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Sample records for proton microprobe study

  1. The proton (nuclear) microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, G. J. F.

    1989-04-01

    The scanning proton microprobe (SPMP) is closely related to the scanning electron microprobe (SEMP) or scanning electron microscope (SEM) with X-ray detector. Though the much greater elemental sensitivity of the SPMP is inherent in the physics, the generally inferior spatial resolution of the SPMP is not inherent and big improvements are possible, As its alternative name would imply, the SPMP is often used with heavier particle beams and with nuclear rather than atomic reactions. Its versatility and quantitative accuracy have justified greater instrumentation and computer power than that associated with other microprobes. It is fast becoming an industrially and commercially important instrument and there are few fields of scientific research in which it has not played a part. Notable contributions have been made in biology, medicine, agriculture, semiconductors, geology, mineralogy, extractive metallurgy, new materials, archaeology, forensic science, catalysis, industrial problems and reactor technology.

  2. Proton microprobe analysis of zinc in skeletal tissues. [Proton induced x-ray emission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, S B; Jones, K W; Kraner, H W; Shroy, R E; Hanson, A L

    1980-06-01

    A proton microprobe with windowless exit port was used to study zinc distributions in various types of skeletal tissues. The use of an external beam facilitated positioning of the targets for examination of particular points of interest. The proton microprobe is uniquely suited to this work since it combines high sensitivity for zinc determinations in thick samples with good spatial resolution. Measurements on rat and rabbit Achilles tendon showed a significant increase in zinc concentrations as the beam moved from the unmineralized collagen into the mineralized attachment site. Cartilage gave a similar result, with calcified cartilage having a greater zinc level than the articular surface on unmineralized epiphyseal cartilage.

  3. A scanning proton microprobe study of stinging emergences from the leaf of the common stinging nettle urtica dioica l.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, N. P.; Perry, C. C.; Williams, R. J. P.; Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.

    1988-03-01

    Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) combined with the Oxford scanning proton microprobe (SPM) was used to investigate the abundance and spatial distribution of inorganic elements in mineralising stinging emergences from the leaf of the Common Stinging Nettle, Urtica dioica L. Elemental maps and point analytical data were collected for emergences at two stages of maturity. In all emergences calcium and silicon were spatially organised and present at high concentration. The inorganic elements K, P, S and Mn were also spatially organised during mineralisation, but at maturity these elements were present only at background levels and then showed no specific localisation. The observed changes in the inorganic content of the emergences are obviously related to the mineralisation processes. The possible biochemical significance of the distribution of the elements is discussed.

  4. Elemental mapping of biological samples using a scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.

    1988-03-01

    Elemental mapping using a scanning proton microprobe (SPM) can be a powerful technique for probing trace elements in biology, allowing complex interfaces to be studied in detail, identifying contamination and artefacts present in the specimen, and in certain circumstances obtaining indirect chemical information. Examples used to illustrate the advantages of the technique include the elemental mapping of growing pollen tubes, honey bee brain section, a mouse macrophage cell, human liver section exhibiting primary biliary cirrhosis, and the attack by a mildew fungus on a pea leaf.

  5. An external beam setup for the Lund proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lövestam, N. E. Göran; Swietlicki, Erik

    1989-08-01

    An external beam setup for the proton microprobe in Lund is described. This setup has been added as an option to the current scanning proton microprobe setup for the analysis of fragile samples, such as art objects, and for X-ray imaging of larger areas of a sample. The feasibility of the setup is demonstrated by the analysis of a papyrus document. Missing Greek characters in the text of the document have been detected by processing the data obtained by particle induced X-ray emission analysis using partial least-squares regression: a multivariate statistical data procedure.

  6. Submicron elemental mapping with the oxford scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, G. W.; Watt, F.; Chapman, J. R.

    1987-03-01

    Following recent modifications to the Oxford scanning proton microprobe (SPM) a beam spot diameter of 0.5 μm has been achieved at a beam current of 20-30 pA of 4 MeV protons. This has been confirmed by scanning both a copper test grid and microcrystals of barium sulphate. The potential of using high spatial resolutions in microbiology has been explored by scanning a single mouse cell.

  7. Elemental maps of Amoeba proteus by a scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minqian; Zhu, Jingde; Zhu, Jieqing; Zhou, Zheng; Huang, Zeqi; Zhou, Weiying; Cholewa, M.; Legge, G. J. F.

    1991-03-01

    Elemental maps for P, S, Cl, K, Ca and Zn of individual Amoeba proteus were obtained with the Melbourne scanning proton microprobe. The emphasis was put on the relationship of both distribution and concentration of Zn within the cell and the growth inhibitory effect of higher Zn concentrations in the culture medium. At a concentration of 0.04 mmol ZnCl 2, Amoeba growth was inhibited. But at a concentration of 0.0016 mmol, the Amoeba grew as well as a control grown without addition of Zn. We found that in the former (0.04 mmol) Zn concentrated three times more than in the latter (0.0016 mmol), and also that Zn was enriched much more in the nucleus and endoplasm (five to six times) than in other parts of the cell (two times). Future work along these lines may provide insight into the mechanism by which Zn affects the growth of Amoeba proteus and other cells.

  8. The Oxford scanning proton microprobe: A medical diagnostic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.; Takacs, J.; Vaux, D. J. T.

    1984-04-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a disease characterised by progressive destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, cholestasis, and high levels of copper within the liver. The Oxford 1 μm scanning proton microprobe (SPM) has been used to construct elemental maps of a 7 μm section of diseased liver at several different magnifications. The results of these investigations have shown that the copper is distributed in small deposits ( < 5 μm) at specific locations in the liver. Further there appears to be a 1:1 atomic correlation between copper and sulphur, indicating the presence of an inorganic salt or a protein with approximately equal numbers of copper and sulphur atoms.

  9. The external scanning proton microprobe of Firenze: A comprehensive description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, L.; Massi, M.; Calusi, S.

    2007-06-01

    An external proton scanning microbeam setup is installed on the -30° line of the new 3 MV tandem accelerator in Firenze; the most relevant features of the line, such as detection setup for IBA measurements, target viewing system, beam diagnostic and transport are described here. With our facility we can work with a beam spot on sample better than 10 μm full-width half-maximum (FWHM) and an intensity of some nanoamperes. Standard beam exit windows are silicon nitride (Si 3N 4) TEM membranes, 100 nm thick and 0.5×0.5 mm 2 wide; we also successfully performed measurements using membranes 1×1 mm 2 wide, 100 nm thick, and 2×2 mm 2 wide, 200 and 500 nm thick. Exploiting the yield of Si X-rays produced by the beam in the exit window as an indirect measurement of the charge, a beam charge monitor system was implemented. The analytical capabilities of the microbeam have been extended by integrating a two-detector PIXE setup with BS and PIGE detectors; the external scanning proton microprobe in Firenze is thus a powerful instrument to fully characterize samples by ion beam analysis, through the simultaneous collection of PIXE, PIGE and BS elemental maps. Its characteristics can make it often competitive with traditional in vacuum microbeam for measurements of thick targets.

  10. Application of the Karlsruhe proton microprobe to medical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, D.; Rokita, E.

    1984-04-01

    The Karlsruhe nuclear microprobe was used in the investigation of healthy and malign tissue of animals and men. Target preparation tests showed that cryofixation of the tissue before cutting with a microtome and succeeding lyophilization of the slices gave reliable results. The slices were mounted on backing foils of Formvar the thickness of which varied between 30 and 50 {μg}/{cm 2}. For irradiation we tested various patterns generated by the 3 MeV proton beam by sweeping in one or two dimensions. Most of the data were collected in line-scan mode, where 256 equidistant irradiation dots of 3 × 10 μm 2 formed a line of 750 μm length at beam currents of 250 pA. The target thickness was determined simultaneously by proton elastic scattering in all cases. Radial concentration profiles of degenerated human arteries (atherosclerosis) showed a remarkable increase of Ca, partly correlated with local maxima of the Zn content, when compared with non-degenerated capillaries. Microtome cuts across a Morris Hepatoma 7777 cancer grown in a rat leg were investigated to correlate the concentration shifts of some trace elements in malign tissue with single cells.

  11. [Investigation of Carbonaceous Airborne Particles by Scanning Proton Microprobe].

    PubMed

    Bao, Liang-man; Liu, Jiang-feng; Lei, Qian-tao; Li, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Gui-lin; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    Carbonaceous particles are an important component of the atmospheric aerosol particles and important for global climate change, air quality and human health. The PM₁₀ single particles from two environmental monitor locations and seven pollution emission sources were analyzed using scanning proton microprobe (SPM) techniques. The concentration of carbon in individual particles was quantitatively determined by proton non-Rutherford elastic backscattering spectrometry (EBS). The results of this investigation showed that carbonaceous particles were dominant in the pollution sources of coal and oil combustions, diesel busexhaust and automobile exhaust, while inorganic particles were dominant in the sources of steel industry, cement dust and soil dust. Carbonaceous matter was enriched in particles from the city center, while mineral matter was the main component of airborne particles in the industrial area. Elemental mapping of single aerosol particles yielded important information on the chemical reactions of aerosol particles. The micro-PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) maps of S, Ca and Fe of individual carbonaceous particles showed that sulfuration reaction occurred between SO₂and mineral particles, which increased the sulfur content of particles. PMID:27078933

  12. Distribution of lead in human bone: 2. Proton microprobe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schidlovsky, G.; Jones, K.W. ); Burger, D.E.; Milder, F.L. ); Hu, H. )

    1989-01-01

    Little is known about the distribution of lead in the human tibia on a microscopic scale. The radial distribution of lead in a 2-mm thick section of the human femur has been measured; it was observed that the concentration peaked in a region close to the periosteal and endosteal surfaces. The distribution in the interior of the bone was relatively uniform with the exception of a peak located about 1.8 mm from the periphery along a straight radial scan from periosteum to endosteum. Lindh also mapped the distribution of lead over a single osteon and showed that the concentration was highest at the edges. We have investigated the radial distribution of lead in the human tibia. Our motivation was to obtain data that can be used to understand the biological mechanisms for deposition of lead in bone and for use in the interpretation of in-vivo bone x-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements of lead concentration. This paper presents the results of proton microprobe line scans of several tibial sections from periosteum to endosteum with spatial resolutions from less than 100 micrometers to about 1000 micrometers. The results are complementary to those reported in a companion paper. 3 refs.

  13. Trace elemental analysis of bituminuos coals using the Heidelberg proton microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, J.R.; Kneis, H.; Martin, B.; Nobiling, R.; Traxel, K.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Trace elements in coal can occur as components of either the organic constituents (macerals) or the inorganic constituents (minerals). Studies of the concentrations and distribution of the trace elements are vital to understanding the geochemical millieu in which the coal was formed and in evaluating the attempts to recover rare but technologically valuable metals. In addition, information on the trace element concentrations is important in predicting the environmental impact of burning particular coals, as many countries move toward greater utilization of coal reserves for energy production. Traditionally, the optical and the electron microscopes and more recently the electron microprobe have been used in studying the components of coal. The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) microprobe offers a new complementary approach with an order of magnitude or more better minimum detection limit. We present the first measurements with a PIXE microprobe of the trace element concentrations of bituminous coal samples. Elemental analyses of the coal macerals-vitrinite, exinite, and inertinite-are discussed for three coal samples from the Eastern U.S.A., three samples from the Western U.S.A., and one sample from the Peoples Republic of China. ?? 1981.

  14. Microprobe study of diode corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Hlava, P.; Braithwaite, J.; Sorensen, R.

    1996-12-31

    A few diodes from a production lot were discovered to have unacceptable current leak rates after about 5 years of storage. Inspection revealed the presence of copper sulfide deposits that bridged the external body of the diode and presumably provided a leakage path. Figure 1 shows the physical configuration of a diode. The function of this device is performed by a silicon-based semiconductor that is bonded between two cylinders of tungsten with copper headpins (Cu wire with a flat {open_quotes}nail-head{close_quotes} formed on one end) brazed to the opposite ends of the cylinders. A tropical ring of glass protects the Si chip. All exposed metal parts are covered by an immersion plating of Ag. Then the entire assembly is coated with black epoxy and a band of green ink is applied to the cathode end. During storage, each diode was placed in a cardboard holder and secured in stacks of about ten with rubber bands. Analytical and environmental exposure studies were performed at Allied Signal and Sandia to determine the cause and potential long-term significance of this corrosion product and help identify the corrosion mechanism.

  15. PROTON MICROPROBE ANALYSIS OF TRACE-ELEMENT VARIATIONS IN VITRINITES IN THE SAME AND DIFFERENT COAL BEDS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minkin, J.A.; Chao, E.C.T.; Blank, Herma; Dulong, F.T.

    1987-01-01

    The PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) microprobe can be used for nondestructive, in-situ analyses of areas as small as those analyzed by the electron microprobe, and has a sensitivity of detection as much as two orders of magnitude better than the electron microprobe. Preliminary studies demonstrated that PIXE provides a capability for quantitative determination of elemental concentrations in individual coal maceral grains with a detection limit of 1-10 ppm for most elements analyzed. Encouraged by the earlier results, we carried out the analyses reported below to examine trace element variations laterally (over a km range) as well as vertically (cm to m) in the I and J coal beds in the Upper Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale in central Utah, and to compare the data with the data from two samples of eastern coals of Pennsylvanian age.

  16. Analysis of lichen thin sections by PIXE and STIM using a proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. M.; Mangelson, N. F.; St. Clair, L. L.; Gardner, J. S.; Cooper, L. S.; Rees, L. B.; Grant, P. G.; Bench, G. S.

    1999-04-01

    In order to better understand the distribution pattern of mineral elements in lichen tissues, thin sections (15 μm) of the foliose, vagrant soil lichen Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa were examined using proton microprobe Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). This technique was used to make two-dimensional scans, with 5 μm resolution, across tissue cross sections of the test species. Element maps for Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and As have been prepared. Several elements are strongly localized in the element maps. PIXE data are complimented with STIM, light micrographs, and SEM images. Preliminary data suggest that nuclear microprobe techniques may be useful in elucidating element absorption and transport mechanisms in lichens.

  17. State and history of heart tissue preparation for proton microprobe elemental analysis at the Eindhoven Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaedackers, J. A.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; de Goeij, J. J. M.; de Voigt, M. J. A.; van der Vusse, G. J.

    1999-10-01

    Proton microprobe techniques are useful in investigating ischemia-reperfusion induced ion shifts between cardiac muscle cells and interstitial fluid. Preliminary results have shown that proper analysis of ion concentrations in various cardiac compartments is hampered by dislocation of elements during sample preparation. In this study the different stages of the preparation were evaluated as possible sources of artifacts. After improvements of the sample preparation procedure, sharp ion concentration gradients within heart tissue preparations were obtained, indicating no noticeable ion dislocation at the scale of the measurements.

  18. Development of a bio-PIXE setup at the Debrecen scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Uzonyi, I.; Simon, A.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2005-04-01

    On the growing need of an accurate, quantitative method for the analysis of thin biological tissues down to the cell level, a measurement setup and data evaluating system has been developed at the Debrecen scanning proton microprobe facility, using its unique capability of the PIXE-PIXE technique. Quantitative elemental concentrations and true elemental maps from C to U can be produced in the case of thin (10-50 μm), inhomogeneous samples of organic matrix with a 2 μm lateral resolution. The method is based on the combined application of on-axis STIM and PIXE-PIXE ion beam analytical techniques. STIM spectra and maps are used to determine the morphology and the area density of the samples. PIXE spectra and maps of an ultra thin windowed and a conventional Be-windowed Si(Li) X-ray detectors are used to quantify concentrations and distributions of elements in the C to Fe (light and medium) and S to U (medium and heavy) atomic number regions, separately. For cross-checking the validation of the obtained data in a few cases RBS technique was used simultaneously. The application of the new bio-PIXE method is shown through an example, the study of the penetration and clearance of ultra-fine particles containing heavy metals (TiO2) of physical bodycare cosmetics in different layers of skin within the frame of the NANODERM EU5 project.

  19. Microprobe and oxygen fugacity study of armalcolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friel, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The stability of synthetic armalcolite was determined as a function of oxygen fugacity with particular regard to the oxidation state of iron and titanium. The equilibrium pseudobrookite (armalcolite) composition was measured at 1200 C under various conditions of oxidation typical of the lunar environment. These data, when compared with published descriptions of mare basalts, provide information about the conditions of crystallization of armalcolite-bearing lunar rocks. Some information about the crystal chemistry of armalcolite was obtained from X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses of synthetic armalcolite and Zr-armalcolite. Further data were gathered from a comparison of the Mossbauer spectra of a phase pure stoichiometric armalcolite and one containing appreciable amounts of trivalent titanium.

  20. Volatility in the lunar crust: Trace element analyses of lunar minerals by PIXE proton microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Griffin, W. L.; Ryan, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    In situ determination of mineral compositions using microbeam techniques can characterize magma compositions through mineral-melt partitioning, and be used to investigate fine-grained or rare phases which cannot be extracted for analysis. Abundances of Fe, Mn, Sr, Ga, Zr, Y, Nb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Se, and Sb were determined for various mineral phases in a small number of lunar highlands rocks using the PIXE proton microprobe. Sr/Ga ratios of plagioclase and Mn/Zn ratios of mafic silicates show that the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-suite cumulates are depleted in volatile lithophile elements to about the same degree compared with chondrites and the Earth. This links the entire lunar crust to common processes or source compositions. In contrast, secondary sulfides in Descartes breccia clasts are enriched in chalcophile elements such as Cu, Zn, Ni, Se, and Sb, and represent a potential resource in the lunar highlands.

  1. Investigation of the uptake of drugs, carcinogens and mutagens by individual mammalian cells using a scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholewa, M.; Turnbull, I. F.; Legge, G. J. F.; Weigold, H.; Marcuccio, S. M.; Holan, G.; Tomlinson, E.; Wright, P. J.; Dillon, C. T.; Lay, P. A.; Bonin, A. M.

    1995-09-01

    The use of micro-PIXE [1] in measuring the quantitative uptake of drugs containing metal atoms by individual Vero cells (African green monkey kidney cell line) and V79 Chinese hamster lung cells is demonstrated. One class of drugs, heteropolytungstates, which are being assessed for activity against the HIV virus, were studied using Vero cells. The cellular uptake of a series of chromium compounds, including carcinogens and mutagens, in which the metal oxidation state was either (III), (V) or (VI), was measured using V79 cells. It was found that, unlike any other techniques, scanning proton microprobe (SPM) offers both the sensitivity and spatial resolution to carry out unicellular analysis. The use of cultured cell lines in these analyses was shown to have distinct advantages over cells such as peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs).

  2. Deposition of corrosion products from dowels on human dental root surfaces measured with proton microprobe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, D.; Brunell, G.; Lindh, U.

    1982-06-01

    Distribution of copper, mercury and zinc on human teeth root surfaces adjacent to dowels of gold alloy or brass as well as dowels of brass in conjunction with an amalgam crown has been measured with a proton microprobe using PIXE techniques. Upper limits of the contents of gold and silver on the root surfaces were established. Pronounced concentration profiles of copper and zinc were observed on the root surfaces of teeth prepared with dowels of brass. The dowel of gold alloy revealed only zinc deposition. The major part of copper on the root surfaces is assumed to arise from corrosion of the dowels, and has been transported to the surface by diffusion through the dential tubuli. Zinc in the volume analysed is a constituent of dentin tissue as well as a corrosion product of the brass dowel. Part of the zinc level could also be ascribed to erosion of the zinc phosphate cement matrix. The volumes analysed were (25×25×25)μm 3. The levels of copper, mercury and zinc on the tooth root surfaces attained values up to about 200, 20 and 600 ppm, respectively.

  3. Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) for Hydrogen Profiling in High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Pascal; Sayir, Ali; Berger, Marie-Helene

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between hydrogen and various high temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) has not been clearly understood due to poor densification and unreacted secondary phases. the melt-processing technique is used in producing fully dense simple SrCe(0.9)Y (0.10) O(3-delta) and complex Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskites that can not be achieved by solid-state sintering. the possibilities of ion beam analysis have been investigated to quantify hydrogen distribution in HTPC perovskites subjected to water heat treatment. Nuclear microprobe technique is based on the interactions of a focused ion beam of MeV light ions (H-1, H-2, He-3, He-4,.) with the sample to be analyzed to determine local elemental concentrations at the cubic micrometer scale, the elastic recoil detection analysis technique (ERDA) has been carried out using He-4(+) microbeams and detecting the resulting recoil protons. Mappings of longitudinal sections of water treated SrCeO3 and Sr(Ca(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3 perovskites have been achieved, the water treatment strongly alters the surface of simple SrCe(0.9)Y(0.10)O(3-delta) perovskite. From Rutherford Back Scattering measurements (RBS), both Ce depletion and surface re-deposition is evidenced. the ERDA investigations on water treated Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskite did not exhibit any spatial difference for the hydrogen incorporation from the surface to the centre. the amount of hydrogen incorporation for Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) was low and required further development of two less conventional techniques, ERDA in forward geometry and forward elastic diffusion H-1(p,p) H-1 with coincidence detection.

  4. A High Resolution Microprobe Study of EETA79001 Lithology C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite EETA79001 has received substantial attention for possibly containing a component of Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) [1]. The composition of Martian soil can illuminate near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Impact melts in meteorites represent our most direct samples of Martian regolith. We present the initial findings from a high-resolution electron microprobe study of Lithology C from Martian meteorite EETA79001. As this study develops we aim to extract details of a potential soil composition and to examine Martian surface processes using elemental ratios and correlations.

  5. Correlated petrographic, electron microprobe, and ion microprobe studies of selected primitive and processed phase assemblages in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden L.

    1993-01-01

    During the past three years we have received support to continue our research in elucidating the formation and alteration histories of selected meteoritic materials by a combination of petrographic, trace element, and isotopic analyses employing optical and scanning electron microscopes and electron and ion microprobes. The awarded research funds enabled the P.I. to attend the annual LPSC, the co-I to devote approximately 15 percent of his time to the research proposed in the grant, and partial support for a visiting summer post-doctoral fellow to conduct electron microprobe analyses of meteoritic samples in our laboratory. The research funds, along with support from the NASA Education Initiative awarded to P.I. G. Wasserburg, enabled the co-I to continue a mentoring program with inner-city minority youth. The support enabled us to achieve significant results in the five projects that we proposed (in addition to the Education Initiative), namely: studies of the accretional and post-accretional alteration and thermal histories in CV meteorites, characterization of periclase-bearing Fremdlinge in CV meteorites, characterization of Ni-Pt-Ge-Te-rich Fremdlinge in CV meteorites in an attempt to determine the constraints they place on the petrogenetic and thermal histories of their host CAI's, correlated electron and ion microprobe studies of silicate and phosphate inclusions in the Colomera meteorite in an attempt to determine the petrogenesis of the IE iron meteorites, and development of improved instrumental and correction procedures for improved accuracy of analysis of meteoritic materials with the electron microprobe. This grant supported, in part or whole, 18 publications so far by our research team, with at least three more papers anticipated. The list of these publications is included. The details of the research results are briefly summarized.

  6. Investigation of the uptake of drugs by individual cells using a scanning proton microprobe (SPM).

    PubMed

    Cholewa, M; Turnbull, I F; Legge, G J; Weigold, H; Marcuccio, S M; Holan, G; Tomlinson, E; Wright, P J

    1996-02-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of micro-PIXE (proton induced X-ray emission) for measuring the quantitative uptake of anti-AIDS drugs, containing metal atoms, by individual Vero cells (African green monkey kidney cell line). Hetero-polytungstates, which are assessed to present an activity against the HIV virus, were studied using Vero cells. It was found that unlike other techniques, SPM offers both the sensitivity and the spatial resolution to carry out these programs of investigations. The use of elemental analysis in single cells of cultured cell lines has shown to have distinct advantages over peripheral blood lymphocytes. PMID:8833668

  7. Fiber optic microprobes with rare-earth-based phosphor tips for proton beam characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darafsheh, Arash; Kassaee, Alireza; Taleei, Reza; Dolney, Derek; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using fiber optics probes with rare-earth-based phosphor tips for proton beam radiation dosimetry. We designed and fabricated a fiber probe with submillimeter resolution based on TbF3 phosphors and evaluated its performance for measurement of proton beams including profiles and range. The fiber optic probe, embedded in tissue-mimicking plastics, was irradiated with a clinical proton beam and the luminescence spectroscopy was performed by a CCD-coupled spectrograph to analyze the emission spectra of the fiber tip. By using a linear fitting algorithm we extracted the contribution of the ionoluminescence signal to obtain the percentage depth dose in phantoms and compared that with measurements performed with a standard ion chamber. We observed a quenching effect in the spread out Bragg peak region, manifested as an under-responding of the signal due to the high linear energy transfer of the beam. However, the beam profiles measurements were not affected by the quenching effect indicating that the fiber probes can be used for high-resolution measurements of proton beams profile.

  8. Ion microprobe study of the scale formed during high temperature oxidation of high silicon EN-1.4301 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paúl, A.; Elmrabet, S.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, M. F.; Soares, J. C.; Odriozola, J. A.

    2001-07-01

    A study of the oxide layer formed on the surface of high silicon (0.8%) EN-1.4301 (AISI-304) stainless steel after 125 h oxidation in air at 1273 K has been performed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), RBS and proton microprobe. Oxidation experiments in synthetic air were performed in a thermobalance and the kinetic curve is compared to that of a standard EN-1.4301 austenitic stainless steel. These results show that the high silicon steel presents an enhanced oxidation resistance. XRD experiments show that the only crystalline species present in the scale is Cr 2O 3. Nevertheless, transversal section studies of the scale using proton microprobe show the development of a multilayered scale formed by an amorphous silicon rich layer in the scale to alloy interface and a Cr 2O 3 oxide layer in the external scale. Those results are confirmed by SEM experiments. The formation of the silica layer can be the responsible of the increase in the resistance to high temperature oxidation in this steel.

  9. Newsprint smearing - an industrial problem studied with the nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansson, P.; Larsson, T.; Malmberg, S.; Malmqvist, L.; Elfman, M.; Malmqvist, K.; Pallon, J.

    1999-10-01

    Six newsprint samples, selected with respect to their different smearing properties, have been investigated with the PIXE-technique with a nuclear microprobe. In addition, local basis weight was simultaneously measured with the off-axis STIM technique. The newsprint samples were all printed nominally with the same amount of cyan ink (≈2% Cu). The normalised Cu-yield distributions differ both with respect to spread and slope of the tail. Correlations have been found between the spread and global paper parameters like surface roughness and porosity. Of major interest for the smearing problem is the correlation found between the momentary smearing parameter, set-off and the micro distribution parameters. Correlations between basis weight and ink distributions are discussed and a possibility to measure the different penetrations of pigment particles and oil in the paper structure is pointed out.

  10. Laser-microprobe studies of rare gas isotopes in meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschbaum, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new rare gas mass spectrometer of high sensitivity coupled to a laser microprobe extraction system (constructed by the author) is described. The laser microprobe is applied to a long standing problem in cosmochemistry - determining the minerals which carry /sup 129/Xe from the decay of the extinct radioactive isotope /sup 129/I (this /sup 129/Xe is referred to as /sup 129/Xe/sub r/). The /sup 129/Xe/sub r//sup 127/I ratios and the inferred relative formation times of these minerals are also determined. In the Allende meteorite, sodalite (Na/sub 8/(Al/sub 6/Si/sub 6/O/sub 24/)Cl/sub 2/) has been verified to be the major carrier for /sup 129/Xe/sub r/ in fine-grained inclusions. Although the exact mineral phase responsible has not been identified a carrier other than sodalite is also present in matrix from Allende. The /sup 129/Xe/sub r/ of this carrier is physically correlated with trapped xenon in the matrix and has a chlorine/iodine ratio which is lower than the ratio in the fine-grained inclusions. The /sup 129/Xe/sub r///sup 127/I ratios for sodalite from the fine-grained inclusions, and matrix are similar - between 1.25 and 1.35 x 10/sup -4/. This implies an age for these samples within 2 million years of the Bjurbole meteorite (Bjurbole is commonly used as a standard for meteorite formation intervals). The /sup 129/Xe/sub r///sup 127/I ratio of the sample of the fine-grained inclusion in which sodalite was thermally decomposed by laboratory preheating, is 2.4 x 10/sup -4/ or 16 million years before Bjurbole. The alteration-product-free coarse-grained inclusion on the other hand showed a ratio of 3.15 x 10/sup -5/ or 35 million years after Bjurbole. These relative formation intervals are much longer than expected for nebular processes and hence are either due to parent body processes or heterogeneity of the /sup 129/I//sup 127/I ratio in the early solar system.

  11. Study of microstructure and silicon segregation in cast iron using color etching and electron microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vazehrad, S.; Diószegi, A.

    2015-06-15

    An investigation on silicon segregation of lamellar, compacted and nodular graphite iron was carried out by applying a selective, immersion color etching and a modified electron microprobe to study the microstructure. The color etched micrographs of the investigated cast irons by revealing the austenite phase have provided data about the chronology and mechanism of microstructure formation. Moreover, electron microprobe has provided two dimensional segregation maps of silicon. A good agreement was found between the segregation profile of silicon in the color etched microstructure and the silicon maps achieved by electron microprobe analysis. However, quantitative silicon investigation was found to be more accurate than color etching results to study the size of the eutectic colonies. - Highlights: • Sensitivity of a color etchant to silicon segregation is quantitatively demonstrated. • Si segregation measurement by EMPA approved the results achieved by color etching. • Color etched micrographs provided data about solidification mechanism in cast irons. • Austenite grain boundaries were identified by measuring the local Si concentration.

  12. Recent applications of nuclear microprobes to the study of art objects and archaeological artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, Charles P.

    1997-07-01

    This review covers the period from the 4th Nuclear Microprobe Conference held in Shanghai, China, October 10-14, 1994 to the present. As per the last review on this topic, as given by the present author, emphasis will be placed on studies using external beams with diameters in the range from 1000 to 50 μm. A vacuum environment is not generally suitable for art objects and archaeological artifacts; howerver, a degree of spatial resolution is essential for the analysis of most materials-metal alloys, the products of metal smelting (copper and iron), multi-colored glasses, gold jewelry, pottery glazes/slips, manuscripts and paintings and, finally, human remains (bones and hair). Reference is made to investigations in many laboratories around the world which are involved in the study of such materials.

  13. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  14. Study of ancient Islamic gilded pieces combining PIXE-RBS on external microprobe with sem images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ynsa, M. D.; Chamón, J.; Gutiérrez, P. C.; Gomez-Morilla, I.; Enguita, O.; Pardo, A. I.; Arroyo, M.; Barrio, J.; Ferretti, M.; Climent-Font, A.

    2008-07-01

    Numerous metallic objects with very aesthetic and technological qualities have been recovered by archaeological excavations. Adequate processes of restoration and conservation treatments require the accurate determination of the elemental composition and distribution within the objects, as well as the identification of the nature and distribution of the corrosion products. Ideally the identification method should cause no alteration in the sample. In this work, different archaeological pieces with a gilded look have been characterized using simultaneously PIXE and RBS at the CMAM external microprobe in order to study the gilding metalworking done in the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages. The gold layer thickness and its elemental concentrations of Ag, Au and Hg were determined by both techniques and compared with the scanning electron microscopy images obtained for some fragments of pieces.

  15. Scanning Auger Microprobe and atomic absorption studies of lunar volcanic volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirlin, E. H.; Housley, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Results on lunar volatile transport processes have been obtained by studying green and brown glass droplets, orange and black core tube samples and the surface sample 74241 with the Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) and by Flameless Atomic Absorption Analysis (FLAA). SAM analyses show that the most dominant volatiles in the top few atomic layers of droplets are Zn and S, confirming that the surface Zn and S are good indicators of pyroclastic origin, and they are not entirely present as ZnS. In addition, FLAA thermal release profiles show that almost all the Zn and Cd are on grain surfaces, indicating that Zn and Cd were completely outgassed from lava fountain products during the volcanic eruption, were recondensed during or after the eruptions, and are thus present as surface coating.

  16. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  17. Nuclear microprobe study of TiO 2-penetration in the epidermis of human skin xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Gontier, E.; Moretto, P.; Surlève-Bazeille, J.-E.; Kiss, B.; Juhász, I.; Hunyadi, J.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2005-04-01

    Titanium-dioxide is a widely used physical photoprotective component of various cosmetic products. However, very few experiments have been carried out on its penetration through the human epidermal barrier and its possible biological effects in vivo and in vitro. In the frame of the NANODERM EU5 project, the penetration of TiO2-nanoparticles through the epidermis of human foreskin grafts transplanted into SCID mice was investigated in the Debrecen and Bordeaux nuclear microprobe laboratories using combined IBA techniques. Transmission electron microscope studies of the same samples were also carried out in the DMPFCS laboratory. The skin grafts were treated with a hydrophobic emulsion containing micronised TiO2-nanoparticles in occlusion, for different time periods. Quantitative elemental concentrations and distributions have been determined in 14-16 μm thick freeze-dried sections obtained from quick frozen punch biopsies using STIM, PIXE and RBS analytical methods. Using both microscopic methods, we have observed nanoparticles having penetrated into the corneocyte layers of stratum corneum by direct visualisation in TEM and via their chemical fingerprint in PIXE. The human skin xenograft has proved to be a model particularly well adapted to such penetration studies.

  18. Ion microprobe studies of a carbonaceous (CM) xenolith in the Erevan howardite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahijpal, S.; Nazarov, M. A.

    1994-07-01

    The presence of carbonaceous (CM) xenoliths in the Erevan howardite has been reported recently by Nazarov et al. The carbonates present in these clasts occur as rounded aggregates and are fine grained and extremely pure in composition. Although they resemble CAIs in morphology and texture, no relic refractory phases are present in them. These features and the absence of associated secondary phases led Nazarov et al. to propose these carbonates to be of nebular origin even though carbonates are generally not considered to be a stable phase under normal solar nebular conditions. A unique fragment of P-rich sulfide was also found in one of the carbonaceous clasts. A highly nebular environment characterized by high S fugacity was proposed as the formation site of this unique fragment, which was later incorporated into the carbonaceous matrix. We have used the ion microprobe to determine Ca isotopic compositions of several of the carbonate inclusions and S isotopic composition of the P-rich sulfide. We present the results of our Ca isotopic studies. The results obtained from Ca isotopic studies of six carbonate inclusions from the carbonaceous clast that also contain the P-rich sulfide are presented. The Ca isotopic compositions of all the inclusions are normal within the limits of our experimental uncertainties. If these carbonate inclusions were indeed of nebular origin, they have either sampled a nebular reservoir of normal Ca isotopic composition or they have equilibrated with reservoir(s) of normal isotopic composition

  19. Application of a nuclear microprobe to the study of calcified tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coote, Graeme E.; Vickridge, Ian C.

    1988-03-01

    The mineral fraction of calcified tissue is largely calcium hydroxyapatite (bones and teeth) or calcium carbonate (shells and fish otoliths). Apatite has such a strong affinity for fluoride ions that the F/Ca ratio can vary markedly with position in a bone or tooth, depending on the amount of fluoride present at the time of calcification or partial recrystallization. New biological information can be obtained by introducing extra fluoride into the diet of an animal and using a microprobe later to scan sections of bones or teeth. In suitable burial sites extra fluoride is introduced after death, and the new distribution may have applications in forensic science and archaeology. Fish otoliths are also of interest since a new carbonate layer is formed each day and the distribution of trace elements may record some aspects of the fish's life history. Results from the following studies are presented: fluorine distributions in the teeth of sheep which ingested extra fluoride for known periods; distributions of calcium and fluorine in femurs of rats which drank water high in fluoride for periods from 2 to 15 weeks; calcium and fluorine distributions in artificially-prepared lesions in tooth enamel; diffusion profiles in archaeological human teeth and animal bones; patterns in the strontium/calcium ratio in sectioned otoliths of several species of fish.

  20. Why are blue visual pigments blue? A resonance Raman microprobe study.

    PubMed Central

    Loppnow, G R; Barry, B A; Mathies, R A

    1989-01-01

    A resonance Raman microscope has been developed to study the structure of the retinal prosthetic group in the visual pigments of individual photoreceptor cells. Raman vibrational spectra are obtained by focusing the probe laser on intact photoreceptors frozen on a 77 K cold stage. To elucidate the mechanism of wavelength regulation in blue visual pigments, we have used this apparatus to study the structure of the chromophore in the 440-nm absorbing pigment found in "green rods" of the toad (Bufo marinus). The 9-cis isorhodopsin form of the green rod pigment exhibits a 1662-cm-1 C = NH+ Schiff base stretching mode that shifts to 1636 cm-1 in deuterium-substituted H2O. This demonstrates that the Schiff base linkage to the protein is protonated. Protonation of the Schiff base is sufficient to explain the 440-nm absorption maximum of this pigment without invoking any additional protein-chromophore interactions. The absence of additional perturbations is supported by the observation that the ethylenic band and the perturbation-sensitive C-10-C-11 and C-14-C-15 stretching modes have the same frequency as those of the 9-cis protonated retinal Schiff base in solution. Our demonstration that a blue visual pigment contains an unperturbed protonated Schiff base provides experimental evidence that the protein charge perturbation responsible for the opsin shift in the 500-nm absorbing pigments is removed in the opsins of blue pigments, as suggested by the sequence data. PMID:2493645

  1. The BioCAT Microprobe for X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging, MicroXAFS and Microdiffraction Studies on Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Barrea, R.A.; Gore, D.; Kondrashkina, E.; Weng, T.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Orgel, J.; Davidson, M.; Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Irving, T.C.

    2007-07-31

    Microbeam capabilities have been recently added to the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team (BioCAT) beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source to allow x-ray elemental mapping, micro x-ray absorption fine structure and microdiffraction studies on biological samples. The microprobe setup comprises a pair of platinum coated silicon KB mirrors; a sample holder mounted in a high precision positioner (100 nm accuracy); fluorescence detectors including a Si drift detector, Fe and Zn Bent Laue analyzers and a Ge detector; and a CCD detector for micro-diffraction experiments. The energy range of the microprobe is from 3.5 keV up to 17 keV. The fast scanning capabilities of the Bio-CAT beamline facilitate rapid acquisition of x-ray elemental images and micro-XAFS spectra. This paper reports the results of commissioning the KB mirror system and its performance in initial x-ray fluorescence mapping and micro-diffraction studies.

  2. Microprobe studies of microtomed particles of white druse salts in shergottite EETA 79001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The white druse material in Antarctic shergottite EETA 79001 has attracted much attention as a possible sample fo Martian aqueous deposits. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to determine trace element analyses of small particles of this material obtained by handpicking of likely grains from broken surfaces of the meteorite. Electron microprobe work was attempted on grain areas as large as 150x120 microns. Backscattered electron images show considerable variations in brightness, and botryoidal structures were observed. Microprobe analyses showed considerable variability both within single particles and between different particles. Microtomed surfaces of small selected particles were shown to be very useful in obtaining information on the texture and composition of rare lithologies like the white druse of EETA 79001. This material is clearly heterogeneous on all distance scales, so a large number of further analyses will be required to characterize it.

  3. Large detector array and real-time processing and elemental image projection of X-ray and proton microprobe fluorescence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, C. G.; Siddons, D. P.; Moorhead, G.; Kirkham, R.; Dunn, P. A.; Dragone, A.; De Geronimo, G.

    2007-07-01

    A detector concept is described that integrates a large solid-angle detector array developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory and a high speed pipelined parallel processing engine developed at CSIRO for machine vision, with an embedded implementation of the Dynamic Analysis method for fluorescence spectra deconvolution and image projection, to yield a detection system capable of energy-dispersive detection, spectral deconvolution and real-time elemental imaging at ˜10 8 events per second for PIXE elemental imaging using the nuclear microprobe and SXRF elemental imaging using the synchrotron X-ray microprobe.

  4. Electron-microprobe study of chromitites associated with alpine ultramafic complexes and some genetic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Electron-microprobe and petrographic studies of alpine chromite deposits from around the world demonstrate that they are bimodal with respect to the chromic oxide content of their chromite. The two modes occur at 54 ? 4 and 37 ? 3 weight per cent chromic oxide corresponding to chromite designated as high-chromium and high-aluminum chromite respectively. The high-chromium chromite occurs exclusively with highly magnesian olivine (Fo92-97) and some interstitial diopside. The high-aluminum chromite is associated with more ferrous olivine (Fo88-92), diopside, enstatite, and feldspar. The plot of the mole ratios Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) vs. Mg/(Mg+Fe2+) usually presented for alpine chromite is shown to have a high-chromium, high-iron to low-chromium, low-iron trend contrary to that shown by stratiform chromite. This trend is characteristic of alpine type chromite and is termed the alpine trend. However, a trend similar to that for startiform chromite is discernable on the graph for the high-chromium chromite data. This latter trend is well-developed at Red Mountain, Seldovia, Alaska. Analysis of the iron-magnesium distribution coefficient, Kd=(Fe/Mg)ol/(Fe/Mg)ch, between olivine and chromite shows that Kd for the high-chromium chromite from all ultramafic complexes has essentially the same constant value of .05 while the distribution coefficient for the high-aluminum chromite varies with composition of the chromite. These distribution coefficients are also characteristic of alpine-type chromites. The constant value for Kd for the high-chromium chromite and associated high-magnesium olivine in all alpine complexes suggests that they all crystallized under similar physico-chemical conditions. The two types of massive chromite and their associations of silicate minerals suggest the possibility of two populations with different origins. Recrystallization textures associated with the high-aluminum chromite together with field relationships between the gabbro and the chromite pods

  5. Cryptic crustal events elucidated through zone imaging and ion microprobe studies of zircon, southern Appalachian Blue Ridge, North Carolina Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Calvin F.; Hatcher, Robert D., Jr.; Harrison, T. Mark; Coath, Christopher D.; Gorisch, Elizabeth B.

    1998-05-01

    Compositional zoning reveals multistage growth histories and resorption events in zircon from a high-grade terrane in the eastern Blue Ridge of North Carolina and Georgia. These zoning patterns were used to guide high-resolution ion microprobe dating that places important constraints on the evolution of the southern Appalachian crust. Zircons from granulite facies metapelite have unzoned rims that yield concordant U-Pb ages of 495 ± 14 Ma. We interpret this as the time of rim growth, which occurred during peak metamorphism early in the protracted orogenic history of the region. Detrital cores, characterized by truncated euhedral zoning, are of Grenville age (1.04 1.26 Ga). Zircons from the Whiteside and Rabun plutons have well-defined, rounded, inherited cores and euhedral, oscillatory-zoned magmatic rims. Rims of Rabun zircons record magmatic crystallization at 374 ± 4 Ma, whereas Whiteside rims yield a 466 ± 10 Ma crystallization age. Cores from both plutons include 1.1 1.3 Ga and 2.6 2.7 Ga ages. These data indicate that there was no single, voluminous episode of plutonism in this area, that similar material underpinned the region at least from 370 to 470 Ma, and that previously unrecognized Archean basement or Archean basement derived sedimentary rock was present in the southern Appalachians. Results of this study verify the value of combining zoning and ion microprobe studies: Using conventional U-Pb methods or ion microprobe dating without knowledge of zoning would have made interpreting the events recorded in these zircons and the ages that they yield difficult or impossible.

  6. Proton capture resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.E. |; Bilpuch, E.G. |; Bybee, C.R. |; Cox, J.M.; Fittje, L.M. |; Labonte, M.A.; Moore, E.F.; Shriner, J.D. |; Shriner, J.F. Jr. |; Vavrina, G.A. |; Wallace, P.M. |

    1997-02-01

    The fluctuation properties of quantum systems now are used as a signature of quantum chaos. The analyses require data of extremely high quality. The {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction is being used to establish a complete level scheme of {sup 30}P to study chaos and isospin breaking in this nuclide. Determination of the angular momentum J, the parity {pi}, and the isospin T from resonance capture data is considered. Special emphasis is placed on the capture angular distributions and on a geometric description of these angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Electron microprobe study of lunar and planetary zoned plagioclase feldspars: An analytical and experimental study of zoning in plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. K.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Natural and experimentally grown zoned plagioclase feldspars were examined by electron microprobe. The analyses revealed discontinuous, sector, and oscillary chemical zoning superimposed on continuous normal or reverse zoning trends. Postulated mechanisms for the origin of zoning are based on either physical changes external to the magma (P, T, H2O saturation) or kinetic changes internal to the magma (diffusion, supersaturation, growth rate). Comparison of microprobe data on natural zoned plagioclase with zoned plagioclase grown in controlled experiments show that it may be possible to distinguish zonal development resulting from physio-chemical changes to the bulk magma from local kinetic control on the growth of individual crystals.

  8. Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes in the Study of Metal Homeostasis in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Punshon, T.; Guerinot, M; Lanzirotti, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: This Botanical Briefing reviews the application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes to the plant sciences; how the technique has expanded our knowledge of metal(loid) homeostasis, and how it can be used in the future. Scope: The use of SXRF microspectroscopy and microtomography in research on metal homeostasis in plants is reviewed. The potential use of SXRF as part of the ionomics toolbox, where it is able to provide fundamental information on the way that plants control metal homeostasis, is recommended. Conclusions: SXRF is one of the few techniques capable of providing spatially resolved in-vivo metal abundance data on a sub-micrometre scale, without the need for chemical fixation, coating, drying or even sectioning of samples. This gives researchers the ability to uncover mechanisms of plant metal homeostasis that can potentially be obscured by the artefacts of sample preparation. Further, new generation synchrotrons with smaller beam sizes and more sensitive detection systems will allow for the imaging of metal distribution within single living plant cells. Even greater advances in our understanding of metal homeostasis in plants can be gained by overcoming some of the practical boundaries that exist in the use of SXRF analysis.

  9. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K.S.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Yu, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S.H.; Weintraub, W.; Rykaczewski, K.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R.C.; Woods, P.J.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; MacDonald, B.D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.F.; Ressler, J.J.; Walters, W.B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-01

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Study of Italian Renaissance sculptures using an external beam nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchiatti, A.; Bouquillon, A.; Moignard, B.; Salomon, J.; Gaborit, J. R.

    2000-03-01

    The use of an extracted proton micro-beam for the PIXE analysis of glazes is discussed in the context of the growing interest in the creation of an analytical database on Italian Renaissance glazed terracotta sculptures. Some results concerning the frieze of an altarpiece of the Louvre museum, featuring white angels and cherubs heads, are presented.

  11. Study of the mechanism of chromium cluster formation by laser microprobe mass spectrometry. Correlation with theoretical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachimi, A.; Poitevin, E.; Krier, G.; Muller, J. F.; Ruiz-Lopez, M. F.

    1995-05-01

    Different stoichiometries of micrometric particles of powdered chromium oxides and salts are examined by time-of-flight laser microprobe mass spectrometry (TOF-LMMS). The negative cluster ion distributions show a good correlation with the stoichiometry of the chromium in the oxide. We have noticed a great spectral similarity between chromium(VI) oxide and hydrated chromium(III), salts leading to difficulties in differentiating these two kinds of compounds and determining the valency of chromium. The formation of CrO4- ions could be associated with product hydration, and could modify the fingerprint spectra of the chromium oxides and salts. We demonstrate that the CrO4- ion arises from collision between molecules present in the plasma generated by laser ablation. The mechanism of cluster formation is closely associated with the presence of neutral or ionized species (water, sulfate, nitrate, etc.). In particular, the hydration effect is very marked in the initial chromium salt. To confirm these results, an FT ion cyclotron MS investigation has been carried out, which allowed determination of the laser power dependence and relative stability of CrO-, CrO-2 and CrO3-. Results from a theoretical study of these types of cluster ions are presented and compared with the experimental data.

  12. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction microprobe studies of the conversion of cellulose I to ethylenediamine-cellulose I

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Wada, Masahisa; Hanson, B. Leif; Langan, Paul

    2010-08-03

    Structural changes during the treatment of films of highly crystalline microfibers of Cladophora cellulose with ethylenediamine (EDA) have been studied by time-resolved X-ray microprobe diffraction methods. As EDA penetrates the sample and converts cellulose I to EDA-cellulose I, the measured profile widths of reflections reveal changes in the shapes and average dimensions of cellulose I and EDA-cellulose I crystals. The (200) direction of cellulose I is most resistant to EDA penetration, with EDA penetrating most effectively at the hydrophilic edges of the hydrogen bonded sheets of cellulose chains. Most of the cellulose chains in the initial crystals of cellulose I are incorporated into crystals of EDA-cellulose I. The size of the emerging EDA-cellulose I crystals is limited to about half of their size in cellulose I, most likely due to strains introduced by the penetration of EDA molecules. There is no evidence of any gradual structural transition from cellulose I to EDA-cellulose I involving a continuously changing intermediate phase. Rather, the results point to a rapid transition to EDA-cellulose I in regions of the microfibrils that have been penetrated by EDA.

  13. An experimental study of hydroxyl in quartz using infrared spectroscopy and ion microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovetta, M. R.; Blacic, J. D.; Hervig, R. L.; Holloway, J. R.

    1989-05-01

    We have measured the concentrations of hydroxyl, deuterium, Al, Fe, Li, Na, K, and Rb in a natural quartz crystal before and after hydrothermal treatment at 1.5 GPa and 800°-1050°C. We employed microbeam infrared spectroscopy and ion probe techniques to avoid impurities trapped in healed cracks and fluid inclusions that might bias a normal bulk analysis. The ƒH2 of our experiments were buffered to the hematite-magnetite-(OH) fluid, nickel-nickel oxide-(OH) fluid, or iron-wustite-(OH) fluid phase assemblages. After hydrothermal treatment, the samples contained local concentrations of hydrogen or deuterium of several hundred atoms/106 Si (the starting crystal contained 45 H/106 Si). We did several experiments with Al2O3 or RbCl added to the sample charge and found local Al enrichment where the deuterium concentration was high but no Rb enrichment. Finally, we measured trace elements and hydroxyl in a quartz sample after plastic deformation in a talc furnace assembly; in regions of the sample containing basal and prismatic deformation lamellae (but no visible healed microcracks at 400× optical magnification) hydroxyl had increased to ˜200 OH/106 Si with no increase in Al or Fe. Samples enriched in hydroxyl but not Al (including the plastically strained sample) gave infrared spectra resembling natural amethyst crystals. We observed that the sharp pleochroic peaks near ˜3400 cm-1 and present in the starting crystal, were very intense only in samples showing Al enrichment, whereas the intensity of the sharp pleochroic peaks near 3600 cm-1 and broad isotropic absorption were independent of Al. Our analyses indicate that more hydrogen was introduced into the treated samples than Al or Fe. Because one proton or alkali cation is needed to screen each Al or Fe atom substituted into a Si lattice site, we conclude that the hydrothermal treatment had produced new hydroxyl defects in the quartz that did not contain Al or Fe. Although the speciation of this excess hydroxyl

  14. Impact history of the Chelyabinsk meteorite: Electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS study of sulfides and metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronikov, A. V.; Andronikova, I. E.; Hill, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    Electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS study of sulfides and metals from two fragments of the LL5 Chelyabinsk meteorite were conducted. The fragments are impact breccias, one fragment contains both chondritic and shock vein lithologies, and the other contains shock-darkened chondritic clasts and vesicular impact melts. The chondritic lithology and shock veins display very similar opaque mineral compositions. The mineral compositions in the impact-melt breccias are distinctly different. The brecciated state of the Chelyabinsk meteorite suggests strong involvement of shock-related processes during the evolution of the parent body. Multiple heavy impact events occurred on the parent asteroid and on the Chelyabinsk meteoroid itself over the time period from ca. 4.5 Ga until ca. 1.2 Ma. The shock veins were produced in situ on the parent body. The impact-melt breccias could have formed because of the dramatic impact to the parent LL-chondrite body that could be partly disintegrated. The fragment containing shock-darkened chondritic clasts and vesicular impact melt lithologies preserves a record of melting, volatilization, partial degassing, and quenching of the molten material. The abundance and size (up to 1 mm) of the vesicles suggest that the impact melt must have been buried at some depth after formation. After impact and subsequent melting occurred, the impact-induced pressure on the shallow asteroid interior was released that caused "boiling" of volatiles and generation of S-rich bubbles. Such an impact excavated down to depths of the body generating multiple fragments with complicated histories. These fragments reaccumulated into a gravitational aggregate and formed the parental meteoroid for the Chelyabinsk meteorite.

  15. Petrology of Apollo 14 regolith breccias and ion microprobe studies of glass beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, S. B.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Hughes, S. S.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Mineral chemistries, glass chemistries, and bulk compositions of Apollo 14 regolith beccias are used to study the regolith evolution at the Apollo 14 site and on the moon in general. Major changes in the regolith since the formation of the breccias include an increase in maturity, an increase in glasses with the Fra Mauro basalt composition, and decreases in feldspathic and mare glasses. The results suggest the presence of a source with a larger non-KREEPy highland plutonic component than other breccias.

  16. Synchrotron x-ray and electron micro-probe study of contaminated dredged sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitevin, A.; Lerouge, C.; Wille, G.; Bataillard, P.; Hennet, L.

    2012-04-01

    Sediments originating from periodic dredging of waterways were traditionally disposed of in storage sites without any precautions or treatments. There may be some environmental concerns especially when the dredged material comes from historically contaminated areas such as the North French coal basin. This study aims to characterize the metal mobility (mainly Zn and Pb) in deposited dredged sediments by combining chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The sediments consist of a silty fraction (~ 40 %: dominant quartz, minor feldspar), carbonates and a clay fraction (illite dominant, illite-smectite mixed layer, kaolinite). This mineralogical heterogeneity and the observed grain-size distribution (70 to 80 % wt of the total sediment is <50µm) lead to a need to use microbeam techniques to identify Zn and Pb carriers. Electron probe micro-analyse (EPMA) combined with microbeam x-ray fluorescence (µXRF) at Synchrotron sources were used to identify Zn and Pb carriers. In particular Zn and Pb distributions in thin-section samples were determined by µ-XRF elemental mappings. EPMA was used to determine the distribution of light elements for which the energy of the emission lines is below 4 keV (Si, S, P…). The presence of reduced (sulphides) and oxidized (sulphates, oxihydroxides) phases strongly suggests that the redox state is one of the major parameters controlling the metal mobility. Therefore x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were also performed to study the oxidation state in both bulk samples and on selected regions of interest in thin section samples. Preliminary chemical analyses In this work, the potential effects of the sample preparation on phase's structure and redox state were also studied and will be presented. In particular measurements using x-ray absorption spectroscopy were carried out on air dried or lyophilised powders and on samples stored in a cryogenic environment after sampling. For the latter, we studied the evolution of the iron

  17. JSC Mars-1 Martian Soil Simulant: Melting Experiments and Electron Microprobe Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, P.; Sebille, L.; Boles, W.; Chadwell, M.; Schwarz, L.

    2003-01-01

    JSC Mars-1 has been developed as a Martian regolith simulant, and is the <1 mm size fraction of a palagonitic tephra (a glassy volcanic ash altered at low temperatures) from Pu'u Nene cinder cone on the Island of Hawaii. The Mars-1 simulant forms the basis for numerous terrestrial studies which aim to evaluate the suitability of Martian soil for materials processing. Martian soil may be sintered to form building materials for construction, and also melted or reacted to extract metals for various uses, as well as oxygen for life support.

  18. X-ray microprobe studies of Hungarian background and urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Toeroek, S.; Sandor, S.; Xhoffer, C.; Van Grieken, R.; Jones, K.W.; Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    In order to determine the polluting atmospheric sources in urban and background areas source apportionment of the air particulate matter is necessary. Hitherto these studies were mostly based on bulk composition measurements of the aerosol. Source profiles, i.e. the concentrations of several elements for air particulate matter originating from one source, can be deduced from the receptor data using a number of multivariate techniques among which the chemical mass balance. The application is limited by the large number of observations that must be made for each of the variables. Often an elaborated sample preparation is necessary for fractionating the sample into several sub samples, according to the density, particle diameter or other relevant properties. Often this may results in poorly resolved source profiles. The aim of the present work is to find the relative abundance of the particle types originating from two different background monitoring stations in the middle of the Great Hungarian Plain. In urban areas most pollutants originate from traffic and municipal waste incineration. Since heavy metals play an important role in these samples the highly sensitive x-ray microscope (XRM) of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory was used. A feasibility study on individual aerosol particles sampled at the above background stations and in the urban area of Budapest is discussed.

  19. Broad Beam and Ion Microprobe Studies of Single-Event Upsets in High Speed 0.18micron Silicon Germanium Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors and Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Robert A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Pickel, Jim; Carts, Martin A.; Irwin, TIm; Niu, Guofu; Cressler, John; Krithivasan, Ramkumar; Fritz, Karl; Riggs, Pam

    2003-01-01

    SiGe based technology is widely recognized for its tremendous potential to impact the high speed microelectronic industry, and therefore the space industry, by monolithic incorporation of low power complementary logic with extremely high speed SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (HBT) logic. A variety of studies have examined the ionizing dose, displacement damage and single event characteristics, and are reported. Accessibility to SiGe through an increasing number of manufacturers adds to the importance of understanding its intrinsic radiation characteristics, and in particular the single event effect (SEE) characteristics of the high bandwidth HBT based circuits. IBM is now manufacturing in its 3rd generation of their commercial SiGe processes, and access is currently available to the first two generations (known as and 6HP) through the MOSIS shared mask services with anticipated future release of the latest (7HP) process. The 5 HP process is described and is characterized by a emitter spacing of 0.5 micron and a cutoff frequency ff of 50 GHz, whereas the fully scaled 7HP HBT employs a 0.18 micron emitter and has an fT of 120 GHz. Previous investigations have the examined SEE response of 5 HP HBT circuits through both circuit testing and modeling. Charge collection modeling studies in the 5 H P process have also been conducted, but to date no measurements have been reported of charge collection in any SiGe HBT structures. Nor have circuit models for charge collection been developed in any version other than the 5 HP HBT structure. Our investigation reports the first indications of both charge collection and circuit response in IBM s 7HP-based SiGe process. We compare broad beam heavy ion SEU test results in a fully function Pseudo-Random Number (PRN) sequence generator up to frequencies of 12 Gbps versus effective LET, and also report proton test results in the same circuit. In addition, we examine the charge collection characteristics of individual 7HP HBT

  20. An ion microprobe study of CAIs from CO3 meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Greenwood, R. C.; Fahey, A. J.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    When attempting to interpret the history of Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) it is often difficult to distinguish between primary features inherited from the nebula and those produced during secondary processing on the parent body. We have undertaken a systematic study of CAIs from 10 CO chondrites, believed to represent a metamorphic sequence with the goal of distinguishing primary and secondary features. ALHA 77307 (3.0), Colony (3.0), Kainsaz (3.1), Felix (3.2), ALH 82101 (3.3), Ornans (3.3), Lance (3.4), ALHA 77003 (3.5), Warrenton (3.6), and Isna (3.7) were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. We have identified 141 CAIs within these samples, and studied in detail the petrology of 34 inclusions. The primary phases in the lower petrologic types are spinel, melilite, and hibonite. Perovskite, FeS, ilmenite, anorthite, kirschsteinite, and metallic Fe are present as minor phases. Melilite becomes less abundant in higher petrologic types and was not detected in chondrites of type 3.5 and above, confirming previous reports that this mineral easily breaks down during heating. Iron, an element that would not be expected to condense at high temperatures, has a lower abundance in spinel from low-petrologic-type meteorites than those of higher grade, and CaTiO3 is replaced by FeTiO3 in meteorites of higher petrologic type. The abundance of CAIs is similar in each meteorite. Eight inclusions have been analyzed by ion probe. The results are summarized. The results obtained to date show that CAIs in CO meteorites, like those from other meteorite classes, contain Mg* and that Mg in some inclusions has been redistributed.

  1. Asymmetri Distribution of Metals in the Xenopus Laevis Oocyte: a Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microprobe Study

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, B.F.G.; Belak, Z.R.; Ignatyev, K.; Ovsenek, N.; Nichol, H.; /Saskatchewan U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-29

    The asymmetric distribution of many components of the Xenopus oocyte, including RNA, proteins, and pigment, provides a framework for cellular specialization during development. During maturation, Xenopus oocytes also acquire metals needed for development, but apart from zinc, little is known about their distribution. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe was used to map iron, copper, and zinc and the metalloid selenium in a whole oocyte. Iron, zinc, and copper were asymmetrically distributed in the cytoplasm, while selenium and copper were more abundant in the nucleus. A zone of high copper and zinc was seen in the animal pole cytoplasm. Iron was also concentrated in the animal pole but did not colocalize with zinc, copper, or pigment accumulations. This asymmetry of metal deposition may be important for normal development. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe will be a useful tool to examine how metals accumulate and redistribute during fertilization and embryonic development.

  2. Asymmetric Distribution of Metals in the Xenopus Laevis Oocyte: a Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microprobe Study

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, B.F.Gh.; Belak, Z.R.; Ignatyev, K.; Ovsenek, N.; Nichol, H.

    2009-06-04

    The asymmetric distribution of many components of the Xenopus oocyte, including RNA, proteins, and pigment, provides a framework for cellular specialization during development. During maturation, Xenopus oocytes also acquire metals needed for development, but apart from zinc, little is known about their distribution. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe was used to map iron, copper, and zinc and the metalloid selenium in a whole oocyte. Iron, zinc, and copper were asymmetrically distributed in the cytoplasm, while selenium and copper were more abundant in the nucleus. A zone of high copper and zinc was seen in the animal pole cytoplasm. Iron was also concentrated in the animal pole but did not colocalize with zinc, copper, or pigment accumulations. This asymmetry of metal deposition may be important for normal development. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe will be a useful tool to examine how metals accumulate and redistribute during fertilization and embryonic development.

  3. Feasibility study of a lunar landing area navigation network deployed by impacting micro-probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, P.; Yung, K. L.

    2010-05-01

    Exploration activities on the lunar surface will require precise knowledge of the position of a robotic or manned vehicle. This paper discusses the use of radio beacons as method to determine the position of a mobile unit on the surface. Previous concepts consider the installation of such equipment by the robot itself. A novel idea is discussed here, namely to use miniaturized radio beacons which are deployed (released) during the descent of the lander on the surface. This idea has three major advantages compared to previous proposals: (i) it avoids the time costly and energy consuming installation of the equipment by a rover. (ii) The impact velocities of the probes are in reasonable range since the probes are deployed at low altitude from the main lander that approaches its final landing site. (iii) The probes can take reconnaissance pictures during their free-fall to the surface. This method will therefore deliver charts of the proximity of the landing area with higher resolution than those done by orbital means. Such information will enable scientists and mission operators to precisely plan robotic excursions (and later Extra Vehicular Activity) through the identification of hazardous areas and spots of interest. The paper will study the feasibility of this system from different aspects. The first section will outline the application scenario and the potential outcome of such a system for the coming phase of lunar exploration. A technological readiness review was done to evaluate if the payload instrumentation for these high velocity impacting probes is available. The second section presents the simulation of the impact process of a preliminary probe model in nonlinear transient dynamic finite element analysis using the Lagrangian hydrocode LS-DYNA. The purpose of this simulation was to evaluate if the beacon is able to communicate with the mobile unit even when buried into the soil. The integration of this payload into coming lunar missions will contribute to

  4. Histological changes induced by 15 F CO2 laser microprobe especially designed for root canal sterilization: an in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Gavriel; Koren, Rumelia; Gal, Rivka

    1998-04-01

    Until now, no suitable delivery fiber existed for CO2 laser endodontic radiation in the apical region where it is most difficult to eliminate the pulp tissue using conventional methods. To overcome this problem, we designed a microprobe that reaches closer to the apex, distributing the energy density to a smaller area of the root canal, thus favorably increasing the thermal effects. The 15 F CO2 microprobe is a flexible, hollow, metal fiber, 300 micrometer in diameter and 20 mm in length, coupled onto a handpiece, with the following radiation parameters: wavelength -- 10.6 micrometer; pulse duration -- 50m/sec; energy per pulse 0.25 joule; energy density -- 353.7J/cm2 per pulse; power on tissue -- 5 W. The study was conducted on 30 vital maxillary or mandibulary; central, lateral, or premolar teeth destined for extraction due to periodontal problems. Twenty were experimentally treated with pulsed CO2 laser delivered by this newly developed fiber after conventional root canal preparation. Temperature measured at three points on the root surface during laser treatment did not exceed 38 degrees Celsius. Ten teeth represented the control group in which only root canal preparation was performed in the conventional method. Histological examination of the laser treated teeth showed coagulation necrosis and vacuolization of remaining pulp tissue in the root canal periphery. Primary and secondary dentin appeared normal, in all cases treated with 15 F CO2 laser. Gramm stain and bacteriologic examination revealed complete sterilization. These results demonstrate the unique capabilities of this special microprobe in sterilization of the root canal, and no thermal damage to the surrounding tissue.

  5. Proton irradiation study of GFR candidate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian; Yang, Yong; Dickson, Clayton; Allen, Todd

    2009-06-01

    This work investigated the microstructural response of SiC, ZrC and ZrN irradiated with 2.6 MeV protons at 800 °C to a fluence of 2.75 × 10 19 protons/cm 2, corresponding to 0.71-1.8 displacement per atom (dpa), depending on the material. The change of lattice constant evaluated using HOLZ patterns is not observed. In comparison to Kr ion irradiation at 800 °C to 10 dpa from the previous studies, the proton irradiated ZrC and ZrN at 1.8 dpa show less irradiation damage to the lattice structure. The proton irradiated ZrC exhibits faulted loops which are not observed in the Kr ion irradiated sample. ZrN shows the least microstructural change from proton irradiation. The microstructure of 6H-SiC irradiated to 0.71 dpa consists of black dot defects at high density.

  6. Simulation study of proton transport in ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Philip; Allahyarov, Elshad

    2008-03-01

    Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations were used to study the morphological changes induced in a Nafion-like ionomer by the imposition of a strong electric field. We observe that proton transport through this polymer electrolyte membrane is accompanied by morphological changes that include the formation of structures aligned along the direction of the applied field. The polar head groups of the ionomer side chains assemble into clusters, which then form rod-like formations, and these cylindrical structures then assemble into a hexagonally ordered array aligned with the direction of current flow. For dry ionomers, at current densities in excess of 1 A/cm^2 these rod-like clusters undergo an inner micro-phase separation, in which distinct wire-like lines of sulfonate head groups are accompanied by similar wire-like alignments of bound protons. The clusters appear to be of two types. If there are two, four, or five lines of sulfonates then there is an equal number of lines of protons, but if there are three lines of sulfonates then they are accompanied by four lines of protons. Occasionally these lines of sulfonates and protons form a helical structure. Upon removal of the electric field, the hexagonal array of rod-like structures remains, but the microphase separation disappears below the threshold current of 1 A/cm^2.

  7. A study of the behavior of bromide in artificial pits using in situ X-ray microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Kaneko, M.

    1997-12-31

    An in situ X-ray microprobe analysis of Type 316 stainless steel artificial pits has been carried out with a bromide/chloride solution. A high intensity 8 micron diameter polychromatic X-ray beam was scanned across the steel solution interface within the artificial pit. The resulting X-ray fluorescence was analyzed using an energy dispersive X-ray detector. In contrast to the light Cl atom, Br could be detected, making it possible to monitor the behavior of halides in the artificial pits and in the salt layer at the interface. It was found that Br was more active than Cl. At high potentials, elemental Br was produced as an oxidation product, whereas without added bromide, chloride only formed a salt layer. Br also concentrated at the salt steel interface at potentials below where it was oxidized.

  8. Experimental determination of the partitioning of gallium between solid iron metal and synthetic basaltic melt Electron and ion microprobe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Reed, S. J. B.; Enright, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of Ga between solid Fe metal and synthetic basaltic melt is investigated experimentally at temperatures of 1190 and 1330 C, and over a narrow range of oxygen fugacities. Metal-silicate reversal experiments were conducted, indicating a close approach to equilibrium. The analysis of the partitioned products was performed using electron and ion microprobes. At one bar total pressure, the solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficient D(Ga) is used to evaluate metal-silicate fractionation processes in the earth, moon, and Eucrite Parent Body (EPB). It is found that the depletion of Ga abundances in the EPB is due to the extraction of Ga into a metallic core. Likewise, the depletion of Ga in the lunar mantle is consistent with the extraction of Ga into a smaller lunar core if Ga was originally present in a subchondritic concentration. The relatively high Ga abundances in the earth's mantle are discussed, with reference to several theoretical models.

  9. Nuclear microprobe analysis of lead profile in crocodile bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlic, I.; Siegele, R.; Hammerton, K.; Jeffree, R. A.; Cohen, D. D.

    2003-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of lead were found in Australian free ranging saltwater crocodile ( Crocodylus porosus) bone and flesh. Lead shots were found as potential source of lead in these animals. ANSTO's heavy ion nuclear microprobe was used to measure the distribution of Pb in a number of bones and osteoderms. The aim was to find out if elevated Pb concentration remains in growth rings and if the concentration is correlated with the blood levels recorded at the time. Results of our study show a very distinct distribution of accumulated Pb in bones and osteoderms as well as good correlation with the level of lead concentration in blood. To investigate influence of ion species on detection limits measurements of the same sample were performed by using 3 MeV protons, 9 MeV He ions and 20 MeV carbon ions. Peak to background ratios, detection limits and the overall 'quality' of obtained spectra are compared and discussed.

  10. Intracochlear microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bone, R.C.; Ryan, A.F.

    1982-04-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) or microprobe analysis provides cochlear physiologists with a means of accurately assessing relative ionic concentrations in selected portions of the auditory mechanism. Rapid freezing followed by lyophilization allows the recovery of fluid samples in crystalline form not only from perilymphatic and endolymphatic spaces, but also from much smaller subregions of the cochlea. Because samples are examined in a solid state, there is no risk of diffusion into surrounding or juxtaposed fluids. Samples of cochlear tissues may also be evaluated without the danger of intercellular ionic diffusion. During direct visualization by scanning electron microscopy, determination of the biochemical makeup of the material being examined can be simultaneously, assuring the source of the data collected. Other potential advantages and disadvantages of EDXA are reviewed. Initial findings as they relate to endolymph, perilymph, stria vascularis, and the undersurface of the tectorial membrane are presented.

  11. Zircon geochronology and ca. 400 Ma exhumation of Norwegian ultrahigh-pressure rocks: An ion microprobe and chemical abrasion study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Root, D.B.; Hacker, B.R.; Mattinson, J.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the formation and exhumation of the remarkable ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks of the Western Gneiss Region, Norway, hinges on precise determination of the time of eclogite recrystallization. We conducted detailed thermal ionization mass spectrometry, chemical abrasion analysis and sensitive high-resolution ion-microprobe analysis of zircons from four ultrahigh- and high-pressure (HP) rocks. Ion-microprobe analyses from the Flatraket eclogite yielded a broad range of apparently concordant Caledonian ages, suggesting long-term growth. In contrast, higher precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry analysis of zircon subject to combined thermal annealing and multi-step chemical abrasion yielded moderate Pb loss from the first (lowest temperature) abrasion step, possible minor Pb loss or minor growth at 400 Ma from the second step and a 407-404 Ma cluster of slightly discordant 206Pb/238U ages, most likely free from Pb loss, from the remaining abrasion steps. We interpret the latter to reflect zircon crystallization at ???405-400 Ma with minor discordance from inherited cores. Zircon crystallization occurred at eclogite-facies, possibly post-peak conditions, based on compositions of garnet inclusions in zircon as well as nearly flat HREE profiles and lack of Eu anomalies in zircon fractions subjected to chemical abrasion. These ages are significantly younger than the 425 Ma age often cited for western Norway eclogite recrystallization, implying faster rates of exhumation (>2.5-8.5 km/Myr), and coeval formation of eclogites across the UHP portion of the Western Gneiss Region. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Positron microprobe at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka, P; Howell, R; Stoeffl, W

    1998-11-01

    The electron linac based positron source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. We are building a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with sub-micron resolution. The widely spaced and intense positron packets from the tungsten moderator at the end of the 100 MeV LLNL linac are captured and trapped in a magnetic bottle. The positrons are then released in 1 ns bunches at a 20 MHz repetition rate. With a three-stage re-moderation we will compress the cm-sized original beam to a 1 micro-meter diameter final spot on the target. The buncher will compress the arrival time of positrons on the target to less than 100 ps. A detector array with up to 60 BaF2 crystals in paired coincidence will measure the annihilation radiation with high efficiency and low background. The energy of the positrons can be varied from less than 1 keV up to 50 keV.

  13. An ion microprobe study of the intra-crystalline behavior of REE and selected trace elements in pyroxene from mare basalts with different cooling and crystallization histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of crystallization interaction on the trace element zoning characteristics of pyroxenes are analyzed using electron and ion microprobe techniques. Four pigeonite basalts with similar isochemical composition, but different cooling rates and crystallization histories are studied. Pyroxene quadrilaterals displaying crystallization trends are presented. The crystal chemical rationalization of REE zoning, pattern shapes, and abundances are examined. The data reveal that the trace element zoning characteristics in pyroxene and the partitioning of trace elements between pyroxene and the melt are related to the interaction between the efficiency of the crystallization process, the kinetics at the crystal-melt interface, the kinetics of plagioclase nucleation and the characteristics of the crystal chemical substitutions in the pyroxene and the associated crystallizing phase.

  14. An ion and electron microprobe study of amphibole in the Garland Peak Syenite, Red Hill Complex, NH

    SciTech Connect

    Dorais, M.J. ); Macrae, N.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The Garland Peak Syenite (GPS) of the Red Hill complex, NH, consists predominantly of amphibole, oligoclase, perthite, and quartz; amphiboles are zoned from kaersutite cores to hastingsite-hornblende rims. The association of kaersutite with quartz indicates that the GPS magma experienced substantial changes in silica activity during its crystallization history. Camptonites are also associated with the Red Hill complex, and in order to elucidate the camptonite-GPS, and the GPS kaersutite-quartz relationships, amphiboles in these rocks were analyzed by electron and ion microprobe techniques. Kaersutites in the camptonites and GPS are very similar in terms of major and minor elements. REE concentrations in the camptonite's kaersutite are slightly less than the GPS kaersutite; LREE abundances are 100 times chondrites, La/Yb values are 4--5. GPS kaersutitic cores have LREE abundances between 200--300 times chondrites with La/Yb values between 6--8. Compared to the cores, the hastingsite rims are preferentially enriched in REE with LREE between 1,000 and 2,000 times chondrites, La/Yb values range between 16--18, and the patterns have large negative Eu anomalies. Although complicated by the certainty of changing partition coefficients during crystallization, the enrichment in total REE from camptonite--GPS kaersutite--GPS hastingsite is consistent with a differentiation origin of the suite. Rimward depletions in Sr, Eu, V, and Ti concentrations, and the increase in La/Yb values suggest that parental camptonites fractionated amphibole, magnetite, and feldspar to produce silica-oversaturated GPS liquids. The significance of amphibole and magnetite fractionation on camptonite-GPS silica activity is also indicated by bulk-rock, major element modeling.

  15. Quantitative elemental imaging of octopus stylets using PIXE and the nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubleday, Zoë; Belton, David; Pecl, Gretta; Semmens, Jayson

    2008-01-01

    By utilising targeted microprobe technology, the analysis of elements incorporated within the hard bio-mineralised structures of marine organisms has provided unique insights into the population biology of many species. As hard structures grow, elements from surrounding waters are incorporated effectively providing a natural 'tag' that is often unique to the animal's particular location or habitat. The spatial distribution of elements within octopus stylets was investigated, using the nuclear microprobe, to assess their potential for determining dispersal and population structure in octopus populations. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was conducted using the Dynamic Analysis method and GeoPIXE software package, which produced high resolution, quantitative elemental maps of whole stylet cross-sections. Ten elements were detected within the stylets which were heterogeneously distributed throughout the microstructure. Although Ca decreased towards the section edge, this trend was consistent between individuals and remained homogeneous in the inner region of the stylet, and thus appears a suitable internal standard for future microprobe analyses. Additional analyses used to investigate the general composition of the stylet structure suggested that they are amorphous and largely organic, however, there was some evidence of phosphatic mineralisation. In conclusion, this study indicates that stylets are suitable for targeted elemental analysis, although this is currently limited to the inner hatch region of the microstructure.

  16. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  17. The second Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), Chris Voorhees (left) and Satish Krishnan (right), from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, remove the second Mars microprobe from a drum. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  18. Multielement geochemical investigations by SRXRF microprobe studies on tectite material: Evidence from the NE-Mexican Cretaceous/Tertiary record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harting, M.; Rickers, K.; Kramar, U.; Simon, R.; Staub, S.; Schulte, P.

    2002-12-01

    The K/T boundary is long known as one of a few mass extinctions in earth history. The impact of a big meteorite at the Chicxulub on the northern Yucatan peninsula in Mexico is discussed to have triggered the faunal mass extinction and the rapid change of the palaeoenvironmental conditions near the K/T boundary. Tectite material, especially spherules are explained from many of the sections in correlation to the K/T-boundary event. This rare, glassy or alterated material is extremely variable in its major element chemistry, morphology and stratigraphic position in K/T transitions worldwide. For the first time, we perfom trace element analysis on tectites from the K/T boundary using synchrotron radiation XRF (SRXRF). Measurements were performed at the Hamburger Strahlungssynchrotronlabor HASYLAB at DESY (Hamburg, Germany) and at the ANKA (Karlsruhe, Germany) with polychromatic and monochromatic excitation, respectively collimating the beam to 15 æm by capillary optics. Based on results from SRXRF microprobe determinations, these structures are to be interpreted as mixing of several melts with different chemical composition. The different components may represent melts from different sediment layers and possibly of basement material excavated by the Chicxulub impact. Igneous rocks with andesitic composition in cores at Chicxulub are considered to be impact melt rocks and are correlated mainly by the composition of major elements with the glass spherules found in the surrounding. Our investigations show that it is possible to trace elements with high sensitivity and a high spatial resolution. Some of the samples show clearly zonation and alteration parts, as well as carbonate inclusions, triggered by the Chicxulub impact event. In general, the results from the SRXRF show that the tectite material have different trace element patterns, formed by mixing of melts with different chemical composition derived from different sediment layers and possibly of basement material

  19. Study of elastic proton-proton scattering with the STAR detector at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Rafal

    2015-09-01

    The STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is equipped with system of dedicated Silicon Strip Detectors housed inside Roman Pot vessels, allowing to detect protons scattered at small angles. Data from polarized proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass system (c.m.s.) energy √s = 200 GeV collected with special settings of RHIC magnet lattice (β * = 22 m) allow to study proton-proton elastic scattering at very low values of squared four-momentum transfer (Mandelstam t), 0:003 <= -t <= 0:035 GeV2=c2. Results of analysis of systematic effects and large statistics of collected data sample reveal possibility of measurement of the Nuclear Slope Parameter with precision not yet achieved at this c.m.s. energy.

  20. MeV heavy ion microprobe PIXE for the analysis of the materials surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokuno, Y.; Horino, Y.; Kinomura, A.; Chayahara, A.; Kiuchi, M.; Fujii, K.; Takai, M.

    1994-03-01

    Micro PIXE analysis using MeV phosphorus microprobes was performed to a surface structure which consists of multilevel aluminum wirings in silicon nitride and these results were compared with those from a proton microprobe. In the case of a 2 MeV phosphorus microprobe, the X-ray production was enhanced near the surface due to the large energy deposition rate or the short projectile range. As a result, the increase in surface sensitivity was clearly shown in PIXE mapping images of aluminum, silicon, and phosphorus.

  1. Beam developments for the Harwell microprobe system

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.M.; Cookson, J.A.; Alton, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A consequence of the rapid development of micron and submicron size electronic devices is the diminished applicability of high energy ion microprobes with their present resolution limitations to the study of such components. Although submicron beams have been reported the available beam current is barely sufficiently for PIXE and is not adequate for RBS. This lack of lateral resolution is due to low beam brightness at the microprobe object and aberrations in the focusing elements. As part of a program to address these problems the Harwell microprobe lens has been relocated on a new 5 MV Laddertron accelerator. The increased brightness and improved stability of this facility has so far led to a reduction in beam size from 3 x 3 mS to about 2 x 2 mS. The feasibility of using a liquid metal ion source has been examined with a view to achieving more substantial increases in brightness. While such sources have brightness approximately 10V times greater than conventional gaseous sources the highly divergent nature of the beam presents problems for the beam transport system. The use of a liquid metal source on the accelerator has been successfully demonstrated but it indicates the need for a special low aberration injection lens if brightness is to be maintained.

  2. Microprobe PIXE analysis of aluminium in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Kakimi, S.; Fujii, K.

    1996-04-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), we examined aluminium (Al) in the rat liver, and in the brains (hippocampus) of Alzheimer's disease patients using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+) microprobe and proton (2 MeV) microprobe PIXE analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si 2+) have several time's higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. (1) In the rat liver, Al was detected in the cell nuclei, where phosphorus (P) was most densely distributed. (2) We also demonstrated Al in the cell nuclei isolated from Alzheimer's disease brains using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+) microprobes. Al spectra were detected using 2 MeV proton microprobes in the isolated brain cell nuclei. Al could not be observed in areas where P was present in relatively small amounts, or was absent. Our results indicate that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells.

  3. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity.

  4. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity. PMID:27423927

  5. Moessbauer and Electron Microprobe Studies of Density Separates of Martian Nakhlite Mil03346: Implications for Interpretation of Moessbauer Spectra Acquired by the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; McKay, G. A.; Agresti, D. G.; Li, Loan

    2008-01-01

    Martian meteorite MIL03346 is described as an augite-rich cumulate rock with approx.80%, approx.3%, and approx.21% modal phase proportions of augite (CPX), olivine and glassy mesostasis, respectively, and is classified as a nakhlite [1]. The Mossbauer spectrum for whole rock (WR) MIL 03346 is unusual for Martian meteorites in that it has a distinct magnetite subspectrum (7% subspectral area) [2]. The meteorite also has products of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration ("iddingsite") that is associated primarily with the basaltic glass and olivine. The Mossbauer spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers have measured the Fe oxidation state and the Fe mineralogical composition of rocks and soils on the planet s surface since their landing in Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum in January, 2004 [3,4]. The MIL 03346 meteorite provides an opportunity to "ground truth" or refine Fe phase identifications. This is particularly the case for the so-called "nanophase ferric oxide" (npOx) component. NpOx is a generic name for a ferric rich product of oxidative alteration. On Earth, where we can take samples apart and study individual phases, examples of npOx include ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, akagaaneite, and superparamagnetic (small particle) goethite and hematite. It is also possible for ferric iron to be associated to some unknown extent with igneous phases like pyroxene. We report here an electron microprobe (EMPA) and Moessbauer (MB) study of density separates of MIL 03346. The same separates were used for isotopic studies by [5]. Experimental techniques are described by [6,7].

  6. 150 MeV proton medical cyclotron design study.

    PubMed

    Burleigh, R J; Clark, D J; Flood, W S

    1975-01-01

    A brief design study has been done for a 150 MeV proton sector cyclotron. The object was to minimize cost but maintain good reliability and easy maintenance. The use of the proton beam would be for therapy, radiography and isotope production.

  7. An x-ray microprobe beam line for trace element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchrotron radiation to an x-ray microprobe for trace element analysis is a complementary and natural extension of existing microprobe techniques using electrons, protons, and heavier ions as excitation sources for x-ray fluorescence. The ability to focus charged particles leads to electron microprobes with spatial resolutions in the sub-micrometer range and down to 100 ppM detection limits and proton microprobes with micrometer resolution and ppM detection limits. The characteristics of synchrotron radiation that prove useful for microprobe analysis include a broad and continuous energy spectrum, a relatively small amount of radiation damage compared to that deposited by charged particles, a highly polarized source which reduces background scattered radiation in an appropriate counting geometry, and a small vertical divergence angle of approx.0.2 mrad which allows for focussing of the light beam into a small spot with high flux. The features of a dedicated x-ray microprobe beam line developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) are described. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Mautner, M. N.; Barry, B.; Markwitz, A.

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  9. Proton radioactivity studies at the FMA

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, H. ||; Davids, C.N.; Woods, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    A double sided silicon strip (DSSD) setup is installed at the Argonne National Laboratory recoil separator FMA. Ground state proton emitters {sup 146,147}Tm, {sup 160}Re, {sup 156}Ta, {sup 150,151}Lu were produced in a series of test experiments. Improved T{sub 1/2} values were obtained for {sup 147}Tm, {sup 160}Re, and {sup 156}Ta. Improved alpha T{sub 1/2} value of (13.2 {plus_minus} 1.1) ms was obtained for {sup 161}Re. In a search of new proton radioactivities a (5 {plus_minus} 2)% proton decay branch with E{sub p} = (1345 {plus_minus} 13) keV for {sup 161}Re was found.

  10. A wireless beta-microprobe based on pixelated silicon for in vivo brain studies in freely moving rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, J.; Benoit, D.; Balasse, L.; Benoit, M.; Clémens, J. C.; Fieux, S.; Fougeron, D.; Graber-Bolis, J.; Janvier, B.; Jevaud, M.; Genoux, A.; Gisquet-Verrier, P.; Menouni, M.; Pain, F.; Pinot, L.; Tourvielle, C.; Zimmer, L.; Morel, C.; Laniece, P.

    2013-07-01

    The investigation of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the functional specificity of brain regions requires the development of technologies that are well adjusted to in vivo studies in small animals. An exciting challenge remains the combination of brain imaging and behavioural studies, which associates molecular processes of neuronal communications to their related actions. A pixelated intracerebral probe (PIXSIC) presents a novel strategy using a submillimetric probe for beta+ radiotracer detection based on a pixelated silicon diode that can be stereotaxically implanted in the brain region of interest. This fully autonomous detection system permits time-resolved high sensitivity measurements of radiotracers with additional imaging features in freely moving rats. An application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) allows for parallel signal processing of each pixel and enables the wireless operation. All components of the detector were tested and characterized. The beta+ sensitivity of the system was determined with the probe dipped into radiotracer solutions. Monte Carlo simulations served to validate the experimental values and assess the contribution of gamma noise. Preliminary implantation tests on anaesthetized rats proved PIXSIC's functionality in brain tissue. High spatial resolution allows for the visualization of radiotracer concentration in different brain regions with high temporal resolution.

  11. The first Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory open the drums containing the Mars microprobes that will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander. From left, they are Satish Krishnan, Charles Cruzan, Chris Voorhees and Arden Acord. Scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket, the solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  12. Upper Stephanian volcanism and sedimentation in the French Massif Central (France): A high resolution ion microprobe U-Th-Pb study of volcanic tuffs and its tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruguier, O.; Becq-Giraudon, J. F.; Champenois, M.; Deloule, E.; Ludden, J.; Mangin, D.

    2003-04-01

    Post-convergence evolution of the Variscan belt is characterized by the development of numerous intramontane coal-bearing basins containing volcano-sedimentary successions. As these basins are widely distributed in the whole Variscan belt, they represent important tectonic markers that can be used to bracket the phases of extensional tectonics affecting basement country rocks. A series of five volcanic ash layers interbedded in stephanian sedimentary basins from the southern part of the French Massif Central (France) have been studied by high resolution ion-microprobe analyses of zircons in order to constrain the age of basin formation and sedimentation. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages for the five studied tuffs are indistinguishable at the 95% confidence level and range from 295.5±5.1 Ma (Graissessac) to 297.9±5.1 Ma (Roujan-Neffies). These U-Pb ages support the argument for intense magmatic activity in the southern part of the French Massif Central during the period 295--300 Ma which is contemporaneous with volcanic events identified in other parts of the Variscan Belt. This suggests magma generation by orogenic belt scale phenomenoms. Inherited zircons were identified in two out of the five dated tuff horizons and support a model involving a anatexis of basement source rocks with ages of ca. 2400 Ma (Jaujac basin), 1900 and 340 Ma (Graissessac basin). One possible xenocrystic grain, ca. 600 Ma old was also detected in zircons from the Graissessac bentonite. The Proterozoic components indicate a Gondwanan affinity for the deep seated material. Apatite concentrates and single zircon grains, analysed for their chemical composition, further indicate magma generation from the continental crust and, at least for the Jaujac basin, with participation of a mafic component. Contemporaneous eruption of mafic and silicic magmas is thought to be related to replenishment of magmatic chambers at depth by influx of mafic, mantle-derived, magmas triggering the upper Stephanian

  13. Study of Proton Transfer in E. Coli Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2013-06-01

    Photolyase is a flavoprotein which utilizes blue-light energy to repair UV-light damaged DNA. The catalytic cofactor of photolyase, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), has five redox states. Conversions between these redox states involve intraprotein electron transfer and proton transfer, which play important role in protein function. Here we systematically studied proton transfer in E. coli photolyase in vitro by site-directed mutagenesis and steady-state UV-vis spectroscopy, and proposed the proton channel in photolyase. We found that in the mutant N378C/E363L, proton channel was completely eliminated when DNA substrate was bound to the protein. Proton is suggested to be transported from protein surface to FAD by two pathways: the proton relay pathway through E363 and surface water to N378 and then to FAD; and the proton diffusion pathway through the substrate binding pocket. In addition, reaction kinetics of conversions between the redox states was then solved and redox potentials of the redox states were determined. These results described a complete picture of FAD redox changes, which are fundamental to the functions of all flavoenzymes.

  14. Long-term clinical evaluation of endodontically treated teeth by 15 F CO2 laser microprobe: three years clinical follow-up of 1512 root canals--in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Gavriel; Koren, Rumelia; Kesler, Anat; Hay, Nissim; Gal, Rivka

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of 15 F CO2 laser microprobe, in cases of periapical lesions, by eliminating the pathological reaction caused by certain species of bacteria, reduction of reinfection and stimulation of osteogenesis in the periapical region. Until now, no suitable delivery fiber existed for CO2 laser endodontic radiation in the apical region where it is most difficult to eliminate the pulp tissue using conventional methods. To overcome this problem, Sharplan laser designed a microprobe that reaches closer to the apex, distributing the energy density to a smaller area of the root canal, thus favorably increasing the thermal effects. The study was conducted on 900 teeth, divided in two groups. 468 were new case, carefully selected according to strict parameters such as: wide periapical translucency over 1mm, supported by digital x-ray, with a lesion of 3mm and more. All root canals were mechanically prepared in the conventional method up to size 35, Physiological saline solution served as finding solution and were treated by 15 F CO2 laser microprobe for 60 pulses repeatedly. The temperature at the surrounding tissue of the root did not exceed 38 degrees C filling of the canal was possible at the same appointment, without antibiotical treatment. 432 of the cases, which were referred to us by other dentists, after an unsuccessful treatment according to the classical therapy, were treated by the same laser therapy. Follow up was performed by clinical examination, and digital x-ray taken, during and after treatment as well as after 3, 6, 9, 12 month. The result demonstrate 98% success rate in both study groups, according to objective criteria for a successful treatment such as: reduction of apical translucency after 2- 6 months, freedom form clinical complains, and no need for periapical surgery.

  15. Heavy-ion broad-beam and microprobe studies of single-event upsets in 0.20 um SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors and circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Karl; Irwin, Timothy J.; Niu, Guofu; Fodness, Bryan; Carts, Martin A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Reed, Robert A.; Gilbert, Barry; Randall, Barbara; Prairie, Jason; Riggs, Pam; Pickel, James C.; LaBel, Kenneth; Cressler, John D.; Krithivasan, Ramkumar; Dodd, Paul Emerson; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2003-09-01

    Combining broad-beam circuit level single-event upset (SEU) response with heavy ion microprobe charge collection measurements on single silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors improves understanding of the charge collection mechanisms responsible for SEU response of digital SiGe HBT technology. This new understanding of the SEU mechanisms shows that the right rectangular parallele-piped model for the sensitive volume is not applicable to this technology. A new first-order physical model is proposed and calibrated with moderate success.

  16. Transversity studies with protons and light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopetta, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    A general formalism to evaluate time-reversal odd transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (T-odd TMDS) is reviewed and applied to the calculation of the leading-twist quantities, i.e., the Sivers and the Boer-Mulders functions. Two different models of the proton structure, namely a non relativistic constituent quark model and the MIT bag model, have been used. The results obtained in both frameworks fulfill the Burkardt sum rule to a large extent. The calculation of nuclear effects in the extraction of neutron single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off transversely polarized 3He is also illustrated. In the kinematics of JLab, it is found that the nuclear effects described by an Impulse Approximation approach are under theoretical control.

  17. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  18. Environmental applications of the LANL nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmott, D. D.; Herrin, J. M.; Abell, R.; George, M.; Stimac, J.; Gauerke, E. R.; Denniston, R. F.

    1997-07-01

    The LANL nuclear microprobe has been used to study the distributions of trace elements (TE) of environmental interest including: (1) metals in coal and fly ash, (2) Pb in the Bandelier Tuff (BT), (3) Ba in tree rings, (4) Mn, Fe, Sr and Y in Yucca Mountain calcites. These studies illustrate environmental problems that can be addressed using nuclear microprobes. Micro-PIXE (MP) analyses with 5-10 micrometer spatial resolution provide constraints on processes that redistribute contaminants in the environment, and hence may help answer environmental problems where fine-scale chemical records are important. MP analyses of particulates in coal and ash show that pyrite contains As, Se, Hg and Pb; macerals contain Cr, halogens and S; cenospheres contain As, Se and Ni; and hematite ash contains Ni and As. Understanding these elemental modes of occurrence allows prediction of metal behavior in boilers and may enhance compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments. Fine-grained high-Pb minerals were identified using SEM and MP analyses of BT minerals. These minerals were from samples associated with deep-groundwater wells containing Pb at levels greater than regulatory limits. Pb is concentrated in Pb minerals (e.g. cerussite), smectite, and hematite formed during low-T alteration of tuff. Understanding mineralogic speciation of metals may provide insights into sources of groundwater pollution. Tree rings from ponderosa pines that grew in a Ba-contaminated drainage were analyzed using MP. Ba concentrations are typically higher in rings that formed after operations discharging Ba to the environment began. Such tree-ring analyses may ultimately provide information on rates of contaminant migration in the environment. TE in zoned calcites from Yucca Mountain were analyzed by MP. Calcites from the saturated zone (SZ) have distinct chemical signatures (high Fe, Mn and low Y). No calcites in the unsaturated zone with SZ chemical signatures were found using MP. MP analyses of vein

  19. Ion microprobe study of Au and Carlin-type trace metals in rhyolite melt inclusions from Eocene dikes and ash-flow tuff in northern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, K. E.; Colgan, J. P.; John, D. A.; Henry, C.; Coble, M. A.; Hervig, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    , Te, As) were within 'typical' ranges for rhyolites, and with the possible exception of As, cannot be used to differentiate the Caetano and Cortez melt inclusion datasets. Synthesis of SIMS trace element concentrations with major element data obtained by electron microprobe does not reveal any consistent trends of trace element enrichments or depletions in the analyzed inclusions. This study highlights the utility of SIMS for quantifying low-level concentrations of Au and other trace metals at the small spatial scales (10s of microns) required for melt inclusion work. Our results do not provide evidence for a magmatic origin of Au in Carlin-type gold deposits, or at least not as retained in the melt inclusion record of the Eocene rhyolites in this study.

  20. 200 MeV proton radiography studies with a hand phantom using a prototype proton CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V; Feng, V; Hurley, F; Johnson, R P; Leary, C; Macafee, S; Plumb, A; Rykalin, V; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schubert, K; Schulte, R; Schultze, B; Steinberg, D; Witt, M; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2014-04-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton computed tomography (CT) scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality.

  1. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V.; Feng, V.; Hurley, F.; Johnson, R.P.; Leary, C.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Rykalin, V.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Schubert, K.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, B.; Steinberg, D.; Witt, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton CT scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  2. Studies of electron and proton isochoric heating for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Beg, F; Clarke, R; Clarke, D; Chen, M; Chung, H; Chen, S; Freeman, R; Green, J; Gu, P; Gregori, G; Highbarger, K; Habara, H; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Heathcote, R; Hill, J; King, J; Kodama, R; Koch, J; Lancaster, K; Langdon, B; Murphy, C; Norreys, P; Neely, D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nakamura, H; Patel, N; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Snavley, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Foord, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Storm, M; Tanaka, K; Tempo, M; Toley, M; Town, R; Wilks, S; VanWoerkom, L; Weber, R; Yabuuchi, T; Zhang, B

    2006-10-02

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) proposal to use this technique to initiate burn in a fusion capsule. Experiments designed to investigate electron isochoric heating have measured heating in two limiting cases of interest to fast ignition, small planar foils and hollow cones. Data from Cu K{alpha} fluorescence, crystal x-ray spectroscopy of Cu K shell emission, and XUV imaging at 68eV and 256 eV are used to test PIC and Hybrid PIC modeling of the interaction. Isochoric heating by focused proton beams generated at the concave inside surface of a hemi-shell and from a sub hemi-shell inside a cone have been studied with the same diagnostic methods plus imaging of proton induced K{alpha}. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled. Conclusions from the proton and electron heating experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed.

  3. Lack of effect of microinjection of noradrenaline or medetomidine on stimulus-evoked release of substance P in the spinal cord of the cat: a study with antibody microprobes.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, C. W.; Hope, P. J.; Grubb, B. D.; Duggan, A. W.

    1994-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed on barbiturate anaesthetized, spinalized cats to investigate the effect of microinjected noradrenaline or medetomidine on the release of immunoreactive substance P in the dorsal spinal cord following peripheral nerve stimulation. The presence of immunoreactive substance P was assessed with microprobes bearing C-terminus-directed antibodies to substance P. 2. Noradrenaline or medetomidine were microinjected into the grey matter of the spinal cord, near microprobe insertion sites, at depths of 2.5, 2.0, 1.5 and 1.0 mm below the spinal cord surface with volumes of approximately 0.125 microliters and a concentration of 10(-3) M. 3. In the untreated spinal cord, electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral tibial nerve (suprathreshold for C-fibres) elicited release of immunoreactive substance P which was centred in and around lamina II. Neither noradrenaline nor medetomidine administration in the manner described produced significant alterations in this pattern of nerve stimulus-evoked release. 4. In agreement with recent ultrastructural studies these results do not support a control of substance P release by catecholamines released from sites near to the central terminals of small diameter primary afferent fibres. PMID:7522862

  4. Comments on Injector Proton Beam Study in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    During the entire period of injector proton study in run 2014, it seems that the beam transverse emittance out of Booster is larger than that in run 2013. The emittance measured at the BtA transfer line and also the transmission from Booster late to AGS late are presented for this argument. In addition to this problem, it seems that the multiturn Booster injection, which defines the transverse emittance, needs more attention. Moreover, for high intensity operations, the space charge effect may be already relevant in RHIC polarized proton runs. With the RHIC proton intensity improvement in the next several years, higher Booster input intensity is needed, therefore, the space charge effect at the Booster injection and early ramp may become a new limiting factor.

  5. Wide area microprobe analyser (WAMPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoyski, A.; Skidmore, B.; Maheswaran, V.; Wright, I.; Zarnecki, J.; Pillinger, C.

    2006-10-01

    Wide area microprobe analyser (WAMPA) represents a new scientific instrument concept for planetary exploration. WAMPA builds on recently published research such as sensor webs and distributed microsensors [The sensor web: a new instrument concept, SPIE Symposium on Integrated Optics, 20 26 January 2001, San Jose, CA; Design considerations for distributed microsensor systems, Proceedings of the IEEE 1999 Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC ’99), May 1999, pp. 279 286] but adds new sensor and localisation concepts. WAMPA is driven by the recurrent theme in spacecraft and sensor design to achieve smaller, lighter and lower cost systems. The essential characteristics of the WAMPA design that differentiates it from other space science instruments are that WAMPA is both a wide area instrument, consisting of a distributed set of sensors, and that each probe is designed to use little, if any, power. It achieves the former by being utilised in large numbers (>10), requiring that the individual probes be low mass (<100g) and low volume (<10cm). It is envisaged that the probes would be dispersed by landers or rovers as mission support instruments rather than primary science instruments and would be used in hostile environments and rugged terrains where the lander/rover could not be risked (see Fig. 1).

  6. Progress of the Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS).

    PubMed

    Bryant, P J

    1999-06-01

    The Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) was set up following an agreement between Professor M. Regler of the Med-AUSTRON (Austria) and Professor U. Amaldi of the TERA Foundation (Italy) to join their efforts in the design of a medical synchrotron that could later be adapted to individual national needs. CERN agreed to host this study inside its PS Division and to contribute one full-time member to the study team. The study group has worked in collaboration with GSI (Germany) and was more recently joined by Onkologie 2000 (Czech Republic). Work started in January 1996 and is expected to finish during 1998. The agreed aim of the study was to investigate and design a generic facility that would allow the direct clinical comparison of protons and carbon ions for cancer treatment. The accelerator was to be designed primarily for high-precision active beam scanning with both protons and ions, but was also to be capable of delivering proton beams with passive spreading. PMID:10394382

  7. Method study of parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Feng; Gao, Jie; Xiao, Ming; Wang, Dou; Wang, Yi-Wei; Bai, Sha; Bian, Tian-Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we show a systematic method of appropriate parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider by using an analytical expression for the beam-beam tune shift limit, starting from a given design goal and technical limitations. A suitable parameter space has been explored. Based on the parameter scan, sets of appropriate parameters designed for a 50 km and 100 km circular proton-proton collider are proposed. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175192)

  8. An NMR Protonation Study of Metal Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letkeman, Peter

    1979-01-01

    This experiment is suitable for an integrated laboratory course for senior chemistry majors. It introduces the student to a study of the relative basicity of different proton accepting sites. It serves as an opportunity to learn about nmr techniques and could extend to infrared, as well. (BB)

  9. A Case Study in Proton Pencil-Beam Scanning Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Kooy, Hanne M.; Clasie, Benjamin M.; Lu, H.-M.; Madden, Thomas M.; Bentefour, Hassan; Depauw, Nicolas M.S.; Adams, Judy A.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Demaret, Denis; Delaney, Thomas F.; Flanz, Jacob B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: We completed an implementation of pencil-beam scanning (PBS), a technology whereby a focused beam of protons, of variable intensity and energy, is scanned over a plane perpendicular to the beam axis and in depth. The aim of radiotherapy is to improve the target to healthy tissue dose differential. We illustrate how PBS achieves this aim in a patient with a bulky tumor. Methods and Materials: Our first deployment of PBS uses 'broad' pencil-beams ranging from 20 to 35 mm (full-width-half-maximum) over the range interval from 32 to 7 g/cm{sup 2}. Such beam-brushes offer a unique opportunity for treating bulky tumors. We present a case study of a large (4,295 cc clinical target volume) retroperitoneal sarcoma treated to 50.4 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) (presurgery) using a course of photons and protons to the clinical target volume and a course of protons to the gross target volume. Results: We describe our system and present the dosimetry for all courses and provide an interdosimetric comparison. Discussion: The use of PBS for bulky targets reduces the complexity of treatment planning and delivery compared with collimated proton fields. In addition, PBS obviates, especially for cases as presented here, the significant cost incurred in the construction of field-specific hardware. PBS offers improved dose distributions, reduced treatment time, and reduced cost of treatment.

  10. Hard X-Ray Spectro Microprobe Analysis of Inhomogeneous Solids: A Case Study. Element Distribution and Speciation in Selected Iron Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Cavell, R.G.; Feng, R.; Barnes, E.M.; Cavell, P.A.; McCready, A.J.; Webb, M.A.

    2007-06-08

    The hard X-ray microprobe provides an effective methodology for the non-destructive analysis of inhomogeneous materials. Application of X-ray absorption/fluroescence spectroscopy techniques (XANES and EXAFS) permits the speciation of the elements and yields information about the local structural environment. Microfocussed, monochromatic, tunable X-rays allows examination of small areas of micrometer dimensions with spectroscopic procedures. Typically the materials which are presented are thick and cannot be altered for the experiment. This condition introduces difficulties which may compromise the results. Herein we discuss those difficulties and show that the system can yield reliable results in spite of the compromises. Some results are presented on the two iron meteorites we have examined. These specimens are representative of highly inhomogeneous materials and illustrate the difficulties encountered with compositional variations which may occur at sub-millimeter dimensions and also illustrate the difficulties presented by the need to analyze components present at ppm concentration levels in a concentrated matrix. In these particular samples the major constituent is Fe which ranges from 90% to 70%, balanced by Ni which ranges from 10% to 30%. The critical diagnostic trace elements Ga and Ge which must also be analyzed are present at the 80 and 340 ppm level respectively. These diagnostic elements have been shown by EXAFS to be substitutionally placed in the matrix of the major element species in these meteorite samples.

  11. Dynamic studies of proton diffusion in mesoscopic heterogeneous matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, M.; Nachliel, E.; Kiryati, S.

    1992-01-01

    The thin water layer, as found in chloroplast or mitochondria, is confined between low dielectric amphypathic surfaces a few nm apart. The physical properties of this mesoscopic space, and how its dimensions affect the rate of chemical reactions proceeding in it, is the subject for this study. The method selected for this purpose is time resolved fluorometry which can monitor the reversible dissociation of a proton from excited molecule of pyranine (8 hydroxy pyrene 1,3,6 tri sulfonate) trapped in thin water layers of a multilamellar vesicle made of neutral or slightly charged phospholipids. The results were analyzed by a computer program of N. Agmon (Pines, E., D. Huppert, and N. Agmon. 1988. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 88:5620-5630) that simulates the diffusion of a proton, subjected to electrostatic attraction, in a thin water layer enclosed between low affinity, proton binding surfaces. The analysis determines the diffusion coefficient of the proton, the effective dielectric constant of the water and the water accessibility of the phosphomoieties of the lipids. These parameters were measured for various lipids [egg-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol + DPPC (1:1) and egg PC plus phosphatidyl serine (9:1)] and under varying osmotic pressure which reduces the width of the water layer down to ∼10 ∼ across. We found that: (a) The effective dielectric constant of the aqueous layer, depending on the lipid composition, is ∼40. (b) The diffusion coefficient of the proton in the thin layer (30-10 ∼ across) is that measured in bulk water D = 9.3 10-5 cm2/s, indicating that the water retains its normal liquid state even on contact with the membrane. (c) The reactivity of the phosphomoiety, quantitated by rate of its reaction with proton, diminishes under lateral pressure which reduces the surface area per lipid. We find no evidence for abnormal dynamics of proton transfer at the lipid water interface which, by any mechanism

  12. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-08-26

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs.

  13. Nuclear microprobe - synchrotron synergy: towards integrated quantitative real-time elemental imaging using PIXE and SCRF.

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, C. G.; Etschmann, B. E.; Vogt, S.; Maser, J.; Harland, C. L.; van Achterbergh, E.; Legnini, D.; Experimental Facilities Division; CSIRO Exploration and Mining; Australian Synchrotron Research Program, ANSTO

    2005-01-01

    The Dynamic Analysis (DA) method, for the projection of quantitative elemental images using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), has been extended for use with energy-dispersive Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) data collected with the X-ray microprobe by making use of similarities and synergy with nuclear microscopy. The broad element sensitivity of PIXE is complemented by the selective nature of SXRF, where the beam energy can be tuned to optimize the sensitivity in a portion of the periodic table. PIXE combined with Proton Induced {gamma}-ray Emission (PIGE) in this study provided images of geological samples of 25 elements, including characteristic X-rays up to the energy of the Nd K lines (37 keV). Maximum sensitivity was achieved for elements around Z {approx} 33 with detection limits of {approx}250 ppb (in 5 h). SXRF using a 16.1 keV photon microbeam provided images of 16 elements, with optimum sensitivity around Z {approx} 35 with detection limits of {approx}70 ppb (in 11 h), an improvement of {approx}2.4 times when corrected for acquisition time.

  14. Ion microprobe U-Th-Pb geochronology and study of micro-inclusions in zircon from the Himalayan high- and ultrahigh-pressure eclogites, Kaghan Valley of Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Hafiz Ur; Kobayash, Katsura; Tsujimori, Tatsuki; Ota, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Eizo; Kaneko, Yoshiyuki; Khan, Tahseenullah; Terabayashi, Masaru; Yoshida, Kenta; Hirajima, Takao

    2013-02-01

    We report ion microprobe U-Th-Pb geochronology of in situ zircon from the Himalayan high- and ultrahigh-pressure eclogites, Kaghan Valley of Pakistan. Combined with the textural features, mineral inclusions, cathodoluminescence image information and the U-Th-Pb isotope geochronology, two types of zircons were recognized in Group I and II eclogites. Zircons in Group I eclogites are of considerably large size (>100 μm up to 500 μm). A few grains are euhederal and prismatic, show oscillatory zoning with distinct core-rim luminescence pattern. Several other grains show irregular morphology, mitamictization, embayment and boundary truncations. They contain micro-inclusions such as muscovite, biotite, quartz and albite. Core or middle portions of zircons from Group I eclogites yielded concordant U-Th-Pb age of 267.6 ± 2.4 Ma (MSWD = 8.5), have higher U and Th contents with a Th/U ratio > 1, indicating typical magmatic core domains. Middle and rim or outer portions of these zircons contain inclusions of garnet, omphacite, phengite and these portions show no clear zonation. They yielded discordant values ranging between 210 and 71 Ma, indicating several thermal or Pb-loss events during their growth and recrystalization prior to or during the Himalayan eclogite-facies metamorphism. Zircons in Group II eclogites are smaller in size, prismatic to oval, display patchy or sector zoning and contain abundant inclusions of garnet, omphacite, phengite, quartz, rutile and carbonates. They yielded concordant U-Th-Pb age of 44.9 ± 1.2 Ma (MSWD = 4.9). The lower U and Th contents and a lower Th/U ratio (<0.05) in these zircons suggest their formation from the recrystallization of the older zircons during the Himalayan high and ultrahigh-pressure eclogite-facies metamorphism.

  15. Ion and electron microprobe study of troctolites, norite, and anorthosites from Apollo 14: Evidence for urKREEP assimilation during petrogenesis of Apollo 14 Mg-suite rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Shervais, J.W.; McGee, J.J.

    1998-09-01

    Most of the Moon`s highland crust comprises Fe-rich anorthosites with calcic plagioclase compositions. Subsequent evolution of the highland crust was dominated by troctolites, anorthosites, and norites of the Mg-suite. This plutonic series is characterized by calcic plagioclase, and mafic minerals with high mg{number_sign} (=100{sup *}Mg/[Mg + Fe]). In an effort to distinguish the origin of this important lunar rock series, the authors have analyzed the REE content of primary cumulus phases in ten Mg-suite cumulates using SIMS, along with their major and minor element compositions by electron microprobe analysis. Nine of these samples have high mg{number_sign}s, consistent with their formation from the most primitive parent melts of the Mg-suite. The data presented here show that Mg-suite troctolites and anorthosites preserve major and trace element characteristics acquired during their formation as igneous cumulate rocks and that these characteristics can be used to reconstruct related aspects of the parent magma composition. Data show that primitive cumulates of the Mg-suite crystallized from magmas with REE contents similar to high-K KREEP in both concentration and relative abundance. The highly enriched nature of this parent magma contrasts with its primitive major element characteristics, as pointed out by previous workers. This enigma is best explained by the mixing of residual magma ocean urKREEP melts with ultramagnesian komatiitic partial melts from the deep lunar interior. The data do not support earlier models that invoke crustal metasomatism to enrich the Mg-suite cumulates after formation, or models which call for a superKREEP parent for the troctolites and anorthosites.

  16. Relativistic mean-field study on proton skins and proton halos in exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhongzhou; Mittig, W.; Sarazin, F.

    1999-06-01

    We investigate the ground state properties of proton-rich nuclei in the framework of the relativistic mean-field model. Calculations show that the experimental proton halo in the nuclei 26,27,28P can be reproduced by the model. The proton halos can appear in proton-rich nuclei because the total nuclear potential is attractive up to the radial distance r ≈ 5.5 fm. But the size of proton halos is finite due to the limitation of the Coulomb potential barrier. The mean-square radius of a halo proton is not very sensitive to the separation energy of the last proton in some very proton-rich nuclei due to the effect of the Coulomb barrier. This behavior is different from the case of a neutron halo where the mean-square radius of a halo neutron is inversely proportional to the separation energy of the last halo neutron. We have also analysed the differences of the relativistic mean-field potentials of 25Al and 26P and found that the isovector potential from the p meson has an important effect on the differences.

  17. How proton pulse characteristics influence protoacoustic determination of proton-beam range: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin C; Seghal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    The unique dose deposition of proton beams generates a distinctive thermoacoustic (protoacoustic) signal, which can be used to calculate the proton range. To identify the expected protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and arrival time for different proton pulse characteristics encountered at hospital-based proton sources, the protoacoustic pressure emissions generated by 150 MeV, pencil-beam proton pulses were simulated in a homogeneous water medium. Proton pulses with Gaussian widths ranging up to 200 μs were considered. The protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and time-of-flight (TOF) range accuracy were assessed. For TOF calculations, the acoustic pulse arrival time was determined based on multiple features of the wave. Based on the simulations, Gaussian proton pulses can be categorized as Dirac-delta-function-like (FWHM < 4 μs) and longer. For the δ-function-like irradiation, the protoacoustic spectrum peaks at 44.5 kHz and the systematic error in determining the Bragg peak range is <2.6 mm. For longer proton pulses, the spectrum shifts to lower frequencies, and the range calculation systematic error increases (⩽ 23 mm for FWHM of 56 μs). By mapping the protoacoustic peak arrival time to range with simulations, the residual error can be reduced. Using a proton pulse with FWHM = 2 μs results in a maximum signal-to-noise ratio per total dose. Simulations predict that a 300 nA, 150 MeV, FWHM = 4 μs Gaussian proton pulse (8.0 × 10(6) protons, 3.1 cGy dose at the Bragg peak) will generate a 146 mPa pressure wave at 5 cm beyond the Bragg peak. There is an angle dependent systematic error in the protoacoustic TOF range calculations. Placing detectors along the proton beam axis and beyond the Bragg peak minimizes this error. For clinical proton beams, protoacoustic detectors should be sensitive to <400 kHz (for -20 dB). Hospital-based synchrocyclotrons and cyclotrons are promising sources of proton pulses for generating clinically measurable protoacoustic

  18. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  19. Study on Solar Energetic proton (SEP) Prediction using Regression Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, KiChang; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young Yun; Kwon, Yongki; Wi, Gwan-sik

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Solar Energetic Proton (SEP) can cause significant effects on electric devices in satellite such as displacement damage and single event effect. It can be dangerous to flight crew/passenger flying high altitude with polar route, and therefore, it is essential that it should be predicted in advance to mitigate radiation exposure risk. However, SEP has been hard to predict, because it is not well-connected solar activities such as solar flare, coronal mass ejection (CME). In this study, we analyzed the variation pattern of proton event from 2000 to 2015, and suggested optimum Gaussian function which can well describe the maximum value of previous event, after then, we finally adopted the regression technique to predict SEP value repetitively. This paper shows that the maximum value and duration of ongoing SEP events can be well predicted, but this model typically has large errors in case of predicting starting point and occurrence of SEP events.

  20. The use of a scanning proton microprobe in AIDS research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholewa, M.; Legge, G. J. F.; Weigold, H.; Holan, G.; Birch, C.

    1993-05-01

    A series of organometallic and inorganic drugs has been synthesized at the CSIRO Division of Chemicals and Polymers. The drugs, which are all polyanions of various size, shape and charge are being tested for their activity for the HIV virus in a continuous human T-lymphocyte line (MT2) and in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Determinations of drug activity have been carried out at the Fairfield Hospital's Virology Department. It is important for the drug synthesis programme to develop an understanding of the relationship between polyanion properties and antiviral activity. For this it is essential to establish: (a) whether polyanions enter HIV infected cells, (b) their distribution within these cells, (c) whether this distribution is the same for all polyanions, (d) whether the drugs remain intact (do not dissociate) on entering the cell, (e) the differences between active and inactive drugs of similar structure. Answers to these questions and to others will facilitate the synthesis programme.

  1. The Study of Solar Energetic Protons Associated with EUV Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhye; Innes, Davina; Bucik, Radoslav; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kahler, Stephen W.

    2014-06-01

    We studied the relationship between solar energetic protons (SEPs) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave properties between 2010 August and 2013 May observed by STEREO, SOHO and SDO. We determined the onset times, peak times and peak fluxes of the SEPs in SOHO ERNE and STEREO LET proton channel (6 - 10 MeV). Full Sun heliographic images created by combining STB 195Å, SDO 193Å, and STA 195Å were used for the analysis of the EUV waves. EUV wave arrival times at the spacecraft connecting points and their speed on the low corona were determined by space-time plots. It is noted that there is a significant correlation between the EUV wave arrival times and SEP onset times (r=0.73) but no SEP peak times. SEP peak fluxes increase with EUV wave speed (r=0.69) and the power law spectral index become harder with the EUV wave speed. This suggests that energetic protons are strongly associated with EUV waves, which is considered as the signature of CME shock in the low corona.

  2. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  3. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Kawachi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-07-01

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  4. Carrier phases for iodine in the Allende meteorite and their associated sup 129 Xe sub r / sup 127 I ratios: A laser microprobe study

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschbaum, C. )

    1988-03-01

    A new mass spectrometer of high sensitivity coupled to a laser microprobe sample extraction system was used to determine the {sup 129}Xe{sub r}/I ratios of minerals which carry {sup 129}Xe{sub r} in the Allende meteorite. In sodalite-rich fine-grained inclusions Ok correlates with Cl verifying that sodalite carries the majority of I. One sample heated above the decomposition point of sodalite had a small amount of residual I indicating the presence of at least one other carrier. The Cl/I ratio of the matrix was different from that of the fine-grained inclusions and the {sup 129}Xe{sub r} correlates with trapped Xe. This implies either a different Cl/I ratio for sodalite in the matrix or a different carrier for I in matrix. In melilite from one coarse-grained inclusion, I is variable and correlates with both Xe and, surprisingly, {sup 131}Xe produced from Ba during the irradiation. In coarse-grained inclusions with Cl-rich alteration products in cracks, most of the {sup 129}Xe{sub r} is found in those cracks. A residual amount of {sup 129}Xe{sub r} is present in melilite samples which show no Cl-rich alteration products, and is a trace impurity in the melilite. The {sup 129}Xe{sub r}/{sup 127}I ratio of sodalite from the fine-grained inclusions, and matrix is similar--between 1.25 and 1.35 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. This implies an age for these samples within 2 million years of a Bjurbole chondrule included in the irradiation as a standard. The {sup 129}Xe{sub r}/{sup 127}I ratio of a sample of a fine-grained inclusion heated to 1,100{degree}C is 2.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or 16 million years before the Bjurbole chondrule. A coarse-grained inclusion on the other hand showed a {sup 129}Xe{sub r}/{sup 127}I ratio of 3.15 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} or 35 million years after the Bjurbole chondrule.

  5. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, K C; Witztum, A; Sehgal, C M; Avery, S

    2014-11-01

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ~1 mm.

  6. Electron Capture Dissociation Studies of the Fragmentation Patterns of Doubly Protonated and Mixed Protonated-Sodiated Peptoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Bogdan; Zhao, Xiaoning; Robinson, David B.; Ren, Jianhua

    2014-07-01

    The fragmentation patterns of a group of doubly protonated ([P + 2H]2+) and mixed protonated-sodiated ([P + H + Na]2+) peptide-mimicking oligomers, known as peptoids, have been studied using electron capturing dissociation (ECD) tandem mass spectrometry techniques. For all the peptoids studied, the primary backbone fragmentation occurred at the N-Cα bonds. The N-terminal fragment ions, the C-ions (protonated) and the C'-ions (sodiated) were observed universally for all the peptoids regardless of the types of charge carrier. The C-terminal ions varied depending on the type of charge carrier. The doubly protonated peptoids with at least one basic residue located at a position other than the N-terminus fragmented by producing the Z•-series of ions. In addition, most doubly protonated peptoids also produced the Y-series of ions with notable abundances. The mixed protonated-sodiated peptoids fragmented by yielding the Z•'-series of ions in addition to the C'-series. Chelation between the sodium cation and the amide groups of the peptoid chain might be an important factor that could stabilize both the N-terminal and the C-terminal fragment ions. Regardless of the types of the charge carrier, one notable fragmentation for all the peptoids was the elimination of a benzylic radical from the odd-electron positive ions of the protonated peptoids ([P + 2H]•+) and the sodiated peptoids ([P + H + Na]•+). The study showed potential utility of using the ECD technique for sequencing of peptoid libraries generated by combinatorial chemistry.

  7. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  8. Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Li Tianfang; Liang Zhengrong; Singanallur, Jayalakshmi V.; Satogata, Todd J.; Williams, David C.; Schulte, Reinhard W.

    2006-03-15

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) has been explored in the past decades because of its unique imaging characteristics, low radiation dose, and its possible use for treatment planning and on-line target localization in proton therapy. However, reconstruction of pCT images is challenging because the proton path within the object to be imaged is statistically affected by multiple Coulomb scattering. In this paper, we employ GEANT4-based Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional pCT reconstruction of an elliptical phantom to investigate the possible use of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) with three different path-estimation methods for pCT reconstruction. The first method assumes a straight-line path (SLP) connecting the proton entry and exit positions, the second method adapts the most-likely path (MLP) theoretically determined for a uniform medium, and the third method employs a cubic spline path (CSP). The ART reconstructions showed progressive improvement of spatial resolution when going from the SLP [2 line pairs (lp) cm{sup -1}] to the curved CSP and MLP path estimates (5 lp cm{sup -1}). The MLP-based ART algorithm had the fastest convergence and smallest residual error of all three estimates. This work demonstrates the advantage of tracking curved proton paths in conjunction with the ART algorithm and curved path estimates.

  9. Perspective study of exotics and flavour baryons in antiproton-proton annihilation and proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanov, Mikhail; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Abstract. The spectroscopy of exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. Together with charmonium, these provide a good tool for testing theories of the strong interactions including both perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, lattice QCD, potential and other phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of exotics spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimentally observed states with masses above the DD̅ threshold region are considered. Experimental results from different collaborations (BES, BaBar, Belle, LHCb) are analyzed with special attention given to recently discovered hidden charm states. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-lying charmonium states and others as tetraquarks with hidden charm. It has been shown that charged/neutral tetraquarks must have their neutral/charge partners with mass values differ by at most a few MeV/c2, hypotheses that tend to coincide with those proposed by Maiani and Polosa. However, measurements of different decay modes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using ahigh quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c and proton-proton collisions with momentum up to 26 GeV/c. DD

  10. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  11. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Yue, Weisheng; Li, Xiaolin; Wan, Tianmin; Liu, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Guilin; Li, Yan

    2006-06-01

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM(10) were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPs collected from various pollution sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM(10) is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM(10) are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra. PMID:16808872

  12. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y.

    2006-06-15

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  13. Proton-transport mechanisms in cytochrome c oxidase revealed by studies of kinetic isotope effects

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ann-Louise; Chakrabarty, Suman; Siöberg, Catrine Berthold; Högbom, Martin; Warshel, Arieh; Brzezinski, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) is a membrane-bound enzyme, which catalyzes the reduction of di-oxygen to water and uses a major part of the free energy released in this reaction to pump protons across the membrane. In the Rhodobacter sphaeroides aa3 CytcO all protons that are pumped across the membrane, as well as one half of the protons that are used for O2 reduction, are transferred through one specific intraprotein proton pathway, which holds a highly conserved Glu286 residue. Key questions that need to be addressed in order to understand the function of CytcO at a molecular level are related to the timing of proton transfers from Glu286 to a “pump site” and the catalytic site, respectively. Here, we have investigated the temperature dependencies of the H/D kinetic-isotope effects of intramolecular proton-transfer reactions in the wild-type CytcO as well as in two structural CytcO variants, one in which proton uptake from solution is delayed and one in which proton pumping is uncoupled from O2 reduction. These processes were studied for two specific reaction steps linked to transmembrane proton pumping, one that involves only proton transfer (peroxy–ferryl, P→F, transition) and one in which the same sequence of proton transfers is also linked to electron transfer to the catalytic site (ferryl–oxidized, F→O, transition). An analysis of these reactions in the framework of theory indicates that that the simpler, P→F reaction is rate-limited by proton transfer from Glu286 to the catalytic site. When the same proton-transfer events are also linked to electron transfer to the catalytic site (F→O), the proton-transfer reactions are gated by a protein structural change, which presumably ensures that the proton-pumping stoichiometry is maintained also in the presence of a transmembrane electrochemical gradient. PMID:21463601

  14. Data acquisition with a nuclear microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, C.

    1980-01-01

    Spatially resolved information from the near surfaces of materials can be obtained with a nuclear microprobe. The spatial resolution is determined by the optics of the instrument and radiation damage in the specimen. Two- and three-dimensional maps of elemental concentration may be obtained from the near surfaces of materials. Data are acquired by repeated scans of a constantly moving beam over the region of interest or by counting for a preset integrated charge at each specimen location.

  15. Proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected CBCT image: Feasibility study for adaptive proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yang-Kyun; Sharp, Gregory C.; Phillips, Justin; Winey, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: CBCT projection images were acquired from anthropomorphic phantoms and a prostate patient using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. Two previously introduced techniques were used to correct the scattered x-rays in the raw projection images: uniform scatter correction (CBCTus) and a priori CT-based scatter correction (CBCTap). CBCT images were reconstructed using a standard FDK algorithm and GPU-based reconstruction toolkit. Soft tissue ROI-based HU shifting was used to improve HU accuracy of the uncorrected CBCT images and CBCTus, while no HU change was applied to the CBCTap. The degree of equivalence of the corrected CBCT images with respect to the reference CT image (CTref) was evaluated by using angular profiles of water equivalent path length (WEPL) and passively scattered proton treatment plans. The CBCTap was further evaluated in more realistic scenarios such as rectal filling and weight loss to assess the effect of mismatched prior information on the corrected images. Results: The uncorrected CBCT and CBCTus images demonstrated substantial WEPL discrepancies (7.3 ± 5.3 mm and 11.1 ± 6.6 mm, respectively) with respect to the CTref, while the CBCTap images showed substantially reduced WEPL errors (2.4 ± 2.0 mm). Similarly, the CBCTap-based treatment plans demonstrated a high pass rate (96.0% ± 2.5% in 2 mm/2% criteria) in a 3D gamma analysis. Conclusions: A priori CT-based scatter correction technique was shown to be promising for adaptive proton therapy, as it achieved equivalent proton dose distributions and water equivalent path lengths compared to those of a reference CT in a selection of anthropomorphic phantoms. PMID:26233175

  16. Exploring ocean biogeochemistry by single-cell microprobe analysis of protist elemental composition.

    PubMed

    Twining, Benjamin S; Baines, Stephen B; Vogt, Stefan; de Jonge, Martin D

    2008-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of many elements in the ocean are linked by their simultaneous incorporation into protists. In order to understand these elemental interactions and their implications for global biogeochemical cycles, accurate measures of cellular element stoichiometries are needed. Bulk analysis of size-fractionated particulate material obscures the unique biogeochemical roles of different functional groups such as diatoms, calcifying protists, and diazotrophs. Elemental analysis of individual protist cells can be performed using electron, proton, and synchrotron X-ray microprobes. Here we review the capabilities and limitations of each approach and the application of these advanced techniques to cells collected from natural communities. Particular attention is paid to recent studies of plankton biogeochemistry in low-iron waters of the Southern Ocean. Single-cell analyses have revealed significant inter-taxa differences in phosphorus, iron, and nickel quotas. Differences in the response of autotrophs and heterotrophs to iron fertilization were also observed. Two-dimensional sub-cellular mapping indicates the importance of iron to photosynthetic machinery and of zinc to nuclear organelles. Observed changes in diatom silicification and cytoplasm content following iron fertilization modify our understanding of the relationship between iron availability and silicification. These examples demonstrate the advantages of studying ocean biogeochemistry at the level of individual cells.

  17. Field Emission Electron Microprobe Analysis of Halogens in Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacker, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Field emission electron microprobe is capable of higher resolution and lower voltage than other microprobes, making it an ideal instrument for analysis of small accessory minerals in thin section such as apatite. In this study, the field emission electron microprobe was evaluated for analysis of fluorine and chlorine in apatite. Analysis was conducted on (001), (100) and an intermediate section of natural apatite crystals, using the JEOL JXA-8530F Hyperprobe, located at Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Conditions were beam current of 10 nanoamps, accelerating voltages from 5-20 kV, and spot sizes from 1-10 micrometers. Very short counting times were used, some as little as 2 seconds. Analytical strategies exploited the fact that excitation energies for fluorine Kα are much lower than for chlorine. Earlier studies (e.g. Stormer et al. 1993; Fialin and Chopin, 2006) documented the complex behavior of beam-driven migration, subsurface accumulation and desorption during fluorine analysis. The cumulative effect is increase and then fall of count rates with time and repeated analysis. The details of earlier studies were reproduced: (1) Apatite analysis by electron microprobe has two additional unknown variables, which are the crystallographic orientation of the unknown and of the standard. (2) The most reliable measure of fluorine cps is derived from a regression to zero time, accounting for crystal orientation; (3) Changing the analytical conditions (accelerating voltage, spot size, duration of analysis) changes only the time scale over which migration and desorption take place. New results from the JEOL Hyperprobe show that, for all crystal orientations, initial fluorine cps increase from 5 and 7 kV to 10 kV, but decrease systematically with further increases in kV, interpreted as loss of fluorine without concomitant excitation of X-rays. To date, fluorine analysis is routinely conducted at 15 and 20 kV. In contrast, chlorine initial

  18. Macroparticle simulation studies of a proton beam haloexperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Colestock, P.L.; Gilpatrick, D.; Smith, H.V.; Wangler,T.P.; Schulze, M.E.

    2002-09-12

    We report macroparticle simulations for comparison withmeasured results from a proton beam-halo experiment in a 52-quadrupoleperiodic-focusing channel. An important issue is that the inputphase-space distribution is not experimentally known. Three differentinitial distributions with different shapes predict different beamprofiles in the transport system. Simulations have been fairly successfulin reproducing the core of the measured matched-beam profiles and thetrend of emittance growth as a function of mismatch factor, butunderestimate the growth rate of halo and emittance for mismatched beams.In this study, we find that knowledge of the Courant-Snyder parametersand emittances of the input beam is not sufficient for reliableprediction of the halo. Input distributions iwth greater population inthe tails produce larger rates of emittance growth, a result that isqualitatively consistent with the particle-core model of halo formationin mismatched beams.

  19. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Hamed; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-03-01

    Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M+ ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of "internal proton affinity" (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule.

  20. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Wang, Y. S.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, G. L.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.

    2007-07-01

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  1. In vivo monitoring of nanosphere onsite delivery using fiber optic microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Leu-Wei; Yang, Chung-Shi

    2005-02-01

    To recognize the information of ischemia-induced blood vessel permeability would be valuable to formulate the drugs for optimal local delivery, we constructed an implantable needle type fiber-optic microprobe for the monitoring of in vivo fluorescent substances in anesthetized rats. This fiber-optic microprobe was composed of coaxial optical fibers and catheterized using a thin wall tubing of stainless steel (~400 um O.D. and ~300 um I.D.). The central fiber, with 100 um core diameter and 20 um cladding, coated with a 30 um layer of gold, was surrounded by 10 fibers with 50 um cores. The central fiber carried the light from the 488 nm Argon laser to the tissue while the surrounding fibers collected the emitted fluorescence to the detector. When the fiber-optic microprobe was placed in the solutions containing various concentrations of fluorescent nanospheres (20 nm), either with or without 10% lipofundin as optical phantom, nanosphere concentration-dependent responses of the fluorescence intensity were observed. The microprobe was then implanted into the liver and the brain of anesthetized rats to monitor the in situ extravasation of pre-administered fluorescent nanospheres from vasculature following the ischemic insults. Both the hepatic and cerebral ischemic insults showed immediate increases of the extracellular 20 nm fluorescent nanospheres. The implantable fiber-optic microprobe constructed in present study provides itself as a minimally-invasive technique capable of investigating the vascular permeability for in vivo nanosphere delivery in both ischemic liver and brain.

  2. MicroProbe Small Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Geoffrey; Miles, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The MicroProbe unmanned aerial system (UAS) concept incorporates twin electric motors mounted on the vehicle wing, thus enabling an aerodynamically and environmentally clean nose area for atmospheric sensors. A payload bay is also incorporated in the fuselage to accommodate remote sensing instruments. A key feature of this concept is lightweight construction combined with low flying speeds to minimize kinetic energy and associated hazards, as well as maximizing spatial resolution. This type of aerial platform is needed for Earth science research and environmental monitoring. There were no vehicles of this type known to exist previously.

  3. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  4. Technical aspects of nuclear microprobe analysis of senile plaques from alzheimer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, N. P.-O.; Tapper, U. A. S.; Sturesson, K.; Odselius, R.; Brun, A.

    1990-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease, a common form of senile dementia, has been proposed to be caused by aluminium. One of the interesting structures to be studied, senile plaque cores in the brain, have centres of only about 10 μm. We have investigated the possibility of applying nuclear microprobes to sections containing senile plaques. An alternative staining procedure, TMToluidin blue staining using a spray technique, is also presented. An outline is given of a procedure for preparing senile plaque specimens for nuclear microprobe analysis. This includes a technique for accurate ion beam positioning, utilizing electron microscopy-grids. The subject may be of general interest since sample preparation is one of the most important aspects in microprobe analysis of biological matter.

  5. The Debrecen Scanning Nuclear Microprobe and its Applications in Biology and Environmental Science

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Zsofia

    2007-11-26

    Nuclear microscopy is one of the most powerful tools which are able to determine quantitative trace element distributions in complex samples on a microscopic scale. The advantage of nuclear microprobes are that different ion beam analytical techniques, like PIXE, RBS, STIM and NRA can be applied at the same time allowing the determination of the sample structure, major, minor and trace element distribution simultaneously.In this paper a nuclear microprobe setup developed for the microanalysis of thin complex samples of organic matrix at the Debrecen Scanning Nuclear Microprobe Facility is presented. The application of nuclear microscopy in life sciences is shown through an example, the study of penetration of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles of bodycare cosmetics in skin layers.

  6. Boron analysis by electron microprobe using MoB4C layered synthetic crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, J.J.; Slack, J.F.; Herrington, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary electron microprobe studies of B distribution in minerals have been carried out using MoB4C-layered synthetic crystals to improve analytical sensitivity for B. Any microprobe measurements of the B contents of minerals using this crystal must include analyses for Cl to assess and correct for the interference of Cl X-rays on the BK?? peak. Microprobe analyses for B can be made routinely in tourmaline and other B-rich minerals, and minor B contents also can be determined in common rock-forming minerals. Incorporation of unusually high B contents in minerals other than borosilicates has been discovered in prograde and retrograde minerals in tourmalinites from the Broken Hill district, Australia, and may reflect high B activities produced during the metamorphism of tourmaline-rich rocks. -from Authors

  7. Two-satellite study of proton drift on quiet days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, A.; Kremser, G.; Fennell, J. F.

    1981-07-01

    The drift shells of protons in a model magnetic field were calculated. The radial gradient of the protons is combined with calculated drift shells to predict the flux levels at several local times for different pitch angles and energies. The field model is a three term Mead model, which is fit to the observed B-values at synchronous orbit. The predicted local time dependent fluxes match the observed fluxes, and correctly predict the pitch angle dependencies.

  8. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    in high-resolution NMR spectra. This technique is selective for protons on the surface organic functional groups due to their motional averaging in solution. In this study, 1H solution NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the interface of the organic functional groups in D2O. The pKa for these functional groups covalently bound to the surface of nanoparticles was determined using an NMR-pH titration method based on the variation in the proton chemical shift for the alkyl group protons closest to the amine group with pH. The adsorption of toxic contaminants (chromate and arsenate anions) on the surface of functionalized silicalite-1 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been studied by 1H solution NMR spectroscopy. With this method, the surface bound contaminants are detected. The analysis of the intensity and position of these peaks allows quantitative assessment of the relative amounts of functional groups with adsorbed metal ions. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy to the electronic environment and structure of the surface functional groups on porous nanomaterials.

  9. The study of cosmic rays on the proton artificial earth satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigorov, N. L.; Savenko, I. A.; Basilova, R. N.; Volodichev, N. N.; Voropayev, S. I.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Kakhidze, G. P.; Labutin, V. A.; Melioranskiy, A. S.; Pryakhin, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations were carried out with the space stations of the Proton series to study the physics of cosmic rays. The SEZ-13 device for the search of particles with a fractional electrical charge and the SEZ-11 device for the measurement of high energy electrons were mounted on the Proton-3 satellite. The mode of action of the SEZ-11 device differed from that of the SEZ-12 device used in the Proton-1 and Proton-2 satellites for similar purposes. Some of the results that were obtained are presented.

  10. Proton therapy detector studies under the experience gained at the CATANA facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuttone, G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Di Rosa, F.; Lojacono, P. A.; Lo Nigro, S.; Marino, C.; Mongelli, V.; Patti, I. V.; Pittera, S.; Raffaele, L.; Russo, G.; Sabini, M. G.; Salamone, V.; Valastro, L. M.

    2007-10-01

    Proton therapy represents the most promising radiotherapy technique for external tumor treatments. At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN-LNS), Catania (I), a proton therapy facility is active since March 2002 and 140 patients, mainly affected by choroidal and iris melanoma, have been successfully treated. Proton beams are characterized by higher dose gradients and linear energy transfer with respect to the conventional photon and electron beams, commonly used in medical centers for radiotherapy.In this paper, we report the experience gained in the characterization of different dosimetric systems, studied and/or developed during the last ten years in our proton therapy facility.

  11. Friction microprobe investigation of particle layer effects on sliding friction

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Interfacial particles (third-bodies), resulting from wear or external contamination, can alter and even dominate the frictional behavior of solid-solid sliding in the absence of effective particle removal processes (e.g., lubricant flow). A unique friction microprobe, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was used to conduct fine- scale friction studies using 1.0 mm diameter stainless steel spheres sliding on several sizes of loose layers of fine aluminum oxide powders on both aluminum and alumina surfaces. Conventional, pin-on-disk experiments were conducted to compare behavior with the friction microprobe results. The behavior of the relatively thick particle layers was found to be independent of the nature of underlying substrate, substantiating previous work by other investigators. The time-dependent behavior of friction, for a spherical macrocontact starting from rest, could generally be represented by a series of five rather distinct phases involving static compression, slider breakaway, transition to steady state, and dynamic layer instability. A friction model for the steady state condition, which incorporates lamellar powder layer behavior, is described.

  12. Protons in polar media: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rosenvinge, Tycho

    1998-10-01

    The hydrates of hydrogen chloride are ionic crystals that contain hydronium (H3O+). The hydronium in the monohydrate has been reported to be statistically disordered between two possible sites related by inversion symmetry. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are presented for the monohydrate, as well as the di-, and tri-hydrates, of hydrogen chloride using the density functional based Car-Parrinello technique. The simulations were carried out with the goal of investigating proton disorder in these crystals. The possible role of nuclear quantum effects has been explored via path integral molecular dynamic simulations. The present results suggest that the proposed disordered sites in the monohydrate are dynamically unstable and therefore unlikely to be responsible for the reported disorder. No useful information was obtained for the dihydrate because the large unit cell leads to difficulties in carrying out the simulations. Nuclear quantum effects are shown to be important for characterizing the proton distributions in the trihydrate. The structure and dynamical behavior of liquid HF with dissolved KF have been investigated using the Car- Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics scheme. Specifically, a system with stoichiometry KFċ2HF was studied at temperatures of 400K and 1000K. This system, which was started from a phase separated mixture, rapidly formed into solvated potassium ions and HnFn+1/sp- polyfluoride anions with n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The resulting polyfluoride anions were classified, and their structures and dynamical behavior were compared with the known structures and spectra of crystalline compounds KF/cdot xHF and with theoretical predictions of isolated gas phase species. The present study reveals dramatic frequency shifts in the H atom vibrational modes with variation in the HF coordination number of the polyfluoride anion. In particular the FH wagging motion red shifts while the FH stretch blue shifts as n increases. The present calculations

  13. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  14. Molecular organization in the native state of woody tissue: Studies of tertiary structure using the Raman microprobe Solid State [sup 13]C NMR and biomimetic tertiary aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A number of new approaches to the study of native wood tissue complementary to our earlier Raman spectroscopy including solid state [sup 13]C NMR and X-ray diffractometry. A wide variety of native cellulosic tissues were examined which led to the generation of biomimetic tertiary aggregates which simulate states of aggregation characteristic of cell walls. We have also explored charge transport characteristics of lignified tissue. Our Raman spectroscopic studies have advanced our understanding of key spectral features and confirmed the variability of the patterns of orientation of lignin reported earlier. A major effort was dedicated to assessing the contributions of electronic factors such as conjugation and the resonance Raman effect to enhancement of the spectra features associated with lignin. We have now established a solid foundation for spectral mapping of different regions in cell walls.

  15. Carrier phases for iodine in the Allende meteorite and their associated Xe-129(r)/I-127 ratios - A laser microprobe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the carrier phases of iodine in the Allende meteorite and their associated Xe-129(r)/I-127 ratios, obtained using a new high-sensitivity low-blank mass spectrometer coupled with a low-blank laser extraction system. Two types of experiments were performed: a survey of the Xe-129(r) amounts in unirradiated specimens of fine-grained assemblages and individual coarse mineral grains, and a study of the relationship between chlorine and iodine in irradiated samples of the inclusions, in which the Xe-129(r)/I-127 ratios were determined for various minerals. As a by-product of these measurements, the Ar-40/Ar-39 ages were obtained along with some results on trapped Xe components. A schematic diagram of the new mass spectrometer system is included.

  16. Laser-induced oxidation kinetics of bismuth surface microdroplets on GaAsBi studied in situ by Raman microprobe analysis.

    PubMed

    Steele, J A; Lewis, R A

    2014-12-29

    We report the cw-laser-induced oxidation of molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAsBi bismuth surface microdroplets investigated in situ by micro-Raman spectroscopy under ambient conditions as a function of irradiation power and time. Our results reveal the surface droplets are high-purity crystalline bismuth and the resultant Bi2O3 transformation to be β-phase and stable at room temperature. A detailed Raman study of Bi microdroplet oxidation kinetics yields insights into the laser-induced oxidation process and offers useful real-time diagnostics. The temporal evolution of new β-Bi2O3 Raman modes is shown to be well described by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov kinetic transformation theory and while this study limits itself to the laser-induced oxidation of GaAsBi bismuth surface droplets, the results will find application within the wider context of bismuth laser-induced oxidation and direct Raman laser processing.

  17. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  18. Study of {beta}-Decay in the Proton-Neutron Interacting Boson-Fermion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuffi, L.; Brant, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2006-04-26

    We study {beta}-decay in odd-A nuclei together with the energy levels and other properties in the proton-neutron interacting-boson-fermion model. We also report on the preliminary results in the odd-odd nuclei in the proton-neutron interacting boson-fermion-fermion model.

  19. Two-satellite study of proton drift on quiet days

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, A.; Kremser, G.; Fennell, J.F.

    1981-07-30

    The drift shells of protons in a model magnetic field are calculated. The observed radial gradient of the protons is combined with the calculated drift shells to predict the flux levels at several local times for different pitch angles and energies. A simplified method is used to describe the drift shells. The field model is a three term Mead model, which is fit to the observed B values at synchronous orbit. The resulting predicted local time dependent fluxes match the observed fluxes very well and correctly predict the pitch angle dependencies.

  20. The electron microprobe as a metallographic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.

    1974-01-01

    The electron microprobe (EMP) is shown to represent one of the most powerful techniques for the examination of the microstructure of materials. It is an electron optical instrument in which compositional and topographic information is obtained from regions smaller than 1 micron in diameter on a specimen. Photographs of compositional and topographic changes in 1-sq-mm to 20-sq-micron areas on various types of specimens can also be obtained. These photographs are strikingly similar to optical photomicrographs. Various signals measured in the EMP (X-rays, secondary electrons, backscattered electrons, etc.) are discussed, along with their resolution and the type of information they may help obtain. In addition to elemental analysis, solid state detecting and scanning techniques are reviewed. Various techniques extending the EMP instrument capabilities, such as deconvolution and soft X-ray analysis, are also described.

  1. Proton Emission Studies at GSI in the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Sigurd

    2000-12-31

    This article describes the experiments that were performed during the first decade of the operation of UNILAC, GSI-Darmstadt, at the recoil separator SHIP and the on-line mass separator. The measurements resulted in the discovery of the first radioactive ground state proton emitters, {sup 151}Lu and {sup 147}Tm.

  2. Proton and sodium cation affinities of harpagide: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Colas, Cyril; Bouchonnet, Stéphane; Rogalewicz-Gilard, Françoise; Popot, Marie-Agnès; Ohanessian, Gilles

    2006-06-15

    The aim of this work was to estimate the proton and sodium cation affinities of harpagide (Har), an iridoid glycoside responsible for the antiinflammatory properties of the medicinal plant Harpagophytum. Monte Carlo conformational searches were performed at the semiempirical AM1 level to determine the most stable conformers for harpagide and its protonated and Na+-cationized forms. The 10 oxygen atoms of the molecule were considered as possible protonation and cationization sites. Geometry optimizations were then refined at the DFT B3LYP/6-31G level from the geometries of the most stable conformers found. Final energetics were obtained at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G level. The proton and sodium ion affinities of harpagide have been estimated at 223.5 and 66.0 kcal/mol, respectively. Since harpagide mainly provides HarNa+ ions in electrospray experiments, the DeltarG298 associated with the reaction of proton/sodium exchange between Har and methanol, MeOHNa+ + HarH+ --> MeOH2+ + HarNa+ (1), has been calculated; it has been estimated to be 1.9 kcal/mol. Complexing a methanol molecule to each reagent and product of reaction 1 makes the reaction become exothermic by 1.7 kcal/mol. These values are in the limit of the accuracy of the method and do not allow us to conclude definitely whether the reaction is endo- or exothermic, but, according to these very small values, the cation exchange reaction is expected to proceed easily in the final stages of the ion desolvation process. PMID:16759142

  3. Analysis of biological materials using a nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    The use of nuclear microprobe techniques including: Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) for elemental analysis and quantitative elemental imaging of biological samples is especially useful in biological and biomedical research because of its high sensitivity for physiologically important trace elements or toxic heavy metals. The nuclear microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) has been used to study the enhancement in metal uptake of two different plants. The roots of corn (Zea mays) have been analyzed to study the enhancement of iron uptake by adding Fe (II) or Fe(III) of different concentrations to the germinating medium of the seeds. The Fe uptake enhancement effect produced by lacing the germinating medium with carbon nanotubes has also been investigated. The aim of this investigation is to ensure not only high crop yield but also Fe-rich food products especially from calcareous soil which covers 30% of world's agricultural land. The result will help reduce iron deficiency anemia, which has been identified as the leading nutritional disorder especially in developing countries by the World Health Organization. For the second plant, Mexican marigold (Tagetes erecta ), the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices ) for the improvement of lead phytoremediation of lead contaminated soil has been investigated. Phytoremediation provides an environmentally safe technique of removing toxic heavy metals (like lead), which can find their way into human food, from lands contaminated by human activities like mining or by natural disasters like earthquakes. The roots of Mexican marigold have been analyzed to study the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in enhancement of lead uptake from the contaminated rhizosphere.

  4. Micro Electron MicroProbe and Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bearman, Gregory; Douglas, Susanne; Bronikowski, Michael; Urgiles, Eduardo; Kowalczyk, Robert; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    A proposed, low-power, backpack-sized instrument, denoted the micro electron microprobe and sample analyzer (MEMSA), would serve as a means of rapidly performing high-resolution microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) of soil, dust, and rock particles in the field. The MEMSA would be similar to an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) but would be much smaller and designed specifically for field use in studying effects of geological alteration at the micrometer scale. Like an ESEM, the MEMSA could be used to examine uncoated, electrically nonconductive specimens. In addition to the difference in size, other significant differences between the MEMSA and an ESEM lie in the mode of scanning and the nature of the electron source.

  5. NMR studies of proton exchange kinetics in aqueous formaldehyde solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Michal; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil

    2014-05-01

    Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, formalin, are commonly used for tissue fixation and preservation. Treatment with formalin is known to shorten the tissue transverse relaxation time T2. Part of this shortening is due to the effect of formalin on the water T2. In the present work we show that the shortening of water T2 is a result of proton exchange between water and the major constituent of aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, methylene glycol. We report the observation of the signal of the hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol at 2 ppm to high frequency of the water signal that can be seen at low temperatures and at pH range of 6.0 ± 1.5 and, at conditions where it cannot be observed by the single pulse experiment, it can be detected indirectly through the water signal by the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment. The above finding made it possible to obtain the exchange rate between the hydroxyl protons of the methylene glycol and water in aqueous formaldehyde solutions, either using the dispersion of the spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (1/T1ρ) or, at the slow exchange regime, from the line width hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol. The exchange rate was ∼104 s-1 at pH 7.4 and 37 °C, the activation energy, 50.2 kJ/mol and its pH dependence at 1.1 °C was fitted to: k (s-1) = 520 + 6.5 × 107[H+] + 3.0 × 109[OH-].

  6. Spectroscopic studies on light proton-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, V.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Kubono, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Nomura, T.; Katayama, I.; Kato, S.

    2007-02-12

    A systematic for the light proton rich nuclei with constant TZ = -3/2 isospin is proposed, where a survey on their structure have shown interesting features. Preliminary results of a re-analysis on the sctructure of 13O nucleus is also presented. This 13O nucleus have been investigated by the 3-neutron pick up (3He,6He) reaction, and new levels have been assigned for this nucleus.

  7. A laboratory and theoretical study of protonated carbon disulfide, HSCS+.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M C; Thaddeus, P; Wilke, Jeremiah J; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-06-21

    The rotational spectrum of protonated carbon disulfide, HSCS(+), has been detected in the centimeter-wave band in a molecular beam by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Rotational and centrifugal distortion constants have been determined from ten transitions in the K(a)=0 ladder of the normal isotopic species, HS(13)CS(+), and DSCS(+). The present assignment agrees well with high-level coupled cluster calculations of the HSCS(+) structure, which, like earlier work, predict this isomer to be the ground state on the HCS(2) (+) potential energy surface; HCSS(+), an isomer with C(2v) symmetry, is predicted to lie more than 20 kcal/mol higher in energy. Other properties of HSCS(+) including its dipole moment, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities have also been computed at the coupled cluster level of theory with large basis sets. Because carbon disulfide possesses a fairly large proton affinity, and because this nonpolar molecule may plausibly exist in astronomical sources, HSCS(+) is a good candidate for detection with radio telescopes in the submillimeter band where the stronger b-type transitions of this protonated cation are predicted to lie. PMID:19548724

  8. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field-size effects on dose output. In the present study, we developed a pencil-beam algorithm for scanning-proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil-beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field-size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy. PMID:22297324

  9. Mössbauer study of proton-exchanged LiNbO3:Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, H.; Andler, G.; Dézsi, I.

    1990-07-01

    Topotactic proton exchange (Li against H) can be achieved by treating LiBnO3 with appropriate acids. In order to investigate the effect of proton exchange on Fe-impurities we studied LiNbO3:Fe powder material treated in sulphuric acid and LiNbO3:Fe single crystals treated in benzoic acid by Mössbauer spectroscopy. During the topotactic ion exchange only the Li-ions are exchanged for protons, whereas the Fe-impurities are retained in the material.

  10. Experimental stand for studying the impact of laser-accelerated protons on biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdonov, K. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Ignatova, N. I.; Osmanov, R. R.; Sladkov, A. D.; Soloviev, A. A.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Ginzburg, V. N.; Kuz'min, A. A.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Revet, G.; Sergeev, A. M.; Fuchs, J.; Khazanov, E. A.; Chen, S.; Shaykin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    An original experimental stand is presented, aimed at studying the impact of high-energy protons, produced by the laser-plasma interaction at a petawatt power level, on biological objects. In the course of pilot experiments with the energy of laser-accelerated protons up to 25 MeV, the possibility is demonstrated of transferring doses up to 10 Gy to the object of study in a single shot with the magnetic separation of protons from parasitic X-ray radiation and fast electrons. The technique of irradiating the cell culture HeLa Kyoto and measuring the fraction of survived cells is developed. The ways of optimising the parameters of proton beams and the suitable methods of their separation with respect to energy and transporting to the studied living objects are discussed. The construction of the stand is intended for the improvement of laser technologies for hadron therapy of malignant neoplasms.

  11. Experimental comparison of micro-PIXE with other methods utilized for biomineralization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichocki, T.; Heck, D.; Jarczyk, L.; Rokita, E.; Strzalkowski, A.; Sych, M.

    1988-05-01

    The present study deals with the investigation of arterial wall mineralization i.e. of inorganic compound development within artery wall under normal or pathologic conditions. Autopsy samples of human aorta as well as fragments of aorta obtained from hypercholesterolemic rabbits were used for the experiments. The samples were investigated using micro-PIXE, PIXE and PIGE techniques, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and a variety of histochemical methods in order to compare the techniques based on a proton microprobe with the other methods which aimed at the investigation of inorganic deposits. Proton microprobe measurements confirm the different composition of mineral deposits found in rabbit and human aorta samples. In the case of animal aorta the apatite crystals constitute the mineral form of deposits while for human samples we deal with a mixture of different compounds. Moreover, for rabbit aorta samples the deposits were found always in the atheromas, while in human aorta sections the mineral deposits were localized in the media of the aortic wall. The proton microprobe can be considered to be a valuable addition to the experimental methods that have been applied in the study of the biomineralization process. It permits a qualitative determination of mineral deposits in situ while infrared and Raman spectroscopy as well as X-ray powder diffraction measurements may be performed only for ashed aorta samples. The possibility of in situ measurements and high detection sensitivity seem to be the most significant advantages of a proton microprobe in the study of artery wall mineralization.

  12. X-ray microprobe using multilayer mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Thompson, A. C.; Wu, Y.; Giauque, R. D.

    1988-04-01

    Multilayer reflectors for the X-ray region have now progressed beyond the experimental stage to the point where they can be relied upon as optics for experimental systems, in synchrotron radiation research as well as in other fields. This paper reviews the design considerations for an X-ray microprobe, and summarizes experience with prototypes tested at both SSRL and NSLS. The optical systems described employ multilayer-coated spherical mirrors arranged in the Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration to demagnify the X-ray source by a factor of several hundred. By this means a spot of X-rays less than 10 μm square can be produced. The optical aberrations and other factors that limit the performance are detailed, and possible ways to improve the performance are discussed. In the prototypes the spot is directed on the specimen which is carried on a stage that can be translated horizontally and vertically. The characteristic fluorescent X-rays excited by the focused 10 keV photons are analysed by an energy-dispersive Si(Li) detector, so that by scanning the stage an elemental concentration map of the specimen is built up. In a companion paper [A.C. Thompson, J.H. Underwood, Y. Wu, R.D. Giauque, K.W. Jones and M.L. Rivers, these Proceedings, p. 318] some experimental programs are described, and estimates of the elemental sensitivity are provided.

  13. Stand-alone microprobe at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Antolak, A J; Bench, G S; Brown, T A; Frantz, B R; Grant, P G; Morse, D H; Roberts, M L

    1998-10-02

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories/California have jointly constructed a new stand-alone microprobe facility. Although the facility was built to develop a method to rapidly locate and determine elemental concentrations of micron scale particulates on various media using PIXE, the facility has found numerous applications in biology and materials science. The facility is located at LLNL and uses a General Ionex Corporation Model 358 duoplasmatron negative ion source, a National Electrostatics Corporation 5SDH-2 tandem accelerator, and an Oxford triplet lens. Features of the system include complete computer control of the beam transport using LabVIEWTM for Macintosh, computer controlled beam collimating and divergence limiting slits, automated sample positioning to micron resolution, and video optics for beam positioning and sample observation. Data collection is accomplished with the simultaneous use of as many as four EG&G Ortec IGLET-XTM X-Ray detectors, digital amplifiers made by X-Ray Instruments and Associates (XIA), and LabVIEWTM for Macintosh acquisition software.

  14. Aerothermal Heating Predictions for Mars Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; DiFulvio, M.; Horvath, T. J.; Braun, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    A combination of computational predictions and experimental measurements of the aerothermal heating expected on the two Mars Microprobes during their entry to Mars are presented. The maximum, non-ablating, heating rate at the vehicle's stagnation point (at alpha = 0 degrees) is predicted for an undershoot trajectory to be 194 Watts per square centimeters with associated stagnation point pressure of 0.064 atm. Maximum stagnation point pressure occurs later during the undershoot trajectory and is 0.094 atm. From computations at seven overshoot-trajectory points, the maximum heat load expected at the stagnation point is near 8800 Joules per square centimeter. Heat rates and heat loads on the vehicle's afterbody are much lower than the forebody. At zero degree angle-of-attack, heating over much of the hemi-spherical afterbody is predicted to be less than 2 percent of the stagnation point value. Good qualitative agreement is demonstrated for forebody and afterbody heating between CFD calculations at Mars entry conditions and experimental thermographic phosphor measurements from the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. A novel approach which incorporates six degree-of-freedom trajectory simulations to perform a statistical estimate of the effect of angle-of-attack, and other off-nominal conditions, on heating is included.

  15. TEAM – Titan Exploration Atmospheric Microprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Conor; Esper, Jaime; Aslam, Shahid; Quilligan, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    The astrobiological potential of Titan's surface hydrocarbon liquids and probable interior water ocean has led to its inclusion as a destination in NASA's "Ocean Worlds" initiative, and near-term investigation of these regions is a high-level scientific goal. TEAM is a novel initiative to investigate the lake and sea environs using multiple dropsondes –scientific probes derived from an existing cubesat bus architecture (CAPE – the Cubesat Application for Planetary Exploration) developed at NASA GSFC. Each 3U probe will parachute to the surface, making atmospheric structure and composition measurements during the descent, and photographing the surface – land, shoreline and seas - in detail. TEAM probes offer a low-cost, high-return means to explore multiple areas on Titan, yielding crucial data about the condensing chemicals, haze and cloud layers, winds, and surface features of the lakes and seas. These microprobes may be included on a near-term New Frontiers class mission to the Saturn system as additional payload, bringing increased scientific return and conducting reconnaissance for future landing zones. In this presentation we describe the probe architecture, baseline payload, flight profile and the unique engineering and science data that can be returned.

  16. The new nuclear microprobe at Livermore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Bench, G. S.; Heikkinen, D. W.; Morse, D. H.; Bach, P. R.; Pontau, A. E.

    1995-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories/California have jointly constructed a new nuclear microprobe beamline. This beamline is located on the LLNL 10 MV tandem accelerator and can be used for multidisciplinary research using PIXE, PIGE, energy loss tomography, or IBS techniques. Distinctive features of the beamline include incorporation of magnet power supplies into the accelerator control system, computer-controlled object and image slits, automated target positioning to sub-micron resolution, and video optics for beam positioning and observation. Mitigation of vibrations was accomplished with vibration isolators and a rigid beamline design while integral beamline shielding was used to shield from stray magnetic fields. Available detectors include a wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer, a High-Purity Germanium detector (HPGe), a Lithium-Drifted Silicon X-Ray detector (SiLi), and solid state surface barrier detectors. Along with beamline performance, results from recent measurements on determination of trace impurities in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) super conducting wire strand, determination of Ca/Sr ratios in seashells, and determination of minor and trace element concentrations in sperm cells are presented.

  17. Electron microprobe analysis of zinc incorporation into rumen protozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, A.; Quintana, C.; Durand, M.

    1980-11-01

    With the aid of electron microprobe analysis on ciliate spreads, we detected zinc in ciliates and its accumulation in the endoplasm. A correlation was found between the amount of zinc accumulation and its concentration in the medium. By the same microprobe analysis of of ultrathin sections, we determined semiquantitatively the zinc accumulation in the intracytoplasmic granules and its presence in macronuclei and in intra- and extracellular bacteria.

  18. Extrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-03-01

    We studied narrow 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 100-355 K and 42-59 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. The Fourier transformed NMR spectra of the proton free-induction signals show the superposition of broad and narrow components, which can be assigned to immobile protons and extrinsic mobile protons, respectively. We found that a narrow spectrum develops on heating above about Tc = 260 K and widens above a Larmor frequency of about νc = 50 MHz for Mg(OH)2. The temperature-induced NMR spectrum and the characteristic frequency νc of 50 MHz are the noteworthy features of the nuclear spin fluctuation spectra of the extrinsic protons.

  19. Hydration and translocation of an excess proton in water clusters: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2005-10-01

    The hydration structure and translocation of an excess proton in hydrogen bonded water clusters of two different sizes are investigated by means of finite temperature quantum simulations. The simulations are performed by employing the method of Car--Parrinello molecular dynamics where the forces on the nuclei are obtained directly from `on the fly' quantum electronic structure calculations. Since no predefined interaction potentials are used in this scheme, it is ideally suited to study proton translocation processes which proceed through breaking and formation of chemical bonds. The coordination number of the hydrated proton and the index of oxygen to which the excess proton is attached are calculated along the simulation trajectories for both the clusters.

  20. Optimized Structures and Proton Affinities of Fluorinated Dimethyl Ethers: An Ab Initio Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Victoria B.; Ball, David W.; Zehe, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    Ab initio methods have been used to investigate the proton affinity and the geometry changes upon protonation for the molecules (CH3)2O, (CH2F)2O, (CHF2)2O, and (CF3)2O. Geometry optimizations were performed at the MP2/3-2 I G level, and the resulting geometries were used for single-point energy MP2/6-31G calculations. The proton affinity calculated for (CH3)2O was 7 Kjoule/mole from the experimental value, within the desired variance of +/- 8Kjoule/mole for G2 theory, suggesting that the methodology used in this study is adequate for energy difference considerations. For (CF3)20, the calculated proton affinity of 602 Kjoule/mole suggests that perfluorinated ether molecules do not act as Lewis bases under normal circumstances; e.g. degradation of commercial lubricants in tribological applications.

  1. A fluorescence study of isofagomine protonation in β-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Lindbäck, Emil; Laursen, Bo Wegge; Poulsen, Jens Christian Navarro; Kilså, Kristine; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Bols, Mikael

    2015-06-21

    N-(10-Chloro-9-anthracenemethyl)isofagomine 5 and N-(10-chloro-9-anthracenemethyl)-1-deoxynojirimycin 6 were prepared, and their inhibition of almond β-glucosidase was measured. The isofagomine derivative 5 was found to be a potent inhibitor, while the 1-deoxynojirimycin derivative 6 displayed no inhibition at the concentrations investigated. Fluorescence spectroscopy of 5 with almond β-glucosidase at different pH values showed that the inhibitor nitrogen is not protonated when bound to the enzyme. Analysis of pH inhibition data confirmed that 5 binds as the amine to the enzyme's unprotonated dicarboxylate form. This is a radically different binding mode than has been observed with isofagomine and other iminosugars in the literature.

  2. Computational studies of a redox-driven proton pump: Cytochrome c oxidase and biological energy transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2006-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a redox-driven proton pump, an energy converting molecular machine, which reduces atmospheric oxygen to water and couples the oxygen reduction reaction to the creation of a membrane proton gradient. The proton gradient subsequently drives the synthesis of ATP. The structure of the enzyme has been solved; however, the molecular mechanism of proton pumping is still poorly understood. The correlated electron and proton transport plays a crucial role in the function of the enzyme. Our computer simulations -- combined ab initio and classical, MD and MC- indicate a possible mechanism of CcO. We find that one of the His ligands of the catalytic site, and certain chains of water molecules inside of the enzyme play a crucial role. In this presentation, computational and experimental studies directed toward understanding the mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase will be discussed. D.M. Popovic and A.A. Stuchebrukhov, Proton pumping mechanism and catalytic cycle of cytochrome c oxidase: Coulomb pump model with kinetic gating, FEBS Lett. 2004.

  3. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  4. Biological Effects in Coral Biomineralization: The Ion-Microprobe Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, A.

    2004-12-01

    Scleractinian corals are among the most prolific biomineralizing organisms on Earth and massive, reef-building corals are used extensively as proxies for past variations in the global climate. It is therefore of wide interest to understand the degree to which biological versus inorganic processes control the chemistry of the coral skeleton. Early workers considered aragonitic coral skeleton formation to be a purely physiochemical process. More recent studies have increasingly emphasized the role of a skeletal organic matrix, or intercalated organic macro-molecules that control the macroscopic shape and size of the growing crystals. It is now well established that organic compounds play a key role in controlling the morphology of crystals in a wide variety of calcium carbonate biomineralization processes by binding to specific sites, thereby causing direction-specific binding energies on the crystal surfaces. Macro-molecules, such as aspartic acid-rich or glutamic proteins and sulfated polysaccharides, are known to be embedded within the aragonitic skeletal components of coral. In addition, endosymbiotic algae and the layer of cells adjacent to the mineralizing surface, the calicoblastic ectoderm, are believed to play important roles in driving and controlling hermatypic coral skeletogenesis. However, until recently, further progress has been somewhat limited because it was not possible to obtain chemical analyses of the coral skeleton with sufficiently high spatial resolution and sensitivity to correlate chemical variations with the micrometer scale organization of its different structural components. The recent emergence of new ion microprobe technology is changing this situation radically. Conventional ion microprobe and laser ablation techniques have already contributed substantially to our knowledge about the micro-distribution of key trace elements such as B, Mg, Sr, Ba and U. However, with the development of the NanoSIMS, a newly designed ion microprobe

  5. Study of new proton conducting glasses for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiple, S. R.; Deshpande, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    The glasses in the series (35-x) BaO:65 P2O5:x (NH4)2SO4 are synthesized and characterized by Tg, CTE, density and electrical conductivity measurements. The decrease in density and Tg is observed with addition of (NH4)2SO4. The increase in CTE compliments the observed variation in Tg. The protonic conductivity increases with addition of (NH4)2SO4 up to 7.5 mol% and decreases beyond this composition. The increase in the ratio of O/P, which in turn, creates more non-bridging oxygens, enhances the conductivity. Further, sulfur is mainly incorporated in sulfophosphate glasses as isolated SO42- group which also results in increase in conductivity. The glass with maximum conductivity [7.5(NH4)2SO4:27.5BaO:65 P2O5] is used to fabricate a fuel cell. It gives the power density of 12.43 μW/cm2. The power density of the fuel cell in the present work at room temperature is higher than that reported in literature at 473 K. The fuel cell has a potential of giving higher power density at higher temperature of 423 K.

  6. Proton transport in triflic acid pentahydrate studied via ab initio path integral molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robin L; Paddison, Stephen J; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2011-06-16

    Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid hydrates provide a well-defined system to study proton dissociation and transport in perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, typically used as the electrolyte in hydrogen fuel cells, in the limit of minimal water. The triflic acid pentahydrate crystal (CF(3)SO(3)H·5H(2)O) is sufficiently aqueous that it contains an extended three-dimensional water network. Despite it being extended, however, long-range proton transport along the network is structurally unfavorable and would require considerable rearrangement. Nevertheless, the triflic acid pentahydrate crystal system can provide a clear picture of the preferred locations of local protonic defects in the water network, which provides insights about related structures in the disordered, low-hydration environment of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the proton defect is most likely to transfer to the closest water that has the expected presolvation and only contains water in its first solvation shell. Unlike the tetrahydrate of triflic acid (CF(3)SO(3)H·4H(2)O), there is no evidence of the proton preferentially transferring to a water molecule bridging two of the sulfonate groups. However, this could be an artifact of the crystal structure since the only such water molecule is separated from the proton by long O-O distances. Hydrogen bonding criteria, using the two-dimensional potential of mean force, are extracted. Radial distribution functions, free energy profiles, radii of gyration, and the root-mean-square displacement computed from ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations reveal that quantum effects do significantly extend the size of the protonic defect and increase the frequency of proton transfer events by nearly 15%. The calculated IR spectra confirm that the dominant protonic defect mostly exists as an Eigen cation but contains some Zundel ion characteristics. Chain lengths and ring sizes determined from the

  7. The Perils of Electron Microprobe Analysis of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, C. E.; Essene, E. J.; Wang, K. L.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    . Infrared spectra show a strong band of (CO3)2- for this apatite, which indicates a possible substitution of (CO3)2-(F)- for (PO4)3-. Other techniques to mitigate temporal variation of F and Cl, including alternative metal coatings, concurrent stage movement, and cryogenic sample-cooling were attempted, but did not eliminate the disparity in measured F concentrations between the two sample orientations. Thus, we believe that F measurements on F-rich apatite samples of unknown orientation are immediately suspect and should be regarded as upper limits of true F concentration. X-ray mapping, CL imaging and subsequent quantitative analyses show compositional variations in Na, S, Si, and REE in the Durango and Wilberforce fluorapatite samples used in this study. Problems of electron beam sensitivity, X-ray intensity anisotropy due to sample orientation, and compositional heterogeneity call into question their continued use as routine microanalysis reference materials. Microanalysts are encouraged to use more robust calibration standards, such as Cl-rich or other F-poor apatites for Ca, P, O and Cl, and MgF2 for F measurements. [1] Stormer, J.C., Pierson, M.L, and Tacker, R.C. (1993) Variation of F and Cl X-ray intensity due to anisotropic diffusion in apatite during electron microprobe analysis. Am. Min., 78, 641-648.

  8. SU-E-T-304: Study of Secondary Neutrons From Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M; Zheng, Y; Benton, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are unwanted byproducts from proton therapy and exposure from secondary radiation during treatment could increase risk of developing a secondary cancer later in a patient's lifetime. The purpose of this study is to investigate secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams under various beam conditions using both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: CR-39 Plastic Track Nuclear Detectors (PNTD) were used for the measurement. CR-39 PNTD has tissue like sensitivity to the secondary neutrons but insensitive to the therapeutic protons. In this study, we devised two experimental conditions: a) hollow-phantom; phantom is bored with a hollow cylinder along the direction of the beam so that the primary proton passes through the phantom without interacting with the phantom material, b) cylindrical-phantom; a solid cylinder of diameter close to the beam diameter is placed along the beam path. CR-39 PNTDs were placed laterally inside a 60X20X35 cm3 phantom (hollow-phantom) and in air (cylindrical-phantom) at various angles with respect to the primary beam axis. We studied for three different proton energies (78 MeV, 162 MeV and 226 MeV), using a 4 cm modulation width and 5cm diameter brass aperture for the entire experiment and simulation. A comparison of the experiment was performed using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Results: The measured secondary neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranges from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 25.42 ± 2.3 mSv/Gy for the hollow phantom study, and 2.7 ± 0.3 to 46.4 ± 3.4 mSv/Gy for the cylindrical phantom study. Monte Carlo simulations predicated neutron dose equivalent from measurements within a factor of 5. Conclusion: The study suggests that the production of external neutrons is significantly higher than the production of internal neutrons.

  9. Excess protons in water-acetone mixtures. II. A conductivity study.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Longinotti, M Paula

    2013-10-28

    In the present work we complement a previous simulation study [R. Semino and D. Laria, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 194503 (2012)] on the disruption of the proton transfer mechanism in water by the addition of an aprotic solvent, such as acetone. We provide experimental measurements of the mobility of protons in aqueous-acetone mixtures in a wide composition range, for water molar fractions, xw, between 0.05 and 1.00. Furthermore, new molecular dynamics simulation results are presented for rich acetone mixtures, which provide further insight into the proton transport mechanism in water-non-protic solvent mixtures. The proton mobility was analyzed between xw 0.05 and 1.00 and compared to molecular dynamics simulation data. Results show two qualitative changes in the proton transport composition dependence at xw ∼ 0.25 and 0.8. At xw < 0.25 the ratio of the infinite dilution molar conductivities of HCl and LiCl, Λ(0)(HCl).Λ(0)(LiCl)(-1), is approximately constant and equal to one, since the proton diffusion is vehicular and equal to that of Li(+). At xw ∼ 0.25, proton mobility starts to differ from that of Li(+) indicating that above this concentration the Grotthuss transport mechanism starts to be possible. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed that at this threshold concentration the probability of interconversion between two Eigen structures starts to be non-negligible. At xw ∼ 0.8, the infinite molar conductivity of HCl concentration dependence qualitatively changes. This result is in excellent agreement with the analysis presented in the previous simulation work and it has been ascribed to the interchange of water and acetone molecules in the second solvation shell of the hydronium ion.

  10. Excess protons in water-acetone mixtures. II. A conductivity study.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Longinotti, M Paula

    2013-10-28

    In the present work we complement a previous simulation study [R. Semino and D. Laria, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 194503 (2012)] on the disruption of the proton transfer mechanism in water by the addition of an aprotic solvent, such as acetone. We provide experimental measurements of the mobility of protons in aqueous-acetone mixtures in a wide composition range, for water molar fractions, xw, between 0.05 and 1.00. Furthermore, new molecular dynamics simulation results are presented for rich acetone mixtures, which provide further insight into the proton transport mechanism in water-non-protic solvent mixtures. The proton mobility was analyzed between xw 0.05 and 1.00 and compared to molecular dynamics simulation data. Results show two qualitative changes in the proton transport composition dependence at xw ∼ 0.25 and 0.8. At xw < 0.25 the ratio of the infinite dilution molar conductivities of HCl and LiCl, Λ(0)(HCl).Λ(0)(LiCl)(-1), is approximately constant and equal to one, since the proton diffusion is vehicular and equal to that of Li(+). At xw ∼ 0.25, proton mobility starts to differ from that of Li(+) indicating that above this concentration the Grotthuss transport mechanism starts to be possible. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed that at this threshold concentration the probability of interconversion between two Eigen structures starts to be non-negligible. At xw ∼ 0.8, the infinite molar conductivity of HCl concentration dependence qualitatively changes. This result is in excellent agreement with the analysis presented in the previous simulation work and it has been ascribed to the interchange of water and acetone molecules in the second solvation shell of the hydronium ion. PMID:24182052

  11. Solvation and protonation of coumarin 102 in aqueous media: a fluorescence spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Hessz, Dóra; Hégely, Bence; Kállay, Mihály; Vidóczy, Tamás; Kubinyi, Miklós

    2014-07-17

    The ground- and excited-state protonation of Coumarin 102 (C102), a fluorescent probe applied frequently in heterogeneous systems with an aqueous phase, has been studied in aqueous solutions by spectroscopic experiments and theoretical calculations. For the dissociation constant of the protonated form in the ground state, pKa = 1.61 was obtained from the absorption spectra; for the excited-state dissociation constant, pKa* = 2.19 was obtained from the fluorescence spectra. These values were closely reproduced by theoretical calculations via a thermodynamic cycle (the value of pKa* also by calculations via the Förster cycle) using an implicit–explicit solvation model (polarized continuum model + addition of a solvent molecule). The theoretical calculations indicated that (i) in the ground state, C102 occurs primarily as a hydrogen-bonded water complex, with the oxo group as the binding site, (ii) this hydrogen bond becomes stronger upon excitation, and (iii) in the ground state, the amino nitrogen atom is the protonation site, and in the excited state, the carboxy oxygen atom is the protonation site. A comprehensive analysis of fluorescence decay data yielded the values kpr = 3.27 × 10(10) M(–1) s(–1) for the rate constant of the excited-state protonation and kdpr = 2.78 × 10(8) s(–1) for the rate constant of the reverse process (kpr and kdpr were treated as independent parameters). This, considering the relatively long fluorescence lifetimes of neutral C102 (6.02 ns) and its protonated form (3.06 ns) in aqueous media, means that a quasi-equilibrium state of excited-state proton transfer is reached in strongly acidic solutions.

  12. Experimental study of {beta}-delayed proton decay of {sup 23}Al for nucleosynthesis in novae

    SciTech Connect

    Saastamoinen, A.; Aeystoe, J.; Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tribble, R. E.; Bentley, M. A.; Davinson, T.; Woods, P. J.

    2011-04-15

    The {beta}-delayed {gamma} and proton decay of {sup 23}Al has been studied with an alternative detector setup at the focal plane of the momentum achromat recoil separator MARS at Texas A and M University. We could detect protons down to an energy of 200 keV and determine the corresponding branching ratios. Contrary to results of previous {beta}-decay studies, no strong proton intensity from the decay of the isobaric analog state (IAS) of the {sup 23}Al ground state at E{sub x}=7803 keV in {sup 23}Mg was observed. Instead we assign the observed low-energy group E{sub p,c.m.}=206 keV to the decay from a state that is 16 keV below the IAS. We measured both proton and gamma branches from the decay of this state at E{sub x}=7787 keV in {sup 23}Mg, which is a very rare case in the literature. Combining our data with its measured lifetime, we determine its resonance strength to be {omega}{gamma}=1.4{sub -0.4}{sup +0.5} meV. The value is in agreement with older direct measurements, but disagrees with a recent direct measurement. This state is the most important resonance for the radiative proton capture {sup 22}Na(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Mg in some astrophysical environments, such as novae.

  13. Initial beam size study for passive scatter proton therapy. II. Changes in delivered depth dose profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Harvey, Mark C.; Smith, Alfred R.

    2007-11-15

    In passively scattered proton radiotherapy, a clinically useful treatment beam is produced by spreading a small proton 'pencil beam' extracted from the accelerator to create both a uniform dose profile laterally and a uniform spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) in depth. Lateral spreading and range modulation of the beam are accomplished using specially designed components within the treatment delivery nozzle. The purpose of this study was to determine how changes in the size of the initial proton pencil beam affect the delivery of dose with a passive scatter treatment nozzle. Monte Carlo calculations were used to study changes of the beam's in-air energy distribution at the exit of the nozzle and the central axis depth dose profiles in water resulting from changes in the incident beam size. Our results indicate that the width of the delivered SOBP decreases as the size of the initial beam increases.

  14. Studies of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The expected induced radioactivity of experimental material in low Earth orbit was studied for characteristics of activating particles such as cosmic rays, high energy Earth albedo neutrons, trapped protons, and secondary protons and neutrons. The activation cross sections for the production of long lived radioisotopes and other existing nuclear data appropriate to the study of these reactions were compiled. Computer codes which are required to calculate the expected activation of orbited materials were developed. The decreased computer code used to predict the activation of trapped protons of materials placed in the expected orbits of LDEF and Spacelab II. Techniques for unfolding the fluxes of activating particles from the measured activation of orbited materials are examined.

  15. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  16. Study of the Polarization Deterioration During Physics Stores in RHIC Polarized Proton Runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Z.; Qin, Q.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2016-02-01

    As the only high energy polarized proton collider in the world, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has achieved a great success in colliding polarized proton beams up to 255GeV per beam energy with over 50% average store polarizations for spin physics studies. With the help of Siberian snakes as well as outstanding beam control during the acceleration, polarization loss during acceleration up to 100 GeV is negligible. However, about 10% polarization loss was observed between acceleration from 100 GeV to 255 GeV. In addition, a mild polarization deterioration during long store for physics data taking was also observed. In this paper, studies in understanding the store depolarizing mechanism is reported, including the analysis of polarization deterioration data based on the past couple of RHIC polarized proton runs.

  17. Brain activity mapping at multiple scales with silicon microprobes containing 1,024 electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Shobe, Justin L.; Claar, Leslie D.; Parhami, Sepideh; Bakhurin, Konstantin I.

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated activity of neural ensembles across multiple interconnected regions has been challenging to study in the mammalian brain with cellular resolution using conventional recording tools. For instance, neural systems regulating learned behaviors often encompass multiple distinct structures that span the brain. To address this challenge we developed a three-dimensional (3D) silicon microprobe capable of simultaneously measuring extracellular spike and local field potential activity from 1,024 electrodes. The microprobe geometry can be precisely configured during assembly to target virtually any combination of four spatially distinct neuroanatomical planes. Here we report on the operation of such a device built for high-throughput monitoring of neural signals in the orbitofrontal cortex and several nuclei in the basal ganglia. We perform analysis on systems-level dynamics and correlations during periods of conditioned behavioral responding and rest, demonstrating the technology's ability to reveal functional organization at multiple scales in parallel in the mouse brain. PMID:26133801

  18. Automatic system for single ion/single cell irradiation based on Cracow microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselov, O.; Polak, W.; Lekki, J.; Stachura, Z.; Lebed, K.; Styczeń, J.; Ugenskiene, R.

    2006-05-01

    Recently, the Cracow ion microprobe has found its new application as a single ion hit facility (SIHF), allowing precise irradiations of living cells by a controlled number of ions. The instrument enables a broad field of research, such as survival studies, adaptive response investigations, bystander effect, inverse dose-rate effect, low-dose hypersensitivity, etc. This work presents principles of construction and operation of the SIHF based on the Cracow microprobe. We discuss some crucial features of optical, positioning, and blanking systems, including self-developed software responsible for semiautomatic cell recognition, for precise positioning of cells, and for controlling the irradiation process. We also show some tests carried out to determine the efficiency of the whole system and of its segments. In addition, we present results of the first irradiation measurements performed with living cells.

  19. Study of open charm production in proton+proton collisions at center of mass energies = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsyk, Sergey

    2005-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with its unique electron identification system enables us to perform high precision measurements of electron yields. By measuring electron production at high transverse momentum, we can disentangle the contribution of electrons originating from semi-leptonic decays of heavy quarks (charm or bottom) from the less interesting "photonic" decay modes of light mesons. D/B mesons carry single heavy valence quarks and are usually referred to as "Open Charm" and "Open Bottom" particles, differentiating them from Closed Flavor particles such as J/psi, and Y mesons. Due to the large mass of the heavy quarks, their production mechanisms can be adequately explained by perturbative QCD (pQCD) theory. This dissertation presents the measurement of electrons from heavy flavor decays in proton + proton collisions at RHIC at collision energy s = 200 GeV over a wide range of transverse moment (0.4 < pT < 5 GeV/c). Two independent analysis techniques of signal extraction were performed. The "Cocktail" subtraction is based on the calculation and subtraction of the expected "photon-related" electron background based upon measured yields of light mesons. The "Converter" subtraction is based upon a direct measurement of photon yields achieved introducing additional material in the PHENIX acceptance and deducing the photon abundance by measuring the increase in electron yield. This is the first measurement of the Open Charm crossection at this collision energy and it is an important baseline measurement for comparison with nucleus + nucleus collisions. The modification of Open Charm production in heavy ion collisions compared to the presented p + p result can be used to study the final state interaction of the heavy quarks with hot dense matter inside the collisions. The results of the Open Charm measurements are compared to current pQCD predictions both in Leading Order (LO) O a2s and Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) O a3s

  20. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject (J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 5241-5249). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action.

  1. Impact of the material composition on proton range variation - A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. W.; Tung, C. J.; Lee, C. C.; Fan, K. H.; Huang, H. C.; Chao, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we used the Geant4 toolkit to demonstrate the impacts of the material composition of tissues on proton range variation. Bragg curves of different materials subjected to a 250 MeV mono-energy proton beam were simulated and compared. These simulated materials included adipose, heart, brain, cartilage, cortical bone and water. The results showed that there was significant proton range deviation between Bragg curves, especially for cortical bone. The R50 values for a 250 MeV proton beam were approximately 39.55 cm, 35.52 cm, 37.00 cm, 36.51 cm, 36.72 cm, 22.53 cm, and 38.52 cm in the phantoms that were composed completely of adipose, cartilage, tissue, heart, brain, cortical bone, and water, respectively. Mass density and electron density were used to scale the proton range for each material; electron density provided better range scaling. In addition, a similar comparison was performed by artificially setting all material density to 1.0 g/cm3 to evaluate the range deviation due to chemical components alone. Tissue heterogeneity effects due to density variation were more significant, and less significant for chemical composition variation unless the Z/A was very different.

  2. Feasibility study of using statistical process control to customized quality assurance in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Oh, Do Hoon; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Gwe-Ya

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and improve the reliability of proton quality assurance (QA) processes and, to provide an optimal customized tolerance level using the statistical process control (SPC) methodology. Methods: The authors investigated the consistency check of dose per monitor unit (D/MU) and range in proton beams to see whether it was within the tolerance level of the daily QA process. This study analyzed the difference between the measured and calculated ranges along the central axis to improve the patient-specific QA process in proton beams by using process capability indices. Results: The authors established a customized tolerance level of ±2% for D/MU and ±0.5 mm for beam range in the daily proton QA process. In the authors’ analysis of the process capability indices, the patient-specific range measurements were capable of a specification limit of ±2% in clinical plans. Conclusions: SPC methodology is a useful tool for customizing the optimal QA tolerance levels and improving the quality of proton machine maintenance, treatment delivery, and ultimately patient safety.

  3. The nuclear microprobe: An insight of applications in cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Ph.; Llabador, Y.

    1997-07-01

    During the last five years, the evolution of biomedical research based upon nuclear microprobe analysis has followed the development of experimental models of cultured or isolated cells. Fundamental studies of cellular mechanisms have been approached by means of in vitro assays associated with single cell analysis. Within those groups which are involved in such programs, special emphasis has been placed on cell culture and processing techniques which fulfill the methodological requirements for intracellular ion beam analysis. Great efforts have been orientated towards the improvement of normalization procedures. It is now possible to provide reliable quantitative results expressed in such units that they can be easily cross-checked using conventional methods. Imaging techniques have been also developed for the identification of the analyzed structures. In this paper, different domains of cell biology which have been addressed during the last years are reviewed. Studies dealing with cellular physiology and pharmacology are briefly presented as are also those related to the role of trace elements. Topics under development in our group as well as ongoing investigations will be also evoked.

  4. Elemental analysis of single phytoplankton cells using the Lund nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallon, Jan; Elfman, Mikael; Kristiansson, Per; Malmqvist, Klas; Granéli, Edna; Sellborn, Anders; Karlsson, Chatarina

    1999-10-01

    The occurrence of annual marine phytoplankton blooms is becoming a global problem. In Europe, the NUTOX project supported by the EC investigates if unbalanced nutrient compositions in the water promote the dominance of harmful phytoplankton species. One of the tasks is the determination of the elemental composition of single phytoplankton cells. This is carried out using the Lund Nuclear Microprobe with a special focus on C, N, P and K. The overall aim is to understand the mechanism leading to toxin production, model it and eventually propose a counteracting method. The preparative method, used to isolate single living cells while reducing their salt environment, is an important part of the analytical procedure. A comparison of light element detection using backscattering from protons and nuclear reaction analysis using deuterons is made.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Proposed Proton Transport Pathways in [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Linehan, John C.; Cheng, Yuhui; Dupuis, Michel; Raugei, Simone; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-01-15

    Possible proton channels in Clostridium pasteurianum [FeFe]-hydrogenase were investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. This study was undertaken to discern proposed channels, compare their properties, evaluate the functional channel, and to provide insight into the features of an active proton channel. Our simulations suggest that protons are not transported through water wires. Instead, a five-residue motif (E282, S319, E279, HOH, C299) was found to be the likely channel, consistent with experimental observations. This channel connects the surface of the enzyme and the di-thiomethylamine bridge of the catalytic H-cluster, permitting the transport of protons. The channel was found to have a persistent hydrogen bonded core (residues E279 to S319), with less persistent hydrogen bonds at the ends of the channel. The hydrogen bond occupancy in this network was found to be sensitive to the protonation state of the residues in the channel, with different protonation states enhancing or stabilizing hydrogen bonding in different regions of the network. Single site mutations to non-hydrogen bonding residues break the hydrogen bonding network at that residue, consistent with experimental observations showing catalyst inactivation. In many cases, these mutations alter the hydrogen bonding in other regions of the channel which may be equally important in catalytic failure. A correlation between the protein dynamics near the proton channel and the redox partner binding regions was also found as a function of protonation state. The likely mechanism of proton movement in [FeFe]-hydrogenases is discussed based on the structural analysis presented here. This work was funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of

  6. Fragmentation Patterns and Mechanisms of Singly and Doubly Protonated Peptoids Studied by Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianhua; Tian, Yuan; Hossain, Ekram; Connolly, Michael D.

    2016-04-01

    Peptoids are peptide-mimicking oligomers consisting of N-alkylated glycine units. The fragmentation patterns for six singly and doubly protonated model peptoids were studied via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The experiments were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. Both singly and doubly protonated peptoids were found to fragment mainly at the backbone amide bonds to produce peptoid B-type N-terminal fragment ions and Y-type C-terminal fragment ions. However, the relative abundances of B- versus Y-ions were significantly different. The singly protonated peptoids fragmented by producing highly abundant Y-ions and lesser abundant B-ions. The Y-ion formation mechanism was studied through calculating the energetics of truncated peptoid fragment ions using density functional theory and by controlled experiments. The results indicated that Y-ions were likely formed by transferring a proton from the C-H bond of the N-terminal fragments to the secondary amine of the C-terminal fragments. This proton transfer is energetically favored, and is in accord with the observation of abundant Y-ions. The calculations also indicated that doubly protonated peptoids would fragment at an amide bond close to the N-terminus to yield a high abundance of low-mass B-ions and high-mass Y-ions. The results of this study provide further understanding of the mechanisms of peptoid fragmentation and, therefore, are a valuable guide for de novo sequencing of peptoid libraries synthesized via combinatorial chemistry.

  7. Manipulating the proton transfer process in molecular complexes: synthesis and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Panja, Sumit Kumar; Dwivedi, Nidhi; Saha, Satyen

    2016-08-01

    The proton transfer process in carefully designed molecular complexes has been investigated directly in the solid and solution phase. SCXRD studies have been employed to investigate the N-H-O bonding interaction sites of the molecular complexes, with additional experimental support from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies, to gain information on the relative position of hydrogen in between the N and O centers. Further, the proton transfer process in solution is studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy through monitoring the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) process in these molecular complexes, which is primarily governed by the number of electron withdrawing groups (nitro groups) on proton donor moieties (NP, DNP and TNP). It is found that the magnitude of the ICT process depends on the extent of proton transfer, which on the other hand depends on the relative stabilities of the constituent species (phenolate species). A correlation is observed between an increase in the number of nitro groups and an increase in the melting point of the molecular complexes, indicating the enhancement of ionic character due to the proton transfer process. The aliphatic H-bonding is identified and monitored using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, which reveals that the identity of molecular complexes in solution interestingly depends on the extent of proton transfer, in addition to the nature of the solvents. The aliphatic C-H-O H-bonding interaction between the oxygen atom of the nitro group and the alkyl hydrogen in piperidinium was also found to play a significant role in strengthening the primary interaction involving a hydrogen transfer process. The conductivity of the molecular complexes increases with an increase in the number of nitro groups, indicating the enhancement in ionic character of the molecular complexes. PMID:27424765

  8. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  9. Experimental Studies of Fast Protons Originated from Fusion Reactions in Plasma-Focus Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowska, A.; Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Zebrowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.

    2008-03-19

    The paper describes results of the recent measurements of fusion-reaction protons, which were performed within the PF-360 facility operated at the IPJ in Swierk, Poland. The main aim of those studies was to perform time-integrated measurements of fast protons (of energy of about 3 MeV) by means of ion-pinhole cameras, which were equipped with solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) of the PM-355 type and absorption filters made of thin metal foils. In order to determine the spatial distribution of fusion-produced protons the use was made of several miniature pinhole cameras placed at different angles to the PF-360 axis. The irradiated and etched detectors were analyzed with an optical microscope coupled with a CCD camera and a PC unit.

  10. Experimental study of the beta-delayed proton decays of {sup 145,147}Er

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, F.; Zhou, X. H.; Zheng, Y.; Xu, S. W.; Xie, Y. X.; Chen, L.; Lei, X. G.; Guo, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. H.; Li, Z. K.; Qiang, Y. H.; Guo, S.; Wang, H. X.; Zhou, H. B.; Ding, B.; Li, G. S.; Zhang, N. T.

    2010-04-15

    The beta-delayed proton decays of {sup 145,147}Er have been studied experimentally using the {sup 58}Ni+{sup 92}Mo reaction at beam energy of 383 MeV. On the basis of a He-jet apparatus coupled with a tape transport system, the beta-delayed proton radioactivities both from the nus{sub 1/2} ground state and the nuh{sub 11/2} isomer in {sup 145,147}Er were observed by proton-gamma coincidence measurements. By analyzing the time distributions of the 4{sup +}->2{sup +}gamma transitions in the granddaughter nuclei {sup 144,146}Dy, the half-lives of 1.0+-0.3 s and 1.6+-0.2 s have been deduced for the nuh{sub 11/2} isomers in {sup 145,147}Er, respectively.

  11. Ion-induced electron emission ERDA with a nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanović Radović, I.; Medunić, Z.; Jakšić, M.; Siketić, Z.; Skukan, N.

    2005-04-01

    With intention to be used for the 3D analysis of hydrogen, a new ion-induced electron emission (IEE) ERDA system has been installed on the nuclear microprobe. A better depth resolution has been obtained with IEE particle identification system when compared to conventional ERDA systems that use stopping foil. Spectra of the forward scattered ions as well as the recoiled atoms are collected using the same particle detector. This simplifies normalization needed for quantitative analysis without the use of an additional detector. However, well defined but rather small solid angle of the IEE detector requires higher ion beam currents if sufficient sensitivity for H detection needs to be achieved. High beam currents focused to several micrometer spot size lead to rather high current densities and increased probability of H loss from the sample, which may limit the achievable sensitivity. By positioning IEE ERDA system at 45° instead of 30°, as well as by using heavier ions (O ions instead of He), two orders of magnitude better sensitivity can be obtained without a significant deterioration of depth resolution due to the increased recoil cross-section. In this work, several different sample types containing H have been studied. The capabilities of system for 3D imaging of H in samples have been demonstrated.

  12. Imaging mass spectrometry with nuclear microprobes for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Y.; Yamada, H.; Honda, Y.; Ninomiya, S.; Seki, T.; Aoki, T.; Matsuo, J.

    2009-06-01

    A mass spectrometric technique using nuclear microprobes is presented in this paper for biological applications. In recent years, imaging mass spectrometry has become an increasingly important technique for visualizing the spatial distribution of molecular species in biological tissues and cells. However, due to low yields of large molecular ions, the conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), that uses keV primary ion beams, is typically applied for imaging of either elements or low mass compounds. In this study, we performed imaging mass spectrometry using MeV ion beams collimated to about 10 μm, and successfully obtained molecular ion images from plant and animal cell sections. The molecular ion imaging of the pollen section showed high intensities of PO3- ions in the pollen cytoplasm, compared to the pollen wall, and indicated the heterogeneous distribution in the cytoplasm. The 3T3-L1 cell image revealed the high intensity of PO3- ions, in particular from the cell nucleus. The result showed that not only the individual cell, but also the cell nucleus could be identified with the present imaging technique.

  13. Identification of cosmogenic argon components in Allende by laser microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, C.

    1986-01-01

    New techniques are presented for using a laser microprobe to determine the spallation argon systematics of calcium-aluminum inclusions. The Ar-38(s) amounts determined for melilite and anorthite in a coarse-grained inclusion from Allende are 2.9 x 10 to the -8th and 1.3 x 10 to the -8th cc/g, respectively. The ratio of the amounts is consistent with the calcium contents of these two minerals. The Ar-38(s) amount determined for a fine-grained inclusion from Allende is 1.1 x 10 to the -8th cc/g. Calcium and potassium amounts were determined from irradiated samples of the same inclusions so that production of Ar-38 from calcium during the cosmic ray exposure of Allende could be determined for these samples. The production observed was 12.4 + or - 2.1 x 10 to the -8th cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the coarse-grained inclusion and 9.9 + or - 2.4 cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the fine-grained inclusion. No evidence of unusual exposure was observed in the two inclusions studied.

  14. Study of the effects of high-energy proton beams on escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection is one of the most serious risks to public health care today. However, discouragingly, the development of new antibiotics has progressed little over the last decade. There is an urgent need for alternative approaches to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Novel methods, which include photothermal therapy based on gold nano-materials and ionizing radiation such as X-rays and gamma rays, have been reported. Studies of the effects of high-energy proton radiation on bacteria have mainly focused on Bacillus species and its spores. The effect of proton beams on Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been limitedly reported. Escherichia coli is an important biological tool to obtain metabolic and genetic information and is a common model microorganism for studying toxicity and antimicrobial activity. In addition, E. coli is a common bacterium in the intestinal tract of mammals. In this research, the morphological and the physiological changes of E. coli after proton irradiation were investigated. Diluted solutions of cells were used for proton beam radiation. LB agar plates were used to count the number of colonies formed. The growth profile of the cells was monitored by using the optical density at 600 nm. The morphology of the irradiated cells was observed with an optical microscope. A microarray analysis was performed to examine the gene expression changes between irradiated samples and control samples without irradiation. E coli cells have observed to be elongated after proton irradiation with doses ranging from 13 to 93 Gy. Twenty-two were up-regulated more than twofold in proton-irradiated samples (93 Gy) compared with unexposed one.

  15. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  16. Proton irradiation induced defects in GaN: Rutherford backscattering and thermally stimulated current studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nishikata, N.; Kamioka, K.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2016-03-01

    The proton irradiation induced defects in GaN are studied by combining elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), thermally stimulated current (TSC), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements. The proton irradiation (peak concentration: 1.0 × 1015 cm-2) into GaN films with a thickness of 3 μm is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The proton concentration by a TRIM simulation is maximum at 3600 nm in depth, which means that the proton beam almost passes through the GaN film. The carrier concentration decreases three orders of magnitude to 1015 cm-3 by the proton irradiation, suggesting the existence of the proton irradiation-induced defects. The ERDA measurements using the 1.5 MeV helium beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to ∼300 nm. The hydrogen concentration at ∼220 nm is ∼8.3 × 1013 cm-2 and ∼1.0 × 1014 cm-2 for un-irradiated and as-irradiated samples, respectively, suggesting that electrical properties are almost not affected by hydrogen. TSC measurements show a broad spectrum at around 110 K which can be divided into three traps, P1 (ionization energy 173 meV), P2 (251 meV), and P3 (330 meV). The peak intensity of P1 is much larger than that of P2 and P3. These traps are related to the N vacancy and/or complex involving N vacancy (P1), neutral Ga vacancy (VGa) (P2), and complex involving VGa (P3). The Ga displacement concentration evaluated by RBS measurements is 1.75 × 1019 cm-3 corresponding to 1/1000 of the Ga concentration in GaN. The observed Ga displacement may be origins of P2 and P3 traps.

  17. Study of Polarized Sea Quark Distributions in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sq root(s) = 500 GeV with PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Mibe, Tsutomu

    2009-08-04

    The PHENIX spin program studies the flavor structure of the polarized sea quark distributions in polarized proton-proton collisions. Starting from 2009 run, the quark and antiquark polarization, sorted by flavor, will be investigated with the parity-violating single-spin asymmetry of W-boson production at the collision energy of sq root(s) = 500 GeV. High momentum muons from W-boson decay are detected in the PHENIX muon arms. The muon trigger is being upgraded to allow one to select high momentum muons.

  18. Feasibility studies on time-like proton electromagnetic form factors at PANDA-FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Iris; Dbeyssi, Alaa; Khaneft, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    This contribution reports on the latest status of the feasibility studies for the measurement of time-like proton electromagnetic form factors (FF's) at the PANDA experiment [1] at FAIR (Germany). Electromagnetic FF's are fundamental quantities parameterizing the electric and magnetic structure of hadrons. In the time-like region proton FF's can be accessed experimentally through the annihilation processes p ¯p → l+l- (l = e, μ), assuming that the interaction takes place through the exchange of one virtual photon. Due to the low luminosity available at colliders in the past, an individual determination of the time-like electric and magnetic proton FF's was not feasible. The statistical precision, at which the proton FF's will be determined at PANDA, is estimated for both signal processes p ¯p → l+l- (l = e, μ) using the PandaRoot software, which encompasses full detector simulation and event reconstruction. The signal identification and suppression of the main background process (p ¯p → π+π-) is studied. Different methods have been used to generate and analyze the processes of interest. The results from the different analyses show that time-like electromagnetic FF's can be measured at PANDA with unprecedented statistical accuracy.

  19. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  20. The proton therapy nozzles at Samsung Medical Center: A Monte Carlo simulation study using TOPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Ahn, Sunghwan; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    To expedite the commissioning process of the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC), we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation model of the proton therapy nozzles by using TOol for PArticle Simulation (TOPAS). At SMC proton therapy center, we have two gantry rooms with different types of nozzles: a multi-purpose nozzle and a dedicated scanning nozzle. Each nozzle has been modeled in detail following the geometry information provided by the manufacturer, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. For this purpose, the novel features of TOPAS, such as the time feature or the ridge filter class, have been used, and the appropriate physics models for proton nozzle simulation have been defined. Dosimetric properties, like percent depth dose curve, spreadout Bragg peak (SOBP), and beam spot size, have been simulated and verified against measured beam data. Beyond the Monte Carlo nozzle modeling, we have developed an interface between TOPAS and the treatment planning system (TPS), RayStation. An exported radiotherapy (RT) plan from the TPS is interpreted by using an interface and is then translated into the TOPAS input text. The developed Monte Carlo nozzle model can be used to estimate the non-beam performance, such as the neutron background, of the nozzles. Furthermore, the nozzle model can be used to study the mechanical optimization of the design of the nozzle.

  1. Ab Initio Study of Hydration and Proton Dissociation in Ionomer Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2010-07-01

    We present a comparative study of proton dissociation in various functional acidic units that are promising candidates as building blocks for polymeric electrolyte membranes. Minimum energy structures for four acidic moieties with clusters of 1-6 water molecules were determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G** level starting from chemically rational initial configurations. The perfluoro sulfonyl imide acid group (CF3CF2SO2NHSO2CF3) was observed to be the strongest acid, due to the substantial electron withdrawing effect of both fluorocarbon groups. The hydrophilic functional group (CH3OC6H3OCH3C6H4SO3H) of sulfonated polyetherether ketone (SPEEK) membrane was found to be the strongest base with the acidic proton dissociation requiring the addition of six water molecules and the hydrated proton being more tightly bound to the conjugate base. Even though both perfluoro sulfonyl imides and sulfonic acids (hydrophilic functional groups for sulfonyl imide and Nafion ionomers respectively) required only three water molecules to exhibit spontaneous proton dissociation, the largest possible solvent-separated hydronium ion was attained only for the sulfonyl imide moiety. These results provide a scientific basis for understanding the improved conductivity of perfluorinated sulfonyl imide-based membranes relative to that of the widely-used Nafion membrane.

  2. Detailed defect study in proton irradiated InP/Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Romero, M. J.; Araújo, D.; García, R.; Messenger, S. R.; Summers, G. P.

    1999-10-01

    A detailed study of the effects of proton irradiation-induced defects in heteroepitaxially grown InP/Si solar cells has been made through a combination of cathodoluminescence (CL), electron beam induced current (EBIC), and electrochemical capacitance versus voltage (ECV) carrier profiling measurements. The CL data indicate the distribution of nonradiative recombination centers both before and after proton irradiation, and temperature dependent and spectroscopic analysis of the CL signal give an estimate of the energies of the dominant defect levels. The EBIC data yield an estimate of the magnitude and spatial variation of the minority carrier diffusion length (L) in the base region. Values of L determined from EBIC measurements made on solar cells irradiated by protons ranging in energy from 0.1 up to 4.5 MeV follow a single curve when plotted versus displacement dose, Dd, allowing a single proton damage coefficient to be determined. The ECV measurements show the evolution of the carrier concentration profile in the cell under irradiation, as carrier removal first depletes and eventually type converts the base region. From an in-depth analysis of the combined data, the physical defects that give rise the radiation-induced energy levels are suggested, and a detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms causing the radiation response of InP/Si solar cells is developed.

  3. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  4. Electron Microprobe Analysis Techniques for Accurate Measurements of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoff, B. A.; Webster, J. D.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F, Cl, OH)] is a ubiquitous accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The mineral contains halogens and hydroxyl ions, which can provide important constraints on fugacities of volatile components in fluids and other phases in igneous and metamorphic environments in which apatite has equilibrated. Accurate measurements of these components in apatite are therefore necessary. Analyzing apatite by electron microprobe (EMPA), which is a commonly used geochemical analytical technique, has often been found to be problematic and previous studies have identified sources of error. For example, Stormer et al. (1993) demonstrated that the orientation of an apatite grain relative to the incident electron beam could significantly affect the concentration results. In this study, a variety of alternative EMPA operating conditions for apatite analysis were investigated: a range of electron beam settings, count times, crystal grain orientations, and calibration standards were tested. Twenty synthetic anhydrous apatite samples that span the fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solution series, and whose halogen concentrations were determined by wet chemistry, were analyzed. Accurate measurements of these samples were obtained with many EMPA techniques. One effective method includes setting a static electron beam to 10-15nA, 15kV, and 10 microns in diameter. Additionally, the apatite sample is oriented with the crystal’s c-axis parallel to the slide surface and the count times are moderate. Importantly, the F and Cl EMPA concentrations are in extremely good agreement with the wet-chemical data. We also present EMPA operating conditions and techniques that are problematic and should be avoided. J.C. Stormer, Jr. et al., Am. Mineral. 78 (1993) 641-648.

  5. Study of the secondary neutral radiation in proton therapy: Toward an indirect in vivo dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Carnicer, A.; Letellier, V.; Rucka, G.; Angellier, G.; Sauerwein, W.; Herault, J.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Secondary particles produced in the collision of protons with beam modifiers are of concern in proton therapy. Nevertheless, secondary radiation can provide information on the dosimetric parameters through its dependency on the modulating accessories (range shifter and range modulating wheel). Relatively little data have been reported in the literature for low-energy proton beams. The present study aims at characterizing the neutron and photon secondary radiation at the low-energy proton therapy facility of the Centre Antoine Lacassagne (CAL), and studying their correlation to the dosimetric parameters to explore possible practical uses of secondary radiation in the treatment quality for proton therapy. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to simulate the proton therapy facility at CAL. Neutron and photon fluence, {Phi}, and ambient dose equivalent per proton dose, H*(10)/D, were determined across the horizontal main plane spanning the whole treatment room. H*(10)/D was also calculated at two positions of the treatment room where dosimetric measurements were performed for validation of the Monte Carlo calculations. Calculations and measurements were extended to 100 clinical spread-out Bragg Peaks (SOBPs) covering the whole range of therapeutic dose rates (D/MU) employed at CAL. In addition, the values of D and MU were also calculated for each SOBP and the results analyzed to study the relationship between secondary radiation and dosimetric parameters. Results: The largest production of the secondary particles takes place at the modulating devices and the brass collimators located along the optical bench. Along the beam line and off the beam axis to 2.5 m away, H*(10)/D values ranged from 5.4 {mu}Sv/Gy to 5.3 mSv/Gy for neutrons, and were 1 order of magnitude lower for photons. H*(10)/D varied greatly with the distance and angle to the beam axis. A variation of a factor of 5 was found for the different range of modulations (SOBPs). The ratios

  6. Studies of proton-irradiated cometary-type ice mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.H.; Donn, B.; Khanna, R.

    1983-06-01

    Cometary ice mixtures are studied in a laboratory experiment designed to simulate the temperature, pressure and radiation environments of the interstellar Oort cloud region, in order to test the hypothesized radiation synthesis mechanism for changing the characteristics of the outer few meters of a comet stored in the Oort cloud for 4.6 billion years. All experiments conducted confirm the synthesis of new molecular species in solid phase mixtures at 20 K. When CH4 is present in the irradiated ice mixture, long chained, voltaile hydrocarbon and CO2 are synthesized together with high molecular weight C compounds present in the room temperature residue. Due to radiation synthesis, about 1 percent of the ice was converted into a nonvolatile residue containing complicated C compounds not present in the blank samples. These results suggest that initial molecular abundances can be altered, and new species created, as a result of radiation synthesis. Irradiated mixtures exhibited thermoluminescence and pressure enhancements during warming, showing the synthesis of reactive species. Outbursts in new comets resulting from similar irradiation-induced exothermic activity would be expected to begin occurring at distances of the order of 100 AU. 40 references.

  7. Studies of proton-irradiated cometary-type ice mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. H.; Donn, B.; Khanna, R.; A'Hearn, M. F.

    1983-06-01

    Cometary ice mixtures are studied in a laboratory experiment designed to simulate the temperature, pressure and radiation environments of the interstellar Oort cloud region, in order to test the hypothesized radiation synthesis mechanism for changing the characteristics of the outer few meters of a comet stored in the Oort cloud for 4.6 billion years. All experiments conducted confirm the synthesis of new molecular species in solid phase mixtures at 20 K. When CH4 is present in the irradiated ice mixture, long chained, voltaile hydrocarbon and CO2 are synthesized together with high molecular weight C compounds present in the room temperature residue. Due to radiation synthesis, about 1 percent of the ice was converted into a nonvolatile residue containing complicated C compounds not present in the blank samples. These results suggest that initial molecular abundances can be altered, and new species created, as a result of radiation synthesis. Irradiated mixtures exhibited thermoluminescence and pressure enhancements during warming, showing the synthesis of reactive species. Outbursts in new comets resulting from similar irradiation-induced exothermic activity would be expected to begin occurring at distances of the order of 100 AU.

  8. Electron microprobe observations of PB diffusion in metamorphosed detrital monazites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Adachi, M.; Kajizuka, I.

    1994-12-01

    Electron microprobe analyses have been made on monazite grains from paragneiss samples in the andalusite-sillimanite transition (620 +/- 15 C) and sillimanite-orthoclase (680 +/- 15 C) zones of the Cretaceous Ryoke metamorphic belt, southwest Japan. Monazites from pelitic gneisses are of metamorphic origin, euhedral to subhedral and chronologically homogeneous, giving chemical Th-U-total Pb isochron (CHIME) ages of 98.8 +/- 3.3 - 98.0 +/- 3.2 Ma. Two psammitic gneisses of individual metamorphic grade contain both metamorphic monazite grains and detrital ones as old as ca. 1700 Ma. Most detrital monazite grains are heterogeneous in the ThO2 and UO2 concentrations and have multiple or single rims as young as ca. 100 Ma. Several detrital monazite grains are well rounded in form, exhibit homogeneous Th and U distributions and show a Pb diffusion profile in the margin. The width of the diffusion zones is approximately constant throughout grains from each psammitic gneiss: 18-22 micrometers for 620 C and 48-58 micrometers for 680 C. Assuming the isothermal diffusion of Pb from homogeneous monazite spheres during a 5 Ma duration of peak metamorphism, we obtain diffusion coefficients of 1.9 (+/- 0.3) x 10-21 and 1.5 (+/- 0.3) x 10-20 sq cm/s at 620 C and 680 C, respectively. These data derive an activation energy of 2.44 (+2.85/-1.26) x 105 J/mol and a frequency factor of 3.4 x 10-7 (8.5 x 10-12 - 2.2 x 107 sq cm/s, taking account of uncertainties of +/- 15 C in the temperatures and of +/- 20% in the diffusion coefficients. The diffusion parameters obtained from natural samples in this study provide a reliable insight into the closure temperature for Pb in monazite that has been poorly understood so far.

  9. Comparative Study of Proton Pump Inhibitors on Dexamethasone Plus Pylorus Ligation Induced Ulcer Model in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thippeswamy, A. H. M.; Sajjan, M.; Palkar, M. B.; Koti, B. C.; Viswanathaswamy, A. H. M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to compare ulcer protective effect of proton pump inhibitors viz. omeprazole, rabeprazole and lansoprazole against dexamethasone plus pylorus ligation induced ulcer model. Dexamethasone (5 mg/kg) was used as an ulcerogen. Dexamethasone suspended in 1% CMC in water was given orally to all the rats 15 min after the pylorus ligation. Omeprazole (20 mg/kg), rabeprazole (20 mg/kg), and lansoprazole (20 mg/kg) were administered by oral route 30 min prior to ligation was used for ulcer protective studies, gastric secretion and mucosal studies. Effects of proton pump inhibitors were determined by the evaluation of various biochemical parameters such as ulcer index, free and total acidity, gastric pH, mucin, pepsin and total proteins. Oral administration of proton pump inhibitors showed significant reduction in gastric acid secretion and ulcer protective activity against dexamethasone plus pylorus ligation induced ulcer model. The % protection of omeprazole, rabeprazole and lansoprazole was 84.04, 89.36 and 79.78, respectively. Rabeprazole significantly inhibited the acid-pepsin secretion and increased the gastric mucin secretion. The observations made in the present study suggest that rabeprazole is the most effective gastric antisecretory and ulcer healing agent as compared to omeprazole and lansoprazole. PMID:21188049

  10. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Proton Transport in Hydrogenase and Hydrogenase Mimics.

    PubMed

    Ginovska, B; Raugei, S; Shaw, W J

    2016-01-01

    There is extensive interest in hydrogenases based on their ability to rapidly and efficiently interconvert H2 with protons and electrons, and their (typically) superior function relative to molecular mimics. Understanding the function of enzymes is one approach to implementing design features to make better catalysts and is an approach we have implemented in our work. In this review, we will discuss our efforts to develop design principles from enzymes, with specific focus on proton transport. We will also present computational studies of the mimics we have investigated with similar methodologies. We will discuss the mechanisms used by small scaffolds on molecular mimics which in many cases are surprisingly similar to those used by nature, while in other cases, computational analysis allowed us to reveal an unexpected role. Computational methods provide one of the best ways, and in some cases, the only way, to gain insight into the mechanistic details of enzymes. In this review, we illustrate the general computational strategy we used to study the proton pathway of [FeFe]-hydrogenase, and the similar strategy to investigate small molecules. We present the main results we obtained and how our computational work stimulated or worked in concert with experimental investigations. We also focus on estimation of errors and convergence of properties in the simulations. These studies demonstrate the powerful results that can be obtained by the close pairing of experimental and theoretical approaches. PMID:27497163

  11. Structural characteristics of hydrated protons in the conductive channels: effects of confinement and fluorination studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Song, Yuechun; Ruan, Xuehua; Yan, Xiaoming; Liu, Zhao; Shen, Zhuanglin; Wu, Xuemei; He, Gaohong

    2016-09-21

    The relationship between the proton conductive channel and the hydrated proton structure is of significant importance for understanding the deformed hydrogen bonding network of the confined protons which matches the nanochannel. In general, the structure of hydrated protons in the nanochannel of the proton exchange membrane is affected by several factors. To investigate the independent effect of each factor, it is necessary to eliminate the interference of other factors. In this paper, a one-dimensional carbon nanotube decorated with fluorine was built to investigate the independent effects of nanoscale confinement and fluorination on the structural properties of hydrated protons in the nanochannel using classical molecular dynamics simulation. In order to characterize the structure of hydrated protons confined in the channel, the hydrogen bonding interaction between water and the hydrated protons has been studied according to suitable hydrogen bond criteria. The hydrogen bond criteria were proposed based on the radial distribution function, angle distribution and pair-potential energy distribution. It was found that fluorination leads to an ordered hydrogen bonding structure of the hydrated protons near the channel surface, and confinement weakens the formation of the bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the radial direction. Besides, fluorination lowers the free energy barrier of hydronium along the nanochannel, but slightly increases the barrier for water. This leads to disintegration of the sequential hydrogen bond network in the fluorinated CNTs with small size. In the fluorinated CNTs with large diameter, the lower degree of confinement produces a spiral-like sequential hydrogen bond network with few bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the central region. This structure might promote unidirectional proton transfer along the channel without random movement. This study provides the cooperative effect of confinement dimension and fluorination on the structure and hydrogen

  12. Proton radiography and fluoroscopy of lung tumors: A Monte Carlo study using patient-specific 4DCT phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Han Bin; Xu, X. George; Chen, George T. Y.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods are used to simulate and optimize a time-resolved proton range telescope (TRRT) in localization of intrafractional and interfractional motions of lung tumor and in quantification of proton range variations. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code with a particle tracking feature was employed to evaluate the TRRT performance, especially in visualizing and quantifying proton range variations during respiration. Protons of 230 MeV were tracked one by one as they pass through position detectors, patient 4DCT phantom, and finally scintillator detectors that measured residual ranges. The energy response of the scintillator telescope was investigated. Mass density and elemental composition of tissues were defined for 4DCT data. Results: Proton water equivalent length (WEL) was deduced by a reconstruction algorithm that incorporates linear proton track and lateral spatial discrimination to improve the image quality. 4DCT data for three patients were used to visualize and measure tumor motion and WEL variations. The tumor trajectories extracted from the WEL map were found to be within {approx}1 mm agreement with direct 4DCT measurement. Quantitative WEL variation studies showed that the proton radiograph is a good representation of WEL changes from entrance to distal of the target. Conclusions: MCNPX simulation results showed that TRRT can accurately track the motion of the tumor and detect the WEL variations. Image quality was optimized by choosing proton energy, testing parameters of image reconstruction algorithm, and comparing to ground truth 4DCT. The future study will demonstrate the feasibility of using the time resolved proton radiography as an imaging tool for proton treatments of lung tumors.

  13. Study of anisotropy in nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of water protons in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kasturi, S R; Chang, D C; Hazlewood, C F

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropy of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and the spin-spin relaxation times (T2) of water protons in skeletal muscle tissue have been studied by the spin-echo technique. Both T1 and T2 have been measured for the water protons of the tibialis anterior muscle of mature male rats for theta = 0, 55, and 90 degrees, where theta is the orientation of the muscle fiber with respect to the static field. The anisotropy in T1 and T2 has been measured at temperatures of 28, -5 and -10 degrees C. No significant anisotropy was observed in the T1 of the tissue water, while an average anisotropy of approximately 5% was observed in T2 at room temperature. The average anisotropy of T2 at -5 and -10 degrees C was found to be approximately 2 and 1.3%, respectively. PMID:6266530

  14. Radioactive halos and ion microprobe measurement of Pb isotope ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    This investigation was to obtain, if possible, the Pb isotope ratios of both lunar and meteoritic troilite grains by utilizing ion microprobe techniques. Such direct in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios would eliminate contamination problems inherent in wet chemistry separation procedures, and conceivably determine whether lunar troilite grains were of meteoritic origin. For comparison purposes two samples of meteoritic troilite were selected (one from Canyon Diablo) for analysis along with two very small lunar troilite grains (approximately 50-100 microns). It was concluded that the ion microprobe as presently operating, does not permit the in situ measurement of Pb isotope ratios in lunar or meteoritic troilite. On the basis of these experiments no conclusions could be drawn as to the origin of the lunar troilite grains.

  15. Application of nuclear microprobes to material of archaeological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demortier, G.

    1988-03-01

    Strongly focused nuclear microprobes have not been widely used until recently for characterization of material of archaeological interest. The main reasons are (1) the large size of many artefacts are not suitable for measurements in vacuum together with the requirement of avoiding sampling from (often) unique material; (2) the frequent surface corrosion of objects to depths thicker than the range of the incident particles; (3) the high cost of analyses when compared with the budgets of Museum's curators for scientific investigations. About ten laboratories throughout the world are concerned with nuclear milliprobe for investigation of bones, glasses, papers and parchments, potsherds, coins, iron and bronze artefacts, silver and gold jewelry. The nuclear microprobe facilities in this field of research have mostly been developed at Bartol-Delaware and Los Alamos (USA), Lower Hutt (New Zealand), Saclay (France) and LARN — Namur (Belgium).

  16. Analysis of the measurement sensitivity of multidimensional vibrating microprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Riel, M. C. J. M.; Bos, E. J. C.; Homburg, F. G. A.

    2014-07-01

    A comparison is made between tactile and vibrating microprobes regarding the measurement of typical high aspect ratio microfeatures. It is found that vibrating probes enable the use of styli with higher aspect ratios than tactile probes and are still capable of measuring with high sensitivity. In addition to the one dimensional sensitivity, the directional measurement sensitivity of a vibrating probe is investigated. A vibrating microprobe can perform measurements with high sensitivity in a space spanned by its mode shapes. If the natural frequencies that correspond to these mode shapes are different, the probe shows anisotropic and sub-optimal measurement sensitivity. It is shown that the closer the natural frequencies of the probe are, the better its performance is when regarding optimal and isotropic measurement sensitivity. A novel proof-of-principle setup of a vibrating probe with two nearly equal natural frequencies is realized. This system is able to perform measurements with high and isotropic sensitivity.

  17. The effects of energetic proton bombardment on polymeric materials: Experimental studies and degradation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, D. R.; Gupta, A.; Smith, M. V.; Fornes, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes 3 MeV proton bombardment experiments on several polymeric materials of interest to NASA carried out on the Tandem Van De Graff Accelerator at the California Institute of Technology's Kellogg Radiation Laboratory. Model aromatic and aliphatic polymers such as poly(1-vinyl naphthalene) and poly(methyl methacrylate), as well as polymers for near term space applications such as Kapton, Epoxy and Polysulfone, have been included in this study. Chemical and physical characterization of the damage products have been carried out in order to develop a model of the interaction of these polymers with the incident proton beam. The proton bombardment methodology developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and reported here is part of an ongoing study on the effects of space radiation on polymeric materials. The report is intended to provide an overview of the mechanistic, as well as the technical and experimental, issues involved in such work rather than to serve as an exhaustive description of all the results.

  18. Comparative study of stimulated proton-transfer luminescence of three chromones

    SciTech Connect

    Parthenopoulos, D.A.; Kasha, M. ); McMorrow, D. )

    1991-04-04

    The contrasting behavior of three related chromones with respect to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and laser action as intramolecular proton-transfer laser systems at room temperature is investigated. The intramolecular proton-transfer laser is considered a chemical laser in which the excited tautomer species is produced by a chemical reaction after photon-pumping activating a four-level laser system. The three chromones studied are 2-methyl-3-hydroxychromone, 2-phenyl-3-hydroxychromone (3-hydroxyflavone), and the natural product fisetin (3,3{prime},4{prime},7-tetrahydroxyflavone), each of which exhibits good proton-transfer fluorescences in the 500-nm region, with respective quantum yields of 0.29 (MCH), 0.36 (MCH), and 0.16 (dioxane). Low-temperature spectroscopic study and picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that fluorescence quenching from molecular aggregation and transient parasitic S{sub n}{prime} {l arrow} S{sub 1}{prime} absorption of the tautomer both contribute to nonobservability of ASE and lasing action in the 2-methyl-3-hydroxychromone, in contrast to excellent ASE/lasing characteristics of the 3-hydroxyflavone and fisetin under comparable conditions.

  19. Production of a positron microprobe using a transmission remoderator.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Masanori; Jinno, Satoshi; Fukuzumi, Masafumi; Kawaguchi, Takumi; Oguma, Koichi; Akahane, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A production method for a positron microprobe using a beta+-decay radioisotope (22Na) source has been investigated. When a magnetically guided positron beam was extracted from the magnetic field, the combination of an extraction coil and a magnetic lens enabled us to focus the positron beam by a factor of 10 and to achieve a high transport efficiency (71%). A 150-nm-thick Ni(100) thin film was mounted at the focal point of the magnetic lens and was used as a remoderator for brightness enhancement in a transmission geometry. The remoderated positrons were accelerated by an electrostatic lens and focused on the target by an objective magnetic lens. As a result, a 4-mm-diameter positron beam could be transformed into a microprobe of 60 microm or less with 4.2% total efficiency. The S parameter profile obtained by a single-line scan of a test specimen coincided well with the defect distribution. This technique for a positron microprobe is available to an accelerator-based high-intensity positron source and allows 3-dimensional vacancy-type defect analysis and a positron source for a transmission positron microscope.

  20. Spherical chamber effective solution for multipurpose nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelicon, P.; Simčič, J.; Jakšić, M.; Medunić, Z.; Naab, F.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2005-04-01

    Vacuum chambers for multipurpose nuclear microprobes must provide for the installation and servicing of several detection systems operating simultaneously, as well as sample visual control and mechanical manipulation. Detectors for X-rays, scattered ions, nuclear reaction products, secondary electrons, secondary luminescence and optical microscopes are mounted at the angles preferably larger than 120° with respect to the beam direction. Their positioning should not increase the space in the region between the ion lens and the focal point of the microprobe. Spherical chambers presented here effectively solve this problem and offer, at the same time, ports for gamma-ray detector, annular microscope, easy manual access in the sample region, ports for vertical and horizontal sample positioning and manipulation, as well as STIM and ERDA detectors at forward scattering angles and the Faraday cup. The basic construction, resulting in the three different but similar chamber designs at three nuclear microprobes worldwide, are presented. Current installation details, comments on the performance and suggested improvements are given.

  1. Proton Donor/acceptor Propensities of Ammonia: Rotational Studies of its Molecular Complexes with Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Barbara M.; Maris, Assimo; Melandri, Sonia; Favero, Laura B.; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther

    2009-06-01

    We studied the rotational spectra of the adducts of ammonia with several organic molecules, namely tert-butanol, glycidol, ethyl alcohol, anisol and 1,4-difluorobenzene. The adducts with glycidol and ethanol have been observed for both conformers of the substrate molecule. Based on the rotational and ^{14}N quadrupole coupling constants of the various complexes, we found a considerably different behaviour of ammonia, with respect to water, in its proton donor/acceptor double role. In the interaction with the three alcohol molecules, NH_{3} acts as a proton acceptor and the OH groups as a proton donor. However, in the case of glycidol-NH_{3}, a secundary N-H\\cdotsO interaction occurrs between ammonia and the ether oxygen. This interaction generates a sizable V_{3} barrier to the internal rotation of the NH_{3} moiety, while NH_{3} undergoes a free rotation in tert-butanol-NH_{3} and in ethanol-NH_{3}. As to the anisole-NH_{3} and 1,4-difluorobenzene-NH_{3} complexes, the NH_{3} group explicits its double proton donor/acceptor role, although through two weak (C_{Me}-H\\cdotsN and N-H\\cdotsπ) H-bonds. There is, however, an important difference between the two complexes, because in the first one NH_{3} lies out of the aromatic plane, while in the second one it is in the plane of the aromatic ring. B. M. Giuliano, M. C. Castrovilli, A. Maris, S. Melandri, W. Caminati and E. A. Cohen, Chem.Phys.Lett., 2008, 463, 330 B. M. Giuliano, S. Melandri, A. Maris, L. B. Favero and W. Caminati, Angew.Chem.Int.Ed., 2009, 48, 1102

  2. Fast-neutron spectroscopy studies using induced-proton tracks in PADC track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sersy, A. R.; Eman, S. A.

    2010-06-01

    In this work, a simple and adequate method for fast-neutron spectroscopy is proposed. This method was performed by free-in-air fast-neutron irradiation of CR-39 Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) using an Am-Be source. Detectors were then chemically etched to remove few layers up to a thickness of 6.25 μm. By using an automatic image analyzer system for studying the registration of the induced-proton tracks in the NTD, the obtained data were analyzed via two tracks shapes. In the first one, the elliptical tracks were eliminated from the calculation and only the circular ones were considered in developing the response function. In the second method all registered tracks were considered and the corresponding response function was obtained. The rate of energy loss of the protons as a function of V[(d E/d X) - V] was calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation. The induced-proton energy was extracted from the corresponding d E/d X in NTD using a computer program based on the Bethe-Bloch function. The energy of the incident particles was up to few hundred MeV/nucleon. The energy of the interacting neutrons was then estimated by means of the extracted induced-proton energies and the scattering angle. It was found that the present resulting energy distribution of the fast-neutron spectrum from the Am-Be source was similar to that given in the literature where an average neutron energy of 4.6MeV was obtained.

  3. High-resolution proton NMR studies of intracellular metabolites in yeast using 13C decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Shulman, Robert G.

    The resolution and specificity of 1H NMR in studies of yeast cellular metabolism were increased by feeding a 13C-labeled substrate and observing 1H difference spectra in the presence and absence of 13C decoupling fields. [2- 13C]Acetate was utilized as a respiratory substrate in an aerobic suspension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The broad cellular background proton resonances are removed by the technique, leaving only signals from the protons of the substrate, or its metabolites, that are coupled to 13C. Spectra of the yeast suspension after acetate feeding show the disappearance of label from the acetate pool and the subsequent appearance of 13C in glutamate C 3 and C 4 and in aspartate C 3. These results are in accord with the known fluxes of metabolites. Selective single-frequency 13C decoupling was used to provide assignments for the difference signals. The limitations on single-frequency decoupling coming from finite decoupling fields are investigated. The technique shows a potential for application in a wide variety of systems where the resolution of the 13C spectrum may be combined with the sensitivity for proton detection to observe metabolites that have been previously unobservable.

  4. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  5. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, http://doi.org/10.7566/JPSJ.84.113601, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  6. The study of the proton-proton collisions at the beam momentum 1581 MeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, K. N.; Medvedev, V. I.; Nikonov, V. A.; Rogachevsky, O. V.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Sarantsev, V. V.; Sherman, S. G.

    2014-06-01

    The new data on the elastic pp and single-pion production reaction pp → pnπ + taken at the incident proton momentum 1581 MeV/ c are presented. To extract contributions of the leading partial waves the single-pion production data are analyzed in the framework of the event-by-event maximum-likelihood method together with pp → ppπ + data measured earlier and the pp → pnπ + data taken at 1628 MeV/ c. The analysis shows that at 1581 MeV/ c the largest contributions stem from the 3 P 2, 3 P 1, 3 P 0 and 3 F 2 initial partial waves. From these partial waves we also deduce contributions for the production of the Δ(1232) and N(1440) states.

  7. Proton Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed. PMID:25686476

  8. A study of the first solar proton event of current solar cycle recorded by satellites and ground based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerontidou, M.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Plainaki, C.; Belov, A.; Eroshenko, E.; Yanke, V.; Laurenza, M.; Storini, M.

    2013-09-01

    On 2012, May 17 the GOES satellites recorded a great and simultaneous increase on proton flux in different energy channels thereby producing a solar proton event (SPE). These protons had enough energy to be recorded by the ground based worldwide network of neutron monitors thereby producing the first ground level enhancement of solar cosmic rays (GLE71) of the current solar cycle. In this work a combined study of the this solar proton event, as it is recorded by GOES satellites as well as by the ground based network of Neutron monitors is presented. On 2012, May 17 at 02:10 UTC the GOES spacecraft recorded a fast rise in the flux of solar protons, followed by a slower decay, which was still ongoing on 18 May 2012. Several solar proton events stronger than that of 17 May 2012 were detected by GOES in January and March 2012. This event of 17 May extended to much higher energies than those earlier ones, but was weaker at lower energies. Through this research an attempt to understand the reason for these differences is performed. Additionally, a first attempt to derive the characteristics of this recent proton event, by applying an updated version of the NMBANGLE PPOLA model, already used for modeling past GLEs (e.g. GLE70 ) is presented. The special characteristics of this event with respect to the result of NMBANGLE POLLA model can provide useful information not only about the solar source that triggered this SPE, but also its special impact at interplanetary space.

  9. X-ray microprobe measurements of the chemical compositions of ALH84001 carbonate globules

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.J.; Sutton, S.R.; Keller, L.P.

    2004-01-28

    We measured minor element contents of carbonate from ALH84001 and report trends in tbe Ca, V, Mn and Sr in carbonate and the associated magnetite bands. McKay et al. suggested that carbonate globules in the ALH84001 meteorite from Mars contained evidence consistent with the development of bacterial life early in the history of Mars. This result provoked an extensive study of the ALH84001 meteorite. More recently Thomas-Keprta et al. have published a study showing that the magnetite associated with carbonate rims are of the size and shape produced by terrestrial bacteria. This paper has revived interest in ALH84001. The typical ALH84001 carbonate globule consists of four regions: a core of Fe-rich carbonate, a thin magnetite-rich band, a rim of Mn-rich carbonate, and another thin magnetite-rich band. Trace element analysis of each of these phases may allow us to address several important questions about these carbonates: (1) The origin of the magnetite-rich bands in the ALH84001 carbonate globules. If the magnetites are derived from the underlying carbonate through thermal decomposition (as proposed by Golden et al.), then we expect to see 'inherited' trace elements in these magnetite bands. (2) The origin of the rim carbonate, by determining whether the carbonate in the core has the same trace elements as the rim carbonates. (3) The age of the rim carbonate. Borg et al. dated the formation of the rim carbonate using the Rb/Sr chronometer. Borg et al. performed their measurements on an aliquot of what they called a high-Rb, low-Sr carbonate separate from the rim. We previously measured the trace element contents of chips from core and rim carbonates from an ALH84001 carbonate globule using an X-Ray Microprobe on Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source. These measurements showed the rim carbonate had a very low Rb content, with Sr>>Rb, inconsistent with the {approx}5 ppm Rb reported by Borg et al. in the sample they dated by the Rb/Sr chronometer. The

  10. A study of molecular dynamics and freezing phase transition in tissues by proton spin relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, S N; Peemoeller, H; Thompson, R T; Kydon, D W; Pintar, M M

    1978-01-01

    Muscle, spleen, and kidney tissues from 4-wk-old C57 black mice were studied by proton magnetic resonance. Spin-lattice relaxation times at high fields and in the rotating frame, as well as the spin-spin relaxation times, are reported as a function of temperature in the liquid and frozen phase. Motions of large molecules and of water molecules and their changes at the freezing phase transition are studied. The shortcomings of the two-state fast-exchange relaxation model are discussed. PMID:667294

  11. Proton Decay Studies of the Light Lu, Tm and Ho Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Akovali, Y.; Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Davinson, T.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; Grzywacz, R.; Hamilton, J.H.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Kim, S.H.; MacDonald, B.D.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Piechaczek, A.; Ressler, J.J.; Rykaczewski, K.; Slinger, R.C.; Szerypo, J.; Toth, K.S.; Weintraub, W.; Woods, P.J.; Yu, C.-H.; Zganjar, E.F.

    1998-10-15

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {micro}sec. In this paper the authors present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu.

  12. Proton decay studies of the light Lu, Tm and Ho isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Gross, C. J.; Grzywacz, R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K. S.; Zganjar, E. F.; Akovali, Y.; Davinson, T.; Ginter, T. N.

    1999-09-02

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Influence of 5-HALOGENATION on the Structure of Protonated Uridine: Irmpd Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of the Protonated 5-HALOURIDINES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Harrison; Hamlow, Lucas; Lee, Justin; Rodgers, M. T.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The chemical and structural diversity and the extent of post-transcriptional modification of RNA is remarkable! Presently, there are 142 different naturally-occurring and many more synthetically modified nucleosides known. Uridine (Urd) is the most commonly modified nucleoside among those that occur naturally, but has also been an important target for synthesis and development of modified nucleosides for pharmaceutical applications. Indeed, modified nucleosides are of pharmaceutical interest due to their bioactivities. In particular, 5-bromouridine (br5Urd) has been shown to exhibit antiviral activity to human immunodeficiency virus and has been used in RNA labeling studies. Halogenation is a common modification employed in pharmaceutical studies that enables systematic variation is the electronic properties of the molecule of interest due to the availability of halogen substituents that vary in size, dipole moment, polarizability, and electron withdrawing properties. In order to elucidate the influence of 5-halogenation on the intrinsic gas-phase structure and stability on the protonated form of Urd, synergistic spectroscopic and theoretical studies of the protonated forms of the 5-halouridines are performed here, where x5Urd = 5-fluorouridine (f5Urd), 5-chlorouridine (cl5Urd), br5Urd, and 5-iodouridine (i5Urd). Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectra of the protonated forms of the 5-halouridines, [x5Urd+H]+, are measured over the IR fingerprint region using the FELIX free electron laser and the hydrogen stretching region using an OPO/OPA laser from 3300-3800 wn. Complementary electronic structure calculations are performed to determine the stable low-energy conformations available to these species and to predict their IR spectra. Comparative analyses of the measured IRMPD spectra and predicted IR spectra are performed to elucidate the preferred sites of protonation, and the low-energy tautomeric conformations that are populated by

  14. LHC potential for study of the small x gluon physics in ultraperipheral collisions of 3.5 TeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Rebyakova, V.; Strikman, M.; Zhalov, M.

    2010-02-01

    We argue that already the first year LHC run at {radical}(s)=7 TeV will provide a quick and effective way to test the dynamics of the color dipole-gluon interactions and the small x behavior of the gluon density in the proton by studying vector meson photoproduction in ultraperipheral proton-proton collisions.

  15. Study on strontium isotope abundance-ratio measurements by using a 13-MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ki; Jang, Han; Lee, Goung-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The Rb-Sr dating method is used in dating Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks. This method measures the 87Rb and the 87Sr concentrations by using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) [J. Hefne et al., Inter. J. Phys. Sci. 3(1), 28 (2008)]. In addition, it calculates the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio to increase the reliability of Rb-Sr dating. In this study, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was measured by using a 13-MeV proton accelerator. Proton kinetic energies are in the range of tens of megaelectronvolts, and protons have large absorption cross-sections for ( p, n) reactions with most substances. After absorbing a proton with such a high kinetic energy, an element is converted into a nuclide with its atomic number increased by one via nuclear transmutation. These nuclides usually have short half-lives and return to the original state through radioactive decay. When a strontium sample is irradiated with protons, nuclear transmutation occurs; thus, the strontium isotope present in the sample changes to a yttrium isotope, which is an activated radioisotope. Based on this, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was calculated by analyzing the gamma-rays emitted by each yttrium isotope. The KIRAMS-13 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Center of Chosun University, where 13-MeV protons can be extracted, was utilized in our experiment. The 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio was computed for samples irradiated with these protons, and the result was similar to the isotope ratio for the Standard Reference Material, i.e., 98.2 ± 3.4%. As part of the analysis, proton activation analyses were performed using 13-MeV protons, and the experimental results of this research suggest a possible approach for measuring the strontium-isotope abundance ratio of samples.

  16. Study of proton acceleration at the target front surface in laser-solid interactions by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Proton acceleration inside solid LiF and CH-LiF targets irradiated by a 450-fs, 20-J, 1053-nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} has been studied via neutron spectroscopy. Neutron spectra produced through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction that occurs between accelerated protons, at the front surface, and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. From measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, total number, and slope temperature of the accelerated protons are investigated. The study indicates that protons originate at the front surface and are accelerated to a maximum energy that is reasonably consistent with the calculated one due to the ponderomotive force.

  17. The role of electron microprobe mapping and dating in tectonic geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. L.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Dumond, G.; Mahan, K. H.; Flowers, R. M.

    2007-12-01

    Electron microprobe geochronology occupies a special niche within the spectrum of geochronological techniques and may be particularly relevant to the question, "What are we dating?" The technique was originally envisioned to be a low-cost, reconnaissance dating tool, opening low-resolution geochronology to a large number of researchers. However, more than a decade of research has shown that, when used in a reconnaissance fashion (i.e. using major-element analytical techniques for trace-element analysis) uncertainties are unsuitably large (several 10s of m.y. or more) for solving most tectonic problems. Using trace element analytical techniques (background modeling, interference correction, highly conductive coating, multi-analysis measurement, etc.) precision and accuracy are dramatically increased, but analysis time and cost are also increased, challenging the "quick, cheap, and easy" description. The power of microprobe geochronology comes from the spatial resolution and the natural integration with compositional data. High-resolution compositional mapping is valuable for all in-situ geochronology. Large area maps provide petrologic and textural context for chronometer phases; small scale maps illuminate the history of the chronometers themselves. Compositional maps associated with monazite are particularly informative, but examples from the East Athabasca granulite terrane using zircon, titanite, and rutile will be discussed. Most monazite crystals are 30μ or less and most have several compositional domains. Rim compositions and dates are particularly critical because they can commonly be tied to reactions and to matrix texture and fabric. Commonly, rims and internal sub domains are several microns in width and can only be analyzed by electron probe. Y has been widely used to tie monazite to Grt growth or breakdown, but current studies use a suite of trace and REE (Y, Sm, Nd, Ca, Eu, Gd, etc) to tie monazite into chemical reactions. A rapidly growing

  18. Studying the proton 'radius' puzzle with μp elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, R.

    2013-11-07

    The disagreement between the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen and from electronic measurements is called the proton radius puzzle. The resolution of the puzzle remains unclear and appears to require new experimental results. An experiment to measure muon-proton elastic scattering is presented here.

  19. Proton transfer and the mobilities of the H+ and OH- ions from studies of a dissociating model for water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Song Hi; Rasaiah, Jayendran C.

    2011-09-01

    Hydrogen (H+) and hydroxide (OH-) ions in aqueous solution have anomalously large diffusion coefficients, and the mobility of the H+ ion is nearly twice that of the OH- ion. We describe molecular dynamics simulations of a dissociating model for liquid water based on scaling the interatomic potential for water developed by Ojamäe-Shavitt-Singer from ab initio studies at the MP2 level. We use the scaled model to study proton transfer that occurs in the transport of hydrogen and hydroxide ions in acidic and basic solutions containing 215 water molecules. The model supports the Eigen-Zundel-Eigen mechanism of proton transfer in acidic solutions and the transient hyper-coordination of the hydroxide ion in weakly basic solutions at room temperature. The free energy barriers for proton transport are low indicating significant proton delocalization accompanying proton transfer in acidic and basic solutions. The reorientation dynamics of the hydroxide ion suggests changes in the proportions of hyper-coordinated species with temperature. The mobilities of the hydrogen and hydroxide ions and their temperature dependence between 0 and 50 °C are in excellent agreement with experiment and the reasons for the large difference in the mobilities of the two ions are discussed. The model and methods described provide a novel approach to studies of liquid water, proton transfer, and acid-base reactions in aqueous solutions, channels, and interfaces.

  20. Diffusion length damage coefficient and annealing studies in proton-irradiated InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Bailey, Sheila G.; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the diffusion length damage coefficient (K(sub L)) and the annealing characteristics of the minority carrier diffusion length (L(sub n)) in Czochralski-grown zinc-doped indium phosphide (InP), with a carrier concentration of 1 x 10(exp l8) cm(exp -3). In measuring K(sub L) irradiations were made with 0.5 MeV protons with fluences ranging from 1 x 10(exp 11) to 3 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Pre- and post-irradiation electron-beam induced current (EBIC) measurements allowed for the extraction of L(sub n) from which K(sub L) was determined. In studying the annealing characteristics of L(sub n) irradiations were made with 2 MeV protons with fluence of 5 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Post-irradiation studies of L(sub n) with time at room temperature, and with minority carrier photoinjection and forward-bias injection were carried out. The results showed that recovery under Air Mass Zero (AMO) photoinjection was complete. L(sub n) was also found to recover under forward-bias injection, where recovery was found to depend on the value of the injection current. However, no recovery of L(sub n) after proton irradiation was observed with time at room temperature, in contrast to the behavior of 1 MeV electron-irradiated InP solar cells reported previously.

  1. Chiral recognition in cinchona alkaloid protonated dimers: mass spectrometry and UV photodissociation studies.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, D; Maitre, P; Rondino, F; Le Barbu-Debus, K; Lepère, V; Zehnacker-Rentien, A

    2010-03-11

    Chiral recognition in protonated cinchona alkaloid dimers has been studied in mass spectrometry experiments. The experimental setups involved a modified 7T FT-ICR (Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance) mass spectrometer (MS) and a modified Paul ion trap both equipped with an electrospray ionization source (ESI). The Paul ion trap has been coupled to a frequency-doubled dye laser. The fragmentation of protonated dimers made from cinchonidine (Cd) and the two pseudoenantiomers of quinine, namely, quinine (Qn) and quinidine (Qd), has been assessed by means of collision-induced dissociation (CID) as well as UV photodissociation (UVPD). Whereas CID fragmentation of the dimers only leads to the evaporation of the monomers, UVPD results in the additional loss of a neutral radical fragment corresponding to the quinuclidinyl radical. The effect of the excitation wavelength and of complexation with H(2)SO(4) has been studied to cast light on the reaction mechanism. Complexation with H(2)SO(4) modifies the photoreactivity of the dimers; only evaporation of the monomeric fragments, quinine, and cinchonidine is observed. Comparison between the mass spectra of the cinchona alkaloid (CdQnH(+)) or (CdQdH(+)) dimers resulting from the UVPD of (CdQnH(2)SO(4)H(+)) and that of bare (CdQnH(+)) helps propose a fragmentation mechanism, which is thought to involve fast proton transfer from the quinuclidine part of a molecular subunit to the quinoline ring. CID and UV fragmentation experiments show that the homochiral dimer is more strongly bound than the heterochiral adduct.

  2. Pulse radiolytic study of the acid dissociation of OH protons in radicals related to salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Q.; Schuler, R.H.

    1987-08-13

    The deprotonation of carboxylated benzosemiquinone radicals prepared by pulse radiolytic oxidation of dihydroxybenzoic acids has been examined by time-resolved absorption spectrophotometry. The pK/sub a/ for dissociation of the OH proton in 3-carboxyl-1,4-benzosemiquinone is found to be 6.47 or 2.4 units higher than that in the unsubstituted radical. This pK/sub a/ is, however, well below that of the OH proton in salicyclic acid (13.6) so that hydrogen bonding is appreciably decreased by the delocalization of the unpaired spin in this radical. Protonation of the basic form of the radical occurs at the diffusion-controlled rate. The rate constant for deprotonation by OH/sup -/ is relatively low, 4.7 X 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, so that reaction with base becomes important only above pH 10. As a result this radical provides an excellent system for studying acid-base equilibration processes in near neutral solutions. Azide ion is shown to be an efficient catalyst which allows the acid-base equilibrium to be examined on the 10-..mu..s time scale. Deprotonation is also catalyzed by the dihydroxybenzoic acid used as the radical source. Analogous studies on 4-carboxy-1,3-benzosemiquinone give the pK/sub a/ as 7.9. In spite of this high pK/sub a/, which indicates the rate constant for spontaneous dissociation of this radical to be > 10/sup 3/ s/sup -1/, the rate constant for deprotonation by OH/sup -/, 4.9 X 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, is considerably higher than in the case of 3-carboxy-1,4-benzosemiquinone.

  3. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  4. A case study of proton precipitation at Mars: Mars Express observations and hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diéval, C.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Stenberg, G.; Nilsson, H.; Futaana, Y.; Holmström, M.; Fedorov, A.; Frahm, R. A.; Jarvinen, R.; Brain, D. A.

    2012-06-01

    Using the data from the Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3) experiment on board Mars Express and hybrid simulations, we have investigated the entry of protons into the Martian induced magnetosphere. We discuss one orbit on the dayside with observations of significant proton fluxes at altitudes down to 260 km on 27 February 2004. The protons observed below the induced magnetosphere boundary at an altitude of less than 700 km have energies of a few keV, travel downward, and precipitate onto the atmosphere. The measured energy flux and particle flux are 108-109 eV cm-2 s-1 and 105-106 H+ cm-2 s-1, respectively. The proton precipitation occurs because the Martian magnetosheath is small with respect to the heated proton gyroradius in the subsolar region. The data suggest that the precipitation is not permanent but may occur when there are transient increases in the magnetosheath proton temperature. The higher-energy protons penetrate deeper because of their larger gyroradii. The proton entry into the induced magnetosphere is simulated using a hybrid code. A simulation using a fast solar wind as input can reproduce the high energies of the observed precipitating protons. The model shows that the precipitating protons originate from both the solar wind and the planetary exosphere. The precipitation extends over a few thousand kilometers along the orbit of the spacecraft. The proton precipitation does not necessarily correlate with the crustal magnetic anomalies.

  5. Maltose/proton co-transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Comparative study with cells and plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, C C; Weusthuis, R A; Postma, E; Van den Broek, P J; Van Dijken, J P

    1992-01-01

    Maltose/proton co-transport was studied in intact cells and in plasma membrane vesicles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to determine uphill transport in vesicles, plasma membranes were fused with proteoliposomes containing cytochrome c oxidase as a proton-motive force-generating system. Maltose accumulation, dependent on the electrical and pH gradients, was observed. The initial uptake velocity and accumulation ratio in vesicles proved to be dependent on the external pH. Moreover, kinetic analysis of maltose transport showed that Vmax. values greatly decreased with increasing pH, whereas the Km remained virtually constant. These observations were in good agreement with results obtained with intact cells, and suggest that proton binding to the carrier proceeds with an apparent pK of 5.7. The observation with intact cells that maltose is co-transported with protons in a one-to-one stoichiometry was ascertained in the vesicle system by measuring the balance between proton-motive force and the chemical maltose gradient. These results show that maltose transport in vesicles prepared by fusion of plasma membranes with cytochrome c oxidase proteoliposomes behaves in a similar way as in intact cells. It is therefore concluded that this vesicle model system offers a wide range of new possibilities for the study of maltose/proton co-transport in more detail. PMID:1318030

  6. High-temperature annealing of proton irradiated beryllium - A dilatometry-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Ghose, Sanjit; Savkliyildiz, Ilyas

    2016-08-01

    Ssbnd 200 F grade beryllium has been irradiated with 160 MeV protons up to 1.2 1020 cm-2 peak fluence and irradiation temperatures in the range of 100-200 °C. To address the effect of proton irradiation on dimensional stability, an important parameter in its consideration in fusion reactor applications, and to simulate high temperature irradiation conditions, multi-stage annealing using high precision dilatometry to temperatures up to 740 °C were conducted in air. X-ray diffraction studies were also performed to compliment the macroscopic thermal study and offer a microscopic view of the irradiation effects on the crystal lattice. The primary objective was to qualify the competing dimensional change processes occurring at elevated temperatures namely manufacturing defect annealing, lattice parameter recovery, transmutation 4He and 3H diffusion and swelling and oxidation kinetics. Further, quantification of the effect of irradiation dose and annealing temperature and duration on dimensional changes is sought. The study revealed the presence of manufacturing porosity in the beryllium grade, the oxidation acceleration effect of irradiation including the discontinuous character of oxidation advancement, the effect of annealing duration on the recovery of lattice parameters recovery and the triggering temperature for transmutation gas diffusion leading to swelling.

  7. A superconducting solenoid as probe forming lens for microprobe applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, A.; Meijer, J.; Höfert, M.; Bukow, H. H.; Rolfs, C.

    1994-05-01

    An improved nuclear microprobe system for applications in material science has been designed at the Dynamitron Tandem Laboratory of the University of Bochum. A superconducting solenoid as probe forming lens allows a wide range of projectile masses and energies. We describe the expected performance of the new system calculated by ray tracing and first experiments with the new lens system. The effects of chromatic, spherical and mechanical aberrations, including misalignment and beam scanning, were determined. The calculations show that a very high degree of axial symmetry of the focusing coil is of main importance to avoid parasitic aberrations. This demands extreme accuracy in the fabrication approaching the technical limits.

  8. Rapid correction of electron microprobe data for multicomponent metallic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. P.; Sivakumar, R.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical relation for the correction of electron microprobe data for multicomponent metallic systems. It evaluates the empirical correction parameter, a for each element in a binary alloy system using a modification of Colby's MAGIC III computer program and outlines a simple and quick way of correcting the probe data. This technique has been tested on a number of multicomponent metallic systems and the agreement with the results using theoretical expressions is found to be excellent. Limitations and suitability of this relation are discussed and a model calculation is also presented in the Appendix.

  9. Super-achromatic microprobe for ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging at 800 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wu; Alemohammad, Milad; Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shaoyong; Li, Xingde

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a super-achromatic microprobe made with fiber-optic ball lens to enable ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging. An axial resolution of ~2.4 µm (in air) can be achieved with a 7-fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The microprobe has minimal astigmatism which affords a high transverse resolution of ~5.6 µm. The miniaturized microprobe has an outer diameter of ~520 µm including the encasing metal guard and can be used to image small luminal organs. The performance of the ultrahigh-resolution OCT microprobe was demonstrated by imaging rat esophagus, guinea pig esophagus, and mouse rectum in vivo.

  10. Time-of-flight neutron rejection to improve prompt gamma imaging for proton range verification: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Biegun, Aleksandra K; Seravalli, Enrica; Lopes, Patrícia Cambraia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Pinto, Marco; Oxley, David C; Dendooven, Peter; Verhaegen, Frank; Parodi, Katia; Crespo, Paulo; Schaart, Dennis R

    2012-10-21

    Therapeutic proton and heavier ion beams generate prompt gamma photons that may escape from the patient. In principle, this allows for real-time, in situ monitoring of the treatment delivery, in particular, the hadron range within the patient, by imaging the emitted prompt gamma rays. Unfortunately, the neutrons simultaneously created with the prompt photons create a background that may obscure the prompt gamma signal. To enhance the accuracy of proton dose verification by prompt gamma imaging, we therefore propose a time-of-flight (TOF) technique to reject this neutron background, involving a shifting time window to account for the propagation of the protons through the patient. Time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the generation and transport of prompt gamma photons and neutrons upon irradiation of a PMMA phantom with 100, 150 and 200 MeV protons were performed using Geant4 (version 9.2.p02) and MCNPX (version 2.7.D). The influence of angular collimation and TOF selection on the prompt gamma and neutron longitudinal profiles is studied. Furthermore, the implications of the proton beam microstructure (characterized by the proton bunch width and repetition period) are investigated. The application of a shifting TOF window having a width of ΔTOF(z) = 1.0 ns appears to reduce the neutron background by more than 99%. Subsequent application of an energy threshold does not appear to sharpen the distal falloff of the prompt gamma profile but reduces the tail that is observed beyond the proton range. Investigations of the influence of the beam time structure show that TOF rejection of the neutron background is expected to be effective for typical therapeutic proton cyclotrons.

  11. SU-D-BRE-05: Feasibility and Limitations of Laser-Driven Proton Therapy: A Treatment Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K; Wilkens, J; Masood, U; Pawelke, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Laser-acceleration of particles may offer a cost- and spaceefficient alternative for future radiation therapy with particles. Laser-driven particle beams are pulsed with very short bunch times, and a high number of particles is delivered within one laser shot which cannot be portioned or modulated during irradiation. The goal of this study was to examine whether good treatment plans can be produced for laser-driven proton beams and to investigate the feasibility of a laser-driven treatment unit. Methods: An exponentially decaying proton spectrum was tracked through a gantry and energy selection beam line design to produce multiple proton spectra with different energy widths centered on various nominal energies. These spectra were fed into a treatment planning system to calculate spot scanning proton plans using different lateral widths of the beam and different numbers of protons contained in the initial spectrum. The clinical feasibility of the resulting plans was analyzed in terms of dosimetric quality and the required number of laser shots as an estimation of the overall treatment time. Results: We were able to produce treatment plans with plan qualities of clinical relevance for a maximum initial proton number per laser shot of 6*10{sup 8}. However, the associated minimum number of laser shots was in the order of 10{sup 4}, indicating a long delivery time in the order of at least 15 minutes, when assuming an optimistic repetition rate of the laser system of 10 Hz. Conclusion: With the simulated beam line and the assumed shape of the proton spectrum it was impossible to produce clinically acceptable treatment plans that can be delivered in a reasonable time. The situation can be improved by a method or a device in the beam line which can modulate the number of protons from shot to shot. Supported by DFG Cluster of Excellence: Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics.

  12. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Pablo P; Eley, John G; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs. PMID:26961764

  13. Neutrino oscillations with a proton driver upgrade and an off-axis detector: A Case study

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; De Gouvea, Andre; Szleper, Michal; Velasco, Mayda

    2002-04-01

    We study the physics capabilities of the NuMI beamline with an off-axis highly-segmented iron scintillator detector and with the inclusion of the currently under study proton driver upgrade. We focus on the prospects for the experimental determination of the remaining neutrino oscillation parameters, assuming different outcomes for experiments under way or in preparation. An optimization of the beam conditions and detector location for the detection of the nu_mu to nu_e transitions is discussed. Different physics scenarios were considered, depending on the actual solution of the solar neutrino puzzle. If KamLAND measures Delta m^2_solar, we find it possible to measure both |U_{e3}|^2 and the CP violating phase delta within a viable exposure time, assuming a realistic detector and a complete data analysis. Exposure to both neutrino and antineutrino beams is necessary. We can, in addition, shed light on Delta m^2_solar if its value is at the upper limit of KamLAND sensitivity (i.e. the precise value of Delta m^2_solar remains unknown even after KamLAND). If the solar neutrino solution is not in the LMA region, we can measure |U_{e3}|^2 and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The existence of the proton driver is vital for the feasibility of most of these measurements.

  14. EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF THE FORMATION MECHANISM OF PROTONATED INTERSTELLAR DIAZINES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Cole, Callie A.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2015-01-10

    Studies of interstellar chemistry have grown in number and complexity by both observations and laboratory measurements, and nitrogen-containing aromatics have been implicated as important interstellar molecules. In this paper, the gas-phase collision induced dissociation (CID) processes of protonated pyridazine (1,2-diazine), pyrimidine (1,3-diazine), and pyrazine (1,4-diazine) cations (C{sub 4}H{sub 5}N{sub 2} {sup +}) are investigated in detail both experimentally and theoretically. The major neutral loss for all three CID processes is HCN, leading to the formation of C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sup +} isomers; our density functional theory (DFT) calculations support and elucidate our experimental results. The formation of C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sup +} isomers from the reaction of abundant interstellar acrylonitrile (CH{sub 2}CHCN) and H{sup +}is also studied employing DFT calculations. Our results lead to a novel mechanism for interstellar protonated diazine formation from the consecutive reactions of CH{sub 2}CHCN+ H{sup +} + HCN. Moreover, our results motivate the continuing search for interstellar C{sub 3}H{sub 4}N{sup +} isomers as well as polycyclic aromatic N-containing hydrocarbons (PANHs)

  15. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Pablo P; Eley, John G; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs.

  16. The study on changes of rectum area in proton prostate cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Lee, H. K.; Shin, H. W.; Kim, S. C.; Cho, J. H.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the changes in the rectum area during treatment and to identify the rectum area within the given field of view in order to reproduce the same pose as that presented during therapy planning to properly deliver the planned dose to the prostate. We obtained digitally reconstructed radiographs after planning treatment for 30 patients out of all patients who had been subjected to proton prostate cancer therapy from August 2012 to November 2014 at this hospital. We then obtained an image using a digital imaging positioning system (DIPS) on the first day of treatment. When planning the digitally reconstructed radiograph treatment, we determined the change in size of the rectum between the actual treatment and treatment planning by measuring the cross section of the rectum and the cross section on the image from the DIPS. The results indicated that the rectum area in the digitally reconstructed radiograph taken during treatment planning and the rectum area obtained from the DIPS image during treatment were different. As a consequence, when region targeted for proton treatment of prostate cancer does not maintain a constant volume, the position of the prostate does not receive an adequate dose due to such changes. Therefore, the results of this study will be useful to determine the corresponding volume during a prostate treatment plan.

  17. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes, Pablo P.; Eley, John G.; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs.

  18. Membrane lipids protected from oxidation by red wine tannins: a proton NMR study.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Aurélien L; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Buchoux, Sébastien; Grélard, Axelle; Dufourc, Erick J; Géan, Julie

    2014-12-01

    Dietary polyphenols widespread in vegetables and beverages like red wine and tea have been reported to possess antioxidant properties that could have positive effects on human health. In this study, we propose a new in situ and non-invasive method based on proton liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the antioxidant efficiency of red wine tannins on a twice-unsaturated phospholipid, 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLiPC), embedded in a membrane model. Four tannins were studied: (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The lipid degradation kinetics was determined by measuring the loss of the bis-allylic protons during oxidation induced by a radical initiator, 2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH). The antioxidant efficiency, i.e. the ability of tannins to slow down the lipid oxidation rate, was shown to be higher for galloylated tannins, ECG and EGCG. Furthermore, the mixture of four tannins was more efficient than the most effective tannin, EGCG, demonstrating a synergistic effect. To better understand the antioxidant action mechanism of polyphenols on lipid membranes, the tannin location was investigated by NMR and molecular dynamics. A correlation between antioxidant action of tannins and their location at the membrane interface (inserted at the glycerol backbone level) could thus be established.

  19. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambraia Lopes, P.; Bauer, J.; Salomon, A.; Rinaldi, I.; Tabacchini, V.; Tessonnier, T.; Crespo, P.; Parodi, K.; Schaart, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong 15O signal due to its relatively short half-life (~2 min) and high oxygen content in biological tissues, enabling shorter scans that are less sensitive to biological washout. This paper presents the first performance tests of a scaled-down in situ time-of-flight (TOF) PET system based on digital photon counters (DPCs) coupled to Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Silicate (LYSO:Ce) crystals, providing quantitative results representative of a dual-head tomograph that complies with spatial constraints typically encountered in clinical practice (2  ×  50°, of 360°, transaxial angular acceptance). The proton-induced activity inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) phantoms was acquired within beam pauses (in-beam) and immediately after irradiation by an actively-delivered synchrotron pencil-beam, with clinically relevant 125.67 MeV/u, 4.6  ×  108 protons s-1, and 1010 total protons. 3D activity maps reconstructed with and without TOF information are compared to FLUKA simulations, demonstrating the benefit of TOF-PET to reduce limited-angle artefacts using a 382 ps full width at half maximum coincidence resolving time. The time-dependent contributions from different radionuclides to the total count-rate are investigated. We furthermore study the impact of the acquisition time window on the laterally integrated activity depth-profiles, with emphasis on 2 min acquisitions starting at different time points. The results depend on phantom composition and reflect the differences in relative contributions from the radionuclides originating from carbon and oxygen. We observe very good agreement between the shapes of the simulated and measured activity depth-profiles for post-beam protocols. However, our results also

  20. SU-E-J-222: Feasibility Study of MRI-Only Proton Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Spadea, M; Izquierdo, D; Catana, C; Collins-Fekete, C; Bortfeld, T; Seco, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric equivalence of MRI based proton planning vs. single energy x-ray CT. Methods: 8 glioblastoma patients were imaged with CT and MRI after surgical resection. T1-weighted 3DMPRAGE was used to delineate the GTV, which was subsequently rigidly registered to the CT volume. A pseudoCT was generated from the aligned MRI by combining segmentation and atlas-based approaches. The spatial resolution both for pseudo- and real CT was 0.6×0.6×2.5mm. Three orthogonal proton beams were simulated on the pseudoCT. Two co-planar beams were set on the axial plane. The third one was planned parallel to the cranio-caudal (CC) direction. Each beam was set to cover the GTV at 98% of the nominal dose (18Gy). The proton plan was copied and transferred to the real CT, including aperture/compensator geometry. Dose comparison between pseudoCT and CT plan was performed beam-by-beam by quantifying the range shift of dose profile on each slice of the GTV. The GTV’s V{sub 98} was computed for the CT. Results: For beams in axial plane the median absolute value of the range shift was 0.3mm, with 0.9mm and 1.4mm as 95th percentile and maximum, respectively. Worst scenarios were found for the CC beam, where we measured 1.1mm (median), 2.7mm (95thpercentile) and 5mm (maximum). Regardless the direction, beams passing through the surgical site, where metal (Titanium MRI-compatible) staples were present, were mostly affected by range shift. GTV’s V{sub 98} for CT was not lower than 99.3%. Conclusion: The study showed the clinical feasibility of an MRI-alone proton plan. Advantages include the possibility to rely on better soft tissue contrast for target and organs at risk delineation without the need of further CT scan and image registration. Additional investigation is required in presence of metal implants along the beam path and to account for partial volume effects due to slice thickness.

  1. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification.

    PubMed

    Cambraia Lopes, P; Bauer, J; Salomon, A; Rinaldi, I; Tabacchini, V; Tessonnier, T; Crespo, P; Parodi, K; Schaart, D R

    2016-08-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong (15)O signal due to its relatively short half-life (~2 min) and high oxygen content in biological tissues, enabling shorter scans that are less sensitive to biological washout. This paper presents the first performance tests of a scaled-down in situ time-of-flight (TOF) PET system based on digital photon counters (DPCs) coupled to Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Silicate (LYSO:Ce) crystals, providing quantitative results representative of a dual-head tomograph that complies with spatial constraints typically encountered in clinical practice (2  ×  50°, of 360°, transaxial angular acceptance). The proton-induced activity inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) phantoms was acquired within beam pauses (in-beam) and immediately after irradiation by an actively-delivered synchrotron pencil-beam, with clinically relevant 125.67 MeV/u, 4.6  ×  10(8) protons s(-1), and 10(10) total protons. 3D activity maps reconstructed with and without TOF information are compared to FLUKA simulations, demonstrating the benefit of TOF-PET to reduce limited-angle artefacts using a 382 ps full width at half maximum coincidence resolving time. The time-dependent contributions from different radionuclides to the total count-rate are investigated. We furthermore study the impact of the acquisition time window on the laterally integrated activity depth-profiles, with emphasis on 2 min acquisitions starting at different time points. The results depend on phantom composition and reflect the differences in relative contributions from the radionuclides originating from carbon and oxygen. We observe very good agreement between the shapes of the simulated and measured activity depth-profiles for post-beam protocols. However, our results

  2. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambraia Lopes, P.; Bauer, J.; Salomon, A.; Rinaldi, I.; Tabacchini, V.; Tessonnier, T.; Crespo, P.; Parodi, K.; Schaart, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong 15O signal due to its relatively short half-life (~2 min) and high oxygen content in biological tissues, enabling shorter scans that are less sensitive to biological washout. This paper presents the first performance tests of a scaled-down in situ time-of-flight (TOF) PET system based on digital photon counters (DPCs) coupled to Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Silicate (LYSO:Ce) crystals, providing quantitative results representative of a dual-head tomograph that complies with spatial constraints typically encountered in clinical practice (2  ×  50°, of 360°, transaxial angular acceptance). The proton-induced activity inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) phantoms was acquired within beam pauses (in-beam) and immediately after irradiation by an actively-delivered synchrotron pencil-beam, with clinically relevant 125.67 MeV/u, 4.6  ×  108 protons s‑1, and 1010 total protons. 3D activity maps reconstructed with and without TOF information are compared to FLUKA simulations, demonstrating the benefit of TOF-PET to reduce limited-angle artefacts using a 382 ps full width at half maximum coincidence resolving time. The time-dependent contributions from different radionuclides to the total count-rate are investigated. We furthermore study the impact of the acquisition time window on the laterally integrated activity depth-profiles, with emphasis on 2 min acquisitions starting at different time points. The results depend on phantom composition and reflect the differences in relative contributions from the radionuclides originating from carbon and oxygen. We observe very good agreement between the shapes of the simulated and measured activity depth-profiles for post-beam protocols. However, our results also

  3. Development of Ultra Low Temperature, Impact Resistant Lithium Battery for the Mars Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H.; Deligiannis, F.; Davies, E.; Ratnakumar, Bugga V.; Surampudi, S.; Russel, P. G.; Reddy, T. B.

    1998-01-01

    The requirements of the power source for the Mars Microprobe, to be backpacked on the Mars 98 Spacecraft, are fairly demanding, with survivability to a shock of the order of 80,000 g combined with an operational requirement at -80 C. Development of a suitable power system, based on primary lithium-thionyl chloride is underway for the last eighteen months, together with Yardney Technical Products Inc., Pawcatuck, CT. The battery consists of 4 cells of 2 Ah capacity at 25 C, of which at least 25 % would be available at -80 C, at a moderate rate of C/20. Each probe contains two batteries and two such probes will be deployed. The selected cell is designed around an approximate 1/2 "D" cells, with flat plate electrodes. Significant improvements to the conventional Li-SOCl2 cell include: (a) use of tetrachlorogallate salt instead of aluminate for improved low temperature performance and reduced voltage delay, (b) optimization of the salt concentration, and (c) modification of the cell design to develop shock resistance to 80,000 g. We report here results from our several electrical performance tests, mission simulation tests, microcalorimetry and AC impedance studies, and Air gun tests. The cells have successfully gone through mission-enabling survivability and performance tests for the Mars Microprobe penetrator.

  4. Computational study of transport and energy deposition of intense laser-accelerated proton beams in solid density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Qiao, B.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Grabowski, P. E.

    2015-11-01

    With intense proton beams accelerated by high power short pulse lasers, solid targets are isochorically heated to become partially-ionized warm or hot dense matter. In this regime, the thermodynamic state of the matter significantly changes, varying the proton stopping power where both bound and free electrons contribute. Additionally, collective beam-matter interaction becomes important to the beam transport. We present self-consistent hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of proton beam transport and energy deposition in solid-density matter, where the individual proton stopping and the collective effects are taken into account simultaneously with updates of stopping power in the varying target conditions and kinetic motions of the beam in the driven fields. Broadening of propagation range and self-focusing of the beam led to unexpected target heating by the intense proton beams, with dependence on the beam profiles and target conditions. The behavior is specifically studied for the case of an experimentally measured proton beam from the 1.25 kJ, 10 ps OMEGA EP laser transporting through metal foils. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contracts No. DE-NA0002034 and No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by the U.S. AFOSR under Contract FA9550-14-1-0346.

  5. Development of an external beam nuclear microprobe on the Aglae facility of the Louvre museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.; Ioannidou, E.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Salomon, J.

    2000-03-01

    The external beam line of our facility has been recently equipped with the focusing system previously mounted on a classical nuclear microprobe. When using a 0.1 μm thick Si 3N 4 foil for the exit window and flowing helium on the sample under analysis, a beam spot as small as 10 μm is attainable at a distance of 3 mm from the window. Elemental micromapping is performed by mechanical scanning. An electronic device has been designed which allows XY scanning by moving the sample under the beam by steps down to 0.1 μm. Beam monitoring is carried out by means of the weak X-ray signal emitted by the exit foil and detected by a specially designed Si(Li) detector cooled by Peltier effect. The characteristics of external beams of protons and alpha particles are evaluated by means of resonance scanning and elemental mapping of a grid. An example of application is presented, dealing with elemental micro-mapping of inclusions in gemstones.

  6. Studies of the response of CR-39 track detectors to protons from a 3 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, L.; Cecchi, A.; Gori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Renzi, R.

    1991-01-01

    A Van de Graaff proton accelerator was tested for its application to the study of CR-39 SSNTD response to accelerated protons. The energies of the proton beams ranged from 0.2 to 2.3 MeV. Two different beam angles of incidence were taken into consideration for each proton energy (i.e. normal incidence and 45°). The complete procedure for the irradiation of a CR-39 sample required relatively little time and the results obtained — in agreement with others as reported in the literature — demonstrated that the Van de Graaff proton accelerator can find a useful application to the problem of neutron dosimetry using SSNTDs.

  7. Improved normal tissue protection by proton and X-ray microchannels compared to homogeneous field irradiation.

    PubMed

    Girst, S; Marx, C; Bräuer-Krisch, E; Bravin, A; Bartzsch, S; Oelfke, U; Greubel, C; Reindl, J; Siebenwirth, C; Zlobinskaya, O; Multhoff, G; Dollinger, G; Schmid, T E; Wilkens, J J

    2015-09-01

    The risk of developing normal tissue injuries often limits the radiation dose that can be applied to the tumour in radiation therapy. Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), a spatially fractionated photon radiotherapy is currently tested at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) to improve normal tissue protection. MRT utilizes an array of microscopically thin and nearly parallel X-ray beams that are generated by a synchrotron. At the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich focused proton microbeams ("proton microchannels") are studied to improve normal tissue protection. Here, we comparatively investigate microbeam/microchannel irradiations with sub-millimetre X-ray versus proton beams to minimize the risk of normal tissue damage in a human skin model, in vitro. Skin tissues were irradiated with a mean dose of 2 Gy over the irradiated area either with parallel synchrotron-generated X-ray beams at the ESRF or with 20 MeV protons at SNAKE using four different irradiation modes: homogeneous field, parallel lines and microchannel applications using two different channel sizes. Normal tissue viability as determined in an MTT test was significantly higher after proton or X-ray microchannel irradiation compared to a homogeneous field irradiation. In line with these findings genetic damage, as determined by the measurement of micronuclei in keratinocytes, was significantly reduced after proton or X-ray microchannel compared to a homogeneous field irradiation. Our data show that skin irradiation using either X-ray or proton microchannels maintain a higher cell viability and DNA integrity compared to a homogeneous irradiation, and thus might improve normal tissue protection after radiation therapy.

  8. Design and performance of the HVE electrostatic nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podaru, Nicolae C.; van de Hoef, F. L.; Gottdang, A.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2013-07-01

    High Voltage Engineering (HVE) designed, built and tested its first electrostatic nuclear microprobe lens with micrometer lateral resolution, based on the “Russian” quadruplet configuration. Ray tracing and three dimensional finite element methods were applied to quantify the role of spherical and parasitic aberrations, to optimize the lens geometry (e.g. electrode to bore diameter ratio) and to determine allowable mechanical tolerances. The lateral resolution of the nuclear microprobe was measured using a 1.5 MeV He+ ion beam. An image of 6.8 (±0.2) μm × 6.1 (±0.2) μm (FWHM) was obtained for an object size of 100 (±1) μm × 100 (±1) μm with 0.23 mrad half-angle divergence (33% lens filling). This closely corresponds to the expected beam size based on the calculated theoretical demagnification of 16.08 (15.5 measured). Additionally, this indicates the little contribution of the spherical and parasitical aberrations and a good agreement between design and actual performance.

  9. Microprobe analysis of teeth by synchrotron radiation: environmental contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Carvalho, M. L.; Casaca, C.; Barreiros, M. A.; Cunha, A. S.; Chevallier, P.

    1999-10-01

    An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, installed at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation du Rayonnement Électromagnétique (LURE) synchrotron (France) was used for elemental determination in teeth. To evaluate the influence of living habits in dental elemental composition nine teeth collected post-mortem were analysed, five from a miner and four from a fisherman. All teeth from the fisherman were healthy. From the miner some teeth were carious and one of them was filled with metallic amalgam. Teeth were sliced under the vertical plane and each slice was scanned from the root to the enamel for elemental profile determination. The synchrotron microprobe resolution was of 100 μm and incident photons of 18 keV energy were used. The elemental concentration values found suggest heterogeneity of the teeth material. Moreover, the distinct profiles for Mn, Sr, Br and Pb were found when teeth from the miner and from the fisherman are compared which can be associated with dietary habits and environmental influence. Higher concentrations of Mn and Sr were found for the fisherman teeth. In addition, Br was only observed in this group of teeth. Pb levels are higher for the miner teeth in particular for dentine regions. The influence of amalgam, such as, increase of Zn and Hg contents in the teeth material, is only noticed for the immediate surroundings of the treated cavity.

  10. Study Of Short-Range Correlations With 6-9 GeV/c Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J. W.

    2008-10-13

    We studied the {sup 12}C(p,2p+n) reaction at beam momenta of 5.9, 8.0 and 9.0 GeV/c. For quasielastic (p,2p) events we reconstructed p{sub f}, the momentum of the knocked-out proton before the reaction;, p{sub f} was then compared (event-by-event) with p{sub n}, the measured, coincident neutron momentum. For |p{sub n}|>k{sub F} = 0.220 GeV/c(the Fermi momentum) a strong back-to-back directional correlation between p{sub f} and p{sub n} was observed, indicative of short-range n-p correlations. From these data we concluded that for nuclear protons with momenta >0.275 GeV/c, 92{+-}18% have correlated neutron partners. This result was recently corroborated by an experiment with 4.6 GeV electrons.

  11. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivel, N.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2015-10-01

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft-collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where -t,-u>2.5 GeV2 the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the helicity-flip amplitudes to this observable is quite small and comparable with other expected theoretical uncertainties. We also show predictions for double polarization observables for which experimental information exists.

  12. SU-E-T-214: Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Based On Passively Scattered Protons and Multi-Leaf Collimation: Prototype TPS and Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose. Intensity-modulated proton therapy is usually implemented with multi-field optimization of pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton fields. However, at the view of the experience with photon-IMRT, proton facilities equipped with double-scattering (DS) delivery and multi-leaf collimation (MLC) could produce highly conformal dose distributions (and possibly eliminate the need for patient-specific compensators) with a clever use of their MLC field shaping, provided that an optimal inverse TPS is developed. Methods. A prototype TPS was developed in MATLAB. The dose calculation process was based on a fluence-dose algorithm on an adaptive divergent grid. A database of dose kernels was precalculated in order to allow for fast variations of the field range and modulation during optimization. The inverse planning process was based on the adaptive simulated annealing approach, with direct aperture optimization of the MLC leaves. A dosimetry study was performed on a phantom formed by three concentrical semicylinders separated by 5 mm, of which the inner-most and outer-most were regarded as organs at risk (OARs), and the middle one as the PTV. We chose a concave target (which is not treatable with conventional DS fields) to show the potential of our technique. The optimizer was configured to minimize the mean dose to the OARs while keeping a good coverage of the target. Results. The plan produced by the prototype TPS achieved a conformity index of 1.34, with the mean doses to the OARs below 78% of the prescribed dose. This Result is hardly achievable with traditional conformal DS technique with compensators, and it compares to what can be obtained with PBS. Conclusion. It is certainly feasible to produce IMPT fields with MLC passive scattering fields. With a fully developed treatment planning system, the produced plans can be superior to traditional DS plans in terms of plan conformity and dose to organs at risk.

  13. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solutions based upon mixed quantum-classical approximation. I. Proton transfer reaction in water

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Atsushi; Kojima, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Susumu

    2014-08-28

    In order to investigate proton transfer reaction in solution, mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations have been carried out based on our previously proposed quantum equation of motion for the reacting system [A. Yamada and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044507 (2008)]. Surface hopping method was applied to describe forces acting on the solvent classical degrees of freedom. In a series of our studies, quantum and solvent effects on the reaction dynamics in solutions have been analysed in detail. Here, we report our mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations for intramolecular proton transfer of malonaldehyde in water. Thermally activated proton transfer process, i.e., vibrational excitation in the reactant state followed by transition to the product state and vibrational relaxation in the product state, as well as tunneling reaction can be described by solving the equation of motion. Zero point energy is, of course, included, too. The quantum simulation in water has been compared with the fully classical one and the wave packet calculation in vacuum. The calculated quantum reaction rate in water was 0.70 ps{sup −1}, which is about 2.5 times faster than that in vacuum, 0.27 ps{sup −1}. This indicates that the solvent water accelerates the reaction. Further, the quantum calculation resulted in the reaction rate about 2 times faster than the fully classical calculation, which indicates that quantum effect enhances the reaction rate, too. Contribution from three reaction mechanisms, i.e., tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing reactions, is 33:46:21 in the mixed quantum-classical calculations. This clearly shows that the tunneling effect is important in the reaction.

  14. Theoretical Studies of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Models and Concepts Relevant to Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Ishikita, Hiroshi; Skone, Jonathan H.; Soudackov, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical studies of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions for model systems provide insight into fundamental concepts relevant to bioenergetics. A dynamical theoretical formulation for vibronically nonadiabatic PCET reactions has been developed. This theory enables the calculation of rates and kinetic isotope effects, as well as the pH and temperature dependences, of PCET reactions. Methods for calculating the vibronic couplings for PCET systems have also been developed and implemented. These theoretical approaches have been applied to a wide range of PCET reactions, including tyrosyl radical generation in a tyrosine-bound rhenium polypyridyl complex, phenoxyl/phenol and benzyl/toluene self-exchange reactions, and hydrogen abstraction catalyzed by the enzyme lipoxygenase. These applications have elucidated some of the key underlying physical principles of PCET reactions. The tools and concepts derived from these theoretical studies provide the foundation for future theoretical studies of PCET in more complex bioenergetic systems such as Photosystem II. PMID:21057592

  15. Study of spatial resolution of proton computed tomography using a silicon strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Y.; Izumikawa, T.; Goto, J.; Kawasaki, T.; Kimura, T.

    2014-01-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) is an imaging technique using a high-energy proton beam penetrating the human body and shows promise for improving the quality of cancer therapy with high-energy particle beams because more accurate electron density distribution measurements can be achieved with proton CT. The deterioration of the spatial resolution owing to multiple Coulomb scattering is, however, a crucial issue. The control of the radiation dose and the long exposure time are also problems to be solved. We have developed a prototype system for proton CT with a silicon strip detector and performed a beam test for imaging. The distribution of the electron density has been measured precisely. We also demonstrated an improvement in spatial resolution by reconstructing the proton trajectory. A spatial resolution of 0.45 mm is achieved for a 25-mm-thick polyethylene object. This will be a useful result for upgrading proton CT application for practical use.

  16. Sensitivity study of proton radiography and comparison with kV and MV x-ray imaging using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depauw, Nicolas; Seco, Joao

    2011-04-01

    The imaging sensitivity of proton radiography has been studied and compared with kV and MV x-ray imaging using Monte Carlo simulations. A phantom was specifically modeled using 21 different material inserts with densities ranging from 0.001 to 1.92 g cm-3. These simulations were run using the MGH double scattered proton beam, scanned pencil proton beams from 200 to 490 MeV, as well as pure 50 keV, 100 keV, 1 MeV and 2 MeV gamma x-ray beams. In order to compare the physics implied in both proton and photon radiography without being biased by the current state of the art in detector technology, the detectors were considered perfect. Along with spatial resolution, the contrast-to-noise ratio was evaluated and compared for each material. These analyses were performed using radiographic images that took into account the following: only primary protons, both primary and secondary protons, and both contributions while performing angular and energetic cuts. Additionally, tissue-to-tissue contrasts in an actual lung cancer patient case were studied for simulated proton radiographs and compared against the original kV x-ray image which corresponds to the current patient set-up image in the proton clinic. This study highlights the poorer spatial resolution of protons versus x-rays for radiographic imaging purposes, and the excellent density resolution of proton radiography. Contrasts around the tumor are higher using protons in a lung cancer patient case. The high-density resolution of proton radiography is of great importance for specific tumor diagnostics, such as in lung cancer, where x-ray radiography operates poorly. Furthermore, the use of daily proton radiography prior to proton therapy would ameliorate patient set-up while reducing the absorbed dose delivered through imaging.

  17. A very simple method for true elemental mapping using the scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jieqing; Lu, Rongrong; Wu, Xiankang; Chen, Youhong

    1997-07-01

    An elemental map by means of SPM is traditionally obtained by total counts entering an energy window (TCEW) corresponding to a characteristic X-ray of that element. Besides the characteristic X-ray signals of the element, the total counts contain the contribution of continuum background and overlapping peaks of the interfering elements as well. A method called NCEW (net counts entering an energy window) has been developed for off-line true elemental mapping. The continuum background is calculated with a trapezoid area determined by the counts within border gates and is subtracted from the total counts of the peak. The branch ratios of the characteristic X-rays of the interfering elements are used to correct their overlapping peaks. Because the net counts eliminate the contribution of the background and the overlapping peaks from the total counts, the map obtained by the NCEW is free of artifacts due to the continuum background and the peak overlapping. This method was tested by scanning a microbeam over a multi-foil target. Applications of the NCEW method to some environmental and geological samples are described.

  18. Theoretical study on the effect of solvent and intermolecular fluctuations in proton transfer reactions: General theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Nobuhiko; Ida, Tomonori; Endo, Kazunaka

    2004-04-30

    We present a theory of proton transfer reactions which incorporate the modulation of the proton's potential surface by intermolecular vibrations and the effect of coupling to solvent degree of freedom. The proton tunnels between states corresponding to it being localized in the wells of a double minimum potential. The resulting tunnel splitting depends on the intermolecular separation. The solvent response to the proton's charge is modeled as that of a continuous distribution of harmonic oscillators and the intermolecular stretching mode is also damped because of the interaction with solvent degree of freedom. The transition rate is given by the Fermi Gorlden Rule expression.

  19. Nuclear Structure of 8B Studied by Proton Resonance Scatterings on 7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Amadio, G.; Kubono, S.; Fujikawa, H.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Niikura, M.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.

    2008-05-01

    A new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on 7Be was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV using the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. The excitation function of 8B above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of 7Be(p,γ)8B, which is the key reaction in the solar 8B neutrino production. For more intensive experimental studies with RI beams, the development of a cryogenic gas target system is ongoing at CNS. In this paper a preliminary result of the 7Be experiment and the present status of the development of the target system are presented.

  20. Nuclear Structure of {sup 8}B Studied by Proton Resonance Scatterings on {sup 7}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hayakawa, S.; Amadio, G.; Kubono, S.; Fujikawa, H.; Niikura, M.; Binh, D. N.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Khiem, L. H.

    2008-05-21

    A new measurement of the proton resonance scattering on {sup 7}Be was performed up to the excitation energy of 6.8 MeV using the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. The excitation function of {sup 8}B above 3.5 MeV was successfully measured for the first time, providing important information about the reaction rate of {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B, which is the key reaction in the solar {sup 8}B neutrino production. For more intensive experimental studies with RI beams, the development of a cryogenic gas target system is ongoing at CNS. In this paper a preliminary result of the {sup 7}Be experiment and the present status of the development of the target system are presented.

  1. Experimental study of pyrolytic boron nitride at high temperature with and without proton and VUV irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balat-Pichelin, M.; Eck, J.; Heurtault, S.; Glénat, H.

    2014-09-01

    In the frame of future exploration missions such as Solar Probe Plus (NASA) and PHOIBOS (ESA), research was carried out to study pyrolytic BN material envisaged as coating for their heat shields. The physico-chemical behavior of CVD pBN at very high temperature with or without hydrogen ions and VUV (Vacuum Ultra-Violet) irradiations was studied in high vacuum together with the in situ measurement of the thermal radiative properties conditioning the thermal equilibrium of the heat shield. Experimental results obtained on massive pBN samples are presented through in situ mass spectrometry and mass loss rate, and post-test microstructural characterization by XRD, SEM, AFM and nano-indentation techniques, some of them leading to mechanical properties. It could be concluded that synergistic effect of high temperature, protons and VUV radiation has an impact on the emission of gaseous species, the mass loss rate and the mechanical properties of the material.

  2. Low LET protons focused to submicrometer shows enhanced radiobiological effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Schmid, T E; Greubel, C; Hable, V; Zlobinskaya, O; Michalski, D; Girst, S; Siebenwirth, C; Schmid, E; Molls, M; Multhoff, G; Dollinger, G

    2012-10-01

    This study shows that enhanced radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) values can be generated focusing low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and thus changing the microdose distribution. 20 MeV protons (LET = 2.65 keV µm(-1)) are focused to submicrometer diameter at the ion microprobe superconducting nanoprobe for applied nuclear (Kern) physics experiments of the Munich tandem accelerator. The RBE values, as determined by measuring micronuclei (RBE(MN) = 1.48 ± 0.07) and dicentrics (RBE(D) = 1.92 ± 0.15), in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells are significantly higher when 117 protons were focused to a submicrometer irradiation field within a 5.4 × 5.4 µm(2) matrix compared to quasi homogeneous in a 1 × 1 µm(2) matrix applied protons (RBE(MN) = 1.28 ± 0.07; RBE(D) = 1.41 ± 0.14) at the same average dose of 1.7 Gy. The RBE values are normalized to standard 70 kV (dicentrics) or 200 kV (micronuclei) x-ray irradiation. The 117 protons applied per point deposit the same amount of energy like a (12)C ion with 55 MeV total energy (4.48 MeV u(-1)). The enhancements are about half of that obtained for (12)C ions (RBE(MN) = 2.20 ± 0.06 and RBE(D) = 3.21 ± 0.10) and they are attributed to intertrack interactions of the induced damages. The measured RBE values show differences from predictions of the local effect model (LEM III) that is used to calculate RBE values for irradiation plans to treat tumors with high LET particles.

  3. Indirect Attractions between Superionic Di-interstitial Protons on Mid-Oxygens in Water at Extreme Conditions: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumuraya, Kazuo; Tasaka, Tomofumi; Nagayama, Hisashi; Tsumuraya, Mary I.; Tsumuraya, Masato

    2014-10-01

    The first principles molecular dynamics study enables us to elucidate attractions between the di-interstitial protons on mid-oxygens in superionic water at an extreme high pressure and the temperature. The present analyses elucidate the existence of inner and outer bonded interstitial protons around oxygens and reveal two types of attractions between the protons and oxygens in the water. One is a covalent attraction between them which induces a covalent bonded indirect attraction between the di-interstitial protons on the mid-oxygens. The other is a Coulomb attraction between them which induces a Coulomb type indirect attraction between the di-interstitial protons on the mid-oxygens. The indirect attractions decrease the impurity diffusion of the protons which reduces Haven's ratios of the protons in the water. The negligible amount of the instantaneously formed proton dimers indicates a failure of the caterpillar diffusion mechanism or the Frenkel-Kontorova model for the water. The incomplete electron transfer from the protons to the oxygens reduces the Coulomb atraction between the ionized oxygens and the protons which weakens the sublattice of the mobile protons with smaller mass and size than the oxygens.

  4. Chemical and Isotopic Analysis of Trace Organic Matter on Meteorites and Interstellar Dust Using a Laser Microprobe Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zare, Richard N.; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of considerable interest today because they are ubiquitous on Earth and in the interstellar medium (ISM). In fact, about 20% of cosmic carbon in the galaxy is estimated to be in the form of PAHs. Investigation of these species has obvious uses for determining the cosmochemistry of the solar system. Work in this laboratory has focused on four main areas: 1) Mapping the spatial distribution of PAHs in a variety of meteoritic samples and comparing this distribution with mineralogical features of the meteorite to determine whether a correlation exists between the two. 2) Developing a method for detection of fullerenes in extraterrestrial samples using microprobe Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectroscopy and utilizing this technique to investigate fullerene presence, while exploring the possibility of spatially mapping the fullerene distribution in these samples through in situ detection. 3) Investigating a possible formation pathway for meteoritic and ancient terrestrial kerogen involving the photochemical reactions of PAHs with alkanes under prebiotic and astrophysically relevant conditions. 4) Studying reaction pathways and identifying the photoproducts generated during the photochemical evolution of PAH-containing interstellar ice analogs as part of an ongoing collaboration with researchers at the Astrochemistry Lab at NASA Ames. All areas involve elucidation of the solar system formation and chemistry using microprobe Laser Desorption Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry. A brief description of microprobe Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectroscopy, which allows selective investigation of subattomole levels of organic species on the surface of a sample at 10-40 micrometer spatial resolution, is given.

  5. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H (*)(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H (*)(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy(-1) was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H (*)(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy(-1) at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to

  6. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H *(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy-1 was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H *(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy-1 at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to thermal

  7. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H *(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy‑1 was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H *(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy‑1 at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to thermal

  8. RABBIT: an electron microprobe data-reduction program using empirical corrections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, Fraser E.

    1977-01-01

    RABBIT is a FORTRAN IV computer Program that uses Bence-Albee empirical corrections for the reduction of electron microprobe data of silicates, oxides, sulphates, carbonates, and phosphates. RABBIT efficiently reduces large volumes of data collected on 3-11 channel microprobes.

  9. Study of direct single photons and correlated particles in proton-proton collisions at. sqrt. s = 62. 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, A. L.S.; Besch, H. J.; Blumenfeld, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    As part of a study of large p/sub T/ phenomena in proton-proton collisions at the CERN ISR, a search for direct single photon production has been performed. A statistical division of the data sample into the fraction consistent with single photon production and the fraction due to multiphoton decays of neutral hadrons is accomplished by measuring the average conversion probability for the sample in a one radiation length thick converter. The fraction of the sample attributable to direct single photon production is < ..gamma../all > = 0.074 +- 0.012 for 6 GeV/c < p/sub T/ < 10 GeV/C, and < ..gamma../all > = 0.26 +- 0.04 for p/sub T/ > 10 GeV/c, with an additional systematic uncertainty of +- 0.05 for both values. It is found that single photons are produced preferentially with no accompanying particles on the same side. The ratio of positive to negative particles on the away side is found to be 3.7 +- 1.2 at high x/sub E/ and p/sub T/ for the single photon events.

  10. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... direction of the tumor. A machine called a synchrotron or cyclotron creates and speeds up the protons. ... redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should ...

  11. Quantum Mechanics Studies of Fuel Cell Catalysts and Proton Conducting Ceramics with Validation by Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ho-Cheng

    We carried out quantum mechanics (QM) studies aimed at improving the performance of hydrogen fuel cells. In part I, The challenge was to find a replacement for the Pt cathode that would lead to improved performance for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) while remaining stable under operational conditions and decreasing cost. Our design strategy was to find an alloy with composition Pt3M that would lead to surface segregation such that the top layer would be pure Pt, with the second and subsequent layers richer in M. Under operating conditions we expect the surface to have significant O and/or OH chemisorbed on the surface; we searched for M that would remain segregated under these conditions. Using QM we examined surface segregation for 28 Pt3M alloys, where M is a transition metal. We found that only Pt3Os and Pt3Ir showed significant surface segregation when O and OH are chemisorbed on the catalyst surfaces. This result indicates that Pt3Os and Pt 3Ir favor formation of a Pt-skin surface layer structure that would resist the acidic electrolyte corrosion during fuel cell operation environments. We chose to focus on Os because the phase diagram for Pt-Ir indicated that Pt-Ir could not form a homogeneous alloy at lower temperature. To determine the performance for ORR, we used QM to examine intermediates, reaction pathways, and reaction barriers involved in the processes for which protons from the anode reactions react with O2 to form H2O. These QM calculations used our Poisson-Boltzmann implicit solvation model include the effects of the solvent (water with dielectric constant 78 with pH 7 at 298K). We also carried out similar QM studies followed by experimental validation for the Os/Pt core-shell catalyst fabricated by the underpotential deposition (UPD) method. The QM results indicated that the RDS for ORR is a compromise between the OOH formation step (0.37 eV for Pt, 0.23 eV for Pt2ML/Os core-shell) and H2O formation steps (0.32 eV for Pt, 0.22 eV for Pt2ML

  12. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  13. Development and applications of an epifluorescence module for synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lisa M.; Smith, Randy J.; Ruppel, Meghan E.; Ott, Cassandra H.; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2005-06-15

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe is a valuable analysis tool for imaging trace element composition in situ at a resolution of a few microns. Frequently, epifluorescence microscopy is beneficial for identifying the region of interest. To date, combining epifluorescence microscopy with x-ray microprobe has involved analyses with two different microscopes. We report the development of an epifluorescence module that is integrated into a synchrotron XRF microprobe beamline, such that visible fluorescence from a sample can be viewed while collecting x-ray microprobe images simultaneously. This unique combination has been used to identify metal accumulation in Alzheimer's disease plaques and the mineral distribution in geological samples. The flexibility of this accessory permits its use on almost any synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe beamline and applications in many fields of science can benefit from this technology.

  14. Studies and calculations of transverse emittance growth in high-energy proton storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.R.; Jackson, G.

    1989-03-01

    In the operation of proton-antiproton colliders, an important goal is to maximize the integrated luminosity. During such operations in the Fermilab Tevatron, the transverse beam emittances were observed to grow unexpectedly quickly, thus causing a serious reduction of the luminosity. We have studied this phenomenon experimentally and theoretically. A formula for the emittance growth rate, due to random dipole kicks, is derived. In the experiment, RF phase noise of known amplitude was deliberately injected into the Tevatron to kick the beam randomly, via dispersion at the RF cavities. Theory and experiment are found to agree reasonably well. We also briefly discuss the problem of quadrupole kicks. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. A simulation study of field-induced proton-conduction pathways in dry ionomers.

    PubMed

    Allahyarov, Elshad; Taylor, Philip L; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-06-15

    The morphological changes that can be induced in a dry ionomer by application of a strong electric field have been studied by means of computer simulation. The internal energy of the membrane at first slowly decreases with increasing field, but then rapidly increases after a certain threshold field is reached. This effect is interpreted as the reorganization of interacting head group dipoles in response to the external perturbation. The resulting morphology contains continuous channels of hydrophilic material capable of facilitating proton conduction. Upon removal of the poling field, the system does not return to its original morphology, but retains the anisotropic structure of the poled material. The poled structure appears to be thermodynamically stable, as confirmed by calculations of the Helmholtz energy of the original and poled samples.

  16. Impedance study of membrane dehydration and compression in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Canut, Jean-Marc; Latham, Ruth; Mérida, Walter; Harrington, David A.

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to measure drying and rehydration in proton exchange membrane fuel cells running under load. The hysteresis between forward and backward acquisition of polarization curves is shown to be largely due to changes in the membrane resistance. Drying tests are carried out with hydrogen and simulated reformate (hydrogen and carbon dioxide), and quasi-periodic drying and rehydration conditions are studied. The membrane hydration state is clearly linked to the high-frequency arc in the impedance spectrum, which increases in size for dry conditions indicating an increase in membrane resistance. Changes in impedance spectra as external compression is applied to the cell assembly show that EIS can separate membrane and interfacial effects, and that changes in membrane resistance dominate. Reasons for the presence of a capacitance in parallel with the membrane resistance are discussed.

  17. Study on the microwave ion source of the 100-MeV proton linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung

    2016-09-01

    A microwave ion source is used as an ion source for the 100-MeV proton accelerator at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC). The specifications of the ion source are a 50-keV energy and a 20-mA peak current. The plasma is operated in the CW mode by using a magnetron, and the pulse beam is extracted using a semiconductor switch located in the extraction power supply. The beam characteristics were measured based on the pulse voltage and current. A test stand was also installed to study the beam characteristics of the ion source off-line. In this paper, the pulse beam characteristics of the ion source are presented, and the installation of the test stand is reported.

  18. Protonation effects on the UV/Vis absorption spectra of imatinib: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grante, Ilze; Actins, Andris; Orola, Liana

    2014-08-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of protonation effects on the UV/Vis absorption spectra of imatinib showed systematic changes of absorption depending on the pH, and a new absorption band appeared below pH 2. These changes in the UV/Vis absorption spectra were interpreted using quantum chemical calculations. The geometry of various imatinib cations in the gas phase and in ethanol solution was optimized with the DFT/B3LYP method. The resultant geometries were compared to the experimentally determined crystal structures of imatinib salts. The semi-empirical ZINDO-CI method was employed to calculate the absorption lines and electronic transitions. Our study suggests that the formation of the extra near-UV absorption band resulted from an increase of imatinib trication concentration in the solution, while the rapid increase of the first absorption maximum could be attributed to both the formation of imatinib trication and tetracation.

  19. Theoretical study on β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes with propiconazole and protonated propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Fifere, Adrian; Marangoci, Narcisa; Maier, Stelian; Coroaba, Adina; Maftei, Dan; Pinteala, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of the β-cyclodextrin/propiconazole nitrate inclusion complex and the advantages of the encapsulation of this drug were recently reported, but the experimental data only partially revealed the structure of the supramolecular complex due to the limitations in understanding the intermolecular association mechanism. The present work describes the equilibrium molecular geometries of β-cyclodextrin/propiconazole and β-cyclodextrin/protonated propiconazole, established by the AM1 and PM3 semi-empirical methods. The affinity between different parts of the guest molecule and the cyclodextrin cavity was studied considering that propiconazole possesses three residues able to be included into the host cavity through primary or secondary hydroxyl rims. The results have revealed that the most stable complex is formed when the azole residue of the propiconazole enters the cavity of the cyclodextrin through the narrow hydroxyl's rim.

  20. First principles studies of proton conduction in KTaO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sung Gu; Sholl, David S.

    2014-07-14

    KTaO{sub 3} (KTO) is a useful prototypical perovskite for examining the mechanisms of proton transport in perovskites. Previously, Gomez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 194701 (2007)] reported density functional theory (DFT) calculations describing proton hopping in defect-free KTO. We use DFT calculations to extend that work in two directions, namely, understanding isotope effects in low and high temperature proton transport and the role of native point defects in KTO. At cryogenic temperatures, quantum tunneling plays a vital role in the net hopping of protons in KTO. At the elevated temperature characteristic of applications involving proton-conducting perovskites, tunneling is negligible but zero point energy effects still lead to non-negligible isotope effects for H{sup +}, D{sup +}, and T{sup +}. We also use DFT to characterize the populations of relevant point defects in KTO as a function of experimental conditions, and to examine the migration of protons that are close in proximity to these defects. This information gives useful insight into the overall transport rates of protons through KTO under a variety of external environments. We also assess the overall diffusivity of protons in KTO at various ranges of oxygen vacancy concentrations by performing kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Application of proton boron fusion reaction to radiation therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suh, Tae Suk

    2014-12-01

    Three alpha particles are emitted from the point of reaction between a proton and boron. The alpha particles are effective in inducing the death of a tumor cell. After boron is accumulated in the tumor region, the emitted from outside the body proton can react with the boron in the tumor region. An increase of the proton's maximum dose level is caused by the boron and only the tumor cell is damaged more critically. In addition, a prompt gamma ray is emitted from the proton boron reaction point. Here, we show that the effectiveness of the proton boron fusion therapy was verified using Monte Carlo simulations. We found that a dramatic increase by more than half of the proton's maximum dose level was induced by the boron in the tumor region. This increase occurred only when the proton's maximum dose point was located within the boron uptake region. In addition, the 719 keV prompt gamma ray peak produced by the proton boron fusion reaction was positively detected. This therapy method features the advantages such as the application of Bragg-peak to the therapy, the accurate targeting of tumor, improved therapy effects, and the monitoring of the therapy region during treatment.

  2. A study of spacecraft charging due to exposure to interplanetary protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Nelson W.; Frederickson, A. Robb

    2006-01-01

    The majority of research regarding IESD has been concerned with the electrons in the space environment around the Earth and at Jupiter; little research has been done on the charging of spacecraft in interplanetary space due to solar event protons. This paper provides a review of the literature regarding IESD due to protons and presents the results of recent laboratory experiments.

  3. Structural stability of anhydrous proton conducting SrZr0.9Er0.1O3-δ perovskite ceramic vs. protonation/deprotonation cycling: Neutron diffraction and Raman studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slodczyk, Aneta; Colomban, Philippe; Upasen, Settakorn; Grasset, Frédéric; André, Gilles

    2015-08-01

    Long-term chemical and structural stability of an ion conducting ceramic is one of the main criteria for its selection as an electrolytic membrane in energy plant devices. Consequently, medium density SrZr0.9Er0.1O3-δ (SZE) anhydrous proton conducting ceramic - a potential electrolyte of SOFC/PCFC, was analysed by neutron diffraction between room temperature and 900 °C. After the first heating/cooling cycle, the ceramic pieces were exposed to water vapour pressure in an autoclave (500 °C, 40 bar, 7 days) in order to incorporate protonic species; the protonated compound was then again analysed by neutron diffraction. This procedure was repeated two times. At each step, the sample was also controlled by TGA and Raman spectroscopy. These studies allow the first comprehensive comparison of structural and chemical stability during the protonation/deprotonation cycling. The results reveal good structural stability, although an irreversible small contraction of the unit-cell volume and local structure modifications near Zr/ErO5[] octahedra are detected after the first protonation. After the second protonation easy ceramic crumbling under a stress is observed because of the presence of secondary phases (SrCO3, Sr(OH)2) well detected by Raman scattering and TGA. The role of crystallographic purity, substituting element and residual porosity in the proton conducting perovskite electrolyte stability is discussed.

  4. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution.

  5. Solubilization Site of Organic Perfume Molecules in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelles: New Insights from Proton NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Suratkar; Mahapatra

    2000-05-01

    The site of incorporation of solubilizates in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar systems has been investigated by proton NMR spectroscopy. The solubilizate molecules chosen for the present study are phenol, 4-methylphenol, 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol, anisole, 4-methylanisole, 4-propenylanisole, 1,8-cineole, and limonene. These molecules possess a wide variety of functional groups with different degrees of hydrophilic/hydrophobic character and are thereby solubilized at different micellar locations. Aromatic compounds, especially those having a phenolic-OH group, showed a large upfield shift of SDS methylene protons that are closely linked to the terminal sulfate groups. Additionally, in the case of phenolic compounds, the unresolved signals of the nine straight-chain bulk methylene protons of SDS are split into a broad doublet with uneven intensity. This splitting of methylene protons was found to be dependent on the concentration of the substrate. Based on these observations, probable solubilization sites and orientation of the substrate molecule within the micelles are discussed. Phenolic compounds, being the most hydrophilic among the present set, reside at the hydrophilic/hydrophobic boundary of micelle-water interface and thus influence the resonances of SDS protons the most. Aromatic methoxy and aliphatic compounds, being relatively more hydrophobic in nature, reside inside the micellar core and thereby result in smaller shifts. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Modelling of the batch biosorption system: study on exchange of protons with cell wall-bound mineral ions.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    The interchange of the protons with the cell wall-bound calcium and magnesium ions at the interface of solution/bacterial cell surface in the biosorption system at various concentrations of protons has been studied in the present work. A mathematical model for establishing the correlation between concentration of protons and active sites was developed and optimized. The sporadic limited residence time reactor was used to titrate the calcium and magnesium ions at the individual data point. The accuracy of the proposed mathematical model was estimated using error functions such as nonlinear regression, adjusted nonlinear regression coefficient, the chi-square test, P-test and F-test. The values of the chi-square test (0.042-0.017), P-test (<0.001-0.04), sum of square errors (0.061-0.016), root mean square error (0.01-0.04) and F-test (2.22-19.92) reported in the present research indicated the suitability of the model over a wide range of proton concentrations. The zeta potential of the bacterium surface at various concentrations of protons was observed to validate the denaturation of active sites.

  7. Implementation of ionoluminescence in the AGLAE scanning external microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichon, L.; Calligaro, T.; Gonzalez, V.; Lemasson, Q.; Moignard, B.; Pacheco, C.

    2015-04-01

    The scope of this work is to present the implementation of an IBIL imaging system in the scanning external microprobe of the AGLAE facility so as to correlate luminescence and composition maps provided by PIXE, RBS and PIGE. The challenging integration of the optical spectrometer, due to incompatibility of acquisition timings and data formats with the other IBA channels has motivated the development of a specific acquisition system. This article details the IBIL setup and explains the technical solutions retained for the coupling of IBIL with IBA techniques in order to produce fast and large IBIL-IBA maps. The IBIL maps stored in the same format as the PIXE, RBS and PIGE ones can be visualised and compared using the dedicated AGLAEmap program or the PyMCA processing package. An example of such a coupled mapping on Mesoamerican jade is presented to emphasise the interest of performing simultaneously IBA and IBIL large mappings.

  8. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOEpatents

    Ward, James W.; Schlanger, Herbert; McNulty, Jr., Hugh; Parker, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  9. Nuclear microprobe and optical investigation of sparkling wine bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padayachee, J.; Prozesky, V. M.; Pineda, C. A.

    1999-10-01

    Glass bottles, used for sparkling wine, are treated with freon during manufacturing to harden the inside surface. Although this type of treatment normally improves the properties of the glass, in this case the occurrence of "egg" formations (egg-shaped rough areas) on distinct areas of bottles, as well as yeast sticking to the insides of bottles at specific areas pointed to the possibility of different areas showing different properties in the same bottle. The question was whether the correct gas was used for the treatment, and secondly, whether the process was controlled well enough to obtain the correct properties for the inside of the glass. We present results of an optical microscopy and nuclear microprobe (NMP) investigation.

  10. Nuclear microprobe imaging of gallium nitrate in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Richard; Suda, Asami; Devès, Guillaume

    2003-09-01

    Gallium nitrate is used in clinical oncology as treatment for hypercalcemia and for cancer that has spread to the bone. Its mechanism of antitumor action has not been fully elucidated yet. The knowledge of the intracellular distribution of anticancer drugs is of particular interest in oncology to better understand their cellular pharmacology. In addition, most metal-based anticancer compounds interact with endogenous trace elements in cells, altering their metabolism. The purpose of this experiment was to examine, by use of nuclear microprobe analysis, the cellular distribution of gallium and endogenous trace elements within cancer cells exposed to gallium nitrate. In a majority of cellular analyses, gallium was found homogeneously distributed in cells following the distribution of carbon. In a smaller number of cells, however, gallium appeared concentrated together with P, Ca and Fe within round structures of about 2-5 μm diameter located in the perinuclear region. These intracellular structures are typical of lysosomial material.

  11. Proton-binding study of standard and reference fulvic acids, humic acids, and natural organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Jason D.; Perdue, E. Michael

    2003-01-01

    The acid-base properties of 14 standard and reference materials from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) were investigated by potentiometric titration. Titrations were conducted in 0.1 M NaCl under a nitrogen atmosphere, averaging 30 min from start to finish. Concentrations of carboxyl groups and phenolic groups were estimated directly from titration curves. Titration data were also fit to a modified Henderson-Hasselbalch model for two classes of proton-binding sites to obtain "best fit" parameters that describe proton-binding curves for the samples. The model was chosen for its simplicity, its ease of implementation in computer spreadsheets, and its excellent ability to describe the shapes of the titration curves. The carboxyl contents of the IHSS samples are in the general order: terrestrial fulvic acids > aquatic fulvic acids > Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) > aquatic humic acids > terrestrial humic acids. Overall, fulvic acids and humic acids have similar phenolic contents; however, all of the aquatically derived samples have higher phenolic contents than the terrestrially derived samples. The acid-base properties of reference Suwannee River NOM are surprisingly similar to those of standard Suwannee River humic acid. Results from titrations in this study were compared with other published results from both direct and indirect titrations. Typically, carboxyl contents for the IHSS samples were in agreement with the results from both methods of titration. Phenolic contents for the IHSS samples were comparable to those determined by direct titrations, but were significantly less than estimates of phenolic content that were based on indirect titrations with Ba(OH) 2 and Ca(OAc) 2. The average phenolic-to-carboxylic ratio of the IHSS samples is approximately 1:4. Models that assume a 1:2 ratio of phenolic-to-carboxylic groups may overestimate the relative contribution of phenolic groups to the acid-base chemistry of humic substances.

  12. SU-E-T-337: Treatment Planning Study of Craniospinal Irradiation with Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tasson, A; Beltran, C; Laack, N; Childs, S; Tryggestad, E; Whitaker, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning technique that achieves optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, and interfield position errors for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using spot scanning proton radiotherapy. Methods: Eighteen CSI patients who had previously been treated using photon radiation were used for this study. Eight patients were less than 10 years old. The prescription dose was 23.4Gy in 1.8Gy fractions. Two different field arrangement types were investigated: 1 posterior field per isocenter and 2 posterior oblique fields per isocenter. For each field type, two delivery configurations were used: 5cm bolus attached to the treatment table and a 4.5cm range shifter located inside the nozzle. The target for each plan was the whole brain and thecal sac. For children under the age of 10, all plan types were repeated with an additional dose of 21Gy prescribed to the vertebral bodies. Treatment fields were matched by stepping down the dose in 10% increments over 9cm. Robustness against 3% and 3mm uncertainties, as well as a 3mm inter-field error was analyzed. Dose coverage of the target and critical structure sparing for each plan type will be considered. Ease of planning and treatment delivery was also considered for each plan type. Results: The mean dose volume histograms show that the bolus plan with posterior beams gave the best overall plan, and all proton plans were comparable to or better than the photon plans. The plan type that was the most robust against the imposed uncertainties was also the bolus plan with posterior beams. This is also the plan configuration that is the easiest to deliver and plan. Conclusion: The bolus plan with posterior beams achieved optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, as well as inter-field position errors.

  13. Study of the radioactivity induced in air by a 15-MeV proton beam.

    PubMed

    Braccini, S; Ereditato, A; Nesteruk, K P; Scampoli, P; Zihlmann, K

    2015-02-01

    Radioactivity induced by a 15-MeV proton beam extracted into air was studied at the beam transport line of the 18-MeV cyclotron at the Bern University Hospital (Inselspital). The produced radioactivity was calculated and measured by means of proportional counters located at the main exhaust of the laboratory. These devices were designed for precise assessment of air contamination for radiation protection purposes. The main produced isotopes were (11)C, (13)N and (14)O. Both measurements and calculations correspond to two different irradiation conditions. In the former, protons were allowed to travel for their full range in air. In the latter, they were stopped at the distance of 1.5 m by a beam dump. Radioactivity was measured continuously in the exhausted air starting from 2 min after the end of irradiation. For this reason, the short-lived (14)O isotope gave a negligible contribution to the measured activity. Good agreement was found between the measurements and the calculations within the estimated uncertainties. Currents in the range of 120-370 nA were extracted in air for 10-30 s producing activities of 9-22 MBq of (11)C and (13)N. The total activities for (11)C and (13)N per beam current and irradiation time for the former and the latter irradiation conditions were measured to be (3.60 ± 0.48) × 10(-3) MBq (nA s)(-1) and (2.89 ± 0.37) × 10(-3) MBq (nA s)(-1), respectively.

  14. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  15. Results from an Orion proton heating experiment for Warm Dense Matter studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Peter; James, Steven; Brown, Colin; Hobbs, Lauren; Hill, Matthew; Hoarty, David; Chen, Hui; Hazi, Andy; AWE Team; LLNL Team

    2014-10-01

    The properties of warm dense matter covering densities and temperatures in the ranges 0.1-10x solid and 1-100eV, fall between ideal plasma and condensed matter theories. Studies have highlighted uncertainties in EoS predictions using methods based on the Thomas-Fermi and ion-cell models. In particular, such models predict large departures from ideal gas behaviour for low Z material at low densities and temperatures. In an extension of previous work, material has been isochorically heated using short-pulse laser-generated proton beams. Here, the method of Foord et al. was used toinfer isentropes oflow Z materials and provide data to validate model predictions. Earlier measurements were limited by the eV backlighterenergy to relatively low densities and pressures below 1.5Mbar, and were conducted in cylindrical geometry. More recent experiments performed at the Orion laser use a parabolic crystal imaging system in order to measure to higher pressures by probing planar expansion of aluminium foils at 1.8keV. The imaging system is described and results are presented showing a spatial resolution of 6um, which was then streaked to give temporal resolution of 10ps. Preliminary analysis of the foil expansion indicates a peak temperature of 30eV. The proton and ion spectra used to heat the sample were measured by a magnetic spectrometer and a Thomson parabola. These results are presented and the effect on the measured expansion discussed. Plans for future measurements are discussed in the light of results obtained so far.

  16. A density functional theory study of dimers of hydrophosphoryl compounds and proton transfer in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Yu. V.; Prisyazhnyuk, A. V.; Ustynyuk, Yu. A.

    2008-01-01

    The structures of dimers of several types of dimethylphosphinous acid (CH3)2POH and dimethylphosphine oxide (CH3)2P(O)H and dimers of the corresponding perfluorinated derivatives (CF3)2POH and (CF3)2P(O)H were studied in detail by density functional theory with the PBE gradient-corrected functional and the TZ2 p basis set. Fairly strong dimeric associates (2.50-10.5 kcal/mol) were shown to form thanks to O-H···O, O-H···P, and C-H···O H-bonds and dipole-dipole interactions of polar phosphoryl groups P → O of two monomer molecules. The existence of C-H···O and the absence of P-H···O H-bonds in (CH3)2P(O)H dimers was substantiated by an AIM (atoms in molecules) analysis of their structures according to Bader. The reaction coordinates were calculated for synchronous transfer of two protons in (CH3)2POH and (CF3)2P(O)H dimers. Both rearrangements were shown to occur via symmetrical six-membered planar transition states with activation barriers of less than 20 kcal/mol, which was much lower than for intramolecular transfer in the corresponding monomers (47 kcal/mol for the (CH3)2P(O)H → (CH3)2POH pair). The tautomeric transitions between the phosphinous acid and phosphine oxide forms observed experimentally in nonpolar media under mild conditions in the absence of molecules that could act as proton carriers were shown to proceed as bimolecular reactions with the intermediate formation of the corresponding dimers.

  17. Characterization of organic matter/ minerals associations in oilfield rocks using the nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, F.; Toulhoat, N.; Trocellier, P.; Durand, C.

    1994-03-01

    The improvement of the oil production forecast and the recovery strategy is closely related to a better understanding of the oil reservoir wettability. As there is a need of a description of the spatial distribution of wettability down to the pore scale, new tools allow to enhance very fine scale wettability contrasts and to evidence the importance of mineralogy. Among them, we propose to use the nuclear microprobe analysis (NMA) for the qualitative and quantitative study of the organic matter/mineral interactions i.e. the description of the reservoir rock wettability. NMA, field emission SEM and AFM techniques are used to image and study the mechanisms and kinetics of the sorption of the organic matter on model samples: the organic film thicknesses and the major elemental contents (carbon and nitrogen) are measured.

  18. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced deep-level defects (both electron and hole traps) in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells are investigated along with the correlation between the measured defect parameters and the solar cell performance parameters. The range of proton energies studied was from 50 KeV to 10 MeV and the proton fluence was varied from 10 to the 10th power to 10 to the 13th power P/sq cm. Experimental tools employed include deep-level transient spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, current voltage, and SEM-EBIC methods. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, capture cross section, carrier lifetimes and effective hole diffusion lengths in n-GaAs LPE layers were determined from these measurements.

  19. Yields of positron and positron emitting nuclei for proton and carbon ion radiation therapy: a simulation study with GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Lau, Andy; Chen, Yong; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-01-01

    A Monte Carlo application is developed to investigate the yields of positron-emitting nuclei (PEN) used for proton and carbon ion range verification techniques using the GEANT4 Toolkit. A base physics list was constructed and used to simulate incident proton and carbon ions onto a PMMA or water phantom using pencil like beams. In each simulation the total yields of PEN are counted and both the PEN and their associated positron depth-distributions were recorded and compared to the incident radiation's Bragg Peak. Alterations to the physics lists are then performed to investigate the PEN yields dependence on the choice of physics list. In our study, we conclude that the yields of PEN can be estimated using the physics list presented here for range verification of incident proton and carbon ions.

  20. Quantum Mechanics Studies of Fuel Cell Catalysts and Proton Conducting Ceramics with Validation by Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ho-Cheng

    We carried out quantum mechanics (QM) studies aimed at improving the performance of hydrogen fuel cells. In part I, The challenge was to find a replacement for the Pt cathode that would lead to improved performance for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) while remaining stable under operational conditions and decreasing cost. Our design strategy was to find an alloy with composition Pt3M that would lead to surface segregation such that the top layer would be pure Pt, with the second and subsequent layers richer in M. Under operating conditions we expect the surface to have significant O and/or OH chemisorbed on the surface; we searched for M that would remain segregated under these conditions. Using QM we examined surface segregation for 28 Pt3M alloys, where M is a transition metal. We found that only Pt3Os and Pt3Ir showed significant surface segregation when O and OH are chemisorbed on the catalyst surfaces. This result indicates that Pt3Os and Pt 3Ir favor formation of a Pt-skin surface layer structure that would resist the acidic electrolyte corrosion during fuel cell operation environments. We chose to focus on Os because the phase diagram for Pt-Ir indicated that Pt-Ir could not form a homogeneous alloy at lower temperature. To determine the performance for ORR, we used QM to examine intermediates, reaction pathways, and reaction barriers involved in the processes for which protons from the anode reactions react with O2 to form H2O. These QM calculations used our Poisson-Boltzmann implicit solvation model include the effects of the solvent (water with dielectric constant 78 with pH 7 at 298K). We also carried out similar QM studies followed by experimental validation for the Os/Pt core-shell catalyst fabricated by the underpotential deposition (UPD) method. The QM results indicated that the RDS for ORR is a compromise between the OOH formation step (0.37 eV for Pt, 0.23 eV for Pt2ML/Os core-shell) and H2O formation steps (0.32 eV for Pt, 0.22 eV for Pt2ML

  1. Heavy ion microprobes: a unique tool for bystander research and other radiobiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, K. O.; Fournier, C.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    2008-07-01

    The risk assessment for low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation has been challenged by a growing body of experimental evidence showing that non-irradiated bystander cells can receive signals from irradiated cells to elicit a variety of cellular responses. These may be significant for radiation protection but also for radiation therapy using heavy ions. Charged particle microbeams for radiobiological application provide a unique means to address these issues by allowing the precise irradiation of single cells with a counted numbers of ions. Here, we focus specifically on heavy ion microbeam facilities currently in use for biological purposes, describing their technical features and biological results. Typically, ion species up to argon are used for targeted biological irradiation at the vertically collimated microbeam at JAEA (Takasaki, Japan). At the SNAKE microprobe in Munich, mostly oxygen ions have been used in a horizontal focused beam line for cell targeting. At GSI (Darmstadt), a horizontal microprobe with a focused beam for defined targeting using ion species up to uranium is operational. The visualization of DNA damage response proteins relocalizing to defined sites of ion traversal has been accomplished at the three heavy ion microbeam facilities described above and is used to study mechanistic aspects of heavy ion effects. However, bystander studies have constituted the main focus of biological applications. While for cell inactivation and effects on cell cycle progression a response of non-targeted cells has been described at JAEA and GSI, respectively, in part controversial results have been obtained for the induction of DNA damage measured by double-strand formation or at the cytogenetic level. The results emphasize the influence of the cellular environment, and standardization of experimental conditions for cellular studies at different facilities as well as the investigation of bystander effects in tissue will be the aims of future

  2. A statistical study of proton pitch angle distributions measured by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run; Summers, Danny; Ni, Binbin; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Mitchell, Donald G.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2016-06-01

    A statistical study of ring current-energy proton pitch angle distributions (PADs) in Earth's inner magnetosphere is reported here. The data are from the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) on board the Van Allen Probe B spacecraft from 1 January 2013 to 15 April 2015. By fitting the data to the functional form sinnα, where α is the proton pitch angle, we examine proton PADs at the energies 50, 100, 180, 328, and 488 keV in the L shell range from L = 2.5 to L = 6. Three PAD types are classified: trapped (90° peaked), butterfly, and isotropic. The proton PAD dependence on the particle energy, magnetic local time (MLT), L shell, and geomagnetic activity are analyzed in detail. The results show a strong dependence of the proton PADs on MLT. On the nightside, the n values outside the plasmapause are clearly lower than those inside the plasmapause. At higher energies and during intense magnetic activity, nightside butterfly PADs can be observed at L shells down to the vicinity of the plasmapause. The averaged n values on the dayside are larger than on the nightside. A maximum of the averaged n values occurs around L = 4.5 in the postnoon sector (12-16 MLT). The averaged n values show a dawn-dusk asymmetry with lower values on the dawnside at high L shells, which is consistent with previous studies of butterfly PADs. The MLT dependence of the proton PADs becomes more distinct with increasing particle energy. These features suggest that drift shell splitting coupled with a radial flux gradient play an important role in the formation of PADs, particularly at L > ~ 4.5.

  3. Feasibility Study of Glass Dosimeter for In Vivo Measurement: Dosimetric Characterization and Clinical Application in Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Oh, Do Hoon; Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Suh, Tae-Suk; Ji, Young Hoon; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the suitability of the GD-301 glass dosimeter for in vivo dose verification in proton therapy. Methods and Materials: The glass dosimeter was analyzed for its dosimetrics characteristic in proton beam. Dosimeters were calibrated in a water phantom using a stairlike holder specially designed for this study. To determine the accuracy of the glass dosimeter in proton dose measurements, we compared the glass dosimeter and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) dose measurements using a cylindrical phantom. We investigated the feasibility of the glass dosimeter for the measurement of dose distributions near the superficial region for proton therapy plans with a varying separation between the target volume and the surface of 6 patients. Results and Discussion: Uniformity was within 1.5%. The dose-response has good linearity. Dose-rate, fading, and energy dependence were found to be within 3%. The beam profile measured using the glass dosimeter was in good agreement with the profile obtained from the ionization chamber. Depth-dose distributions in nonmodulated and modulated proton beams obtained with the glass dosimeter were estimated to be within 3%, which was lower than those with the ionization chamber. In the phantom study, the difference of isocenter dose between the delivery dose calculated by the treatment planning system and that measured by the glass dosimeter was within 5%. With in vivo dosimetry, the calculated surface doses overestimated measurements by 4%-16% using glass dosimeter and TLD. Conclusion: It is recommended that bolus be added for these clinical cases. We also believe that the glass dosimeter has considerable potential for use with in vivo patient proton dosimetry.

  4. Photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer: model study of isotope effects on reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Charulatha; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-10-21

    A model Hamiltonian for photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer reactions is presented, and the equations of motion for the reduced density matrix elements in an electron-proton vibronic basis are derived. This formalism enables a detailed analysis of the proton vibrational dynamics, as well as the dynamics of the electronic state populations, following photoexcitation. The application of this theory to model systems provides insight into the fundamental physical principles underlying these types of processes. The initial nonequilibrium state is prepared by vertical photoexcitation from the ground electronic state to a coherent vibrational mixture in the donor electronic state. This nonstationary state relaxes to the equilibrium distributions in the donor and acceptor electronic states via dynamical processes arising from nonadiabatic transitions between the donor and acceptor vibronic states concurrent with energy dissipation to the bath. During the initial stage, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state is distributed among higher vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket is oscillating with large amplitude, the electronic state population dynamics exhibits virtually no hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect. After vibrational relaxation, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state becomes concentrated in the lower vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket becomes more localized near the minimum of the donor potential, a significant hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect on the electronic state population dynamics is exhibited. These model system calculations lead to experimentally testable predictions about the qualitative behavior of these isotope effects. PMID:20568867

  5. Effect of pressure on the proton-proton vicinal coupling constants in 1,1,2-tricholoethane and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane-1- sup 13 C. A new approach to hig-pressure study of molecular conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Kazuoka, T.; Sera, A. )

    1988-10-26

    The first observation of a pressure-induced change in the proton-proton vicinal coupling constants, J{sub vic}, are reported here. It is also demonstrated that the experiment possibly provides a new, straightforward approach to conformation studies at high pressure. The pressure effects on coupling constants of 1,1,2-trichloroethane + 10 mol % of cyclopentane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane 1-{sup 13}C are reported. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Status of experimental studies of electron cloud effects at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R. J.; Browman, A. A.; Borden, M. J.; Fitzgerald, D. H.; McCrady, R. C.; Spickermann, T. J.; Zaugg, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    Various electron cloud effects (ECE) including the two-stream (e-p) instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have been studied extensively for the past five years with the goal of understanding the phenomena, mitigating the instability and ultimately increasing beam intensity. The specialized diagnostics used in the studies are two types of electron detectors, the retarding field analyzer and the electron sweepmg detector - which have been employed to measure characteristics of the electron cloud as functions of time, location in the ring and various influential beam parameters - plus a short stripline beam position monitor used to measure high frequency motion of the beam centroid. Highlights of this research program are summarized along with more detail on recent results obtained since the ECLOUD'02 workshop. Recent work mcludes a number of parametric studies of the various factors that affect the electron cloud signals, studies of the sources of initial or 'seed' electrons, additional observations of electron cloud dissipation after the beam pulse is extracted, studies of the 'first pulse instability' issue, more data on electron suppression as a cure for the instability, and observations of the effect of a one-turn weak kick on intense beams in the presence of a significant electron cloud.

  7. Molecular organization in the native state of woody tissue: Studies of tertiary structure and its development using the Raman microprobe, solid state {sup 13}C NMR, fluorescence spectroscopy and photoconductivity. Progress report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1995-05-01

    The work completed in the current program period is reported in 14 publications, some of which have appeared in print, and the rest of which are either in review, or will be by the end of September; five are attached to this report. The reports are conveniently discussed in four categories. The first is concerned with studies of cellulose and of the manner in which the hemicelluloses can influence the aggregation of the cellulose. This the focus is the polysaccharide matrix and the couplings that occur between its components. The second category includes the molecular modeling studies. These are new in our program, and cover explorations of the dominant characteristics of the polysaccharides and the precursors of lignin. The third group of publications address our realization that the polysaccharide matrix may well be the key to understanding the source of organization in native lignins. The fourth set of publications deal with direct conservations of organization in native lignin and the characteristic properties which reflect this organization.

  8. Proton transfer in organic scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Dipankar

    This dissertation focuses on the fundamental understanding of the proton transfer process and translating the knowledge into design/development of new organic materials for efficient non-aqueous proton transport. For example, what controls the shuttling of a proton between two basic sites? a) Distance between two groups? or b) the basicity? c) What is the impact of protonation on molecular conformation when the basic sites are attached to rigid scaffolds? For this purpose, we developed several tunable proton sponges and studied proton transfer in these scaffolds theoretically as well as experimentally. Next we moved our attention to understand long-range proton conduction or proton transport. We introduced liquid crystalline (LC) proton conductor based on triphenylene molecule and established that activation energy barrier for proton transport is lower in the LC phase compared to the crystalline phase. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of several critical factors: the choice of the proton transferring groups, mobility of the charge carriers, intrinsic vs. extrinsic charge carrier concentrations and the molecular architectures on long-range proton transport. The outcome of this research will lead to a deeper understanding of non-aqueous proton transfer process and aid the design of next generation proton exchange membrane (PEM) for fuel cell.

  9. Transparent intracortical microprobe array for simultaneous spatiotemporal optical stimulation and multichannel electrical recording.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonhee; Ozden, Ilker; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2015-12-01

    Optogenetics, the selective excitation or inhibition of neural circuits by light, has become a transformative approach for dissecting functional brain microcircuits, particularly in in vivo rodent models, owing to the expanding libraries of opsins and promoters. Yet there is a lack of versatile devices that can deliver spatiotemporally patterned light while performing simultaneous sensing to map the dynamics of perturbed neural populations at the network level. We have created optoelectronic actuator and sensor microarrays that can be used as monolithic intracortical implants, fabricated from an optically transparent, electrically highly conducting semiconductor ZnO crystal. The devices can perform simultaneous light delivery and electrical readout in precise spatial registry across the microprobe array. We applied the device technology in transgenic mice to study light-perturbed cortical microcircuit dynamics and their effects on behavior. The functionality of this device can be further expanded to optical imaging and patterned electrical microstimulation.

  10. Microprobe Evaluations of Grain Boundary Segregation in KM4 and IN100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Smith, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Turbine disk alloys subjected to fatigue cycles with dwells at high temperatures and stresses can fail by cracking along grain boundaries. This could be due to concentrated creep deformation or environmental attack at grain boundaries. It would be important to identify any chemical segregation along grain boundaries to aid understanding of this intergranular failure mode. The objective of this study was to evaluate the degree of chemical segregation present at the grain boundaries of two disk alloys, KM4 and IN 100. An electron microprobe employing wavelength dispersive x-ray chemical analyses was used to characterize the chemistry along multiple grain boundaries in metallographically prepared samples of each alloy. Some degrees of boron, chromium, and cobalt enrichment of grain boundaries were observed in each alloy.

  11. Garnet/high-silica rhyolite trace element partition coefficients measured by ion microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Bacon, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Garnet/liquid trace element partition coefficients have been measured in situ by ion microprobe in a rhyolite from Monache Mountain, California. Partition coefficients are reported for La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Dy, Er, Yb, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Sr, Y, and Zr. The in situ analyses avoid the problem of contamination of the garnet phase by trace element-rich accessory minerals encountered in traditional bulk phenocryst/matrix partitioning studies. The partitioning pattern for the rare earth elements (REEs, excluding Eu) is smooth and rises steeply from the light to the heavy REEs with no sharp kinks or changes in slope, unlike patterns for garnet /silicic liquid REE partitioning determined by bulk methods. This difference suggests that the previous determinations by bulk methods are in error, having suffered from contamination of the phenocryst separates. ?? 1992.

  12. Feasibility study of the neutron dose for real-time image-guided proton therapy: A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Sung; Shin, Jung Suk; Kim, Daehyun; Shin, Eunhyuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungkoo; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sanggyu; Chung, Yoonsun; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    Two full rotating gantries with different nozzles (multipurpose nozzle with MLC, scanning dedicated nozzle) for a conventional cyclotron system are installed and being commissioned for various proton treatment options at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The purpose of this study is to use Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, for X-ray imaging equipment under various treatment conditions. At first, we investigated the H/D for various modifications of the beamline devices (scattering, scanning, multi-leaf collimator, aperture, compensator) at the isocenter and at 20, 40 and 60 cm distances from the isocenter, and we compared our results with those of other research groups. Next, we investigated the neutron dose at the X-ray equipment used for real-time imaging under various treatment conditions. Our investigation showed doses of 0.07 ~ 0.19 mSv/Gy at the X-ray imaging equipment, depending on the treatment option and interestingly, the 50% neutron dose reduction was observed due to multileaf collimator during proton scanning treatment with the multipurpose nozzle. In future studies, we plan to measure the neutron dose experimentally and to validate the simulation data for X-ray imaging equipment for use as an additional neutron dose reduction method.

  13. Studies on sodium metasilicate plus hydrazine sulphate gel as a possible proton conductor: I. Structural and ion transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, D. K.; Chandra, S.

    1997-07-01

    The new proton-conducting gel system 0022-3727/30/14/016/img1 is reported. The gel system is prepared by an aqueous-based sol - gel process. Structural studies have been carried out using IR, XRD and DTA/TGA techniques. The gel systems possess new structural phases and are thermally stable relative to the starting materials. The ion-transport studies in the gel have been carried out using various techniques like polarization, coulometry, TIC and complex impedance spectroscopy. The gel compositions have been found to be predominantly ionically conducting 0022-3727/30/14/016/img2 at room temperature as well as at high temperatures. The main transporting species are identified to be protonic (0022-3727/30/14/016/img3 and 0022-3727/30/14/016/img4) with respective transference numbers 0022-3727/30/14/016/img5 and 0022-3727/30/14/016/img6 are also identified to be mobile in the gel network. The mobilities of these ions have been evaluated at various temperatures. The electrical conductivity of these gels is very high (0022-3727/30/14/016/img7) and is found to vary with composition, temperature and relative humidity.

  14. A dash of protons: A theoretical study on the hydrolysis mechanism of 1-substitued silatranes and their protonated analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Sok, Sarom; Gordon, Mark

    2011-08-17

    Ab initio calculations were carried out to study the hydrolysis mechanism of 1-substituted silatranes in the presence of an acid (acid-catalyzed) and an additional water (water-assisted). Compared with the neutral hydrolysis mechanism involving one water, use of an acid catalyst reduces the barrier associated with the rate-limiting step by approximate to 14 kcal/mol. A modest decrease of approximate to 5 kcal/mol is predicted when an additional water molecule is added to the neutral hydrolysis mechanism involving one water. The combination of an acid catalyst and an additional water molecule reduces the barrier by approximate to 27 kcal/mol. Bond order analysis suggests ring cleavage involving the bond breaking of a siloxane and silanol group during the neutral and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-substituted silatranes. respectively. Solvent effects, represented by the PCM continuum model, do not qualitatively alter computational gas-phase results. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of proton transfer processes and the dissociation of Zn2+-bound water in alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Nadolny, C; Zundel, G

    1997-08-01

    The following complexes were investigated by Fourier transform difference spectroscopy: binary complexes of alcohol dehydrogenases from yeast (YADH) and horse liver (LADH) with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and adenosine (5')-diphospho(5)-beta-D-ribose (ADP-Rib); the binary complex of Zn2+-free YADH with NAD+, the ternary complex of LADH with NAD+ and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. After addition of NAD+ to YADH and LADH, protonation of the N1 atom of the adenine ring of NAD+ is observed. It is shown that this proton arises from the dissociation of the Zn2+-bound water. The interaction of the Zn2+ ion with water is very strong, since this interaction is not just an electrostatic interaction. If the Zn2+ ions are in a tetrahedral environment, a large covalent contribution also occurs. If ADP-Rib is present instead of NAD+, no protonation of the N1 atom of the adenine ring of ADP-Rib is found, which demonstrates that the positively charged nicotinamide ring favors the conduction of the positive charge. All these results confirm the mechanism of Brändén et al. (1975): the Zn2+-bound water is split and the arising (OH)- deprotonates the alcohol. In the case of the ternary complex of LADH with NAD+ and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, we demonstrate that the alcohol is deprotonated and the alcoholate ion is bound directly to the Zn2+ ion. The conduction of the proton from the active site to the N1 atom of adenine occurs via a hydrogen-bonded chain with large proton polarizability due to collective proton motion. The nature and mechanism of this pathway are discussed on the basis of data from previous studies.

  16. 3D reconstruction of scintillation light emission from proton pencil beams using limited viewing angles—a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, CheukKai; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2014-08-01

    An accurate and high-resolution quality assurance (QA) method for proton radiotherapy beams is necessary to ensure correct dose delivery to the target. Detectors based on a large volume of liquid scintillator have shown great promise in providing fast and high-resolution measurements of proton treatment fields. However, previous work with these detectors has been limited to two-dimensional measurements, and the quantitative measurement of dose distributions was lacking. The purpose of the current study is to assess the feasibility of reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) scintillation light distributions of spot scanning proton beams using a scintillation system. The proposed system consists of a tank of liquid scintillator imaged by charge-coupled device cameras at three orthogonal viewing angles. Because of the limited number of viewing angles, we developed a profile-based technique to obtain an initial estimate that can improve the quality of the 3D reconstruction. We found that our proposed scintillator system and profile-based technique can reconstruct a single energy proton beam in 3D with a gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm local) of 100.0%. For a single energy layer of an intensity modulated proton therapy prostate treatment plan, the proposed method can reconstruct the 3D light distribution with a gamma pass rate (3%/3 mm local) of 99.7%. In addition, we also found that the proposed method is effective in detecting errors in the treatment plan, indicating that it can be a very useful tool for 3D proton beam QA.

  17. Factors governing the protonation state of Zn-bound histidine in proteins: a DFT/CDM study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-lin; Lim, Carmay

    2004-03-01

    We have performed systematic theoretical studies to elucidate the factors governing the His protonation/deprotonation state in Zn-binding sites, especially those containing the ubiquitous Zn-His-Asp/Glu triad. Specifically, we have addressed the following three questions: (1) How does the transfer of the Zn-bound His imidazole proton to the second-shell Asp/Glu carboxylate oxygen depend on the composition of the other first-shell ligands and the solvent accessibility of the metal-binding site? (2) Can any second-shell ligand with a proton acceptor group such as the backbone carbonyl oxygen also act as a proton acceptor? (3) What is the effect of the Asp/Glu in the Zn-His-Asp/Glu triad on the Zn-bound water protonation state? To address these questions, we used a combination of quantum mechanical and continuum dielectric methods to compute the free energies for deprotonating a Zn-bound imidazole/water in various Zn complexes. The calculations show that whether the Zn-bound His is protonated or deprotonated depends on (1) the solvent accessibility of the metal-binding site, and (2) the Lewis acid ability of Zn, which is indirectly determined by both the first- and the second-shell Zn ligands. The calculations also show that the effect of the Zn-His-Asp/Glu interaction on the nucleophilicity of the Zn-bound water depends on the solvent accessibility of the catalytic Zn site. Furthermore, they show that the Asp/Glu side chain in the Zn-His-Asp/Glu triad can increase the negative charge of its partner, His, and create an anionic hole that may stabilize a cation in buried cavities, provided that the Zn complex is cationic/neutral. The findings of this work are in accord with available experimental data.

  18. A Comparative Ab Initio Study of the Primary Hydration and Proton Dissociation of Various Imide and Sulfonic Acid Ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Clark II, Jeffrey K.; Paddison, Stephen J.; Eikerling, Michael; Dupuis, Michel; Zawodzinski, Jr., Thomas A.

    2012-03-29

    We compare the role of neighboring group substitutions on proton dissociation of hydrated acidic moieties suitable for proton exchange membranes through electronic structure calculations. Three pairs of ionomers containing similar electron withdrawing groups within the pair were chosen for the study: two fully fluorinated sulfonyl imides (CF3SO2NHSO2CF3 and CF3CF2SO2NHSO2CF3), two partially fluorinated sulfonyl imides (CH3SO2NHSO2CF3 and C6H5SO2NHSO2CF2CF3), and two aromatic sulfonic acid based material s (CH3C6H4SO3H and CH3 OC6 - H3OCH3C6H4SO3H). Fully optimized counterpoise (CP) corrected geometries were obtained for each ionomer fragment with the inclusion of water molecules at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of density functional theory. Spontaneous proton dissociation was observed upon addition of three water molecules in each system, and the transition to a solvent-separated ion pair occurred when four water molecules were introduced. No considerable quantitative or qualitative differences in proton dissociation, hydrogen bond networks formed, or water binding energies were found between systems containing similar electron withdrawing groups. Each of the sulfonyl imide ionomers exhibited qualitatively similar results regarding proton dissociation and separation. The fully fluorinated sulfonyl imides, however, showed a greater propensity to exist in dissociated and ion-pair separated states at low degrees of hydration than the partially fluorinated sulfonyl imides. This effect is due to the additional electron withdrawing groups providing charge stabilization as the dissociated proton migrates away from the imide anion.

  19. 3D reconstruction of scintillation light emission from proton pencil beams using limited viewing angles-a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Hui, CheukKai; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2014-08-21

    An accurate and high-resolution quality assurance (QA) method for proton radiotherapy beams is necessary to ensure correct dose delivery to the target. Detectors based on a large volume of liquid scintillator have shown great promise in providing fast and high-resolution measurements of proton treatment fields. However, previous work with these detectors has been limited to two-dimensional measurements, and the quantitative measurement of dose distributions was lacking. The purpose of the current study is to assess the feasibility of reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) scintillation light distributions of spot scanning proton beams using a scintillation system. The proposed system consists of a tank of liquid scintillator imaged by charge-coupled device cameras at three orthogonal viewing angles. Because of the limited number of viewing angles, we developed a profile-based technique to obtain an initial estimate that can improve the quality of the 3D reconstruction. We found that our proposed scintillator system and profile-based technique can reconstruct a single energy proton beam in 3D with a gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm local) of 100.0%. For a single energy layer of an intensity modulated proton therapy prostate treatment plan, the proposed method can reconstruct the 3D light distribution with a gamma pass rate (3%/3 mm local) of 99.7%. In addition, we also found that the proposed method is effective in detecting errors in the treatment plan, indicating that it can be a very useful tool for 3D proton beam QA. PMID:25054735

  20. Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and Magnesium Concentrations in Hemodialysis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Akio; Ohkido, Ichiro; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Mafune, Aki; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium concentration is a proven predictor of mortality in hemodialysis patients. Recent reports have indicated that proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use affects serum magnesium levels, however few studies have investigated the relationship between PPI use and magnesium levels in hemodialysis patients. This study aimed to clarify the association between PPI use and serum magnesium levels in hemodialysis patients. We designed this cross sectional study and included 1189 hemodialysis patients in stable condition. Associations between PPI and magnesium-related factors, as well as other possible confounders, were evaluated using a multiple regression model. We defined hypomagnesemia as a value < 2.0 mg/dL, and created comparable logistic regression models to assess the association between PPI use and hypomagnesemia. PPI use is associated with a significantly lower mean serum magnesium level than histamine 2 (H2) receptor antagonists or no acid-suppressive medications (mean [SD] PPI: 2.52 [0.45] mg/dL; H2 receptor antagonist: 2.68 [0.41] mg/dL; no acid suppressive medications: 2.68 [0.46] mg/dL; P = 0.001). Hypomagnesemia remained significantly associated with PPI (adjusted OR, OR: 2.05; 95% CI: 1.14-3.69; P = 0.017). PPI use is associated with an increased risk of hypomagnesemia in hemodialysis patients. Future prospective studies are needed to explore magnesium replacement in PPI users on hemodialysis.

  1. Design study for a 500 MeV proton synchrotron with CSNS linac as an injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Ji, Hong-Fei; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Using the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac as the injector, a 500 MeV proton synchrotron is proposed for multidisciplinary applications, such as biology, material science and proton therapy. The synchrotron will deliver proton beam with energy from 80 MeV to 500 MeV. A compact lattice design has been worked out, and all the important beam dynamics issues have been investigated. The 80 MeV H- beam is stripped and injected into the synchrotron by using multi-turn injection. In order to continuously extraction the proton with small beam loss, an achromatic structure is proposed and a slow extraction method with RF knock-out is adopted and optimized.

  2. Design study for a 500 MeV proton synchrotron with CSNS linac as an injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Ji, Hong-Fei; Wang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Using the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac as the injector, a 500 MeV proton synchrotron is proposed for multidisciplinary applications, such as biology, material science and proton therapy. The synchrotron will deliver proton beam with energy from 80 MeV to 500 MeV. A compact lattice design has been worked out, and all the important beam dynamics issues have been investigated. The 80 MeV H‑ beam is stripped and injected into the synchrotron by using multi-turn injection. In order to continuously extraction the proton with small beam loss, an achromatic structure is proposed and a slow extraction method with RF knock-out is adopted and optimized.

  3. Proton transport in triflic acid hydrates studied via path integral car-parrinello molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robin L; Paddison, Stephen J; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2009-12-31

    The mono-, di-, and tetrahydrates of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, which contain characteristic H(3)O(+), H(5)O(2)(+), and H(9)O(4)(+) structures, provide model systems for understanding proton transport in materials with high perfluorosulfonic acid density such as perfluorosulfonic acid membranes commonly employed in hydrogen fuel cells. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that protons in these solids are predisposed to transfer to the water most strongly bound to sulfonate groups via a Grotthuss-type mechanism, but quickly return to the most solvated defect structure either due to the lack of a nearby species to stabilize the new defect or a preference for the proton to be maximally hydrated. Path integral molecular dynamics of the mono- and dihydrate reveal significant quantum effects that facilitate proton transfer to the "presolvated" water or SO(3)(-) in the first solvation shell and increase the Zundel character of all the defects. These trends are quantified in free energy profiles for each bonding environment. Hydrogen bonding criteria for HOH-OH(2) and HOH-O(3)S are extracted from the two-dimensional potential of mean force. The quantum radial distribution function, radius of gyration, and root-mean-square displacement position correlation function show that the protonic charge is distributed over two or more water molecules. Metastable structural defects with one excess proton shared between two sulfonate groups and another Zundel or Eigen type cation defect are found for the mono- and dihydrate but not for the tetrahydrate crystal. Results for the tetrahydrate native crystal exhibit minor differences at 210 and 250 K. IR spectra are calculated for all native and stable defect structures. Graph theory techniques are used to characterize the chain lengths and ring sizes in the hydrogen bond network. Low conductivities when limited water is present may be attributable to trapping of protons between SO(3)(-) groups and the increased

  4. Theoretical study of the structure and electronic spectra of fully protonated emeraldine oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhekova, H.; Tadjer, A.; Ivanova, A.; Petrova, J.; Gospodinova, N.

    Polyaniline (PANI) is one of the most studied conducting polymers. Obtained in its conducting form (known as ?emeraldine salt?) by chemical or electrochemical oxidation of aniline in aqueous acidic medium, this polymer manifests an array of attractive properties. Nevertheless, these properties still need to be described at the molecular level. Intense theoretical investigations during the past few years aim at explaining the chain organization, conductivity mechanism, and other structural and spectral characteristics. Most studies adopt simplified models in which hydration effect is underestimated, since all simulations are performed either in vacuum or in the presence of a limited number of water molecules. The present computational study sheds light on the molecular organization of a number of model PANI hydrated clusters with different alignment and multiplicity, which can explain the experimentally recorded UV/VIS spectra. The influence of hydration and interaction with adjacent oligomers is estimated. Short-chain doubly protonated emeraldine oligomers are used as model systems. The calculations are performed at the semi-empirical (AM1) and/or molecular mechanics (AMBER96) level. Proper configurations of the clusters are selected using Monte Carlo simulations. Electron correlation (CIS) is accounted for upon evaluation of the absorption spectra of the clusters. The relative strength of the interchain coupling is estimated by simulation of PANI clusters consisting of two PANI tetramers in water. Comparison to experimental results is made.

  5. Use of proton-pump inhibitors among adults: a Danish nationwide drug utilization study

    PubMed Central

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, Anne; Hallas, Jesper; de Muckadell, Ove B. Schaffalitzky; Lassen, Annmarie T.; Lødrup, Anders B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) has increased over the last decade. The objective of this study was to provide detailed utilization data on PPI use over time, with special emphasis on duration of PPI use and concomitant use of ulcerogenic drugs. Methods: Using the nationwide Danish Prescription Registry, we identified all Danish adults filling a PPI between 2002 and 2014. Using descriptive statistics, we reported (i) the distribution of use between single PPI entities, (ii) the development in incidence and prevalence of use over time, (iii) measures of duration and intensity of treatment, and (iv) the prevalence of use of ulcerogenic drugs among users of PPIs. Results: We identified 1,617,614 adults using PPIs during the study period. The prevalence of PPI use increased fourfold during the study period to 7.4% of all Danish adults in 2014. PPI use showed strong age dependency, reaching more than 20% among those aged at least 80 years. The proportion of users maintaining treatment over time increased with increasing age, with less than10% of those aged 18–39 years using PPIs 2 years after their first prescription, compared with about 40% among those aged at least 80 years. The overall use of ulcerogenic drugs among PPI users increased moderately, from 35% of users of PPI in 2002 to 45% in 2014. Conclusions: The use of PPIs is extensive and increasing rapidly, especially among the elderly. PMID:27582879

  6. Fundamental Studies on the Use of Laser-Driven Proton Beams for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Kim, J.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Nilson, P. M.; Theobald, W.; Habara, H.; Tanaka, K.; Yabuuchi, T.; Foord, M. E.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H. S.; Roth, M.; McKenna, P.

    2015-11-01

    A short-pulse-laser-driven intense proton beam remains a candidate for Fast Ignition heater due to its focusability and high current. However, the proton current density necessary for FI in practice has never been produced in the laboratory and there are many physics issues that should be addressed using current and near-term facilities. For example, the extraction of sufficient proton charge from the short-pulse laser target could be evaluated with the multi-kilojoule NIF ARC laser. Transport of the beam through matter, such as a cone tip, and deposition in the fuel must be considered carefully as it will isochorically heat any material it enters and produce a rapidly-evolving, warm dense matter state with uncertain transport and stopping properties. Here we share experimental measurements of the proton spectra after passing through metal cones and foils taken with the kilojoule-class, multi-picosecond OMEGA EP and LFEX lasers. We also present complementary PIC simulations of beam generation and transport to and in the foils. Upcoming experiments to further evaluate proton beam performance in proton FI will also be outlined. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA NLUF program, Contract DE-NA0002034 and by the AFOSR under Contract FA9550-14-1-0346.

  7. Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  8. Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

    1951-01-31

    The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

  9. Proton-beam writing channel based on an electrostatic accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapin, A. S.; Rebrov, V. A.; Kolin'ko, S. V.; Salivon, V. F.; Ponomarev, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We have described the structure of the proton-beam writing channel as a continuation of a nuclear scanning microprobe channel. The problem of the accuracy of positioning a probe by constructing a new high-frequency electrostatic scanning system has been solved. Special attention has been paid to designing the probe-forming system and its various configurations have been considered. The probe-forming system that best corresponds to the conditions of the lithographic process has been found based on solving the problem of optimizing proton beam formation. A system for controlling beam scanning using multifunctional module of integrated programmable logic systems has been developed.

  10. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |η| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η-Φspace; “toward”, “away”, and “transverse”. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the “underlying event”. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the “hard component” (initial and final-state radiation) from the “beam-beammore » remnant” and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.« less

  11. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.; Aaltonen, T; Albrow, M; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (p(T) > 0.5 GeV/c, vertical bar eta vertical bar < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies root s = 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of eta - phi space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  12. Conductivity and electrical studies of plasticized carboxymethyl cellulose based proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, M. I. N.; Noor, N. A. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolytes (SBE) comprises of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as polymer host, ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) as doping salt and ethylene carbonate (EC) as plasticizer has been prepared via solution casting technique. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was carried out to study the conductivity and electrical properties of plasticized CMC-NH4SCN SBE system over a wide range of frequency between 50 Hz and 1 MHz at temperature range of 303 to 353 K. Upon addition of plasticizer into CMC-NH4SCN SBE system, the conductivity increased from 10-5 to 10-2 Scm-1. The highest conductivity was obtained by the electrolyte containing 10 wt.% of EC. The conductivity of plasticized CMC-NH4SCN SBE system by various temperatures obeyed Arrhenius law where the ionic conductivity increased as the temperature increased. The activation energy, Ea was found to decrease with enhancement of EC concentration. Dielectric studies for the highest conductivity electrolyte obeyed non-Debye behavior. The conduction mechanism for the highest conductivity electrolyte was determined by employing Jonsher's universal power law and thus, can be represented by the quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) model.

  13. Isomer Studies for Nuclei near the Proton Drip Line in the Mass 130-160 Region

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.; Mason, P. J. R.; Khan, S.; Kishada, A. M.; Varley, B. J.; Rigby, S. V.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P.; Rahkila, P.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A. P.; Nyman, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Grahn, T.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.

    2007-11-30

    This report details the status of an experimental research programme which has studied isomeric states in the mass 130-160 region of the nuclear chart. Several new isomers have been established and characterised near the proton drip line using a recoil isomer tagging technique at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. The latest experiments have been performed with a modified setup where the standard GREAT focal-plane double-sided silicon-strip detector was changed to a dual multi-wire proportional-counter arrangement. This new setup has improved capability for short-lived isomer studies where high focal-plane rates can be tolerated. The results of key recent experiments for nuclei situated above ({sup 153}Yb,{sup 152}Tm) and below ({sup 136}Pm,{sup 142}Tb) the N = 82 shell gap were presented along with an interpretation for the isomers. Finally, the future prospects of the technique, using an isomer-tagged differential-plunger setup, were discussed. This technique will be capable of establishing the deformation of the states above the isomers and will aid in the process of assigning underlying single-particle configurations to the isomeric states.

  14. Study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucá, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We study charged particle production (pT>0.5 GeV /c , |η |<0.8 ) in proton-antiproton collisions at total center-of-mass energies √{s }=300 GeV , 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η -ϕ space: "toward", "away", and "transverse." The average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the "underlying event." The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the "hard component" (initial and final-state radiation) from the "beam-beam remnant" and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. The center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event is studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  15. A study of the energy dependence of the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-11-23

    We study charged particle production (pT > 0.5 GeV/c, |η| < 0.8) in proton-antiproton collisions at 300 GeV, 900 GeV, and 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the charged particle with the largest transverse momentum in each event to define three regions of η-Φspace; “toward”, “away”, and “transverse”. Furthermore, the average number and the average scalar pT sum of charged particles in the transverse region are sensitive to the modeling of the “underlying event”. The transverse region is divided into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the “hard component” (initial and final-state radiation) from the “beam-beam remnant” and multiple parton interaction components of the scattering. We found that the center-of-mass energy dependence of the various components of the event are studied in detail. The data presented here can be used to constrain and improve QCD Monte Carlo models, resulting in more precise predictions at the LHC energies of 13 and 14 TeV.

  16. An analytical model and parametric study of electrical contact resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiliang; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Lianhong; Hu, S. Jack

    This paper presents an analytical model of the electrical contact resistance between the carbon paper gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and the graphite bipolar plates (BPPs) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The model is developed based on the classical statistical contact theory for a PEM fuel cell, using the same probability distributions of the GDL structure and BPP surface profile as previously described in Wu et al. [Z. Wu, Y. Zhou, G. Lin, S. Wang, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 182 (2008) 265-269] and Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Results show that estimates of the contact resistance compare favorably with experimental data by Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Factors affecting the contact behavior are systematically studied using the analytical model, including the material properties of the two contact bodies and factors arising from the manufacturing processes. The transverse Young's modulus of chopped carbon fibers in the GDL and the surface profile of the BPP are found to be significant to the contact resistance. The factor study also sheds light on the manufacturing requirements of carbon fiber GDLs for a better contact performance in PEM fuel cells.

  17. Proton pump inhibitors and vascular function: A prospective cross-over pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T.; Cooke, John P.; Khan, Fouzia; Thakker, Rahul N.; Chang, Peter; Shah, Nigam H.; Nead, Kevin T.; Leeper, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of gastric reflux. Recent retrospective cohorts and large database studies have raised concern that the use of PPIs is associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. However, there is no prospective clinical study evaluating whether the use of PPIs directly causes CV harm. Methods We conducted a controlled open-label cross-over pilot study among 21 adults aged 18 and older who are healthy (n = 11) or have established clinical cardiovascular disease (n = 10). Study subjects were assigned to receive a PPI (Prevacid; 30 mg) or a placebo pill once daily for 4 weeks. After a 2 week washout period, participants were crossed-over to receive the alternate treatment for the ensuing 4 weeks. Subjects underwent evaluation of vascular function (by the EndoPAT technique) and had plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial function previously implicated in PPI-mediated risk) measured prior to and after each treatment interval. Results We observed a marginal inverse correlation between the EndoPAT score and plasma levels of ADMA (r = −0.364). Subjects experienced a greater worsening in plasma ADMA levels while on PPI than on placebo, and this trend was more pronounced amongst those subjects with a history of vascular disease. However, these trends did not reach statistical significance, and PPI use was also not associated with an impairment in flow mediated vasodilation during the course of this study. Conclusions In this open-label, cross-over pilot study conducted among healthy subjects and coronary disease patients, PPI use did not significantly influence vascular endothelial function. Larger, long-term and blinded trials are needed to mechanistically explain the correlation between PPI use and adverse clinical outcomes, which has recently been reported in retrospective cohort studies. PMID:25835348

  18. SU-E-T-590: An Activation Study of Materials and Devices Present in a Proton Treatment Room

    SciTech Connect

    Spitznagel, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The use of protons for radiation therapy is growing rapidly. One consequence of protons interacting with different media is activation. These nuclear reactions induced by the protons, scattered neutrons, and gamma rays, activate different materials encountered, particularly by the therapists. The purpose of this study was to examine the derived nuclides from the activation, and also the decay rate. Methods: The study was conducted in our proton therapy facility. Protons are derived from a synchrocyclotron and pass through field shipping systems, apertures, and range compensators to define the beam within the patient.Included materials of concerns measured; the patient support couch, sheet rock in the wall, solid plastics used for quality assurance and dosimetry, and the passive scattering system itself, which includes brass apertures, and Lucite or blue wax compensators. All devices were studied post irradiation using gamma spectroscopy to determine the nuclides, and a sodium iodine scintillation detector to measure decay, particularly when the dose rate fell to background levels. Results: We have also determined from the measurements we will maintain brass apertures for three months before sending them for scrap. Some of the radionuclides arrived from these measurements included Na-22 for the blue wax compensator, C1-34m for the sheetrock, and Sc-44 and Co-60 for the brass apertures. We found compensators made out of Lucite or wax decayed to background in 2 hours. The patient support couch decayed to background in approximately 40 minutes, and sheet rock decayed in 80 minutes. In terms of the aperture layers, the most proximal aperture slab had much higher activity than the distal slab. Also the proximal sides of the slabs were much more activate than the distal. Conclusion: We have given proper instruction to therapists performing quality assurance in terms of the handled plastics, and to handle apertures rapidly as possible.

  19. Proton beam therapy for pediatric malignancies: a retrospective observational multicenter study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Demizu, Yusuke; Fukushima, Takashi; Ishida, Yuji; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Numajiri, Haruko; Fuji, Hiroshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Shirato, Hiroki; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2016-07-01

    Recent progress in the treatment for pediatric malignancies using a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy has improved survival. However, late toxicities of radiotherapy are a concern in long-term survivors. A recent study suggested reduced secondary cancer and other late toxicities after proton beam therapy (PBT) due to dosimetric advantages. In this study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of PBT for pediatric patients treated in Japan. A retrospective observational study in pediatric patients who received PBT was performed. All patients aged <20 years old who underwent PBT from January 1983 to August 2014 at four sites in Japan were enrolled in the study. There were 343 patients in the study. The median follow-up periods were 22.6 months (0.4-374.3 months) for all patients and 30.6 months (0.6-374.3 months) for survivors. The estimated 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 82.7% (95% CI: 78.5-87.0%), 67.4% (61.7-73.2%), 61.4% (54.8-67.9%), and 58.7% (51.5-65.9%), respectively. Fifty-two events of toxicity ≥ grade 2 occurred in 43 patients. Grade 4 toxicities of myelitis, visual loss (two cases), cerebral vascular disease, and tissue necrosis occurred in five patients. This study provides preliminary results for PBT in pediatric patients in Japan. More experience and follow-up with this technique are required to establish the efficacy of PBT in this patient population.

  20. A density functional study of crystalline acetic acid and its proton transfer polymorphic forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovira, Carme; Novoa, Juan J.

    2000-11-01

    We present a density functional study of the structure and dynamics of solid acetic acid. Our calculations are based on density functional theory combined with molecular dynamics, within the Car-Parrinello scheme. The computed structure of the acetic acid crystal, optimized without symmetry constraints, is in very good agreement with the experiment and reproduces the changes in the intramolecular structure when going from the gas phase to the solid. The cell parameters of the experimental structure are also well reproduced. Cooperative effects along the molecular chains building the crystal are found to be small (1.2 kcal/mol), although larger than it had been previously estimated. The anti conformation of the COOH fragment leads to a stable structure up to 250 K, with an energy of only 3 kcal/mol above that of the known syn form. The energy barrier associated with the most likely pathway for the syn to anti conformations, involving proton transfer along the OH⋯O units (<5.8 kcal/mol) is much smaller than the experimental barrier for the syn/anti isomerism in gas phase and in solution. Intramolecular and intermolecular reorganizations upon change to the anti structure are analyzed. Overall, our results pinpoint the anti form as a good candidate for a possible acetic acid polymorph.

  1. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  2. PET - A proton/electron telescope for studies of magnetospheric, solar, and galactic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Walter R.; Cummings, Alan C.; Cummings, Jay R.; Garrard, Thomas L.; Kecman, Branislav; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Selesnick, Richard S.; Stone, Edward C.; Baker, Daniel N.; Von Rosenvinge, Tycho T.

    1993-01-01

    The Proton/Electron Telescope (PET) on SAMPEX is designed to provide measurements of energetic electrons and light nuclei from solar, galactic, and magnetospheric sources. PET is an all solid-state system that will measure the differential energy spectra of electrons from about 1 to about 30 MeV and H and He nuclei from about 20 to about 300 MeV/nuc, with isotope resolution of H and He extending from about 20 to about 80 MeV/nuc. As SAMPEX scans all local times and geomagnetic cutoffs over the course of its near-polar orbit, PET will characterize precipitating relativistic electron events during periods of declining solar activity, and it will examine whether the production rate of odd nitrogen and hydrogen molecules in the middle atmosphere by precipitating electrons is sufficient to affect O3 depletion. In addition, PET will complement studies of the elemental and isotopic composition of energetic heavy (Z greater than 2) nuclei on SAMPEX by providing measurements of H, He, and electrons. Finally, PET has limited capability to identify energetic positrons from potential natural and man-made sources.

  3. Study of Events with a Muon Accompanied by Jets at the CERN Proton-Antiproton Collider.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin

    1990-01-01

    During the 1988 and 1989 running periods of the CERN Proton-Antiproton Collider, at sqrt {s} = 630 GeV, the UA1 experiment collected 4.7 pb^{-1} data with muon triggers. Events containing an energetic muon and hadronic jets are studied in detail. The data is found to be in good agreement with expectations from known physics processes, mainly from beauty and charm quark production and decay, and from backgrounds such as pion and kaon decays in flight. Based on the understanding of the sources of the muon+jet data sample, a search is carried out for the sixth quark, the top quark. No evidence of top quark production is found in this data sample. Combining this result with those from searches in other UA1 data samples (a total of 5.4 pb^{-1}, a lower limit on the mass of the top quark is obtained: m _{rm top} > 60 GeV/c^2 (95% confidence level). The muon+jet data sample is also used for a search for Z^0 to tau^+tau^- production in pp collisions, by selecting events where one tau decays to a muon and the other tau decays to hadrons. The data is found to be consistent with lepton universality. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253 -1690.).

  4. Studies of Proton-Induced Dimuons with 120 GeV Protons and the Iron Beam Dump at E906/SeaQuest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, Randall; E906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    E906/SeaQuest is a fixed-target dimuon experiment currently taking data using Fermilab's 120 GeV proton beam and hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, iron, and tungsten targets. The primary goal of SeaQuest is the measurement of nucleon antiquark structure via the Drell-Yan process on liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets. However, the use of a solid iron beam dump provides the opportunity to make high-statistics measurements of dimuon decays from proton-iron interactions. Analysis of the beam dump data will yield insights into a number of interesting topics. Drell-Yan decay angle distributions can be used to check the behavior of the Boer-Mulders function and the violation of the Lam-Tung relation in proton induced Drell-Yan. The polar decay angle distribution of J / Ψ events is relevant for testing models of c c productions and hadronization. The intrinsic charm content of the proton could potentially be measured through the xF-dependence of J / Ψ decays and double-charmonium decays. The pT distributions of Drell-Yan and J / Ψ decays can be measured for 120-GeV protons. Preliminary results from various analyses on proton-iron interactions from the 2014 dataset will be presented.

  5. An integrated computer system for Fudan nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Degang; Ren, Chigang; Tang, Jiayong; Yang, Fujia

    1995-09-01

    With the help of modern personal computer (PC) and object oriented programming (OOP) technology, we have recently developed a compact, integrated, user-friendly computer system for Fudan nuclear microprobe, which was originally modeled after the SUNY/Albany system. The system software has been thoroughly rewritten so as to take advantage of today's high-performance PC and facilitate easy upgrading and expansion in the case of future development of both hardware and software. Most functions of this system such as sample searching, scanning control, data acquisition, image processing and displaying, are based on a single 80386 IBM style PC with a 1-MB DRAM TVGA high-resolution monitor. Data from up to 4 ADCs, 4 sensors and a CCD camera can be acquired simultaneously. Two stepper motors are employed to move the target; a CCD camera system is also included to locate the area of interest on the sample; the secondary electron image could act as a reference to fine adjustment. Rectangular raster scanning or irregular scanning is facilitated with beam motion triggered either by a timer or by pulses from a current integrator. A variety of built-in image displaying, processing and printing methods have also been implemented in order to make the maps easier to interpret for the eyes. All of these functions are administrated by an integrated, completely menu-driven software package-MBSYS.

  6. Measuring localized viscoelasticity of the vitreous body using intraocular microprobes.

    PubMed

    Pokki, Juho; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Sevim, Semih; Enzmann, Volker; Torun, Hamdi; Nelson, Bradley J

    2015-10-01

    Vitrectomy is a standard ophthalmic procedure to remove the vitreous body from the eye. The biomechanics of the vitreous affects its duration (by changing the removal rate) and the mechanical forces transmitted via the vitreous on the surrounding tissues during the procedure. Biomechanical characterization of the vitreous is essential for optimizing the design and control of instruments that operate within the vitreous for improved precision, safety, and efficacy. The measurements are carried out using a magnetic microprobe inserted into the vitreous, a method known as magnetic microrheology. The location of the probe is tracked by a microscope/camera while magnetic forces are exerted wirelessly by applied magnetic fields. In this work, in vitro artificial vitreous, ex vivo human vitreous and ex vivo porcine vitreous were characterized. In addition, in vivo rabbit measurements were performed using a suturelessly injected probe. Measurements indicate that viscoelasticity parameters of the ex vivo human vitreous are an order of magnitude different from those of the ex vivo porcine vitreous. The in vivo intra-operative measurements show typical viscoelastic behavior of the vitreous with a lower compliance than the ex vivo measurements. The results of the magnetic microrheology measurements were validated with those obtained by a standard atomic force microscopy (AFM) method and in vitro artificial vitreous. This method allows minimally-invasive characterization of localized mechanical properties of the vitreous in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A better understanding of the characteristics of the vitreous can lead to improvements in treatments concerning vitreal manipulation such as vitrectomy.

  7. Enhanced Raman Microprobe Imaging of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjiev, V. G.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Jandl, S.; Yowell, L.

    2003-01-01

    We explore Raman microprobe capabilities to visualize single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Although this technique is limited to a micron scale, we demonstrate that images of individual SWCNTs, bundles or their agglomerates can be generated by mapping Raman active elementary excitations. We measured the Raman response from carbon vibrations in SWCNTs excited by confocal scanning of a focused laser beam. Carbon vibrations reveal key characteristics of SWCNTs as nanotube diameter distribution (radial breathing modes, RBM, 100-300 cm(exp -1)), presence of defects and functional groups (D-mode, 1300-1350 cm(exp -1)), strain and oxidation states of SWCNTs, as well as metallic or semiconducting character of the tubes encoded in the lineshape of the G-modes at 1520-1600 cm(exp - 1). In addition, SWCNTs are highly anisotropic scatterers. The Raman response from a SWCNT is maximal for incident light polarization parallel to the tube axis and vanishing for perpendicular directions. We show that the SWCNT bundle shape or direction can be determined, with some limitations, from a set of Raman images taken at two orthogonal directions of the incident light polarization.

  8. Light stable isotope analysis of meteorites by ion microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The main goal was to develop the necessary secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) techniques to use a Cameca ims-4f ion microprobe to measure light stable isotope ratios (H, C, O and S) in situ and in non-conducting mineral phases. The intended application of these techniques was the analysis of meteorite samples, although the techniques that have been developed are equally applicable to the investigation of terrestrial samples. The first year established techniques for the analysis of O isotope ratios (delta O-18 and delta O-17) in conducting mineral phases and the measurement of S isotope ratios (delta S-34) in a variety of sulphide phases. In addition, a technique was developed to measure delta S-34 values in sulphates, which are insulators. Other research undertaken in the first year resulted in SIMS techniques for the measurement of wide variety of trace elements in carbonate minerals, with the aim of understanding the nature of alteration fluids in carbonaceous chondrites. In the second year we developed techniques for analyzing O isotope ratios in nonconducting mineral phases. These methods are potentially applicable to the measurement of other light stable isotopes such as H, C and S in insulators. Also, we have further explored the analytical techniques used for the analysis of S isotopes in sulphides by analyzing troilite in a number of L and H ordinary chondrites. This was done to see if there was any systematic differences with petrological type.

  9. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanzo, J.; Fallavier, M.; Alphonse, G.; Bernard, C.; Battiston-Montagne, P.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Dauvergne, D.; Beuve, M.

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  10. SU-E-T-519: Emission of Secondary Particles From a PMMA Phantom During Proton Irradiation: A Simulation Study with the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A; Chen, Y; Ahmad, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy exhibits several advantages over photon therapy due to depth-dose distributions from proton interactions within the target material. However, uncertainties associated with protons beam range in the patient limit the advantage of proton therapy applications. To quantify beam range, positron-emitting nuclei (PEN) and prompt gamma (PG) techniques have been developed. These techniques use de-excitation photons to describe the location of the beam in the patient. To develop a detector system for implementing the PG technique for range verification applications in proton therapy, we studied the yields, energy and angular distributions of the secondary particles emitted from a PMMA phantom. Methods: Proton pencil beams of various energies incident onto a PMMA phantom with dimensions of 5 x 5 x 50 cm3 were used for simulation with the Geant4 toolkit using the standard electromagnetic packages as well as the packages based on the binary-cascade nuclear model. The emitted secondary particles are analyzed . Results: For 160 MeV incident protons, the yields of secondary neutrons and photons per 100 incident protons were ~6 and ~15 respectively. Secondary photon energy spectrum showed several energy peaks in the range between 0 and 10 MeV. The energy peaks located between 4 and 6 MeV were attributed to originate from direct proton interactions with 12C (~ 4.4 MeV) and 16O (~ 6 MeV), respectively. Most of the escaping secondary neutrons were found to have energies between 10 and 100 MeV. Isotropic emissions were found for lower energy neutrons (<10 MeV) and photons for all energies, while higher energy neutrons were emitted predominantly in the forward direction. The yields of emitted photons and neutrons increased with the increase of incident proton energies. Conclusions: A detector system is currently being developed incorporating the yields, energy and angular distributions of secondary particles from proton interactions obtained from this study.

  11. Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

  12. Raman study of protonated H : LiNbO 3 thin film waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savatinova, I.; Savova, I.; Tonchev, S.; Liarokapis, E.; Armenise, M. N.

    1999-03-01

    Multimode proton exchanged waveguides H xLi 1- xNbO 3 have been formed in congruent z-cut substrates using benzoic acid for proton source. The H concentration was changed by annealing, applying two different rates of cooling - quick (q) and slow (s). The samples were characterized by measuring their extraordinary refractive index profiles and waveguide Raman scattering. At high proton concentrations ( x>0.56), where the β i phases are supposed to be existing the s- (equilibrium β 2/β 1 combination) and q- (metastable β 1 phase) type of samples show very different Raman spectra, being also different from the scattering of the pure substrate. This is an evidence for lattice transformations probably related to the large differences in the electrooptic and nonlinear properties of the phases.

  13. Detonation wave structure studies in high explosives by means of proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Sergei; Dudin, Sergei; Mintsev, Victor; Utkin, Alexander; Demidov, Victor; Fertman, Alexander; Golubev, Alexander; Katz, Mark; Markov, Nikolai; Sharkov, Boris; Smirnov, Gennady; Turtikov, Vladimir

    2007-06-01

    Proton radiography is the unique experimental technique for obtaining direct information about important material characteristics of real solid objects under dynamic conditions. The aim of the present work is the application of this method to the investigation of evolution of density in shock and detonation waves in high explosives (HE). Obtained information will be very useful for the improvement of existing detonation models and equations of state of HE. For this purpose a proton radiography facility for dynamic experiments on the basis of TWAC-ITEP accelerator is being constructed. A special containment chamber for explosive experiments was built. Static experiments with imitators of detonating HE charges were performed; as a result the proton radiographic images of imitators with time resolution of up to 10 ns were obtained. Dynamic experiments on the registration of detonation wave structure in pressed TNT are underway.

  14. Recoil Decay Tagging Study Of Transitional Proton Emitters 145,146,147Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A.P.; Woods, P.J.; Davinson, T.; Liu, Z.; Davids, C.N.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M.P.; Hammond, N.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Mukherjee, G.; Sinha, S.; Blank, B.; Freeman, S.J.; Hoteling, N.; Shergur, J.; Walters, W.B.; Scholey, C.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Woehr, A.

    2005-04-05

    Gamma rays from the transitional proton emitting nuclei 145,146,147Tm have been observed using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The ground state band of 147Tm was confirmed and extended and the unfavoured signature sequence was observed. A ground state rotational band with properties of a decoupled h11/2 band was observed in 145Tm. In addition coincidences between the proton fine structure line and the 2+{yields}0+ {gamma}-ray transition in 144Er were detected at the focal plane of the FMA. This is the first time that coincidences between proton radioactive decays and {gamma} rays have been seen. The particle decay of 146Tm has been measured with improved statistics and a rotational band similar to 147Tm has been observed.

  15. Studying the destruction of various fluoropolymers caused by MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntele, Claudiu I.; Allayarov, Sadulla R.; Muntele, Iulia C.; Ila, Daryush

    2007-08-01

    While fluoropolymers are normally used as anti-adherent coating, they are intensely investigated for potential use in various radiation dosimeter applications as well as space technology. In order to understand the discrepancy between high chemical and thermal stability and low radiation stability of various fluoropolymers, we are bombarding them with 1 MeV protons to fluences up to 2 × 1015 protons/cm2. During bombardment we are monitoring the emission of chemical species with a residual gas analyzer (RGA). The results we present here are a good indicator that material damage happens much earlier than 2 × 1015 protons/cm2 and that further work should be addressed at much smaller exposures.

  16. BMI and Neuronal Integrity in Healthy, Cognitively Normal Elderly: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Gazdzinski, Stefan; Millin, Rachel; Kaiser, Lana G.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mueller, Susanne G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies associated excess body weight with brain structural alterations, poorer cognitive function, and lower prefrontal glucose metabolism. We found that higher BMI was related to lower concentrations of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA, a marker of neuronal integrity) in a healthy middle-aged cohort, especially in frontal lobe. Here, we evaluated whether NAA was also associated with BMI in a healthy elderly cohort. We used 4 Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) data from 23 healthy, cognitively normal elderly participants (69.4 ± 6.9 years; 12 females) and measured concentrations of NAA, glutamate (Glu, involved in cellular metabolism), choline-containing compounds (Cho, involved in membrane metabolism), and creatine (Cr, involved in high-energy metabolism) in anterior (ACC) and posterior cingulate cortices (PCC). After adjustment for age, greater BMI was related to lower NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios (β < −0.56, P < 0.008) and lower Glu/Cr and Glu/Cho ratios (β < −0.46, P < 0.02) in ACC. These associations were not significant in PCC (β > −0.36, P > 0.09). The existence of an association between NAA and BMI in ACC but not in PCC is consistent with our previous study in healthy middle-aged individuals and with reports of lower frontal glucose metabolism in young healthy individuals with elevated BMI. Taken together, these results provide evidence that elevated BMI is associated with neuronal abnormalities mostly in frontal brain regions that subserve higher cognitive functions and impulse control. Future studies need to evaluate whether these metabolite abnormalities are involved in the development and maintenance of weight problems. PMID:19816410

  17. An in vivo proton neurospectroscopy study of cerebral oxidative stress in myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome).

    PubMed

    Puri, B K; Agour, M; Gunatilake, K D R; Fernando, K A C; Gurusinghe, A I; Treasaden, I H

    2009-01-01

    A particularly important family of antioxidant defence enzymes in the body are the glutathione peroxidases, which remove H(2)O(2) by coupling its reduction to H(2)O with oxidation of reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidised glutathione (GSSG). There are suggestions that GSH in the peripheral blood may be reduced in myalgic encephalomyelitis, which is a highly disabling neurological disease of unknown aetiology. Since many of the symptoms relate to cerebral functioning, it would seem probable that peripheral blood GSH findings would be reflected in lower cerebral GSH levels. The aim of this study was to carry out the first direct assessment of cerebral GSH levels in myalgic encephalomyelitis; the hypothesis being tested was that cerebral GSH levels would be reduced in myalgic encephalomyelitis. Cerebral proton neurospectroscopy was carried out at a magnetic field strength of 3T in 26 subjects; spectra were obtained from 20x20x20mm(3) voxels using a point-resolved spectroscopy pulse sequence. The mean cerebral GSH level in the myalgic encephalomyelitis patients was 2.703 (SD 2.311) which did not differ significantly from that in age- and gender-matched normal controls who did not have any history of neurological or other major medical disorder (5.191, SD 8.984; NS). Therefore our study does not suggest that GSH is reduced in the brain in myalgic encephalomyelitis. At the present time, based on the results of this study, there is no evidence to support the suggestion that, by taking glutathione supplements, an improvement in the brain-related symptomatology of myalgic encephalomyelitis may occur.

  18. Surface Structure of Protonated R-Sapphire (1$\\bar{1}$02) Studied by Sum-Frequency Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jaeho; Zhang, Luning; Tian, Chuanshan; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Shen, Y. Ron

    2011-03-23

    Sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study the protonated R-plane (1$\\bar{1}$02 ) sapphire surface. The OH stretch vibrational spectra show that the surface is terminated with three hydroxyl moieties, two from AlOH2 and one from Al2OH functional groups. The observed polarization dependence allows determination of the orientations of the three OH species. The results suggest that the protonated sapphire (1$\\bar{1}$02 ) surface differs from an ideal stoichimetric termination in a manner consistent with previous X-ray surface diffraction (crystal truncation rod) studies. However, in order to best explain the observed hydrogenbonding arrangement, surface oxygen spacing determined from the X-ray diffraction study requires modification.

  19. Debug of IC-card chips assisted by FIB and in-situ mechanical microprobing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao D.; Yu, Xiang H.; Lundquist, Theodore R.

    2001-10-01

    The value of mechanical micro-probes and FIB in IC design-debug is well understood. As device dimensions shrink, navigating micro-probes within a light microscope is almost impossible. SEM or FIB, which have higher resolution as well as greater depth of focus, overcome this limitation. FIB is, also, preferred for DUT probe-point creation because its higher milling resolution capability can provide better access to lower level metallizations. IC-card chips present an unique challenge; the backside of these are often insulated so grounding must occur on the exposed front-side. Further, because these IC-card chips are small, very careful setups are required before undertaking FIB modifications. Micro-probes within the FIB chamber solved this problem. Three micro-probes were used to stimulate the chip (input-clock, ground and power) with a fourth probe used to measure output nodes. Requested FIB modifications, including rewiring of poly-silicon traces, were completed. Contacting poly-silicon requires FIB-assisted XeF2 etching through the inter-level dielectric and both fast termination and removal of XeF2 from the chamber upon poly-silicon exposure. The technique for exposing poly-silicon is described in detail. The synergy of mechanical micro-probes within the FIB chamber benefited both techniques in the design-debug task. We summarize various IC-card packaging styles and requirements to ground, micro-probe, and establish a debug platform.

  20. Synthetic applications of enantioselective protonation and case study for (S)-alpha-damascone.

    PubMed

    Fehr, Charles; Randall, Harvey

    2008-06-01

    Among the fragrance compounds synthesized by enantioselective protonation, (S)-alpha-damascone, (R)-muscone, and (S,S)-Vulcanolide are the most prominent ones. (S)-alpha-damascone has been prepared by four different procedures: from the magnesium enolate, from the lithium enolate, from the enol, and from the corresponding thiol ester. We now present a new, industrially viable protocol for the addition of allyl magnesium chloride to the 'cyclogeranoketene' by a Barbier reaction, followed by protonation of the ensuing magnesium enolate by an aggregate formed from (-)-N-isopropylephedrine, lithium isopropylate, and acetic acid, furnishing (S)-alpha-damascone in 91% yield and with 71% ee.

  1. Studying proton pumping mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin and cytochrome c oxidase with multi-conformation continuum electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yifan

    The proton gradient across the biological membrane is important for the biological systems. Bacteriorhodopsin and cytochrome c oxidase convert different energy sources into this gradient. The focus of this thesis is to understand the mechanism of these proteins using computational methods. In bacteriorhodopsin, residue ionization states were calculated in 9 crystal structures trapped in bR, early M and late M states by Multi-Conformation Continuum Electrostatics (MCC). The three groups in the central cluster are ionized in bR structures while a proton has transferred from the SB+ to Asp 85 - in the late M structures matching prior experimental results. The proton release cluster binds one proton in bR structure which is lost to water by pH 8 in late M. Modest changes in intra-protein interactions cause the charge shifts within the clusters. Motions of Arg 82 couple the proton shift in the central cluster to proton release. Changes in the total charge of the two clusters are coupled by direct long-range interactions. Cytochrome c oxidase is a transmembrane proton pump that builds an electrochemical gradient using chemical energy from the reduction of O2. Ionization states of all residues were calculated with MCCE in seven anaerobic oxidase redox states ranging from fully oxidized to fully reduced in Rb. sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. At pH 7, only a hydroxide coordinated to CuB shifts its pKa from below 7 to above 7, and so picks up a proton when Heme a3 and CuB are reduced. Glu I-286, Tyr I-288, His I-334 and a second hydroxide on Heme a3 all have pKas above 7. The propionic acids near the BNC are deprotonated with pKas well below 7. This suggests electroneutrality in the BNC is not maintained during the anaerobic reduction. The electrochemical midpoint potential (E m) of Heme a is calculated to shift down when the BNC is reduced, which agrees with prior experiments. If the BNC reduction is electroneutral, then the Heme a Em is independent of the BNC redox state.

  2. 6-D weak-strong beam-beam simulation study of proton lifetime in presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the calculated particle loss of a proton bunch in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). To compensate the head-on beam-beam effect in the RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run, we are introducing a DC electron beam with the same transverse profile as the proton beam to collide with the proton beam. Such a device is called an electron lens (e-lens). In this note we first present the optics and beam parameters and the tracking setup. Then we calculate and compare the particle loss of a proton bunch with head-on beam-beam compensation, phase advance of k{pi} between IP8 and the center of the e-lens and second order chromaticity correction. We scanned the proton beam's linear chromaticity, working point and bunch intensity. We also scanned the electron beam's intensity, transverse beam size. The effect of the electron-proton transverse offset in the e-lens was studied. In the study 6-D weak-strong beam-beam interaction model a la Hirata is used for proton collisions at IP6 and IP8. The e-lens is modeled as 8 slices. Each slice is modeled with as drift - (4D beam-beam kick) - drift.

  3. Studies of a plasticized PEO + NH4PF6 proton-conducting polymer electrolyte system and its application in a proton battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kuldeep; Rai, Devendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    We have synthesized polyethylene oxide (PEO) + NH4PF6 polymer electrolyte films plasticized with ethylene carbonate (EC) and a mixture of ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate (EC/PC) by using a solution cast technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show a decrease in crystallinity from ˜67% in the unplasticized complex to 39% and 35% in the EC- and the EC/PC-plasticized complexes, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results show the formation of a fringed miscellar structure in the plasticized complexes. An increased coordination between dissociated ions and the ether oxygen of PEO on plasticization is established from the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies. The ionic conductivity shows an enhancement of about two orders of magnitude on plasticization. The room-temperature ionic conductivities of the highest conducting compositions are obtained as ˜1.52 × 10-5 S cm-1 and ˜1.03 × 10-5 S cm-1 in the EC- and the EC/PC-plasticized complexes, respectively. The highest conducting compositions of plasticized polymer electrolyte films are used to fabricate proton batteries with the configuration Zn/ZnSO4.7H2O (anode) ‖Polymer electrolyte‖ PbO2/V2O5 (cathode), and different battery parameters are reported.

  4. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  5. A carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of some experimental referee broadened-specification /ERBS/ turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalling, D. K.; Pugmire, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy study of alternative jet fuels are presented. A referee broadened-specification (ERBS) aviation turbine fuel, a mixture of 65 percent traditional kerosene with 35 percent hydrotreated catalytic gas oil (HCGO) containing 12.8 percent hydrogen, and fuels of lower hydrogen content created by blending the latter with a mixture of HCGO and xylene bottoms were studied. The various samples were examined by carbon-13 and proton NMR at high field strength, and the resulting spectra are shown. In the proton spectrum of the 12.8 percent hydrogen fuel, no prominent single species is seen while for the blending stock, many individual lines are apparent. The ERBS fuels were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and the resulting fractions analyzed by NMR. The species found are identified.

  6. Study of the development of defects in Si PIN diodes exposed to 23 GeV/c protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Chren, D.; Dammer, J.; Píša, V.

    2015-03-01

    Studying the development of crystallographic defects in PIN diodes is the focus of the RD-50 (CERN) research project. The study was carried out on Si PIN diodes manufactured and used in the Czech Republic. The Si PIN diodes were irradiated with 23 GeV/c protons at doses ranging from 0.5 to 43 Gy. The Si PIN diodes were calibrated in a 23 GeV/c proton source [1], and the energy traps of the defects produced were measured by the DLTS method. The IV characteristics and the parameters of the defects were studied. The 23 GeV/c protons produce typical crystallographic defects and, at higher doses, bring about their regrouping thus giving rise to a new generation of defects. Defects are classified by their energy levels in the forbidden band from the conduction band. The mechanism influencing the parameters of the defects is discussed. The study of defects in silicon is important for silicon-based electronic elements used in cosmic research because of their effects on the operability and reliability of electronic equipment installed in satellites. Another application is the dosimetry measurements involving various types of particle accelerators.

  7. Three-dimensional hybrid simulation study of anisotropic turbulence in the proton kinetic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, Bernard J.; Markovskii, Sergei A.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: sergei.markovskii@unh.edu

    2014-06-20

    Three-dimensional numerical hybrid simulations with particle protons and quasi-neutralizing fluid electrons are conducted for a freely decaying turbulence that is anisotropic with respect to the background magnetic field. The turbulence evolution is determined by both the combined root-mean-square (rms) amplitude for fluctuating proton bulk velocity and magnetic field and by the ratio of perpendicular to parallel wavenumbers. This kind of relationship had been considered in the past with regard to interplanetary turbulence. The fluctuations nonlinearly evolve to a turbulent phase whose net wave vector anisotropy is usually more perpendicular than the initial one, irrespective of the initial ratio of perpendicular to parallel wavenumbers. Self-similar anisotropy evolution is found as a function of the rms amplitude and parallel wavenumber. Proton heating rates in the turbulent phase vary strongly with the rms amplitude but only weakly with the initial wave vector anisotropy. Even in the limit where wave vectors are confined to the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field, the heating rate remains close to the corresponding case with finite parallel wave vector components. Simulation results obtained as a function of proton plasma to background magnetic pressure ratio β {sub p} in the range 0.1-0.5 show that the wave vector anisotropy also weakly depends on β {sub p}.

  8. Protonation Preferentially Stabilizes Minor Tautomers of the Halouracils: IRMPD Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampton, K. T.; Rathur, A. I.; Nei, Y.-w.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2012-09-01

    Tautomerization induced by protonation of halouracils may increase their efficacy as anti-cancer drugs by altering their reactivity and hydrogen bonding characteristics, potentially inducing errors during DNA and RNA replication. The gas-phase structures of protonated complexes of five halouracils, including 5-fluorouracil, 5-chlorouracil, 5-bromouracil, 5-iodouracil, and 6-chlorouracil are examined via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical electronic structure calculations. IRMPD action spectra were measured for each complex in the IR fingerprint region extending from ~1000 to 1900 cm-1 using the free electron laser (FELIX). Correlations are made between the measured IRMPD action spectra and the linear IR spectra for the stable low-energy tautomeric conformations computed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. Absence of an intense band(s) in the IRMPD spectrum arising from the carbonyl stretch(es) that are expected to appear near 1825 cm-1 provides evidence that protonation induces tautomerization and preferentially stabilizes alternative, noncanonical tautomers of these halouracils where both keto functionalities are converted to hydroxyl groups upon binding of a proton. The weak, but measurable absorption, which does occur for these systems near 1835 cm-1 suggests that in addition to the ground-state conformer, very minor populations of excited, low-energy conformers that contain keto functionalities are also present in these experiments.

  9. Ab initio study of protonated nitrosamide: a possible intermediate in the deNO x process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Sudhir A.; Pundlik, Savita S.

    1995-10-01

    Ab initio calculations on protonated nitrosamide, a possible intermediate in the deNO x process, have been performed. A mechanism involving the formation of an intermediate NH 3NO + was proposed by Egsgaard, Carlsen and Madsen and tested by performing flame experiments with mass spectrometry. In the present work, the absence of NH 3NO + in the flame has been supported on the basis of its structure. This cation is observed to be a loosely bound adduct of NH 3 and NO + at and beyond the HF level of theory. On the other hand, NH 2NOH + is found to be a covalently bonded compound at all theoretical levels. Topographical analysis of electron density and electrostatic potential has been utilized to gain insight into bonding properties and to predict the possible sites of protonation. The vibrational spectra of both protonated nitrosamide cations are reported. The feasibility of proton transfer reactions of NH 3NO + with ammonia and water are investigated using heats of reactions. These values indicate that such a reaction is possible with NH 3 but unfavorable with H 2O.

  10. Experimental study of ion-beam self-pinched transport for MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, J.M.; Young, F.C.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Ottinger, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Weber, B.V.

    1999-07-01

    A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV proton beam from a pinch-reflex ion diode on the Gamble II accelerator is used to test the concept of self-pinched ion transport. Self-pinched transport (SPT) uses the self-generated magnetic field from the ion beam to radially confine the ion beam. A proton beam is injected through a 3-cm radius aperture covered with a 2-{micro}m thick polycarbonate foil into a 10-cm radius transport region. The transport region is filled with helium at pressures of 30--250 mTorr, vacuum (10{sup {minus}4} Torr), or 1-Torr air. The beam is diagnosed with witness plates, multiple-pinhole-camera imaging onto radiochromic film, time- and space-resolved proton-scattering, and with prompt-{gamma} and nuclear-activation from LiF targets. Witness-plates and the multiple-pinhole-camera are used to determine the size, location, and uniformity of the beam at different distances from the injection aperture. A beam global divergence of 200 mrad is measured at 15 cm. At 50 cm, the beam fills the transport region. At 110 cm and 100- to 200-mTorr helium, there is evidence of beam filamentation. The measured increase in protons is consistent with the physical picture for SPT, and comparisons with IPROP simulations are in qualitative agreement with the measurements.

  11. Microstructural evolution of RPV steels under proton and ion irradiation studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Wu, Y. C.; Liu, X. B.; Wang, R. S.; Nagai, Y.; Inoue, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Toyama, T.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructural evolution of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels induced by proton and heavy ion irradiation at low temperature (∼373 K) has been investigated using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), atom probe tomography (APT), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation. The PAS results indicated that both proton and heavy ion irradiation produce a large number of matrix defects, which contain small-size defects such as vacancies, vacancy-solute complexes, dislocation loops, and large-size vacancy clusters. In proton irradiated RPV steels, the size and number density of vacancy cluster defects increased rapidly with increasing dose due to the migration and agglomeration of vacancies. In contrast, for Fe ion irradiated steels, high density, larger size vacancy clusters can be easily induced at low dose, showing saturation in PAS response with increasing dose. No clear precipitates, solute-enriched clusters or other forms of solute segregation were observed by APT. Furthermore, dislocation loops were observed by TEM after 1.0 dpa, 240 keV proton irradiation, and an increase of the average nanoindentation hardness was found. It is suggested that ion irradiation produces many point defects and vacancy cluster defects, which induce the formation of dislocation loops and the increase of nanoindentation hardness.

  12. A Study of Spacecraft Charging Due to Exposure to Interplanetary Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Nelson W.; Frederickson, A. Robb

    2006-01-01

    Long life spacecraft may be exposed to one or more major solar storms during the mission lifespan. This research task was undertaken to determine the risk to long duration interplanetary spacecraft from spacecraft charging due to exposure to solar energetic protons.

  13. Studying shock dynamics and in-flight ρR asymmetries in NIF implosions using proton spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Ignition-scale, indirect-drive implosions of CH capsules filled with D3He gas have been studied with proton spectroscopy at the NIF. Spectral measurements of D3He protons produced at the shock-bang time provide information about the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of these implosions. The observed energy downshift of the D3He-proton spectra are interpreted with a self-consistent 1-D model to infer ρR, shell Rcm, and yield at this time. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions where the laser drive is on until near the compression-bang time (``short-coast'') while longer-coasting implosions generate lower ρR at shock-bang time. This is most likely due to a larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (~800 ps) than in the short-coast implosions (~400 ps). These differences are determined from the D3He proton spectra and in-flight x-ray radiography data, and it is found to contradict radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict a 700-800 ps temporal difference independent of coasting time. A large variation in the shock proton yield is also observed in the dataset, which is interpreted with a Guderley shock model and found to correspond to ~2× variation in incipient hot-spot adiabat caused by shock heating. This variation may affect the compressibility of NIF implosions. Finally, data from multiple proton spectrometers placed at the pole and equator reveal large ρR asymmetries, which are interpreted as mode-2 polar or azimuthal asymmetries. At the shock-bang time (CR ~ 3-5), asymmetry amplitudes >=10% are routinely observed. Compared to compression-bang time x-ray self-emission symmetry, no apparent asymmetry-amplitude growth is observed, which is in contradiction to several growth models. This is attributed to a lack of correspondence between shell and hot-spot symmetry at peak compression, as discussed in recent computational studies. This work was

  14. Study of proton induced reactions on niobium targets up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.; Baba, M.; Corniani, E.; Shubin, Yu. N.

    2008-12-01

    Niobium is a metal with important technological applications: use as alloying element to increase strength of super alloys, as thin layer for tribological applications, as superconductive material, in high temperature engineering systems, etc. In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross-sections of charged particle induced reactions on structural materials proton induced excitation functions on Nb targets were determined with the aim of applications in accelerator and reactor technology and for thin layer activation (TLA). The charged particle activation cross-sections on this element are also important for yield calculation of medical isotope production ( 88,89Zr, 86,87,88Y) and for dose estimation in PET targetry. As Niobium is a monoisotopic element it is an ideal target material to test nuclear reaction theories. We present here the integral excitation functions of 93Nb(p,x) 90,93mMo, 92m,91m,90Nb, 86,88,89Zr, 86,87mg,88Y and 85Sr in the energy range 30-70 MeV, some measured for the first time at this energy range. The results were compared with the theoretical cross-sections calculated by means of the code ALICE-IPPE and with the literature data. The calculations have been carried out without any parameter adjustment. The theory reproduces the shape of the measured results well and magnitude is also acceptable. Thick target yields calculated from our fitted cross-section give reliable estimations for production of medically relevant radioisotopes and for dose estimation in accelerator technology.

  15. Study of double parton scattering using W + 2-jet events in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-05

    Double parton scattering is investigated in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV where the final state includes a W boson, which decays into a muon and a neutrino, and two jets. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb–1, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Observables sensitive to double parton scattering are investigated after being corrected for detector effects and selection efficiencies. The fraction of W + 2-jet events due to double parton scattering is measured to be 0.055 +/- 0.002 (stat.) +/- 0.014 (syst.). Finally, the effective cross section, σeff, characterizing the effectivemore » transverse area of hard partonic interactions in collisions between protons is measured to be 20.7 +/- 0.8 (stat.) +/- 6.6 (syst.) mb.« less

  16. Study of double parton scattering using W + 2-jet events in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-05

    Double parton scattering is investigated in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV where the final state includes a W boson, which decays into a muon and a neutrino, and two jets. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb–1, collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Observables sensitive to double parton scattering are investigated after being corrected for detector effects and selection efficiencies. The fraction of W + 2-jet events due to double parton scattering is measured to be 0.055 +/- 0.002 (stat.) +/- 0.014 (syst.). Finally, the effective cross section, σeff, characterizing the effective transverse area of hard partonic interactions in collisions between protons is measured to be 20.7 +/- 0.8 (stat.) +/- 6.6 (syst.) mb.

  17. NENIMF: Northeast National Ion Microprobe Facility - A Multi-User Facility for SIMS Microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layne, G. D.; Shimizu, N.

    2002-12-01

    The MIT-Brown-Harvard Regional Ion Microprobe Facility was one of the earliest multi-user facilities enabled by Dan Weill's Instrumentation and Facilities Program - and began with the delivery of a Cameca IMS 3f ion microprobe to MIT in 1978. The Northeast National Ion Microprobe Facility (NENIMF) is the direct descendant of this original facility. Now housed at WHOI, the facility incorporates both the original IMS 3f, and a new generation, high transmission-high resolution instrument - the Cameca IMS 1270. Purchased with support from NSF, and from a consortium of academic institutions in the Northeast (The American Museum of Natural History, Brown University, The Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, MIT, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, WHOI) - this latest instrument was delivered and installed during 1996. NENIMF continues to be supported by NSF EAR I&F as a multi-user facility for geochemical research. Work at NENIMF has extended the original design strength of the IMS 1270 for microanalytical U-Pb zircon geochronology to a wide variety of novel and improved techniques for geochemical research. Isotope microanalysis for studies in volcanology and petrology is currently the largest single component of facility activity. This includes the direct measurement of Pb isotopes in melt inclusions, an application developed at NENIMF, which is making an increasingly significant contribution to our understanding of basalt petrogenesis. This same technique has also been extended to the determination of Pb isotopes in detrital feldspar grains, for the study of sedimentary provenance and tectonics of the Himalayas and other terrains. The determination of δ11B in volcanic melt inclusions has also proven to be a powerful tool in the modeling of subduction-related magmatism. The recent development of δ34S and δ37Cl determination in glasses is being applied to studies of the behavior of these volatile elements in both natural and experimental systems. Other recent undertakings

  18. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  19. Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT studies used for proton radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karin M; Ahnesjö, Anders; Vallhagen Dahlgren, Christina

    2014-09-08

    Metal objects in the body such as hip prostheses cause artifacts in CT images. When CT images degraded by artifacts are used for treatment planning of radiotherapy, the artifacts can yield inaccurate dose calculations and, for particle beams, erroneous penetration depths. A metal artifact reduction software (O-MAR) installed on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT has been tested for applications in treatment planning of proton radiotherapy. Hip prostheses mounted in a water phantom were used as test objects. Images without metal objects were acquired and used as reference data for the analysis of artifact-affected regions outside of the metal objects in both the O-MAR corrected and the uncorrected images. Water equivalent thicknesses (WET) based on proton stopping power data were calculated to quantify differences in the calculated proton beam penetration for the different image sets. The WET to a selected point of interest between the hip prostheses was calculated for several beam directions of clinical relevance. The results show that the calculated differences in WET relative to the reference case were decreased when the O-MAR algorithm was applied. WET differences up to 2.0 cm were seen in the uncorrected case while, for the O-MAR corrected case, the maximum difference was decreased to 0.4 cm. The O-MAR algorithm can significantly improve the accuracy in proton range calculations. However, there are some residual effects, and the use of proton beam directions along artifact streaks should only be used with caution and appropriate margins.

  20. Reduced side effects by proton microchannel radiotherapy: study in a human skin model.

    PubMed

    Zlobinskaya, Olga; Girst, Stefanie; Greubel, Christoph; Hable, Volker; Siebenwirth, Christian; Walsh, Dietrich W M; Multhoff, Gabriele; Wilkens, Jan J; Schmid, Thomas E; Dollinger, Günther

    2013-03-01

    The application of a microchannel proton irradiation was compared to homogeneous irradiation in a three-dimensional human skin model. The goal is to minimize the risk of normal tissue damage by microchannel irradiation, while preserving local tumor control through a homogeneous irradiation of the tumor that is achieved because of beam widening with increasing track length. 20 MeV protons were administered to the skin models in 10- or 50-μm-wide irradiation channels on a quadratic raster with distances of 500 μm between each channel (center to center) applying an average dose of 2 Gy. For comparison, other samples were irradiated homogeneously at the same average dose. Normal tissue viability was significantly enhanced after microchannel proton irradiation compared to homogeneous irradiation. Levels of inflammatory parameters, such as Interleukin-6, TGF-Beta, and Pro-MMP1, were significantly lower in the supernatant of the human skin tissue after microchannel irradiation than after homogeneous irradiation. The genetic damage as determined by the measurement of micronuclei in keratinocytes also differed significantly. This difference was quantified via dose modification factors (DMF) describing the effect of each irradiation mode relative to homogeneous X-ray irradiation, so that the DMF of 1.21 ± 0.20 after homogeneous proton irradiation was reduced to 0.23 ± 0.11 and 0.40 ± 0.12 after microchannel irradiation using 10- and 50-μm-wide channels, respectively. Our data indicate that proton microchannel irradiation maintains cell viability while significantly reducing inflammatory responses and genetic damage compared to homogeneous irradiation, and thus might improve protection of normal tissue after irradiation.

  1. Modeling the protonation states of β-secretase binding pocket by molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Sabbah, Dima A; Zhong, Haizhen A

    2016-07-01

    β-secretase (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease that processes the β-amyloid peptide in the human brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease. There are two catalytic aspartates (ASP32 and ASP228) in the active domain of BACE1. Although it is believed that the net charge of the Asp dyad is -1, the exact protonation state still remains a matter of debate. We carried out molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for the four protonation states of BACE1 proteins. We applied Glide docking studies to 21 BACE1 inhibitors against the MD extracted conformations. The dynamic results infer that the protein/ligand complex remains stable during the entire simulation course for HD32D228 model. The results show that the hydrogen bonds between the inhibitor and the Asp dyad are maintained in the 10,000th ps snapshot of HD32D228 model. Our results also reveal the significant loop residues in maintaining the active binding conformation in the HD32D228 model. Molecular docking results show that the HD32D228 model provided the best enrichment factor score, suggesting that this model was able to recognize the most active compounds. Our observations provide an evidence for the preference of the anionic state (HD32D228) in BACE1 binding site and are in accord with reported computational data. The protonation state study would provide significant information to assign the correct protonation state for structure-based drug design and docking studies targeting the BACE1 proteins as a tactic to develop potential AD inhibitors.

  2. Modeling the protonation states of β-secretase binding pocket by molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Sabbah, Dima A; Zhong, Haizhen A

    2016-07-01

    β-secretase (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease that processes the β-amyloid peptide in the human brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease. There are two catalytic aspartates (ASP32 and ASP228) in the active domain of BACE1. Although it is believed that the net charge of the Asp dyad is -1, the exact protonation state still remains a matter of debate. We carried out molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for the four protonation states of BACE1 proteins. We applied Glide docking studies to 21 BACE1 inhibitors against the MD extracted conformations. The dynamic results infer that the protein/ligand complex remains stable during the entire simulation course for HD32D228 model. The results show that the hydrogen bonds between the inhibitor and the Asp dyad are maintained in the 10,000th ps snapshot of HD32D228 model. Our results also reveal the significant loop residues in maintaining the active binding conformation in the HD32D228 model. Molecular docking results show that the HD32D228 model provided the best enrichment factor score, suggesting that this model was able to recognize the most active compounds. Our observations provide an evidence for the preference of the anionic state (HD32D228) in BACE1 binding site and are in accord with reported computational data. The protonation state study would provide significant information to assign the correct protonation state for structure-based drug design and docking studies targeting the BACE1 proteins as a tactic to develop potential AD inhibitors. PMID:27474865

  3. Proton Beam Therapy as a Nonsurgical Approach to Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nihei, Keiji; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Arahira, Satoko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the clinical benefit of proton beam therapy for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients with mucosal melanoma of the head and neck with histologically confirmed malignant melanoma and N0 and M0 disease were enrolled. Proton therapy was delivered three times per week with a planned total dose of 60 Gy equivalents (GyE) in 15 fractions. Results: Fourteen consecutive patients were enrolled from January 2004 through February 2008. Patient characteristics were as follows: median age 73 years old (range, 56 to 79 years); male/female ratio, 7/7; and T stage 1/2/3/4, 3/2/0/9. All patients were able to receive the full dose of proton therapy. The most common acute toxicities were mucositis (grade 3, 21%) and mild dermatitis (grade 3, 0%). As for late toxicity, 2 patients had a unilateral decrease in visual acuity, although blindness did not occur. No treatment-related deaths occurred throughout the study. Initial local control rate was 85.7%, and, with a median follow-up period of 36.7 months, median progression-free survival was 25.1 months, and 3-year overall survival rates were 58.0%. The most frequent site of first failure was cervical lymph nodes (6 patients), followed by local failure in 1 patient and lung metastases in 1 patient. On follow-up, 5 patients died of disease, 4 died due to cachexia caused by distant metastases, and 1 patient by carotid artery perforation cause by lymph nodes metastases. Conclusions: Proton beam radiotherapy showed promising local control benefits and would benefit from ongoing clinical study.

  4. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  5. Possibilities of studying the structure of halo nuclei in reactions of quasifree proton scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Zuyev, S. V. Kasparov, A. A.; Konobeevski, E. S.

    2015-07-15

    The possibility of experimentally studying the structure of halo nuclei in reactions induced by quasifree proton scattering on clusters of these nuclei is considered. Quasifree proton scattering on {sup 6}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 4}n, {sup 2}n, and n clusters in inverse kinematics is considered for the example of the {sup 8}He nucleus. Angular and energy distributions of secondaries are obtained for various representations of the cluster structure of the {sup 8}He nucleus. It is clearly shown that, in the angular and energy distributions of secondaries, one can single out regions that receive dominant contributions from reactions on specific clusters and which correspond to concrete cluster configurations of halo nuclei. Possible relevant experiments are proposed.

  6. Ab initio study of the molecular structure and vibrational spectrum of nitric acid and its protonated forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    The equilibrium structures, harmonic vibrational frequencies, IR intensities, and relative energetics of HNO3 and its protonated form H2NO3+ were investigated using double-zeta plus polarization and triple-zeta plus polarization basis sets in conjunction with high-level ab initio methods. The latter include second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, the single and double excitation coupled cluster (CCSD) methods, a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)), and the self-consistent field. To determine accurate energy differences CCSD(T) energies were computed using large atomic natural orbital basis sets. Four different isomers of H2NO3+ were considered. The lowest energy form of protonated nitric acid was found to correspond to a complex between H2O and NO2+, which is consistent with earlier theoretical and experimental studies.

  7. Ab initio study of the chlorine nitrate protonation reaction - Implications for loss of ClONO2 in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1993-01-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanical methods, including coupled-cluster theory, are used to determine the equilibrium geometries, dipole moments, and harmonic vibrational frequencies of ClONO2, NO2(+), and four isomers of protonated ClONO2. It was found that, for the equilibrium structures and harmonic frequencies of ClONO2, HOCl, and NO2(+), the highest-level theoretical predictions are consistent with the available experimental information concerning the reactions of ClONO2 and HOCl with HCl on the surface of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The study supports a recent hypothesis that the reaction of ClONO2 on the surface of PSCs is proton catalyzed, although the mechanism is different.

  8. Neutron yield and induced radioactivity: a study of 235-MeV proton and 3-GeV electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Cheng; Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude of potential neutron yield and induced radioactivity of two new accelerators in Taiwan: a 235-MeV proton cyclotron for radiation therapy and a 3-GeV electron synchrotron serving as the injector for the Taiwan Photon Source. From a nuclear interaction point of view, neutron production from targets bombarded with high-energy particles is intrinsically related to the resulting target activation. Two multi-particle interaction and transport codes, FLUKA and MCNPX, were used in this study. To ensure prediction quality, much effort was devoted to the associated benchmark calculations. Comparisons of the accelerators' results for three target materials (copper, stainless steel and tissue) are presented. Although the proton-induced neutron yields were higher than those induced by electrons, the maximal neutron production rates of both accelerators were comparable according to their respective beam outputs during typical operation. Activation products in the targets of the two accelerators were unexpectedly similar because the primary reaction channels for proton- and electron-induced activation are (p,pn) and (γ,n), respectively. The resulting residual activities and remnant dose rates as a function of time were examined and discussed.

  9. Nitrogen and Hydrogen on a Palladium-covered proton conductor: a first principle study of Ammonia catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulatto, Lorenzo; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2009-03-01

    Being liquid at ambient conditions Ammonia would be an ideal Hydrogen vector. However, the industrial Haber process for Ammonia synthesis involves high pressures ( 100 bar) and temperatures (450-500 ^oC), making the process very expensive. Recently, ambient pressure Ammonia production, in the 570-750 ^oC temperature range, has been reported at the Palladium cathode of a proton conducting cell-reactor [1]. The rate limiting step in the Haber process is N2 dissociation, while the observed limiting factor in Ref. [1] appears to be the proton transfer through the conductor and it has been proposed that Nitrogen hydrogenation may in this case precede dissociation. We use first-principles techniques to study Nitrogen, Hydrogen and Ammonia interaction with flat and stepped Pd surfaces, in presence of external electric fields. Our aim is to study the effect of electrochemically provided protons on the catalysis of the reaction. [1]G. Marnellos and M. Stoukides, Science 282, 98 (1998); G. Marnellos, S. Zisekas, and M. Stoukides, J. of Catalysis 193, 80-87 (2000)

  10. Electric dipole response of nuclei studied by proton inelastic scattering: neutron thickness, symmetry energy, and pygmy dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, Atsushi; RCNP E282/E316/E326/E350/E376/E377 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. Electric dipole (E1) responses of heavy nuclei have been studied by high-resolution measurement of proton inelastic scattering at forward angles including zero degrees. Here the proton scattering at 300 MeV is used as an electromagnetic probe to extract precisely the distribution of E1 reduced transition probability B(E1). The measurement has been done on various stable nuclei such as 208Pb, 120Sn, 90Zr, 154Sm, and 96Mo. The dipole polarizability and pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) strength has been extracted. Those quantities are considered to have strong correlations to the neutron skin thickness and the first order density dependence of the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state. We will present the experimental methods and highlights of the results as well as the preliminary ones of recent analyses. JSPS No. 25105509.

  11. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  12. Performance of missing transverse momentum reconstruction in ATLAS studied in proton-proton collisions in 2012 at 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Luis

    2015-10-01

    The missing transverse energy plays a really important role in reconstructing events produced at hadron colliders. Undetectable particles, such as neutrinos, pass through the matter with a negligible probability of interaction. Hence, no direct evidence of them can be measured in a general purpose detector, as ATLAS. However, the total momenta in the transverse plane to the beam axis has to be conserved and computed. In particular, it is used in searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson channels, such as: H → WW, H → ZZ and H → ττ. The benefit of using this conservation law is that an energy imbalance may signal the presence of such undetectable particles. Therefore, it becomes also a powerful tool for new physics searches at the Large Hadron Collider, such as Supersymmetry and Extra Dimensions. The performance of the missing transverse momentum reconstruction in the ATLAS detector is evaluated using data collected in 2012 in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. An optimised reconstruction of missing transverse momentum is used and the effects arising from additional proton-proton interactions superimposed on the hard physics process are suppressed with various methods. Results are shown for a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 20 ft-1 and for events with different topologies with or without a genuine missing transverse momentum due to undetected particles.

  13. Rectal Toxicity After Proton Therapy For Prostate Cancer: An Analysis of Outcomes of Prospective Studies Conducted at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; McKibben, Brian T.; Henderson, Randal H.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Study goals were to characterize gastrointestinal effects of proton therapy (PT) in a large cohort of patients treated for prostate cancer, identify factors associated with rectal bleeding (RB), and compare RB between patients receiving investigational protocols versus those in outcome-tracking protocols. Methods and Materials: A total of 1285 consecutive patients were treated with PT between August 2006 and May 2010. Potential pre-existing clinical and treatment-related risk factors for rectal toxicity were recorded. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to score toxicity. Results: Transient RB was the predominant grade 2 or higher (GR2+) toxicity after PT, accounting for 95% of gastrointestinal events. GR1 RB occurred in 217 patients (16.9%), GR2 RB in 187 patients (14.5%), and GR3 in 11 (0.9%) patients. There were no GR4 or GR5 events. Univariate analyses showed correlations between GR2+ RB and anticoagulation therapy (P=.008) and rectal and rectal wall dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, anticoagulation therapy (P=.0034), relative volume of rectum receiving 75 Gy (V75; P=.0102), and relative rectal wall V75 (P=.0017) were significant predictors for G2+ RB. Patients treated with investigational protocols had toxicity rates similar to those receiving outcome-tracking protocols. Conclusions: PT was associated with a low rate of GR2+ gastrointestinal toxicity, predominantly transient RB, which was highly correlated with anticoagulation and rectal DVH parameters. Techniques that limit rectal exposure should be used when possible.

  14. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Biology: Results from Synergistic Studies in Natural and Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Steven Y.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) underpins energy conversion in biology. PCET may occur with the unidirectional or bidirectional transfer of a proton and electron and may proceed synchronously or asynchronously. To illustrate the role of PCET in biology, this review presents complementary biological and model systems that explore PCET in electron transfer (ET) through hydrogen bonds [azurin as compared to donor-acceptor (D–A) hydrogen-bonded networks], the activation of C–H bonds [alcohol dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase (SLO) as compared to Fe(III) metal complexes], and the generation and transport of amino acid radicals [photosystem II (PSII) and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR)as compared to tyrosine-modified photoactive Re(I) and Ru(II) complexes]. In providing these comparisons, the fundamental principles of PCET in biology are illustrated in a tangible way. PMID:19344235

  15. Study of the proton structure by measurements of polarization transfers in real Compton scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano Fanelli; Cisbani, Evarostp; Hamilton, David; Salme, G.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-03-01

    A preliminary analysis of polarization-transfer data at large scattering angle (70°), obtained in an experiment of real Compton scattering on proton, performed in Hall-C of Jefferson Lab, is presented. It is also discussed the relevance of this kind of experiments for shedding light on the non-perturbative structure of the proton, at low energy, and on the transition from the non-perturbative regime to the perturbative one, that occurs at high energy. Moreover, the possibility to extract Compton form factors and the Generalized Parton Distributions, one of the most promising theoretical tool to determine the total angular momentum contribution of quarks and gluons to nucleon spin, is emphasized.

  16. Study of the Charge Density Control Method Including the Space Charge Effect in the Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinichi; Harada, Hiroyuki; Hotchi, Hideaki; Okabe, Kota; Yamamoto, Kazami; Kinsho, Michikazu

    For high intensity proton accelerators, one of the beam loss sources is the incoherent tune spread caused by the space charge force. In the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, beams are injected sequentially and shifted slightly from the central orbit in order to increase the beam size intentionally and suppress the charge density and incoherent tune spread. This injection method has been adopted and suppressed the beam loss. However, simulations clarified that beams did not spread as much as expected because of the space charge effect in the high current case. As simulation results of the optimized beam shift pattern when the space charge effect is considered, it was obtained that the incoherent tune spread could be suppressed to an extent that has not been achieved previously.

  17. Proton Transfers in a Channelrhodopsin-1 Studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Difference Spectroscopy and Site-directed Mutagenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Ogren, John I.; Yi, Adrian; Mamaev, Sergey; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsin-1 from the alga Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) is a low-efficiency light-activated cation channel that exhibits properties useful for optogenetic applications such as a slow light inactivation and a red-shifted visible absorption maximum as compared with the more extensively studied channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Previously, both resonance Raman and low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that unlike CrChR2, CaChR1 under our conditions exhibits an almost pure all-trans retinal composition in the unphotolyzed ground state and undergoes an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization during the primary phototransition typical of other microbial rhodopsins such as bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, we apply static and rapid-scan FTIR difference spectroscopy along with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the proton transfer events occurring upon the formation of the long-lived conducting P2380 state of CaChR1. Assignment of carboxylic C=O stretch bands indicates that Asp-299 (homolog to Asp-212 in BR) becomes protonated and Asp-169 (homolog to Asp-85 in BR) undergoes a net change in hydrogen bonding relative to the unphotolyzed ground state of CaChR1. These data along with earlier FTIR measurements on the CaChR1 → P1 transition are consistent with a two-step proton relay mechanism that transfers a proton from Glu-169 to Asp-299 during the primary phototransition and from the Schiff base to Glu-169 during P2380 formation. The unusual charge neutrality of both Schiff base counterions in the P2380 conducting state suggests that these residues may function as part of a cation selective filter in the open channel state of CaChR1 as well as other low-efficiency ChRs. PMID:25802337

  18. Proton transfers in a channelrhodopsin-1 studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ogren, John I; Yi, Adrian; Mamaev, Sergey; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2015-05-15

    Channelrhodopsin-1 from the alga Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) is a low-efficiency light-activated cation channel that exhibits properties useful for optogenetic applications such as a slow light inactivation and a red-shifted visible absorption maximum as compared with the more extensively studied channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Previously, both resonance Raman and low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that unlike CrChR2, CaChR1 under our conditions exhibits an almost pure all-trans retinal composition in the unphotolyzed ground state and undergoes an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization during the primary phototransition typical of other microbial rhodopsins such as bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, we apply static and rapid-scan FTIR difference spectroscopy along with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the proton transfer events occurring upon the formation of the long-lived conducting P2 (380) state of CaChR1. Assignment of carboxylic C=O stretch bands indicates that Asp-299 (homolog to Asp-212 in BR) becomes protonated and Asp-169 (homolog to Asp-85 in BR) undergoes a net change in hydrogen bonding relative to the unphotolyzed ground state of CaChR1. These data along with earlier FTIR measurements on the CaChR1 → P1 transition are consistent with a two-step proton relay mechanism that transfers a proton from Glu-169 to Asp-299 during the primary phototransition and from the Schiff base to Glu-169 during P2 (380) formation. The unusual charge neutrality of both Schiff base counterions in the P2 (380) conducting state suggests that these residues may function as part of a cation selective filter in the open channel state of CaChR1 as well as other low-efficiency ChRs. PMID:25802337

  19. A simulation study investigating a Cherenkov material for use with the prompt gamma range verification in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Lau, Andy; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Chen, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In vivo range verification methods will reveal information about the penetration depth into a patient for an incident proton beam. The prompt gamma (PG) method is a promising in vivo technique that has been shown to yield this range information by measuring the escaping MeV photons given a suitable detector system. The majority of current simulations investigating PG detectors utilize common scintillating materials ideal for photons within a low neutron background radiation field using complex geometries or novel designs. In this work we simulate a minimal detector system using a material ideal for MeV photon detection in the presence of a significant neutron field based on the Cherenkov phenomenon. The response of this selected material was quantified for the escaping particles commonly found in proton therapy applications and the feasibility of using the PG technique for this detector material was studied. Our simulations found that the majority of the range information can be determined by detecting photons emitted with a timing window less than ∼50 ns after the interaction of the proton beam with the water phantom and with an energy threshold focusing on the energy range of the de-excitation of 16O photons (∼6 MeV). The Cherenkov material investigated is able to collect these photons and estimate the range with timescales on the order of tens of nanoseconds as well as greatly suppress the signal due to neutron. PMID:27163377

  20. QTES-DFTB dynamics study on the effect of substrate motion on quantum proton transfer in soybean lipoxygenase-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzuca, James; Garashchuk, Sophya; Jakowski, Jacek

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown that the proton transfer in the enzymatic active site of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1) occurs largely by a quantum tunneling mechanism. This study examined the role of local substrate vibrations on this proton tunneling reaction. We employ an approximate quantum trajectory (QT) dynamics method with linear quantum force. The electronic structure (ES) was calculated on-the-fly with a density functional tight binding (DFTB) method. This QTES-DFTB method scales linearly with number of trajectories, and the calculation of the quantum force is a small addition to the overall cost of trajectory dynamics. The active site was represented as a 44-atom system. Quantum effects were included only for the transferring proton, and substrate nuclei were treated classically. The effect of substrate vibrations was evaluated by freezing or relaxing the substrate nuclei. Trajectory calculations were performed at several temperatures ranging from 250-350 K, and rate constants were calculated through the quantum mechanical flux operator which depends on time-dependent correlation functions. It was found that the substrate motion reliably increases the rate constants, as well as the P/D kinetic isotope effect, by approximately 10% across all temperatures examined. NSF Grant No. CHE-1056188, APRA-NSF-EPS-0919436, and CHE-1048629, NICS Teragrid/Xsede TG-DMR110037.

  1. Study of proton conductivity of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer at higher temperature.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Suresh; Biswas, Soumava; Konar, Sanjit

    2015-02-16

    We report the proton conduction properties of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer having the molecular formulas {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·5H2O]}n (1) and {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·2H2O]}n (2), respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 show high conductivity values of 2.55 × 10(-7) and 4.39 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 80 °C and 95% RH. The conductivity value of compound 1 is in the range of those for previously reported flexible MOFs, and compound 2 shows the highest proton conductivity among the carboxylate-based 1D CPs. The dimensionality and the internal hydrogen bonding connectivity play a vital role in the resultant conductivity. Variable-temperature experiments of both compounds at high humidity reveal that the conductivity values increase with increasing temperature, whereas the variable humidity studies signify the influence of relative humidity on high-temperature proton conductivity. The time-dependent measurements for both compounds demonstrate their ability to retain conductivity up to 10 h.

  2. 1,10-Phenanthrolines with tunable luminescence upon protonation: a spectroscopic and computational study.

    PubMed

    Listorti, Andrea; Esposti, Alessandra Degli; Kishore, Ravuri S K; Kalsani, Venkateshwarlu; Schmittel, Michael; Armaroli, Nicola

    2007-08-16

    We have synthesized nine 2,9-aryl-substituted 1,10-phenanthrolines (1-9) with the aim of rationalizing their electronic absorption and luminescence properties in both the basic and acid form. The latter are generated upon addition of trifluoroacetic acid to CH2Cl2 solutions of 1-9 and their formation is unambiguously evidenced by UV-vis absorption and 1H NMR spectroscopy. 1-9 can be subdivided into three groups, depending on their chemical structure and luminescence behavior. 1-3 are symmetrically substituted p-dianisylphenanthrolines which exhibit relatively intense violet fluorescence in CH2Cl2 (lambda(max) ca. 400 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.12-0.33) and are strongly quenched and substantially red-shifted upon protonation (lambda(max) ca. 550 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.010-0.045). 4-5 are 2,6-dimethoxyphenylphenanthrolines with faint luminescence in both the basic and acid form. 6-9 are various unsymmetric aryl-substituted-phenanthrolines and their relatively strong fluorescence (lambda(max) ca. 400 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.08-0.24) is red-shifted and substantially enhanced following protonation (lambda(max) ca. 475 nm, Phi(fl) = 0.16-0.50). The markedly different trends in the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are rationalized by means of both time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional theory by using hybrid functionals to assign the excited states. Interestingly, protonation of 1-9 also occurs in spin-coated films simply exposed to vapors of acid, and the reaction can be signaled by the color tuning of the emission signal (vapoluminescence). This observation makes substituted phenanthrolines potential candidates as proton sensors also in the solid phase. PMID:17645318

  3. Study and development of sulfated zirconia based proton exchange fuel cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Brittany Wilson

    With the increasing consumption of energy, fuel cells are among the most promising alternatives to fossil fuels, provided some technical challenges are overcome. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have been investigated and improvements have been made, but the problem with NafionRTM, the main membrane for PEMFCs, has not been solved. NafionRTM restricts the membranes from operating at higher temperatures, thus preventing them from working in small electronics. The problem is to develop a novel fuel cell membrane that performs comparably to NafionRTM in PEMFCs. The membranes were fabricated by applying sulfated zirconia, via template wetting, to porous alumina membranes. The fabricated membranes showed a proton conductivity of 0.016 S/cm in comparison to the proton conductivity of Nafion RTM (0.05 S/cm). Both formic acid and methanol had a lower crossover flux through the sulfated zirconia membranes (formic acid- 2.89x10 -7 mols/cm2s and methanol-1.78x10-9 mols/cm2s) than through NafionRTM (formic acid-2.03x10 -8 mols/cm2s methanol-2.42x10-6 mols/cm 2s), indicating that a sulfated zirconia PEMFC may serve as a replacement for NafionRTM.

  4. Monte Carlo Study of Electromagnetic Calorimeter Performance for Proton Form Factor Measurements at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrecht, Richard; Puckett, Andrew; Super BigBite Spectrometer Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Jefferson Lab's continuous electron beam, capable of luminosities approaching 1039 cm-2 s-1, has recently been upgraded to a maximum energy of 12 GeV, allowing the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio GEp /GMp to be measured at momentum transfer Q2 of up to 12 GeV2 via the polarization transfer method. The measurement will use the Super BigBite Spectrometer (SBS), a new magnetic spectrometer capable of operating at forward scattering angles under high luminosity conditions, to detect and measure the polarization of elastically scattered protons. The measurement of GEp /GMp also requires detection of the elastically scattered electron in coincidence using a lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter (ECal). ECal, the subject of this talk, is based on the ``BigCal'' detector used in a predecessor experiment in Hall C, re-configured to match the acceptance of SBS for elastically scattered protons. This talk will present an overview of ECal, its role in the measurement of GEp at large Q2, and the technical challenges involved in its operation in the high-radiation environment of Hall A, followed by the results of of detailed GEANT4-based Monte Carlo simulations characterizing its expected performance under experimental conditions.

  5. Proton and hydride transfers in solution: hybrid QMmm/MM free energy perturbation study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L. Lawrence |; Bash, P.A.; Kerell, A.D., Jr

    1996-03-01

    A hybrid quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy perturbation (FEP) method is implemented in the context of molecular dynamics (MD). The semiempirical quantum mechanical (QM) Hamiltonian (Austin Model 1) represents solute molecules, and the molecular mechanical (MM) CHARMM force field describes the water solvent. The QM/MM FEP method is used to calculate the free energy changes in aqueous solution for (1) a proton transfer from methanol to imidazole and (2) a hydride transfer from methoxide to nicotinamide. The QM/MM interaction energies between the solute and solvent arc calibrated to emulate the solute-solvent interaction energies determined at the Hartee-Fock 6-31G(d) level of ab initio theory. The free energy changes for the proton and hydride transfers are calculated to be 15.1 and {minus}6.3 kcal/mol, respectively, which compare favorably with the corresponding experimental values of 12.9 and {minus}7.4 kcal/mol. An estimate of the reliability of the calculations is obtained through the computation of the forward (15.1 and {minus}6.3 kcal/mol) and backward ({minus}14.1 and 9.1 kcal/mol)free energy changes. The reasonable correspondence between these two independent calculations suggests that adequate phase space sampling is obtained along the reaction pathways chosen to transform the proton and hydride systems between their respective reactant and product states.

  6. NMR studies of the protonation states of pyridoxal-5‧-phosphate in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Niether, Christiane; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M.; Toney, Michael D.; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-07-01

    We have measured the 13C NMR spectra of the cofactor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (vitamin B 6, PLP) at 278 K in aqueous solution as a function of pH. By 13C enrichment of PLP in the C-4' and C-5' positions we were able to measure spectra down to pH 1. From the dependence of the 13C chemical shifts on pH, the p Ka values of PLP could be determined. In particular, the heretofore uncharacterized protonation state of PLP, in which the phosphate group as well as the pyridine ring and the phenolic groups are fully protonated, has been analyzed. The corresponding p Ka value of 2.4 indicates that the phosphate group is solely involved in the first deprotonation step. The 15N chemical shifts of the pyridine ring of PLP published previously are in good agreement with the new results. These shifts contain information about the tautomerism of the different protonation states of PLP. The implications of these findings for the biological function of PLP are discussed.

  7. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton radioactivity of 94Ag.

    PubMed

    Mukha, Ivan; Roeckl, Ernst; Batist, Leonid; Blazhev, Andrey; Döring, Joachim; Grawe, Hubert; Grigorenko, Leonid; Huyse, Mark; Janas, Zenon; Kirchner, Reinhard; La Commara, Marco; Mazzocchi, Chiara; Tabor, Sam L; Van Duppen, Piet

    2006-01-19

    The stability and spontaneous decay of naturally occurring atomic nuclei have been much studied ever since Becquerel discovered natural radioactivity in 1896. In 1960, proton-rich nuclei with an odd or an even atomic number Z were predicted to decay through one- and two-proton radioactivity, respectively. The experimental observation of one-proton radioactivity was first reported in 1982, and two-proton radioactivity has now also been detected by experimentally studying the decay properties of 45Fe (refs 3, 4) and 54Zn (ref. 5). Here we report proton-proton correlations observed during the radioactive decay of a spinning long-lived state of the lightest known isotope of silver, 94Ag, which is known to undergo one-proton decay. We infer from these correlations that the long-lived state must also decay through simultaneous two-proton emission, making 94Ag the first nucleus to exhibit one- as well as two-proton radioactivity. We attribute the two-proton emission behaviour and the unexpectedly large probability for this decay mechanism to a very large deformation of the parent nucleus into a prolate (cigar-like) shape, which facilitates emission of protons either from the same or from opposite ends of the 'cigar'.

  8. Electron Microprobe Techniques for Use in Tephrochronological Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, J.; Severin, K.; Wallace, K.; Beget, J.; Larsen, J.

    2006-12-01

    (1992) which followed the 1990 INQUA InterCongress Committee on Tephrochronology Workshop, e.g., use of particular standards, documentation of instrument conditions and analytical procedures, particularly volatile element treatment and matrix correction, and presentation of both tephra and standard compositional data and statistics. We suggest some modification to the recommendations regarding standards and volatile element correction. We recommend the tephra analytical community discuss and make use of this set of standardized procedures for optimizing electron microprobe analysis of volcanic glass and for reporting the data. We also recognize that no single analytical protocol may necessarily be correct for all tephra analyses, but emphasize that all relevant analytical parameters should be explicitly reported so that other laboratories could reproduce similar data on the same tephra.

  9. SU-E-T-267: Proton Pencil Beam Scanning for Mediastinal Lymphoma: 4-Dimensional Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, C; Plastaras, J; Tochner, Z; Hill-Kayser, C; Hahn, S; Both, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) for the treatment of mediastinal lymphoma. Methods: A group of 6 patients were planned using an anterior field with PBS. Spots with ∼5 mm σ were used for all patients, while large spots (∼10 mm σ) were employed for patients with motion perpendicular to the beam (≥5 mm). We considered volumetric repainting such that, in each fraction, the same field would be delivered twice. Four-dimensional dose was calculated on initial and verification 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans (2—3) based on respiratory trace and beam delivery sequence. This was implemented by binning the spots into separate plans on each 4D-CT phase respectively. Four starting phases were sampled for each painting and 4 energy switching times (0.5 s, 1 s, 3 s, and 5 s) were tested, resulting in 2560 dose distributions for the cohort. Plan robustness was measured for target and critical structures in terms of the percentage difference between delivered dose and planned dose. Results: For 5 of the 6 patients, the ITV (internal target volume) D98% was degraded by <3% (standard deviations ∼ 0.1%) when averaged over the whole course (up to 5% per fraction). Deviations of mean lung dose, heart maximum dose, and cord maximum dose were within 5% of prescribed dose. For one patient with motion perpendicular to the beam (up to 5 mm), the degradation of ITV D98% was 9% over the whole course (12% per fraction), which was mitigated to 1% (3% per fraction) by employing large spots and repainting. No significant difference in coverage was observed for different energy switching times. Conclusion: This feasibility study demonstrates that, for mediastinal lymphoma, the PBS plan robustness can be maintained during delivery when target motion is measured and volumetric repainting and/or large spots are employed. This work was supported by Ion Beam Application.

  10. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2–10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora. PMID:24898626

  11. Ion and laser microprobes applied to the measurement of corrosion produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Use of an ion microprobe and a laser microprobe to measure concentrations of corrosion-produced hydrogen on a microscopic scale. Hydrogen concentrations of several thousand ppm were measured by both analytical techniques below corroded and fracture surfaces of hot salt stress corroded titanium alloy specimens. This extremely high concentration compares with only about 100 ppm hydrogen determined by standard vacuum fusion chemical analyses of bulk samples. Both the ion and laser microprobes were used to measure hydrogen concentration profiles in stepped intervals to substantial depths below the original corroded and fracture surfaces. For the ion microprobe, the area of local analysis was 22 microns in diameter and for the laser microprobe, the area of local analysis was about 300 microns in diameter. The segregation of hydrogen below fracture surfaces supports a previously proposed theory that corrosion-produced hydrogen is responsible for hot salt stress corrosion embrittlement and cracking of titanium alloys. These advanced analytical techniques suggest great potential for many areas of stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement research, quality control, and field inspection of corrosion problems. For example, it appears possible that a contour map of hydrogen distribution at notch roots and crack tips could be quantitatively determined. Such information would be useful in substantiating current theories of stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement.

  12. The NeuroMedicator—a micropump integrated with silicon microprobes for drug delivery in neural research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieth, S.; Schumacher, A.; Kallenbach, C.; Messner, S.; Zengerle, R.

    2012-06-01

    The NeuroMedicator is a micropump integrated with application-specific silicon microprobes aimed for drug delivery in neural research with small animals. The micropump has outer dimensions of 11 × 15 × 3 mm3 and contains 16 reservoirs each having a capacity of 0.25 µL. Thereby, the reservoirs are interconnected in a pearl-chain-like manner and are connected to two 8 mm long silicon microprobes. Each microprobe has a cross-sectional area of 250 × 250 µm2 and features an integrated drug delivery channel of 50 × 50 µm2 with an outlet of 25 µm in diameter. The drug is loaded to the micropump prior to implantation. After implantation, individual 0.25 µL portions of drug can be sequentially released by short heating pulses applied to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer containing Expancel® microspheres. Due to local, irreversible thermal expansion of the elastic composite material, the drug is displaced from the reservoirs and released through the microprobe outlet directly to the neural tissue. While implanted, leakage of drug by diffusion occurs due to the open microprobe outlets. The maximum leakage within the first three days after implantation is calculated to be equivalent to 0.06 µL of drug solution.

  13. 3D dose verification with polymer gel detectors of brain-spine match line for proton pencil beam cranio-spinal: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, S.; Cardin, A.; Lin, L.; Kirk, M.; Kassaee, A.; Maryanski, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended as a preliminary study to demonstrate the quality assurance benefits from polymer gel detectors for proton pencil beam cranio-spinal treatments. A stable gel type was selected for protons to suppress the LET dependence at the end of the Bragg peak. The depth dose distributions in the gels were examined with regard of its dose dependences and compared to baseline measurements. The preliminary experimental results indicate polymer gel detectors may be able to verify dose in three dimensions along match line for proton therapy treatments.

  14. Ion microprobe zircon geochronology of the Uivak Gneisses: Implications for the evolution of early terrestrial crust in the North Atlantic Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collerson, K. D.

    1983-01-01

    Ion microprobe U-Pb results for zircons from three Uivak I gneisses and one specimen of Uivak II gneiss, from the Saglek-Hebron area of Northern Labrador are reported. These results are compared with interpretations based on published conventional U-Pb zircon results and with conclusions about crustal evolution in the NAC derived from Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Pb-Pb isotopic studies.

  15. Skeletal muscle fiber analysis by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging at high mass and high spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Garrett, Timothy J; Carter, Christy S; Spengler, Bernhard; Yost, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of heterogeneous muscle fibers with various fiber types. These fibers can be classified into different classes based on their different characteristics. MALDI mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) has been applied to study and visualize different metabolomics profiles of different fiber types. Here, skeletal muscles were analyzed by atmospheric pressure scanning microprobe MALDI-MSI at high spatial and high mass resolution. PMID:27198224

  16. Highly Reproducible Laser Beam Scanning Device for an Internal Source Laser Desorption Microprobe Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Jill Rennee; Tremblay, Paul Leland

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (~5 µm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ~9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  17. Highly reproducible laser beam scanning device for an internal source laser desorption microprobe Fourier transform mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, mass spectrometry has relied on manipulating the sample target to provide scanning capabilities for laser desorption microprobes. This has been problematic for an internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (LD-FTMS) because of the high magnetic field (7 Tesla) and geometric constraints of the superconducting magnet bore. To overcome these limitations, we have implemented a unique external laser scanning mechanism for an internal source LD-FTMS. This mechanism provides adjustable resolution enhancement so that the spatial resolution at the target is not limited to that of the stepper motors at the light source (˜5 μm/step). The spatial resolution is now limited by the practical optical diffraction limit of the final focusing lens. The scanning mechanism employs a virtual source that is wavelength independent up to the final focusing lens, which can be controlled remotely to account for focal length dependence on wavelength. A binary index provides an automatic alignment feature. The virtual source is located ˜9 ft from the sample; therefore, it is completely outside of the vacuum system and beyond the 50 G line of the fringing magnetic field. To eliminate reproducibility problems associated with vacuum pump vibrations, we have taken advantage of the magnetic field inherent to the FTMS to utilize Lenz's law for vibrational dampening. The LD-FTMS microprobe has exceptional reproducibility, which enables successive mapping sequences for depth-profiling studies.

  18. Protonated polynucleotides structures - 22.CD study of the acid-base titration of poly(dG).poly(dC).

    PubMed

    Marck, C; Thiele, D; Schneider, C; Guschlbauer, W

    1978-06-01

    The acid-base titration (pH 8 --> pH 2.5 --> pH 8) of eleven mixing curve samples of the poly(dG) plus poly(dC) system has been performed in 0.15 M NaCl. Upon protonation, poly(dG).poly(dC) gives rise to an acid complex, in various amounts according to the origin of the sample. We have established that the hysteresis of the acid-base titration is due to the non-reversible formation of an acid complex, and the liberation of the homopolymers at the end of the acid titration and during the base titration: the homopolymer mixtures remain stable up to pH 7. A 1G:1C stoichiometry appears to be the most probable for the acid complex, a 1G:2C stoichiometry, as found in poly(C(+)).poly(I).poly(C) or poly(C(+)).poly(G).poly(C), cannot be rejected. In the course of this study, evidence has been found that the structural consequences of protonation could be similar for both double stranded poly(dG).poly(dC) and G-C rich DNA's: 1) protonation starts near pH 6, dissociation of the acid complex of poly(dG).poly(dC) and of protonated DNA take place at pH 3; 2) the CD spectrum computed for the acid polymer complex displays a positive peak at 255 nm as found in the acid spectra of DNA's; 3) double stranded poly(dG).poly(dC) embedded in triple-stranded poly(dG).poly(dG).poly(dC) should be in the A-form and appears to be prevented from the proton induced conformational change. The neutral triple stranded poly(dG).poly(dG).poly(dC) appears therefore responsible, although indirectly, for the complexity and variability of the acid titration of poly(dG).poly(dC) samples.

  19. The study of the neutral pion production in proton-proton collisions at beam momenta 1581 and 1683 MeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantsev, V. V.; Ermakov, K. N.; Medvedev, V. I.; Oposhnyan, T. S.; Rogachevsky, O. V.; Sherman, S. G.

    The detailed investigation of the reaction pp -> ppπ 0 has been carried out at two incident proton momenta. Momentum, angular and effective-mass distributions were analyzed in the framework of the one-pion exchange model. Taking into account only the P33-wave in the pole diagrams allows one to obtain a good agreement with experimental data on differential distributions. At the same time the predictions for total cross-sections are much lower than the experimental data.

  20. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  1. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implicationsmore » for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.« less

  2. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implications for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.

  3. A novel approach to the examination of soil evidence: mineral identification using infrared microprobe analysis.

    PubMed

    Weinger, Brooke A; Reffner, John A; De Forest, Peter R

    2009-07-01

    Identification of minerals using the infrared microprobe with a diamond internal reflection objective is a rapid and reliable method for forensic soil examinations. Ninety-six mineral varieties were analyzed, and 77 were differentiated by their attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectra. Mineral grains may be mounted in oil for conventional polarized light microscope characterization and their ATR spectrum obtained with little or no interference by the liquid. This infrared microprobe method can be used to identify silicates, phosphates, nitrates, carbonates, and other covalent minerals; however, ionic minerals, metal oxide and sulfide minerals, and minerals with refractive indexes greater than diamond do not produce identifiable spectra, but the lack of a spectrum or one with high absorbance values does provide useful information. This research demonstrates the overall utility that infrared microprobe analysis brings mineral identification in soil evidence. PMID:19467138

  4. Study of proton and neutron activation of metal samples in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress in the following activities has been made: the analysis of the gamma ray spectra taken from samples flown in Spacelab 2; the search for and review of neutron and proton activation cross sections needed to analyze the results of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) activation measurements; the consideration given to data analysis of the LDEF and Spacelab 2 samples; the plan to measure relevant cross sections with nuclear accelerator measurements; and the preparation of an extended gamma ray calibration sources continues through planning and direct measurement of gamma ray efficiency for a Ge(Li) as a function of position along the surface of the detector housing.

  5. Complete correlation studies of two-proton decays: 6Be and 45Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Grigorenko, L.; Wiser, T. D.; Miernik, K.; Charity, R. J.; Pfutzner, M.; Banu, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Darby, Iain; Dominik, W.; Elson, J. M.; Ginter, T. N.; Grzywacz, R.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Liddick, Sean; Mercurio, K.; Rajabali, Mustafa; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Shane, R.; Sobotka, L. G.; Stolz, A.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2009-06-01

    The complete three-body correlation pictures are experimentally reconstructed for the two-proton decays of the 6Be and 45Fe ground states. We are able to see qualitative similarities and differences between these decays. They demonstrate very good agreement with the predictions of a theoretical three-body cluster model. Validity of the theoretical methods for treatment of the three-body Coulombic decays of this class is thus established by the broad range of lifetimes and nuclear masses spanned by these cases. Implementations for decay dynamics and nuclear structure of 2p emitters are discussed.

  6. Laser-driven plasma jets propagating in an ambient gas studied with optical and proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Koenig, M.; Waugh, J.; Woolsey, N. C.; Dono, S.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Bouquet, S.; Falize, E.; Michaut, C.; Nazarov, W.; Pikuz, S. A. Jr.

    2010-05-15

    The results of an experiment to propagate laser-generated plasma jets into an ambient medium are presented. The jets are generated via laser irradiation of a foam-filled cone target, the results and characterization of which have been reported previously [Loupias et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 265001 (2007)] for propagation in vacuum. The introduction of an ambient medium of argon at varying density is seen to result in the formation of a shock wave, and the shock front displays perturbations that appear to grow with time. The system is diagnosed with the aid of proton radiography, imaging the perturbed structure in the dense parts of the shock with high resolution.

  7. Proton NMR studies of the electronic structure of ZrH/sub x/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attalla, A.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Craft, B. D.; Venturini, E. L.; Rhim, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    The proton spin lattice relaxation times and Knight shifts were measured in f.c.c. (delta-phase) and f.c.t. (epsilon-phase) ZrH/sub x/ for 1.5 or = to x or = to 2.0. Both parameters indicate that N(E/sub F/) is very dependent upon hydrogen content with a maximum occurring at ZrH1 83. This behavior is ascribed to modifications in N(E/sub F/) through a fcc/fct distortion in ZrH/sub x/ associated with a Jahn-Teller effect.

  8. Two-photon, /sup 13/C and two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopic studies of retinyl Schiff bases, protonated Schiff bases, and Schiff base salts: evidence for a protonation induced. pi pi. * excited state level ordering reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Birge, R.R.; Murray, L.P.; Zidovetzki, R.; Knapp, H.M.

    1987-04-01

    The ..pi pi..* excited singlet state manifolds of the visual chromophores, all-trans-retinylpyrrolidiniminium perchlorate (ATRSBS) and all-trans-N-retinylidene-n-butylimine:HCl (ATRPSB) are studied by using one-photon and two-photon laser spectroscopy. The goal is a better understanding of how protonation and counterion location affect level ordering in retinyl Schiff bases. Ambient temperature two-photon thermal lensing spectra indicate that ATRSBS has a lowest lying /sup 1/A/sub g/*/sup -/-like state as was observed previously for all-trans-retinal and the Schiff base of all-trans-retinal. In contrast, two-photon spectra of ATRPSB indicate that the protonated Schiff base has a lowest lying /sup 1/B/sub u/*/sup +/-like state. The origin of this level ordering reversal is analyzed by using molecular orbital theory as well as /sup 13/C and two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR. They conclude that the relative level ordering of the low-lying covalent and ionic ..pi pi..* excited states of protonated Schiff bases and Schiff base salts is highly sensitive to counterion location (diffuseness). INDO-PSDCI molecular orbital theory is shown to be a reliable theoretical method of predicting the effect of counterion location on the one-photon and two-photon properties of retinyl protonated Schiff bases and Schiff base salts. This study provides further experimental support for the conclusions of a previous two-photon investigation of the rhodopsin binding site which demonstrated that the protein bound 11-cis-retinyl chromophore is protonated and occupies a neutral binding site.

  9. Development of a High Resolution-High Sensitivity Ion Microprobe Facility for Cosmochemical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeegan, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    NASA NAGW-4112 has supported development of the CAMECA ims 1270 ion microprobe at UCLA for applications in cosmochemistry. The instrument has been brought to an operational status and techniques developed for accurate, precise microbeam analysis of oxygen isotope ratios in polished thin-sections. We made the first oxygen isotopic (delta(18)O and delta(17)O) measurements of rare mafic silicates in the most chemically primitive meteorites, the a chondrites (Leshin et al., 1997). The results have implications for both high temperature processing in the nebula and low-T aqueous alteration on the CI asteroid. We have performed measurements of oxygen isotopic compositions of magnetite and co-existing olivine from carbonaceous (Choi et al., 1997) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (Choi et al., in press). This work has identified a significant new oxygen isotope reservoir in the early solar system: water characterized by a very high Delta(17)) value of approx. 5 % per thousand. We have determined the spatial distributions of oxygen isotopic anomalies in all major mineral phases of a type B CAI from Allende. We have also studied an unusual fractionated CAI from Leoville and made the first oxygen isotopic measurements in rare CAIs from ordinary chondrites.

  10. Investigations of the biological corrosion of condenser tubes by scanning auger microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiann-Ruey; Chyou, San-Der; Lew, Shwa-Ing; Huang, Chen-Jen; Fang, Chien-Shyong; Tse, Wan-Sun

    1988-09-01

    A duration test was conducted at the inlet bay of Hsin-Da Power Plant in Taiwan to study the roles of macro-organisms and micro-organisms in facilitating or inhibiting the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metal alloys in seawater. A significant amount of fouling organisms was grown on the attachment plate submerged in the field for 56 and 92 days. Copper toxicity resulted in little fouling but slight corrosion still occurred on the copper plate. Titanium was found to be 100% fouled by the fouling organisms. Stainless steel plate was found to have the worst MIC corrosion among the tested samples. After mechanically peeling off the polychaeta and barnacle organisms, samples were analyzed by the scanning Auger microprobe (SAM). SAM results indicate that sodium, oxygen and sulfur accumulated on the MIC regions of the sample surfaces covered by the fouling organisms, and chlorine and nitrogen were distributed in the regions compensating for the local distributions of sodium, oxygen and sulfur. It was proposed that the development of a thick macro-fouling mass will cause the anaerobic zones to develop on the metal surface, wherein the MIC processes are accelerated.

  11. Improving the quantification at high spatial resolution using a field emission electron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinard, P. T.; Richter, S.

    2014-03-01

    The capabilities of field emitter electron microprobes to perform quantitative measurements at high spatial resolution are discussed. Using Fe-Cr-C particles in a bearing steel (SAE 52100) as example, a generic procedure was established to find the optimal analytical conditions (beam energy, beam current and acquisition time). The influence of these parameters on the accuracy, precision and spatial resolution was evaluated using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. A quantification procedure was developed for soft X-ray lines, taking into account the overlap of high order X-ray lines and background anomalies. The accuracy of Ka- and La-lines was verified using reference materials. A relationship between experimental and simulated X-ray intensities was determined to evaluate the measurement precision. The spatial resolution of each X-ray line was calculated from the simulated lateral and depth X-ray intensity distribution using simulations integrating experimentally measured beam diameters. The optimal analytical conditions for the studied sample were found to be 5 keV, 10 nA and 10 s acquisition time. Further specialized techniques to improve the spatial resolution are presented: focused ion beam preparation of thin lamella and wedge, and Monte Carlo based reconstruction. The feasibility of the latter to quantify features smaller than the X-ray emission volume was demonstrated.

  12. Recent advances in laser microprobe mass analysis (LAMMA) of inner ear tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer zum Gottesberge-Orsulakova, A.; Kaufmann, R.

    1985-01-01

    Maintenance of ionic gradients within the various fluids compartments of the inner ear requires transport active cellular systems at different locations. LAMMA analysis is ideally suited for detection of ions in microquantity on cellular levels overcoming many technical difficulties. The present paper summarizes the results of microprobe analysis obtained with laser induced mass spectrometry (LAMMA) supplemented by X-ray microprobe analysis of epithelial cell layers adjacent to the endolymphatic space in the cochlear duct, in the vestibular organ and in the endolymphatic sac. The possible role of inner ear as well as ocular melanin in the mechanisms of active ion transport is discussed.

  13. Polymer SU-8 Based Microprobes for Neural Recording and Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altuna, Ane; Fernandez, Luis; Berganzo, Javier

    2015-06-01

    This manuscript makes a reflection about SU-8 based microprobes for neural activity recording and drug delivery. By taking advantage of improvements in microfabrication technologies and using polymer SU-8 as the only structural material, we developed several microprobe prototypes aimed to: a) minimize injury in neural tissue, b) obtain high-quality electrical signals and c) deliver drugs at a micrometer precision scale. Dedicated packaging tools have been developed in parallel to fulfill requirements concerning electric and fluidic connections, size and handling. After these advances have been experimentally proven in brain using in vivo preparation, the technological concepts developed during consecutive prototypes are discussed in depth now.

  14. Core Community Specifications for Electron Microprobe Operating Systems: Software, Quality Control, and Data Management Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournelle, John; Carpenter, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Modem electron microprobe systems have become increasingly sophisticated. These systems utilize either UNIX or PC computer systems for measurement, automation, and data reduction. These systems have undergone major improvements in processing, storage, display, and communications, due to increased capabilities of hardware and software. Instrument specifications are typically utilized at the time of purchase and concentrate on hardware performance. The microanalysis community includes analysts, researchers, software developers, and manufacturers, who could benefit from exchange of ideas and the ultimate development of core community specifications (CCS) for hardware and software components of microprobe instrumentation and operating systems.

  15. Unfolding the Quantum Nature of Proton Bound Symmetric Dimers of (MeOH)2H+ and (Me2O)2H+: a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jake Acedera; Kuo, Jer-Lai

    2014-06-01

    A proton under a tug of war between two competing Lewis bases is a common motif in biological systems and proton transfer processes. Over the past decades, model compounds for such motifs can be prepared by delicate stoichiometric control of salt solutions. Unfortunately, condensed phase studies, which aims to identify the key vibrational signatures are complicated to analyze. As a result, gas-phase studies do provide promising insights on the behavior of the shared proton. This study attempts to understand the quantum nature of the shared proton under theoretical paradigms. Proton bound symmetric dimers of (MeOH)2H+ and (Me2O)2H+ are chosen as the model compounds. The simulation is performed using Density Functional Theory (DFT) at the B3LYP level with 6-311+G(d,p) as the basis set. It was found out that stretching mode of shared proton couples with several other normal modes and its corresponding oscillator strength do distribute to other normal modes. J.R. Roscioli, L.R. McCunn and M.A. Johnson. Science 2007, 316, 249 T.E. DeCoursey. Physiol. Rev., 2003, 83, 475 E.S. Stoyanov. Psys. Chem. Phys., 2000,2,1137

  16. Ciliary body and choroidal melanomas treated by proton beam irradiation. Histopathologic study of eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Seddon, J.M.; Gragoudas, E.S.; Albert, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    Proton beam irradiation resulted in clinical and/or histopathological regression of large ciliary body and choroidal melanomas in three eyes. Enucleations were performed 6 1/2 weeks, five months, and 11 months after irradiation for angle-closure glaucoma from total retinal detachment, increase in retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma, respectively. A direct relationship was found between the length of the interval from irradiation to enucleation and the degree of histologic changes. Vascular changes in the tumors included endothelial cell swelling and decreased lumen size, basement membrane thickening, collapse of sinusoidal vessels, and thrombosis of vessels. Although apparently unaltered tumor cells remained, degenerative changes occurred in some melanoma cells, including lipid vacuoles in cytoplasm, pyknotic nuclei, and balloon cell formation. Patchy areas of necrosis and proteinaceous exudate were present. Pigment-laden macrophages were found near tumor vessels and all had a substantial chronic inflammatory infiltrate. The effect of proton beam irradiation on tumor vessels probably plays an important role in uveal melanoma regression.

  17. DFT Study on Enzyme Turnover Including Proton and Electron Transfers of Copper-Containing Nitrite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Lintuluoto, Masami; Lintuluoto, Juha M

    2016-08-23

    The reaction mechanism of copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR) has been proposed to include two important events, an intramolecular electron transfer and a proton transfer. The two events have been suggested to be coupled, but the order of these events is currently under debate. We investigated the entire enzyme reaction mechanism of nitrite reduction at the T2 Cu site in thermophilic Geobacillus CuNiR from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans NG80-2 (GtNiR) using density functional theory calculations. We found significant conformational changes of His ligands coordinated to the T2 Cu site upon nitrite binding during the catalytic reaction. The reduction potentials and pKa values calculated for the relevant protonation and reduction states show two possible routes, A and B. Reduction of the T2 Cu site in the resting state is followed by endothermic nitrite binding in route A, while exothermic nitrite binding occurs prior to reduction of the T2 Cu site in route B. We concluded that our results support the random-sequential mechanism rather than the ordered mechanism. PMID:27455866

  18. Studies of proton-irradiated SO2 at low temperatures Implications for Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. H.

    1984-07-01

    The infrared absorption spectrum from 3.3 to 27 microns of SO2 ice films has been measured at 20 and 88 K before and after 1-MeV proton irradiation. The radiation flux was chosen to simulate the estimated flux of Jovian magnetospheric 1-MeV protons incident on Io. After irradiation, SO3 is identified as the dominant molecule synthesized in the SO2 ice. This is also the case after irradiation of composite samples of SO2 with sulfur or disulfites. Darkening was observed in irradiated SO2 ice and in irradiated S8 pellets. Photometric and spectral measurements of the thermoluminescence of irradiated SO2 have been made during warming. The spectrum appears as a broad band with a maximum at 4450 A. Analysis of the luminescence data suggests that at Ionian temperatures irradiated SO2 ice would not be a dominant contributor to posteclipse brightening phenomena. After warming to room temperature, a form of SO3 remains along with a sulfate and S8. Based on these experiments, it is reasonable to propose that small amounts of SO3 may exist on the surface of Io as a result of irradiation synthesis in SO2 frosts.

  19. Effects of vibrational excitation on multidimensional tunneling: General study and proton tunneling in tropolone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Shoji; Nakamura, Hiroki

    1995-03-01

    Tunneling energy splittings of vibrationally excited states are calculated quantum mechanically using several models of two-dimensional symmetric double well potentials. Various effects of vibrational excitation on tunneling are found to appear, depending on the topography of potential energy surface; the symmetry of the mode coupling plays an essential role. Especially, oscillation of tunneling splitting with respect to vibrational quantum number can occur and is interpreted by a clear physical picture based on the semiclassical theory formulated recently [Takada and Nakamura, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 98 (1994)]. The mixed tunneling in the C region found there allows the wave functions to have nodal lines in classically inaccessible region and can cause the suppression of the tunneling. The above analysis is followed by the interpretation of recent experiments of proton tunneling in tropolone. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations are carried out for the electronically ground state. A simple three-dimensional model potential is constructed and employed to analyze the proton tunneling dynamics. Some of the experimentally observed intriguing features can be explained by the typical mechanisms discussed above.

  20. Measurement of the proton form factor by studying e+e-→p p ¯

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Using data samples collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we measure the Born cross section of e+e-→p p ¯ at 12 center-of-mass energies from 2232.4 to 3671.0 MeV. The corresponding effective electromagnetic form factor of the proton is deduced under the assumption that the electric and magnetic form factors are equal (|GE|=|GM|). In addition, the ratio of electric to magnetic form factors, |GE/GM|, and |GM| are extracted by fitting the polar angle distribution of the proton for the data samples with larger statistics, namely at √{s }=2232.4 and 2400.0 MeV and a combined sample at √{s }=3050.0 , 3060.0 and 3080.0 MeV, respectively. The measured cross sections are in agreement with recent results from BABAR, improving the overall uncertainty by about 30%. The |GE/GM| ratios are close to unity and consistent with BABAR results in the same q2 region, which indicates the data are consistent with the assumption that |GE|=|GM| within uncertainties.

  1. Studies of proton-irradiated SO2 at low temperatures Implications for Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectrum from 3.3 to 27 microns of SO2 ice films has been measured at 20 and 88 K before and after 1-MeV proton irradiation. The radiation flux was chosen to simulate the estimated flux of Jovian magnetospheric 1-MeV protons incident on Io. After irradiation, SO3 is identified as the dominant molecule synthesized in the SO2 ice. This is also the case after irradiation of composite samples of SO2 with sulfur or disulfites. Darkening was observed in irradiated SO2 ice and in irradiated S8 pellets. Photometric and spectral measurements of the thermoluminescence of irradiated SO2 have been made during warming. The spectrum appears as a broad band with a maximum at 4450 A. Analysis of the luminescence data suggests that at Ionian temperatures irradiated SO2 ice would not be a dominant contributor to posteclipse brightening phenomena. After warming to room temperature, a form of SO3 remains along with a sulfate and S8. Based on these experiments, it is reasonable to propose that small amounts of SO3 may exist on the surface of Io as a result of irradiation synthesis in SO2 frosts.

  2. A beam optics study of the biomedical beam line at a proton therapy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Chong Cheoul; Kim, Jong-Won

    2007-10-01

    A biomedical beam line has been designed for the experimental area of a proton therapy facility to deliver mm to sub-mm size beams in the energy range of 20-50 MeV using the TRANSPORT/TURTLE beam optics codes and a newly-written program. The proton therapy facility is equipped with a 230 MeV fixed-energy cyclotron and an energy selection system based on a degrader and slits, so that beam currents available for therapy decrease at lower energies in the therapeutic beam energy range of 70-230 MeV. The new beam line system is composed of an energy-degrader, two slits, and three quadrupole magnets. The minimum beam sizes achievable at the focal point are estimated for the two energies of 50 and 20 MeV. The focused FWHM beam size is approximately 0.3 mm with an expected beam current of 20 pA when the beam energy is reduced to 50 MeV from 100 MeV, and roughly 0.8 mm with a current of 10 pA for a 20 MeV beam.

  3. Fragmentation studies and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of lapachol: protonated, deprotonated and cationized species.

    PubMed

    Vessecchi, Ricardo; Emery, Flavio S; Galembeck, Sérgio E; Lopes, Norberto P

    2010-07-30

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis of lapachol (2-hydroxy-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone) was accomplished in order to elucidate the gas-phase dissociation reactions of this important biologically active natural product. The occurrence of protonated and cationized species in the positive mode and of deprotonated species in the negative mode was explored by means of collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. For the protonated molecule, the H(2)O and C(4)H(8) losses occur by two competitive channels. For the deprotonated molecule, the even-electron rule is not conserved, and the radicalar species are eliminated by formation of distonic anions. The fragmentation mechanism for each ion was suggested on the basis of computational thermochemistry. Atomic charges, relative energies, and frontier orbitals were employed aiming at a better understanding of the gas-phase reactivity of lapachol. Potential energy surfaces for fragmentation reactions were obtained by the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) model. PMID:20552691

  4. The Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, Carlos Garcia; Sassot, Rodolfo

    2003-10-01

    In this talk we present a collection of selected topics concerning the structure of the proton and the fundamental interactions as seen inside it. These topics have been thoroughly covered by high energy experiments with ever increasing precision in recent years and beautifully illustrate our present knowledge of the standard model.

  5. Kinetic and theoretical studies on the protonation of [Ni(2-SC6H4N){PhP(CH2CH2PPh2)2}]+: nitrogen versus sulfur as the protonation site.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Athinoula L; Koutselos, Andreas D; Wahab, Hilal S; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; Henderson, Richard A

    2011-02-01

    The complexes [Ni(4-Spy)(triphos)]BPh(4) and [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)]BPh(4) {triphos = PhP(CH(2)CH(2)PPh(2))(2), 4-Spy = 4-pyridinethiolate, 2-Spy = 2-pyridinethiolate} have been prepared and characterized both spectroscopically and using X-ray crystallography. In both complexes the triphos is a tridentate ligand. However, [Ni(4-Spy)(triphos)](+) comprises a 4-coordinate, square-planar nickel with the 4-Spy ligand bound to the nickel through the sulfur while [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)](+) contains a 5-coordinate, trigonal-bipyramidal nickel with a bidentate 2-Spy ligand bound to the nickel through both sulfur and nitrogen. The kinetics of the reactions of [Ni(4-Spy)(triphos)](+) and [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)](+) with lutH(+) (lut = 2,6-dimethylpyridine) in MeCN have been studied using stopped-flow spectrophotometry, and the two complexes show very different reactivities. The reaction of [Ni(4-Spy)(triphos)](+) with lutH(+) is complete within the deadtime of the stopped-flow apparatus (2 ms) and corresponds to protonation of the nitrogen. However, upon mixing [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)](+) and lutH(+) a reaction is observed (on the seconds time scale) to produce an equilibrium mixture. The mechanistic interpretation of the rate law has been aided by the application of MSINDO semiempirical and ADF calculations. The kinetics and calculations are consistent with the reaction between [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)](+) and lutH(+) involving initial protonation of the sulfur followed by dissociation of the nitrogen and subsequent transfer of the proton from sulfur to nitrogen. The factors affecting the position of protonation and the coupling of the coordination state of the 2-pyridinethiolate ligand to the site of protonation are discussed.

  6. Study of crosslinking onset and hydrogen annealing of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene irradiated with high-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John Ford

    1997-09-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) is used extensively in hip and knee endoprostheses. Radiation damage from the sterilization of these endoprostheses prior to surgical insertion results in polymer crosslinking and decreased oxidative stability. The motivation for this study was to determine if UHMW-PE could be crosslinked by low dose proton irradiation with minimal radiation damage and its subsequent deleterious effects. I found that low dose proton irradiation and post irradiation hydrogen annealing did crosslink UHMW-PE and limit post irradiation oxidation. Crosslinking onset was investigated for UHMW-PE irradiated with 2.6 and 30 MeV H+ ions at low doses from 5.7 × 1011-2.3 × 1014 ions/cm2. Crosslinking was determined from gel permeation chromatography (GPC) of 1,2,4 trichlorobenzene sol fractions and increased with dose. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed irradiation resulted in increased free radicals confirmed from increased carbonyl groups. Radiation damage, especially at the highest doses observed, also showed up in carbon double bonds and increased methyl end groups. Hydrogen annealing after ion irradiation resulted in 40- 50% decrease in FTIR absorption associated with carbonyl. The hydrogen annealing prevented further oxidation after aging for 1024 hours at 80oC. Hydrogen annealing was successful in healing radiation damage through reacting with the free radicals generated during proton irradiation. Polyethylenes, polyesters, and polyamides are used in diverse applications by the medical profession in the treatment of orthopedic impairments and cardiovascular disease and for neural implants. These artificial implants are sterilized with gamma irradiation prior to surgery and the resulting radiation damage can lead to accelerated deterioration of the implant properties. The findings in this study will greatly impact the continued use of these materials through the elimination of many problems associated with radiation

  7. Study of mass loss of spacecraft polymeric thermal control coatings under electron and proton radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanshin, Rashid; Novikov, Lev; Galygin, Alexander

    Polymeric composites have a number of properties that give a possibility to apply them as spacecraft external coatings. In space environment, however, such materials become one of the main sources of volatile products that form the outer spacecraft atmosphere and are able to con-dense on contamination-sensitive surfaces of onboard equipment. Thermal control coatings oc-cupy a considerable part of a satellite surface and are mostly subjected to ionizing radiations ac-companying by outgassing. The main stages of the process are the following: formation of vola-tile radiolysis products, diffusion of the products to free material surface, and desorption. Radia-tion-induced destruction and outgassing of material increase its permeability and accelerate mi-gration processes in it. Experimental data of effect of radiation on mass loss of polymeric composites used as thermal control coatings was analyzed and interpreted in the work. As a particular case, it was shown that mass loss of a polymeric composite irradiated by protons is greater than by electrons if energies and flux densities of the particles are the same. It can be explained that volatile products, in the first case, generate within a thin near-surface layer of material which permeability increases together with the absorbed dose, and quickly escape in vacuum. In the second case, a bulk of volatile products emerges far enough from the free surface of material which permeability increases slower as compared with proton radiation. Therefore, migration time of volatile products to the free surface grows and quantity of chemical reactions which they are involved in increases. To analyze and interpret experimental data, a mathematical model describing mass loss of polymeric composites subject to its growth of permeability under radiation is proposed. Based upon analysis of experiments and numerical simulation results, thresholds of fluen-cies and flux densities of electron and proton were determined. Exceeding these

  8. SU-E-J-140: Simulation Study Using Thermoacoustics to Image Proton Dose and Range in Water and Skull Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Stantz, K; Moskvin, V

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, thermoacoustic pressure signals generated from a proton beam were simulated in water and currently within a skull phantom to investigate the sensitivity of radioacoustic CT imaging in the brain. Methods: Thermoacoustically generated pressure signals from a pulse pencil proton beam (12, 15, 20, and 27cm range) were simulated in water. These simulated pressure signal are detected using a (71) transducer array placed along the surface of a cylinder (30cm × 40cm) and rotated over 2π (in 2 degree increments), where the normal vector to the surface of each transducer intersects the isocenter of the scanner. Currently, a software skull phantom is positioned at isocenter, where the scattering, absorption and speed of dispersion of the thermoacoustic signal through a three layer cortical-trabecular-cortical structure is being simulated. Based on data obtained from the literature, the effects of acoustic attenuation and speed-of-sound (dispersion) will be applied within the 3D FBP algorithm to obtain dosimetric images. Results: Based on hydrophone detector specifications, a 0.5MHz bandwidth and 50dB re 1μPa per Hz^1/2, a 1.6cGy sensitivity at the Bragg peak was demonstrated while maintaining a 1.0 mm (FWHM) range resolution along the central axis of the beam. Utilizing this same information, the integral dose within the Bragg peak and distal edge compared to MC had a 2% (statistical) and 5% voxel-based RMS at this same dose sensitivity. We plan to present preliminary data determining the range sensitivity for a head phantom for this scanner design and the feasibility of imaging the proton dose in patients with a brain tumor undergoing therapy. Conclusion: RACT scanner provides 3D dosimetric images with 1.6cGy (Bragg peak) sensitivity with 1mm range sensitivity. Simulations will be performed to determine feasibility to treat brain cancer patients.

  9. Laboratory studies in support of the detection of biogenic unsaturated alcohols by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarcke, M.; Amelynck, C.; Schoon, N.; Dhooghe, F.; Rimetz-Planchon, J.; van Langenhove, H.; Dewulf, J.

    2010-02-01

    The effect of the ratio of the electric field to the buffer gas number density (E/N) in the drift tube reactor of a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) on the product ion distributions of seven common biogenic unsaturated alcohols (2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, 1-penten-3-ol, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, trans-2-hexen-1-ol, 1-octen-3-ol, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol and linalool) has been investigated. At low E/N values, the dominant product ion is the dehydrated protonated alcohol. Increasing E/N results in more extensive fragmentation for all compounds. For cis-3-hexenol and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol the contribution of the protonated molecule can be enhanced by reducing E/N with respect to commonly used PTR-MS E/N values (120-130 Td). Significant differences have been found between some of the isomeric species studied, opening a way for selective detection. The C10 alcohol linalool mainly results in product ions at m/z 137 and 81, which are also PTR-MS fingerprints of monoterpenes. This may complicate monoterpene quantification when linalool and monoterpenes are simultaneously present in sampled air. Furthermore the influence of the water vapour pressure in the PTR-MS inlet line on the product ion distributions has been determined. Some major fingerprint ions of the unsaturated alcohols were found to depend significantly on the water vapour pressure in the inlet line and this should be taken into account for accurate quantification of these species by PTR-MS.

  10. Study of mixed-symmetry excitations in 96Ru via inelastic proton-scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, A.; Spieker, M.; Werner, V.; Ahn, T.; Anagnostatou, V.; Cooper, N.; Derya, V.; Elvers, M.; Endres, J.; Goddard, P.; Heinz, A.; Hughes, R. O.; Ilie, G.; Mineva, M. N.; Pickstone, S. G.; Petkov, P.; Radeck, D.; Ross, T.; Savran, D.; Zilges, A.

    2015-02-01

    Mixed-symmetry states of octupole (L = 3) and hexadecapole (L = 4) character have been recently proposed in the N = 52 isotones 92 Zr and 94Mo, based on strong M1 transitions to the lowest-lying 3- and 4+ states, respectively. In order to investigate similar excitations in the heaviest stable N = 52 isotone 96Ru, two inelastic proton-scattering experiments have been performed at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory (WNSL), Yale University, USA and the Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, Germany. From the combined data of both experiments, absolute E1, M1, and E2 transition strengths were extracted, allowing for the identification of candidates for MS octupole and hexadecapole states. The structure of the low-lying 4+ states is investigated by means of sdg-IBM-2 calculations.

  11. A proton spectroscopy study of white matter in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Hardan, Antonio Y; Fung, Lawrence K; Frazier, Thomas; Berquist, Sean W; Minshew, Nancy J; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Stanley, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    White matter abnormalities have been described in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with mounting evidence implicating these alterations in the pathophysiology of the aberrant connectivity reported in this disorder. The goal of this investigation is to further examine white matter structure in ASD using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS). Multi-voxel, short echo-time in vivo(1)H MRS data were collected from 17 male children with ASD and 17 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Key (1)H MRS metabolite ratios relative to phosphocreatine plus creatine were obtained from four different right and left white matter regions. Significantly lower N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratios were found in the anterior white matter regions of the ASD group when compared to controls. These findings reflect impairment in neuroaxonal white matter tissue and shed light on the neurobiologic underpinnings of white matter abnormalities in ASD by implicating an alteration in myelin and/or axonal development in this disorder.

  12. Proton nuclear Overhauser effect study of the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Dugad, L B; Goff, H M

    1992-07-13

    Proton nuclear Overhauser effect and paramagnetic relaxation measurements have been used to define more extensively the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, CMP (previously known as Coprinus cinereus peroxidase), as the ferric low-spin cyanide ligated complex. The results are compared with other well-characterized peroxidase enzymes. The NMR spectrum of CMPCN shows changes in the paramagnetically shifted resonances as a function of time, suggesting a significant heme disorder for CMP. The presence of proximal and distal histidine amino acid residues are common to the heme environments of both CMPCN and HRPCN. However, the upfield distal arginine signals of HRPCN are not evident in the 1H-NMR spectra of CMPCN.

  13. Study of proton and neutron activation of metal samples in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The analysis of the gamma-ray spectra taken from samples flown in Spacelab 1; the search for and review of neutron and proton activation cross-sections needed to analyze the results of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) activation measurements; additional calculations of neutron induced activation for the LDEF samples; the data analysis plan for the LDEF and Spacelab 2 samples; the measurement of relevant cross-sections with activation of samples of V, Co, In, and Ta at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility; and the preparation of an extended gamma-ray calibration source through the development of a proper technique to accurately deposit equal quantities of radioactive material onto a large number of point on the source are discussed.

  14. Real-Time Time-Dependent DFT Study of Electronic Stopping in Semiconductors under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Dillon C.; Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    Understanding the detailed mechanisms of how highly energetic charged particles transfer their kinetic energy to electronic excitations in materials has become an important topic in various technologies ranging from nuclear energy applications to integrated circuits for space missions. In this work, we use our new large-scale real-time time-dependent density functional theory simulation to investigate details of the ion-velocity-dependent dynamics of electronic excitations in the electronic stopping process. In particular, we will discuss how point defects in semiconductor materials influence the electronic stopping process under proton irradiation, using silicon carbide (3C-SiC) as a representative material due to its great technological importance. Additionally, we will provide atomistic insights into existing analytical models that are based on the plane-wave Born approximation by examining velocity-dependence of the projectile charge from first-principles simulations.

  15. NMR studies of protonation and hydrogen bond states of internal aldimines of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate acid-base in alanine racemase, aspartate aminotransferase, and poly-L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Dos, Alexandra; Zander, Reinhard; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Compton, Shara; Fogle, Emily; Toney, Michael D; Shenderovich, Ilya; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-12-01

    Using (15)N solid-state NMR, we have studied protonation and H-bonded states of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) linked as an internal aldimine in alanine racemase (AlaR), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), and poly-L-lysine. Protonation of the pyridine nitrogen of PLP and the coupled proton transfer from the phenolic oxygen (enolimine form) to the aldimine nitrogen (ketoenamine form) is often considered to be a prerequisite to the initial step (transimination) of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Indeed, using (15)N NMR and H-bond correlations in AspAT, we observe a strong aspartate-pyridine nitrogen H-bond with H located on nitrogen. After hydration, this hydrogen bond is maintained. By contrast, in the case of solid lyophilized AlaR, we find that the pyridine nitrogen is neither protonated nor hydrogen bonded to the proximal arginine side chain. However, hydration establishes a weak hydrogen bond to pyridine. To clarify how AlaR is activated, we performed (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR experiments on isotopically labeled PLP aldimines formed by lyophilization with poly-L-lysine. In the dry solid, only the enolimine tautomer is observed. However, a fast reversible proton transfer involving the ketoenamine tautomer is observed after treatment with either gaseous water or gaseous dry HCl. Hydrolysis requires the action of both water and HCl. The formation of an external aldimine with aspartic acid at pH 9 also produces the ketoenamine form stabilized by interaction with a second aspartic acid, probably via a H-bond to the phenolic oxygen. We postulate that O-protonation is an effectual mechanism for the activation of PLP, as is N-protonation, and that enzymes that are incapable of N-protonation employ this mechanism. PMID:24147985

  16. Numerical studies of petawatt laser-driven proton generation from two-species targets using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, J.; Badziak, J.; Jabloński, S.

    2016-04-01

    Laser-driven generation of high-energy ion beams has recently attracted considerable interest due to a variety of potential applications including proton radiography, ICF fast ignition, nuclear physics or hadron therapy. The ion beam parameters depend on both laser pulse and target parameters, and in order to produce the ion beam of properties required for a particular application the laser and target parameters must be carefully selected, and the mechanism of the ion beam generation should be well understood and controlled. Convenient and commonly used tools for studies of the ion acceleration process are particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. Using two-dimensional PIC simulations, the properties of a proton beam generated from a thin erbium hydride (ErH3) target irradiated by a 25fs laser pulse of linear or circular polarization and of intensity ranging from 1020 to 1021 W/cm2 are investigated and compared with the features of a proton beam produced from a hydrocarbon (CH) target. It has been found that using erbium hydride targets instead of hydrocarbon ones creates an opportunity to generate more compact proton beams of higher mean energy, intensity and of better collimation. This is especially true for the linear polarization of the laser beam, for which the mean proton energy, the amount of high energy protons and the intensity of the proton beam generated from the hydride target is by an order of magnitude higher than for the hydrocarbon target. For the circular polarization, the proton beam parameters are lower than those for the linear one, and the effect of target composition on the acceleration process is weaker.

  17. Spin-lattice relaxation study of the methyl proton dynamics in solid 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT).

    PubMed

    Piślewski, N; Tritt-Goc, J; Bielejewski, M; Rachocki, A; Ratajczyk, T; Szymański, S

    2009-06-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation studies are performed for powder samples of 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT) and its isotopomer DMT-d(12) in which all the non-methyl protons in the molecule are replaced by deuterons. The relaxation data are interpreted in terms of the conventional relaxation theory based on the random jump model in which the Pauli correlations between the relevant spin and torsional states are discarded. The Arrhenius activation energies, obtained from the relaxation data, 25.3 and 24.8 kJ mol(-1) for DMT and DMT-d(12), respectively, are very high as for the methyl groups. The validity of the jump model in the present case is considered from the perspective of Haupt theory in which the Pauli principle is explicitly invoked. To this purpose, the dynamic quantities entering the Haupt model are reinterpreted in the spirit of the damped quantum rotation (DQR) approach introduced recently for the purpose of NMR lineshape studies of hindered molecular rotators. Theoretical modelling of the relevant methyl group dynamics, based on the DQR theory, was performed. From these calculations it is inferred that direct assessments of the torsional barrier heights, based on the Arrhenius activation energies extracted from relaxation data, should be treated with caution.

  18. Comparative proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amantadine complexes formed in aqueous solutions with three major cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Lis-Cieplak, Agnieszka; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-01-01

    Host-guest complexes of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD, respectively) with amantadine (1-aminoadamantane, AMA; an antiviral agent) were characterized in aqueous solutions using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Host-guest molecular interactions were manifested by changes in the chemical shifts of AMA protons. NMR Job's plots showed that the stoichiometry of all the studied complexes was 1:1. Two-dimensional T-ROESY experiments demonstrated that the complexes were formed by different degrees of incorporation of the adamantyl group of AMA into the CD cavity. The mode of AMA binding was proposed. The AMA molecule came into the α-CD cavity (the smallest size) or β-CD cavity (the intermediate size) through its wide entrance to become shallowly or deeply accommodated, respectively. In the complex of AMA with γ-CD (the largest cavity size), the adamantyl group was also quite deeply inserted into the CD cavity, but it arrived there through the narrow cavity entrance. It was found that the adamantyl group of AMA was best accommodated by the β-CD cavity. The binding constants Kaa of the studied complexes (in M(-1) ), determined from DOSY NMR, were fairly high; their values in an ascending order were: α-CD (183) < γ-CD (306) ≪ β-CD (5150).

  19. Development of an NMR microprobe procedure for high-throughput environmental metabolomics of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Nagato, Edward G; Lankadurai, Brian P; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the primary platform used in high-throughput environmental metabolomics studies because its non-selectivity is well suited for non-targeted approaches. However, standard NMR probes may limit the use of NMR-based metabolomics for tiny organisms because of the sample volumes required for routine metabolic profiling. Because of this, keystone ecological species, such as the water flea Daphnia magna, are not commonly studied because of the analytical challenges associated with NMR-based approaches. Here, the use of a 1.7-mm NMR microprobe in analyzing tissue extracts from D. magna is tested. Three different extraction procedures (D2O-based buffer, Bligh and Dyer, and acetonitrile : methanol : water) were compared in terms of the yields and breadth of polar metabolites. The D2O buffer extraction yielded the most metabolites and resulted in the best reproducibility. Varying amounts of D. magna dry mass were extracted to optimize metabolite isolation from D. magna tissues. A ratio of 1-1.5-mg dry mass to 40 µl of extraction solvent provided excellent signal-to-noise and spectral resolution using (1)H NMR. The metabolite profile of a single daphnid was also investigated (approximately 0.2 mg). However, the signal-to-noise of the (1)H NMR was considerably lower, and while feasible for select applications would likely not be appropriate for high-throughput NMR-based metabolomics. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on D. magna extracts were also performed using the 1.7-mm NMR probe to confirm (1)H NMR metabolite assignments. This study provides an NMR-based analytical framework for future metabolomics studies that use D. magna in ecological and ecotoxicity studies.

  20. On the analysis of neonatal hamster tooth germs with the photon microprobe at Daresbury, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tros, G. H. J.; Van Langevelde, F.; Vis, R. D.

    1990-04-01

    Complementary to the micro-PIXE experiments performed on hamster tooth germs to elucidate the role of fluoride during the growth, the photon microprobe at Daresbury was used to obtain information on the distribution of Zn. The germs of fluoride-administered hamsters, together with a control group, were analyzed with the micro-synchrotron radiation fluorescence method (micro-SXRF).