillary network immediately under the epidermis could be evaluated with the whole mount technique. Meanwhile, only little segmentation of skin lymphatic vessel from five immunohistochemically stained serial sections was reconstructed and evaluated due to expense and special skills required using computer graphic three-dimensional reconstruction. Furthermore, a great number of artifacts and special skills required in its processes leaded to less accurate structure of skin lymphatic vessels. Our findings demonstrated that the use of either of the proposed techniques alone could not allow a comprehensive analysis of the skin lymphatic system due to their relative drawbacks. Combination of immunohistology of tissue sections and three-dimensional whole-mount preparations appears to be the best candidate for comprehensive evaluation of skin lymphatic system.

  5. Exercise countermeasure protocol management expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, L.; Chen, J. G.; Flores, L.; Tan, S.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise will be used primarily to countermeasure against deconditioning on extended space flight. In this paper we describe the development and evaluation of an expert system for exercise countermeasure protocol management. Currently, the system includes two major subsystems: baseline prescription and prescription adjustment. The baseline prescription subsystem is designed to provide initial exercise prescriptions while prescription adjustment subsystem is designed to modify the initial prescription based on the exercised progress. The system runs under three different environments: PC, SUN workstation, and Symbolic machine. The inference engine, baseline prescription module, prescription adjustment module and explanation module are developed under the Symbolic environment by using the ART (Automated Reasoning Tool) software. The Sun environment handles database management features and interfaces with PC environment to obtain physical and physiological data from exercise units on-board during the flight. Eight subjects' data have been used to evaluate the system performance by comparing the prescription of nine experienced exercise physiologists and the one prescribed by the expert system. The results of the validation test indicated that the performance of the expert system was acceptable.

  6. Advances in Lymphatic Imaging and Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Gunda, Padmaja; Majeti, Bharat K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Laird, Forrest M.

    2011-09-10

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death after heart disease in the US. While metastasized cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon are incurable, before their distant spread, these diseases will have invaded the lymphatic system as a first step in their progression. Hence, proper evaluation of the disease state of the lymphatics which drain a tumor site is crucial to staging and the formation of a treatment plan. Current lymphatic imaging modalities with visible dyes and radionucleotide tracers offer limited sensitivity and poor resolution; however, newer tools using nanocarriers, quantum dots, and magnetic resonance imaging promise to vastly improve the staging of lymphatic spread without needless biopsies. Concurrent with the improvement of lymphatic imaging agents, has been the development of drug carriers that can localize chemotherapy to the lymphatic system, thus improving the treatment of localized disease while minimizing the exposure of healthy organs to cytotoxic drugs. This review will focus on polymeric systems that have been developed for imaging and drug delivery to the lymph system, how these new devices improve upon current technologies, and where further improvement is needed.

  7. In vivo dual-modality imaging of lymphatic systems using indocyanine green in rats: three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging and planar fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Song, Kwang Hyun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to map non-invasively sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) and lymphatic vessels of rats in vivo using FDA-approved indocyanine green (ICG) and two non-ionizing imaging modalities: volumetric spectroscopic photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which measures optical absorption, and planar fluorescence imaging, which measures fluorescent emission. SLNs and lymphatic vessels were clearly visible after a 0.2 ml-intradermal-injection of 1 mM ICG in both imaging systems. We also imaged deeply positioned lymph nodes in vivo by layering biological tissues on top of rats. These two modalities, when used together with ICG, have the potential to map SLNs in axillary staging and to study tumor metastasis in breast cancer patients.

  8. Spacelab system analysis: The modified free access protocol: An access protocol for communication systems with periodic and Poisson traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, Frank; Owens, John; Daniel, Steven

    1989-01-01

    The protocol definition and terminal hardware for the modified free access protocol, a communications protocol similar to Ethernet, are developed. A MFA protocol simulator and a CSMA/CD math model are also developed. The protocol is tailored to communication systems where the total traffic may be divided into scheduled traffic and Poisson traffic. The scheduled traffic should occur on a periodic basis but may occur after a given event such as a request for data from a large number of stations. The Poisson traffic will include alarms and other random traffic. The purpose of the protocol is to guarantee that scheduled packets will be delivered without collision. This is required in many control and data collection systems. The protocol uses standard Ethernet hardware and software requiring minimum modifications to an existing system. The modification to the protocol only affects the Ethernet transmission privileges and does not effect the Ethernet receiver.

  9. Cardiac Lymphatics - A New Avenue for Therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Vuorio, Taina; Tirronen, Annakaisa; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2017-01-10

    Recent progress in lymphatic vessel biology and in novel imaging techniques has established the importance of the lymphatic vasculature as part of the cardiovascular system. The lymphatic vessel network regulates many physiological processes important for heart function such as fluid balance, transport of extravasated proteins, and trafficking of immune cells. Therefore, lymphangiogenic therapy could be beneficial in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, for example by improving reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) from atherosclerotic lesions or by resolving edema and fibrosis after myocardial infarction. In this review we first describe recent findings on the development and function of cardiac lymphatic vessels, and subsequently focus on the prospects of pro- and anti-lymphangiogenic therapies in cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Genetics of lymphatic anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Brouillard, Pascal; Boon, Laurence; Vikkula, Miikka

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic anomalies include a variety of developmental and/or functional defects affecting the lymphatic vessels: sporadic and familial forms of primary lymphedema, secondary lymphedema, chylothorax and chylous ascites, lymphatic malformations, and overgrowth syndromes with a lymphatic component. Germline mutations have been identified in at least 20 genes that encode proteins acting around VEGFR-3 signaling but also downstream of other tyrosine kinase receptors. These mutations exert their effects via the RAS/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT pathways and explain more than a quarter of the incidence of primary lymphedema, mostly of inherited forms. More common forms may also result from multigenic effects or post-zygotic mutations. Most of the corresponding murine knockouts are homozygous lethal, while heterozygotes are healthy, which suggests differences in human and murine physiology and the influence of other factors. PMID:24590274

  11. Comparative and Developmental Anatomy of Cardiac Lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Ratajska, A.; Gula, G.; Flaht-Zabost, A.; Czarnowska, E.; Ciszek, B.; Jankowska-Steifer, E.; Niderla-Bielinska, J.; Radomska-Lesniewska, D.

    2014-01-01

    The role of the cardiac lymphatic system has been recently appreciated since lymphatic disturbances take part in various heart pathologies. This review presents the current knowledge about normal anatomy and structure of lymphatics and their prenatal development for a better understanding of the proper functioning of this system in relation to coronary circulation. Lymphatics of the heart consist of terminal capillaries of various diameters, capillary plexuses that drain continuously subendocardial, myocardial, and subepicardial areas, and draining (collecting) vessels that lead the lymph out of the heart. There are interspecies differences in the distribution of lymphatic capillaries, especially near the valves, as well as differences in the routes and number of draining vessels. In some species, subendocardial areas contain fewer lymphatic capillaries as compared to subepicardial parts of the heart. In all species there is at least one collector vessel draining lymph from the subepicardial plexuses and running along the anterior interventricular septum under the left auricle and further along the pulmonary trunk outside the heart and terminating in the right venous angle. The second collector assumes a different route in various species. In most mammalian species the collectors run along major branches of coronary arteries, have valves and a discontinuous layer of smooth muscle cells. PMID:24592145

  12. The lymphatic vasculature: development and role in shaping immunity.

    PubMed

    Betterman, Kelly L; Harvey, Natasha L

    2016-05-01

    The lymphatic vasculature is an integral component of the immune system. Lymphatic vessels are a key highway via which immune cells are trafficked, serving not simply as a passive route of transport, but to actively shape and coordinate immune responses. Reciprocally, immune cells provide signals that impact the growth, development, and activity of the lymphatic vasculature. In addition to immune cell trafficking, lymphatic vessels are crucial for fluid homeostasis and lipid absorption. The field of lymphatic vascular research is rapidly expanding, fuelled by rapidly advancing technology that has enabled the manipulation and imaging of lymphatic vessels, together with an increasing recognition of the involvement of lymphatic vessels in a myriad of human pathologies. In this review we provide an overview of the genetic pathways and cellular processes important for development and maturation of the lymphatic vasculature, discuss recent work revealing important roles for the lymphatic vasculature in directing immune cell traffic and coordinating immune responses and highlight the involvement of lymphatic vessels in a range of pathological settings.

  13. Laminar flow downregulates Notch activity to promote lymphatic sprouting.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dongwon; Park, Eunkyung; Jung, Eunson; Seong, Young Jin; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Esak; Hong, Mingu; Lee, Sunju; Ishida, Hiroaki; Burford, James; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Adams, Ralf H; Srikanth, Sonal; Gwack, Yousang; Chen, Christopher S; Vogel, Hans J; Koh, Chester J; Wong, Alex K; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2017-04-03

    The major function of the lymphatic system is to drain interstitial fluid from tissue. Functional drainage causes increased fluid flow that triggers lymphatic expansion, which is conceptually similar to hypoxia-triggered angiogenesis. Here, we have identified a mechanotransduction pathway that translates laminar flow-induced shear stress to activation of lymphatic sprouting. While low-rate laminar flow commonly induces the classic shear stress responses in blood endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), only LECs display reduced Notch activity and increased sprouting capacity. In response to flow, the plasma membrane calcium channel ORAI1 mediates calcium influx in LECs and activates calmodulin to facilitate a physical interaction between Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2), the major regulator of shear responses, and PROX1, the master regulator of lymphatic development. The PROX1/KLF2 complex upregulates the expression of DTX1 and DTX3L. DTX1 and DTX3L, functioning as a heterodimeric Notch E3 ligase, concertedly downregulate NOTCH1 activity and enhance lymphatic sprouting. Notably, overexpression of the calcium reporter GCaMP3 unexpectedly inhibited lymphatic sprouting, presumably by disturbing calcium signaling. Endothelial-specific knockouts of Orai1 and Klf2 also markedly impaired lymphatic sprouting. Moreover, Dtx3l loss of function led to defective lymphatic sprouting, while Dtx3l gain of function rescued impaired sprouting in Orai1 KO embryos. Together, the data reveal a molecular mechanism underlying laminar flow-induced lymphatic sprouting.

  14. Lymphatic Vessels in Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Schaupper, Mira; Jeltsch, Michael; Rohringer, Sabrina; Redl, Heinz; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The lymphatic system is involved in maintaining interstitial fluid homeostasis, fat absorption, and immune surveillance. Dysfunction of lymphatic fluid uptake can lead to lymphedema. Worldwide up to 250 million people are estimated to suffer from this disfiguring and disabling disease, which places a strain on the healthcare system as well as on the affected patients. The severity of lymphatic diseases calls for the establishment of new treatment methods. One approach is to replace dysfunctional lymphatic vessels with bioengineered ones. In this study, we mainly focus on hydrogels, scaffolds with cellular constructs, interstitial flow, and extracorporeal shockwave therapy. This review provides an overview on the current status of lymphatic biology and approaches of reconstruction and regeneration of lymphatic vascular tissues.

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lahdenranta, Johanna; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Padera, Timothy P.; Hoshida, Tohru; Nelson, Gregory; Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai

    2009-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is a critical determinant of cancer prognosis. Recently, several lymphangiogenic molecules such as vafscular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C and -D were identified. However, the mechanistic understanding of lymphatic metastasis is still in infancy. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a crucial role in regulating blood vessel growth and function as well as lymphatic vessel function. NOS expression correlates with lymphatic metastasis. However, causal relationship between NOS and lymphatic metastasis has not been documented. To this end, we first show that both VEGF receptor-2 and -3 stimulation activate eNOS in lymphatic endothelial cells and that NO donors induce proliferation and/or survival of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells in a dose dependent manner. We find that an NOS inhibitor L-NMMA blocked regeneration of lymphatic vessels. Using intravital microscopy that allows us to visualize the steps of lymphatic metastasis, we show that genetic deletion of eNOS as well as NOS blockade attenuates peritumor lymphatic hyperplasia of VEGF-C-overexpressing T241 fibrosarcomas and decreases the delivery of metastatic tumor cells to the draining lymph nodes. Genetic deletion of eNOS in the host also leads to a decrease in T241 tumor cell dissemination to the lymph nodes and macroscopic lymph node metastasis of B16F10 melanoma. These findings indicate that eNOS mediates VEGF-C induced lymphangiogenesis and, consequently, plays a critical role in lymphatic metastasis. Our findings explain the correlation between NOS and lymphatic metastasis seen in a number of human tumors and open the door for potential therapies exploiting NO signaling to treat diseases of the lymphatic system. PMID:19318557

  16. Survivability validation protocol issues for a system-of-systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, G.; Ianacone, K.J.; Stringer, T.A.

    1993-08-01

    This paper illuminates the various issues confronting a protocol developer as he attempts to construct a system-of-systems (SOS) survivability validation protocol. These issues are considered in the context of a Battle Management Command, Control, and Communications (BMC{sup 3}) network in the form of a Hypothetical System Architecture consisting of air, sea, ground, and space platforms. The purpose of the protocol of concem is to validate the nuclear survivability of the BMC{sup 3} SOS. To achieve this validation, the combined susceptibilities of the SOS platforms and communications links must be considered. A basic SOS simulation concept is described, which assumes individual platform survivability. The nuclear environments to be considered in the simulation are outlined with a discussion of the relationship to basic system susceptibility. Various validation concepts for the SOS protocol are summarized in relation to the life cycle phase during which they would be utilized. Computer simulation issues are discussed, including the environments to be modeled, validation of the codes, documentation, and configuration control. Concluding remarks center on the most likely way of simulating nuclear effects and on treating simulation tools like mission critical items.

  17. Lymphatic imaging: Lymphography, computed tomography and scintigraphy, 2nd ed

    SciTech Connect

    Close, M.E.; Wallace, S.

    1985-01-01

    The latest addition to the Golden's Diagnostic Radiology series deals not only with imaging of the lymphatic system but also with lymphatic anatomy, its pathophysiology, and treatment of disorders. The first two chapters deal with the history of the discovery of the lymphatic system and its normal anatomy. The section on technique contains practical information and discussion of lymphatic physiology and the pathology of lymphomas. Half of the book's 16 chapters are devoted to problems encountered in clinical imaging. The approach is both by anatomy (thorax, neck, abdomen) and pathology (benign disease, lymphoma, solid tumors).

  18. New developments in clinical aspects of lymphatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Peter S.; Rockson, Stanley G.

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system is fundamentally important to cardiovascular disease, infection and immunity, cancer, and probably obesity — the four major challenges in healthcare in the 21st century. This Review will consider the manner in which new knowledge of lymphatic genes and molecular mechanisms has demonstrated that lymphatic dysfunction should no longer be considered a passive bystander in disease but rather an active player in many pathological processes and, therefore, a genuine target for future therapeutic developments. The specific roles of the lymphatic system in edema, genetic aspects of primary lymphedema, infection (cellulitis/erysipelas), Crohn’s disease, obesity, cancer, and cancer-related lymphedema are highlighted. PMID:24590276

  19. Determinants of valve gating in collecting lymphatic vessels from rat mesentery

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Elaheh; Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Zawieja, David C.; Moore, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary lymphatic valves are essential for minimizing backflow of lymph and are presumed to gate passively according to the instantaneous trans-valve pressure gradient. We hypothesized that valve gating is also modulated by vessel distention, which could alter leaflet stiffness and coaptation. To test this hypothesis, we devised protocols to measure the small pressure gradients required to open or close lymphatic valves and determine if the gradients varied as a function of vessel diameter. Lymphatic vessels were isolated from rat mesentery, cannulated, and pressurized using a servo-control system. Detection of valve leaflet position simultaneously with diameter and intraluminal pressure changes in two-valve segments revealed the detailed temporal relationships between these parameters during the lymphatic contraction cycle. The timing of valve movements was similar to that of cardiac valves, but only when lymphatic vessel afterload was elevated. The pressure gradients required to open or close a valve were determined in one-valve segments during slow, ramp-wise pressure elevation, either from the input or output side of the valve. Tests were conducted over a wide range of baseline pressures (and thus diameters) in passive vessels as well as in vessels with two levels of imposed tone. Surprisingly, the pressure gradient required for valve closure varied >20-fold (0.1–2.2 cmH2O) as a passive vessel progressively distended. Similarly, the pressure gradient required for valve opening varied sixfold with vessel distention. Finally, our functional evidence supports the concept that lymphatic muscle tone exerts an indirect effect on valve gating. PMID:21460194

  20. Determinants of valve gating in collecting lymphatic vessels from rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael J; Rahbar, Elaheh; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James E

    2011-07-01

    Secondary lymphatic valves are essential for minimizing backflow of lymph and are presumed to gate passively according to the instantaneous trans-valve pressure gradient. We hypothesized that valve gating is also modulated by vessel distention, which could alter leaflet stiffness and coaptation. To test this hypothesis, we devised protocols to measure the small pressure gradients required to open or close lymphatic valves and determine if the gradients varied as a function of vessel diameter. Lymphatic vessels were isolated from rat mesentery, cannulated, and pressurized using a servo-control system. Detection of valve leaflet position simultaneously with diameter and intraluminal pressure changes in two-valve segments revealed the detailed temporal relationships between these parameters during the lymphatic contraction cycle. The timing of valve movements was similar to that of cardiac valves, but only when lymphatic vessel afterload was elevated. The pressure gradients required to open or close a valve were determined in one-valve segments during slow, ramp-wise pressure elevation, either from the input or output side of the valve. Tests were conducted over a wide range of baseline pressures (and thus diameters) in passive vessels as well as in vessels with two levels of imposed tone. Surprisingly, the pressure gradient required for valve closure varied >20-fold (0.1-2.2 cmH(2)O) as a passive vessel progressively distended. Similarly, the pressure gradient required for valve opening varied sixfold with vessel distention. Finally, our functional evidence supports the concept that lymphatic muscle tone exerts an indirect effect on valve gating.

  1. Interaction between the extracellular matrix and lymphatics - consequences for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic function

    PubMed Central

    Wiig, Helge; Keskin, Doruk; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system is important for body fluid balance as well as immunological surveillance. Due to the identification of new molecular markers during the last decade, there has been a recent dramatic increase in our knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis) and lymphatic function. Here we review data showing that although it is often overlooked, the extracellular matrix plays an important role in the generation of new lymphatic vessels as a response to physiological and pathological stimuli. Extracellular matrix-lymphatic interactions as well as biophysical characteristics of the stroma have consequences for tumor formation, growth and metastasis. During the recent years, anti-lymphangiogenesis has emerged as an additional therapeutic modality to the clinically applied anti-angiogenesis strategy. Oppositely, enhancement of lymphangiogenesis in situations of lymph accumulation is seen as a promising strategy to a set of conditions where few therapeutic avenues are available. Knowledge on the interaction between the extracellular matrix and the lymphatics may enhance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and may ultimately lead to better therapies for conditions where reduced or increased lymphatic function is the therapeutic target PMID:20727409

  2. Lymphatic vessels arise from specialized angioblasts within a venous niche.

    PubMed

    Nicenboim, J; Malkinson, G; Lupo, T; Asaf, L; Sela, Y; Mayseless, O; Gibbs-Bar, L; Senderovich, N; Hashimshony, T; Shin, M; Jerafi-Vider, A; Avraham-Davidi, I; Krupalnik, V; Hofi, R; Almog, G; Astin, J W; Golani, O; Ben-Dor, S; Crosier, P S; Herzog, W; Lawson, N D; Hanna, J H; Yanai, I; Yaniv, K

    2015-06-04

    How cells acquire their fate is a fundamental question in developmental and regenerative biology. Multipotent progenitors undergo cell-fate restriction in response to cues from the microenvironment, the nature of which is poorly understood. In the case of the lymphatic system, venous cells from the cardinal vein are thought to generate lymphatic vessels through trans-differentiation. Here we show that in zebrafish, lymphatic progenitors arise from a previously uncharacterized niche of specialized angioblasts within the cardinal vein, which also generates arterial and venous fates. We further identify Wnt5b as a novel lymphatic inductive signal and show that it also promotes the ‘angioblast-to-lymphatic’ transition in human embryonic stem cells, suggesting that this process is evolutionarily conserved. Our results uncover a novel mechanism of lymphatic specification, and provide the first characterization of the lymphatic inductive niche. More broadly, our findings highlight the cardinal vein as a heterogeneous structure, analogous to the haematopoietic niche in the aortic floor.

  3. Mechanical Forces and Lymphatic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    This review examines current understanding of how the lymphatic vessel network can optimize lymph flow in response to various mechanical forces. Lymphatics are organized as a vascular tree, with blind-ended initial lymphatics, precollectors, prenodal collecting lymphatics, lymph nodes, postnodal collecting lymphatics and the larger trunks (thoracic duct and right lymph duct) that connect to the subclavian veins. The formation of lymph from interstitial fluid depends heavily on oscillating pressure gradients to drive fluid into initial lymphatics. Collecting lymphatics are segmented vessels with unidirectional valves, with each segment, called a lymphangion, possessing an intrinsic pumping mechanism. The lymphangions propel lymph forward against a hydrostatic pressure gradient. Fluid is returned to the central circulation both at lymph nodes and via the larger lymphatic trunks. Several recent developments are discussed, including: evidence for the active role of endothelial cells in lymph formation; recent developments on how inflow pressure, outflow pressure, and shear stress affect pump function of the lymphangion; lymphatic valve gating mechanisms; collecting lymphatic permeability; and current interpretations of the molecular mechanisms within lymphatic endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms by lymphatic vessels sense mechanical stimuli, integrate the information, and generate the appropriate response is key for determining the pathogenesis of lymphatic insufficiency and developing treatments for lymphedema. PMID:25107458

  4. A new classification system for primary lymphatic dysplasias based on phenotype.

    PubMed

    Connell, F; Brice, G; Jeffery, S; Keeley, V; Mortimer, P; Mansour, S

    2010-05-01

    Traditional classification systems for lymphoedema are of limited use for the diagnosis of specific forms of primary lymphoedema. The understanding of primary lymphoedema has been impeded by confusing terminology and a tendency to simply divide patients into three categories based on the age of onset: lymphoedema congenita manifests at or shortly after birth, lymphoedema praecox is apparent before the age of 35 years and lymphoedema tarda manifests thereafter. The clinical presentation in the spectrum of primary lymphoedema disorders is very variable; the phenotypes of primary lymphoedema conditions vary in the age of onset, site of the oedema, inheritance patterns, associated features and genetic causes. Different inheritance patterns are recognised and there are numerous associated anomalies. Some subgroups, such as Milroy disease and Lymphoedema distichiasis, are well characterised, but others are not. A new clinical classification for primary lymphoedema has been developed as a diagnostic algorithm. Its use is demonstrated on 333 probands referred to our lymphoedema clinic. Grouping patients by accurate phenotyping facilitates molecular investigations, understanding of inheritance patterns, and the natural history of different types of primary lymphoedema. Descriptions of the diagnostic categories, some of which have not been previously clearly defined as distinct clinical entities, are illustrated by clinical cases.

  5. Recent advances in the research of lymphatic stomata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Bin; Li, Meng; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    Lymphatic stomata are small openings of lymphatic capillaries on the free surface of the mesothelium. The peritoneal cavity, pleural cavity, and pericardial cavity are connected with lymphatic system via these small openings, which have the function of active absorption. The ultrastructure of the lymphatic stomata and their absorption from the body cavities are important clinically, such as ascites elimination, neoplasm metastasis, and inflammatory reaction. The lymphatic stomata play an important role in the physiological and pathological conditions. Our previous study indicated for the first time that nitric oxide (NO) could regulate the opening and absorption of the lymphatic stomata. It could decrease the level of free intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)] through increasing the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) level in the rat peritoneal mesothelial cells, thus regulating the lymphatic stomata. This process is related with the NO-cGMP-[Ca(2+)] signal pathway. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the development and the function of the lymphatic stomata. The ultrastructure and regulations of the lymphatic stomata are also discussed in this review.

  6. Tissue-engineered lymphatic graft for the treatment of lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Kanapathy, Muholan; Patel, Nikhil M.; Kalaskar, Deepak M.; Mosahebi, Afshin; Mehrara, Babak J.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lymphedema is a chronic debilitating condition and curative treatment is yet to be found. Tissue engineering approach, which combines cellular components, scaffold, and molecular signals hold great potential in the treatment of secondary lymphedema with the advent of lymphatic graft to reconstruct damaged collecting lymphatic vessel. This review highlights the ideal characteristics of lymphatic graft, the limitation and challenges faced, and the approaches in developing tissue-engineered lymphatic graft. Methods Literature on tissue engineering of lymphatic system and lymphatic tissue biology was reviewed. Results The prime challenge in the design and manufacturing of this graft is producing endothelialized conduit with intraluminal valves. Suitable scaffold material is needed to ensure stability and functionality of the construct. Endothelialization of the construct can be enhanced via biofunctionalization and nanotopography, which mimics extracellular matrix. Nanocomposite polymers with improved performance over existing biomaterials are likely to benefit the development of lymphatic graft. Conclusions With the in-depth understanding of tissue engineering, nanotechnology, and improved knowledge on the biology of lymphatic regeneration, the aspiration to develop successful lymphatic graft is well achievable. PMID:25248852

  7. Visualization of lymphatic vessel development, growth, and function.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, Cathrin; Hägerling, René; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    Despite their important physiological and pathophysiological functions, lymphatic endothelial cells and lymphatic vessels remain less well studied compared to the blood vascular system. Lymphatic endothelium differentiates from venous blood vascular endothelium after initial arteriovenous differentiation. Only recently by the use of light sheet microscopy, the precise mechanism of separation of the first lymphatic endothelial progenitors from the cardinal vein has been described as delamination followed by mesenchymal cell migration of lymphatic endothelial cells. Dorsolaterally of the embryonic cardinal vein, lymphatic endothelial cells reaggregate to form the first lumenized lymphatic vessels, the dorsal peripheral longitudinal vessel and the more ventrally positioned primordial thoracic duct. Despite this progress in our understanding of the first lymph vessel formation, intravital observation of lymphatic vessel behavior in the intact organism, during development and in the adult, is prerequisite to a precise understanding of this tissue. Transgenic models and two-photon microscopy, in combination with optical windows, have made live intravital imaging possible: however, new imaging modalities and novel approaches promise gentler, more physiological, and longer intravital imaging of lymphatic vessels.

  8. Transceiving protocol design for a free space optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hualong; Su, Wanxin; Xing, Zhongbao

    2008-12-01

    A new transceiving protocol is demonstrated for a Free Space Optical (FSO) communication system, and it's discussed in two parts: the transmitting protocol and the receiving protocol. During the discussion of these two parts, the cooperation of them is also discussed. Different from wired communication, an FSO system modulates the data on a narrow beam of laser transmitting through the free space or the atmosphere, and the protocol presented in this paper is mainly optimized for terrestrial Free Space Optical links, in which the signal channel of the system is mainly the atmosphere. Due to the complex composition and activity of the atmosphere, this signal channel brings in great influence on the transmitting laser in it, for example, the absorption and scattering of the atmosphere molecules and aerosols, the scintillation of received laser power caused by the turbulence of the atmosphere, all of which results in a much higher Bit Error Rate (BER) of the communication system. Thus in designing a protocol for an FSO system, more effort should be taken in the encoding of the data stream, the synchronization of the data stream, error checking and exception handling. The main function of the transmitting protocol includes interfacing the outer input data with a parallel port, buffering the input data, encoding the input data stream, serializing the parallel data and output the serialized data. It also has an output management unit to manage the activity of each part of the transmitting protocol. The main function of the receiving protocol includes filtering and synchronizing the input serial data stream, paralleling the serial data stream, decoding the input data, error checking, exception handling and interfacing the outer receiver with a parallel port. The entire transceiving protocol could be programmed into a single FPGA chip to improve system integrity and reduce the system cost. The presented protocol could be taken as "protocol transparent" for outer interfaces

  9. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B.; Chaplain, Mark A.J.; McDougall, Steven R.; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John

    2014-01-01

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but leads to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the

  10. British Columbia/Alberta Transfer System Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this agreement is to provide assurance to students that they will receive transfer credit for courses or programs they have successfully completed where the content/outcomes are demonstrably equivalent to those offered at the institution to which they transfer. This protocol is undertaken by the British Columbia Council on…

  11. Anatomy and development of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature: Its role in injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sophie; Riley, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lymphatic vessels are present throughout the entire body in all mammals and function to regulate tissue fluid balance, lipid transport and survey the immune system. Despite the presence of an extensive lymphatic plexus within the heart, until recently the importance of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature and its origins were unknown. Several studies have described the basic anatomy of the developing cardiac lymphatic vasculature and more recently the detailed development of the murine cardiac lymphatics has been documented, with important insight into their cellular sources during embryogenesis. In this review we initially describe the development of systemic lymphatic vasculature, to provide the background for a comparative description of the spatiotemporal development of the cardiac lymphatic vessels, including detail of both canonical, typically venous, and noncanonical (hemogenic endothelium) cellular sources. Subsequently, we address the response of the cardiac lymphatic network to myocardial infarction (heart attack) and the therapeutic potential of targeting cardiac lymphangiogenesis.

  12. Chemokine signaling directs trunk lymphatic network formation along the preexisting blood vasculature.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young Ryun; Fujita, Misato; Butler, Matthew; Isogai, Sumio; Kochhan, Eva; Siekmann, Arndt F; Weinstein, Brant M

    2012-04-17

    The lymphatic system is crucial for fluid homeostasis, immune responses, and numerous pathological processes. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for establishing the anatomical form of the lymphatic vascular network remain largely unknown. Here, we show that chemokine signaling provides critical guidance cues directing early trunk lymphatic network assembly and patterning. The chemokine receptors Cxcr4a and Cxcr4b are expressed in lymphatic endothelium, whereas chemokine ligands Cxcl12a and Cxcl12b are expressed in adjacent tissues along which the developing lymphatics align. Loss- and gain-of-function studies in zebrafish demonstrate that chemokine signaling orchestrates the stepwise assembly of the trunk lymphatic network. In addition to providing evidence for a lymphatic vascular guidance mechanism, these results also suggest a molecular basis for the anatomical coalignment of lymphatic and blood vessels.

  13. Operating systems and network protocols for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Prabal; Dunkels, Adam

    2012-01-13

    Sensor network protocols exist to satisfy the communication needs of diverse applications, including data collection, event detection, target tracking and control. Network protocols to enable these services are constrained by the extreme resource scarcity of sensor nodes-including energy, computing, communications and storage-which must be carefully managed and multiplexed by the operating system. These challenges have led to new protocols and operating systems that are efficient in their energy consumption, careful in their computational needs and miserly in their memory footprints, all while discovering neighbours, forming networks, delivering data and correcting failures.

  14. Assessment of The Lymphatic System of the Genitalia Using Magnetic Resonance Lymphography Before and After Treatment of Male Genital Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Jiang, Zhaohua; Zhao, Zizhou; Wu, Lianming; Wu, Guangyu; Suo, Shiteng; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment for chronic male genital lymphedema (GL) is limited. No standard treatment or validated instrument to assess GL is available. The aim of this study was to explore whether magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) could be used to assess GL, select proper treatment for patients, and monitor postoperative progress. This is a retrospective analysis of a prospectively acquired cohort of men with GL presenting for MRL over a 7-year period. Thirty-six of 47 eligible men were included. All men were offered preoperative and postoperative MRL and assigned a morphology and function classification. Men with mild, moderate, and severe nodal dysfunction underwent complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP), lymphoveneous microsurgery, and surgical excision, respectively. The volume reductions in the genitalia of patients with mild and moderate nodal dysfunction were recorded and compared using Student t test. The abnormal superficial and deep lymphatic vessels in the lymphedematous genitalia were detected by MRL, and inguinal lymph node dysfunction was classified by MRL. Seven patients with mild dysfunction who underwent CDP showed a more significant mean volume reduction in the genitalia than did 9 patients with moderate dysfunction. Three patients with hyperplasia and moderate dysfunction who underwent microsurgical operations and 17 patients with hypoplasia and moderate or severe nodal dysfunction who underwent surgical excision had excellent cosmetic results with no lymphedema at the 3- to 5-year follow-up. MRL can be used to assess morphological and functional lymphatic abnormalities in GL, preoperatively select appropriate treatment, and postoperatively evaluate treatment outcomes. PMID:27227943

  15. Lymphatic vessels: new targets for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Seidel, Catharina D; Detmar, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in the physiological control of the tissue fluid balance and in the initiation of immune responses. Recent studies have shown that lymphangiogenesis, the growth of new lymphatic vessels and/or the expansion of existing lymphatic vessels, is a characteristic feature of acute inflammatory reactions and of chronic inflammatory diseases. In these conditions, lymphatic vessel expansion occurs at the tissue level but also within the draining lymph nodes. Surprisingly, activation of lymphatic vessel function by delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor-C exerts anti-inflammatory effects in several models of cutaneous and joint inflammation. These effects are likely mediated by enhanced drainage of extravasated fluid and inflammatory cells, but also by lymphatic vessel-mediated modulation of immune responses. Although some of the underlying mechanisms are just beginning to be identified, lymphatic vessels have emerged as important targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory conditions. In this context, it is of great interest that some of the currently used anti-inflammatory drugs also potently activate lymphatic vessels.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Circulating Lymphatic Endothelial Colony Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Terri A.; Wentz, Breanna L.; Lagunoff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rationale The identification of circulating endothelial progenitor cells has led to speculation regarding their origin as well as their contribution to neovascular development. Two distinct types of endothelium make up the blood and lymphatic vessel system. However, it has yet to be determined whether there are distinct lymphatic-specific circulating endothelial progenitor cells. Objective This study aims to isolate and characterize the cellular properties and global gene expression of lymphatic-specific endothelial progenitor cells. Methods and Results We isolated circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) from whole peripheral blood. These cells are endothelial in nature, as defined by their expression of endothelial markers and their ability to undergo capillary morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture. A subset of isolated colonies express markers of lymphatic endothelium, including VEGFR-3 and Prox-1, with low levels of VEGFR-1, a blood endothelial marker, while the bulk of the isolated cells express high VEGFR-1 levels with low VEGFR-3 and Prox-1 expression. The different isolates have differential responses to VEGF-C, a lymphatic endothelial specific cytokine, strongly suggesting that there are lymphatic specific and blood specific ECFCs. Global analysis of gene expression revealed key differences in the regulation of pathways involved in cellular differentiation between blood and lymphatic-specific ECFCs. Conclusion These data indicate that there are two distinguishable circulating ECFC types, blood and lymphatic, which are likely to have discrete functions during neovascularization. PMID:26597759

  17. Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark J; Hoerauf, Achim; Bockarie, Moses

    2010-10-02

    Lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are parasitic helminth diseases that constitute a serious public health issue in tropical regions. The filarial nematodes that cause these diseases are transmitted by blood-feeding insects and produce chronic and long-term infection through suppression of host immunity. Disease pathogenesis is linked to host inflammation invoked by the death of the parasite, causing hydrocoele, lymphoedema, and elephantiasis in lymphatic filariasis, and skin disease and blindness in onchocerciasis. Most filarial species that infect people co-exist in mutualistic symbiosis with Wolbachia bacteria, which are essential for growth, development, and survival of their nematode hosts. These endosymbionts contribute to inflammatory disease pathogenesis and are a target for doxycycline therapy, which delivers macrofilaricidal activity, improves pathological outcomes, and is effective as monotherapy. Drugs to treat filariasis include diethylcarbamazine, ivermectin, and albendazole, which are used mostly in combination to reduce microfilariae in blood (lymphatic filariasis) and skin (onchocerciasis). Global programmes for control and elimination have been developed to provide sustained delivery of drugs to affected communities to interrupt transmission of disease and ultimately eliminate this burden on public health.

  18. Thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) is expressed by lymphatic vessels and mediates cell adhesion to lymphatic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Jurisic, Giorgia; Iolyeva, Maria; Proulx, Steven T; Halin, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2010-10-15

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined by comparative transcriptional profiling studies of ex vivo isolated mouse intestinal lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative PCR, and at the protein level by FACS and immunofluorescence analyses. Thy1 was also strongly expressed by tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, as evaluated in a B16 melanoma footpad model in mice. Blockade of Thy1 inhibited tumor cell adhesion to cultured mouse lymphatic endothelial cells. Importantly, treatment of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells with tumor necrosis factor or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate resulted in Thy1 upregulation in podoplanin-expressing lymphatic endothelial cells, but not in podoplanin-negative blood vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, adhesion of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes to human lymphatic endothelial cells was Thy1-dependent. Together, these results identify Thy1 as a novel lymphatic vessel expressed gene and suggest its potential role in the cell adhesion processes required for tumor progression and inflammation.

  19. Aberrant Lymphatic Endothelial Progenitors in Lymphatic Malformation Development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, June K.; Kitajewski, Christopher; Reiley, Maia; Keung, Connie H.; Monteagudo, Julie; Andrews, John P.; Liou, Peter; Thirumoorthi, Arul; Wong, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are vascular anomalies thought to arise from dysregulated lymphangiogenesis. These lesions impose a significant burden of disease on affected individuals. LM pathobiology is poorly understood, hindering the development of effective treatments. In the present studies, immunostaining of LM tissues revealed that endothelial cells lining aberrant lymphatic vessels and cells in the surrounding stroma expressed the stem cell marker, CD133, and the lymphatic endothelial protein, podoplanin. Isolated patient-derived CD133+ LM cells expressed stem cell genes (NANOG, Oct4), circulating endothelial cell precursor proteins (CD90, CD146, c-Kit, VEGFR-2), and lymphatic endothelial proteins (podoplanin, VEGFR-3). Consistent with a progenitor cell identity, CD133+ LM cells were multipotent and could be differentiated into fat, bone, smooth muscle, and lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro. CD133+ cells were compared to CD133− cells isolated from LM fluids. CD133− LM cells had lower expression of stem cell genes, but expressed circulating endothelial precursor proteins and high levels of lymphatic endothelial proteins, VE-cadherin, CD31, podoplanin, VEGFR-3 and Prox1. CD133− LM cells were not multipotent, consistent with a differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell phenotype. In a mouse xenograft model, CD133+ LM cells differentiated into lymphatic endothelial cells that formed irregularly dilated lymphatic channels, phenocopying human LMs. In vivo, CD133+ LM cells acquired expression of differentiated lymphatic endothelial cell proteins, podoplanin, LYVE1, Prox1, and VEGFR-3, comparable to expression found in LM patient tissues. Taken together, these data identify a novel LM progenitor cell population that differentiates to form the abnormal lymphatic structures characteristic of these lesions, recapitulating the human LM phenotype. This LM progenitor cell population may contribute to the clinically refractory behavior of LMs. PMID:25719418

  20. Regional recruitment of rat diaphragmatic lymphatics in response to increased pleural or peritoneal fluid load

    PubMed Central

    Moriondo, Andrea; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Sciacca, Laura; Guidali, Maria Luisa; Marcozzi, Cristiana; Negrini, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    The specific role of the diaphragmatic tendinous and muscular tissues in sustaining lymph formation and propulsion in the diaphragm was studied in 24 anaesthetized spontaneously breathing supine rats. Three experimental protocols were used: (a) control; (b) peritoneal ascitis, induced through an intraperitoneal injection of 100 ml kg−1 of iso-oncotic saline; and (c) pleural effusion, induced through an intrapleural injection of 6.6 ml kg−1 saline solution. A group of animals (n = 12) was instrumented to measure the hydraulic transdiaphragmatic pressure gradient between the pleural and peritoneal cavities in the three protocols. In the other group (n = 12), the injected iso-oncotic saline was enriched with 2% fluorescent dextrans (molecular mass = 70 kDa); at 30 min from the injections these animals were suppressed and their diaphragm excised and processed for confocal microscopy analysis. In control conditions, in spite of a favourable peritoneal-to-pleural pressure gradient, the majority of the tracer absorbed into the diaphragmatic lymphatic system converges towards the deeper collecting lymphatic ducts. This suggests that diaphragmatic lymph formation mostly depends upon pressure gradients developing between the serosal cavities and the lymphatic vessel lumen. In addition, the tracer distributes to lymph vessels located in the muscular diaphragmatic tissue, suggesting that active muscle contraction, rather than passive tendon stretch, more efficiently enhances local diaphragmatic lymph flow. Vice versa, a prevailing recruitment of the lymphatics of the tendinous diaphragmatic regions was observed in peritoneal ascitis and pleural effusion, suggesting a functional adaptation of the diaphragmatic network to increased draining requirements. PMID:17218349

  1. The lymphatic vasculature revisited-new developments in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Padberg, Y; Schulte-Merker, S; van Impel, A

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system is lined by endothelial cells and part of the vasculature. It is essential for tissue fluid homeostasis, absorption of dietary fats, and immune surveillance in vertebrates. Misregulation of lymphatic vessel formation and dysfunction of the lymphatic system have been indicated in a number of pathological conditions including lymphedema formation, obesity or chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In zebrafish, lymphatics were discovered about 10years ago, and the underlying molecular pathways involved in its development have since been studied in detail. Due to its superior live cell imaging possibilities and the broad tool kit for forward and reverse genetics, the zebrafish has become an important model organism to study the development of the lymphatic system during early embryonic development. In the current review, we will focus on the key players during zebrafish lymphangiogenesis and compare the roles of these genes to their mammalian counterparts. In particular, we will focus on novel findings that shed new light on the molecular mechanisms of lymphatic cell fate specification, as well as sprouting and migration of lymphatic precursor cells.

  2. The dual role of tumor lymphatic vessels in dissemination of metastases and immune response development.

    PubMed

    Stachura, Joanna; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Kilarski, Witold W; Güç, Esra; Golab, Jakub; Muchowicz, Angelika

    2016-07-01

    Lymphatic vasculature plays a crucial role in the immune response, enabling transport of dendritic cells (DCs) and antigens (Ags) into the lymph nodes. Unfortunately, the lymphatic system has also a negative role in the progression of cancer diseases, by facilitating the metastatic spread of many carcinomas to the draining lymph nodes. The lymphatics can promote antitumor immune response as well as tumor tolerance. Here, we review the role of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in tumor progression and immunity and mechanism of action in the newest anti-lymphatic therapies, including photodynamic therapy (PDT).

  3. The dual role of tumor lymphatic vessels in dissemination of metastases and immune response development

    PubMed Central

    Stachura, Joanna; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Kilarski, Witold W.; Güç, Esra; Golab, Jakub; Muchowicz, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lymphatic vasculature plays a crucial role in the immune response, enabling transport of dendritic cells (DCs) and antigens (Ags) into the lymph nodes. Unfortunately, the lymphatic system has also a negative role in the progression of cancer diseases, by facilitating the metastatic spread of many carcinomas to the draining lymph nodes. The lymphatics can promote antitumor immune response as well as tumor tolerance. Here, we review the role of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in tumor progression and immunity and mechanism of action in the newest anti-lymphatic therapies, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). PMID:27622039

  4. The priority dispute over the function of the lymphatic system and Glisson's ghost (the 18th-century Hunter-Monro Feud).

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Charles T

    2007-01-01

    Basic Immunology has had only two significant public priority disputes. The first began in the late 1650s and concerned the recognition of the peripheral network of vessels which collects lymph throughout the body. The publication of this major anatomical discovery prompted a priority feud discussed in a previous paper. The subject of this essay is the second dispute which occurred a century later in the late 1750s. It focused on the function of the lymphatic system and precipitated a heated war of words between a young Scotch medical graduate (Alexander Monro) and a noted London anatomist (William Hunter). Their published charges and responses ranged from feigned respect to ad hominen invectives. But in retrospect, the priority claims of both were precluded by the observations and speculations of an Englishman (Francis Glisson) a full century before. The several editions of his work were unknown to Hunter and Monro at the inception of their feud.

  5. Lipopolysaccharide modulates neutrophil recruitment and macrophage polarization on lymphatic vessels and impairs lymphatic function in rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Zawieja, Scott D; Wang, Wei; Lee, Yang; Wang, Yuan J; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves; Zawieja, David C; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2015-12-15

    Impairment of the lymphatic system is apparent in multiple inflammatory pathologies connected to elevated endotoxins such as LPS. However, the direct mechanisms by which LPS influences the lymphatic contractility are not well understood. We hypothesized that a dynamic modulation of innate immune cell populations in mesentery under inflammatory conditions perturbs tissue cytokine/chemokine homeostasis and subsequently influences lymphatic function. We used rats that were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (10 mg/kg) to determine the changes in the profiles of innate immune cells in the mesentery and in the stretch-mediated contractile responses of isolated lymphatic preparations. Results demonstrated a reduction in the phasic contractile activity of mesenteric lymphatic vessels from LPS-injected rats and a severe impairment of lymphatic pump function and flow. There was a significant reduction in the number of neutrophils and an increase in monocytes/macrophages present on the lymphatic vessels and in the clear mesentery of the LPS group. This population of monocytes and macrophages established a robust M2 phenotype, with the majority showing high expression of CD163 and CD206. Several cytokines and chemoattractants for neutrophils and macrophages were significantly changed in the mesentery of LPS-injected rats. Treatment of lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) with LPS showed significant changes in the expression of adhesion molecules, VCAM1, ICAM1, CXCR2, and galectin-9. LPS-TLR4-mediated regulation of pAKT, pERK pI-κB, and pMLC20 in LMCs promoted both contractile and inflammatory pathways. Thus, our data provide the first evidence connecting the dynamic changes in innate immune cells on or near the lymphatics and complex cytokine milieu during inflammation with lymphatic dysfunction.

  6. Primary and Secondary Lymphatic Valve Development: Molecular, Functional and Mechanical Insights

    PubMed Central

    Bazigou, Eleni; Wilson, John T.; Moore, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid homeostasis in vertebrates critically relies on the lymphatic system forming a hierarchical network of lymphatic capillaries and collecting lymphatics, for the efficient drainage and transport of extravasated fluid back to the cardiovascular system. Blind–ended lymphatic capillaries employ specialized junctions and anchoring filaments to encourage a unidirectional flow of the interstitial fluid into the initial lymphatic vessels, whereas collecting lymphatics are responsible for the active propulsion of the lymph to the venous circulation via the combined action of lymphatic muscle cells and intraluminal valves. Here we describe recent findings on molecular and physical factors regulating the development and maturation of these two types of valves and examine their role in tissue-fluid homeostasis. PMID:25086182

  7. Progression of Inflammatory Bowel Disease to Cancer: Is the Patient Better Off without Lymphatic Vessels or Nodes (or Angiopoietin 2)?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    our modification to use the Angiopoietin2 knockout mice (3,4) with lymphatic deficiency to explore the role of the lymphatic system in IBD. 1) Abraham...underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The lymphatic system has been implicated in both IBD pathogenesis and pathophysiology as well as in CRC...for colo- rectal cancer (CRC) [~15-20% lifetime risk in ulcerative colitis (UC)]. The lymphatic system has been implicated in both IBD pathophysiology

  8. Protocols for configuring computation loops on a distributed multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect

    Woei Lin; Chuan-lin Wu

    1983-01-01

    Protocols for configuring computation loops in a multiprocessing system are examined. Processing nodes are connected by a reconfigurable communication subnet using a multistage interconnection network. Configuration protocols are presented in terms of distributed algorithms such that processing nodes are configured in loop topologies. The configurability of loop topologies is first investigated. It is verified that the communication subnet can emulate loop distributed systems. It is also proven that multiple loops of various lengths can be configured in the distributed network. The technique demonstrated for configuring loop topologies can be used to configure other computation topologies. 6 references.

  9. Lymphatic Vascular-Based Therapy for IBD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    microbial factors in the lamina propria reflects a failure of lymphatics to clear these factors, precipitating immune system activation and injury...where some cells/mediators may inhibit lymphangiogenesis leading to a vicious cycle of impaired interstitial clearance and immune system activation...VEGFR-2 kinase blockade made no difference in development of disease. Lastly, we found that spleen weight, an indicator or ongoing system

  10. Lymphatic vessel development: fluid flow and valve-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Kume, Tsutomu

    2015-08-03

    Hemodynamic forces regulate many aspects of blood vessel disease and development, including susceptibility to atherosclerosis and remodeling of primary blood vessels into a mature vascular network. Vessels of the lymphatic circulatory system are also subjected to fluid flow-associated forces, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which these forces regulate the formation and maintenance of lymphatic vessels remain largely uncharacterized. This issue of the JCI includes two articles that begin to address how fluid flow influences lymphatic vessel development and function. Sweet et al. demonstrate that lymph flow is essential for the remodeling of primary lymphatic vessels, for ensuring the proper distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and for the development and maturation of lymphatic valves. Kazenwadel et al. show that flow-induced lymphatic valve development is initiated by the upregulation of GATA2, which has been linked to lymphedema in patients with Emberger syndrome. Together, these observations and future studies inspired by these results have potential to lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of lymphatic disorders.

  11. Interaction of tumor cells and lymphatic vessels in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Alitalo, A; Detmar, M

    2012-10-18

    Metastatic spread of cancer through the lymphatic system affects hundreds of thousands of patients yearly. Growth of new lymphatic vessels, lymphangiogenesis, is activated in cancer and inflammation, but is largely inactive in normal physiology, and therefore offers therapeutic potential. Key mediators of lymphangiogenesis have been identified in developmental studies. During embryonic development, lymphatic endothelial cells derive from the blood vascular endothelium and differentiate under the guidance of lymphatic-specific regulators, such as the prospero homeobox 1 transcription factor. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and VEGF receptor 3 signaling are essential for the further development of lymphatic vessels and therefore they provide a promising target for inhibition of tumor lymphangiogenesis. Lymphangiogenesis is important for the progression of solid tumors as shown for melanoma and breast cancer. Tumor cells may use chemokine gradients as guidance cues and enter lymphatic vessels through intercellular openings between endothelial cell junctions or, possibly, by inducing larger discontinuities in the endothelial cell layer. Tumor-draining sentinel lymph nodes show enhanced lymphangiogenesis even before cancer metastasis and they may function as a permissive 'lymphovascular niche' for the survival of metastatic cells. Although our current knowledge indicates that the development of anti-lymphangiogenic therapies may be beneficial for the treatment of cancer patients, several open questions remain with regard to the frequency, mechanisms and biological importance of lymphatic metastases.

  12. Lymphangion coordination minimally affects mean flow in lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Arun M; Stewart, Randolph H; Laine, Glen A; Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M; Quick, Christopher M

    2007-08-01

    The lymphatic system returns interstitial fluid to the central venous circulation, in part, by the cyclical contraction of a series of "lymphangion pumps" in a lymphatic vessel. The dynamics of individual lymphangions have been well characterized in vitro; their frequencies and strengths of contraction are sensitive to both preload and afterload. However, lymphangion interaction within a lymphatic vessel has been poorly characterized because it is difficult to experimentally alter properties of individual lymphangions and because the afterload of one lymphangion is coupled to the preload of another. To determine the effects of lymphangion interaction on lymph flow, we adapted an existing mathematical model of a lymphangion (characterizing lymphangion contractility, lymph viscosity, and inertia) to create a new lymphatic vessel model consisting of several lymphangions in series. The lymphatic vessel model was validated with focused experiments on bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels in vitro. The model was then used to predict changes in lymph flow with different time delays between onset of contraction of adjacent lymphangions (coordinated case) and with different relative lymphangion contraction frequencies (noncoordinated case). Coordination of contraction had little impact on mean flow. Furthermore, orthograde and retrograde propagations of contractile waves had similar effects on flow. Model results explain why neither retrograde propagation of contractile waves nor the lack of electrical continuity between lymphangions adversely impacts flow. Because lymphangion coordination minimally affects mean flow in lymphatic vessels, lymphangions have flexibility to independently adapt to local conditions.

  13. I. THE PERMEABILITY OF THE WALL OF THE LYMPHATIC CAPILLARY

    PubMed Central

    Hudack, Stephen; McMaster, Philip D.

    1932-01-01

    A technique has been developed for the demonstration of lymphatic capillaries in the ear of the mouse by means of vital dyes and for tests of their permeability under normal and pathological conditions. The lymphatics become visible as closed channels from which the dyes escape secondarily into the tissue. Some of them, cross-connections, with extremely narrow lumen, would seem ordinarily not to be utilized. There is active flow along the lymphatics of the mouse ear under ordinary circumstances. The movement of dye was always toward the main collecting system. The valves of the lymphatics as well as fluid flow prevented distal spread. There was in addition slow migration, apparently interstitial in character, but in the same general direction, of dots of color produced by the local injection of dye. The normal permeability of the lymphatics was studied with dyes of graded diffusibility. Their walls proved readily permeable for those highly diffusible pigments that the blood capillaries let through easily, but retained those that the latter retained. Finely particulate matter (India ink, "Hydrokollag"), they did not let pass. No gradient of permeability was observed to exist along them such as exists along the blood capillaries of certain organs. The observed phenomena of lymphatic permeability, like those of the permeability of the blood capillaries, can be explained on the assumption that the lymphatic wall behaves like a semipermeable membrane. PMID:19870062

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 promotes the development of the lymphatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Dellinger, Michael T; Meadows, Stryder M; Wynne, Katherine; Cleaver, Ondine; Brekken, Rolf A

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is highly expressed by lymphatic endothelial cells and has been shown to stimulate lymphangiogenesis in adult mice. However, the role VEGFR2 serves in the development of the lymphatic vascular system has not been defined. Here we use the Cre-lox system to show that the proper development of the lymphatic vasculature requires VEGFR2 expression by lymphatic endothelium. We show that Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice possess significantly fewer dermal lymphatic vessels than Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice. Although Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice exhibit lymphatic hypoplasia, the lymphatic network is functional and contains all of the key features of a normal lymphatic network (initial lymphatic vessels and valved collecting vessels surrounded by smooth muscle cells (SMCs)). We also show that Lyve-1(Cre) mice display robust Cre activity in macrophages and in blood vessels in the yolk sac, liver and lung. This activity dramatically impairs the development of blood vessels in these tissues in Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) embryos, most of which die after embryonic day14.5. Lastly, we show that inactivation of Vegfr2 in the myeloid lineage does not affect the development of the lymphatic vasculature. Therefore, the abnormal lymphatic phenotype of Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice is due to the deletion of Vegfr2 in the lymphatic vasculature not macrophages. Together, this work demonstrates that VEGFR2 directly promotes the expansion of the lymphatic network and further defines the molecular mechanisms controlling the development of the lymphatic vascular system.

  15. Decline of lymphatic vessel density and function in murine skin during aging.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Sinem; Buschle, Dorina; Luciani, Paola; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael; Proulx, Steven T

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic vessels play important roles in the pathogenesis of many conditions that have an increased prevalence in the elderly population. However, the effects of the aging process on the lymphatic system are still relatively unknown. We have applied non-invasive imaging and whole-mount staining techniques to assess the lymphatic vessel function and morphology in three different age groups of mice: 2 months (young), 7 months (middle-aged), and 18 months (aged). We first developed and validated a new method to quantify lymphatic clearance from mouse ear skin, using a lymphatic-specific near-infrared tracer. Using this method, we found that there is a prominent decrease in lymphatic vessel function during aging since the lymphatic clearance was significantly delayed in aged mice. This loss of function correlated with a decreased lymphatic vessel density and a reduced lymphatic network complexity in the skin of aged mice as compared to younger controls. The blood vascular leakage in the skin was slightly increased in the aged mice, indicating that the decreased lymphatic function was not caused by a reduced capillary filtration in aged skin. The decreased function of lymphatic vessels with aging might have implications for the pathogenesis of a number of aging-related diseases.

  16. Molecular and functional analyses of the contractile apparatus in lymphatic muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Gashev, Anatoliy; Boswell, Niven; Dawson, Nancy; Zawieja, David; Delp, Z. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Lymphatics are necessary for the generation and regulation of lymph flow. Lymphatics use phasic contractions and extrinsic compressions to generate flow; tonic contractions alter resistance. Lymphatic muscle exhibits important differences from typical vascular smooth muscle. In this study, the thoracic duct exhibited significant functional differences from mesenteric lymphatics. To understand the molecular basis for these differences, we examined the profiles of contractile proteins and their messages in mesenteric lymphatics, thoracic duct, and arterioles. Results demonstrated that mesenteric lymphatics express only SMB smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), whereas thoracic duct and arterioles expressed both SMA and SMB isoforms. Both SM1 and SM2 isoforms of SM-MHC were detected in arterioles and mesenteric and thoracic lymphatics. In addition, the fetal cardiac/skeletal slow-twitch muscle-specific beta-MHC message was detected only in mesenteric lymphatics. All four actin messages, cardiac alpha-actin, vascular alpha-actin, enteric gamma-actin, and skeletal alpha-actin, were present in both mesenteric lymphatics and arterioles. However, in thoracic duct, predominantly cardiac alpha-actin and vascular alpha-actin were found. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses corroborated the mRNA studies. However, in arterioles only vascular alpha-actin protein was detected. These data indicate that lymphatics display genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of vascular, cardiac, and visceral myocytes, which are needed to fulfill the unique roles of the lymphatic system.

  17. Roles of transcriptional network during the formation of lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Watabe, Tetsuro

    2012-09-01

    The lymphatic vascular system, also known as the second vascular system in vertebrates, plays crucial roles in various physiological and pathological processes. It participates in the maintenance of normal tissue fluid balance, trafficking of the immune cells and absorption of fatty acids in the gut. Furthermore, lymphatic system is associated with the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, including lymphedema, inflammatory diseases and tumour metastasis. Lymphatic vessels are comprised of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), which are differentiated from blood vascular endothelial cells. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the transcriptional control of LEC fate determination and reflects on efforts to understand the roles of transcriptional networks during this discrete developmental process.

  18. Advanced information processing system: Authentication protocols for network communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Richard E.; Adams, Stuart J.; Babikyan, Carol A.; Butler, Bryan P.; Clark, Anne L.; Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1994-01-01

    In safety critical I/O and intercomputer communication networks, reliable message transmission is an important concern. Difficulties of communication and fault identification in networks arise primarily because the sender of a transmission cannot be identified with certainty, an intermediate node can corrupt a message without certainty of detection, and a babbling node cannot be identified and silenced without lengthy diagnosis and reconfiguration . Authentication protocols use digital signature techniques to verify the authenticity of messages with high probability. Such protocols appear to provide an efficient solution to many of these problems. The objective of this program is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate intercomputer communication architectures which employ authentication. As a context for the evaluation, the authentication protocol-based communication concept was demonstrated under this program by hosting a real-time flight critical guidance, navigation and control algorithm on a distributed, heterogeneous, mixed redundancy system of workstations and embedded fault-tolerant computers.

  19. System level traffic shaping in disk servers with heterogeneous protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Eric; Kruse, Daniele Francesco

    2014-06-01

    Disk access and tape migrations compete for network bandwidth in CASTORs disk servers, over various protocols: RFIO, Xroot, root and GridFTP. As there are a limited number of tape drives, it is important to keep them busy all the time, at their nominal speed. With potentially 100s of user read streams per server, the bandwidth for the tape migrations has to be guaranteed to a controlled level, and not the fair share the system gives by default. Xroot provides a prioritization mechanism, but using it implies moving exclusively to the Xroot protocol, which is not possible in short to mid-term time frame, as users are equally using all protocols. The greatest commonality of all those protocols is not more than the usage of TCP/IP. We investigated the Linux kernel traffic shaper to control TCP/ IP bandwidth. The performance and limitations of the traffic shaper have been understood in test environment, and satisfactory working point has been found for production. Notably, TCP offload engines' negative impact on traffic shaping, and the limitations of the length of the traffic shaping rules were discovered and measured. A suitable working point has been found and the traffic shaping is now successfully deployed in the CASTOR production systems at CERN. This system level approach could be transposed easily to other environments.

  20. Current and Future Lymphatic Imaging Modalities for Tumor Staging

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kuo; Liu, Tiegang; Tariq, Imran; Sajjad, Ashif; Niu, Meiying; Liu, Guokai; Mehmood, Zahid; Tian, Guihua

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression is supported by the lymphatic system which should be scanned efficiently for tumor staging as well as the enhanced therapeutic outcomes. Poor resolution and low sensitivity is a limitation of traditional lymphatic imaging modalities; thus new noninvasive approaches like nanocarriers, magnetic resonance imaging, positron-emission tomography, and quantum dots are advantageous. Some newer modalities, which are under development, and their potential uses will also be discussed in this review. PMID:24757671

  1. Lymph system

    MedlinePlus

    Lymphatic system ... Dains JE, Flynn JA, Solomon BS, Stewart RW. Lymphatic system. In: Ball JW, Dains JE, Flynn JA, Solomon ... 2015:chap 9. Hall JE. The microcirculation and lymphatic system: capillary fluid exchange, interstitial fluid, and lymph flow. ...

  2. A brief perspective on the diverging theories of lymphatic targeting with colloids

    PubMed Central

    Siram, Karthik; Marslin, Gregory; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Rahman, Habibur; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    For targeted delivery of colloids to the lymphatic system, the colloids should efficiently reach and remain in the lymphatics for a considerable period of time. As per the current knowledge, diffusion and phagocytosis are the two mechanisms through which colloids reach the lymphatic system. Several parameters including particle size and charge have been shown to affect the direct uptake of colloids by the lymphatic system. Although many researchers attached ligands on the surface of colloids to promote phagocytosis-mediated lymphatic delivery, another school of thought suggests avoidance of phagocytosis by use of carriers like polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated colloids to impart stealth attributes and evade phagocytosis. In this perspective, we weigh up the paradoxical theories and approaches available in the literature to draw conclusions on the conditions favorable for achieving efficient lymphatic targeting of colloids. PMID:27366065

  3. A brief perspective on the diverging theories of lymphatic targeting with colloids.

    PubMed

    Siram, Karthik; Marslin, Gregory; Raghavan, Chellan Vijaya; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Rahman, Habibur; Franklin, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    For targeted delivery of colloids to the lymphatic system, the colloids should efficiently reach and remain in the lymphatics for a considerable period of time. As per the current knowledge, diffusion and phagocytosis are the two mechanisms through which colloids reach the lymphatic system. Several parameters including particle size and charge have been shown to affect the direct uptake of colloids by the lymphatic system. Although many researchers attached ligands on the surface of colloids to promote phagocytosis-mediated lymphatic delivery, another school of thought suggests avoidance of phagocytosis by use of carriers like polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated colloids to impart stealth attributes and evade phagocytosis. In this perspective, we weigh up the paradoxical theories and approaches available in the literature to draw conclusions on the conditions favorable for achieving efficient lymphatic targeting of colloids.

  4. The association of adult Onchocerca volvulus with lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, C D; Huntington, M K; Wanji, S; Lovato, R V; Eversole, R R; Geary, T G

    2010-02-01

    Immunocytochemical examination of onchocercal nodule tissues containing adult Onchocerca volvulus using immuno-markers for blood and lymphatic vessels (vWF, D2-40, podoplanin, Prox-1, and Lyve1) shows a distinct pattern of distribution of these vessels within nodules. Blood vessels were commonly seen associated with organized lymphoid cellular aggregates in the both the outer and inner areas of the nodules. In contrast, the majority of the lymphatic vessel positivity was seen in the central zone in close apposition to the adult parasites, and the remainder usually associated with microfilariae in the outer areas of the nodule. These findings suggest an intimate relationship between adult O. volvulus and lymphatic vessels, including the likely proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells (lymphangectasia) akin to that seen with other filariae. These findings indicate that adult O. volvulus may migrate via the lymphatic system, and that clinical manifestations of this disease that involve tissue edema may be the result of the location of these worms in the lymphatic system.

  5. Photoacoustic lymphatic imaging with high spatial-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Catherine; Yao, Junjie; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-11-01

    Despite its critical function in coordinating the egress of inflammatory and immune cells out of tissues and maintaining fluid balance, the causative role of lymphatic network dysfunction in pathological settings is still understudied. Engineered-animal models and better noninvasive high spatial-temporal resolution imaging techniques in both preclinical and clinical studies will help to improve our understanding of different lymphatic-related pathologic disorders. Our aim was to take advantage of our newly optimized noninvasive wide-field fast-scanning photoacoustic (PA) microcopy system to coordinately image the lymphatic vasculature and its flow dynamics, while maintaining high resolution and detection sensitivity. Here, by combining the optical-resolution PA microscopy with a fast-scanning water-immersible microelectromechanical system scanning mirror, we have imaged the lymph dynamics over a large field-of-view, with high spatial resolution and advanced detection sensitivity. Depending on the application, lymphatic vessels (LV) were spectrally or temporally differentiated from blood vessels. Validation experiments were performed on phantoms and in vivo to identify the LV. Lymphatic flow dynamics in nonpathological and pathological conditions were also visualized. These results indicate that our newly developed PA microscopy is a promising tool for lymphatic-related biological research.

  6. Lymphatic Regulation of Cellular Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels play vital roles in immune surveillance and immune regulation by conveying antigen loaded dendritic cells, memory T cells, macrophages and neutrophils from the peripheral tissues to draining lymph nodes where they initiate as well as modify immune responses. Until relatively recently however, there was little understanding of how entry and migration through lymphatic vessels is organized or the specific molecular mechanisms that might be involved. Within the last decade, the situation has been transformed by an explosion of knowledge generated largely through the application of microscopic imaging, transgenic animals, specific markers and function blocking mAbs that is beginning to provide a rational conceptual framework. This article provides a critical review of the recent literature, highlighting seminal discoveries that have revealed the fascinating ultrastructure of leucocyte entry sites in lymphatic vessels, as well as generating controversies over the involvement of integrin adhesion, chemotactic and haptotactic mechanisms in DC entry under normal and inflamed conditions. It also discusses the major changes in lymphatic architecture that occur during inflammation and the different modes of leucocyte entry and trafficking within inflamed lymphatic vessels, as well as presenting a timely update on the likely role of hyaluronan and the major lymphatic endothelial hyaluronan receptor LYVE-1 in leucocyte transit. PMID:27808282

  7. A protocol for secure communication in large distributed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. P.; Ferrari, D.; Rangan, P. V.; Sartirana, B.

    1987-01-01

    A mechanism for secure communication in large distributed systems is proposed. The mechanism, called Authenticated Datagram Protocol (ADP), provides message authentication and, optionally, privacy of data. ADP is a host-to-host datagram protocol, positioned below the transport layer; it uses public-key encryption to establish secure channels between hosts and to authenticate owners, and single-key encryption for communication over a channel and to ensure privacy of the messages. ADP is shown to satisfy the main security requirements of large distributed systems, to provide end-to-end security in spite of its relatively low level, and to exhibit several advantages over schemes in which security mechanisms are at a higher level. The results of a trace-driven measurement study of ADP performance show that its throughput and latency are acceptable even within the limitations of today's technology, provided single-key encryption/decryption can be done in hardware.

  8. Interactions of immune cells and lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kataru, Raghu P; Lee, Yulia G; Koh, Gou Young

    2014-01-01

    In addition to fluid and lipid absorption, immune cell trafficking has now become recognized as one of the major functions of the lymphatic system. Recently, several critical roles of the lymphatic vessels (LVs) in modulating immune reactions during both physiological and pathological conditions have been emerging. As LVs serve as conduits for immune cells, they come to closely interact with macrophages/monocytes, dendritic cells, and T and B lymphocytes. Accumulating evidences indicate that reciprocal interactions between the LVs and immune cells exist which cause considerable influence over the process of immune cell migration, LV growth, and ultimately certain immune reactions. This chapter discusses on the interactions of macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells with peripheral LVs and on those of sinusoidal macrophages and T and B lymphocytes with lymph node LVs.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of near-infrared functional lymphatic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Michael; Kassis, Timothy; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-03-01

    Background - Near-infrared (NIR) imaging of lymphatic drainage of injected indocyanine green (ICG) has emerged as a new technology for clinical imaging of lymphatic architecture and quantification of vessel function, offering better spatial and temporal resolution than competing imaging modalities. While NIR lymphatic imaging has begun to be reported in the literature, the technology is still in its infancy and its imaging capabilities have yet to be quantitatively characterized. The objective of this study, therefore, was to characterize the parameters of NIR lymphatic imaging to quantify its capabilities as a diagnostic tool for evaluating lymphatic disease. Methods - An NIR imaging system was developed using a laser diode for excitation, ICG as a fluorescent agent, and a CCD camera to detect emission. A tissue phantom with mock lymphatic vessels of known depths and diameters was used as an alternative to in vivo lymphatic vessels due to the greater degree of control with the phantom. Results and Conclusions - When dissolved in an albumin physiological salt solution (APSS) to mimic interstitial fluid, ICG experiences shifts in the excitation/emission wavelengths such that it is maximally excited at 805nm and produces peak fluorescence at 840nm. Premixing ICG with albumin induces greater fluorescence intensity, with the ideal concentration being: 900μM (60g/L) albumin and 193.5μM (150μg/mL) ICG. ICG fluorescence can be detected as deep as 6mm, but spatial resolution deteriorates severely below 3mm, thus skewing vessel geometry measurements. ICG packet travel, a common measure of lymphatic transport, can be detected as deep as 5mm.

  10. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Marcia R; Towner, Rheal; Smith, Nataliya; Abbott, Andrew; Neeman, Michal; Davis, Carole A; Simpson, Cindy; Maier, Julie; Mémet, Sylvie; Wu, Xue-Ru; Saban, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Background The lymphatics form a second circulatory system that drains the extracellular fluid and proteins from the tumor microenvironment, and provides an exclusive environment in which immune cells interact and respond to foreign antigen. Both cancer and inflammation are known to induce lymphangiogenesis. However, little is known about bladder lymphatic vessels and their involvement in cancer formation and progression. Methods A double transgenic mouse model was generated by crossing a bladder cancer-induced transgenic, in which SV40 large T antigen was under the control of uroplakin II promoter, with another transgenic mouse harboring a lacZ reporter gene under the control of an NF-κB-responsive promoter (κB-lacZ) exhibiting constitutive activity of β-galactosidase in lymphatic endothelial cells. In this new mouse model (SV40-lacZ), we examined the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and function (LVF) during bladder cancer progression. LVD was performed in bladder whole mounts and cross-sections by fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC) using LYVE-1 antibody. LVF was assessed by real-time in vivo imaging techniques using a contrast agent (biotin-BSA-Gd-DTPA-Cy5.5; Gd-Cy5.5) suitable for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, IHC of Cy5.5 was used for time-course analysis of co-localization of Gd-Cy5.5 with LYVE-1-positive lymphatics and CD31-positive blood vessels. Results SV40-lacZ mice develop bladder cancer and permitted visualization of lymphatics. A significant increase in LVD was found concomitantly with bladder cancer progression. Double labeling of the bladder cross-sections with LYVE-1 and Ki-67 antibodies indicated cancer-induced lymphangiogenesis. MRI detected mouse bladder cancer, as early as 4 months, and permitted to follow tumor sizes during cancer progression. Using Gd-Cy5.5 as a contrast agent for MRI-guided lymphangiography, we determined a possible reduction of lymphatic flow within the

  11. Sensitivity analysis of near-infrared functional lymphatic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Michael; Kassis, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Near-infrared imaging of lymphatic drainage of injected indocyanine green (ICG) has emerged as a new technology for clinical imaging of lymphatic architecture and quantification of vessel function, yet the imaging capabilities of this approach have yet to be quantitatively characterized. We seek to quantify its capabilities as a diagnostic tool for lymphatic disease. Imaging is performed in a tissue phantom for sensitivity analysis and in hairless rats for in vivo testing. To demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging approach to quantifying immediate functional changes in lymphatics, we investigate the effects of a topically applied nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate ointment. Premixing ICG with albumin induces greater fluorescence intensity, with the ideal concentration being 150  μg/mL ICG and 60  g/L albumin. ICG fluorescence can be detected at a concentration of 150  μg/mL as deep as 6 mm with our system, but spatial resolution deteriorates below 3 mm, skewing measurements of vessel geometry. NO treatment slows lymphatic transport, which is reflected in increased transport time, reduced packet frequency, reduced packet velocity, and reduced effective contraction length. NIR imaging may be an alternative to invasive procedures measuring lymphatic function in vivo in real time. PMID:22734775

  12. Sensitivity analysis of near-infrared functional lymphatic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Michael; Kassis, Timothy; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-06-01

    Near-infrared imaging of lymphatic drainage of injected indocyanine green (ICG) has emerged as a new technology for clinical imaging of lymphatic architecture and quantification of vessel function, yet the imaging capabilities of this approach have yet to be quantitatively characterized. We seek to quantify its capabilities as a diagnostic tool for lymphatic disease. Imaging is performed in a tissue phantom for sensitivity analysis and in hairless rats for in vivo testing. To demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging approach to quantifying immediate functional changes in lymphatics, we investigate the effects of a topically applied nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate ointment. Premixing ICG with albumin induces greater fluorescence intensity, with the ideal concentration being 150 μg/mL ICG and 60 g/L albumin. ICG fluorescence can be detected at a concentration of 150 μg/mL as deep as 6 mm with our system, but spatial resolution deteriorates below 3 mm, skewing measurements of vessel geometry. NO treatment slows lymphatic transport, which is reflected in increased transport time, reduced packet frequency, reduced packet velocity, and reduced effective contraction length. NIR imaging may be an alternative to invasive procedures measuring lymphatic function in vivo in real time.

  13. Lymphatics at the crossroads of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Scavelli, Claudio; Weber, Elisabetta; Aglianò, Margherita; Cirulli, Teresa; Nico, Beatrice; Vacca, Angelo; Ribatti, Domenico

    2004-01-01

    The lymphatic system is implicated in interstitial fluid balance regulation, immune cell trafficking, oedema and cancer metastasis. However, the sequence of events that initiate and coordinate lymphatic vessel development (lymphangiogenesis) remains obscure. In effect, the understanding of physiological regulation of lymphatic vasculature has been overshadowed by the greater emphasis focused on angiogenesis, and delayed by a lack of specific markers, thereby limiting this field to no more than a descriptive characterization. Recently, new insights into lymphangiogenesis research have been due to the discovery of lymphatic-specific markers and growth factors of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family, such as VEGF-C and VEGF-D. Studies using transgenic mice overexpressing VEGF-C and VEGF-D have demonstrated a crucial role for these factors in tumour lymphangiogenesis. Knowledge of lymphatic development has now been redefined at the molecular level, providing an interesting target for innovative therapies. This review highlights the recent insights and advances into the field of lymphatic vascular research, outlining the most important aspects of the embryo development, structure, specific markers and methods applied for studying lymphangiogenesis. Finally, molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of lymphangiogenesis are described. PMID:15198686

  14. Geographic information system (GIS) mapping of lymphatic filariasis endemic areas of Gampaha District, Sri Lanka based on epidemiological and entomological screening.

    PubMed

    Wijegunawardana, N D A D; Gunawardene, Y I N Silva; Manamperi, Aresha; Senarathne, H; Abeyewickreme, W

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a site directed geographic information system (GIS) map of lymphatic filariasis (LF) in Gampaha District, Sri Lanka as a guide for targeted control activities. Epidemiological and entomological screening of LF was carried out in nine pre-identified endemic areas in Gampaha District, using night blood screening and pool-screening PCR-ELISA. In total, 1,073 subjects (286 children, 787 adults) from 9 sites were examined. Positive cases were detected at 2 sites, with prevalence rates of 0.5% (Hekiththa) and 3.4% (Peliyagoda); the prevalence of microfilaria (mf) among adult Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes surveyed was 30%. The overall prevalence of mosquitoes with L1-L2 larvae of W. bancrofti ranged from 0% to 8.31% using dissection and point estimates of infection prevalence, and ranged from 0 to 32.4% using PCR-ELISA. The largest number of human cases was found at altitudes of 2.5-3.5 min highly populated areas, where transmission appears to have taken place. Questionnaires indicated that limited community awareness of LF may be a reason for the fairly static infection prevalent among the local population. The GIS mapping of LF cases shows a considerable prevalence of LF and marked variability by geographic site in Gampaha.

  15. Streetlight Control System Based on Wireless Communication over DALI Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bellido-Outeiriño, Francisco José; Quiles-Latorre, Francisco Javier; Moreno-Moreno, Carlos Diego; Flores-Arias, José María; Moreno-García, Isabel; Ortiz-López, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Public lighting represents a large part of the energy consumption of towns and cities. Efficient management of public lighting can entail significant energy savings. This work presents a smart system for managing public lighting networks based on wireless communication and the DALI protocol. Wireless communication entails significant economic savings, as there is no need to install new wiring and visual impacts and damage to the facades of historical buildings in city centers are avoided. The DALI protocol uses bidirectional communication with the ballast, which allows its status to be controlled and monitored at all times. The novelty of this work is that it tackles all aspects related to the management of public lighting: a standard protocol, DALI, was selected to control the ballast, a wireless node based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard with a DALI interface was designed, a network layer that considers the topology of the lighting network has been developed, and lastly, some user-friendly applications for the control and maintenance of the system by the technical crews of the different towns and cities have been developed. PMID:27128923

  16. Streetlight Control System Based on Wireless Communication over DALI Protocol.

    PubMed

    Bellido-Outeiriño, Francisco José; Quiles-Latorre, Francisco Javier; Moreno-Moreno, Carlos Diego; Flores-Arias, José María; Moreno-García, Isabel; Ortiz-López, Manuel

    2016-04-27

    Public lighting represents a large part of the energy consumption of towns and cities. Efficient management of public lighting can entail significant energy savings. This work presents a smart system for managing public lighting networks based on wireless communication and the DALI protocol. Wireless communication entails significant economic savings, as there is no need to install new wiring and visual impacts and damage to the facades of historical buildings in city centers are avoided. The DALI protocol uses bidirectional communication with the ballast, which allows its status to be controlled and monitored at all times. The novelty of this work is that it tackles all aspects related to the management of public lighting: a standard protocol, DALI, was selected to control the ballast, a wireless node based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard with a DALI interface was designed, a network layer that considers the topology of the lighting network has been developed, and lastly, some user-friendly applications for the control and maintenance of the system by the technical crews of the different towns and cities have been developed.

  17. Proposed traceable structural resolution protocols for 3D imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, David; Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Cournoyer, Luc; Carrier, Benjamin; Blais, François

    2009-08-01

    A protocol for determining structural resolution using a potentially-traceable reference material is proposed. Where possible, terminology was selected to conform to those published in ISO JCGM 200:2008 (VIM) and ASTM E 2544-08 documents. The concepts of resolvability and edge width are introduced to more completely describe the ability of an optical non-contact 3D imaging system to resolve small features. A distinction is made between 3D range cameras, that obtain spatial data from the total field of view at once, and 3D range scanners, that accumulate spatial data for the total field of view over time. The protocol is presented through the evaluation of a 3D laser line range scanner.

  18. General surgery, translational lymphology and lymphatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Campisi, C; Witte, M H; Fulcheri, E; Campisi, C; Bellini, C; Villa, G; Campisi, C; Santi, P L; Parodi, A; Murdaca, G; Puppo, F; Boccardo, F

    2011-12-01

    A wide clinical experience in General Surgery has brought about a remarkable knowledge about lymphatic disorders both primary and secondary ones. Diagnostic and histopathological studies of lymphatic diseases allowed to better understand etiological aspects and pathophysiological mechanisms responsible of complex clinical features correlated to lymphatic dysfunctions. Translational lymphologic basic and clinical researches permitted to improve therapeutical approaches both from the medical and surgical point of view. Thus, strategies of treatment were proposed to prevent lymphatic injuries, to avoid lymphatic complications and to treat lymphatic diseases early in order to be able even to cure these pathologies.

  19. [Advances in the research of the peritoneal lymphatic stomata in human].

    PubMed

    Li, H; Li, J

    2000-12-01

    Peritoneal lymphatic stomata are small openings of the subperitoneal lymphatic vessels on the free surface of the mesothelium. The peritoneal cavity is connected with lymphatic system via these small openings which are considered to be the main passage-way that can absorb matter from the peritoneal cavity. The lymphatic stomata are claimed to be involved in many clinic procedures, such as ascites elimination; ultrafiltration failure on the continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis; metastasis of tumor cells from the peritoneal cavity, and so on. It was reported that the cellular factor-NO(i.e. endothelium-derived relaxing factor, EDRF) can enhance the patency of the stomata and lymphatic absorption of the stomata by stimulating guanylate way, then increasing the concentration of the cGMP, decreasing the concentration of the [Ca2+] and as a result diastole the lymphatic stomata. Some traditional Chinese medicines, which can enhance absorption of ascites, have a regulative function on the stomata by enhancing the NO concentration.

  20. Immunohistochemical study of the lymphatic vessels in major salivary glands of the rat.

    PubMed

    Aiyama, Shigeo; Kikuchi, Kenichiro; Takada, Kiyomi; Ikeda, Rie; Sato, Sumie; Kuroki, Jyunya

    2011-02-01

    This study was designed to examine whether lymphatic vessels are present in the lobules of major salivary glands in the rat. Immunostaining with an antibody against podoplanin, a lymphatic endothelial cell marker, was performed on sections of the submandibular, sublingual and parotid glands. Light microscopy demonstrated podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels around the interlobular ducts and the interlobular arteries and veins in the interlobular connective tissue in all of the major salivary glands. No podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels were found in the lobules. Electron microscopy also demonstrated lymphatic endothelial cells showing podoplanin expression only in the interlobular connective tissue. These findings suggest that the lymphatic system of the rat major salivary glands originates in the interlobular connective tissue, and not in the lobules.

  1. Expansion of the lymphatic vasculature in cancer and inflammation: new opportunities for in vivo imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Steven T; Luciani, Paola; Dieterich, Lothar C; Karaman, Sinem; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael

    2013-12-10

    Over the last 15 years, discovery of key growth factors and specific molecular markers for lymphatic vessels has enabled a new era of molecular research on the lymphatic vascular system. As a result, it has been found that lymphangiogenesis, the expansion of existing lymphatic vessels, plays an important role in tumor progression and in the control of chronic inflammation. At the same time, technical advancements have been made to improve the visualization of the lymphatic system. We have recently developed liposomal and polymer-based formulations of near-infrared lymphatic-specific imaging tracers for the non-invasive quantitative in vivo imaging of lymphatic vessel function. Using these tracers, a near-infrared stereomicroscope system allows imaging of initial and collecting lymphatic vessels with high spatial and temporal resolution in mice. In addition, we have developed a new method, using antibodies to a lymphatic specific marker and positron emission tomography, to sensitively detect lymphatic expansion in lymph nodes as the earliest sign of cancer metastasis. These imaging methods have great potential to provide non-invasive measures to assess the functionality of the lymphatic system and to assess the efficiency of lymphatic drug delivery.

  2. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  3. Evaluation protocol for the WIND system atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric transport and diffusion models have been developed for real-time calculations of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during a accidental release at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These models are have been incorporated into an automated menu-driven computer based system called the WIND (Weather INformation and Display) system. In an effort to establish more formal quality assurance procedures for the WIND system atmospheric codes, a software evaluation protocol is being developed. An evaluation protocol is necessary to determine how well they may perform in emergency response (real-time) situations. The evaluation of high-impact software must be conducted in accordance with WSRC QA Manual, 1Q, QAP 20-1. This report will describe the method that will be used to evaluate the atmospheric models. The evaluation will determine the effectiveness of the atmospheric models in emergency response situations, which is not necessarily the same procedure used for research purposes. The format of the evaluation plan will provide guidance for the evaluation of atmospheric models that may be added to the WIND system in the future. The evaluation plan is designed to provide the user with information about the WIND system atmospheric models that is necessary for emergency response situations.

  4. Endogenous TNFα orchestrates the trafficking of neutrophils into and within lymphatic vessels during acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Arokiasamy, Samantha; Zakian, Christian; Dilliway, Jessica; Wang, Wen; Nourshargh, Sussan; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit

    2017-03-13

    Neutrophils are recognised to play a pivotal role at the interface between innate and acquired immunities following their recruitment to inflamed tissues and lymphoid organs. While neutrophil trafficking through blood vessels has been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms regulating their migration into the lymphatic system are still poorly understood. Here, we have analysed neutrophil-lymphatic vessel interactions in real time and in vivo using intravital confocal microscopy applied to inflamed cremaster muscles. We show that antigen sensitisation of the tissues induces a rapid but transient entry of tissue-infiltrated neutrophils into lymphatic vessels and subsequent crawling along the luminal side of the lymphatic endothelium. Interestingly, using mice deficient in both TNF receptors p55 and p75, chimeric animals and anti-TNFα antibody blockade we demonstrate that tissue-release of TNFα governs both neutrophil migration through the lymphatic endothelium and luminal crawling. Mechanistically, we show that TNFα primes directly the neutrophils to enter the lymphatic vessels in a strictly CCR7-dependent manner; and induces ICAM-1 up-regulation on lymphatic vessels, allowing neutrophils to crawl along the lumen of the lymphatic endothelium in an ICAM-1/MAC-1-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a new role for TNFα as a key regulator of neutrophil trafficking into and within lymphatic system in vivo.

  5. Endogenous TNFα orchestrates the trafficking of neutrophils into and within lymphatic vessels during acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Arokiasamy, Samantha; Zakian, Christian; Dilliway, Jessica; Wang, Wen; Nourshargh, Sussan; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are recognised to play a pivotal role at the interface between innate and acquired immunities following their recruitment to inflamed tissues and lymphoid organs. While neutrophil trafficking through blood vessels has been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms regulating their migration into the lymphatic system are still poorly understood. Here, we have analysed neutrophil-lymphatic vessel interactions in real time and in vivo using intravital confocal microscopy applied to inflamed cremaster muscles. We show that antigen sensitisation of the tissues induces a rapid but transient entry of tissue-infiltrated neutrophils into lymphatic vessels and subsequent crawling along the luminal side of the lymphatic endothelium. Interestingly, using mice deficient in both TNF receptors p55 and p75, chimeric animals and anti-TNFα antibody blockade we demonstrate that tissue-release of TNFα governs both neutrophil migration through the lymphatic endothelium and luminal crawling. Mechanistically, we show that TNFα primes directly the neutrophils to enter the lymphatic vessels in a strictly CCR7-dependent manner; and induces ICAM-1 up-regulation on lymphatic vessels, allowing neutrophils to crawl along the lumen of the lymphatic endothelium in an ICAM-1/MAC-1-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a new role for TNFα as a key regulator of neutrophil trafficking into and within lymphatic system in vivo. PMID:28287124

  6. Delineating the Effect a Novel Anti-VEGF-A Therapy has on the Lymphatic System of Immunocompetent Tumor-Bearing Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    exhibit lymphedema , chylous ascites or chylothorax. Lyve-1wt/Cre;Vegfr2flox/flox embryos display reduced viability and blood vessel defects...lymphatic vascular failure in lymphedema distichiasis. Nat Med, 2004. 10(9): p. 974-81. 4. Makinen, T., et al., PDZ interaction site in ephrinB2 is

  7. A tale of two models: mouse and zebrafish as complementary models for lymphatic studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Dae; Jin, Suk-Won

    2014-07-01

    Lymphatic vessels provide essential roles in maintaining fluid homeostasis and lipid absorption. Dysfunctions of the lymphatic vessels lead to debilitating pathological conditions, collectively known as lymphedema. In addition, lymphatic vessels are a critical moderator for the onset and progression of diverse human diseases including metastatic cancer and obesity. Despite their clinical importance, there is no currently effective pharmacological therapy to regulate functions of lymphatic vessels. Recent efforts to manipulate the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C (VEGFC) pathway, which is arguably the most important signaling pathway regulating lymphatic endothelial cells, to alleviate lymphedema yielded largely mixed results, necessitating identification of new targetable signaling pathways for therapeutic intervention for lymphedema. Zebrafish, a relatively new model system to investigate lymphatic biology, appears to be an ideal model to identify novel therapeutic targets for lymphatic biology. In this review, we will provide an overview of our current understanding of the lymphatic vessels in vertebrates, and discuss zebrafish as a promising in vivo model to study lymphatic vessels.

  8. LyP-1-conjugated doxorubicin-loaded liposomes suppress lymphatic metastasis by inhibiting lymph node metastases and destroying tumor lymphatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhan, Changyou; Wen, Ziyi; Feng, Linglin; Wang, Fei; Liu, Yu; Yang, Xiangkun; Dong, Qing; Liu, Min; Lu, Weiyue

    2011-10-01

    Lymphatic metastasis can be greatly promoted by metastases growth and lymphangiogenesis in lymph nodes (LNs). LyP-1, a cyclic peptide, is able to specifically bind with tumor cells and tumor lymphatics in metastatic LNs. This work aimed to use LyP-1-conjugated liposomes (L-LS) loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (L-LS/DOX) to suppress lymphatic metastasis by inhibiting both metastases and tumor lymphatics in LNs. L-LS were prepared and exhibited sizes around 90 nm and spherical morphology as characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The in vitro cellular studies showed that LyP-1 modification obviously increased liposome uptake by MDA-MB-435 tumor cells and enhanced the cytotoxicity of liposomal DOX. A popliteal and iliac LN metastases model was successfully established by subcutaneous inoculation of tumor cells to nude mice. The immunofluorescence staining analysis indicated that LyP-1 modification enabled specific binding of liposome with tumor lymphatics and enhanced the destroying effect of liposomal DOX on tumor lymphatics. The in vivo fluorescence imaging and pharmacodynamic studies showed that LyP-1 modification increased liposome uptake by metastatic LNs and that L-LS/DOX significantly decreased metastatic LN growth and LN metastasis rate. These results suggested that L-LS/DOX were an effective delivery system for suppressing lymphatic metastasis by simultaneously inhibiting LN metastases and tumor lymphatics.

  9. Work-related road traffic injury: a multilevel systems protocol

    PubMed Central

    Newnam, Sharon; Sheppard, Dianne M; Griffin, Mark A; McClure, Roderick J; Heller, Gillian; Sim, Malcolm R; Stevenson, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Background Although road traffic injury is reported as the leading cause of work-related death in Australia, it is not clear, due to limitations in previous methods used, just how large a burden it is. Many organisations are unaware of the extent of work-related road traffic injury and, importantly, what can be done to reduce the burden. The proposed research will (i) estimate the prevalence of work-related road traffic injury and (ii) identify the organisational determinants associated with work-related road traffic injury. Methods and design The current study is designed to enumerate the problem and identify the individual driver-level, the supervisor-level and organisational-level factors associated with work-related road traffic injury. The multilevel systems protocol will involve a series of cross-sectional surveys administered to drivers of fleet vehicles (n=1200), supervisors of the drivers (n=1200) and senior managers (n=300) within the same organisation. Discussion The novel use of the multilevel systems protocol is critical to be able to accurately assess the specific determinants of driving safety within each context of an organisation. Results The results are expected to highlight that reducing injury in the workplace requires more than just individual compliance with safety procedures. It will also establish, for the first time, an occupational translation taskforce to ensure that the research findings are adopted into work-place practice and thereby directly contribute to reductions in work-related road traffic injury. PMID:24478230

  10. Quantitative measurement of lymphatic function in mice by noninvasive near-infrared imaging of a peripheral vein

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiaoli; Andina, Diana; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Optical imaging methods have been developed to measure lymphatic function in skin; however, the lymphatic system of many organs is not accessible to this technology. Since lymphatic transport of macromolecules from any organ proceeds to the blood circulation, we aimed to develop a method that can measure lymphatic function by monitoring the fluorescence in a superficial vein of an interstitially injected tracer. We selected a 40-kDa PEGylated near-infrared dye conjugate, as it showed lymphatic system–specific uptake and extended circulation in blood. Lymphatic transport to blood from subcutaneous tissue required a transit time before signal enhancement was seen in blood followed by a steady rise in signal over time. Increased lymphatic transport was apparent in awake mice compared with those under continuous anesthesia. The methods were validated in K14-VEGFR-3-Fc and K14-VEGF-C transgenic mice with loss and gain of lymphatic function, respectively. Reduced lymphatic transport to blood was also found in aged mice. The technique was also able to measure lymphatic transport from the peritoneal cavity, a location not suitable for optical imaging. The method is a promising, simple approach for assessment of lymphatic function and for monitoring of therapeutic regimens in mouse models of disease and may have potential for clinical translation. PMID:28097238

  11. A New Technique to Map the Lymphatic Distribution and Alignment of the Penis.

    PubMed

    Long, Liu Yan; Qiang, Pan Fu; Ling, Tao; Wei, Zhang Yan; Long, Zhang Yu; Shan, Meng; Rong, Li Shi; Li, Li Hong

    2015-08-01

    The present study was to examine the distribution of lymphatic vessels in the penis of normal adult males, which could provide an anatomical basis for improvement of incisions in penile lengthening surgery, and may also help to prevent postoperative refractory edema. Thirteen normal adult male volunteers were recruited for this study. Contrast agent was injected subcutaneously in the foreskin of the penis, and after two minutes magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MRL) was performed. The acquired magnetic resonance images were analyzed to determine the changes in the number and diameter of lymphatic vessels in different parts of the penis. Maximum intensity projections (MIP) and materializes interactive medical image control system (MIMICS) were applied to analyze the overall distribution of lymphatic vessels in the penis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the lymphatic vessels were in conspicuous contrast with surrounding tissues and could be clearly identified. Penile lymphatic vessels were clearly visible in the root of the penis. At the junction of the penis and the abdominal wall, all lymphatic vessels were found to be concentrated in the dorsal part of the penis. MIP two-dimensional reconstruction showed that the overall distribution of relatively large lymphatic vessels in the dorsal and ventral parts of the penis could be seen clearly on bilateral 45° position, but not inside the abdominal wall because some of lymphatic vessels were overlapped by other tissues in the abdomen. MIMICS three-dimensional reconstruction was able to reveal the overall spatial distribution of lymphatic vessels in the penis from any angle. The reconstruction results showed that there were 1-2 main lymphatic vessels on the root of dorsal penis, which coursed along the cavernous to the first physiological curvature of the penis. Lymphatic vessels merged on both sides of the ventral penis. At the root of the penis, lymphatic vessels gradually coursed to the dorsal surface

  12. ASSESSMENT PROTOCOLS - DURABILITY OF PERFORMANCE OF A HOME RADON REDUCTION SYSTEM FOR SUB-SLAB DEPRESSURIZA- TION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook contains protocols that compare the immediate performance of subslab depressurization (SSD) mitigation system with performance months or years later. These protocols provide a methodology to test SSD radon mitigation systems in situ to determine long-term performanc...

  13. Blood and Lymphatic Vessel Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bautch, Victoria L.; Caron, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Blood and lymphatic vessels deliver oxygen and nutrients, remove waste and CO2, and regulate interstitial pressure in tissues and organs. These vessels begin life early in embryogenesis using transcription factors and signaling pathways that regulate differentiation, morphogenesis, and proliferation. Here we describe how these vessels develop in the mouse embryo, and the signals that are important to their development. PMID:25731762

  14. An Gen2 Based Security Authentication Protocol for RFID System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoluo; Wang, Liangmin; Mao, Dongmei; Zhan, Yongzhao

    EPC Class-1 Generation-2 specification(Gen2 in brief) has been accepted as the standard for RFID tags under grant number ISO18000-6C. However, Gen2 does not pay due attention to security. For this reason, a Gen2 based security authentication protocol is developed in this paper. In details, we study the security requirements presented in the current Gen2 based RFID authentication protocols[7-13]. Then we point out the security flaws of Chien's mutual authentication protocol[7], and improve the protocol based on a 11 security requirements. Our improved protocol merely uses CRC and PRNG operations supported by Gen2 and meets the 11 security requirements. In contrast to the similar work [14,15] on Chien's protocol or other Gen2 based schemes, our protocol is more secure and our security analysis is much more comprehensive and qualitative.

  15. Role of lymphatic vessels in tumor immunity: passive conduits or active participants?

    PubMed

    Lund, Amanda W; Swartz, Melody A

    2010-09-01

    Research in lymphatic biology and cancer immunology may soon intersect as emerging evidence implicates the lymphatics in the progression of chronic inflammation and autoimmunity as well as in tumor metastasis and immune escape. Like the blood vasculature, the lymphatic system comprises a highly dynamic conduit system that regulates fluid homeostasis, antigen transport and immune cell trafficking, which all play important roles in the progression and resolution of inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. This review presents emerging evidence that lymphatic vessels are active modulators of immunity, perhaps fine-tuning the response to adjust the balance between peripheral tolerance and immunity. This suggests that the tumor-associated lymphatic vessels and draining lymph node may be important in tumor immunity which in turn governs metastasis.

  16. ACKR2: An Atypical Chemokine Receptor Regulating Lymphatic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Bonavita, Ornella; Mollica Poeta, Valeria; Setten, Elisa; Massara, Matteo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in the induction of the immune response by transporting antigens, inflammatory mediators, and leukocytes from peripheral tissues to draining lymph nodes. It is emerging that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are playing an active role in this context via the expression of chemokines, inflammatory mediators promoting cell migration, and chemokine receptors. Particularly, LECs express atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs), which are unable to promote conventional signaling and cell migration while they are involved in the regulation of chemokine availability. Here, we provide a summary of the data on the role of ACKR2 expressed by lymphatics, indicating an essential role for this ACKRs in the regulation of the inflammation and the immune response in different pathological conditions, including infection, allergy, and cancer. PMID:28123388

  17. Coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems based on PS-request protocols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwoo; Park, Suwon; Rhee, Seung Hyong; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Chung, Young-uk; Hwang, Ho Young

    2011-01-01

    We introduce both the coexistence zone within the WiMAX frame structure and a PS-Request protocol for the coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems sharing a frequency band. Because we know that the PS-Request protocol has drawbacks, we propose a revised PS-Request protocol to improve the performance. Two PS-Request protocols are based on the time division operation (TDO) of WiFi system and WiMAX system to avoid the mutual interference, and use the vestigial power management (PwrMgt) bit within the Frame Control field of the frames transmitted by a WiFi AP. The performance of the revised PS-Request protocol is evaluated by computer simulation, and compared to those of the cases without a coexistence protocol and to the original PS-Request protocol.

  18. Lymphatic Vascular Response to Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Pier-Anne; Hazen, Amy; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    During acute inflammation, functioning lymphatics are believed to reduce edema and to provide a transiting route for immune cells, but the extent at which the dermal lymphatic remodeling impacts lymphatic transport or the factors regulating these changes remains unclear. Herein we quantify the increase in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and examine the expression of pro-angiogenenic and lymphangiogenic factors during acute cutaneous hypersensitivity (CHS). We found that LECs actively proliferate during CHS but that this proliferation does not affect the lymphatic vessel density. Instead, lymphatic remodeling is accompanied by lymphatic vessel leakiness and lower ejection of lymph fluid, which is observed only in the proximal lymphatic vessel draining the inflamed area. LECs and the immune cells release growth factors and cytokines during inflammation, which impact the lymphatic microenvironment and function. We identified that FGF-2, PLGF-2, HGF, EGF, and KC/CXCL17 are differentially expressed within tissues during acute CHS, but both VEGF-C and VEGF-D levels do not significantly change. Our results indicate that VEGF-C and VEGF-D are not the only players and other factors may be responsible for the LECs proliferation and altered lymphatic function in acute CHS. PMID:24086691

  19. What Is the Lymphatic System?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage 3 Infection and Other Complications NLN Position Papers Lymphedema Awareness Campaign Education Kits Educational Videos What ... Patients (8) LymphLink Articles (174) FAQ's (6) Position Papers (9) LSAP Perspective (9) National Lymphedema Network is ...

  20. Inflammation induces neuro-lymphatic protein expression in multiple sclerosis brain neurovasculature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with ectopic lymphoid follicle formation. Podoplanin+ (lymphatic marker) T helper17 (Th17) cells and B cell aggregates have been implicated in the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) in MS and experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). Since podoplanin expressed by Th17 cells in MS brains is also expressed by lymphatic endothelium, we investigated whether the pathophysiology of MS involves inductions of lymphatic proteins in the inflamed neurovasculature. Methods We assessed the protein levels of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor and podoplanin, which are specific to the lymphatic system and prospero-homeobox protein-1, angiopoietin-2, vascular endothelial growth factor-D, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3, which are expressed by both lymphatic endothelium and neurons. Levels of these proteins were measured in postmortem brains and sera from MS patients, in the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)-induced EAE and Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) mouse models and in cell culture models of inflamed neurovasculature. Results and conclusions Intense staining for LYVE-1 was found in neurons of a subset of MS patients using immunohistochemical approaches. The lymphatic protein, podoplanin, was highly expressed in perivascular inflammatory lesions indicating signaling cross-talks between inflamed brain vasculature and lymphatic proteins in MS. The profiles of these proteins in MS patient sera discriminated between relapsing remitting MS from secondary progressive MS and normal patients. The in vivo findings were confirmed in the in vitro cell culture models of neuroinflammation. PMID:24124909

  1. Successful treatment of plastic bronchitis by selective lymphatic embolization in a Fontan patient.

    PubMed

    Dori, Yoav; Keller, Marc S; Rychik, Jack; Itkin, Maxim

    2014-08-01

    Plastic bronchitis is a rare and often fatal complication of single-ventricle surgical palliation after total cavopulmonary connection. Although lymphatic abnormalities have been postulated to play a role in the disease process, the etiology and pathophysiology of this complication remain incompletely understood. Here we report on the etiology of plastic bronchitis in a child with total cavopulmonary connection as demonstrated by magnetic resonance (MR) lymphangiography. We also report on a new treatment of this disease. The patient underwent noncontrast T2-weighted MR lymphatic mapping and dynamic contrast MR lymphangiography with bi-inguinal intranodal contrast injection to determine the anatomy and flow pattern of lymph in his central lymphatic system. The MRI scan demonstrated the presence of a dilated right-sided peribronchial lymphatic network supplied by retrograde lymphatic flow through a large collateral lymphatic vessel originating from the thoracic duct. After careful analysis of the MRI scans we performed selective lymphatic embolization of the pathologic lymphatic network and supplying vessel. This provided resolution of plastic bronchitis for this patient. Five months after the procedure, the patient remains asymptomatic off respiratory medications.

  2. Cell-based approach for 3D reconstruction of lymphatic capillaries in vitro reveals distinct functions of HGF and VEGF-C in lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gibot, Laure; Galbraith, Todd; Kloos, Bryan; Das, Suvendu; Lacroix, Dan A; Auger, François A; Skobe, Mihaela

    2016-02-01

    Regeneration of lymphatic vessels is important for treatment of various disorders of lymphatic system and for restoration of lymphatic function after surgery. We have developed a method for generating a human 3D lymphatic vascular construct. In this system, human lymphatic endothelial cells, co-cultured with fibroblasts, spontaneously organized into a stable 3D lymphatic capillary network without the use of any exogenous factors. In vitro-generated lymphatic capillaries exhibited the major molecular and ultra-structural features of native, human lymphatic microvasculature: branches in the three dimensions, wide lumen, blind ends, overlapping borders, adherens and tight junctions, anchoring filaments, lack of mural cells, and poorly developed basement membrane. Furthermore, we show that fibroblast-derived VEGF-C and HGF cooperate in the formation of lymphatic vasculature by activating ERK1/2 signaling, and demonstrate distinct functions of HGF/c-Met and VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 in lymphangiogenesis. This lymphatic vascular construct is expected to facilitate studies of lymphangiogenesis in vitro and it holds promise as a strategy for regeneration of lymphatic vessels and treatment of lymphatic disorders in various conditions.

  3. microRNAs in the Lymphatic Endothelium: Master Regulators of Lineage Plasticity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Daniel; Coles, Mark C.; Lagos, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are highly conserved, small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. They have crucial roles in organismal development, homeostasis, and cellular responses to pathological stress. The lymphatic system is a large vascular network that actively regulates the immune response through antigen trafficking, cytokine secretion, and inducing peripheral tolerance. Here, we review the role of miRNAs in the lymphatic endothelium with a particular focus on their role in lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) plasticity, inflammation, and regulatory function. We highlight the lineage plasticity of LECs during inflammation and the importance of understanding the regulatory role of miRNAs in these processes. We propose that targeting miRNA expression in lymphatic endothelium can be a novel strategy in treating human pathologies associated with lymphatic dysfunction. PMID:28232833

  4. Supermicrosurgical anastomosis of superficial lymphatic vessel to deep lymphatic vessel for a patient with cellulitis-induced chronic localized leg lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Koshima, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Supermicrosurgical lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA) has been reported to be useful for the treatment of obstructive lymphedema. However, LVA has a potential risk of anastomosis site thrombosis. It is more physiological to use a lymphatic vessel as a recipient vessel of lymphatic bypass surgery, because there is no chance for blood to contact the anastomosis site. We report a chronic localized lower leg lymphedema case treated with supermicrosurgical superficial-to-deep lymphaticolymphatic anastomosis (LLA). A 66-year-old male with a 60-year history of cellulitis-induced left lower leg lymphedema suffered from very frequent episodes of cellulitis and underwent LLA under local infiltration anesthesia. LLA was performed at the dorsum of the left foot. A dilated superficial lymphatic vessel was found in the fat layer, and a nondilated intact deep lymphatic vessel was found along the dorsalis pedis artery below the deep fascia. The superficial lymphatic vessel was supermicrosurgically anastomosed to the deep lymphatic vessel in a side-to-end fashion. After the surgery, the patient had no episodes of cellulitis, and the left lower leg lymphedematous volume decreased. Superficial-to-deep LLA may be a useful option for the treatment of secondary lymphedema due to obstruction of only the superficial lymphatic system.

  5. Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, David R.; Crawford, Aladsair J.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Ferreira, Summer; Schoenwald, David

    2014-06-01

    The Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems (PNNL-22010) was first issued in November 2012 as a first step toward providing a foundational basis for developing an initial standard for the uniform measurement and expression of energy storage system (ESS) performance. Its subsequent use in the field and review by the protocol working group and most importantly the users’ subgroup and the thermal subgroup has led to the fundamental modifications reflected in this update of the 2012 Protocol. As an update of the 2012 Protocol, this document (the June 2014 Protocol) is intended to supersede its predecessor and be used as the basis for measuring and expressing ESS performance. The foreword provides general and specific details about what additions, revisions, and enhancements have been made to the 2012 Protocol and the rationale for them in arriving at the June 2014 Protocol.

  6. Potential application of in vivo imaging of impaired lymphatic duct to evaluate the severity of pressure ulcer in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Akira; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a cause of pressure ulcer. However, a mechanism underlying the IR injury-induced lymphatic vessel damage remains unclear. We investigated the alterations of structure and function of lymphatic ducts in a mouse cutaneous IR model. And we suggested a new method for evaluating the severity of pressure ulcer. Immunohistochemistry showed that lymphatic ducts were totally vanished by IR injury, while blood vessels were relatively preserved. The production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in injured tissue. In vitro study showed a high vulnerability of lymphatic endothelial cells to ROS. Then we evaluated the impaired lymphatic drainage using an in vivo imaging system for intradermally injected indocyanine green (ICG). The dysfunction of ICG drainage positively correlated with the severity of subsequent cutaneous changes. Quantification of the lymphatic duct dysfunction by this imaging system could be a useful strategy to estimate the severity of pressure ulcer.

  7. Lymphatic Imaging: Focus on Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    In view of the importance of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in tumor staging and patient management, sensitive and accurate imaging of SLNs has been intensively explored. Along with the advance of the imaging technology, various contrast agents have been developed for lymphatic imaging. In this review, the lymph node imaging agents were summarized into three groups: tumor targeting agents, lymphatic targeting agents and lymphatic mapping agents. Tumor targeting agents are used to detect metastatic tumor tissue within LNs, lymphatic targeting agents aim to visualize lymphatic vessels and lymphangionesis, while lymphatic mapping agents are mainly for SLN detection during surgery after local administration. Coupled with various signal emitters, these imaging agents work with single or multiple imaging modalities to provide a valuable way to evaluate the location and metastatic status of SLNs. PMID:25897334

  8. Integration of the subarachnoid space and lymphatics: Is it time to embrace a new concept of cerebrospinal fluid absorption?

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Lena; Zakharov, Andrei; Johnston, Miles

    2005-01-01

    In most tissues and organs, the lymphatic circulation is responsible for the removal of interstitial protein and fluid but the parenchyma of the brain and spinal cord is devoid of lymphatic vessels. On the other hand, the literature is filled with qualitative and quantitative evidence supporting a lymphatic function in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption. The experimental data seems to warrant a re-examination of CSF dynamics and consideration of a new conceptual foundation on which to base our understanding of disorders of the CSF system. The objective of this paper is to review the key studies pertaining to the role of the lymphatic system in CSF absorption. PMID:16174293

  9. A communication protocol for mobile satellite systems affected by rain attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Norman; Dessouky, Khaled

    1992-01-01

    A communication protocol is described that has been developed as part of a K/Ka-band mobile terminal breadboard system to be demonstrated through NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) in 1993. The protocol is aimed at providing the means for enhancing link availability and continuity by supporting real-time data rate selection and changes during rain events. Particular attention is given to the system architecture; types of links, connections, and packets; the protocol procedures; and design rationales.

  10. HA-ving lymphatics improves lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maltzman, Jonathan S.; Reed, Hasina Outtz; Kahn, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Lung allografts are prone to rejection, even though recipients undergo aggressive immunosuppressive therapy. Lymphatic vessels serve as conduits for immune cell trafficking and have been implicated in the mediation of allograft rejection. In this issue of the JCI, Cui et al. provide compelling evidence that lymphatic vessel formation improves lung allograft survival in a murine transplant model. Moreover, their data suggest a potential mechanism for the beneficial effects of lymphatics that does not involve immune cell or antigen transport. Together, the results of this study provide new insight into the role of lymphatic vessels in transplant tolerance. PMID:26524589

  11. Proposing an Abstracted Interface and Protocol for Computer Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, David Richard; Ignatowski, Mike

    2014-07-01

    While it made sense for historical reasons to develop different interfaces and protocols for memory channels, CPU to CPU interactions, and I/O devices, ongoing developments in the computer industry are leading to more converged requirements and physical implementations for these interconnects. As it becomes increasingly common for advanced components to contain a variety of computational devices as well as memory, the distinction between processors, memory, accelerators, and I/O devices become s increasingly blurred. As a result, the interface requirements among such components are converging. There is also a wide range of new disruptive technologies that will impact the computer market in the coming years , including 3D integration and emerging NVRAM memory. Optimal exploitation of these technologies cannot be done with the existing memory, storage, and I/O interface standards. The computer industry has historically made major advances when industry players have been able to add innovation behind a standard interface. The standard interface provides a large market for their products and enables relatively quick and widespread adoption. To enable a new wave of innovation in the form of advanced memory products and accelerators, we need a new standard interface explicitly designed to provide both the performance and flexibility to support new system integration solutions.

  12. Proposing an Abstracted Interface and Protocol for Computer Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, David Richard; Ignatowski, Mike

    2014-07-01

    While it made sense for historical reasons to develop different interfaces and protocols for memory channels, CPU to CPU interactions, and I/O devices, ongoing developments in the computer industry are leading to more converged requirements and physical implementations for these interconnects. As it becomes increasingly common for advanced components to contain a variety of computational devices as well as memory, the distinction between processors, memory, accelerators, and I/O devices become s increasingly blur red. As a result, the interface requirements among such components are converging. There is also a wide range of new disruptive technologies that will impact the computer market in the coming years , including 3D integration and emerging NVRAM memory. Optimal exploitation of these technologies cannot be done with the existing memory , storage, and I/O interface standards. The computer industry has historically made major advances when industry players have been able to add innovation behind a standard interface. The standard interface provides a large market for their products and enable s relatively quick and widespread adoption. To enable a new wave of innovation in the form of advanced memory products and accelerators, we need a new standard interface explicitly design ed to provide both the performance and flexibility to support new system integration solutions.

  13. The discovery of the synovial lymphatic stomata and lymphatic reabsorption in knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Ping, Zepeng; Jiang, Tingting; Wang, Chong; Chen, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhongliang; Wang, Jiaxiong; Wang, Li; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Changming; Li, Zhongjie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    To illustrate the mechanism of lymphatic reabsorption in knee joint effusion. The current investigation employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques to reveal the ultrastructure of the knee synovial membrane in New Zealand rabbits and human. Ultrastructural changes of the synovial lymphatic stomata were observed by using trypan blue absorption and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) digestion methods, and the animal models of synovitis. New Zealand rabbits and human synovial membranes were composed of two types of synovial cells: type A and type B. No lymphatic stomata were found among type A synovial cells, whereas lymphatic stomata with the diameters ranging 0.74-3.26 µm were found in type B synovial cells, and some stomata were closed. After the NaOH digestion, a number of sieve pores, similar to lymphatic stomata in size and shape, were observed in the dense fibrous connective tissue underneath the type B synovial cells. After injecting trypan blue into the rabbit knee joint cavity, absorption of trypan blue through the lymphatic stomata was observed, suggesting the absorption function of the synovial lymphatic stomata. In the rabbit knee joint synovitis models, the synovial lymphatic stomata diameter enlarged. Some macrophages migrated from the lymphatic stomata, indicating that the synovial lymphatic stomata were involved in the joint effusion absorption and inflammatory response. Our study is the first to report the existence of synovial lymphatic stomata in the New Zealand rabbits and human knee joints. Lymphatic stomata may have an important role in the reabsorption of joint effusion.

  14. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, Ernie; Nelson, James; Robertson-Tait, Ann; Savy, Jean; Wong, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This Protocol is a living guidance document for geothermal developers, public officials, regulators and the general public that provides a set of general guidelines detailing useful steps to evaluate and manage the effects of induced seismicity related to EGS projects.

  15. Identification of lymphatics in the ciliary body of the human eye: a novel "uveolymphatic" outflow pathway.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Yeni H; Johnston, Miles G; Ly, Tina; Patel, Manoj; Drake, Brian; Gümüş, Ersin; Fraenkl, Stephan A; Moore, Sara; Tobbia, Dalia; Armstrong, Dianna; Horvath, Eva; Gupta, Neeru

    2009-11-01

    Impaired aqueous humor flow from the eye may lead to elevated intraocular pressure and glaucoma. Drainage of aqueous fluid from the eye occurs through established routes that include conventional outflow via the trabecular meshwork, and an unconventional or uveoscleral outflow pathway involving the ciliary body. Based on the assumption that the eye lacks a lymphatic circulation, the possible role of lymphatics in the less well defined uveoscleral pathway has been largely ignored. Advances in lymphatic research have identified specific lymphatic markers such as podoplanin, a transmembrane mucin-type glycoprotein, and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 (LYVE-1). Lymphatic channels were identified in the human ciliary body using immunofluorescence with D2-40 antibody for podoplanin, and LYVE-1 antibody. In keeping with the criteria for lymphatic vessels in conjunctiva used as positive control, D2-40 and LYVE-1-positive lymphatic channels in the ciliary body had a distinct lumen, were negative for blood vessel endothelial cell marker CD34, and were surrounded by either discontinuous or no collagen IV-positive basement membrane. Cryo-immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the presence D2-40-immunoreactivity in lymphatic endothelium in the human ciliary body. Fluorescent nanospheres injected into the anterior chamber of the sheep eye were detected in LYVE-1-positive channels of the ciliary body 15, 30, and 45 min following injection. Four hours following intracameral injection, Iodine-125 radio-labeled human serum albumin injected into the sheep eye (n = 5) was drained preferentially into cervical, retropharyngeal, submandibular and preauricular lymph nodes in the head and neck region compared to reference popliteal lymph nodes (P < 0.05). These findings collectively indicate the presence of distinct lymphatic channels in the human ciliary body, and that fluid and solutes flow at least partially through this system. The discovery of a uveolymphatic

  16. Effect of postural changes on human lymphatic capillary pressure of the skin.

    PubMed Central

    Franzeck, U K; Fischer, M; Costanzo, U; Herrig, I; Bollinger, A

    1996-01-01

    1. The influence of postural changes on cutaneous lymphatic capillary pressure and venous pressure was measured at the dorsum of the foot in twelve healthy volunteers. Measurements were performed in the supine and sitting positions. 2. Lymphatic skin capillaries were visualized by fluorescence microlymphography with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-Dextran 150000. Subsequently a lymphatic capillary was punctured with a glass micropipette and pressure was measured using the servo-nulling technique. Lymphatic capillary pressure, venous pressure, heart and respiration rates were recorded simultaneously. 3. Mean lymphatic capillary pressure was significantly higher (P = 0.0096) in the sitting (9.9 +/- 3.0 mmHg) than in the supine (3.9 +/- 4.2 mmHg) position. There was no significant difference (P = 0.09) between lymphatic capillary pressure and venous pressure (6.8 +/- 3.4 mmHg) in the supine position. During sitting mean lymphatic capillary pressure was significantly lower (P = 0.0022) than mean venous pressure (53.3 +/- 4.1 mmHg). The smaller increase in lymphatic capillary pressure may be caused by the discontinuous fluid column in the lymphatic system and enhanced orthostatic contractile activity of lymphatic collectors and precollectors. Spontaneous low frequency pressure fluctuations occurred in 89% of recordings during sitting, which was significantly (P = 0.02) higher than in the supine position (54%). 4. The present results support the suggestion of enhanced intrinsic contractile activity of lymph precollectors and collectors in the dependent position. This mechanism is primarily responsible for the propulsion of lymph from the periphery to the thoracic duct during quiet sitting, when extrinsic pumping by the calf muscles is not active. PMID:8842016

  17. In vitro induction of human adipose-derived stem cells into lymphatic endothelial-like cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Chen, Xiao-hu; Li, Fu-gui; Chen, Yun-xian; Gu, Li-qiang; Zhu, Jia-kai; Li, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) may provide a suitable number of progenitors for the treatment of lymphatic edema; however, to date the protocols for inducing hADSCs into this tissue type have not been standardized. We wished to investigate the induction of hADSCs into lymphatic endothelial-like cells using vascular endothelial growth factor-C156S (VEGF-C156S) and other growth factors in vitro. hADSCs from healthy adult adipose tissue were purified using enzyme digestion. Differentiation was induced using medium containing VEGF-C156S and bovine fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Differentiation was confirmed using immunostaining for lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) and fms-related tyrosine kinase 4 (FLT-4), two lymphatic endothelial cell markers. The expression levels of LYVE-1, prospero homeobox 1 (PROX-1), and FLT-4 throughout induction were assessed using reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction. hADSCs were successfully obtained by trypsin digest and purification. Flow cytometry showed these cells were similar to mesenchymal stem cells, with a high positive rate of CD13, CD29, CD44, and CD105, and a low positive rate of CD31, CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. Induction to lymphatic endothelial-like cells was successful, with cells expressing high levels of LYVE-1, PROX-1, and FLT-4. Adipose-derived stem cells can be induced to differentiate into lymphatic endothelial-like cells using a medium containing VEGF-C156S, bFGF, and other growth factors. This population of lymphatic endothelial-like cells may be useful for lymphatic reconstruction in the future.

  18. Microneedles for the Noninvasive Structural and Functional Assessment of Dermal Lymphatic Vessels.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Davide; Proulx, Steven T; Marschalkova, Patrizia; Detmar, Michael; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2016-02-24

    The medical and scientific communities' interest in the lymphatic system has been growing rapidly in recent years. It has become evident that the lymphatic system is much more than simply a homeostasis controller and that it plays key roles in several pathological conditions. This work describes the identification of the optimal combination of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) and a near-infrared dye (indocyanine green) for the manufacturing of soluble microneedles and their application to the imaging of the lymphatic system. Upon application to the skin, the microneedle-bearing indocyanine green is delivered in the dermal layer, where the lymphatic vessels are abundant. The draining lymphatics can then be visualized and the clearance kinetics from the administration site simply determined using a near-infrared camera. This painless functional "tattooing" procedure can be used for quantitative assessment of the dermal lymphatic function in several dermal conditions and treatment-response evaluations. The two components of these microneedles are extensively used in routine medical care, potentially leading to rapid clinical translation. Moreover, this procedure may have a significant impact on preclinical lymphatic studies.

  19. Novel function for blood platelets and podoplanin in developmental separation of blood and lymphatic circulation.

    PubMed

    Uhrin, Pavel; Zaujec, Jan; Breuss, Johannes M; Olcaydu, Damla; Chrenek, Peter; Stockinger, Hannes; Fuertbauer, Elke; Moser, Markus; Haiko, Paula; Fässler, Reinhard; Alitalo, Kari; Binder, Bernd R; Kerjaschki, Dontscho

    2010-05-13

    During embryonic development, lymph sacs form from the cardinal vein, and sprout centrifugally to form mature lymphatic networks. Separation of the lymphatic from the blood circulation by a hitherto unknown mechanism is essential for the homeostatic function of the lymphatic system. O-glycans on the lymphatic endothelium have recently been suggested to be required for establishment and maintenance of distinct blood and lymphatic systems, primarily by mediating proper function of podoplanin. Here, we show that this separation process critically involves platelet activation by podoplanin. We found that platelet aggregates build up in wild-type embryos at the separation zone of podoplanin(+) lymph sacs and cardinal veins, but not in podoplanin(-/-) embryos. Thus, podoplanin(-/-) mice develop a "nonseparation" phenotype, characterized by a blood-filled lymphatic network after approximately embryonic day 13.5, which, however, partially resolves in postnatal mice. The same embryonic phenotype is also induced by treatment of pregnant mice with acetyl salicylic acid, podoplanin-blocking antibodies, or by inactivation of the kindlin-3 gene required for platelet aggregation. Therefore, interaction of endothelial podoplanin of the developing lymph sac with circulating platelets from the cardinal vein is critical for separating the lymphatic from the blood vascular system.

  20. LYMPHATIC INJURY AND REGENERATION IN CARDIAC ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Thing Rinda; Pathak, Arvind; Asano, Hiroshi; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Baldwin, William M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Severed donor heart lymphatics are not anastomosed to recipient lymphatics in cardiac transplantation. We evaluated the effects of cellular infiltrates of T cells and macrophages on the morphology of lymphatics in heart grafts. Methods: Dark Agouti (DA) hearts were transplanted to Lewis or control DA rats on sub-therapeutic doses of cyclosporin. Transplants were examined by immunohistology and quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy using LYVE-1 as a lymphatic marker and CD8 and CD68 as markers for cellular infiltration at selected intervals from 1 to 8 weeks post-transplantation. Results: Allograft inner myocardial lymphatic density decreased by more than 30-fold at 1 week, and recovered to only 15% of the native level at 8 weeks post-transplantation. In contrast, allograft lymphatics in and near the epicardium showed no significant density decline, but increased in size by more than 5-fold at 2 weeks, and sustained about a 3-fold increase at 8 weeks post-transplantation. Lymphatic changes correlated temporally with the extent of T cell and macrophage infiltration in allografts, which peaked at 2-3 weeks post-transplantation. When grafts were retransplanted from allogeneic to isogeneic recipients at 3 weeks post-transplantation, inner lymphatic density returned close to native level within 2 weeks after retransplantation. Conclusions: This is the first characterization of regional and morphological effects of immunological responses on heart lymphatics after transplantation. Elimination of alloimmune responses produces rapid restoration of inner lymphatic vessels, suggesting that lymphatics injured during rejection can recover when rejection is reversed during the post-transplantation course. PMID:20118845

  1. A RFID authentication protocol based on infinite dimension pseudo random number generator for image recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Qiaoling; Zou, Xuecheng; Tong, Hengqing

    2009-10-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has been widely used in the image recognition system. However, the feature of the RFID system may bring out security threatens. In this paper, we analyze the existing RFID authentication protocols and state an infinite dimension pseudo random number generator to strengthen the protocol security. Then an authentication protocol based on infinite dimension pseudo random number generator is proposed. Compared to the traditional protocols, our method could resist various attack approaches, and protect the tag information and the location privacy of the tag holder efficiently.

  2. Model Checking a Byzantine-Fault-Tolerant Self-Stabilizing Protocol for Distributed Clock Synchronization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the mechanical verification of a simplified model of a rapid Byzantine-fault-tolerant self-stabilizing protocol for distributed clock synchronization systems. This protocol does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the system. This protocol tolerates bursts of transient failures, and deterministically converges within a time bound that is a linear function of the self-stabilization period. A simplified model of the protocol is verified using the Symbolic Model Verifier (SMV) [SMV]. The system under study consists of 4 nodes, where at most one of the nodes is assumed to be Byzantine faulty. The model checking effort is focused on verifying correctness of the simplified model of the protocol in the presence of a permanent Byzantine fault as well as confirmation of claims of determinism and linear convergence with respect to the self-stabilization period. Although model checking results of the simplified model of the protocol confirm the theoretical predictions, these results do not necessarily confirm that the protocol solves the general case of this problem. Modeling challenges of the protocol and the system are addressed. A number of abstractions are utilized in order to reduce the state space. Also, additional innovative state space reduction techniques are introduced that can be used in future verification efforts applied to this and other protocols.

  3. Current concepts and future directions in the diagnosis and management of lymphatic vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rockson, Stanley G

    2010-06-01

    Despite the central, complex role for the lymphatic system in the maintenance of human health, the biology of this important and complex vasculature has been relatively under-investigated. However, the last decade has witnessed a substantial growth in the elucidation of lymphatic structural biology and the function of this system in health and in disease. These newly gained insights can be used to formulate our evolving concepts about the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to patients with lymphatic vascular disorders. In lymphedema, there is a spectrum of disease that extends from primary (heritable) to secondary (acquired) causes. Once detected, the presence of lymphatic edema mandates very specific modalities of intervention, predominated by physiotherapeutic techniques. In addition, a physiological basis for adjunctive, intermittent pneumatic compression has been established, and these modalities may be indicated in selected patient populations. The acknowledgement of a unique biology in lymphatic edemas is, increasingly, guiding research efforts within this field. Increasing investigative attention is being directed toward animal models of lymphatic vascular disease. As insight into the complex biology of the lymphatic vasculature continues to expand through focused biomedical investigation, the translation of these mechanistic insights into targeted, rationally conceived therapeutics will become increasingly feasible.

  4. Lymphatic vessels in the development of tissue and organ rejection.

    PubMed

    Hos, Deniz; Cursiefen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic vascular system-amongst other tasks-is critically involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses as it provides an important route for APC trafficking to secondary lymphatic organs. In this context, the cornea, which is the transparent and physiologically avascular "windscreen" of the eye, has served as an excellent in vivo model to study the role of the blood and lymphatic vasculature in mediating allogenic immune responses after transplantation. Especially the mouse model of high-risk corneal transplantation, where corneal avascularity is abolished by a severe inflammatory stimulus prior to keratoplasty, allows for comparison to other transplantations performed in primarily vascularized tissues and solid organs. Using this model, we recently demonstrated that especially lymphatic vessels, but not blood vessels, define the high-risk status of vascularized corneas and that anti(lymph)angiogenic treatment significantly promotes corneal allograft survival. Since evidence for lymphangiogenesis and its potential association with graft rejection is nowadays also present in solid organ transplantation, studies are currently addressing the potential benefits of anti(lymph)angiogenic treatment as a novel therapeutic concept also in solid organ grafting with promising initial results.

  5. Protocol dependence of mechanical properties in granular systems.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, S; Otsuki, M; Sasa, S

    2011-11-01

    We study the protocol dependence of the mechanical properties of granular media by means of computer simulations. We control a protocol of realizing disk packings in a systematic manner. In 2D, by keeping material properties of the constituents identical, we carry out compaction with various strain rates. The disk packings exhibit the strain rate dependence of the critical packing fraction above which the pressure becomes non-zero. The observed behavior contrasts with the well-studied jamming transitions for frictionless disk packings. We also observe that the elastic moduli of the disk packings depend on the strain rate logarithmically. Our results suggest that there exists a time-dependent state variable to describe macroscopic material properties of disk packings, which depend on its protocol.

  6. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Alicia L.; Kelley, Philip M.; Tempero, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Post natal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT+ LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT+ lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  7. Fault-Tolerant Consensus of Multi-Agent System With Distributed Adaptive Protocol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun; Ho, Daniel W C; Li, Lulu; Liu, Ming

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, fault-tolerant consensus in multi-agent system using distributed adaptive protocol is investigated. Firstly, distributed adaptive online updating strategies for some parameters are proposed based on local information of the network structure. Then, under the online updating parameters, a distributed adaptive protocol is developed to compensate the fault effects and the uncertainty effects in the leaderless multi-agent system. Based on the local state information of neighboring agents, a distributed updating protocol gain is developed which leads to a fully distributed continuous adaptive fault-tolerant consensus protocol design for the leaderless multi-agent system. Furthermore, a distributed fault-tolerant leader-follower consensus protocol for multi-agent system is constructed by the proposed adaptive method. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical analysis.

  8. Novel role of immature myeloid cells in formation of new lymphatic vessels associated with inflammation and tumors.

    PubMed

    Ran, Sophia; Wilber, Andrew

    2017-04-13

    Inflammation triggers an immune cell-driven program committed to restoring homeostasis to injured tissue. Central to this process is vasculature restoration, which includes both blood and lymphatic networks. Generation of new vessels or remodeling of existing vessels are also important steps in metastasis-the major cause of death for cancer patients. Although roles of the lymphatic system in regulation of inflammation and cancer metastasis are firmly established, the mechanisms underlying the formation of new lymphatic vessels remain a subject of debate. Until recently, generation of new lymphatics in adults was thought to occur exclusively through sprouting of existing vessels without help from recruited progenitors. However, emerging findings from clinical and experimental studies show that lymphoendothelial progenitors, particularly those derived from immature myeloid cells, play an important role in this process. This review summarizes current evidence for the existence and significant roles of myeloid-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECPs) in generation of new lymphatics. We describe specific markers of M-LECPs and discuss their biologic behavior in culture and in vivo, as well as currently known molecular mechanisms of myeloid-lymphatic transition (MLT). We also discuss the implications of M-LECPs for promoting adaptive immunity, as well as cancer metastasis. We conclude that improved mechanistic understanding of M-LECP differentiation and its role in adult lymphangiogenesis may lead to new therapeutic approaches for correcting lymphatic insufficiency or excessive formation of lymphatic vessels in human disorders.

  9. Mechanics of interstitial-lymphatic fluid transport: theoretical foundation and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Swartz, M A; Kaipainen, A; Netti, P A; Brekken, C; Boucher, Y; Grodzinsky, A J; Jain, R K

    1999-12-01

    Interstitial fluid movement is intrinsically linked to lymphatic drainage. However, their relationship is poorly understood, and associated pathologies are mostly untreatable. In this work we test the hypothesis that bulk tissue fluid movement can be evaluated in situ and described by a linear biphasic theory which integrates the regulatory function of the lymphatics with the mechanical stresses of the tissue. To accomplish this, we develop a novel experimental and theoretical model using the skin of the mouse tail. We then use the model to demonstrate how interstitial-lymphatic fluid movement depends on a balance between the elasticity, hydraulic conductivity, and lymphatic conductance as well as to demonstrate how chronic swelling (edema) alters the equipoise between tissue fluid balance parameters. Specifically, tissue fluid equilibrium is perturbed with a continuous interstitial infusion of saline into the tip of the tail. The resulting gradients in tissue stress are measured in terms of interstitial fluid pressure using a servo-null system. These measurements are then fit to the theory to provide in vivo estimates of the tissue hydraulic conductivity, elastic modulus, and overall resistance to lymphatic drainage. Additional experiments are performed on edematous tails to show that although chronic swelling causes an increase in the hydraulic conductivity, its greatly increased distensibility (due to matrix remodeling) dampens the driving forces for fluid movement and leads to fluid stagnation. This model is useful for examining potential treatments for edema and lymphatic disorders as well as substances which may alter tissue fluid balance and/or lymphatic drainage.

  10. Efficacy of AdipoDren® in Reducing Interleukin-1-Induced Lymphatic Endothelial Hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Valerio; Monti, Martina; Antonini, Giulia; Mattoli, Luisa; Burico, Michela; Marini, Francesca; Maidecchi, Anna; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic leakage can be seen as a detrimental phenomenon associated with fluid retention and deposition as well as gain of weight. Moreover, lymphatic dysfunction is associated with an inflammatory environment and can be a substrate for other health conditions. A number of treatments can ameliorate lymphatic vasculature: natural substances have been used as treatment options particularly suitable for their consolidated effectiveness and safety profile. Here we report the protective effect of AdipoDren®, an association of a series of plant-derived natural complexes, on lymphatic endothelium permeability promoted by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and the associated molecular mechanisms. AdipoDren® demonstrated a protective effect on dermal lymphatic endothelial cell permeability increased by IL-1β. Reduced permeability was due to the maintenance of tight junctions and cell-cell localisation of occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Moreover, AdipoDren® reduced the expression of the inflammatory key element cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), while not altering the levels of endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthases (eNOS and iNOS). The upregulation of antioxidant enzymatic systems (catalase and superoxide dismutase-1, SOD-1) and the downregulation of pro-oxidant markers (p22 phox subunit of NADPH oxidase) were also evident. In conclusion, AdipoDren® would be useful to ameliorate conditions of altered lymphatic vasculature and to support the physiological functionality of the lymphatic endothelium.

  11. Higher order finite-time consensus protocol for heterogeneous multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yingjiang; Yu, Xinghuo; Sun, Changyin; Yu, Wenwu

    2015-02-01

    This paper studies the higher order finite-time consensus protocol for heterogeneous multi-agent systems (HMASs). By adding a power integrator method and using heterogeneous domination method, two kinds of consensus protocols are proposed with state feedback and output feedback, respectively. First, for the leaderless and leader-follower HMASs, the continuous finite-time consensus protocols are proposed. Then, by designing a finite-time observer, the output-feedback finite-time consensus protocol is developed. Finally, simulations are performed to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  12. A Standard Mutual Authentication Protocol for Cloud Computing Based Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Prerna; Amin, Ruhul; Karati, Arijit; Biswas, G P; Khan, Muhammad Khurram

    2017-04-01

    Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) supports a standard platform to the patient for getting necessary medical treatment from the doctor(s) via Internet communication. Security protection is important for medical records (data) of the patients because of very sensitive information. Besides, patient anonymity is another most important property, which must be protected. Most recently, Chiou et al. suggested an authentication protocol for TMIS by utilizing the concept of cloud environment. They claimed that their protocol is patient anonymous and well security protected. We reviewed their protocol and found that it is completely insecure against patient anonymity. Further, the same protocol is not protected against mobile device stolen attack. In order to improve security level and complexity, we design a light weight authentication protocol for the same environment. Our security analysis ensures resilience of all possible security attacks. The performance of our protocol is relatively standard in comparison with the related previous research.

  13. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  14. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  15. Protocols development for security and privacy of radio frequency identification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagha, Fatin

    There are benefits to adopting radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, although there are methods of attack that can compromise the system. This research determined how that may happen and what possible solutions can keep that from happening. Protocols were developed to implement better security. In addition, new topologies were developed to handle the problems of the key management. Previously proposed protocols focused on providing mutual authentication and privacy between readers and tags. However, those protocols are still vulnerable to be attacked. These protocols were analyzed and the disadvantages shown for each one. Previous works assumed that the channels between readers and the servers were secure. In the proposed protocols, a compromised reader is considered along with how to prevent tags from being read by that reader. The new protocols provide mutual authentication between readers and tags and, at the same time, remove the compromised reader from the system. Three protocols are proposed. In the first protocol, a mutual authentication is achieved and a compromised reader is not allowed in the network. In the second protocol, the number of times a reader contacts the server is reduced. The third protocol provides authentication and privacy between tags and readers using a trusted third party. The developed topology is implemented using python language and simulates work to check the efficiency regarding the processing time. The three protocols are implemented by writing codes in C language and then compiling them in MSP430. IAR Embedded workbench is used, which is an integrated development environment with the C/C++ compiler to generate a faster code and to debug the microcontroller. In summary, the goal of this research is to find solutions for the problems on previously proposed protocols, handle a compromised reader, and solve key management problems.

  16. Communication protocol in chassis detecting wireless transmission system based on WiFi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In chassis detecting wireless transmission system, the wireless network communication protocol plays a key role in the information exchange and synchronization between the host and chassis PDA. This paper presents a wireless network transmission protocol based on TCP/IP which makes the rules of info...

  17. Development of a Decision Support System to Predict Physicians' Rehabilitation Protocols for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M.; Alshraideh, Mohammad A.; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M.; Salah, Imad K.; Holm, Margo B.; Otom, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee…

  18. A Secure RFID Tag Authentication Protocol with Privacy Preserving in Telecare Medicine Information System.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Ta; Weng, Chi-Yao; Lee, Cheng-Chi

    2015-08-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) based solutions are widely used for providing many healthcare applications include patient monitoring, object traceability, drug administration system and telecare medicine information system (TMIS) etc. In order to reduce malpractices and ensure patient privacy, in 2015, Srivastava et al. proposed a hash based RFID tag authentication protocol in TMIS. Their protocol uses lightweight hash operation and synchronized secret value shared between back-end server and tag, which is more secure and efficient than other related RFID authentication protocols. Unfortunately, in this paper, we demonstrate that Srivastava et al.'s tag authentication protocol has a serious security problem in that an adversary may use the stolen/lost reader to connect to the medical back-end server that store information associated with tagged objects and this privacy damage causing the adversary could reveal medical data obtained from stolen/lost readers in a malicious way. Therefore, we propose a secure and efficient RFID tag authentication protocol to overcome security flaws and improve the system efficiency. Compared with Srivastava et al.'s protocol, the proposed protocol not only inherits the advantages of Srivastava et al.'s authentication protocol for TMIS but also provides better security with high system efficiency.

  19. A network identity authentication protocol of bank account system based on fingerprint identification and mixed encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lijuan; Liu, Jingao

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes a network identity authentication protocol of bank account system based on fingerprint identification and mixed encryption. This protocol can provide every bank user a safe and effective way to manage his own bank account, and also can effectively prevent the hacker attacks and bank clerk crime, so that it is absolute to guarantee the legitimate rights and interests of bank users.

  20. Altered lymphatics in an ovine model of congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Datar, Sanjeev A; Johnson, Eric G; Oishi, Peter E; Johengen, Michael; Tang, Eric; Aramburo, Angela; Barton, Jubilee; Kuo, Hsuan-Chang; Bennett, Stephen; Xoinis, Konstantine; Reel, Bhupinder; Kalkan, Gokhan; Sajti, Eniko; Osorio, Oscar; Raff, Gary W; Matthay, Michael A; Fineman, Jeffrey R

    2012-03-15

    Abnormalities of the lymphatic circulation are well recognized in patients with congenital heart defects. However, it is not known how the associated abnormal blood flow patterns, such as increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF), might affect pulmonary lymphatic function and structure. Using well-established ovine models of acute and chronic increases in PBF, we cannulated the efferent lymphatic duct of the caudal mediastinal node and collected and analyzed lymph effluent from the lungs of lambs with acutely increased PBF (n = 6), chronically increased PBF (n = 6), and age-matched normal lambs (n = 8). When normalized to PBF, we found that lymph flow was unchanged following acute increases in PBF but decreased following chronic increases in PBF. The lymph:plasma protein ratio decreased with both acute and chronic increases in PBF. Lymph bioavailable nitric oxide increased following acute increases in PBF but decreased following chronic increases in PBF. In addition, we found perturbations in the transit kinetics of contrast material through the pleural lymphatics of lambs with chronic increases in PBF. Finally, there were structural changes in the pulmonary lymphatic system in lambs with chronic increases in PBF: lymphatics from these lambs were larger and more dilated, and there were alterations in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-C, lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1, and Angiopoietin-2, proteins known to be important for lymphatic growth, development, and remodeling. Taken together these data suggest that chronic increases in PBF lead to both functional and structural aberrations of lung lymphatics. These findings have important therapeutic implications that warrant further study.

  1. Lymphatic abnormalities are associated with RASA1 gene mutations in mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Patricia E.; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Rasmussen, John C.; Aldrich, Melissa B.; Guilliod, Renie; Maus, Erik A.; Fife, Caroline E.; Kwon, Sunkuk; Lapinski, Philip E.; King, Philip D.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in gene RASA1 have been historically associated with capillary malformation–arteriovenous malformation, but sporadic reports of lymphatic involvement have yet to be investigated in detail. To investigate the impact of RASA1 mutations in the lymphatic system, we performed investigational near-infrared fluorescence lymphatic imaging and confirmatory radiographic lymphangiography in a Parkes–Weber syndrome (PKWS) patient with suspected RASA1 mutations and correlated the lymphatic abnormalities against that imaged in an inducible Rasa1 knockout mouse. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis and validation by Sanger sequencing of DNA from the patient and unaffected biological parents enabled us to identify an early-frameshift deletion in RASA1 that was shared with the father, who possessed a capillary stain but otherwise no overt disease phenotype. Abnormal lymphatic vasculature was imaged in both affected and unaffected legs of the PKWS subject that transported injected indocyanine green dye to the inguinal lymph node and drained atypically into the abdomen and into dermal lymphocele-like vesicles on the groin. Dermal lymphatic hyperplasia and dilated vessels were observed in Rasa1-deficient mice, with subsequent development of chylous ascites. WES analyses did not identify potential gene modifiers that could explain the variability of penetrance between father and son. Nonetheless, we conclude that the RASA1 mutation is responsible for the aberrant lymphatic architecture and functional abnormalities, as visualized in the PKWS subject and in the animal model. Our unique method to combine investigatory near-infrared fluorescence lymphatic imaging and WES for accurate phenoptyping and unbiased genotyping allows the study of molecular mechanisms of lymphatic involvement of hemovascular disorders. PMID:23650393

  2. Nitric Oxide Regulates The Lymphatic Reactivity Following Hemorrhagic Shock Through Atp-Sensitive Potassium Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Min; Qin, Li-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Zi-Gang; Niu, Chun-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Lymphatic reactivity has been shown to exhibit a biphasic change following hemorrhagic shock, and nitric oxide (NO) is involved in this process. However, the precise mechanism responsible for NO regulation of the lymphatic reactivity along with the progression of hemorrhagic shock is unclear. Therefore, the present study was to investigate how NO participates in regulating the shock-induced biphasic changes in lymphatic reactivity and its underlying mechanisms. First, the expressions or contents of inducible NO synthase, nitrite plus nitrate, and elements of cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP pathway in thoracic ducts tissue were assessed. The results revealed that levels of nitrite plus nitrate, cAMP, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), p-PKA, and p-PKG were increased gradually along with the process of shock. Second, the roles of cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP in NO regulating lymphatic response to gradient substance P were evaluated with an isolated lymphatic perfusion system. The results showed that the NOS substrate (L-Arg), PKA donor (8-Br-cAMP) decreased the reactivity of shock 0.5 h-lymphatics, and that the PKA inhibitor (H-89) and KATP inhibitor (glibenclamide) restrained the effects of L-Arg while glibenclamide abolished the effects of 8-Br-cAMP. Meanwhile, NOS antagonist (L-NAME), protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor (KT-5823), and soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) increased the reactivity of shock 2 h-lymphatics, whereas KATP opener (pinacidil) inhibited these elevated effects induced by either L-NAME, ODQ, or KT-5823. Taken together, these results indicate that NO regulation of lymphatic reactivity during shock involves both cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP pathways. These findings have potential significance for the treatment of hemorrhagic shock through regulating lymphatic reactivity.

  3. Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, David R.; Crawford, Aladsair J.; Fuller, Jason C.; Gourisetti, Sri Nikhil Gup; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Ferreira, Summer; Schoenwald, David; Rosewater, David

    2016-04-01

    The Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems (PNNL-22010) was first issued in November 2012 as a first step toward providing a foundational basis for developing an initial standard for the uniform measurement and expression of energy storage system (ESS) performance. Based on experiences with the application and use of that document, and to include additional ESS applications and associated duty cycles, test procedures and performance metrics, a first revision of the November 2012 Protocol was issued in June 2014 (PNNL 22010 Rev. 1). As an update of the 2014 revision 1 to the Protocol, this document (the March 2016 revision 2 to the Protocol) is intended to supersede the June 2014 revision 1 to the Protocol and provide a more user-friendly yet more robust and comprehensive basis for measuring and expressing ESS performance.

  4. T Cell Trafficking through Lymphatic Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Morgan C.; Teijeira, Alvaro; Halin, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    T cell migration within and between peripheral tissues and secondary lymphoid organs is essential for proper functioning of adaptive immunity. While active T cell migration within a tissue is fairly slow, blood vessels and lymphatic vessels (LVs) serve as speedy highways that enable T cells to travel rapidly over long distances. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of T cell migration out of blood vessels have been intensively studied over the past 30 years. By contrast, less is known about T cell trafficking through the lymphatic vasculature. This migratory process occurs in one manner within lymph nodes (LNs), where recirculating T cells continuously exit into efferent lymphatics to return to the blood circulation. In another manner, T cell trafficking through lymphatics also occurs in peripheral tissues, where T cells exit the tissue by means of afferent lymphatics, to migrate to draining LNs and back into blood. In this review, we highlight how the anatomy of the lymphatic vasculature supports T cell trafficking and review current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular requirements of T cell migration through LVs. Finally, we summarize and discuss recent insights regarding the presumed relevance of T cell trafficking through afferent lymphatics. PMID:28066423

  5. Label-free optical imaging of lymphatic vessels within tissue beds in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Siavash; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels are a part of circulatory system in vertebrates that maintain tissue fluid homeostasis and drain excess fluid and large cells that cannot easily find their way back into venous system. Due to the lack of non-invasive monitoring tools, lymphatic vessels are known as forgotten circulation. However, lymphatic system plays an important role in diseases such as cancer and inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we start to briefly review the current existing methods for imaging lymphatic vessels, mostly involving dye/targeting cell injection. We then show the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for label-free non-invasive in vivo imaging of lymph vessels and nodes. One of the advantages of using OCT over other imaging modalities is its ability to assess label-free blood flow perfusion that can be simultaneously observed along with lymphatic vessels for imaging the microcirculatory system within tissue beds. Imaging the microcirculatory system including blood and lymphatic vessels can be utilized for imaging and better understanding pathologic mechanisms and treatment technique development in some critical diseases such as inflammation, malignant cancer angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:25642129

  6. Label-free optical imaging of lymphatic vessels within tissue beds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Siavash; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels are a part of circulatory system in vertebrates that maintain tissue fluid homeostasis and drain excess fluid and large cells that cannot easily find their way back into venous system. Due to the lack of non-invasive monitoring tools, lymphatic vessels are known as forgotten circulation. However, lymphatic system plays an important role in diseases such as cancer and inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we start to briefly review the current existing methods for imaging lymphatic vessels, mostly involving dye/targeting cell injection. We then show the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for label-free non-invasive in vivo imaging of lymph vessels and nodes. One of the advantages of using OCT over other imaging modalities is its ability to assess label-free blood flow perfusion that can be simultaneously observed along with lymphatic vessels for imaging the microcirculatory system within tissue beds. Imaging the microcirculatory system including blood and lymphatic vessels can be utilized for imaging and better understanding pathologic mechanisms and treatment technique development in some critical diseases such as inflammation, malignant cancer angiogenesis and metastasis.

  7. Bidirectional Crosstalk between Lymphatic Endothelial Cell and T Cell and Its Implications in Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Kim Pin; Angeli, Veronique

    2017-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels have been traditionally considered as passive transporters of fluid and lipids. However, it is apparent from recent literature that the function of lymphatic vessels is not only restricted to fluid balance homeostasis but also extends to regulation of immune cell trafficking, antigen presentation, tolerance, and immunity, all which may impact the progression of inflammatory responses and diseases such as cancer. The lymphatic system and the immune system are intimately connected, and there is emergent evidence for a crosstalk between T cell and lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC). This review describes how LECs in lymph nodes can affect multiple functional properties of T cells and the impact of these LEC-driven effects on adaptive immunity and, conversely, how T cells can modulate LEC growth. The significance of such crosstalk between T cells and LECs in cancer will also be discussed. PMID:28220121

  8. Lymphatic vessels clean up your arteries.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the pathway by which cholesterol accumulated in peripheral tissues, including the artery wall, is transported to the liver for excretion. There is strong evidence suggesting that interventions that increase macrophage cholesterol efflux and RCT would be antiatherogenic. In this issue of the JCI, Martel et al. investigate the contribution of lymphatic vasculature to RCT. Their results support the concept that the lymphatic vessel route is critical for RCT from atherosclerotic plaques. Therefore, strategies to improve lymphatic transport might be useful for treating atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  9. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchenko, V V; Kuznetsov, Yu L; Meglinski, I V

    2013-07-31

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions. (laser applications in biology and medicine)

  10. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V. V.; Kuznetsov, Yu L.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2013-07-01

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions.

  11. Evaluating Management Information Systems, A Protocol for Automated Peer Review Systems

    PubMed Central

    Black, Gordon C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses key issues in evaluating an automated Peer Review System. Included are the conceptual base, design, steps in planning structural components, operation parameters, criteria, costs and a detailed outline or protocol for use in the evaluation. At the heart of the Peer Review System is the criteria utilized for measuring quality. Criteria evaluation should embrace, as a minimum, appropriateness, validity and reliability, and completemess or comprehensiveness of content. Such an evaluation is not complete without determining the impact (clinical outcome) of the service system or the patient and the population served.

  12. A hash based mutual RFID tag authentication protocol in telecare medicine information system.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Keerti; Awasthi, Amit K; Kaul, Sonam D; Mittal, R C

    2015-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a technology which has multidimensional applications to reduce the complexity of today life. Everywhere, like access control, transportation, real-time inventory, asset management and automated payment systems etc., RFID has its enormous use. Recently, this technology is opening its wings in healthcare environments, where potential applications include patient monitoring, object traceability and drug administration systems etc. In this paper, we propose a secure RFID-based protocol for the medical sector. This protocol is based on hash operation with synchronized secret. The protocol is safe against active and passive attacks such as forgery, traceability, replay and de-synchronization attack.

  13. Lymphatic Vessel Abnormalities Arising from Disorders of Ras Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; King, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic diseases in man have been described in which abnormalities in the development and function of the lymphatic vascular (LV) system are prominent features. The genes that are mutated in these diseases are varied and include genes that encode lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) growth factor receptors and their ligands and transcription factors that control LEC fate and function. In addition, an increasing number of genes have been identified that encode components of the Ras signal transduction pathway that conveys signals from cell surface receptors to regulate cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. Gene targeting studies performed in mice have confirmed that the LV system is particularly susceptible to perturbations in the Ras pathway. PMID:24183794

  14. Comparison of viscoelastic properties of walls and functional characteristics of valves in lymphatic and venous vessels.

    PubMed

    Ohhashi, T

    1987-12-01

    The principal function of the lymphatic and venous system is to maintain a favorable environment for cells of the body. As a consequence mainly of hydrostatic forces, shifts of fluid usually occur between the vascular system and the extracellular space. To compensate for these shifts the veins are capable of active and passive changes in capacity that serve to modulate the filling pressure of the heart by adjusting the central blood volume. In addition to the venous function, the lymphatic function also contributes to compensate for the fluid shifts by drainage from the interstitial space. Namely, the general function of the lymphatic system is to return fluid and protein which escapes from the blood capillaries to the lymph circulation. To elucidate the mode of venous and lymph transport, therefore, it is of essential importance to obtain basic knowledge of the mechanical characteristics of the walls of the vessels and the functional characteristics of the lymphatic and venous valves dividing two adjacent compartments. In this communication, in order to answer the question, "Are Lymphatics Different From Blood Vessels?", I would like to review a comparison of viscoelastic properties of walls and functional characteristics of valves in lymph and venous vessels by use of our original data obtained with isolated canine veins and thoracic ducts and with isolated bovine mesenteric lymphatics (1-9).

  15. Visualisation and stereological assessment of blood and lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Lokmic, Zerina; Mitchell, Geraldine M

    2011-06-01

    The physiological processes involved in tissue development and regeneration also include the parallel formation of blood and lymphatic vessel circulations which involves their growth, maturation and remodelling. Both vascular systems are also frequently involved in the development and progression of pathological conditions in tissues and organs. The blood vascular system circulates oxygenated blood and nutrients at appropriate physiological levels for tissue survival, and efficiently removes all waste products including carbon dioxide. This continuous network consists of the heart, aorta, arteries, arterioles, capillaries, post-capillary venules, venules, veins and vena cava. This system exists in an interstitial environment together with the lymphatic vascular system, including lymph nodes, which aids maintenance of body fluid balance and immune surveillance. To understand the process of vascular development, vascular network stability, remodelling and/or regression in any research model under any experimental conditions, it is necessary to clearly and unequivocally identify and quantify all elements of the vascular network. By utilising stereological methods in combination with cellular markers for different vascular cell components, it is possible to estimate parameters such as surface density and surface area of blood vessels, length density and length of blood vessels as well as absolute vascular volume. This review examines the current strategies used to visualise blood vessels and lymphatic vessels in two- and three-dimensions and the basic principles of vascular stereology used to quantify vascular network parameters.

  16. Arteries provide essential guidance cues for lymphatic endothelial cells in the zebrafish trunk.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Jeroen; Bos, Frank L; Urasaki, Akihiro; Kawakami, Koichi; Duckers, Henricus J; Schulte-Merker, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    The endothelial cells of the vertebrate lymphatic system assemble into complex networks, but local cues that guide the migration of this distinct set of cells are currently unknown. As a model for lymphatic patterning, we have studied the simple vascular network of the zebrafish trunk consisting of three types of lymphatic vessels that develop in close connection with the blood vasculature. We have generated transgenic lines that allow us to distinguish between arterial, venous and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) within a single zebrafish embryo. We found that LECs migrate exclusively along arteries in a manner that suggests that arterial endothelial cells serve as the LEC migratory substrate. In the absence of intersegmental arteries, LEC migration in the trunk is blocked. Our data therefore demonstrate a crucial role for arteries in LEC guidance.

  17. Lymphatic vessel density in radical prostatectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Bishop, Elena; Zhou, Honghong; Maclennan, Gregory T; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Zhang, Shaobo; Badve, Sunil; Baldridge, Lee Ann; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2008-04-01

    Formation of new lymphatic channels, or lymphangiogenesis, has been associated with poor prognosis in a number of human cancers. Its prognostic significance in prostate cancer is uncertain. We analyzed 122 radical prostatectomy specimens. Immunohistochemistry for lymphatic vessels was performed using a mouse monoclonal antibody reactive with an O-linked sialoglycoprotein found on lymphatic endothelium (clone D2-40, Signet Laboratories, Dedham, Mass). The mean lymphatic vessel densities (LVDs) of the 3 prostate compartments were compared. Lymphatic vessel densities were correlated with other clinical and pathologic characteristics. Mean values for intratumoral, peritumoral, and normal prostate LVD were 3.0, 5.2, and 4.8 lymphatic vessels per 200x field, respectively. The intratumoral LVD was significantly lower than the peritumoral or normal LVD (P < .001), and the LVD of the latter 2 compartments was not significantly different (P = .29). The prostate LVD did not correlate with other clinical and pathologic parameters. In conclusion, LVD is reduced in the intratumoral compartment compared with the peritumoral and normal prostate compartments, whereas the latter 2 have similar LVD. In contrast to other malignancies, quantitation of lymphangiogenesis in prostatic adenocarcinoma does not appear to offer useful prognostic information.

  18. Pathway-related molecules of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis in tumor lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingwen; Huang, Yuhong; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Yuanyi; Mahoud, Salma; Bakheet, Ahmed Musa Hago; Wang, Li; Zhou, Shuting; Tang, Jianwu

    2016-10-01

    Precondition for tumor lymphatic metastasis is that tumor cells induce formation of original and newborn lymphatic vessels and invade surrounding lymphatic vessels in tumor stroma, while some pathway-related molecules play an important role in mechanisms associated with proliferation and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and tumor cells. In lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, the pathway-related molecules of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis, such as Furin-like enzyme, CNTN1, Prox1, LYVE-1, Podoplanin, SOX18, SDF1 and CXCR4, are direct constitutors as a portion of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis, and their biological activities rely on this ligand-receptor system. These axis-related signal molecules could gradually produce waterfall-like cascading effects, mediate differentiation and maturation of LECs, remodel original and neonatal lymphatic vessels, as well as ultimately promote tumor cell chemotaxis, migration, invasion and metastasis to lymphoid tracts. This review summarizes the structure and function features of pathway-related molecules of VEGFC/D-VEGFR3/NRP2 axis, the expression changes of these molecules in different anatomic organs or histopathologic types or development stages of various tumors, the characteristics of transduction, implementation, integration of signal networks, the interactive effects on biological behaviors between tumor cells and lymphatic endothelial cells, and their molecular mechanisms and significances in tumor lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis.

  19. Topographic study on nerve-associated lymphatic vessels in the murine craniofacial region by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Masahide; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Kajiwara, Tooru; Kato, Seiji; Yanagisawa, Shigetaka

    2008-12-01

    The distribution and fine structure of lymphatic vessels associated with nerves was studied by immunohistochemistry in the murine craniofacial region. The tissue sections and blocks were immunostained for LYVE-1, protein gene product 9.5, CD34 and aquaporin-1 to demonstrate the lymphatic vessels, nerves, blood vessels and water channel protein, respectively. Transmission electron microscopic examination was also performed to investigate the relationship between the lymphatics and nerves. In the nasal area, the lymphatics were found in dura mater on the cribriform plate and beneath the nasal mucosa, this supposedly supplying the cerebrospinal fluid drainage route along the olfactory nerves. The proximal portions of the cranial nerves were equipped with the lymphatics in the epineurium. In the distal portions of the nerves, the lymphatics were distributed in close proximity of the perineural sheath, and thus might contribute to maintenance of microenvironment suitable for the nerves by an absorptive activity of the lymphatic endothelial cells. The present findings suggest that the lymphatic system associated with the cranial nerves provides the pathway for transport of cerebrospinal fluid, tissue fluid, and free cells involved in immune response and tumor metastasis in the craniofacial region.

  20. Altered lymphatic function and architecture in salt-induced hypertension assessed by near-infrared fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Agollah, Germaine D.; Chan, Wenyaw; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2012-08-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in maintaining the fluid homeostasis between the blood vascular and interstitial tissue compartment and there is recent evidence that its transport capabilities may regulate blood pressure in salt-induced hypertension. Yet, there is little known how the lymphatic contractile function and architecture responds to dietary salt-intake. Thus, we longitudinally characterized lymphatic contractile function and vessel remodeling noninvasively using dynamic near-infrared fluorescence imaging in animal models of salt-induced hypertension. The lymphatics of mice and rats were imaged following intradermal injection of indocyanine green to the ear tip or the base of the tail before and during two weeks of either a high salt diet (HSD) or normal chow. Our noninvasive imaging data demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the skin of mice and rats on a HSD as compared to their baseline levels. In addition, our dynamic imaging results showed increased lymphatic contraction frequency in HSD-fed mice and rats. Lymphatic contractile function and vessel remodeling occurs in response to salt-induced hypertension suggesting a possible role for the lymphatics in the regulation of vascular blood pressure.

  1. In vivo label-free lymphangiography of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in human burn scars using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Peijun; Es’haghian, Shaghayegh; Harms, Karl-Anton; Murray, Alexandra; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an automated, label-free method for lymphangiography of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in humans in vivo using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This method corrects for the variation in OCT signal due to the confocal function and sensitivity fall-off of a spectral-domain OCT system and utilizes a single-scattering model to compensate for A-scan signal attenuation to enable reliable thresholding of lymphatic vessels. A segment-joining algorithm is then incorporated into the method to mitigate partial-volume effects with small vessels. The lymphatic vessel images are augmented with images of the blood vessel network, acquired from the speckle decorrelation with additional weighting to differentiate blood vessels from the observed high decorrelation in lymphatic vessels. We demonstrate the method with longitudinal scans of human burn scar patients undergoing ablative fractional laser treatment, showing the visualization of the cutaneous lymphatic and blood vessel networks. PMID:28018713

  2. In vivo label-free lymphangiography of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in human burn scars using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Gong, Peijun; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Harms, Karl-Anton; Murray, Alexandra; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M; Sampson, David D; McLaughlin, Robert A

    2016-12-01

    We present an automated, label-free method for lymphangiography of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in humans in vivo using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This method corrects for the variation in OCT signal due to the confocal function and sensitivity fall-off of a spectral-domain OCT system and utilizes a single-scattering model to compensate for A-scan signal attenuation to enable reliable thresholding of lymphatic vessels. A segment-joining algorithm is then incorporated into the method to mitigate partial-volume effects with small vessels. The lymphatic vessel images are augmented with images of the blood vessel network, acquired from the speckle decorrelation with additional weighting to differentiate blood vessels from the observed high decorrelation in lymphatic vessels. We demonstrate the method with longitudinal scans of human burn scar patients undergoing ablative fractional laser treatment, showing the visualization of the cutaneous lymphatic and blood vessel networks.

  3. Byzantine-fault tolerant self-stabilizing protocol for distributed clock synchronization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A rapid Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol that self-stabilizes from any state, tolerates bursts of transient failures, and deterministically converges within a linear convergence time with respect to the self-stabilization period. Upon self-stabilization, all good clocks proceed synchronously. The Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the clocks. Furthermore, there is neither a central clock nor an externally generated pulse system. The protocol converges deterministically, is scalable, and self-stabilizes in a short amount of time. The convergence time is linear with respect to the self-stabilization period.

  4. Synchronization and Random Triggering of Lymphatic Vessel Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Baish, James W.; Kunert, Christian; Padera, Timothy P.; Munn, Lance L.

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system is responsible for transporting interstitial fluid back to the bloodstream, but unlike the cardiovascular system, lacks a centralized pump-the heart–to drive flow. Instead, each collecting lymphatic vessel can individually contract and dilate producing unidirectional flow enforced by intraluminal check valves. Due to the large number and spatial distribution of such pumps, high-level coordination would be unwieldy. This leads to the question of how each segment of lymphatic vessel responds to local signals that can contribute to the coordination of pumping on a network basis. Beginning with elementary fluid mechanics and known cellular behaviors, we show that two complementary oscillators emerge from i) mechanical stretch with calcium ion transport and ii) fluid shear stress induced nitric oxide production (NO). Using numerical simulation and linear stability analysis we show that the newly identified shear-NO oscillator shares similarities with the well-known Van der Pol oscillator, but has unique characteristics. Depending on the operating conditions, the shear-NO process may i) be inherently stable, ii) oscillate spontaneously in response to random disturbances or iii) synchronize with weak periodic stimuli. When the complementary shear-driven and stretch-driven oscillators interact, either may dominate, producing a rich family of behaviors similar to those observed in vivo. PMID:27935958

  5. Synchronization and Random Triggering of Lymphatic Vessel Contractions.

    PubMed

    Baish, James W; Kunert, Christian; Padera, Timothy P; Munn, Lance L

    2016-12-01

    The lymphatic system is responsible for transporting interstitial fluid back to the bloodstream, but unlike the cardiovascular system, lacks a centralized pump-the heart-to drive flow. Instead, each collecting lymphatic vessel can individually contract and dilate producing unidirectional flow enforced by intraluminal check valves. Due to the large number and spatial distribution of such pumps, high-level coordination would be unwieldy. This leads to the question of how each segment of lymphatic vessel responds to local signals that can contribute to the coordination of pumping on a network basis. Beginning with elementary fluid mechanics and known cellular behaviors, we show that two complementary oscillators emerge from i) mechanical stretch with calcium ion transport and ii) fluid shear stress induced nitric oxide production (NO). Using numerical simulation and linear stability analysis we show that the newly identified shear-NO oscillator shares similarities with the well-known Van der Pol oscillator, but has unique characteristics. Depending on the operating conditions, the shear-NO process may i) be inherently stable, ii) oscillate spontaneously in response to random disturbances or iii) synchronize with weak periodic stimuli. When the complementary shear-driven and stretch-driven oscillators interact, either may dominate, producing a rich family of behaviors similar to those observed in vivo.

  6. Optimization of monoclonal antibody delivery via the lymphatics: the dose dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, M.A.; Parker, R.J.; Covell, D.G.; Holton, O.D. 3d.; Keenan, A.M.; Sieber, S.M.; Weinstein, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    After interstitial injection in mice, antibody molecules enter local lymphatic vessels, flow with the lymph to regional lymph nodes, and bind to target antigens there. Compared with i.v. administration, delivery via the lymphatics provides a more efficient means for localizing antibody in lymph nodes. An IgG2a (36-7-5) directed against the murine class I major histocompatibility antigen H-2Kk has proved useful for studying the pharmacology of lymphatic delivery. At very low doses, most of the antibody remains at the injection site in Kk-positive animals. As the dose is progressively increased, most effective labeling occurs first in nodes proximal to the injection site and then in the next group of nodes along the lymphatic chain. At higher doses, antibody overflows the lymphatic system and enters the blood-stream via the thoracic duct and other lymphatic-venous connections. Once in the blood, antibody is rapidly cleared, apparently by binding to Kk-bearing cells. These findings indicate that the single-pass distribution of monoclonal antibodies in the lymphatics can be strongly dose dependent, a principle which may be of clinical significance in the improvement of immunolymphoscintigraphic imaging, especially with antibodies directed against normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Monoclonal antibodies directed against normal cell types in the lymph node may be useful for assessing the integrity of lymphatic chains by immunolymphoscintigraphy or, more speculatively, for altering the status of regional immune function. The results presented here indicate that a low or intermediate antibody dose may optimize the signal:noise ratio for imaging. In Kk-negative animals, the percentage of dose taken up in the major organs was essentially independent of the dose administered; there was no evidence for saturable sites of nonspecific binding.

  7. Utilization of Internet Protocol-Based Voice Systems in Remote Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Susan; Nichols, Kelvin; Bradford, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of a proposed voice communication system for use in remote payload operations performed on the International Space Station. The system, Internet Voice Distribution System (IVoDS), would make use of existing Internet protocols, and offer a number of advantages over the system currently in use. Topics covered include: system description and operation, system software and hardware, system architecture, project status, and technology transfer applications.

  8. Colonic insult impairs lymph flow, increases cellular content of the lymph, alters local lymphatic micro-environment and leads to sustained inflammation in the rat ileum

    PubMed Central

    Cromer, Walter; Wang, Wei; Zawieja, Scott D.; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves; Newell Rogers, M. Karen; Zawieja, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lymphatic dysfunction has been linked to inflammation since the 1930’s. Lymphatic function in the gut and mesentery is grossly underexplored in models of IBD despite the use of lymphatic occlusion in early models of IBD. Activation of the innate and adaptive immune system is a hallmark of TNBS-induced inflammation and is linked to disruption of the intrinsic lymph pump. Recent identification of crosstalk between lymphatic vessel resident immune cells and regulation of lymphatic vessel contractility underscore the importance of the timing of lymphatic dysfunction during tissue inflammation in response to TNBS. Methods To evaluate lymphatic function in TNBS induced inflammation, lymph was collected and flow measured from mesenteric lymphatics. Cellularity and cytokine profile of the lymph was also measured. Histopathology was performed to determine severity of injury and immunofluorescent staining of the mesentery was done to evaluate changes in the population of immune cells that reside near and on gastro-intestinal collecting lymphatics. Results Lymph transport fell 24hrs after TNBS administration and began recovering at 72hrs. Significant reduction of lymph flow preceded significant increase in histopathological score and occurred simultaneously with increased MPO activity. These changes were preceded by increased MHCII+ cells surrounding mesenteric lymphatics leading to an altered lymphatic environment that would favor dysfunction. Conclusions Alterations in environmental factors that effect lymphatic function occur before the development of gross GI inflammation. Reduced lymphatic function in TNBS-mediated inflammation is likely an early factor in the development of injury and that recovery of function is associated with resolution of inflammation. PMID:25939039

  9. Absence of lymphatic vessels in human dental pulp: a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Gerli, Renato; Secciani, Ilaria; Sozio, Francesca; Rossi, Antonella; Weber, Elisabetta; Lorenzini, Guido

    2010-04-01

    Few and controversial data are available in the literature regarding the presence of lymphatic vessels in the human dental pulp. The present study was designed to examine morphologically the existence of a lymph drainage system in human dental pulp. Human dental pulp and skin sections were immunohistochemically stained with specific antibodies for lymphatic endothelium (D2-40, LYVE-1, VEGFR-3 [vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3], and Prox-1), with the pan-endothelial markers CD31 and von Willebrand factor (vWF), and with the blood-specific marker CD34. Several blood vessels were identified in human pulps and skin. Lymphatic vessels were found in all human skin samples but in none of the pulps examined. Western blotting performed on human dermis and on pulps treated with collagenase (to remove odontoblasts) confirmed these results. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that vessels which, by light microscopy, appeared to be initial lymphatic vessels had no anchoring filaments or discontinuous basement membrane, both of which are typical ultrastructural characteristics of lymphatic vessels. These results suggest that under normal conditions human dental pulp does not contain true lymphatic vessels. The various theories about dental pulp interstitial fluid circulation should be revised accordingly.

  10. Diphtheria toxin–mediated ablation of lymphatic endothelial cells results in progressive lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Gardenier, Jason C.; Hespe, Geoffrey E.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Savetsky, Ira L.; Torrisi, Jeremy S.; Nores, Gabriela D. García; Dayan, Joseph J.; Chang, David; Zampell, Jamie; Martínez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel treatments for lymphedema has been limited by the fact that the pathophysiology of this disease is poorly understood. It remains unknown, for example, why limb swelling resulting from surgical injury resolves initially, but recurs in some cases months or years later. Finding answers for these basic questions has been hampered by the lack of adequate animal models. In the current study, we used Cre-lox mice that expressed the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) driven by a lymphatic-specific promoter in order to noninvasively ablate the lymphatic system of the hind limb. Animals treated in this manner developed lymphedema that was indistinguishable from clinical lymphedema temporally, radiographically, and histologically. Using this model and clinical biopsy specimens, we show that the initial resolution of edema after injury is dependent on the formation of collateral capillary lymphatics and that this process is regulated by M2-polarized macrophages. In addition, we show that despite these initial improvements in lymphatic function, persistent accumulation of CD4+ cells inhibits lymphangiogenesis and promotes sclerosis of collecting lymphatics, resulting in late onset of edema and fibrosis. Our findings therefore provide strong evidence that inflammatory changes after lymphatic injury play a key role in the pathophysiology of lymphedema. PMID:27699240

  11. The Use of Efficient Broadcast Protocols in Asynchronous Distributed Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmuck, Frank Bernhard

    1988-01-01

    Reliable broadcast protocols are important tools in distributed and fault-tolerant programming. They are useful for sharing information and for maintaining replicated data in a distributed system. However, a wide range of such protocols has been proposed. These protocols differ in their fault tolerance and delivery ordering characteristics. There is a tradeoff between the cost of a broadcast protocol and how much ordering it provides. It is, therefore, desirable to employ protocols that support only a low degree of ordering whenever possible. This dissertation presents techniques for deciding how strongly ordered a protocol is necessary to solve a given application problem. It is shown that there are two distinct classes of application problems: problems that can be solved with efficient, asynchronous protocols, and problems that require global ordering. The concept of a linearization function that maps partially ordered sets of events to totally ordered histories is introduced. How to construct an asynchronous implementation that solves a given problem if a linearization function for it can be found is shown. It is proved that in general the question of whether a problem has an asynchronous solution is undecidable. Hence there exists no general algorithm that would automatically construct a suitable linearization function for a given problem. Therefore, an important subclass of problems that have certain commutativity properties are considered. Techniques for constructing asynchronous implementations for this class are presented. These techniques are useful for constructing efficient asynchronous implementations for a broad range of practical problems.

  12. A simple, effective media access protocol system for integrated, high data rate networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, K.; Overstreet, C. M.; Khanna, S.; Zhang, L.

    1992-01-01

    The operation and performance of a dual media access protocol for integrated, gigabit networks are described. Unlike other dual protocols, each protocol supports a different class of traffic. The Carrier Sensed Multiple Access-Ring Network (CSMA/RN) protocol and the Circulating Reservation Packet (CRP) protocol support asynchronous and synchronous traffic, respectively. The two protocols operate with minimal impact upon each other. Performance information demonstrates that they support a complete range of integrated traffic loads, do not require call setup/termination or a special node for synchronous traffic control, and provide effective pre-use and recovery. The CRP also provides guaranteed access and fairness control for the asynchronous system. The paper demonstrates that the CSMA-CRP system fulfills many of the requirements for gigabit LAN-MAN networks most effectively and simply. To accomplish this, CSMA-CRP features are compared against similar ring and bus systems, such as Cambridge Fast Ring, Metaring, Cyclic Reservation Multiple Access, and Distributed Dual Queue Data Bus (DQDB).

  13. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R.G.; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R.; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  14. Effect of hepatoma H22 on lymphatic endothelium in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hua; Zhou, Hong-Zhi; Wang, Chun-Mei; Gu, Xiao-Ming; Pan, Bo-Rong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of metastatic hepatoma cells on lymphangioma-derived endothelium, and to establish in vitro model systems for assessing metastasis-related response of lymphatic endothelium. METHODS: Benign lymphangioma, induced by intraperitoneal injection of the incomplete Freund’s adjuvant in BALB/c mice, was embedded in fibrin gel or digested and then cultured in the conditioned medium derived from hepatoma H22. Light and electron microscopy, and the transwell migration assay were used to determine the effect of H22 on tissue or cell culture. Expressions of Flt-4, c-Fos, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cultured cells, and content of nitric oxide in culture medium were also examined. RESULTS: The embedded lymphangioma pieces gave rise to array of capillaries, while separated cells from lymphangioma grew to a cobblestone-like monolayer. H22 activated growth and migration of the capillaries and cells, induced expressions of Flt-4, c-Fos, PCNA and iNOS in cultured cells, and significantly increased the content of NO in the culture medium. CONCLUSION: Lymphangioma-derived cells keep the differentiated phenotypes of lymphatic endothelium, and the models established in this study are feasible for in vitro study of metastasis-related response of lymphatic endothelium. PMID:15526361

  15. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Thomas R; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R G; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M; Wilkinson, Robert J; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G

    2016-03-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes.

  16. Study on intralymphatic-targeted hyaluronic acid-modified nanoliposome: influence of formulation factors on the lymphatic targeting.

    PubMed

    Tiantian, Ye; Wenji, Zhang; Mingshuang, Sun; Rui, Yang; Shuangshuang, Song; Yuling, Mao; Jianhua, Yao; Xinggang, Yang; Shujun, Wang; Weisan, Pan

    2014-08-25

    In this study, hyaluronic acid-modified docetaxel-loaded liposomes were prepared to evaluate the lymphatic targeting after subcutaneous administration, and formulation factors affecting the lymphatic targeting were examined, including free hyaluronic acid, molecular weight, hyaluronic acid-density and particle diameter. The high molecular weight hyaluronic acid-modified docetaxel-loaded liposomes (HA-LPs) and low molecular weight hyaluronic acid-modified docetaxel-loaded liposomes (LMWHA-LPs) were prepared via electrostatic attraction. The physicochemical properties and in vitro drug release were evaluated. The lymphatic drainage and the lymph node uptake were investigated by pharmacokinetics and distribution recovery of docetaxel in lymph nodes, injection site and plasma. The lymphatic targeting ability of optimized Cy7-loaded LMWHA-LPs (LMWHA-LPs/Cy7) was evaluated by near-infrared fluorescence imaging technique. The result showed that HA-LPs and LMWHA-LPs with suitable and stable physicochemical properties could be used for in vivo lymphatic targeting studies. Hyaluronic acid-modified liposome significantly increased the docetaxel recovery in lymph nodes, and displayed higher AUC(0-24h) and longer retention time compared to unmodified liposomes in vivo. In contrast, the presence of free hyaluronic acid hindered the lymphatic drainage and increased the plasma-drug concentration. Importantly, LMWHA-modification improved lymphatic drainage and lymph node uptake of liposomes compared with HA-modification. And Lymph node uptake of LMWHA-LPs depended mainly on LMWHA-density instead of particle size. The results of in vivo imaging showed that LMWHA-LPs/Cy7 significantly located in the lymphatic system. And both DTX-loaded and Cy7-loaded LMWHA-LPs had similar and stable lymphatic target level. Our investigation showed that LMWHA-LPs were a highly promising lymphatic targeting carrier for chemotherapy drugs and diagnostic fluorescence agents.

  17. Protocol description and optimization scheduling for multi-fieldbus integration system.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chongquan; Chen, Chen

    2015-11-01

    Device integration technique is applied to integrate different fieldbus devices into one control system. At present mature integration techniques use appropriative software to support corresponding protocols. New software must be developed when a new fieldbus is integrated. In this research, a universal protocol description method is proposed. It focuses on the packets encapsulation description, and different protocol messages can be encapsulated and parsed by the interpreter in a unified way. Moreover, in order to ensure the communication efficiency and QoS of different kinds of messages, packets encapsulated via protocol description are optimized and scheduled before transmission inside the interpreter. The approaches have been applied in the prototype of a software product and verified in a power monitoring project.

  18. An efficient two-tier causal protocol for mobile distributed systems.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Eduardo Lopez; Pomares Hernandez, Saul E; Gomez, Gustavo Rodriguez; Medina, Maria Auxilio

    2013-01-01

    Causal ordering is a useful tool for mobile distributed systems (MDS) to reduce the non-determinism induced by three main aspects: host mobility, asynchronous execution, and unpredictable communication delays. Several causal protocols for MDS exist. Most of them, in order to reduce the overhead and the computational cost over wireless channels and mobile hosts (MH), ensure causal ordering at and according to the causal view of the Base Stations. Nevertheless, these protocols introduce certain disadvantage, such as unnecessary inhibition at the delivery of messages. In this paper, we present an efficient causal protocol for groupware that satisfies the MDS's constraints, avoiding unnecessary inhibitions and ensuring the causal delivery based on the view of the MHs. One interesting aspect of our protocol is that it dynamically adapts the causal information attached to each message based on the number of messages with immediate dependency relation, and this is not directly proportional to the number of MHs.

  19. Protocol: A high-throughput DNA extraction system suitable for conifers

    PubMed Central

    Bashalkhanov, Stanislav; Rajora, Om P

    2008-01-01

    Background High throughput DNA isolation from plants is a major bottleneck for most studies requiring large sample sizes. A variety of protocols have been developed for DNA isolation from plants. However, many species, including conifers, have high contents of secondary metabolites that interfere with the extraction process or the subsequent analysis steps. Here, we describe a procedure for high-throughput DNA isolation from conifers. Results We have developed a high-throughput DNA extraction protocol for conifers using an automated liquid handler and modifying the Qiagen MagAttract Plant Kit protocol. The modifications involve change to the buffer system and improving the protocol so that it almost doubles the number of samples processed per kit, which significantly reduces the overall costs. We describe two versions of the protocol: one for medium-throughput (MTP) and another for high-throughput (HTP) DNA isolation. The HTP version works from start to end in the industry-standard 96-well format, while the MTP version provides higher DNA yields per sample processed. We have successfully used the protocol for DNA extraction and genotyping of thousands of individuals of several spruce and a pine species. Conclusion A high-throughput system for DNA extraction from conifer needles and seeds has been developed and validated. The quality of the isolated DNA was comparable with that obtained from two commonly used methods: the silica-spin column and the classic CTAB protocol. Our protocol provides a fully automatable and cost effective solution for processing large numbers of conifer samples. PMID:18673554

  20. Lymphoedema caused by idiopathic lymphatic thrombus.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hisako; Mihara, Makoto; Seki, Yukio; Koshima, Isao

    2013-12-01

    Primary lymphoedema includes some diseases whose genetic anomaly is detected and others whose pathology is unknown. In this article, we report a lymphatic thrombus found in a limb with lymphoedema during lymphatico-venous anastomosis (LVA). A 32-year-old man was aware of oedema in his left calcar pedis 3 years previously, which appeared without any trigger. Indocyanine green lymphography indicated lymphatic stasis in the left calf and thigh region, and we performed LVA for the patient. During the operation, we found yellow vessels, which were thought to be lymphatic vessels filled with a yellow solid substance, just beneath the superficial fascia at the left ankle. Pathological examination of the thrombi revealed hyaline material mixed with cell components. The cells were categorised as lymphatic endothelial cells, as they were positive for podoplanin. There was no evidence of malignancy. Causes of idiopathic lymphatic thrombus such as this may be one of the causes of so-called primary lymphoedema, and evaluation of such cases may be the first step towards elucidating the mechanisms involved in the development of primary lymphoedema.

  1. Communications protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming (Inventor); Baras, John S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved communications protocol which increases the efficiency of transmission in return channels on a multi-channel slotted Alohas system by incorporating advanced error correction algorithms, selective retransmission protocols and the use of reserved channels to satisfy the retransmission requests.

  2. An Efficient and Secure Certificateless Authentication Protocol for Healthcare System on Wireless Medical Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Wen, Qiaoyan; Jin, Zhengping; Zhang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Sensor networks have opened up new opportunities in healthcare systems, which can transmit patient's condition to health professional's hand-held devices in time. The patient's physiological signals are very sensitive and the networks are extremely vulnerable to many attacks. It must be ensured that patient's privacy is not exposed to unauthorized entities. Therefore, the control of access to healthcare systems has become a crucial challenge. An efficient and secure authentication protocol will thus be needed in wireless medical sensor networks. In this paper, we propose a certificateless authentication scheme without bilinear pairing while providing patient anonymity. Compared with other related protocols, the proposed scheme needs less computation and communication cost and preserves stronger security. Our performance evaluations show that this protocol is more practical for healthcare system in wireless medical sensor networks. PMID:23710147

  3. Cryptanalysis and improvement of authentication and key agreement protocols for telecare medicine information systems.

    PubMed

    Islam, S K Hafizul; Khan, Muhammad Khurram

    2014-10-01

    Recently, many authentication protocols have been presented using smartcard for the telecare medicine information system (TMIS). In 2014, Xu et al. put forward a two-factor mutual authentication with key agreement protocol using elliptic curve cryptography (ECC). However, the authors have proved that the protocol is not appropriate for practical use as it has many problems (1) it fails to achieve strong authentication in login and authentication phases; (2) it fails to update the password correctly in the password change phase; (3) it fails to provide the revocation of lost/stolen smartcard; and (4) it fails to protect the strong replay attack. We then devised an anonymous and provably secure two-factor authentication protocol based on ECC. Our protocol is analyzed with the random oracle model and demonstrated to be formally secured against the hardness assumption of computational Diffie-Hellman problem. The performance evaluation demonstrated that our protocol outperforms from the perspective of security, functionality and computation costs over other existing designs.

  4. A Byzantine-Fault Tolerant Self-Stabilizing Protocol for Distributed Clock Synchronization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2006-01-01

    Embedded distributed systems have become an integral part of safety-critical computing applications, necessitating system designs that incorporate fault tolerant clock synchronization in order to achieve ultra-reliable assurance levels. Many efficient clock synchronization protocols do not, however, address Byzantine failures, and most protocols that do tolerate Byzantine failures do not self-stabilize. Of the Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization algorithms that exist in the literature, they are based on either unjustifiably strong assumptions about initial synchrony of the nodes or on the existence of a common pulse at the nodes. The Byzantine self-stabilizing clock synchronization protocol presented here does not rely on any assumptions about the initial state of the clocks. Furthermore, there is neither a central clock nor an externally generated pulse system. The proposed protocol converges deterministically, is scalable, and self-stabilizes in a short amount of time. The convergence time is linear with respect to the self-stabilization period. Proofs of the correctness of the protocol as well as the results of formal verification efforts are reported.

  5. A new communication protocol family for a distributed spacecraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldi, Andrea; Pace, Marco

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe the concepts behind and architecture of a communication protocol family, which was designed to fulfill the communication requirements of ESOC's new distributed spacecraft control system SCOS 2. A distributed spacecraft control system needs a data delivery subsystem to be used for telemetry (TLM) distribution, telecommand (TLC) dispatch and inter-application communication, characterized by the following properties: reliability, so that any operational workstation is guaranteed to receive the data it needs to accomplish its role; efficiency, so that the telemetry distribution, even for missions with high telemetry rates, does not cause a degradation of the overall control system performance; scalability, so that the network is not the bottleneck both in terms of bandwidth and reconfiguration; flexibility, so that it can be efficiently used in many different situations. The new protocol family which satisfies the above requirements is built on top of widely used communication protocols (UDP and TCP), provides reliable point-to-point and broadcast communication (UDP+) and is implemented in C++. Reliability is achieved using a retransmission mechanism based on a sequence numbering scheme. Such a scheme allows to have cost-effective performances compared to the traditional protocols, because retransmission is only triggered by applications which explicitly need reliability. This flexibility enables applications with different profiles to take advantage of the available protocols, so that the best rate between sped and reliability can be achieved case by case.

  6. A real-time VLC to UART protocol conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian-zhi; Yao, Meng; Cheng, Xiao-hui; Deng, Zhuo-hong

    2016-07-01

    A real-time visible light communication (VLC) to universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter (UART) conversion system is made up of a transmitter with a light emitting diode (LED) and a receiver with a photodiode (PD), by which a VLC system is connected to traditional communication modes, and the data are transferred by wireless visible light. UART packets are converted to light packets by the modulation of a 10 kHz on-off-keying (OOK) light signal, and the data losses in the transportation are avoided by the protection of a data buffer mechanism. The experimental results reveal that the real-time VLC to UART conversion system can provide a real-time VLC transmission way for two UART devices in not less than 10 m at a baud rate not less than 19 200 Bd with stable ambient lighting at the same time.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of lymphatic pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, Christian; Padera, Tim P.; Munn, Lance L.

    2012-02-01

    Lymphatic flow plays an important role in the progress of many diseases, including lymphedema and metastasis. However lymphatic pumping and flow is poorly understood. Here, we present a computer model that is based on biological observations of lymphatic pumping. Fluid flow is simulated by a D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann model. The boundary of the vessels moves according to shear-induced nitric oxide production, and wall motion transfers momentum to the fluid to induce flow. Because the model only includes local properties, it can be highly parallelized. In our case we utilize graphic processors (GPU) to achieve high performance computation. We show that the model provides stable pumping over a wide range of parameter values, with optimum flow achieved in the biological ranges. Furthermore, we investigate the efficiency by analyzing the flow rate and pumping frequency in order to compare the behavior of the model with existing in vivo data.

  8. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Use of Space Link Extension (SLE) Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Cordier, G. R.; Johnson, L. M.; Tillery, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite -- Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Contributing the afternoon orbit & ground system (GS) to replace current NOAA POES Satellites, its sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological & solar-geophysical data. The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), consisting of Command, Control & Communications (C3) and Interface Data Processing (IDP) segments, is developed by Raytheon. CGS now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transferring data between ground facilities, processing them into Environmental Data Records for NOAA & DoD weather centers, and expanding to support JPSS-1 in 2017. CGS Block 2.0 (B2.0) is the recent CDR-approved design to support both the current S-NPP and upcoming JPSS-1 missions. In B2.0, many important improvements were made to evolve CGS C3. One of those improvements is the addition of SLE services. The CCSDS SLE Protocol standard facilitates and significantly improves GS-to-Data Center communications. The CGS SLE architecture provides data reliability and resource scheduling and is scalable to support added missions. The JPSS CGS is a mature, tested solution for supporting operational weather forecasting for civil, military, and international partners as well as climate research. It features a flexible design that handles order-of-magnitude increases in data over legacy satellite ground systems and meets demanding science accuracy needs. The JPSS CGS is expandable to support additional ground station service providers with or without the deployment of additional JPSS ground hardware by using standard SLE Transfer Service protocol and offers opportunities to reduce costs and improve information Integration across missions. The Raytheon-built JPSS CGS provides the full common ground capability, from design and development through operations & sustainment. These features lay the foundation for the CGS future

  9. A Protocol Specification-Based Intrusion Detection System for VoIP and Its Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phit, Thyda; Abe, Kôki

    We propose an architecture of Intrusion Detection System (IDS) for VoIP using a protocol specification-based detection method to monitor the network traffics and alert administrator for further analysis of and response to suspicious activities. The protocol behaviors and their interactions are described by state machines. Traffic that behaves differently from the standard specifications are considered to be suspicious. The IDS has been implemented and simulated using OPNET Modeler, and verified to detect attacks. It was found that our system can detect typical attacks within a reasonable amount of delay time.

  10. Protocol feasibility workflow using an automated multi-country patient cohort system.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rey, Iñaki; Trinczek, Benjamin; Karakoyun, Töresin; Dugas, Martin; Fritz, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    The Electronic Health Record for Clinical Research (EHR4CR) project aims to improve the current process of clinical trials, providing a technological platform that supports the design and execution of trials. For the protocol feasibility scenario, the system currently allows the user to create a set of in-/exclusion criteria to find patients matching these criteria across sites located in several countries. The automated multi-country patient cohort system developed in EHR4CR implies substantial changes on the current protocol feasibility process, which will be reflected in this study.

  11. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of lymphatics in head and neck lymphedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, I.-Chih; Maus, Erik A.; Rasmussen, John C.; Marshall, Milton V.; Fife, Caroline E.; Smith, Latisha A.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of lymphatic disease is complicated and controversial, due in part to the limited understanding of the lymphatic system. Lymphedema (LE) is a frequent complication after surgical resection and radiation treatment in cancer survivors, and is especially debilitating in regions where treatment options are limited. Although some extremity LE can be effectively treated with manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) therapy or compression devices to direct proximal lymph transport, head and neck LE is more challenging, due to complicated geometry and complex lymphatic structure in head and neck region. Herein, we describe the compassionate use of an investigatory technique of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging to understand the lymphatic anatomy and function, and to help direct MLD in a patient with head and neck LE. Immediately after 9 intradermal injections of 25 μg indocyanine green each around the face and neck region, NIR fluorescence images were collected using a custom-built imaging system with diffused excitation light illumination. These images were then used to direct MLD therapy. In addition, 3-dimensional (3D) surface profilometry was used to monitor response to therapy. NIR fluorescence images of functioning lymphatic vessels and abnormal structures were obtained. Precise geometries of facial structures were obtained using 3D profilometry, and detection of small changes in edema between therapy sessions was achieved. NIR fluorescence imaging provides a mapping of lymphatic architecture to direct MLD therapy and thus improve treatment efficacy in the head and neck LE, while 3D profilometry allowed longitudinal assessment of edema to evaluate the efficacy of therapy.

  12. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism after Lymphatic Embolization for Plastic Bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Dori, Yoav; Itkin, Maxim; Licht, Daniel J.; Ichord, Rebecca; Vossough, Arastoo

    2016-01-01

    An adolescent with plastic bronchitis due to congenital heart disease had altered mental status after an interventional lymphatic procedure in which lipiodol contrast was used. Neuroimaging revealed cerebral lipiodol embolization due to direct shunting between lymphatic channels and pulmonary veins. Cerebral lipiodol embolization is a potential neurologic morbidity associated with interventional lymphatic procedures. PMID:27297208

  13. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels.

  14. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y.; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm2) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm2). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:26333787

  15. A time-slotted on-demand routing protocol for mobile ad hoc unmanned vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsmann, J. Hope; Hiromoto, Robert E.; Svoboda, John

    2007-04-01

    Successful deployment of Unmanned Vehicle Systems (UVS) in military operations has increased their popularity and utility. The ability to sustain reliable mobile ad hoc formations dramatically enhances the usefulness and performance of UVS. Formation movement increases the amount of ground coverage in less time, decreases fuel consumption of the individual nodes, and provides an avenue for mission expansion through cooperative maneuvers such as refueling. In this paper, we study the wireless communication demands that arise from formation and maintenance of UVS within the context of a mobile ad hoc network (MANET). A MANET in formation is typically characterized by tradeoffs between network congestion and the ability to maintain useable communication bandwidth. Maintenance of UVS formations requires each node in the network to be peer-aware, which places a heavy demand on inner node communication. In order to mitigate the inner node network congestion, we introduce a time-slotted communication protocol. The protocol assigns time-slots and allows the designated nodes to communicate directly with other peer-nodes. This approach has been introduced within the context of the Time-Slotted Aloha protocol for station-to-station communication. The approach taken here is to embed the time-slotted reservation protocol into a standard on-demand routing protocol to also address the need to reactively and proactively respond to formation maintenance. The time-slotted on-demand routing protocol is shown to eliminate collisions due to route determination and, therefore, enhance quality of service as well as ensure necessary support for formation movement. A worst-case scenario is described and simulations performed to comparatively demonstrate the advantages of the new protocol.

  16. Students' Attitudes toward a Group Coursework Protocol and Peer Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraes, Caroline; Michaelidou, Nina; Canning, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a knowledge gap by presenting an empirical investigation of a group coursework protocol and peer assessment system (GCP&PAS) used in a UK university to support postgraduate marketing students in their assessed group activities. The aim of the research was to examine students' understanding of the GCP&PAS and their…

  17. Implementation of the Commonwealth Teacher Recruitment Protocol: Considering the Education Systems and Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochs, Kimberley

    2007-01-01

    The Commonwealth Teacher Recruitment Protocol (CTRP), adopted by Commonwealth member states in 2004, "aims to balance the rights of teachers to migrate internationally, on a temporary or permanent basis, against the need to protect the integrity of national education systems, and to prevent the exploitation of the scarce human resources of poorer…

  18. Fast equilibration protocol for million atom systems of highly entangled linear polyethylene chains.

    PubMed

    Sliozberg, Yelena R; Kröger, Martin; Chantawansri, Tanya L

    2016-04-21

    Equilibrated systems of entangled polymer melts cannot be produced using direct brute force equilibration due to the slow reptationdynamics exhibited by high molecular weight chains. Instead, these dense systems are produced using computational techniques such as Monte Carlo-Molecular Dynamics hybrid algorithms, though the use of soft potentials has also shown promise mainly for coarse-grained polymeric systems. Through the use of soft-potentials, the melt can be equilibrated via molecular dynamics at intermediate and long length scales prior to switching to a Lennard-Jones potential. We will outline two different equilibration protocols, which use various degrees of information to produce the starting configurations. In one protocol, we use only the equilibrium bond angle, bond length, and target density during the construction of the simulation cell, where the information is obtained from available experimental data and extracted from the force field without performing any prior simulation. In the second protocol, we moreover utilize the equilibrium radial distribution function and dihedral angle distribution. This information can be obtained from experimental data or from a simulation of short unentangled chains. Both methods can be used to prepare equilibrated and highly entangled systems, but the second protocol is much more computationally efficient. These systems can be strictly monodisperse or optionally polydisperse depending on the starting chain distribution. Our protocols, which utilize a soft-core harmonic potential, will be applied for the first time to equilibrate a million particle system of polyethylene chains consisting of 1000 united atoms at various temperatures. Calculations of structural and entanglement properties demonstrate that this method can be used as an alternative towards the generation of entangled equilibrium structures.

  19. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  20. Anti-collision protocols for RFID systems exploiting multi-antenna readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yimin; Amin, Moeness G.

    2009-05-01

    In conventional RFID systems, only one tag can be identified at a time. Tag collisions occur if more than one tag simultaneously occupies the shared RF channel, resulting in low identification efficiency and long delay, particularly when the population of tags is large. In this paper, we propose two RFID anti-collision protocols, both are based on framed slotted ALOHA (FSA), to concurrently identify multiple tags by using a multi-antenna reader. The first one is Blind Identification Protocol, which relies on blind estimation of the channel between the activated tags and the reader and, as such, does not require redesign of the existing RFID tags. The second one is Orthogonal ID-aided Identification Protocol which estimates the channels with the use of temporary orthogonal IDs, which are randomly selected by the tags and are inserted at the head of each tag's reply signal. The use of orthogonal IDs facilitates both the detection of activated tags and the channel estimation. Unlike code division multiple access (CDMA) techniques which rely on the use of excessive bandwidth and require redesign of tags, the proposed protocols use multiple antennas at the reader to support concurrent identification of multiple tags without the requirement of additional bandwidth and no or minimal modifications to the existing tags. As a result, the proposed techniques yield significant improvement of the identification efficiency and reduction of the identification delay. We analyze, in an analytical framework, the identification efficiency of the proposed protocols, and the optimum frame size is derived.

  1. Lymphatic Muscle Cells in Rat Mesenteric Lymphatic Vessels of Various Ages

    PubMed Central

    Bridenbaugh, Eric A.; Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Jupiter, Daniel; Nagai, Takashi; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chatterjee, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent studies on aging-associated changes in mesenteric lymph flow in situ demonstrated predominance of the severe negative chronotropic effect of aging on the contractility of aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLV). At the same time, contraction amplitude of the aged vessels was only slightly diminished by aging and can be rapidly stimulated within 5–15 minutes. However, the detailed quantitative evaluation of potential aging-associated changes in muscle cells investiture in MLV has never been performed. Methods and Results In this study we, for the first time, performed detailed evaluation of muscle cells investiture in MLV in reference to the position of lymphatic valve in different zones of lymphangion within various age groups (3-mo, 9-mo and 24-mo Fischer-344 rats). Using visual and quantitative analyses of the images of MLV immunohistochemically labeled for actin, we confirmed that the zones located close upstream (pre-valve zones) and above lymphatic valves (valve zones) possess the lowest investiture of lymphatic muscle cells. Most of the high muscle cells investiture zones exist downstream to the lymphatic valve (post-valve zones). The muscle cells investiture of these zones is not affected by aging, while pre-valve and valve zones demonstrate significant aging-associated decrease in muscle cells investiture. Conclusions The low muscle cells investiture zones in lymphatic vessels consist of predominantly longitudinally oriented muscle cells which are positioned in pre-valve and valve zones and connect adjacent lymphangions. These cells may provide important functional impact on the biomechanics of the lymphatic valve gating and electrical coupling between lymphangions, while their aging-associated changes may delimit adaptive reserves of aged lymphatic vessels. PMID:23531183

  2. A protocol for geographically randomized snail surveys in schistosomiasis fieldwork using the global positioning system.

    PubMed

    Seto, E; Liang, S; Qiu, D; Gu, X; Spear, R C

    2001-01-01

    A protocol was created for performing geographically randomized snail surveys for schistosomiasis research using the global positioning system (GPS). This protocol differs from traditional surveys in its ability to accurately map and measure the spatial distribution of snail habitat. The protocol was used to map irrigation ditches, the primary habitat for Oncomelania hupensis, in two residence areas in Sichuan Province, China. From the 7,450 meters of mapped ditches, snail surveys were performed at 203 random sites along the ditch network. Of these, 116 (57.1%) sites had snails. The total number of living snails captured was 2,014, resulting in an average snail density of 0.27 snails per linear meter of potential habitat.

  3. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  4. Lymphatic and venous function in lipoedema.

    PubMed

    Harwood, C A; Bull, R H; Evans, J; Mortimer, P S

    1996-01-01

    Lipoedema is a common but infrequently recognized condition causing bilateral enlargement of the legs in women. Although generally considered to be the result of an abnormal deposition of subcutaneous fat with associated oedema, the precise mechanisms responsible for oedema formation have yet to be fully established. In order to evaluate the possible role of lymphatic or venous dysfunction in the pathogenesis of lipoedema, 10 patients were investigated by photoplethysmography (venous function) and quantitative lymphoscintigraphy (lymphatic function). The results were compared with those from patients with primary lymphoedema and those from healthy volunteers. The results demonstrated minor abnormalities of venous function in only two patients. One patient had moderately impaired lymphatic function in both legs and seven patients had a marginal degree of impairment in one or both legs. However, in none of these cases did the impairment attain the low levels seen in true lymphoedema. Lipoedema appears to be a distinct clinical entity best classified as a lipodystrophy rather than a direct consequence of any primary venous or lymphatic insufficiency.

  5. Network, system, and status software enhancements for the autonomously managed electrical power system breadboard. Volume 2: Protocol specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, James W.

    1990-01-01

    This volume (2 of 4) contains the specification, structured flow charts, and code listing for the protocol. The purpose of an autonomous power system on a spacecraft is to relieve humans from having to continuously monitor and control the generation, storage, and distribution of power in the craft. This implies that algorithms will have been developed to monitor and control the power system. The power system will contain computers on which the algorithms run. There should be one control computer system that makes the high level decisions and sends commands to and receive data from the other distributed computers. This will require a communications network and an efficient protocol by which the computers will communicate. One of the major requirements on the protocol is that it be real time because of the need to control the power elements.

  6. Label-free 3D imaging of microstructure, blood, and lymphatic vessels within tissue beds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Zhongwei; Jung, Yeongri; Wang, Ruikang K

    2012-03-01

    This Letter reports the use of an ultrahigh resolution optical microangiography (OMAG) system for simultaneous 3D imaging of microstructure and lymphatic and blood vessels without the use of an exogenous contrast agent. An automatic algorithm is developed to segment the lymphatic vessels from the microstructural images based on the fact that the lymph fluid is optically transparent. An OMAG system is developed that utilizes a broadband supercontinuum light source, providing an axial resolution of 2.3 μm and lateral resolution of 5.8 μm, capable of resolving the capillary vasculature and lymphatic vessels innervating microcirculatory tissue beds. Experimental demonstration is performed by showing detailed 3D lymphatic and blood vessel maps, coupled with morphology, within mouse ears in vivo.

  7. Blocking of the Lymphatic Vessel in Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In this case report, we present a case wherein we observed a blocking of lymphatic vessels in indocyanine green lymphography and found a shrunken lymphatic vessel intraoperatively. Methods: We performed indocyanine green lymphography and lymphaticovenous anastomosis on a 77-year-old woman. She had previously undergone right mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection accompanied by radiotherapy and chemotherapy for right breast cancer. She noticed swelling in the right upper limb 22 years after the surgery and consulted our hospital. Although she started wearing elastic sleeve, there was still stiffness in the right upper limb, and we decided to perform lymphaticovenous anastomosis 5 months after the first consultation. Results: In the preoperative indocyanine green lymphography, we observed a linear pattern in the medial side of the right forearm, which suddenly blocked in the middle of the forearm. At that point, we observed dilated lymphatic vessels that were suddenly shrunken at the proximal side intraoperatively. We performed lymphaticovenous anastomosis with the dilated part of this lymphatic vessel. We also performed 4 additional lymphaticovenous anastomoses. The operation time was 2 hours 10 minutes, and the amount of bleeding was minimal. The right upper limb of the patient got softer, and she was satisfied with the result 3 months after the operation. The average circumference change at the 5 points in the right upper limb was −1.26 cm (range, −2.3 to −0.3 cm). Conclusions: There was a possibility that the blocking of the lymphatic vessels was a cause of lymphedema in the upper extremity.

  8. Lymphatic drainage of the liver and its implications in the management of colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Paye, François; Coelho, Fabricio Ferreira; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirolla; Herman, Paulo

    2014-12-01

    The liver is the most common site of distant metastases in patients with colorectal cancer. Surgery represents the mainstream for curative treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) with long-term survival up to 58 and 36 % at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Despite advances on diagnosis, staging and surgical strategies, 60-70 % of patients will develop recurrence of the disease even after R0 resection of CRCLM. Tumor staging, prognosis, and therapeutic approaches for cancer are most often based on the extent of involvement of regional lymph nodes (LNs) and, to a lesser extent, on the invasion of regional lymphatic vessels draining the primary tumor. For CRCLM, the presence of intra hepatic lymphatic and blood vascular dissemination has been associated with an increased risk of intra hepatic recurrence, poorer disease-free and overall survival after liver resection. Also, several studies have reviewed the role of surgery in the patient with concomitant CRCLM and liver pedicle LN metastasis. Although pedicle LN involvement is related to worst survival rates, it does not differentiate patients that will relapse from those that will not. This review aims to briefly describe the anatomy of the liver's lymphatic drainage, the incidence of intrahepatic lymphatic invasion and hilar lymph node involvement, as well as their clinical impact in CRCLM. A better understanding of the role of liver lymphatic metastasis might, in the near future, impact the strategy of systemic therapies after liver resection as for primary colorectal tumors.

  9. A novel treatment for metastatic lymph nodes using lymphatic delivery and photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oladipo, Adewale O.; Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi S.; Songca, Sandile P.; Sukhbaatar, Ariunbuyan; Mori, Shiro; Okajima, Junnosuke; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Systemic delivery of an anti-cancer agent often leads to only a small fraction of the administered dose accumulating in target sites. Delivering anti-cancer agents through the lymphatic network can achieve more efficient drug delivery for the treatment of lymph node metastasis. We show for the first time that polymeric gold nanorods (PAuNRs) can be delivered efficiently from an accessory axillary lymph node to a tumor-containing proper axillary lymph node, enabling effective treatment of lymph node metastasis. In a mouse model of metastasis, lymphatic spread of tumor was inhibited by lymphatic-delivered PAuNRs and near-infrared laser irradiation, with the skin temperature controlled by cooling. Unlike intravenous injection, lymphatic injection delivered PAuNRs at a high concentration within a short period. The results show that lymphatic administration has the potential to deliver anti-cancer agents to metastatic lymph nodes for inhibition of tumor growth and could be developed into a new therapeutic method. PMID:28368042

  10. VEGFR signaling during lymphatic vascular development: From progenitor cells to functional vessels.

    PubMed

    Secker, Genevieve A; Harvey, Natasha L

    2015-03-01

    Lymphatic vessels are an integral component of the cardiovascular system, serving important roles in fluid homeostasis, lipid absorption, and immune cell trafficking. Defining the mechanisms by which the lymphatic vasculature is constructed and remodeled into a functional vascular network not only provides answers to fascinating biological questions, but is fundamental to understanding how lymphatic vessel growth and development goes awry in human pathologies. While long recognized as dysfunctional in lymphedema and exploited as a route of tumor metastasis, recent work has highlighted important roles for lymphatic vessels in modulating immune responses, regulating salt-sensitive hypertension and important for lung inflation at birth. Substantial progress in our understanding of the signaling pathways important for development and morphogenesis of the lymphatic vasculature has been made in recent years. Here, we review advances in our knowledge of the best characterized of these signaling pathways, that involving the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members VEGF-C and VEGF-D, together with their receptors VEGFR2 and VEGFR3. Recent work has defined multiple levels at which signal transduction by means of this key axis is regulated; these include control of ligand processing and bioavailability, modulation of receptor activation by interacting proteins, and regulation of receptor endocytosis and trafficking.

  11. Role of RhoA in regulating the pump function of isolated lymphatics from hemorrhagic shock rats.

    PubMed

    Si, Yong-Hua; Niu, Chun-Yu; Zhao, Zi-Gang; Zhang, Li-Min; Zhang, Yu-Ping

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this present study was to examine changes in RhoA protein levels and the role in RhoA in lymphatic contractility and reactivity after hemorrhagic shock. Levels of RhoA and phospho-RhoA in lymphatic tissue isolated from hemorrhagic shock rats were measured, and the contractility and reactivity to substance P of lymphatics isolated from control rats and rats subjected to shock 0.5 and 2 h were determined with an isolated lymphatic perfusion system at a transmural pressure of 3 cmH2O. At the same time, lymphatics isolated from rats subjected to shock 0.5 and 2 h were incubated with agonists and antagonists of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling. Contractile frequency, end-diastolic and end-systolic diameter, and passive diameter were recorded and used to calculate lymphatic tonic index, contractile amplitude, and fractional pump flow. After stimulation with a gradient of substance P, the differences between the preadministration and postadministration values of contractile frequency, contractile amplitude, tonic index, and fractional pump flow were calculated to further assess lymphatic reactivity. RhoA protein levels were significantly increased at 0.5 h after shock but decreased at 2 and 3 h after shock; p-Rho levels were initially increased after shock and subsequently decreased. The contractility and reactivity of 0.5-h-shocked lymphatics were significantly reduced by the RhoA antagonist C3 transferase and the Rho kinase antagonist Y-27632. The RhoA agonist U-46619 increased the contractility and reactivity of 2-h-shocked lymphatics, whereas Y-27632 suppressed the effect of U-46619. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of myosin light-chain phosphatase, had no effect on the contractility of 2-h-shocked lymphatics, but improved lymphatic reactivity. These results suggest that RhoA is involved in the modulation of lymphatic pump function during hemorrhagic shock and that its effects may be mediated by Rho kinase and MLCP.

  12. Development of a decision support system to predict physicians' rehabilitation protocols for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M; Alshraideh, Mohammad A; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M; Salah, Imad K; Holm, Margo B; Otom, Ali H

    2012-09-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee OA were entered into the MDSS. Demographic variables in the model were age and sex. Clinical variables entered into the model were height, weight, BMI, affected side, severity of knee OA, and severity of pain. All patients in the study received one of three treatment protocols for patients with knee OA: (a) hot packs, followed by electrotherapy and exercise, (b) ice packs, followed by ultrasound and exercise and (c) exercise alone. The resilient back propagation artificial neural network algorithm was used, with a ten-fold cross-validation. It was estimated that the MDSS is able to accurately predict the treatment prescribed by the physician for 87% of the patients. We developed an artificial neural network-based decision support system that can viably aid physicians in determining which treatment protocol would best match the anthropometric and clinical characteristics of patients with knee OA.

  13. Characterization of modems and error correcting protocols using a scintillation playback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Mahon, Rita; Ferraro, Mike S.; Murphy, James L.; Moore, Christopher I.

    2016-03-01

    The performance of free space optical (FSO) communication systems is strongly affected by optical scintillation. Scintillation fades can cause errors when the power on a detector falls below its noise floor, while surges can overload a detector. The very long time scale of scintillation compared to a typical bit in an FSO link means that error-correcting protocols designed for fiber optic links are inappropriate for FSO links. Comparing the performance effects of different components, such as photodetectors, or protocols, such as forward error correction, in the field is difficult because conditions are constantly changing. On the other hand, laboratory-based turbulence simulators, often using hot plates and fans, do not really simulate the effects of long-range propagation through the atmosphere. We have investigated a different approach. Scintillation has been measured during field tests using FSO terminals by sending a continuous wave beam through the atmosphere. A high dynamic range photodetector was digitized at a 10 KHz rate and files of the intensity variations were saved. Many hours of scintillation data under different environmental conditions and at different sites have been combined into a library of data. A fiber-optic based scintillation playback system was then used in the laboratory to test modems and protocols with the recorded files. This allowed comparisons using the same atmospheric conditions allowing optimization of such parameters as detector dynamic range. It also allowed comparison and optimization of different error correcting protocols.

  14. Design of versatile ASIC and protocol tester for CBM readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabołotny, W. M.; Byszuk, A. P.; Emschermann, D.; Gumiński, M.; Juszczyk, B.; Kasiński, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Lehnert, J.; Müller, W. F. J.; Poźniak, K.; Romaniuk, R.; Szczygieł, R.

    2017-02-01

    Silicon Tracking System (STS), Muon Chamber (MUCH) and Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) subdetectors in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) detector system at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) use the same innovative protocol ensuring reliable synchronization of the communication link between the controller and the front-end ASIC, transmission of time-deterministic commands to the ASIC and efficient readout of data. The paper describes the FPGA-based tester platform which can be used both for the verification of the protocol implementation in a front-end ASIC at the design stage, and for testing of the produced ASICs. Due to its modularity, the platform can be easily adapted for different integrated circuits and readout systems.

  15. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Margaris, Konstantinos N; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James; Black, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ -PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ -PIV technique in these vessels.

  16. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaris, Konstantinos N.; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C.; Moore, James; Black, Richard A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ-PIV technique in these vessels.

  17. Permeability and contractile responses of collecting lymphatic vessels elicited by atrial and brain natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J; Huxley, Virginia H

    2013-10-15

    Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP, respectively) are cardiac hormones released into the bloodstream in response to hypervolaemia or fluid shifts to the central circulation. The actions of both peptides include natriuresis and diuresis, a decrease in systemic blood pressure, and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Further, ANP and BNP elicit increases in blood microvessel permeability sufficient to cause protein and fluid extravasation into the interstitium to reduce the vascular volume. Given the importance of the lymphatic vasculature in maintaining fluid balance, we tested the hypothesis that ANP or BNP (100 nM) would likewise elevate lymphatic permeability (Ps) to serum albumin. Using a microfluorometric technique adapted to in vivo lymphatic vessels, we determined that rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic Ps to rat serum albumin increased by 2.0 ± 0.4-fold (P = 0.01, n = 7) and 2.7 ± 0.8-fold (P = 0.07, n = 7) with ANP and BNP, respectively. In addition to measuring Ps responses, we observed changes in spontaneous contraction amplitude and frequency from the albumin flux tracings in vivo. Notably, ANP abolished spontaneous contraction amplitude (P = 0.005) and frequency (P = 0.006), while BNP augmented both parameters by ∼2-fold (P < 0.01 each). These effects of ANP and BNP on contractile function were examined further by using an in vitro assay. In aggregate, these data support the theory that an increase in collecting lymphatic permeability opposes the absorptive function of the lymphatic capillaries, and aids in the retention of protein and fluid in the interstitial space to counteract volume expansion.

  18. An improved authenticated key agreement protocol for telecare medicine information system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenhao; Xie, Qi; Wang, Shengbao; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In telecare medicine information systems (TMIS), identity authentication of patients plays an important role and has been widely studied in the research field. Generally, it is realized by an authenticated key agreement protocol, and many such protocols were proposed in the literature. Recently, Zhang et al. pointed out that Islam et al.'s protocol suffers from the following security weaknesses: (1) Any legal but malicious patient can reveal other user's identity; (2) An attacker can launch off-line password guessing attack and the impersonation attack if the patient's identity is compromised. Zhang et al. also proposed an improved authenticated key agreement scheme with privacy protection for TMIS. However, in this paper, we point out that Zhang et al.'s scheme cannot resist off-line password guessing attack, and it fails to provide the revocation of lost/stolen smartcard. In order to overcome these weaknesses, we propose an improved protocol, the security and authentication of which can be proven using applied pi calculus based formal verification tool ProVerif.

  19. Maximum shortening velocity of lymphatic muscle approaches that of striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongzhen; Taucer, Anne I; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Zawieja, David C; Davis, Michael J

    2013-11-15

    Lymphatic muscle (LM) is widely considered to be a type of vascular smooth muscle, even though LM cells uniquely express contractile proteins from both smooth muscle and cardiac muscle. We tested the hypothesis that LM exhibits an unloaded maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) intermediate between that of smooth muscle and cardiac muscle. Single lymphatic vessels were dissected from the rat mesentery, mounted in a servo-controlled wire myograph, and subjected to isotonic quick release protocols during spontaneous or agonist-evoked contractions. After maximal activation, isotonic quick releases were performed at both the peak and plateau phases of contraction. Vmax was 0.48 ± 0.04 lengths (L)/s at the peak: 2.3 times higher than that of mesenteric arteries and 11.4 times higher than mesenteric veins. In cannulated, pressurized lymphatic vessels, shortening velocity was determined from the maximal rate of constriction [rate of change in internal diameter (-dD/dt)] during spontaneous contractions at optimal preload and minimal afterload; peak -dD/dt exceeded that obtained during any of the isotonic quick release protocols (2.14 ± 0.30 L/s). Peak -dD/dt declined with pressure elevation or activation using substance P. Thus, isotonic methods yielded Vmax values for LM in the mid to high end (0.48 L/s) of those the recorded for phasic smooth muscle (0.05-0.5 L/s), whereas isobaric measurements yielded values (>2.0 L/s) that overlapped the midrange of values for cardiac muscle (0.6-3.3 L/s). Our results challenge the dogma that LM is classical vascular smooth muscle, and its unusually high Vmax is consistent with the expression of cardiac muscle contractile proteins in the lymphatic vessel wall.

  20. An expert system to advise astronauts during experiments: The protocol manager module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymann-Haber, Guido; Colombano, Silvano P.; Groleau, Nicolas; Rosenthal, Don; Szolovits, Peter; Young, Laurence R.

    1990-01-01

    Perhaps the scarcest resource for manned flight experiments - on Spacelab or on the Space Station Freedom - will continue to be crew time. To maximize the efficiency of the crew and to make use of their abilities to work as scientist collaborators as well as equipment operators, normally requires more training in a wide variety of disciplines than is practical. The successful application of on-board expert systems, as envisioned by the Principal Investigator in a Box program, should alleviate the training bottleneck and provide the astronaut with the guidance and coaching needed to permit him or her to operate an experiment according to the desires and knowledge of the PI, despite changes in conditions. The Protocol Manager module of the system is discussed. The Protocol Manager receives experiment data that has been summarized and categorized by the other modules. The Protocol Manager acts on the data in real-time, by employing expert system techniques. Its recommendations are based on heuristics provided by the Principal Investigator in charge of the experiment. This prototype was developed on a Macintosh II by employing CLIPS, a forward-chaining rule-based system, and HyperCard as an object-oriented user interface builder.

  1. Minimally invasive method for determining the effective lymphatic pumping pressure in rats using near-infrared imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Tyler S.; Akin, Ryan E.; Weiler, Michael J.; Kassis, Timothy; Kornuta, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to quantify collecting vessel function in a minimally invasive fashion is crucial to the study of lymphatic physiology and the role of lymphatic pump function in disease progression. Therefore, we developed a highly sensitive, minimally invasive research platform for quantifying the pumping capacity of collecting lymphatic vessels in the rodent tail and forelimb. To achieve this, we have integrated a near-infrared lymphatic imaging system with a feedback-controlled pressure cuff to modulate lymph flow. After occluding lymphatic flow by inflating a pressure cuff on the limb or tail, we gradually deflate the cuff while imaging flow restoration proximal to the cuff. Using prescribed pressure applications and automated image processing of fluorescence intensity levels in the vessels, we were able to noninvasively quantify the effective pumping pressure (Peff, pressure at which flow is restored after occlusion) and vessel emptying rate (rate of fluorescence clearance during flow occlusion) of lymphatics in the rat. To demonstrate the sensitivity of this system to changes in lymphatic function, a nitric oxide (NO) donor cream, glyceryl trinitrate ointment (GTNO), was applied to the tails. GTNO decreased Peff of the vessels by nearly 50% and the average emptying rate by more than 60%. We also demonstrate the suitability of this approach for acquiring measurements on the rat forelimb. Thus, this novel research platform provides the first minimally invasive measurements of Peff and emptying rate in rodents. This experimental platform holds strong potential for future in vivo studies that seek to evaluate changes in lymphatic health and disease. PMID:24430884

  2. Test Protocol for Room-to-Room Distribution of Outside Air by Residential Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Anderson, R.; Hendron, B.; Hancock, E.

    2007-12-01

    This test and analysis protocol has been developed as a practical approach for measuring outside air distribution in homes. It has been used successfully in field tests and has led to significant insights on ventilation design issues. Performance advantages of more sophisticated ventilation systems over simpler, less-costly designs have been verified, and specific problems, such as airflow short-circuiting, have been identified.

  3. Application of a Mechanical Verification System to a High-Speed Transport Protocol.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    The high speed transport protocol, SNR , has never been completely analyzed. SNR’s design incorporates a novel feature, specifically, periodic and...fiber optic networks to increase data transmission rates. Traditional methods used to verify SNR have been largely unsuccessful because of the...called Murphi. The Murphi Verification System is used to verify two phases of SNR , the connection establishment phase and data transfer phase operating

  4. Cardiac mouse lymphatics: developmental and anatomical update.

    PubMed

    Flaht-Zabost, Aleksandra; Gula, Grzegorz; Ciszek, Bogdan; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Jankowska-Steifer, Ewa; Madej, Maria; Niderla-Bielińska, Justyna; Radomska-Leśniewska, Dorota; Ratajska, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The adult mouse heart possesses an extensive lymphatic plexus draining predominantly the subepicardium and the outer layer of the myocardial wall. However, the development of this plexus has not been entirely explored, partially because of the lack of suitable methods for its visualization as well as prolonged lymphatic vessel formation that starts prenatally and proceeds during postnatal stages. Also, neither the course nor location of collecting vessels draining lymph from the mouse heart have been precisely characterized. In this article, we report that murine cardiac lymphatic plexus development that is limited prenatally only to the subepicardial area, postnatally proceeds from the subepicardium toward the myocardial wall with the base-to-apex gradient; this plexus eventually reaches the outer half of the myocardium with a predominant location around branches of coronary arteries and veins. Based on multiple marker immunostaining, the molecular marker-phenotype of cardiac lymphatic endothelial cells can be characterized as: Prox-1(+), Lyve-1(+), VEGFR3(+), Podoplanin(+), VEGFR2(+), CD144(+), Tie2(+), CD31(+), vWF(-), CD34(-), CD133(-). There are two major collecting vessels: one draining the right and left ventricles along the left conal vein and running upwards to the left side of the pulmonary trunk and further to the nearest lymph nodes (under the aortic arch and near the trachea), and the other one with its major branch running along the left cardiac vein and further on the surface of the coronary sinus and the left atrium to paratracheal lymph nodes. The extracardiac collectors gain the smooth muscle cell layer during late postnatal stages.

  5. A lightweight neighbor-info-based routing protocol for no-base-station taxi-call system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xudong; Wang, Jinhang; Chen, Yunchao

    2014-01-01

    Since the quick topology change and short connection duration, the VANET has had unstable routing and wireless signal quality. This paper proposes a kind of lightweight routing protocol-LNIB for call system without base station, which is applicable to the urban taxis. LNIB maintains and predicts neighbor information dynamically, thus finding the reliable path between the source and the target. This paper describes the protocol in detail and evaluates the performance of this protocol by simulating under different nodes density and speed. The result of evaluation shows that the performance of LNIB is better than AODV which is a classic protocol in taxi-call scene.

  6. A Lightweight Neighbor-Info-Based Routing Protocol for No-Base-Station Taxi-Call System

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xudong; Wang, Jinhang; Chen, Yunchao

    2014-01-01

    Since the quick topology change and short connection duration, the VANET has had unstable routing and wireless signal quality. This paper proposes a kind of lightweight routing protocol-LNIB for call system without base station, which is applicable to the urban taxis. LNIB maintains and predicts neighbor information dynamically, thus finding the reliable path between the source and the target. This paper describes the protocol in detail and evaluates the performance of this protocol by simulating under different nodes density and speed. The result of evaluation shows that the performance of LNIB is better than AODV which is a classic protocol in taxi-call scene. PMID:24737984

  7. Design and implementation of an intrusion detection system based on IPv6 protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Li, Zhitang; Li, Yao; Li, Zhanchun

    2005-11-01

    Network intrusion detection systems (NIDS) are important parts of network security architecture. Although many NIDS have been proposed, there is little effort to expand the current set of NIDS to support IPv6 protocol. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Network-based Intrusion Detection System that supports both IPv6 protocol and IPv4 protocol. It characters rules based logging to perform content pattern matching and detect a variety of attacks and probes from IPv4 and IPv6.There are four primary subsystems to make it up: packet capture, packet decoder, detection engine, and logging and alerting subsystem. A new approach to packet capture that combined NAPI with MMAP is proposed in this paper. The test results show that the efficiency of packet capture can be improved significantly by this method. Several new attack tools for IPv6 have been developed for intrusion detection evaluation. Test shows that more than 20 kinds of IPv6 attacks can be detected by this system and it also has a good performance under heavy traffic load.

  8. How size evaluation of lymph node is protocol dependent in MRI when using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehaghaji, Nahideh; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Sarkar, Saeed; Darki, Fahimeh; Beitollahi, Ali

    2009-05-01

    In this study, the volume of susceptibility artifact was evaluated in T1 and T2-weighted spin echo (SE) and gradient echo (GRE) images at various parameters using registration and subtraction methods. In order to state an important misinterpretation problem in lymphography, it was demonstrated that a lymph node size may be enlarged approximately 10 times when a T2*-weighted GRE protocol is used. To overcome this problem a technical consideration using multisequence (GRE and SE) paradigm was suggested to ensure both lymph node detection and metastasis identification in lymphatic system. The paradigm was also extended by post-processing manipulation of the SE images using a registration and subtraction approach for detection of lymphatic lesions.

  9. Lymphatic Filariasis Disseminating to the Upper Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Maldjian, Catherine; Khanna, Vineet; Tandon, Bevan; Then, Matthew; Yassin, Mohamed; Adam, Richard; Klein, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is the most common cause of acquired lymphedema worldwide (Szuba and Rockson, 1998). It is endemic to tropical and subtropical regions, and its effects are devastating. With over 100 million infected persons, it ranks second only to leprosy as the leading cause of permanent and long-term disability. Wuchereria bancrofti is the etiologic agent in 90% of cases. There is a dearth of published MRI findings with pathologically proven active infections, making this entity even more of a diagnostic dilemma. Imaging may provide the first clue that one is dealing with a parasite and may facilitate proper treatment and containment of this disease. This is the first report of pathologic correlation with MRI findings in the extremity in active filariasis. The magnetic resonance images demonstrate an enhancing, infiltrative, mass-like appearance with partial encasement of vasculature that has not been previously described in filariasis. Low signal strands in T2-hyperintense dilated lymphatic channels are seen and may depict live adult worms. We hypothesize that the low signal strands correspond to the collagen rich acellular cuticle. This, in combination with the surrounding hyperintense T2 signal, corresponding to a dilated lymphatic channel, may provide more specific MRI findings for active nematodal infection, which can prompt early biopsy, pathological correlation, and diagnosis. PMID:24707427

  10. Distributed robust finite-time nonlinear consensus protocols for multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zongyu; Tie, Lin

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the robust finite-time consensus problem of multi-agent systems in networks with undirected topology. Global nonlinear consensus protocols augmented with a variable structure are constructed with the aid of Lyapunov functions for each single-integrator agent dynamics in the presence of external disturbances. In particular, it is shown that the finite settling time of the proposed general framework for robust consensus design is upper bounded for any initial condition. This makes it possible for network consensus problems to design and estimate the convergence time offline for a multi-agent team with a given undirected information flow. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of our finite-time protocols.

  11. Tissue Engineering of Dermal Blood and Lymphatic Microvascular Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-06

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This proposal focused on establishing the conditions necessary to induce lymphatic endothelial cell (EC) tube...morphogenesis in 3D collagen matrices with the long-term goal of establishing separate networks of lymphatic tubes and co-existing, but not interconnecting...networks of blood EC-lined tubes. In addition, we hoped that pericytes, which support blood EC tube networks, but not lymphatic vessel networks, would

  12. Delivery of molecules to the lymph node via lymphatic vessels using ultrasound and nano/microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shigeki; Shirai, Yuko; Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2015-05-01

    Lymph node (LN) dissection is the primary option for head and neck cancer when imaging modalities and biopsy confirm metastasis to the sentinel LN. However, there are no effective alternative treatments to dissection for LN metastasis. Here, we describe a novel drug delivery system combining nano/microbubbles (NMBs) with ultrasound (US) that exhibits considerable potential for the delivery of exogenous molecules into LNs through the lymphatic vessels. A solution containing fluorophores (as a model of a therapeutic molecule) and NMBs was injected into the subiliac LNs of MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr mice, which develop systemic swelling of LNs (up to 13 mm in diameter, similar to human LNs). It was found that the NMBs were delivered to the entire area of the proper axillary LN (proper-ALN) via the lymphatic channels and that these were retained there for more than 8 min. Furthermore, exposure to US in the presence of NMBs enhanced the delivery of fluorophores into the lymphocytes near the lymphatic channels, compared with exposure to US in the absence of NMBs. It is proposed that a system using US and NMBs to deliver therapeutic drugs via lymphatic vessels can serve as a new treatment method for LN metastasis.

  13. Implementation of Both High-Speed Transmission and Quality of System for Internet Protocol Multicasting Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Byounghee; Park, Youngchoong; Nahm, Euiseok

    The paper introduces both high-speed transmission and quality of system to offer the Internet services on a HFC (Hybrid Fiber Coaxial) network. This utilizes modulating the phase and the amplitude to the signal of the IPMS (Internet Protocol Multicasting Service). An IP-cable transmitter, IP-cable modem, and IP-cable management servers that support 30-Mbps IPMS on the HFC were developed. The system provides a 21Mbps HDTV transporting stream on a cable TV network. It can sustain a clear screen for a long time.

  14. The county child abuse protocol system in Georgia: an interagency cooperation approach to a complex issue.

    PubMed

    Doss, C B; Idleman, L S

    1994-01-01

    In 1987, the Georgia Legislature mandated that each of its 159 counties establish a formal committee made up of representatives from law enforcement, child protective services, school systems, and county child advocacy groups to handle cases of sexual and physical abuse of children, in an effort to eliminate chronic mishandling of serious cases of abuse caused by the lack of a forum for bureaucratic cooperation. No funding was provided to implement the mandate. This article reports research findings that document the protocol committees' activity levels, discusses changes in organizational patterns brought about by the committee system, and offers insight into the degree to which "mandates without money" can influence organizational cooperation.

  15. Insights into the pathogenesis of disease in human lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Nutman, Thomas B

    2013-09-01

    Although two thirds of the 120 million people infected with lymph-dwelling filarial parasites have subclinical infections, ∼40 million have lymphedema and/or other pathologic manifestations including hydroceles (and other forms of urogenital disease), episodic adenolymphangitis, lymphedema, and (in its most severe form) elephantiasis. Adult filarial worms reside in the lymphatics and lymph nodes and induce lymphatic dilatation. Progressive lymphatic damage and pathology results primarily from the host inflammatory response to the parasites but also perhaps from the host inflammatory response to the parasite's Wolbachia endosymbiont and as a consequence of superimposed bacterial or fungal infections. This review will attempt to shed light on disease pathogenesis in lymphatic filariasis.

  16. The Department of Defense’s Transition of Program of Record (POR) Systems from Internet Protocol Version Four (IPv4) to Internet Protocol Version Six (IPv6)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Protocol IA Information Assurance IANA Internet Assigned Numbers Authority ICANN Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers ICE... ICANN ) is responsible for the global coordination of the Internet’s system of unique identifiers. Unique identifies include domain names like .org...or .museum, and country codes such as .UK .IE. Any new RIR shall, on recognition by ICANN receive an IPv6 allocation from the IANA. A RIR is

  17. Different mechanical loading protocols influence serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels in young healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, A; Kersting, U G; Helling, S; Dargel, J; Maurer, J; Thevis, M; Brüggemann, G-P

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether a relationship between the loading mode of physical activity and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) concentration exists and whether the lymphatic system contributes to COMP release into the serum. Serum COMP levels were determined in healthy male subjects before, after and at 18 further time points within 7 h at four separate experimental days with four different loading interventions. The loading intervention included high impact running exercise, slow but deep knee bends, and lymphatic drainage of 30 min duration, respectively, and a resting protocol. The serum COMP levels were measured using a commercially available quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An increase (p < 0.001) in serum COMP concentration was detected immediately after 30 min running exercise. Slow but deep knee bends did not cause any significant changes in serum COMP levels. Lymphatic drainage also had no effect on the serum COMP concentration. After 30 min of complete rest the serum COMP level was significantly (p = 0.008) reduced. The elevation of COMP serum concentration seems to depend on the loading mode of the physical activity and to reflect the extrusion of COMP fragments from the impact loaded articular cartilage or synovial fluid.

  18. Near-Infrared Fluorescence Lymphatic Imaging to Reconsider Occlusion Pressure of Superficial Lymphatic Collectors in Upper Extremities of Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Vandermeeren, Liesbeth; Vankerckhove, Sophie; Valsamis, Jean-Baptiste; Malloizel-Delaunay, Julie; Moraine, Jean-Jacques; Liebens, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: There are very little scientific data on occlusion pressure for superficial lymphatic collectors. Given its importance in determining the transport capacity of lymphatic vessels, it is crucial to know its value. The novel method of near-infrared fluorescence lymphatic imaging (NIRFLI) can be used to visualize lymphatic flow in real time. The goal of this study was to see if this method could be used to measure the lymphatic occlusion pressure. Methods: We observed and recorded lymph flow in the upper limb of healthy volunteers through a transparent cuff using near-infrared fluorescence lymphatic imaging. After obtaining a baseline of the lymph flow without pressure inside the cuff, the cuff was inflated by increments of 10 mm Hg starting at 30 mm Hg. A NIRFLI guided manual lymphatic drainage technique named “Fill & Flush Drainage Method” was performed during the measurement to promote lymph flow. Lymphatic occlusion pressure was determined by observing when lymph flow stopped under the cuff. Results: We measured the lymphatic occlusion pressure on 30 healthy volunteers (11 men and 19 women). Mean lymphatic occlusion pressure in the upper limb was 86 mm Hg (CI ±3.7 mm Hg, α = 0.5%). No significant differences were found between age groups (p = 0.18), gender (p = 0.12), or limb side (p = 0.85). Conclusions: NIRFLI, a transparent sphygmomanometer cuff and the “Fill and Flush” manual lymphatic drainage method were used to measure the lymphatic occlusion pressure in 30 healthy humans. That combination of these techniques allows the visualization of the lymph flow in real time, while ensuring the continuous filling of the lymph collectors during the measurement session, reducing false negative observations. The measured occlusion pressures are much higher than previously described in the medical literature. PMID:27167187

  19. Protocol for uniformly measuring and expressing the performance of energy storage systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Summer Kamal Rhodes; Rose, David Martin; Schoenwald, David A; Bray, Kathy; Conover, David; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Viswanathan, Vilayanur

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program, through the support of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), facilitated the development of the protocol provided in this report. The focus of the protocol is to provide a uniform way of measuring, quantifying, and reporting the performance of ESSs in various applications; something that does not exist today and, as such, is hampering the consideration and use of this technology in the market. The availability of an application-specific protocol for use in measuring and expressing performance-related metrics of ESSs will allow technology developers, power-grid operators and other end-users to evaluate the performance of energy storage technologies on a uniform and comparable basis. This will help differentiate technologies and products for specific application(s) and provide transparency in how performance is measured. It also will assist utilities and other consumers of ESSs to make more informed decisions as they consider the potential application and use of ESSs, as well as form the basis for documentation that might be required to justify utility investment in such technologies.

  20. Protocol for Uniformly Measuring and Expressing the Performance of Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, Kathryn L.; Conover, David R.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Viswanathan, Vijayganesh; Ferreira, Summer; Rose, David; Schoenwald, David

    2012-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program, through the support of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), facilitated the development of the protocol provided in this report. The focus of the protocol is to provide a uniform way of measuring, quantifying, and reporting the performance of EESs in various applications; something that does not exist today and, as such, is hampering the consideration and use of this technology in the market. The availability of an application-specific protocol for use in measuring and expressing performance-related metrics of ESSs will allow technology developers, power-grid operators and other end-users to evaluate the performance of energy storage technologies on a uniform and comparable basis. This will help differentiate technologies and products for specific application(s) and provide transparency in how performance is measured. It also will assist utilities and other consumers of ESSs make more informed decisions as they consider the potential application and use of ESSs, as well as form the basis for documentation that might be required to justify utility investment in such technologies.

  1. Analysis of energy efficient routing protocols for implementation of a ubiquitous health system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jongwon; Park, Yongman; Koo, Sangjun; Ayurzana, Odgeral; Kim, Hiesik

    2007-12-01

    The innovative Ubiquitous-Health was born through convergence of medical service, with development of up to date information technologies and ubiquitous IT. The U-Health can be applied to a variety of special situations for managing functions of each medical center efficiently. This paper focuses on estimation of various routing protocols for implementation of U-health monitoring system. In order to facilitate wireless communication over the network, a routing protocol on the network layer is used to establish precise and efficient route between sensor nodes so that information acquired from sensors may be delivered in a timely manner. A route establishment should be considered to minimize overhead, data loss and power consumption because wireless networks for U-health are organized by a large number of sensor nodes which are small in size and have limited processing power, memory and battery life. In this paper a overview of wireless sensor network technologies commonly known is described as well as evaluation of three multi hop routing protocols which are flooding, gossiping and modified low energy adaptive clustering hierarchy(LEACH) for use with these networks using TOSSIM simulator. As a result of evaluation the integrated wireless sensor board was developed in particular. The board is embedded device based on AVR128 porting TinyOS. Also it employs bio sensor measures blood pressure, pulse frequency and ZigBee module for wireless communication. This paper accelerates the digital convergence age through continual research and development of technologies related the U-Health.

  2. VehiHealth: An Emergency Routing Protocol for Vehicular Ad Hoc Network to Support Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Bhoi, S K; Khilar, P M

    2016-03-01

    Survival of a patient depends on effective data communication in healthcare system. In this paper, an emergency routing protocol for Vehicular Ad hoc Network (VANET) is proposed to quickly forward the current patient status information from the ambulance to the hospital to provide pre-medical treatment. As the ambulance takes time to reach the hospital, ambulance doctor can provide sudden treatment to the patient in emergency by sending patient status information to the hospital through the vehicles using vehicular communication. Secondly, the experienced doctors respond to the information by quickly sending a treatment information to the ambulance. In this protocol, data is forwarded through that path which has less link breakage problem between the vehicles. This is done by calculating an intersection value I v a l u e for the neighboring intersections by using the current traffic information. Then the data is forwarded through that intersection which has minimum I v a l u e . Simulation results show VehiHealth performs better than P-GEDIR, GyTAR, A-STAR and GSR routing protocols in terms of average end-to-end delay, number of link breakage, path length, and average response time.

  3. Protocol for Detecting the Primo Vascular System in the Lymph Ducts of Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Youn; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2015-12-01

    The primo vascular system (PVS), which is the proposed conduit for the acupuncture Qi, is a complex network distributed throughout an animal's body. However, even with a microscope, it is not easily detectable because of its transparency. Thus, its existence is largely unknown in current anatomy. A convincing demonstration of its existence is needed. The lymph-primo vessel (PV), which is a subsystem of the PVS, is a very effective visual demonstration of the PVS. The lymph-PVS is a mobile threadlike structure floating in lymph ducts that has been observed in rabbits, rats, and mice by several independent teams. The involved techniques are novel and rather complicated; therefore, we have already provided detailed protocols for the surgery; for the injection of the staining dye; and for the detection, extraction, and identification of the PVS in rabbits and rats. However, the mouse is one of the most important laboratory animals used for various biomedical research purposes. For the convenience of researchers who wish to initiate the PVS experiments in mice, we provide a shortened version of the protocol, despite many similarities with previously published protocols. Thus, researcher can easily obtain the samples of the lymph-PVS of mice.

  4. A chronic and latent lymphatic insufficiency follows recovery from acute lymphedema in the rat foreleg

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Uziel; Stroup, Emily M.; Lynch, Laura L.; Waller, Anna B.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema in humans is a common consequence of axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) to treat breast cancer. Remarkably, secondary lymphedema generally first appears following a delay of over a year and can be triggered suddenly by an inflammatory insult. However, it remains unclear why the apparently functional lymphatic system is unable to accommodate an inflammatory trigger. To provide mechanistic insight into the delayed and rapid secondary lymphedema initiation, we compared the ability of the ALND-recovered rat foreleg lymphatic system to prevent edema during an inflammatory challenge with that of the uninjured lymphatic system. At 73 days postsurgery, the forelegs of ALND−- and ALND+-sensitized rats were exposed to the proinflammatory agent oxazolone, which was found to reduce fluid drainage and increase skin thickness in both ALND− and ALND+ forelegs (P < 0.05). However, drainage in the ALND-recovered forelegs was more severely impaired than ALND− forelegs, as visualized by indocyanine green lymphography and quantified by interstitial transport of fluid marker (P < 0.05). Although both ALND+ and ALND− forelegs experienced significant inflammation-induced edema with the oxazolone exposure (P < 0.05), the peak tissue swelling in the ALND+ group was significantly greater than that of the ALND− forelegs (arm area peaked at ∼13.4 vs. ∼5.7% swelling, respectively, P < 0.005; wrist diameter peaked at 9.7 vs. 2.2% swelling, respectively, P < 0.005). The findings demonstrate that outward recovery from ALND in the rat foreleg masks an ensuing chronic and latent lymphatic insufficiency, which reduces the ability of the foreleg lymphatic system to prevent edema during an acute inflammatory process. PMID:22942182

  5. Evaluation of a new system for chest tomosynthesis: aspects of image quality of different protocols determined using an anthropomorphic phantom

    PubMed Central

    Sundin, A; Aspelin, P; Båth, M; Nyrén, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality obtained with the different protocols in a new chest digital tomosynthesis (DTS) system. Methods: A chest phantom was imaged with chest X-ray equipment with DTS. 10 protocols were used, and for each protocol, nine acquisitions were performed. Four observers visually rated the quality of the reconstructed section images according to pre-defined quality criteria in four different classes. The data were analysed with visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis, using the vendor-recommended protocol [12-s acquisition time, source-to-image distance (SID) 180 cm] as reference, and the area under the VGC curve (AUCVGC) was determined for each protocol and class of criteria. Results: Protocols with a smaller swing angle resulted in a lower image quality for the classes of criteria “disturbance” and “homogeneity in nodule” but a higher image quality for the class “structure”. The class “demarcation” showed little dependency on the swing angle. All protocols but one (6.3 s, SID 130 cm) obtained an AUCVGC significantly <0.5 (indicating lower quality than reference) for at least one class of criteria. Conclusion: The study indicates that the DTS protocol with 6.3 s yields image quality similar to that obtained with the vendor-recommended protocol (12 s) but with the clinically important advantage for patients with respiratory impairment of a shorter acquisition time. Advances in knowledge: The study demonstrates that the image quality may be strongly affected by the choice of protocol and that the vendor-recommended protocol may not be optimal. PMID:26118300

  6. A Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis Management Protocol Incorporating a Two-Bag Intravenous Fluid System Decreases Duration of Intravenous Insulin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Kourtney; Norman, Susan; Brock, Michael Alan; Peng, Monica; Shenk, Jennifer; Chen, Jerome Gene

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes. We implemented a standardized DKA management protocol by using a 2-bag intravenous (IV) fluid system. The purpose of the study was to examine if the protocol improved clinical outcomes and process efficiency. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients who did and did not undergo the protocol. Patients were included if they were 18 years of age or younger, were diagnosed with DKA, admitted to an intensive care unit or stepdown unit, and received continuous IV insulin. RESULTS: Of 119 encounters evaluated, 46 (38.7%) received treatment with the protocol and 73 (61.3%) did not. The median time to normalization of ketoacidosis was 9 hours (IQR 5–12) and 9 hours (IQR 6.5–13) for protocol and non-protocol groups, respectively (p = 0.14). The median duration of IV insulin therapy was 16.9 hours (IQR 13.7–21.5) vs. 21 hours (IQR 15.3–26) for protocol and non-protocol groups (p = 0.03). The median number of adjustments to insulin drip rate was 0 (IQR 0–1) and 2 (IQR 0–3) for protocol and non-protocol groups (p = 0.0001). There was no difference in the incidence of hypokalemia, hypoglycemia, or cerebral edema. CONCLUSIONS: The protocol did not change time to normalization of ketoacidosis but did decrease the duration of insulin therapy, number of adjustments to insulin drip rate, and number of wasted IV fluid bags without increasing the incidence of adverse events. PMID:28018153

  7. A Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis Management Protocol Incorporating a Two-Bag Intravenous Fluid System Decreases Duration of Intravenous Insulin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Veverka, Megan; Marsh, Kourtney; Norman, Susan; Brock, Michael Alan; Peng, Monica; Shenk, Jennifer; Chen, Jerome Gene

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes. We implemented a standardized DKA management protocol by using a 2-bag intravenous (IV) fluid system. The purpose of the study was to examine if the protocol improved clinical outcomes and process efficiency. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients who did and did not undergo the protocol. Patients were included if they were 18 years of age or younger, were diagnosed with DKA, admitted to an intensive care unit or stepdown unit, and received continuous IV insulin. RESULTS: Of 119 encounters evaluated, 46 (38.7%) received treatment with the protocol and 73 (61.3%) did not. The median time to normalization of ketoacidosis was 9 hours (IQR 5-12) and 9 hours (IQR 6.5-13) for protocol and non-protocol groups, respectively (p = 0.14). The median duration of IV insulin therapy was 16.9 hours (IQR 13.7-21.5) vs. 21 hours (IQR 15.3-26) for protocol and non-protocol groups (p = 0.03). The median number of adjustments to insulin drip rate was 0 (IQR 0-1) and 2 (IQR 0-3) for protocol and non-protocol groups (p = 0.0001). There was no difference in the incidence of hypokalemia, hypoglycemia, or cerebral edema. CONCLUSIONS: The protocol did not change time to normalization of ketoacidosis but did decrease the duration of insulin therapy, number of adjustments to insulin drip rate, and number of wasted IV fluid bags without increasing the incidence of adverse events.

  8. The Mesenteric Lymph Duct Cannulated Rat Model: Application to the Assessment of Intestinal Lymphatic Drug Transport

    PubMed Central

    Trevaskis, Natalie L.; Hu, Luojuan; Caliph, Suzanne M.; Han, Sifei; Porter, Christopher J.H.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal lymphatic system plays key roles in fluid transport, lipid absorption and immune function. Lymph flows directly from the small intestine via a series of lymphatic vessels and nodes that converge at the superior mesenteric lymph duct. Cannulation of the mesenteric lymph duct thus enables the collection of mesenteric lymph flowing from the intestine. Mesenteric lymph consists of a cellular fraction of immune cells (99% lymphocytes), aqueous fraction (fluid, peptides and proteins such as cytokines and gut hormones) and lipoprotein fraction (lipids, lipophilic molecules and apo-proteins). The mesenteric lymph duct cannulation model can therefore be used to measure the concentration and rate of transport of a range of factors from the intestine via the lymphatic system. Changes to these factors in response to different challenges (e.g., diets, antigens, drugs) and in disease (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, diabetes) can also be determined. An area of expanding interest is the role of lymphatic transport in the absorption of orally administered lipophilic drugs and prodrugs that associate with intestinal lipid absorption pathways. Here we describe, in detail, a mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model which enables evaluation of the rate and extent of lipid and drug transport via the lymphatic system for several hours following intestinal delivery. The method is easily adaptable to the measurement of other parameters in lymph. We provide detailed descriptions of the difficulties that may be encountered when establishing this complex surgical method, as well as representative data from failed and successful experiments to provide instruction on how to confirm experimental success and interpret the data obtained. PMID:25866901

  9. Analysis of Existing Privacy-Preserving Protocols in Domain Name System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fangming; Hori, Yoshiaki; Sakurai, Kouichi

    In a society preoccupied with gradual erosion of electronic privacy, loss of privacy in the current Domain Name System is an important issue worth considering. In this paper, we first review the DNS and some security & privacy threats to make average users begin to concern about the significance of privacy preservation in DNS protocols. Then, by an careful survey of four noise query generation based existing privacy protection approaches, we analyze some benefits and limitations of these proposals in terms of both related performance evaluation results and theoretic proofs. Finally, we point out some problems that still exist for research community's continuing efforts in the future.

  10. Monitoring of small lymphatics function under different impact on animal model by integrated optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Chowdhury, Parimal; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2004-08-01

    The digital transmission microscopy is very informative, noninvasive for vessels, simple and available method for studying and measuring lymph microvessels function in vivo. Rat mesentery can use as promising animal model of lymph microvessels in vivo. Such imaging system allowed visualizing the entire lymphangion (with input and output valves), its wall, lymphatic valves, lymph flow as well as single cells in flow; obtaining anew basic information on lymph microcirculation and quantitative data on lymphatic function including indexes of phasic contractions and valve function, the quantitative parameters of lymph-flow velocity. Rat mesentery is good model to create different types of lymphedemas in acute and chronic experiments. The obtained data revealed that significant edema started immediately after lymph node dissection in one-half of cases and was accompanied by lymphatic disturbances. The greatest degree of edema was found after 1 week. After 4 weeks, the degree of edema sometimes decreased, but functional lymphatic disturbances progressed. Nicotine had significant direct dose-dependent effect on microlymphatic function at the acute local application, but the same dose of this drug was not effect on microcirculation in chronic intoxication. Despite yielding interesting data, transmittance microscopy had some limitations when applied to microcirculation studies. The problems could be solved at the application of integrated measuring technique.

  11. Lymph Nodes and Cancer Metastasis: New Perspectives on the Role of Intranodal Lymphatic Sinuses

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Rui-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system is essential for transporting interstitial fluid, soluble antigen, and immune cells from peripheral tissues to lymph nodes (LNs). Functional integrity of LNs is dependent on intact lymphatics and effective lymph drainage. Molecular mechanisms that facilitate interactions between tumor cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) during tumor progression still remain to be identified. The cellular and molecular structures of LNs are optimized to trigger a rapid and efficient immune response, and to participate in the process of tumor metastasis by stimulating lymphangiogenesis and establishing a premetastatic niche in LNs. Several molecules, e.g., S1P, CCR7-CCL19/CCL21, CXCL12/CXCR4, IL-7, IFN-γ, TGF-β, and integrin α4β1 play an important role in controlling the activity of LN stromal cells including LECs, fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) and follicular dendritic cells (DCs). The functional stromal cells are critical for reconstruction and remodeling of the LN that creates a unique microenvironment of tumor cells and LECs for cancer metastasis. LN metastasis is a major determinant for the prognosis of most human cancers and clinical management. Ongoing work to elucidate the function and molecular regulation of LN lymphatic sinuses will provide insight into cancer development mechanisms and improve therapeutic approaches for human malignancy. PMID:28036019

  12. Transport in lymphatic capillaries. I. Macroscopic measurements using residence time distribution theory.

    PubMed

    Swartz, M A; Berk, D A; Jain, R K

    1996-01-01

    We present a novel integrative method for characterizing transport in the lymphatic capillaries in the tail of the anesthetized mouse, which is both sensitive and reproducible for quantifying uptake and flow. Interstitially injected, fluorescently labeled macromolecules were used to visualize and quantify these processes. Residence time distribution (RTD) theory was employed to measure net flow velocity in the lymphatic network as well as to provide a relative measure of lymphatic uptake of macromolecules from the interstitium. The effects of particle size and injection pressure were determined. The uptake rate was found to be independent of particle size in the range of a 6- to 18-nm radius; beyond this size, the interstitial matrix seemed to pose a greater barrier. A comparison of 10 vs. 40 cmH2O injection pressure showed a significant influence on the relative uptake rate but not on the net velocity within the network (3.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 3.8 +/- 1.0 micron/s). This suggested the presence of a systemic driving force for baseline lymph propulsion that is independent of the local pressure gradients driving the uptake. This model can be used to examine various aspects of transport physiology of the initial lymphatics.

  13. Ultrasound Imaging System Implementation and Ignition Protocol for the Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, David C.; Anthenien, Ralph A.; Roslon, Mark; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Urban, David L.

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment is a study of the smolder characteristics of porous combustible materials in a microgravity environment. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smolder, both in microgravity and normal earth gravity. Experiments have been conducted aboard the NASA Space Shuttle in the Get Away Special Canister (GAS-CAN), an apparatus requiring completely remote operation. Future GAS-CAN experiments will utilize an ultrasound imaging system (UIS) which has been incorporated into the MSC experimental apparatus. Thermocouples are currently used to measure temperature and reaction front velocities. A less intrusive method is desirable, however, as smolder is a very weak reaction and it has been found that heat transfer along the thermocouple is sufficient to affect the smolder reaction. It is expected that the UIS system will eventually replace the existing array of thermocouples as a non-intrusive technique without compromising data acquisition. The UIS measures line of sight permeability, providing information about the reaction front position and extent. Additionally, the ignition sequence of the MSC experiments has been optimized from previous experiments to provide longer periods of self-supported smolder. An ignition protocol of a fixed power to the igniter for a fixed time is now implemented. This, rather than a controlled temperature profile ignition protocol at the igniter surface, along with the UIS system, will allow for better study of the effect of gravity on a smolder reaction.

  14. Closed System Cell Culture Protocol Using HYPERStack Vessels with Gas Permeable Material Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Mark; Martin, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Large volume adherent cell culture is currently standardized on stacked plate cell growth products when microcarrier beads are not an optimal choice. HYPERStack vessels allow closed system scale up from the current stacked plate products and delivers >2.5X more cells in the same volumetric footprint. The HYPERStack vessels function via gas permeable material which allows gas exchange to occur, therefore eliminating the need for internal headspace within a vessel. The elimination of headspace allows the compartment where cell growth occurs to be minimized to reduce space, allowing more layers of cell growth surface area within the same volumetric footprint. For many applications such as cell therapy or vaccine production, a closed system is required for cell growth and harvesting. The HYPERStack vessel allows cell and reagent addition and removal via tubing from media bags or other methods. This protocol will explain the technology behind the gas permeable material used in the HYPERStack vessels, gas diffusion results to meet the metabolic needs of cells, closed system cell growth protocols, and various harvesting methods. PMID:21189467

  15. Blood flow reprograms lymphatic vessels to blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Yu; Bertozzi, Cara; Zou, Zhiying; Yuan, Lijun; Lee, John S.; Lu, MinMin; Stachelek, Stan J.; Srinivasan, Sathish; Guo, Lili; Vincente, Andres; Mericko, Patricia; Levy, Robert J.; Makinen, Taija; Oliver, Guillermo; Kahn, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Human vascular malformations cause disease as a result of changes in blood flow and vascular hemodynamic forces. Although the genetic mutations that underlie the formation of many human vascular malformations are known, the extent to which abnormal blood flow can subsequently influence the vascular genetic program and natural history is not. Loss of the SH2 domain–containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76) resulted in a vascular malformation that directed blood flow through mesenteric lymphatic vessels after birth in mice. Mesenteric vessels in the position of the congenital lymphatic in mature Slp76-null mice lacked lymphatic identity and expressed a marker of blood vessel identity. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that this change in vessel identity was the result of lymphatic endothelial cell reprogramming rather than replacement by blood endothelial cells. Exposure of lymphatic vessels to blood in the absence of significant flow did not alter vessel identity in vivo, but lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to similar levels of shear stress ex vivo rapidly lost expression of PROX1, a lymphatic fate–specifying transcription factor. These findings reveal that blood flow can convert lymphatic vessels to blood vessels, demonstrating that hemodynamic forces may reprogram endothelial and vessel identity in cardiovascular diseases associated with abnormal flow. PMID:22622036

  16. Experimental chemotherapy of lymphatic filariasis. A review.

    PubMed

    Mak, J W; Navaratnam, V; Ramachandran, C P

    1991-02-01

    An intense global collaborative effort under the leadership of the Steering Committee of the Filariasis Scientific Working Group of the Tropical Diseases Research Programme, World Health Organization, has brought together researchers, pharmaceutical chemists and clinicians in the development and search for antifilarial compounds which are more effective and more convenient to administer than diethylcarbamazine citrate, the current drug of choice for lymphatic filariasis. The Brugia spp.-rodent model has been used extensively for the primary screening and B. pahangi infections in the dog or cat for the secondary screening, of potential filaricides. Recently, the leaf-monkey (Presbytis spp.) infected with subperiodic B. malayi or Wuchereria kalimantani has been used for the tertiary evaluation and pharmacokinetic studies of compounds which have shown effectiveness in the primary and secondary screens. Both P. cristata and P. melalophos are extremely susceptible to subperiodic B. malayi infection, but the former is a better host as a higher peak microfilaremia and adult worm recovery rate were obtained. Although more than 30 potential filaricides have been evaluated in the tertiary screen, only a few compounds have shown some promise against lymphatic filariasis. CGP 20376, a 5-methoxyl-6-dithiocarbamic-S-(2-carboxy-ethyl) ester derivative of benzothiazole, had complete adulticidal and microfilaricidal activities against the parasite at a single oral dose of 20 mg kg-1. However, as the compound or its metabolites caused hepatotoxicity, its clinical use in the present formulation is not recommended.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Lymphatic mapping for upper gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yuko; Kitajima, Masaki

    2004-06-01

    Recent studies on lymphatic mapping of upper gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies have provided new insights with regard to the sentinel node (SN) concept in solid tumors. At present, the SN concept seems to be valid not only for breast cancer, but also for esophageal and gastric cancers, which have multidirectional and complicated lymphatic flows. In addition to the staging merits, individualized surgical management has been proposed for upper GI cancer based on the SN concept. Gastric cancer is now a suitable target of SN-guided surgery after breast cancer because of its anatomical situation. Laparoscopic local resection is theoretically feasible for curative treatment of SN-negative early gastric cancer. Because SNs in esophageal cancer are multiple and widespread, complete sampling of SNs is not a minimally invasive procedure, as it is in breast cancer. However, selective and modified lymphadenectomy targeting SNs for clinically N0 esophageal cancer instead of three-field lymph node dissection should become not only feasible but also clinically important. When performing chemoradiotherapy as curative treatment for cT1N0 esophageal cancer, lymphoscintigrams revealing the distribution of SNs in each individual case are useful to tailor the field of irradiation to control occult micrometastases. Although there are several issues to be resolved, this novel procedure has the potential to improve quality control in upper GI cancer.

  18. Lymphatic albumin clearance from psoriatic skin

    SciTech Connect

    Staberg, B.; Klemp, P.; Aasted, M.; Worm, A.M.; Lund, P.

    1983-12-01

    In nine patients with untreated psoriasis vulgaris, human serum albumin labelled with /sup 125/I or /sup 131/I was injected intradermally in symmetrically located involved and uninvolved skin. The activity of the depots was followed by external detection, and the arrival of labelled albumin in plasma was monitored. In involved psoriatic skin the local mean half-time (T1/2) for tracer disappearance was 20.8 +/- 8.2 (S.D.) hr and in clinically normal skin, 29.1 +/- 9.6 (S.D.) hr. The difference was significant (p less than 0.002). Accordingly, the tracer from involved skin reached higher plasma levels than the tracer from uninvolved skin. However, under slight lymphatic stasis the appearance rate of radiolabelled albumin in plasma from both tissues was minimal during 1 to 2 hours after the injection, indicating that a local direct transvascular drainage of plasma albumin from the interstitium of diseased and normal skin was negligible. We conclude that the previously demonstrated increased extravasation of plasma proteins in involved psoriatic skin is compensated by an increased lymphatic drainage of plasma proteins, and not by an increased local transvascular return.

  19. FLOSYS--a web-accessible workflow system for protocol-driven biomolecular sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Badidi, E; Lang, B F; Burger, G

    2004-11-01

    FLOSYS is an interactive web-accessible bioinformatics workflow system designed to assist biologists in multi-step data analyses. FLOSYS allows the user to create complex analysis pathways (protocols) graphically, similar to drawing a flowchart: icons representing particular bioinformatics tools are dragged and dropped onto a canvas and lines connecting those icons are drawn to specify the relationships between the tools. In addition, FLOSYS permits to select input-data, execute the protocol and store the results in a personal workspace. The three-tier architecture of FLOSYS has been implemented in Java and uses a relational database system together with new technologies for distributed and web computing such as CORBA, RMI, JSP and JDBC. The prototype of FLOSYS, which is part of the bioinformatics workbench AnaBench, is accessible on-line at http://malawimonas.bcm.umontreal.ca: 8091/anabench. The entire package is available on request to academic groups who wish to have a customized local analysis environment for research or teaching.

  20. A CAD system and quality assurance protocol for bone age assessment utilizing digital hand atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertych, Arakadiusz; Zhang, Aifeng; Ferrara, Benjamin; Liu, Brent J.

    2007-03-01

    Determination of bone age assessment (BAA) in pediatric radiology is a task based on detailed analysis of patient's left hand X-ray. The current standard utilized in clinical practice relies on a subjective comparison of the hand with patterns in the book atlas. The computerized approach to BAA (CBAA) utilizes automatic analysis of the regions of interest in the hand image. This procedure is followed by extraction of quantitative features sensitive to skeletal development that are further converted to a bone age value utilizing knowledge from the digital hand atlas (DHA). This also allows providing BAA results resembling current clinical approach. All developed methodologies have been combined into one CAD module with a graphical user interface (GUI). CBAA can also improve the statistical and analytical accuracy based on a clinical work-flow analysis. For this purpose a quality assurance protocol (QAP) has been developed. Implementation of the QAP helped to make the CAD more robust and find images that cannot meet conditions required by DHA standards. Moreover, the entire CAD-DHA system may gain further benefits if clinical acquisition protocol is modified. The goal of this study is to present the performance improvement of the overall CAD-DHA system with QAP and the comparison of the CAD results with chronological age of 1390 normal subjects from the DHA. The CAD workstation can process images from local image database or from a PACS server.

  1. Localization and proliferation of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane in normal state and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Takenori; Burford, James L; Hong, Young-Kwon; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Mori, Nozomu; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2013-10-25

    We clarified the localization of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane and proliferation of lymphatic vessels during regeneration after perforation of the tympanic membrane by using whole-mount imaging of the tympanic membrane of Prox1 GFP mice. In the pars tensa, lymphatic vessel loops surrounded the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. Apart from these locations, lymphatic vessel loops were not observed in the pars tensa in the normal tympanic membrane. Lymphatic vessel loops surrounding the malleus handle were connected to the lymphatic vessel loops in the pars flaccida and around the tensor tympani muscle. Many lymphatic vessel loops were detected in the pars flaccida. After perforation of the tympanic membrane, abundant lymphatic regeneration was observed in the pars tensa, and these regenerated lymphatic vessels extended from the lymphatic vessels surrounding the malleus at day 7. These results suggest that site-specific lymphatic vessels play an important role in the tympanic membrane.

  2. Defining the cost of the Egyptian lymphatic filariasis elimination programme

    PubMed Central

    Ramzy, Reda MR; Goldman, Ann S; Kamal, Hussein A

    2005-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is targeted for global elimination. LF elimination programmes in different countries, including Egypt, are supported financially by national and international agencies. The national programme in Egypt is based on mass drug administration (MDA) of an annual dose of a combination of 2 drugs (DEC and albendazole) to all endemic villages. This study aimed primarily to estimate the Total and Government costs of two rounds of MDA conducted in Egypt in 2000 and 2001, the average cost per person treated, and the cost share of the different programme partners. Methods The Total costs reflect the overall annual costs of the MDA programme, and we defined Government costs as those expenditures made by the Egyptian government to develop, implement and sustain the MDA programmes. We used a generic protocol developed in coordination with the Emory Lymphatic Filariasis Support Center. Our study was concerned with all costs to the government, donors and other implementing parties. Cost data were retrospectively gathered from local, regional and national Ministry of Health and Population records. The total estimates for each governorate were based on data from a representative district for the governorate; these were combined with national programme data for a national estimate. Results The overall Total and Government costs for treating approximately 1,795,553 individuals living in all endemic villages in the year 2000 were US $3,181,000 and US $2,412,000, respectively. In 2001, the number of persons treated increased (29%) and the Total costs were US $3,109,000 while Government costs were US $2,331,000. In 2000, the average Total and Government costs per treated subject were US $1.77 and $1.34, respectively, however, these costs decreased to US $1.34 and $1.00, respectively in 2001. The coverage rate was 86.0% in 2000 and it increased to 88.0% in 2001. Conclusion The Egyptian government provided 75.8% of all resources, as reflected in the Total

  3. Utilization of Internet Protocol-Based Voice Systems in Remote Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, jim; Bradford, Bob; Best, Susan; Nichols, Kelvin

    2002-01-01

    Due to limited crew availability to support science and the large number of experiments to be operated simultaneously, telescience is key to a successful International Space Station (ISS) science program. Crew, operations personnel at NASA centers, and researchers at universities and companies around the world must work closely together to per orm scientific experiments on-board ISS. The deployment of reliable high-speed Internet Protocol (IP)-based networks promises to greatly enhance telescience capabilities. These networks are now being used to cost-effectively extend the reach of remote mission support systems. They reduce the need for dedicated leased lines and travel while improving distributed workgroup collaboration capabilities. NASA has initiated use of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) to supplement the existing mission voice communications system used by researchers at their remote sites. The Internet Voice Distribution System (IVoDS) connects remote researchers to mission support "loopsll or conferences via NASA networks and Internet 2. Researchers use NODS software on personal computers to talk with operations personnel at NASA centers. IVoDS also has the ;capability, if authorized, to allow researchers to communicate with the ISS crew during experiment operations. NODS was developed by Marshall Space Flight Center with contractors & Technology, First Virtual Communications, Lockheed-Martin, and VoIP Group. NODS is currently undergoing field-testing with full deployment for up to 50 simultaneous users expected in 2002. Research is being performed in parallel with IVoDS deployment for a next-generation system to qualitatively enhance communications among ISS operations personnel. In addition to the current voice capability, video and data/application-sharing capabilities are being investigated. IVoDS technology is also being considered for mission support systems for programs such as Space Launch Initiative and Homeland Defense.

  4. Effect of abdominal surgery on the intestinal absorption of lipophilic drugs: possible role of the lymphatic transport.

    PubMed

    Gershkovich, Pavel; Itin, Constantin; Yacovan, Avihai; Amselem, Shimon; Hoffman, Amnon

    2009-06-01

    Although abdominal surgery is a routine procedure in clinical practice and in preclinical investigation, little is known regarding its effect on the intestinal absorption of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of abdominal surgery on the intestinal absorption of highly lipophilic compounds with different absorption mechanisms following oral administration. The 2 compounds that were tested were biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) class 2 model lipophilic cannabinoid derivatives, dexanabinol and PRS-211,220. Although dexanabinol is mostly absorbed via passive diffusion to the portal blood, PRS-211,220 is absorbed mostly via lymphatic transport. In this work, we compared the absorption of these compounds after abdominal surgery in rat with the absorption data obtained from naïve animals. The outcomes of this investigation showed that the abdominal surgery mostly affected the absorption process on the preenterocyte level, as indicated by the 2-fold increase in the extent of intestinal absorption of dexanabinol, which is a compound with a low degree of intestinal lymphatic transport. However, the lymphatic transport was not affected by the surgical procedure as evident by the absence of change in the extent of absorption of PRS-211,220, which is transported to the systemic circulation mainly by intestinal lymphatics. In conclusion, abdominal surgery can significantly affect the intestinal absorption of lipophilic drugs; however, intestinal lymphatic transport seems to be less affected by the abdominal surgery.

  5. An evaluation plan of bus architectures and protocols using the NASA Ames intelligent redundant actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defeo, P.; Chen, M.

    1987-01-01

    Means for evaluating data bus architectures and protocols for highly integrated flight control system applications are needed. Described are the criteria and plans to do this by using the NASA/Ames Intelligent Redundant Actuation System (IRAS) experimental set-up. Candidate bus architectures differ from one another in terms of: topology, access control, message transfer schemes, message characteristics, initialization. data flow control, transmission rates, fault tolerance, and time synchronization. The evaluation criteria are developed relative to these features. A preliminary, analytical evaluation of four candidate busses (MIL-STD-1553B, DATAC, Ethernet, and HSIS) is described. A bus must be exercised in a real-time environment to evaluate its dynamic characteristics. A plan for real-time evaluation of these four busses using a combination of hardware and simulation techniques is presented.

  6. Evaluation of a new electromagnetic tracking system using a standardized assessment protocol.

    PubMed

    Hummel, J; Figl, M; Birkfellner, W; Bax, M R; Shahidi, R; Maurer, C R; Bergmann, H

    2006-05-21

    This note uses a published protocol to evaluate a newly released 6 degrees of freedom electromagnetic tracking system (Aurora, Northern Digital Inc.). A practice for performance monitoring over time is also proposed. The protocol uses a machined base plate to measure relative error in position and orientation as well as the influence of metallic objects in the operating volume. Positional jitter (E(RMS)) was found to be 0.17 mm +/- 0.19 mm. A relative positional error of 0.25 mm +/- 0.22 mm at 50 mm offsets and 0.97 mm +/- 1.01 mm at 300 mm offsets was found. The mean of the relative rotation error was found to be 0.20 degrees +/- 0.14 degrees with respect to the axial and 0.91 degrees +/- 0.68 degrees for the longitudinal rotation. The most significant distortion caused by metallic objects is caused by 400-series stainless steel. A 9.4 mm maximum error occurred when the rod was closest to the emitter, 10 mm away. The improvement compared to older generations of the Aurora with respect to accuracy is substantial.

  7. Implementation of Quantum Plug and Play Protocol in a Trapped Ion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Xiang; Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Shuaining; Ma, Jiajun; Kim, Kihwan; Gu, Mile; Thompson, Jayne; Vedral, Vlatko

    2016-05-01

    For the large-scale computer programing, it is important to modularize the program into many small parts, which are called as module. To integrate the modules in the program, all that we need to know is the relation between inputs and outputs not the specific details of the physical implementation. However, such modularity is generically impossible to be adapted in quantum computing. It was discussed with the example of deterministic quantum computing with one qubit (DQC1), which efficiently computes the trace of a unitary matrix U. The authors in Ref. pointed that if we compute | Tr(U) | instead of Tr(U) , the whole process can be modularized. We implement the proposed quantum plug and play protocol in the simplest situation in our trapped ion system. In the protocol, we begin with 1 pure control qubit and 2 completely mixed registers, which are swapped on a state of the control qubit. The | Tr(U) | is computed for any arbitrary unitary operation performed on the one of the register. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China Grant 11CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, the National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11374178 and 11574002.

  8. Itching for answers: how histamine relaxes lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    In the current issue of Microcirculation, studies by Kurtz et al. and Nizamutdinova et al. together provide new evidence supporting a role for histamine as an endothelial-derived molecule that inhibits lymphatic muscle contraction. In particular, Nizamutdinova et al. show that the effects of flow-induced shear stress on lymphatic endothelium are mediated by both nitric oxide and histamine, since only blockade of both prevents contraction strength and frequency from being altered by flow. Separately, Kurtz et al. used confocal microscopy to determine a preferential expression of histamine receptors on the lymphatic endothelium and demonstrated that histamine applied to spontaneously contracting collecting lymphatics inhibits contractions. Previous studies disagreed on whether histamine stimulates or inhibits lymphatic contractions, but also used differing concentrations, species, and preparations. Together these new reports shed light on how histamine acts within the lymphatic vasculature, but also raise important questions about the cell type on which histamine exerts its effects and the signaling pathways involved. This editorial briefly discusses the contribution of each study and its relevance to lymphatic biology.

  9. Lymphatic vessels regulate immune microenvironments in human and murine melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Amanda W.; Wagner, Marek; Fankhauser, Manuel; Steinskog, Eli S.; Broggi, Maria A.; Spranger, Stefani; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Alitalo, Kari; Eikesdal, Hans P.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic remodeling in tumor microenvironments correlates with progression and metastasis, and local lymphatic vessels play complex and poorly understood roles in tumor immunity. Tumor lymphangiogenesis is associated with increased immune suppression, yet lymphatic vessels are required for fluid drainage and immune cell trafficking to lymph nodes, where adaptive immune responses are mounted. Here, we examined the contribution of lymphatic drainage to tumor inflammation and immunity using a mouse model that lacks dermal lymphatic vessels (K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice). Melanomas implanted in these mice grew robustly, but exhibited drastically reduced cytokine expression and leukocyte infiltration compared with those implanted in control animals. In the absence of local immune suppression, transferred cytotoxic T cells more effectively controlled tumors in K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice than in control mice. Furthermore, gene expression analysis of human melanoma samples revealed that patient immune parameters are markedly stratified by levels of lymphatic markers. This work suggests that the establishment of tumor-associated inflammation and immunity critically depends on lymphatic vessel remodeling and drainage. Moreover, these results have implications for immunotherapies, the efficacies of which are regulated by the tumor immune microenvironment. PMID:27525437

  10. The effect of lymphatic valve morphology on fluid transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Ballard, Matthew; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Dixon, Brandon

    2016-11-01

    The lymphatic vasculature is present in nearly all invertebrate tissue, and is essential in the transport of fluid and particles such as immune cells, antigens, proteins and lipids from the tissue to lymph nodes and to the venous circulation. Lymphatic vessels are made of up a series of contractile units that work together in harmony as "micro hearts" to pump fluid against a pressure gradient. Lymphatic valves are critical to this functionality, as they open and close with the oscillating pressure gradients from contractions, thus allowing flow in only one direction and leading to a net pumping effect. We use a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann lattice spring model which captures fluid-solid interactions through two-way coupling between a viscous fluid and lymphatic valves in a section of a lymphatic vessel to study the dynamics of lymphatic valves and their effect on fluid transport. Further, we investigate the effect of variations in valve geometry and material properties on fluid pumping. This work helps to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of lymphatic fluid transport, which has implications in a variety of pathologies, including cancer metastasis, autoimmunity, atherosclerosis and obesity. Support from NSF CMMI 1635133 is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Constitutive Triglyceride Turnover into the Mesenteric Lymph Is Unable to Support Efficient Lymphatic Transport of a Biomimetic Triglyceride Prodrug.

    PubMed

    Han, Sifei; Hu, Luojuan; Quach, Tim; Simpson, Jamie S; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Porter, Christopher J H

    2016-02-01

    The triglyceride (TG) mimetic prodrug (1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-mycophenoloyl glycerol, 2-MPA-TG) biochemically integrates into intestinal lipid transport and lipoprotein assembly pathways and thereby promotes the delivery of mycophenolic acid (MPA) into the lymphatic system. As lipoprotein (LP) formation occurs constitutively, even in the fasted state, the current study aimed to determine whether lymphatic transport of 2-MPA-TG was dependent on coadministered exogenous lipid. In vitro incubation of the prodrug with rat digestive fluid and in situ intestinal perfusion experiments revealed that hydrolysis and absorption of the prodrug were relatively unaffected by the quantity of lipid in formulations. In vivo studies in rats, however, showed that the lymphatic transport of TG and 2-MPA-TG was significantly higher following administration with higher quantities of lipid and that oleic acid (C18:1) was more effective in promoting prodrug transport than lipids with higher degrees of unsaturation. The recovery of 2-MPA-TG and TG in lymph correlated strongly (R(2) = 0.99) and more than 97% of the prodrug was associated with chylomicrons. Inhibition of LP assembly by Pluronic L81 simultaneously inhibited the lymphatic transport of 2-MPA-TG and TG. In conclusion, although the TG mimetic prodrug effectively incorporates into TG resynthetic pathways, lipid coadministration is still required to support efficient lymphatic transport.

  12. Can Lymphatic Filariasis Be Eliminated by 2020?

    PubMed

    Rebollo, Maria P; Bockarie, Moses J

    2017-02-01

    Interventions against neglected tropical diseases (NTD), including lymphatic filariasis (LF), scaled up dramatically after the signing of the London Declaration (LD) in 2012. LF is targeted for elimination by 2020, but some countries are considered not on track to meet the 2020 target using the recommended preventive chemotherapy and morbidity management strategies. In this Opinion article we review the prospects for achieving LF elimination by 2020 in the light of the renewed global action against NTDs and the global efforts to achieve the sustainable development goals (SDGs) by 2030. We conclude that LF can be eliminated by 2020 using cross-sectoral and integrated approaches because of the compound effect of the other SDG activities related to poverty reduction and water and sanitation.

  13. Commercial Building Energy Asset Score System: Program Overview and Technical Protocol (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Na; Gorrissen, Willy J.

    2013-01-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a national voluntary energy asset score system that includes an energy asset score tool to help building owners evaluate their buildings with respect to the score system. The goal of the energy asset score system is to facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency improvements of commercial buildings. The system will allow building owners and managers to compare their building infrastructure against peers and track building upgrade progress over time. The system can also help other building stakeholders (e.g., building operators, tenants, financiers, and appraisers) understand the relative efficiency of different buildings in a way that is independent from their operations and occupancy. This report outlines the technical protocol used to generate the energy asset score, explains the scoring methodology, and provides additional details regarding the energy asset score tool. This report also describes alternative methods that were considered prior to developing the current approach. Finally, this report describes a few features of the program where alternative approaches are still under evaluation.

  14. Algorithm of clinical protocol lowering the risk of systemic Mycosis infections in allografts recipients.

    PubMed

    Swoboda-Kopec, E; Netsvyetayeva, I; Paczek, L; Dabkowska, M; Kwiatkowski, A; Jaworska-Zaremba, M; Mierzwinska-Nastalska, E; Sikora, M; Blachnio, S; Mlynarczyk, G; Fiedor, P

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the study was to describe a diagnostic protocol to lower the risk of a mycotic invasive infection among allotransplant recipients and to suggest the use of preoperative prophylaxis and/or empiric therapy. We chose a group of 268 allograft recipients with transient or constant yeast colonization or confirmed yeast infection. Among 7744 clinical samples, 475 were positive for fungi. We used conventional fungal laboratory diagnosis, enzymatic activity tests, serologic tests, molecular diagnosis of samples from sterile body sites, and histopathologic examinations. The following clinical samples were examined: blood samples; swabs from mouth lesions, throat, and rectum; and sputum, urine, and fecal samples from kidney transplant recipients and simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation recipients who are highly predisposed to mycotic infections. We established microbiologic criteria of a systemic mycosis and principles to distinguish colonization from infection.

  15. [Sonographic imaging of lymphatic vessels compared to other methods].

    PubMed

    Matter, D; Grosshans, E; Muller, J; Furderer, C; Mathelin, C; Warter, S; Bellocq, J P; Maillot, C

    2002-05-01

    This paper reviews for the first time the normal and abnormal appearances of lymphatic channels of the skin using ultrasound. After a review of anatomy and histology, the authors present the current imaging modalities available for lymph vessel imaging. The ultrasound examination is presented with a description of the author's technique as well as the technical requirements of the ultrasound unit (12 MHz linear probe with a resolution of 400 microns). They present the ultrasound appearance of normal lymphatic channels and their relationships to the dermis, hypodermis and lymph nodes, and at last the ultrasound appearance of abnormal lymphatic pathways

  16. Predictive lymphatic mapping: a method for mapping lymphatic channels in patients with advanced unilateral lymphedema using indocyanine green lymphography.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Makoto; Seki, Yukio; Hara, Hisako; Iida, Takuya; Oka, Aiko; Kikuchi, Kazuki; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Haragi, Makiko; Furniss, Dominic; Hin-Lun, Lawrence; Mitsui, Kito; Murai, Noriyuki; Koshima, Isao

    2014-01-01

    In severe lymphedema, indocyanine green lymphography cannot be used to map lymphatic channels before lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA) because linear lymphatics cannot be detected in a severely affected leg. Here, we describe a new method, which we refer to as predictive lymphatic mapping, to predict the location of lymphatics for anastomosis in unilateral lymphedema, thereby improving surgical accuracy and efficiency. The approach consists of marking anatomical landmarks and joining selected landmarks with fixed lines. The distance from these fixed lines to lymphatic channels mapped by indocyanine green lymphography in the unaffected leg is then measured, scaled up based on the difference in circumference between the legs, and transposed to the affected leg. To date, we have used this method in 5 cases of unilateral or asymmetric lymphedema of the lower extremities. In no cases have we failed to find a lymphatic channel suitable for LVA within a 2-cm incision. These results suggest that predictive lymphatic mapping is a useful additional tool for surgeons performing LVA under local anesthesia, which will help to improve the accuracy of incisions and the efficiency of surgery.

  17. Identification of lymphatic vessels and prognostic value of lymphatic microvessel density in lesions of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Saptefraţi, L; Cîmpean, Anca Maria; Ciornîi, A; Ceauşu, Raluca; Eşanu, N; Raica, M

    2009-01-01

    Incomplete characterization of the uterine cervix cancer from molecular point of view represents the main problem for the use of a proper therapy in this disease. Few data are available about D2-40 expression in lymphatic endothelial cells and also in tumor cells from uterine cervix cancer. The aim of the present work was to study the involvement of lymphatics in prognosis and tumor progression of the uterine cervix lesions. We used D2-40 immunostaining to highlight lymphatic vessels from squamous cell metaplasia (n=17), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (n=11), carcinoma in situ (n=3), microinvasive carcinoma (n=4) and invasive carcinoma (n=19) using Avidin-Biotin technique (LSAB+). Type and distribution of lymphatics in different lesions of the cervix were analyzed. We found significant correlation between lymphatic microvessel density and tumor grade and particular distribution of the lymphatics linked to histopathologic type of the lesions. Also, differences was found in lymphovascular invasion interpretation between routine Hematoxylin and Eosin staining specimens and immunohistochemical ones. Our results showed differences in the distribution and D2-40 expression in lymphatic vessels and tumor cells from the cervix lesions linked to histopathology and tumor grade.

  18. Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Technology as a Global Learning Tool: Information Systems Success and Control Belief Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Charlie C.; Vannoy, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Voice over Internet Protocol- (VoIP) enabled online learning service providers struggling with high attrition rates and low customer loyalty issues despite VoIP's high degree of system fit for online global learning applications. Effective solutions to this prevalent problem rely on the understanding of system quality, information quality, and…

  19. Design of the Protocol Processor for the ROBUS-2 Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Miner, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    The ROBUS-2 Protocol Processor (RPP) is a custom-designed hardware component implementing the functionality of the ROBUS-2 fault-tolerant communication system. The Reliable Optical Bus (ROBUS) is the core communication system of the Scalable Processor-Independent Design for Enhanced Reliability (SPIDER), a general-purpose fault tolerant integrated modular architecture currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center. ROBUS is a time-division multiple access (TDMA) broadcast communication system with medium access control by means of time-indexed communication schedule. ROBUS-2 is a developmental version of the ROBUS providing guaranteed fault-tolerant services to the attached processing elements (PEs), in the presence of a bounded number of faults. These services include message broadcast (Byzantine Agreement), dynamic communication schedule update, time reference (clock synchronization), and distributed diagnosis (group membership). ROBUS also features fault-tolerant startup and restart capabilities. ROBUS-2 tolerates internal as well as PE faults, and incorporates a dynamic self-reconfiguration capability driven by the internal diagnostic system. ROBUS consists of RPPs connected to each other by a lower-level physical communication network. The RPP has a pipelined architecture and the design is parameterized in the behavioral and structural domains. The design of the RPP enables the bus to achieve a PE-message throughput that approaches the available bandwidth at the physical layer.

  20. Impaired PIEZO1 function in patients with a novel autosomal recessive congenital lymphatic dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Viktor; Mathur, Jayanti; Mao, Rong; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Procter, Melinda; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Kim, Helen J.; Bandell, Michael; Longo, Nicola; Day, Ronald W.; Stevenson, David A.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Krock, Bryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Piezo1 ion channels are mediators of mechanotransduction in several cell types including the vascular endothelium, renal tubular cells and erythrocytes. Gain-of-function mutations in PIEZO1 cause an autosomal dominant haemolytic anaemia in humans called dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis. However, the phenotypic consequence of PIEZO1 loss of function in humans has not previously been documented. Here we discover a novel role of this channel in the lymphatic system. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identify biallelic mutations in PIEZO1 (a splicing variant leading to early truncation and a non-synonymous missense variant) in a pair of siblings affected with persistent lymphoedema caused by congenital lymphatic dysplasia. Analysis of patients' erythrocytes as well as studies in a heterologous system reveal greatly attenuated PIEZO1 function in affected alleles. Our results delineate a novel clinical category of PIEZO1-associated hereditary lymphoedema. PMID:26387913

  1. Label-free optical lymphangiography: development of an automatic segmentation method applied to optical coherence tomography to visualize lymphatic vessels using Hessian filters.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Siavash; Qin, Jia; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K

    2013-08-01

    Lymphatic vessels are a part of the circulatory system that collect plasma and other substances that have leaked from the capillaries into interstitial fluid (lymph) and transport lymph back to the circulatory system. Since lymph is transparent, lymphatic vessels appear as dark hallow vessel-like regions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross sectional images. We propose an automatic method to segment lymphatic vessel lumen from OCT structural cross sections using eigenvalues of Hessian filters. Compared to the existing method based on intensity threshold, Hessian filters are more selective on vessel shape and less sensitive to intensity variations and noise. Using this segmentation technique along with optical micro-angiography allows label-free noninvasive simultaneous visualization of blood and lymphatic vessels in vivo. Lymphatic vessels play an important role in cancer, immune system response, inflammatory disease, wound healing and tissue regeneration. Development of imaging techniques and visualization tools for lymphatic vessels is valuable in understanding the mechanisms and studying therapeutic methods in related disease and tissue response.

  2. Label-free optical lymphangiography: development of an automatic segmentation method applied to optical coherence tomography to visualize lymphatic vessels using Hessian filters

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Siavash; Qin, Jia; Zhi, Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Lymphatic vessels are a part of the circulatory system that collect plasma and other substances that have leaked from the capillaries into interstitial fluid (lymph) and transport lymph back to the circulatory system. Since lymph is transparent, lymphatic vessels appear as dark hallow vessel-like regions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross sectional images. We propose an automatic method to segment lymphatic vessel lumen from OCT structural cross sections using eigenvalues of Hessian filters. Compared to the existing method based on intensity threshold, Hessian filters are more selective on vessel shape and less sensitive to intensity variations and noise. Using this segmentation technique along with optical micro-angiography allows label-free noninvasive simultaneous visualization of blood and lymphatic vessels in vivo. Lymphatic vessels play an important role in cancer, immune system response, inflammatory disease, wound healing and tissue regeneration. Development of imaging techniques and visualization tools for lymphatic vessels is valuable in understanding the mechanisms and studying therapeutic methods in related disease and tissue response. PMID:23922124

  3. Label-free optical lymphangiography: development of an automatic segmentation method applied to optical coherence tomography to visualize lymphatic vessels using Hessian filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Qin, Jia; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2013-08-01

    Lymphatic vessels are a part of the circulatory system that collect plasma and other substances that have leaked from the capillaries into interstitial fluid (lymph) and transport lymph back to the circulatory system. Since lymph is transparent, lymphatic vessels appear as dark hallow vessel-like regions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross sectional images. We propose an automatic method to segment lymphatic vessel lumen from OCT structural cross sections using eigenvalues of Hessian filters. Compared to the existing method based on intensity threshold, Hessian filters are more selective on vessel shape and less sensitive to intensity variations and noise. Using this segmentation technique along with optical micro-angiography allows label-free noninvasive simultaneous visualization of blood and lymphatic vessels in vivo. Lymphatic vessels play an important role in cancer, immune system response, inflammatory disease, wound healing and tissue regeneration. Development of imaging techniques and visualization tools for lymphatic vessels is valuable in understanding the mechanisms and studying therapeutic methods in related disease and tissue response.

  4. Preparation and long-term biodistribution studies of a PAMAM dendrimer G5–Gd-BnDOTA conjugate for lymphatic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Opina, Ana Christina; Wong, Karen J; Griffiths, Gary L; Turkbey, Baris I; Bernardo, Marcelino; Nakajima, Takahito; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Choyke, Peter L; Vasalatiy, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Aims To demonstrate the use of gadolinium (Gd)-labeled dendrimers as lymphatic imaging agents and establish the long-term biodistribution (90-day) of this type of agent in mice. Materials & methods A G5-Gd-BnDOTA dendrimer was prepared and injected into mice and monkeys for MR lymphangiography, and long-term biodistribution of the conjugate was studied. Results Administration of G5–Gd-BnDOTA in mice demonstrated a rapid uptake in the deep lymphatic system while injection in monkeys showed enhanced internal iliac nodes, indicating its general utility for lymphatic tracking. Biodistribution studies to 90 days showed that gadolinium conjugate is slowly being eliminated from the liver and other organs. Conclusion The use of G5–Gd-BnDOTA holds great promise for lymphatic imaging, but its slow clearance from the body might hamper its eventual clinical translation. PMID:25392239

  5. Existing Models of Maternal Death Surveillance Systems: Protocol for a Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Shahabuddin, ASM; Zhang, Wei Hong; Firoz, Tabassum; Englert, Yvon; Nejjari, Chakib; De Brouwere, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality measurement remains a critical challenge, particularly in low and middle income countries (LMICs) where little or no data are available and maternal mortality and morbidity are often the highest in the world. Despite the progress made in data collection, underreporting and translating the results into action are two major challenges that maternal death surveillance systems (MDSSs) face in LMICs. Objective This paper presents a protocol for a scoping review aimed at synthesizing the existing models of MDSSs and factors that influence their completeness and usefulness. Methods The methodology for scoping reviews from the Joanna Briggs Institute was used as a guide for developing this protocol. A comprehensive literature search will be conducted across relevant electronic databases. We will include all articles that describe MDSSs or assess their completeness or usefulness. At least two reviewers will independently screen all articles, and discrepancies will be resolved through discussion. The same process will be used to extract data from studies fulfilling the eligibility criteria. Data analysis will involve quantitative and qualitative methods. Results Currently, the abstracts screening is under way and the first results are expected to be publicly available by mid-2017. The synthesis of the reviewed materials will be presented in tabular form completed by a narrative description. The results will be classified in main conceptual categories that will be obtained during the results extraction. Conclusions We anticipate that the results will provide a broad overview of MDSSs and describe factors related to their completeness and usefulness. The results will allow us to identify research gaps concerning the barriers and facilitating factors facing MDSSs. Results will be disseminated through publication in a peer-reviewed journal and conferences as well as domestic and international agencies in charge of implementing MDSS. PMID:27729305

  6. Experience in Construction and Operation of the Distributed Information Systems on the Basis of the Z39.50 Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhizhimov, Oleg; Mazov, Nikolay; Skibin, Sergey

    Questions concerned with construction and operation of the distributed information systems on the basis of ANSI/NISO Z39.50 Information Retrieval Protocol are discussed in the paper. The paper is based on authors' practice in developing ZooPARK server. Architecture of distributed information systems, questions of reliability of such systems, minimization of search time and administration are examined. Problems with developing of distributed information systems are also described.

  7. Monocytes can be induced to express lymphatic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Changming, W; Xin, L; Hua, T; Shikun, W; Qiong, X; Zhigeng, Z; Xueying, W

    2011-06-01

    Although it has been recently shown that monocytes can transdifferentiate into blood vascular endothelial cells which are involved in angiogenesis, little attention has been paid to their potential to transdifferentiate into lymphatic endothelial cells. Therefore, we examined this question in our study. We first stimulated monocytes with either fibronectin (FN), VEGF-C, TNF-alpha, LPS, or IL-3 for 24h. Then we examined the expression of several markers of lymphatic endothelium and found that the monocytes expressed specific lymphatic endothelial markers, LYVE-1, Podoplanin, and Prox-1, but not common endothelial markers vWF or eNOS. Next, monocytes were incubated in endothelial growth medium with FN and VEGF-C for 6d. These monocytes were also found to express LYVE-1, Podoplanin and Prox-1, but not vWF or eNOS. Our results indicate that monocytes in vitro can be easily induced to present lymphatic phenotypes in an inflammatory environment.

  8. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Human Dermal Lymphatic Collectors

    PubMed Central

    Buttler, Kerstin; Ströbel, Philipp; Becker, Jürgen; Aung, Thiha; Felmerer, Gunther; Wilting, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Millions of patients suffer from lymphedema worldwide. Supporting the contractility of lymphatic collectors is an attractive target for pharmacological therapy of lymphedema. However, lymphatics have mostly been studied in animals, while the cellular and molecular characteristics of human lymphatic collectors are largely unknown. We studied epifascial lymphatic collectors of the thigh, which were isolated for autologous transplantations. Our immunohistological studies identify additional markers for LECs (vimentin, CCBE1). We show and confirm differences between initial and collecting lymphatics concerning the markers ESAM1, D2-40 and LYVE-1. Our transmission electron microscopic studies reveal two types of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media of the collectors with dark and light cytoplasm. We observed vasa vasorum in the media of the largest collectors, as well as interstitial Cajal-like cells, which are highly ramified cells with long processes, caveolae, and lacking a basal lamina. They are in close contact with SMCs, which possess multiple caveolae at the contact sites. Immunohistologically we identified such cells with antibodies against vimentin and PDGFRα, but not CD34 and cKIT. With Next Generation Sequencing we searched for highly expressed genes in the media of lymphatic collectors, and found therapeutic targets, suitable for acceleration of lymphatic contractility, such as neuropeptide Y receptors 1, and 5; tachykinin receptors 1, and 2; purinergic receptors P2RX1, and 6, P2RY12, 13, and 14; 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors HTR2B, and 3C; and adrenoceptors α2A,B,C. Our studies represent the first comprehensive characterization of human epifascial lymphatic collectors, as a prerequisite for diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27764183

  9. [The macrophage contribution for maintaining lymphatic vessel in cornea].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kazuichi

    2014-11-01

    The presence of antigen-presenting cells and hem- and lymphangiogenesis in the cornea are risk factors for the rejection of corneal transplants. We previously reported that antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages (MPs) play an important role in the induction of lymphatic endothelial cells during inflammation. This prompted us to inquire whether the existence of lymphatic vessels in the cornea is associated with the activation of MPs during inflammation. To investigate this question, we performed suture placement on the cornea to induce inflammation. We found that a large number of MPs were recruited and that lymphatic vessels were formed in response. Next, as C57BL/6 mice have a higher rejection rate after corneal transplantation than BALB/c mice, we compared the corneas of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice under normal and inflamed conditions. We found that the number of spontaneously formed lymphatic vessels in the C57BL/6 corneas was significantly greater than in the BALB/c corneas, and that there were more activated MPs in the C57BL/6 corneas than in the BALB/c corneas. Additionally, to confirm that activated MPs induced and maintained lymphatic vessels in the cornea, we depleted the number of MPs in C57BL/6 mice via clodronate liposomes. We found that MP depletion reduced the spontaneous formation of lymphatic vessels and reduced inflammation-induced lymphangiogenesis relative to control mice. Finally, we found that mice deficient in MP markers had fewer spontaneously formed lymphatic vessels and less lymphangiogenesis than control C57BL/6 mice. The evidence gathered in this study leads us to conclude that activated MPs appear to play an important role in the formation of new lymphatic vessels and in their maintenance.

  10. Quantum dots trace lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye.

    PubMed

    Tam, Alex L C; Gupta, Neeru; Zhang, Zhexue; Yücel, Yeni H

    2011-10-21

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the world, often associated with elevated eye pressure. Currently, all glaucoma treatments aim to lower eye pressure by improving fluid exit from the eye. We recently reported the presence of lymphatics in the human eye. The lymphatic circulation is known to drain fluid from organ tissues and, as such, lymphatics may also play a role in draining fluid from the eye. We investigated whether lymphatic drainage from the eye is present in mice by visualizing the trajectory of quantum dots once injected into the eye. Whole-body hyperspectral fluorescence imaging was performed in 17 live mice. In vivo imaging was conducted prior to injection, and 5, 20, 40 and 70 min, and 2, 6 and 24 h after injection. A quantum dot signal was observed in the left neck region at 6 h after tracer injection into the eye. Examination of immunofluorescence-labelled sections using confocal microscopy showed the presence of a quantum dot signal in the left submandibular lymph node. This is the first direct evidence of lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye. The use of quantum dots to image this lymphatic pathway in vivo is a novel tool to stimulate new treatments to reduce eye pressure and prevent blindness from glaucoma.

  11. Quantum dots trace lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Alex L. C.; Gupta, Neeru; Zhang, Zhexue; Yücel, Yeni H.

    2011-10-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the world, often associated with elevated eye pressure. Currently, all glaucoma treatments aim to lower eye pressure by improving fluid exit from the eye. We recently reported the presence of lymphatics in the human eye. The lymphatic circulation is known to drain fluid from organ tissues and, as such, lymphatics may also play a role in draining fluid from the eye. We investigated whether lymphatic drainage from the eye is present in mice by visualizing the trajectory of quantum dots once injected into the eye. Whole-body hyperspectral fluorescence imaging was performed in 17 live mice. In vivo imaging was conducted prior to injection, and 5, 20, 40 and 70 min, and 2, 6 and 24 h after injection. A quantum dot signal was observed in the left neck region at 6 h after tracer injection into the eye. Examination of immunofluorescence-labelled sections using confocal microscopy showed the presence of a quantum dot signal in the left submandibular lymph node. This is the first direct evidence of lymphatic drainage from the mouse eye. The use of quantum dots to image this lymphatic pathway in vivo is a novel tool to stimulate new treatments to reduce eye pressure and prevent blindness from glaucoma.

  12. Mechanotransduction activates canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling to promote lymphatic vascular patterning and the development of lymphatic and lymphovenous valves

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Boksik; Geng, Xin; Mahamud, Md. Riaj; Fu, Jianxin; Mukherjee, Anish; Kim, Yeunhee; Jho, Eek-hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kahn, Mark L.; Xia, Lijun; Dixon, J. Brandon; Chen, Hong; Srinivasan, R. Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic vasculature regulates fluid homeostasis by returning interstitial fluid to blood circulation. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are the building blocks of the entire lymphatic vasculature. LECs originate as a homogeneous population of cells predominantly from the embryonic veins and undergo stepwise morphogenesis to become the lymphatic capillaries, collecting vessels or valves. The molecular mechanisms underlying the morphogenesis of the lymphatic vasculature remain to be fully understood. Here we show that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for lymphatic vascular morphogenesis. Lymphatic vascular-specific ablation of β-catenin in mice prevents the formation of lymphatic and lymphovenous valves. Additionally, lymphatic vessel patterning is defective in these mice, with abnormal recruitment of mural cells. We found that oscillatory shear stress (OSS), which promotes lymphatic vessel maturation, triggers Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LECs. In turn, Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls the expression of several molecules, including the lymphedema-associated transcription factor FOXC2. Importantly, FOXC2 completely rescues the lymphatic vessel patterning defects in mice lacking β-catenin. Thus, our work reveals that mechanical stimulation is a critical regulator of lymphatic vascular development via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and, in turn, FOXC2. PMID:27313318

  13. Progression of Inflammatory Bowel Disease to Cancer: Is the Patient Better Off without Lymphatic Vessels or Nodes (or Angiopoietin 2)?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    number of functioning lymphatic vessels and impaired lymph drainage (lymphatic vascular insufficiency) in the colon actually protects against...have remained elusive. We proposed that having a reduced number of functioning lymphatic vessels and impaired lymph drainage (lymphatic vascular...Lymphatics, Lymph and the Lymphomyeloid Complex. Academic Press, London, 942 p, 1970. Appendices None Supporting Data None

  14. Biodistribution and Lymphatic Tracking of the Main Neurotoxin of Micrurus fulvius Venom by Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Irene; Castillo, Erick Y; Romero-Piña, Mario E; Torres-Viquez, Itzel; Paniagua, Dayanira; Boyer, Leslie V; Alagón, Alejandro; Medina, Luis Alberto

    2016-03-26

    The venom of the Eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius can cause respiratory paralysis in the bitten patient, which is attributable to β-neurotoxins (β-NTx). The aim of this work was to study the biodistribution and lymphatic tracking by molecular imaging of the main β-NTx of M. fulvius venom. β-NTx was bioconjugated with the chelator diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) and radiolabeled with the radionuclide Gallium-67. Radiolabeling efficiency was 60%-78%; radiochemical purity ≥92%; and stability at 48 h ≥ 85%. The median lethal dose (LD50) and PLA₂ activity of bioconjugated β-NTx decreased 3 and 2.5 times, respectively, in comparison with native β-NTx. The immune recognition by polyclonal antibodies decreased 10 times. Biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-(67)Ga in rats showed increased uptake in popliteal, lumbar nodes and kidneys that was not observed with (67)Ga-free. Accumulation in organs at 24 h was less than 1%, except for kidneys, where the average was 3.7%. The inoculation site works as a depot, since 10% of the initial dose of β-NTx-DTPA-(67)Ga remains there for up to 48 h. This work clearly demonstrates the lymphatic system participation in the biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-(67)Ga. Our approach could be applied to analyze the role of the lymphatic system in snakebite for a better understanding of envenoming.

  15. Biodistribution and Lymphatic Tracking of the Main Neurotoxin of Micrurus fulvius Venom by Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Irene; Castillo, Erick Y.; Romero-Piña, Mario E.; Torres-Viquez, Itzel; Paniagua, Dayanira; Boyer, Leslie V.; Alagón, Alejandro; Medina, Luis Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The venom of the Eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius can cause respiratory paralysis in the bitten patient, which is attributable to β-neurotoxins (β-NTx). The aim of this work was to study the biodistribution and lymphatic tracking by molecular imaging of the main β-NTx of M. fulvius venom. β-NTx was bioconjugated with the chelator diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) and radiolabeled with the radionuclide Gallium-67. Radiolabeling efficiency was 60%–78%; radiochemical purity ≥92%; and stability at 48 h ≥ 85%. The median lethal dose (LD50) and PLA2 activity of bioconjugated β-NTx decreased 3 and 2.5 times, respectively, in comparison with native β-NTx. The immune recognition by polyclonal antibodies decreased 10 times. Biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga in rats showed increased uptake in popliteal, lumbar nodes and kidneys that was not observed with 67Ga-free. Accumulation in organs at 24 h was less than 1%, except for kidneys, where the average was 3.7%. The inoculation site works as a depot, since 10% of the initial dose of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga remains there for up to 48 h. This work clearly demonstrates the lymphatic system participation in the biodistribution of β-NTx-DTPA-67Ga. Our approach could be applied to analyze the role of the lymphatic system in snakebite for a better understanding of envenoming. PMID:27023607

  16. Orbital venous pattern in relation to extraorbital venous drainage and superficial lymphatic vessels in rats.

    PubMed

    Maloveska, Marcela; Kresakova, Lenka; Vdoviakova, Katarina; Petrovova, Eva; Elias, Mario; Panagiotis, Artemiou; Andrejcakova, Zuzana; Supuka, Peter; Purzyc, Halina; Kissova, Viktoria

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the normal and variant anatomy of extraorbital and intraorbital venous drainage together with retroorbital communication, and determine the lymphatic drainage from the superficial orbital region with a potential outlet of lymphatic vessel into the venous bloodstream. The study of the venous system was carried out on 32 Wistar rats by using corrosion casts methods and radiography, while the lymphatic system was studied in 12 Wistar rats following ink injection. Superficially, orbital veins are connected with extraorbital veins running through angular vein of the eye and the superficial temporal vein, and via the pterygoid plexus with the maxillary vein, which provide readily accessible communication routes in the spread of infection. The extent of intraorbital and periorbital venous drainage was ensured by the dorsal and ventral external ophthalmic vein through the infraorbital vein, which together formed the principal part of the ophthalmic plexus. Venous drainage of the eyeball was carried out mainly by the vortex veins, ciliary veins and internal ophthalmic vein. The highest variability, first presented by differences in structural arrangement and formation of anastomoses, was observed within the ventral external ophthalmic vein (22 cases) and the medial vortex vein (10 cases). Four vortex veins, one vein in each quadrant of the eye, were observed in rats. The vortex vein located on the ventral side of the eyeball was occasionally found as two veins (in four cases) in the present study. The lymphatic vessel from the lower eyelid entered into the mandibular lymph centre, and from the upper eyelid entered into the superficial cervical lymph centre, but both drained into the deep cranial cervical lymph node. The direct entry of lymph entering the veins without passing through lymph nodes was not observed.

  17. Optimal postnodal lymphatic network structure that maximizes active propulsion of lymph

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Arun M.; Quick, Christopher M.; Laine, Glen A.; Stewart, Randolph H.

    2009-01-01

    The lymphatic system acts to return lower-pressured interstitial fluid to the higher-pressured veins by a complex network of vessels spanning more than three orders of magnitude in size. Lymphatic vessels consist of lymphangions, segments of vessels between two unidirectional valves, which contain smooth muscle that cyclically pumps lymph against a pressure gradient. Whereas the principles governing the optimal structure of arterial networks have been identified by variations of Murray's law, the principles governing the optimal structure of the lymphatic system have yet to be elucidated, although lymph flow can be identified as a critical parameter. The reason for this deficiency can be identified. Until recently, there has been no algebraic formula, such as Poiseuille's law, that relates lymphangion structure to its function. We therefore employed a recently developed mathematical model, based on the time-varying elastance model conventionally used to describe ventricular function, that was validated by data collected from postnodal bovine mesenteric lymphangions. From this lymphangion model, we developed a model to determine the structure of a lymphatic network that optimizes lymph flow. The model predicted that there is a lymphangion length that optimizes lymph flow and that symmetrical networks optimize lymph flow when the lymphangions downstream of a bifurcation are 1.26 times the length of the lymphangions immediately upstream. Measured lymphangion lengths (1.14 ± 0.5 cm, n = 74) were consistent with the range of predicted optimal lengths (0.1–2.1 cm). This modeling approach was possible, because it allowed a structural parameter, such as length, to be treated as a variable. PMID:19028799

  18. Manual lymphatic drainage and therapeutic ultrasound in liposuction and lipoabdominoplasty post-operative period

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Igor F. B.; de Oliveira, Bruna D. A.; Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Farcic, Thiago Saikali; Júnior, Ivaldo Esteves; Baldan, Cristiano Schiavinato

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physiotherapy in the plastic surgery post-operative (PO) is essential to provide means for an adequate and fast recovery as it restores function through the use of physiotherapeutic procedures. Aim: The aim of the following study is to verify the effects of the association between the manual lymphatic drainage and the therapeutic ultrasound on pain, oedema and the tissue fibrosis in liposuction and lipoabdominoplasty PO. Design: This is a clinical trial prospective. Materials and Methods: Eighteen women aged between 18 and 60 years participated in this study, in the late PO period following lipoabdominoplasty or liposuction in the abdomen, flanks and lower trunk, which showed tissue fibrosis of the flanks and abdomen regions. They were divided into two groups: Liposuction group and lipoabdominoplasty group. A total of twelve sessions of therapeutic ultrasound followed by the manual lymphatic drainage were performed. The patients were assessed with regard to pain, oedema and tissue fibrosis in different moments: Initial assessment, during assessment and final assessment through the application of the protocol of evaluation of cysts fibrosis levels. Statistical Analysis: The test of equality for two proportions and the confidence interval test for mean to evaluate the distribution of variables. The significance level adopted for statistical tests was 5% (P < 0.05). Results: There was a statistically significant reduction of pain, swelling and tissue fibrosis in both groups. Conclusion: the association between manual lymphatic drainage and the therapeutic ultrasound reduced the swelling and the tissue fibrosis and made pain disappear in liposuction and lipoabdominoplasty PO period. PMID:24987208

  19. Conjugation of 10 kDa Linear PEG onto Trastuzumab Fab' Is Sufficient to Significantly Enhance Lymphatic Exposure while Preserving in Vitro Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Linda J; Ascher, David B; Yadav, Rajbharan; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Williams, Charlotte C; Porter, Christopher J H; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Kaminskas, Lisa M

    2016-04-04

    The lymphatic system is a major conduit by which many diseases spread and proliferate. There is therefore increasing interest in promoting better lymphatic drug targeting. Further, antibody fragments such as Fabs have several advantages over full length monoclonal antibodies but are subject to rapid plasma clearance, which can limit the lymphatic exposure and activity of Fabs against lymph-resident diseases. This study therefore explored ideal PEGylation strategies to maximize biological activity and lymphatic exposure using trastuzumab Fab' as a model. Specifically, the Fab' was conjugated with single linear 10 or 40 kDa PEG chains at the hinge region. PEGylation led to a 3-4-fold reduction in binding affinity to HER2, but antiproliferative activity against HER2-expressing BT474 cells was preserved. Lymphatic pharmacokinetics were then examined in thoracic lymph duct cannulated rats after intravenous and subcutaneous dosing at 2 mg/kg, and the data were evaluated via population pharmacokinetic modeling. The Fab' displayed limited lymphatic exposure, but conjugation of 10 kDa PEG improved exposure by approximately 11- and 5-fold after intravenous (15% dose collected in thoracic lymph over 30 h) and subcutaneous (9%) administration, respectively. Increasing the molecular weight of the PEG to 40 kDa, however, had no significant impact on lymphatic exposure after intravenous (14%) administration and only doubled lymphatic exposure after subcutaneous administration (18%) when compared to 10 kDa PEG-Fab'. The data therefore suggests that minimal PEGylation has the potential to enhance the exposure and activity of Fab's against lymph-resident diseases, while no significant benefit is achieved with very large PEGs.

  20. ANALOG I/O MODULE TEST SYSTEM BASED ON EPICS CA PROTOCOL AND ACTIVEX CA INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    YENG,YHOFF,L.

    2003-10-13

    Analog input (ADC) and output (DAC) modules play a substantial role in device level control of accelerator and large experiment physics control system. In order to get the best performance some features of analog modules including linearity, accuracy, crosstalk, thermal drift and so on have to be evaluated during the preliminary design phase. Gain and offset error calibration and thermal drift compensation (if needed) may have to be done in the implementation phase as well. A natural technique for performing these tasks is to interface the analog VO modules and GPIB interface programmable test instruments with a computer, which can complete measurements or calibration automatically. A difficulty is that drivers of analog modules and test instruments usually work on totally different platforms (vxworks VS Windows). Developing new test routines and drivers for testing instruments under VxWorks (or any other RTOS) platform is not a good solution because such systems have relatively poor user interface and developing such software requires substantial effort. EPICS CA protocol and ActiveX CA interface provide another choice, a PC and LabVIEW based test system. Analog 110 module can be interfaced from LabVIEW test routines via ActiveX CA interface. Test instruments can be controlled via LabVIEW drivers, most of which are provided by instrument vendors or by National Instruments. Labview also provides extensive data analysis and process functions. Using these functions, users can generate powerful test routines very easily. Several applications built for Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) system are described in this paper.

  1. Reducing Tobacco Use among Youth: Community-Based Approaches. A Guideline. Prevention Enhancement Protocols System (PEPS) Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    General guidance is offered in the planning and implementation of community-based strategies for the prevention of tobacco use among youth. Ideas and data are organized by means of the Prevention Enhancement Protocols System (PEPS), which is a systematic process for evaluating prevention research and practice evidence, assessing the strength of…

  2. Impaired lymphatic function accelerates cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Steinskog, Eli Sihn Samdal; Sagstad, Solfrid Johanne; Wagner, Marek; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Yang, Ning; Markhus, Carl Erik; Yndestad, Synnøve; Wiig, Helge; Eikesdal, Hans Petter

    2016-01-01

    Increased lymphangiogenesis is a common feature of cancer development and progression, yet the influence of impaired lymphangiogenesis on tumor growth is elusive. C3HBA breast cancer and KHT-1 sarcoma cell lines were implanted orthotopically in Chy mice, harboring a heterozygous inactivating mutation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3, resulting in impaired dermal lymphangiogenesis. Accelerated tumor growth was observed in both cancer models in Chy mice, coinciding with reduced peritumoral lymphangiogenesis. An impaired lymphatic washout was observed from the peritumoral area in Chy mice with C3HBA tumors, and the number of macrophages was significantly reduced. While fewer macrophages were detected, the fraction of CD163+ M2 macrophages remained constant, causing a shift towards a higher M2/M1 ratio in Chy mice. No difference in adaptive immune cells was observed between wt and Chy mice. Interestingly, levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophage-associated cytokines were reduced in C3HBA tumors, pointing to an impaired innate immune response. However, IL-6 was profoundly elevated in the C3HBA tumor interstitial fluid, and treatment with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab inhibited breast cancer growth. Collectively, our data indicate that impaired lymphangiogenesis weakens anti-tumor immunity and favors tumor growth at an early stage of cancer development. PMID:27329584

  3. Localization and proliferation of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane in normal state and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Takenori; Burford, James L.; Hong, Young-Kwon; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Mori, Nozomu; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •We newly developed the whole-mount imaging method of the tympanic membrane. •Lymphatic vessel loops were localized around the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. •In regeneration, abundant lymphatic vessels were observed in the pars tensa. •Site-specific lymphatic vessels may play an important role in the tympanic membrane. -- Abstract: We clarified the localization of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane and proliferation of lymphatic vessels during regeneration after perforation of the tympanic membrane by using whole-mount imaging of the tympanic membrane of Prox1 GFP mice. In the pars tensa, lymphatic vessel loops surrounded the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. Apart from these locations, lymphatic vessel loops were not observed in the pars tensa in the normal tympanic membrane. Lymphatic vessel loops surrounding the malleus handle were connected to the lymphatic vessel loops in the pars flaccida and around the tensor tympani muscle. Many lymphatic vessel loops were detected in the pars flaccida. After perforation of the tympanic membrane, abundant lymphatic regeneration was observed in the pars tensa, and these regenerated lymphatic vessels extended from the lymphatic vessels surrounding the malleus at day 7. These results suggest that site-specific lymphatic vessels play an important role in the tympanic membrane.

  4. Internet Protocol Display Sharing Solution for Mission Control Center Video System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of broadcast television as a constant source of information throughout the NASA manned space flight Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the current Video Transport System (VTS) characteristics provides the ability to visually enhance real-time applications as a broadcast channel that decision making flight controllers come to rely on, but can be difficult to maintain and costly. The Operations Technology Facility (OTF) of the Mission Operations Facility Division (MOFD) has been tasked to provide insight to new innovative technological solutions for the MCC environment focusing on alternative architectures for a VTS. New technology will be provided to enable sharing of all imagery from one specific computer display, better known as Display Sharing (DS), to other computer displays and display systems such as; large projector systems, flight control rooms, and back supporting rooms throughout the facilities and other offsite centers using IP networks. It has been stated that Internet Protocol (IP) applications are easily readied to substitute for the current visual architecture, but quality and speed may need to be forfeited for reducing cost and maintainability. Although the IP infrastructure can support many technologies, the simple task of sharing ones computer display can be rather clumsy and difficult to configure and manage to the many operators and products. The DS process shall invest in collectively automating the sharing of images while focusing on such characteristics as; managing bandwidth, encrypting security measures, synchronizing disconnections from loss of signal / loss of acquisitions, performance latency, and provide functions like, scalability, multi-sharing, ease of initial integration / sustained configuration, integration with video adjustments packages, collaborative tools, host / recipient controllability, and the utmost paramount priority, an enterprise solution that provides ownership to the whole

  5. Lymphatic Stomata in the Adult Human Pulmonary Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Masahiro; Iobe, Hiroaki; Kudo, Tomoo; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Okudela, Koji; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yoshida, Maki; Nagao, Toshitaka; Nakaya, Takeo; Kurata, Atsushi; Ohtani, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphatic stomata are small lymphatic openings in the serosal membrane that communicate with the serosal cavity. Although these stomata have primarily been studied in experimental mammals, little is known concerning the presence and properties of lymphatic stomata in the adult human pleura. Thus, adult human pleurae were examined for the presence or absence of lymphatic stomata. Methods and Results: A total of 26 pulmonary ligaments (13 left and 13 right) were obtained from 15 adult human autopsy cases and examined using electron and light microscopy. The microscopic studies revealed the presence of apertures fringed with D2-40-positive, CD31-positive, and cytokeratin-negative endothelial cells directly communicating with submesothelial lymphatics in all of the pulmonary ligaments. The apertures' sizes and densities varied from case to case according to the serial tissue section. The medians of these aperture sizes ranged from 2.25 to 8.75 μm in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2.50 to 12.50 μm in the right pulmonary ligaments. The densities of the apertures ranged from 2 to 9 per mm2 in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2 to 18 per mm2 in the right pulmonary ligaments. However, no significant differences were found regarding the aperture size (p=0.359) and density (p=0.438) between the left and the right pulmonary ligaments. Conclusions: Our study revealed that apertures exhibit structural adequacy as lymphatic stomata on the surface of the pulmonary ligament, thereby providing evidence that lymphatic stomata are present in the adult human pleura. PMID:25526320

  6. The lymphatic phenotype in Turner syndrome: an evaluation of nineteen patients and literature review.

    PubMed

    Atton, Giles; Gordon, Kristiana; Brice, Glen; Keeley, Vaughan; Riches, Katie; Ostergaard, Pia; Mortimer, Peter; Mansour, Sahar

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex disorder caused by an absent or abnormal sex chromosome. It affects 1/2000-1/3000 live-born females. Congenital lymphoedema of the hands, feet and neck region (present in over 60% of patients) is a common and key diagnostic indicator, although is poorly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyse the medical records of a cohort of 19 Turner syndrome patients attending three specialist primary lymphoedema clinics, to elucidate the key features of the lymphatic phenotype and provide vital insights into its diagnosis, natural history and management. The majority of patients presented at birth with four-limb lymphoedema, which often resolved in early childhood, but frequently recurred in later life. The swelling was confined to the legs and hands with no facial or genital swelling. There was only one case of suspected systemic involvement (intestinal lymphangiectasia). The lymphoscintigraphy results suggest that the lymphatic phenotype of Turner syndrome may be due to a failure of initial lymphatic (capillary) function.

  7. A three-dimensional atlas of human dermal leukocytes, lymphatics, and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Nong; McGovern, Naomi; Gunawan, Merry; Richardson, Connor; Windebank, Martin; Siah, Tee-Wei; Lim, Hwee-Ying; Fink, Katja; Li, Jackson L Yao; Ng, Lai G; Ginhoux, Florent; Angeli, Veronique; Collin, Matthew; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages (Mφ), and T cells are major components of the skin immune system, but their interstitial spatial organization is poorly characterized. Using four-channel whole-mount immunofluorescence staining of the human dermis, we demonstrated the three-dimensional distribution of CD31(+) blood capillaries, LYVE-1(+) lymphatics, discrete populations of CD11c(+) myeloid DCs, FXIIIa(+) Mφ, and lymphocytes. We showed phenotypic and morphological differences in situ between DCs and Mφ. DCs formed the first dermal cellular layer (0-20 μm beneath the dermoepidermal junction), Mφ were located deeper (40-60 μm), and CD3(+) lymphocytes were observed throughout (0-60 μm). Below this level, DCs, T cells, and the majority of Mφ formed stable perivascular sheaths. Whole-mount imaging revealed the true extent of dermal leukocytes previously underestimated from cross-section views. The total area of apical dermis (0-30 μm) contained approximately 10-fold more myeloid DCs than the entire blood volume of an average individual. Surprisingly, <1% of dermal DCs occupied lymphatics in freshly isolated skin. Dermal DCs rapidly accumulated within lymphatics, but Mφ remained fixed in skin explants cultured ex vivo. The leukocyte architecture observed in normal skin was distorted in inflammation and disease. These studies illustrate the micro-anatomy of dermal leukocytes and provide further insights into their functional organization.

  8. Low-cost microcontroller platform for studying lymphatic biomechanics in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A.; Nipper, Matthew E.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-01-01

    The pumping innate to collecting lymphatic vessels routinely exposes the endothelium to oscillatory wall shear stress and other dynamic forces. However, studying the mechanical sensitivity of the lymphatic endothelium remains a difficult task due to limitations of commercial or custom systems to apply a variety of time-varying stresses in vitro. Current biomechanical in vitro testing devices are very expensive, limited in capability, or highly complex; rendering them largely inaccessible to the endothelial cell biology community. To address these short-comings, the authors propose a reliable, low-cost platform for augmenting the capabilities of commercially available pumps to produce a wide variety of flow rate waveforms. In particular, the Arduino Uno, a microcontroller development board, is used to provide open-loop control of a digital peristaltic pump using precisely-timed serial commands. In addition, the flexibility of this platform is further demonstrated through its support of a custom-built cell-straining device capable of producing oscillatory strains with varying amplitudes and frequencies. Hence, this microcontroller development board is shown to be an inexpensive, precise, and easy-to-use tool for supplementing in vitro assays to quantify the effects of biomechanical forces on lymphatic endothelial cells. PMID:23178036

  9. Simultaneous measurement of pressure in the interstitium and the terminal lymphatics of the cat mesentery.

    PubMed Central

    Clough, G; Smaje, L H

    1978-01-01

    1. Simultaneous measurements of the pressure in terminal lymphatics and interstitial tissue have been made in the exteriorized cat mesentery superfused with either physiological salt solution (Krebs solution) or a water-immiscible fluorocarbon, FC-80. 2. The pressures within individual terminal lymphatics were measured using glass micropipettes attached to a servo pressure-measuring system. Tissue pressures were recorded using saline-filled cotton-wool wicks. 3. Mean pressure recorded in the terminal lymphatics of the Krebs-superfused mesentery were slightly above atmospheric (+0.2 mmHg, n = 45), while those recorded in the FC-80-superfused mesentery were slightly below atmospheric (-0.2 mmHg, n = 46). 4. Tissue pressures were also slightly subatmospheric in the in situ mesentery, and the recently exposed tissue. Continuous superfusion with Krebs solution caused the tissue pressure to rise to atmospheric pressure or above; with FC-80-superfusion the tissue pressure also rose, but never to above atmospheric pressure. 5. Isolated strips of mesentery immersed in Krebs solutions of different concentrations gained weight, but when immersed in FC-80 no change in weight was detected. 6. It was concluded that the interstitial gel of the mesentery is normally unsaturated and that superfusion with Krebs solution leads to tissue oedema. This tendency is less marked in FC-80-superfused preparations. Possible mechanisms for lymph formation and propulsion are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:722586

  10. Low-cost microcontroller platform for studying lymphatic biomechanics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nipper, Matthew E; Dixon, J Brandon

    2013-01-04

    The pumping innate to collecting lymphatic vessels routinely exposes the endothelium to oscillatory wall shear stress and other dynamic forces. However, studying the mechanical sensitivity of the lymphatic endothelium remains a difficult task due to limitations of commercial or custom systems to apply a variety of time-varying stresses in vitro. Current biomechanical in vitro testing devices are very expensive, limited in capability, or highly complex; rendering them largely inaccessible to the endothelial cell biology community. To address these shortcomings, the authors propose a reliable, low-cost platform for augmenting the capabilities of commercially available pumps to produce a wide variety of flow rate waveforms. In particular, the Arduino Uno, a microcontroller development board, is used to provide open-loop control of a digital peristaltic pump using precisely timed serial commands. In addition, the flexibility of this platform is further demonstrated through its support of a custom-built cell-straining device capable of producing oscillatory strains with varying amplitudes and frequencies. Hence, this microcontroller development board is shown to be an inexpensive, precise, and easy-to-use tool for supplementing in vitro assays to quantify the effects of biomechanical forces on lymphatic endothelial cells.

  11. Online colour training system for dental students: a comprehensive assessment of different training protocols.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Chen, L; Liu, X; Yang, Y; Zheng, M; Tan, J

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the training effect and to determine the optimal training protocol for a recently developed online colour training system. Seventy students participated in the evaluation. They first completed a baseline test with shade guides (SGT) and the training system (TST), and then trained with one of the three system training methods (Basic colour training for group E1, Vitapan Classical for E2, and Vitapan 3D-Master for E3) or shade guides (group C1) for 4 days. The control group (C2) received no training. The same test was performed after training and they finally completed a questionnaire. The correct matches after training increased in three experimental groups and group C1. Among experimental groups, the greatest improvement of correct matching number was achieved by group E3 (4·00 ± 1·88 in SGT, 4·29 ± 2·73 in TST), followed by E2 (2·29 ± 2·73 in SGT, 3·50 ± 3·03 in TST) and E1 (2·00 ± 2·60 in SGT, 1·93 ± 2·96 in TST). The difference between E3 and E1 was statistically significant (P = 0·036 in SGT, 0·026 in TST). The total average training time was shorter in group E2 (15·39 ± 4·22 min) and E3 (17·63 ± 5·22 min), with no significant difference between them. Subjective evaluations revealed that self-confidence in colour matching were improved greater in group C1 and E3. In conclusion, all tested sections of the system effectively improved students' colour-matching ability. Among system training methods, Vitapan 3D-Master showed the best performance; it enabled greater shade-matching improvement, it saved time and was superior in subjective evaluations.

  12. An in vitro model of the tumor-lymphatic microenvironment with simultaneous transendothelial and luminal flows reveals mechanisms of flow enhanced invasion.

    PubMed

    Pisano, M; Triacca, V; Barbee, K A; Swartz, M A

    2015-05-01

    The most common cancers, including breast and skin, disseminate initially through the lymphatic system, yet the mechanisms by which tumor cells home towards, enter and interact with the lymphatic endothelium remain poorly understood. Transmural and luminal flows are important biophysical cues of the lymphatic microenvironment that can affect adhesion molecules, growth factors and chemokine expression as well as matrix remodeling, among others. Although microfluidic models are suitable for in vitro reconstruction of highly complex biological systems, the difficult assembly and operation of these systems often only allows a limited throughput. Here we present and characterize a novel flow chamber which recapitulates the lymphatic capillary microenvironment by coupling a standard Boyden chamber setup with a micro-channel and a controlled fluidic environment. The inclusion of luminal and transmural flow renders the model more biologically relevant, combining standard 3D culture techniques with advanced control of mechanical forces that are naturally present within the lymphatic microenvironment. The system can be monitored in real-time, allowing continuous quantification of different parameters of interest, such as cell intravasation and detachment from the endothelium, under varied biomechanical conditions. Moreover, the easy setup permits a medium-high throughput, thereby enabling downstream quantitative analyses. Using this model, we examined the kinetics of tumor cell (MDA-MB-231) invasion and transmigration dynamics across lymphatic endothelium under varying flow conditions. We found that luminal flow indirectly upregulates tumor cell transmigration rate via its effect on lymphatic endothelial cells. Moreover, we showed that the addition of transmural flow further increases intravasation, suggesting that distinct flow-mediated mechanisms regulate tumor cell invasion.

  13. The prelymphatic pathways of the brain as revealed by cervical lymphatic obstruction and the passage of particles.

    PubMed Central

    Casley-Smith, J. R.; Földi-Börsök, E.; Földi, M.

    1976-01-01

    Light and electron microscopy was used to examine portions of the brain, the circle of Willis, and the internal carotid arteries of normal cats and rabbits, of sham-operated ones, and of those whose cervical lymphatics had been ligated. Carbon was injected into the cerebral cortex of some lymphoedematous animals. It was found that lymphatic ligation produced oedema of the brain, and a dilatation of the prelymphatic spaces around the vessels. Carbon was traced in these from the injection site, around the minor and major vessels, in the adventitia of the internal carotid artery, entering lymphatics adjacent to it, and finally in the draining lymph nodes. The oedema and dilated spaces were not present in the control animals. This was taken to indicate that there is a continuous system of non-endothelialized spaces and potential spaces-the prelymphatics-draining the brain into the cervical lymphatics. The protein in these spaces appeared to be increased if the lymph-oedema had lasted three weeks as compared to 24 hours, indicating that one of the major roles of this system is the removal of protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 PMID:773400

  14. Study of fluid dynamics reveals direct communications between lymphatic vessels and venous blood vessels at lymph nodes of mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazu; Mori, Shiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2017-02-22

    Cancer cells metastasize to lymph nodes, with distant metastasis resulting in poor prognosis. The role of lymph node metastasis (LNM) in the spread of cancer to distant organs remain incompletely characterized. The visualization of flow dynamics in the lymphatic and blood vessels of MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr mice, which develop systemic swelling of lymph nodes up to 10mm in diameter, has revealed that lymph nodes have the potential to be a direct source of systemic metastasis. However, it is not known whether these fluid dynamics characteristics are universal phenomena present in other strains of laboratory mice. Here we show that the fluid dynamics observed in MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr mice are the same as those observed in C57BL/6J, BALB/cAJcl and NOD/ShiJic-scidJcl mice. Furthermore, when fluorescent solution was injected into a tumor-bearing lymph node, the flow dynamics observed in the efferent lymphatic vessels and thoracoepigastric vein depended on the type of tumor cell. Our results indicate that fluid dynamics in the lymphatic and blood vessels of MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr mice are generalized phenomena seen in conventional laboratory mice. We anticipate our results can facilitate studies of the progression of lymphatic metastasis to hematogenous metastasis via lymph nodes and the early diagnosis and treatment of LNM.

  15. A model to measure lymphatic drainage from the eye.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minhui; Johnston, Miles G; Gupta, Neeru; Moore, Sara; Yücel, Yeni H

    2011-11-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most important risk factor for glaucoma development and progression. Most anti-glaucoma treatments aim to lower IOP by enhancing aqueous humor drainage from the eye. Aqueous humor drainage occurs via well-characterized trabecular meshwork (TM) and uveoscleral (UVS) pathways, and recently described ciliary body lymphatics. The relative contribution of the lymphatic pathway to aqueous drainage is not known. We developed a sheep model to quantitatively assess lymphatic drainage along with TM and UVS outflows. This study describes that model and presents our initial findings. Following intracameral injection of (125)I-bovine serum albumin (BSA), lymph was continuously collected via cannulated cervical lymphatic vessels and the thoracic lymphatic duct over either a 3-h or 5-h time period. In the same animals, blood samples were collected from the right jugular vein every 15 min. Lymphatic and TM drainage were quantitatively assessed by measuring (125)I-BSA in lymph and plasma, respectively. Radioactive tracer levels were also measured in UVS and "other" ocular tissue, as well as periocular tissue harvested 3 and 5 h post-injection. Tracer recovered from UVS tissue was used to estimate UVS drainage. The amount of (125)I-BSA recovered from different fluid and tissue compartments was expressed as a percentage of total recovered tracer. Three hours after tracer injection, percentage of tracer recovered in lymph and plasma was 1.64% ± 0.89% and 68.86% ± 9.27%, respectively (n = 8). The percentage of tracer in UVS, other ocular and periocular tissues was 19.87% ± 5.59%, 4.30% ± 3.31% and 5.32% ± 2.46%, respectively. At 5 h (n = 2), lymphatic drainage was increased (6.40% and 4.96% vs. 1.64%). On the other hand, the percentage of tracer recovered from UVS and other ocular tissue had decreased, and the percentage from periocular tissue showed no change. Lymphatic drainage increased steadily over the 3 h post-injection period, while TM

  16. Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, Maria P.; Sambou, Sana Malang; Thomas, Brent; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Jaye, Momodou C.; Kelly-Hope, Louise; Escalada, Alba Gonzalez; Molyneux, David H.; Bockarie, Moses J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of Wuchereria bancrofti, which causes lymphatic filariasis (LF) in The Gambia was among the highest in Africa in the 1950s. However, surveys conducted in 1975 and 1976 revealed a dramatic decline in LF endemicity in the absence of mass drug administration (MDA). The decline in prevalence was partly attributed to a significant reduction in mosquito density through the widespread use of insecticidal nets. Based on findings elsewhere that vector control alone can interrupt LF, we asked the question in 2013 whether the rapid scale up in the use of insecticidal nets in The Gambia had interrupted LF transmission. Methodology/Principal Finding We present here the results of three independently designed filariasis surveys conducted over a period of 17 years (1997–2013), and involving over 6000 subjects in 21 districts across all administrative divisions in The Gambia. An immunochromatographic (ICT) test was used to detect W. bancrofti antigen during all three surveys. In 2001, tests performed on stored samples collected between 1997 and 2000, in three divisions, failed to show positive individuals from two divisions that were previously highly endemic for LF, suggesting a decline towards extinction in some areas. Results of the second survey conducted in 2003 showed that LF was no longer endemic in 16 of 21 districts surveyed. The 2013 survey used a WHO recommended LF transmission verification tool involving 3180 6–7 year-olds attending 60 schools across the country. We demonstrated that transmission of W. bancrofti has been interrupted in all 21 districts. Conclusions We conclude that LF transmission may have been interrupted in The Gambia through the extensive use of insecticidal nets for malaria control for decades. The growing evidence for the impact of malaria vector control activities on parasite transmission has been endorsed by WHO through a position statement in 2011 on integrated vector management to control malaria and LF. PMID

  17. Intraoperative blood glucose management: impact of a real-time decision support system on adherence to institutional protocol.

    PubMed

    Nair, Bala G; Grunzweig, Katherine; Peterson, Gene N; Horibe, Mayumi; Neradilek, Moni B; Newman, Shu-Fang; Van Norman, Gail; Schwid, Howard A; Hao, Wei; Hirsch, Irl B; Patchen Dellinger, E

    2016-06-01

    Poor perioperative glycemic management can lead to negative surgical outcome. Improved compliance to glucose control protocol could lead to better glucose management. An Anesthesia Information Management System based decision support system-Smart Anesthesia Manager™ (SAM) was used to generate real-time reminders to the anesthesia providers to closely adhere to our institutional glucose management protocol. Compliance to hourly glucose measurements and correct insulin dose adjustments was compared for the baseline period (12 months) without SAM and the intervention period (12 months) with SAM decision support. Additionally, glucose management parameters were compared for the baseline and intervention periods. A total of 1587 cases during baseline and 1997 cases during intervention met the criteria for glucose management (diabetic patients or non-diabetic patients with glucose level >140 mg/dL). Among the intervention cases anesthesia providers chose to use SAM reminders 48.7 % of the time primarily for patients who had diabetes, higher HbA1C or body mass index, while disabling the system for the remaining cases. Compliance to hourly glucose measurement and correct insulin doses increased significantly during the intervention period when compared with the baseline (from 52.6 to 71.2 % and from 13.5 to 24.4 %, respectively). In spite of improved compliance to institutional protocol, the mean glucose levels and other glycemic management parameters did not show significant improvement with SAM reminders. Real-time electronic reminders improved intraoperative compliance to institutional glucose management protocol though glycemic parameters did not improve even when there was greater compliance to the protocol.

  18. Is tuberculosis a lymphatic disease with a pulmonary portal?

    PubMed

    Behr, Marcel A; Waters, W Ray

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis most commonly presents as a pulmonary disease, in which infection, persistence, and induction of transmissible pathology all occur in the lungs. If viewed as a pulmonary disease, enlarged lymph nodes represent reactive adenitis, and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis (including lymphatic tuberculosis) are not transmissible, hence representing an evolutionary dead-end for the pathogen. In an alternative theory, Mycobacterium tuberculosis passes asymptomatically through the lungs and rapidly establishes a chronic lymphatic infection. After a period of weeks to decades secondary lung pathology develops, ultimately allowing transmission to occur. Evidence that supports this lymphatic model includes historical descriptions of human tuberculosis from the preantibiotic era, analogy with other mycobacterial infections, observations of tuberculosis in non-human hosts, and experimental models of tuberculosis disease. At a fundamental level, a lymphocentric model proposes that spread of organisms outside the lung parenchyma is essential to induce adaptive immunity, which is crucial for the generation of transmissible pathology. Furthermore, a lymphatic model could explain why the lesion associated with primary infection (Ghon focus) is anatomically separated from the most common site of reactivation disease (the apex). More practically, an alternative perspective that classes tuberculosis as a lymphatic disease might affect strategies for preclinical and clinical assessment of novel diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines.

  19. High relative density of lymphatic vessels predicts poor survival in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Miia; Pohjola, Konsta; Laranne, Jussi; Rautiainen, Markus; Huhtala, Heini; Renkonen, Risto; Lemström, Karl; Paavonen, Timo; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna

    2016-12-01

    Tongue cancer has a poor prognosis due to its early metastasis via lymphatic vessels. The present study aimed at evaluating lymphatic vessel density, relative density of lymphatic vessel, and diameter of lymphatic vessels and its predictive role in tongue cancer. Paraffin-embedded tongue and lymph node specimens (n = 113) were stained immunohistochemically with a polyclonal antibody von Willebrand factor, recognizing blood and lymphatic endothelium and with a monoclonal antibody podoplanin, recognizing lymphatic endothelium. The relative density of lymphatic vessels was counted by dividing the mean number of lymphatic vessels per microscopic field (podoplanin) by the mean number of all vessels (vWf) per microscopic field. The high relative density of lymphatic vessels (≥80 %) was associated with poor prognosis in tongue cancer. The relative density of lymphatic vessels predicted poor prognosis in the group of primary tumor size T1-T2 and in the group of non-metastatic cancer. The lymphatic vessel density and diameter of lymphatic vessels were not associated with tongue cancer survival. The relative density of lymphatic vessels might have clinically relevant prognostic impact. Further studies with increased number of patients are needed.

  20. A Space Based Internet Protocol System for Sub-Orbital Tracking and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Grant, Charles; Morgan, Dwayne; Streich, Ron; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Personnel from the Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia are responsible for the overall management of the NASA Sounding Rocket Program. Payloads are generally in support of NASA's Space Science Enterprise's missions and return a variety of scientific data as well as providing a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft. The fifteen types of sounding rockets used by NASA can carry payloads of various weights to altitudes from 50 km to more than 1,300 km. Launch activities are conducted not only from established missile ranges, but also from remote locations worldwide requiring mobile tracking and command equipment to be transported and set up at considerable expense. The advent of low earth orbit (LEO) commercial communications satellites provides an opportunity to dramatically reduce tracking and control costs of launch vehicles and Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) by reducing or eliminating this ground infrastructure. Additionally, since data transmission is by packetized Internet Protocol (IP), data can be received and commands initiated from practically any location. A low cost Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) system is currently under development for sounding rockets which also has application to UAVs and scientific balloons. Due to relatively low data rate (9600 baud) currently available, the system will first be used to provide GPS data for tracking and vehicle recovery. Range safety requirements for launch vehicles usually stipulate at least two independent tracking sources. Most sounding rockets flown by NASA now carry GPS receivers that output position data via the payload telemetry system to the ground station. The Flight Modem can be configured as a completely separate link thereby eliminating requirement for tracking radar. The system architecture which integrates antennas, GPS receiver, commercial satellite packet data modem, and a

  1. A Space Based Internet Protocol System for Launch Vehicle Tracking and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton; Grant, Charles; Morgan, Dwayne; Streich, Ron; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Personnel from the Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia are responsible for the overall management of the NASA Sounding Rocket and Scientific Balloon Programs. Payloads are generally in support of NASA's Space Science Enterprise's missions and return a variety of scientific data as well as providing a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft. Sounding rockets used by NASA can carry payloads of various weights to altitudes from 50 km to more than 1,300 km. Scientific balloons can carry a payload weighing as much as 3,630 Kg to an altitude of 42 km. Launch activities for both are conducted not only from established ranges, but also from remote locations worldwide requiring mobile tracking and command equipment to be transported and set up at considerable expense. The advent of low earth orbit (LEO) commercial communications satellites provides an opportunity to dramatically reduce tracking and control costs of these launch vehicles and Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) by reducing or eliminating this ground infrastructure. Additionally, since data transmission is by packetized Internet Protocol (IP), data can be received and commands initiated from practically any location. A low cost Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) system is currently under development for sounding rockets that also has application to UAVs and scientific balloons. Due to relatively low data rate (9600 baud) currently available, the system will first be used to provide GPS data for tracking and vehicle recovery. Range safety requirements for launch vehicles usually stipulate at least two independent tracking sources. Most sounding rockets flown by NASA now carry GP receivers that output position data via the payload telemetry system to the ground station. The Flight Modem can be configured as a completely separate link thereby eliminating the requirement for tracking radar. The

  2. Pump function curve shape for a model lymphatic vessel.

    PubMed

    Bertram, C D; Macaskill, C; Moore, J E

    2016-07-01

    The transport capacity of a contractile segment of lymphatic vessel is defined by its pump function curve relating mean flow-rate and adverse pressure difference. Numerous system characteristics affect curve shape and the magnitude of the generated flow-rates and pressures. Some cannot be varied experimentally, but their separate and interacting effects can be systematically revealed numerically. This paper explores variations in the rate of change of active tension and the form of the relation between active tension and muscle length, factors not known from experiment to functional precision. Whether the pump function curve bends toward or away from the origin depends partly on the curvature of the passive pressure-diameter relation near zero transmural pressure, but rather more on the form of the relation between active tension and muscle length. A pump function curve bending away from the origin defines a well-performing pump by maximum steady output power. This behaviour is favoured by a length/active-tension relationship which sustains tension at smaller lengths. Such a relationship also favours high peak mechanical efficiency, defined as output power divided by the input power obtained from the lymphangion diameter changes and active-tension time-course. The results highlight the need to pin down experimentally the form of the length/active-tension relationship.

  3. Search for lymphatic drainage of the monkey orbit

    SciTech Connect

    McGetrick, J.J.; Wilson, D.G.; Dortzbach, R.K.; Kaufman, P.L.; Lemke, B.N.

    1989-02-01

    Colloid solutions of technetium Tc-99m and india ink injected into the retrobulbar space of the cynomolgus monkey outside the extraocular muscle cone were removed from the orbit by the lymphatic vessels of the conjunctiva and eyelids and were then concentrated within the lymph nodes that drained the conjunctival and eyelid areas. Colloid solutions injected into the retrobulbar space inside the extraocular muscle cone did not reach the conjunctiva and did not collect in any lymph nodes over a 24-hour period. Within the orbit, the injected colloids spread along the planes of the connective-tissue septa. No lymphatic vessels were identified within the orbits posterior to the conjunctiva. Small amounts of india ink left the posterior orbit and ultimately entered the contralateral orbit. This posterior pathway did not lead to lymphatic vessels or lymph nodes and therefore does not appear to represent a prelymphatic pathway.

  4. Guaranteed cost consensus protocol design for linear multi-agent systems with sampled-data information: An input delay approach.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yadong; Zhang, Weidong

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the energy consumption involved in a sampled-data consensus process, the problem of guaranteed cost consensus for sampled-data linear multi-agent systems is considered. By using an input delay approach, an equivalent system is constructed to convert the guaranteed cost consensus problem to a guaranteed cost stabilization problem. A sufficient condition for guaranteed cost consensus is given in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), based on a refined time-dependent Lyapunov functional analysis. Reduced-order protocol design methodologies are proposed, with further discussions on determining sub-optimal protocol gain and enlarging allowable sampling interval bound made as a complement. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  5. Stable implementation agreements for open systems interconnection protocols. Change pages to version 5, edition 1. Output from the September 1992 OSE implementors' workshop (OIW)

    SciTech Connect

    Boland, T.

    1992-11-01

    The document records current stable agreements for Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) protocols among the organizations participating in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Open Systems Environment (OSE) Implementors' Workshop (OIW) series.

  6. Evidence of connections between cerebrospinal fluid and nasal lymphatic vessels in humans, non-human primates and other mammalian species

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Miles; Zakharov, Andrei; Papaiconomou, Christina; Salmasi, Giselle; Armstrong, Dianna

    2004-01-01

    Background The parenchyma of the brain does not contain lymphatics. Consequently, it has been assumed that arachnoid projections into the cranial venous system are responsible for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption. However, recent quantitative and qualitative evidence in sheep suggest that nasal lymphatics have the major role in CSF transport. Nonetheless, the applicability of this concept to other species, especially to humans has never been clarified. The purpose of this study was to compare the CSF and nasal lymph associations in human and non-human primates with those observed in other mammalian species. Methods Studies were performed in sheep, pigs, rabbits, rats, mice, monkeys and humans. Immediately after sacrifice (or up to 7 hours after death in humans), yellow Microfil was injected into the CSF compartment. The heads were cut in a sagittal plane. Results In the seven species examined, Microfil was observed primarily in the subarachnoid space around the olfactory bulbs and cribriform plate. The contrast agent followed the olfactory nerves and entered extensive lymphatic networks in the submucosa associated with the olfactory and respiratory epithelium. This is the first direct evidence of the association between the CSF and nasal lymph compartments in humans. Conclusions The fact that the pattern of Microfil distribution was similar in all species tested, suggested that CSF absorption into nasal lymphatics is a characteristic feature of all mammals including humans. It is tempting to speculate that some disorders of the CSF system (hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension for example) may relate either directly or indirectly to a lymphatic CSF absorption deficit. PMID:15679948

  7. Evidence of connections between cerebrospinal fluid and nasal lymphatic vessels in humans, non-human primates and other mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Miles; Zakharov, Andrei; Papaiconomou, Christina; Salmasi, Giselle; Armstrong, Dianna

    2004-12-10

    BACKGROUND: The parenchyma of the brain does not contain lymphatics. Consequently, it has been assumed that arachnoid projections into the cranial venous system are responsible for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption. However, recent quantitative and qualitative evidence in sheep suggest that nasal lymphatics have the major role in CSF transport. Nonetheless, the applicability of this concept to other species, especially to humans has never been clarified. The purpose of this study was to compare the CSF and nasal lymph associations in human and non-human primates with those observed in other mammalian species. METHODS: Studies were performed in sheep, pigs, rabbits, rats, mice, monkeys and humans. Immediately after sacrifice (or up to 7 hours after death in humans), yellow Microfil was injected into the CSF compartment. The heads were cut in a sagittal plane. RESULTS: In the seven species examined, Microfil was observed primarily in the subarachnoid space around the olfactory bulbs and cribriform plate. The contrast agent followed the olfactory nerves and entered extensive lymphatic networks in the submucosa associated with the olfactory and respiratory epithelium. This is the first direct evidence of the association between the CSF and nasal lymph compartments in humans. CONCLUSIONS: The fact that the pattern of Microfil distribution was similar in all species tested, suggested that CSF absorption into nasal lymphatics is a characteristic feature of all mammals including humans. It is tempting to speculate that some disorders of the CSF system (hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension for example) may relate either directly or indirectly to a lymphatic CSF absorption deficit.

  8. Synthesis of a novel polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugating with alkali blue as a lymphatic tracer and study on the lymphatic targeting in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Xia, Suxia; Ye, Tiantian; Yao, Jianhua; Zhang, Ruizhi; Wang, Shujun; Wang, Siling

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a novel lymphatic tracer polyamidoamin-alkali blue (PAMAM-AB) was synthesized in order to evaluate the intra-lymphatic targeting ability and lymphatic tropism of PAMAM-AB after subcutaneous administration. UV-Vis, FT-IR, NMR and HPLC characterization were performed to prove the successful synthesis of PAMAM-AB. The calculated AB payload of PAMAM-AB conjugate was seven per dendrimer molecule (27.16% by weight). Hydrolysis stability of PAMAM-AB in vitro was evaluated, which was stable in PBS and human plasma. Lymphatic tracing were studied to determine the blue-stained intensity of PAMAM-AB in right popliteral lymph nodes (PLNs), iliac lymph nodes (ILNs) and para-aortic lymph nodes (PALNs) after subcutaneous administration. The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of PAMAM-AB in mice were investigated. PLNs, ILNs and PALNs could be obviously blue-stained within 10 min after PAMAM-AB administration, and displayed a more rapid lymphatic absorption, a higher AUC value in lymph nodes and a longer lymph nodes residence time compared with methylene blue solution (MB-S), MB water-in-oil microemulsion (MB-ME), MB multiple microemulsion (MB-MME). Enhanced lymphatic drainage from the injection site and uptake into lymph of PAMAM-AB indicated that PAMAM-AB possesses the double function of lymphatic tracing and lymphatic targeting, and suggested the potential for the development of lymphatic targeting vectors or as a lymphatic tracer in its own right.

  9. Substance Abuse Treatment For Adults in the Criminal Justice System. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Catalina; Dinsmore, Janet; Gilbert, J. Max; Kornblum, Annette; Latham, Joyce; Oliff, Helen; Paisner, Susan; Sutton, David

    2005-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) provides guidelines for counselors and criminal justice personnel who treat offenders with substance use disorders. TIPs are best-practice guidelines that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts in the…

  10. ZEA-TDMA: design and system level implementation of a TDMA protocol for anonymous wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debasmit; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir

    2013-05-01

    Wireless sensor network used in military applications may be deployed in hostile environments, where privacy and security is of primary concern. This can lead to the formation of a trust-based sub-network among mutually-trusting nodes. However, designing a TDMA MAC protocol is very challenging in situations where such multiple sub-networks coexist, since TDMA protocols require node identity information for slot assignments. This paper introduces a novel distributed TDMA MAC protocol, ZEA-TDMA (Zero Exposure Anonymous TDMA), for anonymous wireless networks. ZEA-TDMA achieves slot allocation with strict anonymity constraints, i.e. without nodes having to exchange any identity revealing information. By using just the relative time of arrival of packets and a novel technique of wireless collision-detection and resolution for fixed packetsizes, ZEA-TDMA is able to achieve MAC slot-allocation which is described as follows. Initially, a newly joined node listens to its one-hop neighborhood channel usage and creates a slot allocation table based on its own relative time, and finally, selects a slot that is collision free within its one-hop neighborhood. The selected slot can however cause hidden collisions with a two-hop neighbor of the node. These collisions are resolved by a common neighbor of the colliding nodes, which first detects the collision, and then resolve them using an interrupt packet. ZEA-TDMA provides the following features: a) it is a TDMA protocol ideally suited for highly secure or strictly anonymous environments b) it can be used in heterogeneous environments where devices use different packet structures c) it does not require network time-synchronization, and d) it is insensitive to channel errors. We have implemented ZEA-TDMA on the MICA2 hardware platform running TinyOS and evaluated the protocol functionality and performance on a MICA2 test-bed.

  11. Quantum cryptography: Theoretical protocols for quantum key distribution and tests of selected commercial QKD systems in commercial fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, Monika; Jacak, Janusz; Jóźwiak, Piotr; Jóźwiak, Ireneusz

    2016-06-01

    The overview of the current status of quantum cryptography is given in regard to quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, implemented both on nonentangled and entangled flying qubits. Two commercial R&D platforms of QKD systems are described (the Clavis II platform by idQuantique implemented on nonentangled photons and the EPR S405 Quelle platform by AIT based on entangled photons) and tested for feasibility of their usage in commercial TELECOM fiber metropolitan networks. The comparison of systems efficiency, stability and resistivity against noise and hacker attacks is given with some suggestion toward system improvement, along with assessment of two models of QKD.

  12. Lack of functioning intratumoral lymphatics in colon and pancreas cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Waldemar L; Stanczyk, Marek; Gewartowska, Magdalena; Domaszewska-Szostek, Anna; Durlik, Marek

    2012-09-01

    There are controversial views as to whether intratumoral or peritumoral lymphatics play a dominant role in the metastatic process. Most clinical observations originate from studies of colon cancer. Colon contains mucosa and submucosa rich in lymphatics and with high lymph formation rate. This seems to be a prerequisite for easy metastasis of cancer cells to regional lymph nodes. However, there are other tissues as pancreas with a rudimentary lymphatic network where cancer metastasis formation is as intensive as in colon cancer. This contradicts the common notion that intratumor lymphatics play major role in metastases. We visualized interstitial space and lymphatics in the central and peripheral regions of colon and pancreas tumors using the color stereoscopic lymphography and simultaneously immunohistochemical performed stainings specific for lymphatic and blood endothelial cells. The density of open and compressed lymphatic and blood vessels was measured in the tumor core and edge. There were very few lymphatics in the colon and pancreas tumor core but numerous minor fluid "lakes" with no visible connection to the peritumoral lymphatics. Lining of "lakes" did not express molecular markers specific for lymphatic endothelial cells. Dense connective tissue surrounding tumor foci did not contain lymphatics. Peritumoral lymphatics were irregularly distributed in both types of tumor and only sporadically contained cells that might be tumor cells. Similar lymphoscintigraphic and histological pictures were seen in colon and pancreas cancer despite of different structure of both tissues. This suggests a uniform reaction of tissues to the growing cancer irrespective of the affected organ.

  13. Reliable broadcast protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, T. A.; Birman, Kenneth P.

    1989-01-01

    A number of broadcast protocols that are reliable subject to a variety of ordering and delivery guarantees are considered. Developing applications that are distributed over a number of sites and/or must tolerate the failures of some of them becomes a considerably simpler task when such protocols are available for communication. Without such protocols the kinds of distributed applications that can reasonably be built will have a very limited scope. As the trend towards distribution and decentralization continues, it will not be surprising if reliable broadcast protocols have the same role in distributed operating systems of the future that message passing mechanisms have in the operating systems of today. On the other hand, the problems of engineering such a system remain large. For example, deciding which protocol is the most appropriate to use in a certain situation or how to balance the latency-communication-storage costs is not an easy question.

  14. The Memory System Engaged During Acquisition Determines the Effectiveness of Different Extinction Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates that extinction of rodent maze behavior may occur without explicit performance of the previously acquired response. In latent extinction, confining an animal to a previously rewarded goal location without reinforcement is typically sufficient to produce extinction of maze learning. However, previous studies have not determined whether latent extinction may be successfully employed to extinguish all types of memory acquired in the maze, or whether only specific types of memory may be vulnerable to latent extinction. The present study examined whether latent extinction may be effective across two plus-maze tasks that depend on anatomically distinct neural systems. Adult male Long-Evans rats were trained in a hippocampus-dependent place learning task (Experiment 1), in which animals were trained to approach a consistent spatial location for food reward. A separate group of rats were trained in a dorsolateral striatum-dependent response learning task (Experiment 2), in which animals were trained to make a consistent egocentric body-turn response for food reward. Following training, animals received response extinction or latent extinction. For response extinction, animals were given the opportunity to execute the original running approach response toward the empty food cup. For latent extinction, animals were confined to the original goal locations with the empty food cup, thus preventing them from making the original running approach response. Results indicate that, relative to no extinction, latent extinction was effective at extinguishing memory in the place learning task, but remained ineffective in the response learning task. In contrast, typical response extinction remained very effective at extinguishing memory in both place and response learning tasks. The present findings confirm that extinction of maze learning may occur with or without overt performance of the previously acquired response, but that the effectiveness of latent

  15. Computer-assisted machine-to-human protocols for authentication of a RAM-based embedded system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrissa, Abdourhamane; Aubert, Alain; Fournel, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    Mobile readers used for optical identification of manufactured products can be tampered in different ways: with hardware Trojan or by powering up with fake configuration data. How a human verifier can authenticate the reader to be handled for goods verification? In this paper, two cryptographic protocols are proposed to achieve the verification of a RAM-based system through a trusted auxiliary machine. Such a system is assumed to be composed of a RAM memory and a secure block (in practice a FPGA or a configurable microcontroller). The system is connected to an input/output interface and contains a Non Volatile Memory where the configuration data are stored. Here, except the secure block, all the blocks are exposed to attacks. At the registration stage of the first protocol, the MAC of both the secret and the configuration data, denoted M0 is computed by the mobile device without saving it then transmitted to the user in a secure environment. At the verification stage, the reader which is challenged with nonces sendsMACs / HMACs of both nonces and MAC M0 (to be recomputed), keyed with the secret. These responses are verified by the user through a trusted auxiliary MAC computer unit. Here the verifier does not need to tract a (long) list of challenge / response pairs. This makes the protocol tractable for a human verifier as its participation in the authentication process is increased. In counterpart the secret has to be shared with the auxiliary unit. This constraint is relaxed in a second protocol directly derived from Fiat-Shamir's scheme.

  16. Immunohistochemical Heterogeneity of the Endothelium of Blood and Lymphatic Vessels in the Developing Human Liver and in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Ivan; Todorović, Vera; Petrović, Aleksandar; Petrović, Vladimir; Jović, Marko; Vladičić, Jelena; Puškaš, Nela

    2017-01-01

    The endothelium of liver sinusoids in relation to the endothelium of other blood vessels has specific antigen expression similar to the endothelium of lymphatic vessels. Bearing in mind that there is no consensus as to the period or intensity of the expression of certain antigens in the endothelium of blood and lymphatic vessels in the liver, the aim of our study was to immunohistochemically investigate the dynamic patterns of the expression of CD31, CD34, D2-40, and LYVE-1 antigens during liver development and in adulthood on paraffin tissue sections of human livers of 4 embryos, 38 fetuses, 6 neonates, and 6 adults. The results show that, in a histologically immature liver at the end of the embryonic period, CD34 molecules are expressed only on vein endothelium localized in developing portal areas, whereby the difference between portal venous branches and CD34-negative central veins belongs to the collecting venous system. In the fetal period, with aging, expression of CD34 and CD31 molecules on the endothelium of central veins and blood vessels of the portal areas increases. Sinusoidal endothelium shows light and sporadic CD34 immunoreactivity in the late embryonic and fetal periods, and is lost in the neonatal and adult periods, unlike CD31 immunoreactivity, which is poorly expressed in the fetal and neonatal periods but is present in adults. The endothelium of sinusoids and lymphatic vessels express LYVE-1, and the endothelium of lymphatic vessels express LYVE-1 and D2-40 but not CD34. Similarity between the sinusoidal and lymphatic endothelium includes the fact that both types are LYVE-1 positive and CD34 negative.

  17. Biplane interventional pediatric system with cone-beam CT: dose and image quality characterization for the default protocols.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, Eva; Vañó, Eliseo; Alejo, Luis; Ubeda, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Larraya, Federico; Garayoa, Julia

    2016-07-08

    The aim of this study was to assess image quality and radiation dose of a biplane angiographic system with cone-beam CT (CBCT) capability tuned for pediatric cardiac procedures. The results of this study can be used to explore dose reduction techniques. For pulsed fluoroscopy and cine modes, polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of various thicknesses and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were employed. Various fields of view (FOV) were selected. For CBCT, the study employed head and body dose phantoms, Catphan 504, and an anthropomorphic cardiology phantom. The study also compared two 3D rotational angiography protocols. The entrance surface air kerma per frame increases by a factor of 3-12 when comparing cine and fluoroscopy frames. The biggest difference in the signal-to- noise ratio between fluoroscopy and cine modes occurs at FOV 32 cm because fluoroscopy is acquired at a 1440 × 1440 pixel matrix size and in unbinned mode, whereas cine is acquired at 720 × 720 pixels and in binned mode. The high-contrast spatial resolution of cine is better than that of fluoroscopy, except for FOV 32 cm, because fluoroscopy mode with 32 cm FOV is unbinned. Acquiring CBCT series with a 16 cm head phantom using the standard dose protocol results in a threefold dose increase compared with the low-dose protocol. Although the amount of noise present in the images acquired with the low-dose protocol is much higher than that obtained with the standard mode, the images present better spatial resolution. A 1 mm diameter rod with 250 Hounsfield units can be distinguished in reconstructed images with an 8 mm slice width. Pediatric-specific protocols provide lower doses while maintaining sufficient image quality. The system offers a novel 3D imaging mode. The acquisition of CBCT images results in increased doses administered to the patients, but also provides further diagnostic information contained in the volumetric images. The assessed CBCT protocols provide images that are noisy, but with

  18. An architecture and protocol for communications satellite constellations regarded as multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindley, Craig A.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents an architecture for satellites regarded as intercommunicating agents. The architecture is based upon a postmodern paradigm of artificial intelligence in which represented knowledge is regarded as text, inference procedures are regarded as social discourse and decision making conventions and the semantics of representations are grounded in the situated behaviour and activity of agents. A particular protocol is described for agent participation in distributed search and retrieval operations conducted as joint activities.

  19. An architecture and protocol for communications satellite constellations regarded as multi-agent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindley, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for satellites regarded as intercommunicating agents. The architecture is based upon a postmodern paradigm of artificial intelligence in which represented knowledge is regarded as text, inference procedures are regarded as social discourse and decision making conventions and the semantics of representations are grounded in the situated behaviour and activity of agents. A particular protocol is described for agent participation in distributed search and retrieval operations conducted as joint activities.

  20. Adaptive Probabilistic Protocols for Advanced Networks/Assuring the Integrity of Highly Decentralized Communications Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    on work done in our effort, and the IPTO Situation-Aware Protocols In Edge Network Technologies ( SAPIENT ) program, under Jonathan Smith, seeks to...of our work: The IPTO SRS program, under Lee Badger, builds 3 on work done in our effort, and the IPTO SAPIENT program, under Jonathan Smith, seeks...Jonathan Smith’s SAPIENT program reflects some of the ideas and successes of our compositional networking approach. SAPIENT will apply similar 11

  1. On-FarmWelfare Assessment Protocol for Adult Dairy Goats in Intensive Production Systems.

    PubMed

    Battini, Monica; Stilwell, George; Vieira, Ana; Barbieri, Sara; Canali, Elisabetta; Mattiello, Silvana

    2015-09-25

    Within the European AWIN project, a protocol for assessing dairy goats' welfareon the farm was developed. Starting from a literature review, a prototype includinganimal-based indicators covering four welfare principles and 12 welfare criteria was set up.The prototype was tested in 60 farms for validity, reliability, and feasibility. After testing theprototype, a two-level assessment protocol was proposed in order to increase acceptabilityamong stakeholders. The first level offers a more general overview of the welfare status,based on group assessment of a few indicators (e.g., hair coat condition, latency to thefirst contact test, severe lameness, Qualitative Behavior Assessment), with no or minimalhandling of goats and short assessment time required. The second level starts if welfareAnimals 2015, 5 935problems are encountered in the first level and adds a comprehensive and detailed individualevaluation (e.g., Body Condition Score, udder asymmetry, overgrown claws), supported byan effective sampling strategy. The assessment can be carried out using the AWIN Goatapp. The app results in a clear visual output, which provides positive feedback on welfareconditions in comparison with a benchmark of a reference population. The protocol maybe a valuable tool for both veterinarians and technicians and a self-assessment instrumentfor farmers.

  2. The Socioeconomic Impact of Lymphatic Filariasis in Tropical Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwoke, Bertram Ekejiuba Bright; Nwoke, Eunice Anyalewechi; Dozie, Ikechukwu Nosike Simplicius

    2007-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is an endemic parasitic disease and a major cause of acute and chronic morbidity and incapacitation with devastating public health and socio-economic consequences. It exacerbates poor conditions of afflicted persons and endemic communities through reduced or lost labour supply and productivity. Stigmatisation and…

  3. Antifilarial compounds in the treatment and control of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Mak, J W

    2004-12-01

    Diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) has been used for treatment and control of lymphatic filariasis since the 1950s. Although this remarkable drug is still useful and modified strategies in its usage have been developed, a number of newer antifilarial compounds are now available. Numerous field trials evaluating their efficacy in the control of lymphatic filariasis have been conducted. In particular, ivermectin (IVM), albendazole (ALB), and DEC have been tested singly and in combinations and the results of such field studies should be evaluated. While most of the studies were based on efficacy in the clearance of microfilaraemia, a few clinical trials evaluated the adulticidal activity of these compounds. Some antibiotics are effective in killing Wolbachia bacteria symbionts of filarial worms, but their role in the chemotherapy of lymphatic filariasis is still undefined. This review of randomised controlled field studies and randomised controlled clinical trials with these compounds will summarise the findings and give recommendations on their appropriate use for the control and treatment of lymphatic filariasis.

  4. Lymphatic mapping and sentinel node location with magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chu W.; Rogers, James M.; Groman, Ernest V.

    1999-04-01

    Subcutaneously administered magnetite nanoparticles were used to locate sentinel lymph nodes in normal rats. Nanoparticles sequestered in brachial and axillary lymph nodes produced magnetic susceptibility artifacts in gradient recall echo magnetic resonance images. The artifact sizes enabled the determination of nanoparticle nodal uptake rates and lymphatic drainage patterns. These studies were confirmed by use of 59Fe labeled magnetite nanoparticles.

  5. Bleomycin sclerotherapy for lymphatic malformation after unsuccessful surgical excision: case report.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, A; Gazikalovic, A; Adjic, O

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are benign cystic masses resulting from the abnormal development of lymphatic channels. Lymphatic malformations occur primarily in the head and neck region. Surgical excision of lymphatic malformation is followed by high rate of recurrence and a high risk of complications. Bleomycin is an established antineoplastic drug. It can be used as a sclerosing agent in vascular anomalies. We present a child who was unsuccessfully treated with four surgical resections, with peripheral palsy of facial nerve as complication. The lymphatic malformation was successfully treated in our institution with intralesional administration of bleomycin.

  6. [THE STRUCTURE OF LYMPHATIC CAPILLARIES OF THE CILIARY BODY OF THE HUMAN EYE].

    PubMed

    Borodin, Yu I; Bgatova, N P; Chernykh, V V; Trunov, A N; Pozhidayeva, A A; Konenkov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Using light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, the structural organization of interstitial spaces and vessels of the ciliary body of the human eye (n = 5) were studied. The ciliary body was found to contain wide interstitial spaces--tissue clefts bound by collagen fibers and fibroblasts. Organ-specific lymphatic capillaries were also demonstrated in the ciliary body. According to the present findings and the lymphatic region concept, the first 2 elements of the lymphatic region of the eye were described: tissue clefts--prelymphatics and lymphatic capillaries of the ciliary body. The third element of the lymphatic region are the lymph nodes of the head and neck.

  7. Intestinal and peri-tumoral lymphatic endothelial cells are resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Hoon Ki; Morisada, Tohru; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Oike, Yuichi; Lee, Jayhun; Sung, Eon Ki; Chung, Jae Hoon; Suda, Toshio; Koh, Gou Young . E-mail: gykoh@kaist.ac.kr

    2006-06-30

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment, but it is unable to completely block cancer metastasis. The lymphatic vasculature serves as the primary route for metastatic spread, but little is known about how lymphatic endothelial cells respond to radiation. Here, we show that lymphatic endothelial cells in the small intestine and peri-tumor areas are highly resistant to radiation injury, while blood vessel endothelial cells in the small intestine are relatively sensitive. Our results suggest the need for alternative therapeutic modalities that can block lymphatic endothelial cell survival, and thus disrupt the integrity of lymphatic vessels in peri-tumor areas.

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies in the Lymphatics: Selective Delivery to Lymph Node Metastases of a Solid Tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, John N.; Steller, Michael A.; Keenan, Andrew M.; Covell, David G.; Key, Marc E.; Sieber, Susan M.; Oldham, Robert K.; Hwang, Kou M.; Parker, Robert J.

    1983-10-01

    After subcutaneous injection, monoclonal antibodies directed against a tumor can enter local lymphatic vessels, pass to the draining lymph nodes, and bind to metastases there. Lymphatic delivery of antibody to early metastases is more efficient than intravenous administration, and the lymphatic route can be used to image smaller metastatic deposits. Perhaps more important, the lymphatic route minimizes binding of antibodies to circulating tumor antigens and to cross-reactive antigens present on normal tissues. Antibodies inappropriate for intravenous use because of binding to normal tissues may therefore be useful against lymph node metastases when injected subcutaneously or directly into lymphatic vessels.

  9. Lymphatic Contribution to the Cellular Niche in Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Loder, Shawn; Agarwal, Shailesh; Sorkin, Michael; Breuler, Chris; Li, John; Peterson, Joshua; Hsieh, Hsiao Hsin Sung; Wang, Stewart; Mehrara, Babak; Levi, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of lymphatic tissue to heterotopic ossification. Background Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the pathologic development of ectopic bone within soft tissues often following severe trauma. Characterization of the tissue niche supporting HO is critical to identifying therapies directed against this condition. Lymphangiogenesis is up-regulated during incidents of trauma, thereby co-incident with the niche supportive of HO. We hypothesized that lymphatic tissues play a critical role in HO formation. Methods Mice underwent hindlimb Achilles’ tendon transection and dorsal burn injury(burn/tenotomy) to induce HO. The popliteal and inguinal lymph nodes were excised ipsilateral to the tenotomy site. Flow cytometry and immunostaining were used to quantify and localize lymphoendothelium. MicroCT was used to quantify HO. Results Enrichment of mature lymphatic tissues was noted 2 weeks after injury at the tendon transection sites when compared with the contralateral, intact tendon based on LYVE1+ tubules (10.9% v. 0.8%, p<0.05). Excision of the inguinal and popliteal nodes with draining popliteal lymphatic vessel significantly decreased the presence of mature lymphoendothelium 2 weeks after injury (10.9% v. 3.3%, p<0.05). Bone-cartilage-stromal progenitor cells (CD105+/AlphaV+/Tie2−/CD45−/CD90−/BP1−) were also significantly decreased after lymph node excision (10.2% v. 0.5%, p<0.05). A significant decrease was noted in the volume of de novo HO present within the soft tissues (0.12 mm^3 v. 0.02 mm^3). Conclusions These findings suggest that lymphatic vessels are intimately linked with the formation de novo bone within soft tissues following trauma, and their presence may facilitate bone formation. PMID:26779981

  10. Assessment of the multi-criteria evaluation system of the Welfare Quality® protocol for growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Czycholl, I; Kniese, C; Schrader, L; Krieter, J

    2017-02-21

    Animal welfare has become an important subject of public and political debate, leading to the necessity of an objective evaluation system for on-farm use. As welfare is a multi-dimensional concept, it makes sense to use a multi-criteria aggregation system to obtain an overall welfare score. Such an aggregation system is provided by the Welfare Quality® Network. The present paper focusses on the assessment of the multi-criteria evaluation model included in the Welfare Quality® protocol for growing pigs in order to aggregate the animal-based indicators first to criteria, then to principles and finally to an overall welfare score. Specifically, the importance of the indicators on the overall assessment of growing pig farms is analysed in a given population which consisted of a total of 198 protocol assessments carried out on a sample of 24 farms in Germany. By means of partial least squares modelling, the influence of measures in the calculation procedure is estimated by calculation and interpretation of Variable Importance for Projection (VIP) scores. Variable Importance for Projection scores revealed some meaningful, unexpected influences as the multi-criteria evaluation model of Welfare Quality® aimed at avoiding interferences and double-counting. Some of these influences led to the assumption that some measures might have potential as iceberg indicators, whereas others showed lesser importance. Thus, feasibility can be gained by the deletion and special weighting of indicators according to their importance. Altogether, the study is an essential contribution to the further development of the Welfare Quality® protocols as well as the application of multi-criteria decision systems in the field of animal welfare science in general.

  11. Efficient Assessment of Developmental, Surgical and Pathological Lymphangiogenesis Using a Lymphatic Reporter Mouse and Its Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Wonhyuek; Seong, Young Jin; Park, Eunkyung; Bramos, Athanasios; Kim, Kyu Eui; Lee, Sunju; Daghlian, George; Seo, Jung In; Choi, Inho; Choi, In-Seon; Koh, Chester J.; Kobielak, Agnieszka; Ying, Qi-Long; Johnson, Maxwell; Gardner, Daniel; Wong, Alex K.; Choi, Dongwon; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Several lymphatic reporter mouse lines have recently been developed to significantly improve imaging of lymphatic vessels. Nonetheless, the usage of direct visualization of lymphatic vessels has not been fully explored and documented. Here, we characterized a new Prox1-tdTomato transgenic lymphatic reporter mouse line, and demonstrated how this animal tool enables the researchers to efficiently assess developmental, surgical and pathological lymphangiogenesis by direct visualization of lymphatic vessels. Moreover, we have derived embryonic stem cells from this reporter line, and successfully differentiated them into lymphatic vessels in vivo. In conclusion, these experimental tools and techniques will help advance lymphatic research. PMID:27280889

  12. Efficacy of B cell Depletion Therapy on Joint Flare is Associated with Increased Lymphatic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Ju, Yawen; Bouta, Echoe M.; Xing, Lianping; Wood, Ronald W.; Kuzin, Igor; Bottaro, Andrea; Ritchlin, Christopher T.; Schwarz, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Arthritic flare in tumor necrosis factor transgenic (TNF-Tg) mice is associated with efferent lymph node (LN) “collapse,” triggered by B cell translocation into lymphatic spaces and decreased lymphatic drainage. We examined whether BCDT efficacy is associated with restoration of lymphatic drainage due to removal of obstructing nodal B cells. Methods We developed contrast-enhancement (CE) MRI imaging, near-infrared indocyanine green (NIR-ICG) imaging, and intravital immunofluorescent imaging to longitudinally assess synovitis, lymphatic flow, and cell migration in lymphatic vessels in TNF-Tg mice. We tested to see if BCDT efficacy is associated with restoration of lymphatic draining and cell egress from arthritic joints. Results Unlike active lymphatics to normal and pre-arthritic knees, afferent lymphatic vessels to collapsed LNs in inflamed knees do not pulse. Intravital immunofluorescent imaging demonstrated that CD11b+ monocytes/macrophages in lymphatic vessels afferent to expanding LN travel at high velocity (186 ± 37 micrometer/sec), while these cells are stationary in lymphatic vessels afferent to collapsed PLN. BCDT of flaring TNF-Tg mice significantly decreased knee synovial volume by 50% from the baseline level, and significantly increased lymphatic clearance versus placebo (p<0.05). This increased lymphatic drainage restored macrophages egress from inflamed joints without recovery of the lymphatic pulse. Conclusion These results support a novel mechanism in which BCDT of flaring joints lessens inflammation by increasing lymphatic drainage and subsequent migration of cells and cytokines from the synovial space. PMID:23002006

  13. A Time-Slotted On-Demand Routing Protocol for Mobile Ad Hoc Unmanned Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hope Forsmann; Robert Hiromoto; John Svoboda

    2007-04-01

    The popularity of UAVs has increased dramatically because of their successful deployment in military operations, their ability to preserve human life, and the continual improvements in wireless communication that serves to increase their capabilities. We believe the usefulness of UAVs would be dramatically increased if formation flight were added to the list of capabilities. Currently, sustained formation flight with a cluster of UAVs has only been achieved with two nodes by the Multi-UAV Testbed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (Park, 2004) Formation flight is a complex operation requiring the ability to adjust the flight patterns on the fly and correct for wind gusts, terrain, and differences in node equipment. All of which increases the amount of inner node communication. Since one of the problems with MANET communication is network congestion, we believe a first step towards formation flight can be made through improved inner node communication. We have investigated current communication routing protocols and developed an altered hybrid routing protocol in order to provide communication with less network congestion.

  14. Evaluation of a realtime, remote monitoring telemedicine system using the Bluetooth protocol and a mobile phone network.

    PubMed

    Jasemian, Yousef; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    A generic, realtime wireless telemedicine system has been developed that uses the Bluetooth protocol and the general packet radio service for mobile phones. The system was tested on 10 healthy volunteers, by continuous monitoring of their electrocardiograms (ECGs). Under realistic conditions, the system had 96.5% uptime, a data throughput of 3.3 kbit/s, a mean packet error rate of 8.5x10(-3) packet/s and a mean packet loss rate of 8.2x10(-3) packet/s. During 24 h testing, the total average downtime was 66 min and 90% of the periods of downtime were of only 1-3 min duration. Less than 10% of the ECGs were of unacceptable quality. Thus, the generic telemedicine system showed high reliability and performance, and the design may provide a foundation for realtime monitoring in clinical practice, for example in cardiology.

  15. Determining the Combined Effect of the Lymphatic Valve Leaflets and Sinus on Resistance to Forward Flow

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John T.; van Loon, Raoul; Wang, Wei; Zawieja, David C.; Moore, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The lymphatic system is vital to a proper maintenance of fluid and solute homeostasis. Collecting lymphatics are composed of actively contracting tubular vessels segmented by bulbous sinus regions that encapsulate bi-leaflet check valves. Valve resistance to forward flow strongly influences pumping performance. However, because of the sub-millimeter size of the vessels with flow rates typically < 1 ml/hour and pressures of a few cmH2O, resistance is difficult to measure experimentally. Using a newly defined idealized geometry, we employed an uncoupled approach where the solid leaflet deflections of the open valve were computed and lymph flow calculations were subsequently performed. We sought to understand: 1) the effect of sinus and leaflet size on the resulting deflections experienced by the valve leaflets and 2) the effects on valve resistance to forward flow of the fully open valve. For geometries with sinus-to-root diameter ratios > 1.39, the average resistance to forward flow was 0.95 × 106 [g/(cm4 s)]. Compared to the viscous pressure drop that would occur in a straight tube the same diameter as the upstream lymphangion, valve leaflets alone increase the pressure drop up to 35%. However, the presence of the sinus reduces viscous losses, with the net effect that when combined with leaflets the overall resistance is less than that of the equivalent continuing straight tube. Accurately quantifying resistance to forward flow will add to the knowledge used to develop therapeutics for treating lymphatic disorders and may eventually lead to understanding some forms of primary lymphedema. PMID:26315921

  16. Validation study for the hypothesis of internal mammary sentinel lymph node lymphatic drainage in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cong, Bin-Bin; Qiu, Peng-Fei; Liu, Yan-Bing; Zhao, Tong; Chen, Peng; Cao, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Chun-Jian; Zhang, Zhao-Peng; Sun, Xiao; Yu, Jin-Ming; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-07-05

    According to axilla sentinel lymph node lymphatic drainage pattern, we hypothesized that internal mammary sentinel lymph node (IM-SLN) receives lymphatic drainage from not only the primary tumor area, but also the entire breast parenchyma. Based on the hypothesis a modified radiotracer injection technique was established and could increase the visualization rate of the IM-SLN significantly. To verify the hypothesis, two kinds of tracers were injected at different sites of breast. The radiotracer was injected with the modified technique, and the fluorescence tracer was injected in the peritumoral intra-parenchyma. The location of IM-SLN was identified by preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative gamma probe. Then, internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB) was performed. The fluorescence status of IM-SLN was identified by the fluorescence imaging system. A total of 216 patients were enrolled from September 2013 to July 2015. The overall visualization rate of IM-SLN was 71.8% (155/216). The success rate of IM-SLNB was 97.3% (145/149). The radiotracer and the fluorescence tracer were identified in the same IM-SLN in 127 cases, the correlation and the agreement is significant (Case-base, rs=0.836, P<0.001; Kappa=0.823, P<0.001). Different tracers injected into the different sites of the intra-parenchyma reached the same IM-SLN, which demonstrates the hypothesis that IM-SLN receives the lymphatic drainage from not only the primary tumor area but also the entire breast parenchyma.

  17. Effects of Bothrops asper Snake Venom on Lymphatic Vessels: Insights into a Hidden Aspect of Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Javier; Mora, Rodrigo; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José María

    2008-01-01

    Background Envenomations by the snake Bothrops asper represent a serious medical problem in Central America and parts of South America. These envenomations concur with drastic local tissue pathology, including a prominent edema. Since lymph flow plays a role in the maintenance of tissue fluid balance, the effect of B. asper venom on collecting lymphatic vessels was studied. Methodology/Principal Findings B. asper venom was applied to mouse mesentery, and the effects were studied using an intravital microscopy methodology coupled with an image analysis program. B. asper venom induced a dose-dependent contraction of collecting lymphatic vessels, resulting in a reduction of their lumen and in a halting of lymph flow. The effect was reproduced by a myotoxic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) homologue isolated from this venom, but not by a hemorrhagic metalloproteinase or a coagulant thrombin-like serine proteinase. In agreement with this, treatment of the venom with fucoidan, a myotoxin inhibitor, abrogated the effect, whereas no inhibition was observed after incubation with the peptidomimetic metalloproteinase inhibitor Batimastat. Moreover, fucoidan significantly reduced venom-induced footpad edema. The myotoxic PLA2 homologue, known to induce skeletal muscle necrosis, was able to induce cytotoxicity in smooth muscle cells in culture and to promote an increment in the permeability to propidium iodide in these cells. Conclusions/Significance Our observations indicate that B. asper venom affects collecting lymphatic vessels through the action of myotoxic PLA2s on the smooth muscle of these vessels, inducing cell contraction and irreversible cell damage. This activity may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the pronounced local edema characteristic of viperid snakebite envenomation, as well as in the systemic biodistribution of the venom, thus representing a potential therapeutical target in these envenomations. PMID:18923712

  18. Subcutaneously Administered Ultrafine PLGA Nanoparticles Containing Doxycycline Hydrochloride Target Lymphatic Filarial Parasites.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yuvraj; Srinivas, Adepu; Gangwar, Mamta; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja; Chourasia, Manish K

    2016-06-06

    Systemic chemotherapeutic targeting of filarial parasites is unfocused due to their deep seated location in lymphatic vessels. This warrants a prolonged dosing regimen in high doses for an anthelmintic like doxycycline hydrochloride (DOX). In order to provide an alternative, we have constructed ultrafine PLGA nanoparticles of DOX (DPNPs), so as to exploit the peculiarity of lymphatic vasculature underneath the subcutaneous layer of skin, which preferentially allows entry of only 10-100 nm sized particles. DPNPs were constructed using a novel solvent diffusion method aided by probe sonication, which resulted in an average size 95.43 ± 0.8 nm as per DLS, PDI 0.168 ± 0.03, zeta potential -7.38 ± 0.32, entrapment efficiency 75.58 ± 1.94%, and refrigerator stability of 7 days with respect to size in the optimized batch. TEM further substantiated the spherical shape of DPNPs along with their actual nonhydrated size as being well below 100 nm. FTIR analysis of DOX, dummy nanoparticles, and freeze-dried DPNPs revealed that the formulation step did not induce prominent changes in the chemical nature of DOX. The drug release was significantly altered (p < 0.05) with 64.6 ± 1.67% release in 48 h from DPNPs and was dictated by Fickian diffusion. Pharmacokinetic studies in Wistar rats further revealed that DPNPs caused a 16-fold prolongation in attainment of plasma Tmax and a 2-fold extension of elimination half-life (28.569 ± 1.27 h) at a dose of 5 mg/kg when compared to native drug (DOX solution) of the same strength. Contrastingly the trend was reversed in regional lymph nodes where Cmax for DPNPs (820 ± 84 ng/mg) was 4-fold greater, and lymphatic Tmax was attained in one-fourth of what was required for DOX solution. This size based preferential lymphatic targeting resulted in significantly greater in vivo antifilarial activity of DPNPs when compared to DOX solution as gauged by several parameters in Brugia malayi infected Mastomys coucha. Interestingly, the

  19. Epidemiology, health systems and stakeholders in rheumatic heart disease in Africa: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Moloi, Annesinah Hlengiwe; Watkins, David; Engel, Mark E; Mall, Sumaya; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic disease affecting the heart valves, secondary to group A streptococcal infection (GAS) and subsequent acute rheumatic fever (ARF). However, RHD cure and preventative measures are inextricably linked with socioeconomic development, as the disease mainly affects children and young adults living in poverty. In order to address RHD, public health officials and health policymakers require up-to-date knowledge on the epidemiology of GAS, ARF and RHD, as well as the existing enablers and gaps in delivery of evidence-based care for these conditions. We propose to conduct a systematic review to assess the literature comprehensively, synthesising all existing quantitative and qualitative data relating to RHD in Africa. Methods and analysis We plan to conduct a comprehensive literature search using a number of databases and reference lists of relevant articles published from January 1995 to December 2015. Two evaluators will independently review and extract data from each article. Additionally, we will assess overall study quality and risk of bias, using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme criteria for quantitative and qualitative studies, respectively. We will meta-analyse estimates of prevalence, incidence, case fatality and mortality for each of the conditions separately for each country. Qualitative meta-analysis will be conducted for facilitators and barriers in RHD health access. Lastly, we will create a list of key stakeholders. This protocol is registered in the PROSPERO International Prospective Register of systematic reviews, registration number CRD42016032852. Ethics and dissemination The information provided by this review will inform and assist relevant stakeholders in identifying key areas of intervention, and designing and implementing evidence-based programmes and policies at the local and regional level. With slight modifications (ie, to the country terms in the search

  20. Expression of VEGFR-3 and 5'-nase in regenerating lymphatic vessels of the cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rui-Cheng; Miura, Masahiro; Qu, Peng; Kato, Seiji

    2004-06-15

    The vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), a specific lymphangiogenic growth factor, raises new questions and perspectives in studying lymphatic development and regeneration. Wound healing skins in mice were processed for 5'-nucleotidase (5'-Nase) and VEGFR-3 (the receptor of VEGF-C) histochemical staining to distinguish lymphatics from blood capillaries and to analyze lymphangiogenesis. In the wounds of 3-5 days after injury, anti-VEGFR-3 immunopositive signals unevenly appeared in 5'-Nase-positive lymphatic vessels in the subcutaneous tissue. A few small circular and irregular lymphatic-like structures with VEGFR-3 expression scattered in the dermal and subcutaneous tissues. Between days 7 and 15 of the wounds, numerous accumulated vasculatures were stained for 5'-Nase and PECAM-1, extending irregularly along the wound edge. Von Willebrand factor was expressed in the endothelial cells of blood vessels and lymphatics in the subcutaneous tissue. Ultrastructural changes of lymphatic vessels developed at different stages, from lymphatic-like structures to newly formed lymphatic vessels with an extremely thin and indented wall. Endothelial cells of the lymphatic vessel were eventually featured by typical intercellular junctions, which deposited with reaction products of VEGFR-3 and 5'-Nase-cerium but lacked VEGF-C expression. The present findings indicate that VEGF-C-induced lymphangiogenesis occurs from the subcutaneous to the dermis along the wound healing edge, especially in the dermal-subcutaneous transitional area, favorable to growth of regenerating lymphatic vessels.

  1. Three-dimensional treatment planning for central lymphatic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J; Bryant, C; Ha, C S; Cox, J D; Antolak, J A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of 3-dimensional (3D) treatment planning for central lymphatic irradiation (CLI). CLI requires more than 1 course of treatment with large, highly blocked, overlapping beams, and careful planning is required to ensure that such treatments are delivered safely and effectively. Three patients were selected for this study. Each patient completed at least 1 course of radiation therapy for CLI and was scheduled to receive irradiation to an adjacent area with overlapping beams. Two treatment plans were generated for each patient: a standard, 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plan and a 3D treatment plan designed to mimic the standard plan, taking advantage of unique 3D features. The time required to complete the treatment plans and differences in the treatment planning processes were noted. The time required to generate a 3D treatment plan was approximately the same as the time required to generate a standard 2D treatment plan; however, the 3D planning process required less redundancy of data entry than the 2D process. The 3D treatment plan was qualitatively similar to the standard 2D treatment plan; however, differences in beam penumbra and beam junctions were noted, and are most likely due to differences in the dose-calculation models used in these 2 treatment planning systems. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated for the spinal cord and were found to be useful to the physicians for quickly and accurately evaluating the presence or absence of hot spots in the junction region. 3D treatment-planning has some advantages over 2D treatment planning for CLI; the main advantage of the 3D treatment plan is that it provides a single plan for each patient with multiple views of the data, including different planar cross-sections and DVHs. For the 2D system, a separate plan was generated for each view, requiring redundant data entry. The quality of the output of the 3D treatment plans is superior to that of 2D

  2. Quantitative study of the topographic distribution of conjunctival lymphatic vessels in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenyi; Zhu, Yuanfang; Yu, Paula K; Yu, Xiaobo; Sun, Xinghuai; Cringle, Stephen J; Su, Er-Ning; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the topographic distribution of bulbar conjunctival microlymphatic vessels in the monkey. Sixteen eyes from 8 rhesus monkeys were used. Full thickness pieces of globe wall were excised from each quadrant. Cryosections were stained for 5'-nucleotidase, an enzyme histochemical staining for lymphatic vessels, or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3, an immunohistochemical marker for the identification of lymphatic endothelial cells, and then counterstained by hematoxylin. The remaining bulbar conjunctiva was dissected and flat mounted. The tissue was then processed with 5'-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme histochemical stain with higher activity in blood vessels. Microscope images were further analysed by image processing. The density of lymphatics, diameter of lymphatic vessels, and the size of the drainage zone of each blind end of the initial lymphatics were studied. Conjunctival lymphatics consisted of initial lymphatics and pre-collectors. The initial lymphatics with blind ends were predominately distributed just under the epithelium. The density of these lymphatics (∼50%) and the drainage zone area (∼0.81 mm(2)) was similar in each quadrant, with no difference in the limbus and fornix regions. The average diameter of lymphatic vessels in each quadrant ranged from 82 to 111 μm, and was greater in the superior and nasal regions. Larger calibre pre-collectors with valve-like structures were mostly located sub Tenon's membrane and predominantly located in the region mid-way between the limbus and fornix. There was a marked depth difference in initial lymphatic distribution, with the initial lymphatics mostly confined to the region between Tenon's membrane and the conjunctival epithelium. Detailed knowledge of the topographic distribution of conjunctival lymphatics have significant relevance to a better understanding of immunology, drug delivery, glaucoma filtration surgery, and tumour

  3. Treg engage lymphotoxin beta receptor for afferent lymphatic transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Iwami, Daiki; Hritzo, Molly K.; Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Simon, Thomas; Hippen, Keli L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to suppress unwanted immunity or inflammation. After islet allo-transplant Tregs must migrate from blood to allograft, then via afferent lymphatics to draining LN to protect allografts. Here we show that Tregs but not non-Treg T cells use lymphotoxin (LT) during migration from allograft to draining LN, and that LT deficiency or blockade prevents normal migration and allograft protection. Treg LTαβ rapidly modulates cytoskeletal and membrane structure of lymphatic endothelial cells; dependent on VCAM-1 and non-canonical NFκB signalling via LTβR. These results demonstrate a form of T-cell migration used only by Treg in tissues that serves an important role in their suppressive function and is a unique therapeutic focus for modulating suppression. PMID:27323847

  4. Lymphoscintigraphic studies of lymphatic drainage from the testes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.D.; Morse, M.J.; Grando, R.; Kleinert, E.L.; Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1986-12-01

    Two colloidal radiopharmaceuticals, Au-198 and Tc-99m antimony, were used to evaluate the lymphatic drainage of the testis in experimental animals and humans. One to 24 hours after direct intratesticular injection of Au-198 colloid in dogs and 4-6 hours after injection of Tc-99m antimony colloid in men, distribution within retroperitoneal lymph nodes was demonstrated. Uptake within the para-aortic lymph nodes primarily draining the testis was decreased following proximal ligation of the spermatic vessels in dogs. Testicular lymphoscintigraphy successfully demonstrated an intact spermatic cord lymphatic communication to the para-aortic nodes in five of six patients with chronic lower-extremity lymphedema. When the intact testicle and spermatic cord were transposed to the thigh in a patient with chronic lymphedema of the lower extremity, percutaneous pedal lymphoscintigraphy successfully demonstrated uptake within the para-aortic lymph nodes draining the ipsilateral testis.

  5. Core content for training in venous and lymphatic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Min, Robert J; Comerota, Anthony J; Meissner, Mark H; Carman, Teresa L; Rathbun, Suman W; Jaff, Michael R; Wakefield, Thomas W; Feied, Craig F

    2014-01-01

    The major venous societies in the United States share a common mission to improve the standards of medical practitioners, the educational goals for teaching and training programs in venous disease, and the quality of patient care related to the treatment of venous disorders. With these important goals in mind, a task force made up of experts from the specialties of dermatology, interventional radiology, phlebology, vascular medicine, and vascular surgery was formed to develop a consensus document describing the Core Content for venous and lymphatic medicine and to develop a core educational content outline for training. This outline describes the areas of knowledge considered essential for practice in the field, which encompasses the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with acute and chronic venous and lymphatic disorders. The American Venous Forum and the American College of Phlebology have endorsed the Core Content. PMID:25059735

  6. Pediatric lymphatic malformations: evolving understanding and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Defnet, Ann M; Bagrodia, Naina; Hernandez, Sonia L; Gwilliam, Natalie; Kandel, Jessica J

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal treatment of lymphatic malformations continues to expand as new information about the biology and genetics of these lesions is discovered, along with knowledge gained from clinical practice. A patient-centered approach, ideally provided by a multidisciplinary medical and surgical team, should guide timing and modality of treatment. Current treatment options include observation, surgery, sclerotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, and laser therapy. New medical and surgical therapies are emerging, and include sildenafil, propranolol, sirolimus, and vascularized lymph node transfer. The primary focus of management is to support and optimize these patients' quality of life. Researchers continue to study lymphatic malformations with the goal of increasing therapeutic options and developing effective clinical pathways for these complicated lesions.

  7. Improvement of Electrical Stimulation Protocol for Simultaneous Measurement of Extracellular Potential with On-Chip Multi-Electrode Array System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Nomura, Fumimasa; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    Cardiotoxicity testing with a multi-electrode array (MEA) system requires the stable beating of cardiomyocytes for the measurement of the field potential duration (FPD), because different spontaneous beating rates cause different responses of FPD prolongation induced by drugs, and the beating rate change effected by drugs complicates the FPD prolongation assessment. We have developed an on-chip MEA system with electrical stimulation for the measurement of the FPD during the stable beating of human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters. Using a conventional bipolar stimulation protocol, we observed such large artifacts in electrical stimulation that we could not estimate the FPD quantitatively. Therefore, we improved the stimulation protocol by using sequential rectangular pulses in which the positive and negative stimulation voltages and number of pulses could be changed flexibly. The balanced voltages and number of pulses for sequential rectangular pulses enabled the recording of small negative artifacts only, which hardly affected the FPD measurement of human-ES-cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters. These conditions of electrical stimulation are expected to find applications for the control of constant beating for cardiotoxicity testing.

  8. Studies of lymphatic drainage from testes by lymphoscintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.D.J.; Morse, M.J.; Grando, R.; Kleinert, E.L.; Whitmore, W.F. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    Severe lymphedema of lower extremity may cause functional disability and foster recurrent lymphangitis. Surgical transportation of the testis to the thigh offers the possibility of enhancing lymphatic drainage from the leg via spermatic cord lymphatics. Testicular lymphoscintigraphy was employed to assess the quality of testicular lymphatic drainage prior to testis transposition. Images of abdomen and measurement of testis radioactivity were made serially after injection of Au 198 colloid into the testis of dogs before and after litigation of the spermatic cord. In the intact dogs, the residual radioactivities in the testis (5 dogs) were 53.5 +- 13.25, 41.6 +- 7.80 and 26.3 +- 5.66% at 2, 4 and 24 hours post injection. After ligation of spermatic cord, the residual activities in the testis were 95.0 +- 3.33, 86.4 +- 6.49 and 74.2 +- 6.28% at corresponding intervals post injection. Paraaortic nodes and liver were visualized in the abdominal images 1 hour after injection in the intact animals but only poorly seen in dogs following ligation. /sup 99m/Tc antimony colloid was used similarly in 5 patients who had severe lymphedema and abnormal pelvic lymphoscintigraphy following bipedal injection. With intratesticular injection, paraaortic lymph nodes and liver were visualized in 7 studies between 3 to 5 hours. Poor visualization was noted in two studies in patients who had previous radiation to the abdomen. The findings suggest that this simple technic can aid in the assessment of testicular lymphatic drainage and help to select patients for appropriate surgical intervention.

  9. Imported lymphatic filariasis in an Indian immigrant to iran.

    PubMed

    Kia, Eshrat Beigom; Sharifdini, Meysam; Hajjaran, Homa; Shahbazi, Ali Ehsan; Sayyad Talaie, Zahra

    2014-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF), a nematode disease transmitted by arthropod vectors, is repeatedly reported in immigrant population. This disease is not endemic in Iran; however, different species of mosquitoes, capable of transmission of parasite microfilaria, are distributed in the country. Hereby, incidental detection of an imported case of LF due to Wuchereria bancrofti in an Indian worker in Iran is reported. Identification of the case was performed based on morphological and morphometrical characteristics of microfilaria and PCR sequencing.

  10. Protocols for multisatellite military networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolavennu, V. R.; Aronson, M. H.; Sites, M. J.

    The performance of a number of network control protocols applicable to multisatellite networks using single and multiple antenna beams is evaluated. The protocols analyzed include: token passing, polled TDMA, adaptive TDMA, and a reservation assignment with TDMA orderwire. The effects of varying the number of network terminals in the system, message arrival rates and length, propagation delay, and interleaver span-times on the performance of the protocols are investigated. The capabilities of a reservation assignment protocol with slotted-Aloha orderwire and an in-band network control protocol with congestion control and multiple user priorities are examined. It is observed that the token passing protocol is most applicable to an EHF tactical network; the reservation assignment protocol is suited to networks with many terminals requiring short, bursty data communication capability; and the in-band network control protocol is useful for tactical networks that require interoperability.

  11. A common framework for greenhouse gas assessment protocols in temperate agroforestry systems: Connecting via GRACEnet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroforestry systems offer many ecosystem benefits, but such systems have previously been marginalized in temperate environments due to overriding economic goals and perceived management complexity. In view of adaptation to a changing climate, agroforestry systems offer advantages that require quan...

  12. [Acute non-lymphatic leukemia in children].

    PubMed

    Pastore, G; Miniero, R; Cordero di Montezemolo, L; Besenzon, L; Saracco, P; Fiandino, G; Grazia, G; Ramenghi, U; Nicola, P; Madon, E

    1983-01-01

    40 children (23 males, 17 females) have been diagnosed have ANLL during the period from february 1970 to september 1981. According to FAB classification, 24 cases were M1,-M2, 9 M3, 3 M4, 3 M5 and 1 M6. At diagnosis, 20 patients (50%) had leukocytes less than 10.000/mmc, 6 (15%) had leukocytes greater than 50.000mmc. Hb levels was 7 g% in 16 patients (40%); 10 children had hepatosplenomegaly (25%), 7 splenomegaly (18%) and 5 lymphoadenomegaly (13%). 4 patients had cutaneous or mucous infiltrates. None had meningeal involvement at diagnosis. According to the year of diagnosis, 3 groups can be identified. In the group I (1970-73), 11 patients have been treated with not codified combination chemotherapy as ARA-C, 6-TG, DNR, CTX, Metil-GAG. In the group II (1974-76) and in the group III (1977-81), the patients (respectively 12 and 17) have been treated according to the following protocols: LAM-5 (3), TRAP (5), COAP (1), LAM 80 (2), AIL 7402 (8), AIL 7604, AIL 7801 (6). Immunotherapy has been performed in 7 cases. CNS prophylaxis (MTX i.t. +/-ARA-C +/- RT) was given in 5 patients of group II and in 6 of group III. I patients of group I (45%), 6 of group II (50%) and 13 of group III (76%) achieved CR. Median duration of remission was 5 months in the group I and in 17 in group II and III.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Regulation of lymphatic capillary regeneration by interstitial flow in skin.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jeremy; Conley, Kelly A; Raehl, Alisha; Bondy, Dona M; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Swartz, Melody A; Rutkowski, Joseph M; Jaroch, David B; Ongstad, Emily L

    2007-05-01

    Decreased interstitial flow (IF) in secondary lymphedema is coincident with poor physiological lymphatic regeneration. However, both the existence and direction of causality between IF and lymphangiogenesis remain unclear. This is primarily because the role of IF and its importance relative to the action of the prolymphangiogenic growth factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C (which signals primarily through its receptor VEGFR-3) are poorly understood. To clarify this, we explored the cooperative roles of VEGFR-3 and IF in a mouse model of lymphangiogenesis in regenerating skin. Specifically, a region of lymphangiogenesis was created by substituting a portion of mouse tail skin with a collagen gel within which lymphatic capillaries completely regenerate over a period of 60 days. The relative importance of IF and VEGF-C signaling were evaluated by either inhibiting VEGFR-3 signaling with antagonistic antibodies or by reducing IF. In some cases, VEGF-C signaling was then increased with exogenous protein. To clarify the role of IF, the distribution of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and VEGF-C within the regenerating region was determined. It was found that inhibition of either VEGFR-3 or IF suppressed endogenous lymphangiogenesis. Reduction of IF was found to decrease lymphatic migration and transport of endogenous MMP and VEGF-C through the regenerating region. Therapeutic VEGF-C administration restored lymphangiogenesis following inhibition of VEGFR-3 but did not increase lymphangiogenesis following inhibition of IF. These results identify IF as an important regulator of the pro-lymphangiogenic action of VEGF-C.

  14. Fluorescein sodium fluorescence microscope-integrated lymphangiography for lymphatic supermicrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ayestaray, Benoit; Bekara, Farid

    2015-07-01

    Microscope-integrated lymphangiography is a useful method in the field of lymphatic supermicrosurgery. Fluorescence based on indocyanine green (ICG) is the most commonly used. Fluorescein sodium is a fluorescent tracer used for retinal and neurosurgical angiography but not yet for lymphatic supermicrosurgery. In this report, we present a case in which the fluorescein sodium fluorescence microscope-integrated lymphangiography was used for assessment of lymphatic drainage pathway and patency in a patient treated for secondary lymphedema by lymphaticovenular anastomoses. Fluorescein sodium fluorescence microscope-integrated lymphangiography was evaluated in a 67-year-old female presented for a Campisi clinical stage IV lymphedema of the upper limb. Transcutaneous guidance and vascular fluorescence were assessed. A comparison with ICG fluorescence was made intraoperatively. Two lymphaticovenular anastomoses were performed and their patency were checked by lymphangiography. Transcutaneous signal was found higher with fluorescein sodium fluorescence. Intraluminal visualization was possible with fluorescein sodium coloration during lymphaticovenular anastomoses. No adverse reaction occurred. The circumferential differential reduction rate of affected limb was 8.1% 3 months after lymphaticovenular anastomoses. The use of fluorescence microscope-integrated lymphangiography with fluorescein sodium may be superior to ICG fluorescence in assistance of lymphaticovenular anastomoses.

  15. Regional differences in pleural lymphatic albumin concentration in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Schultz, E.L.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Staub, N.C.

    1987-01-01

    We used quantitative reflectance autoradiography to compare the concentration of albumin in visceral pleural lymphatics at the cranial and caudal ends of the sheep's lung in the vertical (60 degrees head-up) and horizontal (supine) positions. Twelve to fourteen hours after injecting 125I-albumin intravenously we placed four anesthetized sheep in the vertical position to establish a microvascular hydrostatic pressure gradient along the vertical height of the lung. We placed two anesthetized sheep in the horizontal position. Four hours later, we fixed the left lung and removed visceral pleural tissue blocks from the cranial and caudal ends, separated by a 15-cm distance, along the costovertebral margin. We measured the silver grain density in the pleural lymphatic autoradiograms by dark-field reflectance microspectrophotometry. In the vertical position, the lymph albumin concentration at the cranial end (top) of the lung averaged 2.5 +/- 0.4 g/dl compared with the caudal end (bottom), which averaged 1.8 +/- 0.3 g/dl. The difference (42% greater at the top than the bottom) is significant (P less than 0.05). The computed gradient in perimicrovascular interstitial albumin osmotic pressure was 0.26 +/- 0.13 cmH2O/cm lung height. There were no differences between the cranial and caudal lymphatic groups in the two horizontal sheep. We conclude that in the sheep lung there is a gradient in perimicrovascular albumin concentration due to the vertical gradient in microvascular hydrostatic pressure.

  16. Lymph node biophysical remodeling is associated with melanoma lymphatic drainage.

    PubMed

    Rohner, Nathan Andrew; McClain, Jacob; Tuell, Sara Lydia; Warner, Alex; Smith, Blair; Yun, Youngho; Mohan, Abhinav; Sushnitha, Manuela; Thomas, Susan Napier

    2015-11-01

    Tissue remodeling is a characteristic of many solid tumor malignancies including melanoma. By virtue of tumor lymphatic transport, remodeling pathways active within the local tumor microenvironment have the potential to be operational within lymph nodes (LNs) draining the tumor interstitium. Here, we show that lymphatic drainage from murine B16 melanomas in syngeneic, immune-competent C57Bl/6 mice is associated with LN enlargement as well as nonuniform increases in bulk tissue elasticity and viscoelasticity, as measured by the response of whole LNs to compression. These remodeling responses, which quickly manifest in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) after tumor inoculation and before apparent metastasis, were accompanied by changes in matrix composition, including up to 3-fold increases in the abundance of soluble collagen and hyaluronic acid. Intranodal pressures were also significantly increased in TDLNs (+1 cmH2O) relative to both non-tumor-draining LNs (-1 cmH2O) and LNs from naive animals (-1 to 2 cmH2O). These data suggest that the reorganization of matrix structure, composition, and fluid microenvironment within LNs associated with tumor lymphatic drainage parallels remodeling seen in primary malignancies and has the potential to regulate the adhesion, proliferation, and signaling function of LN-resident cells involved in directing melanoma disease progression.

  17. THE RELATIVE PRESSURES WITHIN CUTANEOUS LYMPHATIC CAPILLARIES AND THE TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    McMaster, Philip D.

    1947-01-01

    The pressure in the cutaneous lymphatic capillaries of normal mice anesthetized with nembutal ranged between 0.0 and 2.7 cm. of water. Measurements of the interstitial pressure in the tissue immediately next the lymphatics showed that, in more than half the instances studied, there was a slight gradient of pressure from the tissues to the lymph. In nearly all the other instances the pressures inside and outside the lymphatic capillaries were approximately equal. In two cases in which lymph flow in the capillaries was rapid, the lymph pressure may have been negative. Under these circumstances there must have been a considerable gradient of pressure from the tissues to the lymph. In skin which was rapidly becoming, or had recently become, edematous as result of the application of xylol or of heat, the intralymphatic capillary pressure generally was increased, yet when compared with the pressure prevailing in the edema fluid outside of the capillaries it was usually found to be relatively much lower, at times by as much as 5.9 cm. of water. The findings indicate that a pressure gradient is an important factor in lymph formation under normal and pathological circumstances. PMID:19871679

  18. Monitoring urban streams: strategies and protocols for humid-region lowland systems.

    PubMed

    Scholz, J G; Booth, D B

    2001-10-01

    Governmental mandates and public awareness have forced progressively smaller and less sophisticated agencies and organizations to initiate stream monitoring programs, particularly in urban and urbanizing areas. Yet many of these monitoring efforts lack either a coherent conceptual framework or appropriately chosen methods, and they rely on monitoring techniques that are simply infeasible for these institutional settings. We propose a monitoring strategy, and specific existing monitoring protocols, that will be useful for the management and rehabilitation of streams in urbanizing watersheds. A monitoring strategy must be developed by 1) identifying the management question(s) being addressed, 2) determining the institional level of effort required (and available) to effectively make particular kinds of measurements, and 3) identifying what specific parameters should and can be measured. Only a limited set of parameters show much utility or feasibility in addressing the most common management questions being faced by municipalities in urbanizing, humid-area regions of the United States. These include measures of riparian canopy, bank erosion and bank hardening, and in-stream large woody debris. With some additional expertise useful data can also be included on channel gradient, substrate composition, and pools. Nearly all of the other myriad parameters that have been measured historically on rivers and streams show little apparent value in these watershed and institutional settings.

  19. Toward a protocol for quantifying the greenhouse gas balance and identifying mitigation options in smallholder farming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstock, T. S.; Rufino, M. C.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Wollenberg, E.

    2013-06-01

    GHG budgets for developing economies. This dearth of information constrains the capacity to transition to low-carbon agricultural development, opportunities for smallholders to capitalize on carbon markets, and the negotiating position of developing countries in global climate policy discourse. Concerns over the poor state of information, in terms of data availability and representation, have fueled appeals for new approaches to quantifying GHG emissions and removals from smallholder agriculture, for both existing conditions and mitigation interventions (Berry and Ryan 2013, Olander et al 2013). Considering the dependence of quantification approaches on data and the current data deficit for smallholder systems, it is clear that in situ measurements must be a core part of initial and future strategies to improve GHG inventories and develop mitigation measures for smallholder agriculture. Once more data are available, especially for farming systems of high priority (e.g., those identified through global and regional rankings of emission hotspots or mitigation leverage points), better cumulative estimates and targeted actions will become possible. Greenhouse gas measurements in agriculture are expensive, time consuming, and error prone. These challenges are exacerbated by the heterogeneity of smallholder systems and landscapes and the diversity of methods used. Concerns over methodological rigor, measurement costs, and the diversity of approaches, coupled with the demand for robust information suggest it is germane for the scientific community to establish standards of measurements—'a protocol'—for quantifying GHG emissions from smallholder agriculture. A standard protocol for use by scientists and development organizations will help generate consistent, comparable, and reliable data on emissions baselines and allow rigorous comparisons of mitigation options. Besides enhancing data utility, a protocol serves as a benchmark for non-experts to easily assess data

  20. Significantly high lymphatic vessel density in cutaneous metastasizing melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Špirić, Z; Erić, M; Eri, Ž; Skrobić, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Cutaneous melanoma has the propensity to early metastatic spread via the lymphatic vessels. Recent studies have found a positive correlation between an increased number of tumor-associated lymphatics and lymph node metastasis. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was a difference in the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) when cutaneous metastasizing melanomas were compared with nonmetastasizing melanomas and nevi. Methods Ninety-five melanoma specimens (45 with lymph node metastasis, 50 nonmetastasizing) and 22 nevi specimens (7 compound, 5 intradermal, 4 blue, and 6 dysplastic) were investigated by immunostaining for the lymphatic endothelial marker D2-40. The quantification of lymphatics was conducted by computer-assisted morphometric analysis. Metastasizing and nonmetastasizing melanoma specimens were matched according to their thickness into three classes ≤2.0 mm, 2.01 – 4.0 mm, >4.0 mm. Results Metastasizing melanomas thick 2.01–4.0 mm and thicker than 4.0 mm, showed a significantly higher intratumoral and peritumoral LVD compared with nonmetastasizing melanomas (2.01–4.0 mm, p =0.006 and p =0.032, respectively; >4.0 mm, p =0.045 and p =0.026, respectively). No significant difference in intratumoral and peritumoral LVD was found between metastasizing and nonmetastasizing melanomas of thickness ≤2.0 mm. Metastasizing melanomas showed a significantly higher intratumoral LVD compared with compound, intradermal, blue and dysplastic nevi p <0.001, p =0.002, p =0.002 and p <0.001, respectively), and significantly higher peritumoral LVD compared with compound nevi (p=0.039). Total average LVD was significantly higher in metastasizing melanomas than in nonmetastasizing melanomas (p <0.001), compound, intradermal, blue and dysplastic nevi (p <0.001, p <0.001, p =0.001 and p <0.001, respectively). Conclusions This study shows higher LVD in metastasizing melanomas compared with nonmetastasizing melanomas and nevi. In melanomas with

  1. Circulating Microbial Products and Acute Phase Proteins as Markers of Pathogenesis in Lymphatic Filarial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, R.; George, P. Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, N.; Fay, Michael P.; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients. Dysregulated host inflammatory responses leading to systemic immune activation are thought to play a central role in filarial disease pathogenesis. We measured the plasma levels of microbial translocation markers, acute phase proteins,