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Sample records for proton nmr coupling

  1. Proton-coupled 15N NMR spectra of neutral and protonated ethenoadenosine and ethenocytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Sierzputowska-Gracz, H; Wiewiórowski, M; Kozerski, L; von Philipsborn, W

    1984-01-01

    The 15N chemical shifts and 15N, 1H spin coupling constants were determined in the title compounds using the INEPT pulse sequence and assigned with the aid of selective proton decoupling. The delta/15N/ and J/N, H/ values are discussed in terms of involvement of the imidazole ring created by ethenobridging in the electronic structure of the whole molecule. Both spectral parameters indicate that the diligant nitrogen in this ring is the primary site of protonation in these modified nucleosides. It is concluded that 15N NMR of nucleoside bases can be largely a complementary method to 1H and 13C NMR studies and, in addition, can serve as a direct probe for studies of nitrogen environment in oligomeric fragments of nucleic acids even at moderately strong magnetic fields due to the higher spectral dispersion compared with 1H and 13C NMR spectra. PMID:6473107

  2. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-05

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  3. (1)JCH NMR Profile: Identification of Key Structural Features and Functionalities by Visual Observation and Direct Measurement of One-Bond Proton-Carbon Coupling Constants.

    PubMed

    Marcó, Núria; Souza, Alexandre A; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Gil, Roberto R; Parella, Teodor

    2017-02-17

    A user-friendly NMR interface for the visual and accurate determination of experimental one-bond proton-carbon coupling constants ((1)JCH) in small molecules is presented. This intuitive (1)JCH profile correlates directly to δ((1)H), and (1)JCH facilitates the rapid identification and assignment of (1)H signals belonging to key structural elements and functional groups. Illustrative examples are provided for some target molecules, including terminal alkynes, strained rings, electronegative substituents, or lone-pair-bearing heteronuclei.

  4. Biochemical and proton NMR characterization of the isolated functional beta-subunit of coupling factor one from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roux-Fromy, M.; Neumann, J.M.; Andre, F.; Berger, G.; Girault, G.; Galmiche, J.M.; Remy, R.

    1987-04-29

    Beta subunits have been dissociated from CF1 of spinach chloroplasts, purified by HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional electrophoresis and fluorescence emission. The solutions of isolated beta subunits are able to hydrolyze MgATP; this ATPase activity is an intrinsic property of the beta molecule. From proton NMR at 300 and 500 MHz, it is shown that the preparations are fully reproducible and that beta subunits remain monomeric with 75% aliphatic protons associated with rigid parts of the molecule. The other 25% give rise to separate resonances and belong to mobile side-chains and/or to flexible regions. The measurement of the transverse relaxation times T2 has permitted a detailed characterization of the molecular dynamics of the isolated beta subunits.

  5. (1) H NMR Spectra. Part 28: Proton chemical shifts and couplings in three-membered rings. A ring current model for cyclopropane and a novel dihedral angle dependence for (3) J(HH) couplings involving the epoxy proton.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Raymond J; Leonard, Paul; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2012-04-01

    The (1) H chemical shifts of selected three-membered ring compounds in CDCl(3) solvent were obtained. This allowed the determination of the substituent chemical shifts of the substituents in the three-membered rings and the long-range effect of these rings on the distant protons. The substituent chemical shifts of common substituents in the cyclopropane ring differ considerably from the same substituents in acyclic fragments and in cyclohexane and were modelled in terms of a three-bond (γ)-effect. For long-range protons (more than three bonds removed), the substituent effects of the cyclopropane ring were analysed in terms of the cyclopropane magnetic anisotropy and steric effect. The cyclopropane magnetic anisotropy (ring current) shift was modelled by (a) a single equivalent dipole perpendicular to and at the centre of the cyclopropane ring and (b) by three identical equivalent dipoles perpendicular to the ring placed at each carbon atom. Model (b) gave a more accurate description of the (1) H chemical shifts and was the selected model. After parameterization, the overall root mean square error for the dataset of 289 entries was 0.068 ppm. The anisotropic effects are significant for the cyclopropane protons (ca 1 ppm) but decrease rapidly with distance. The heterocyclic rings of oxirane, thiirane and aziridine do not possess a ring current. (3) J(HH) couplings of the epoxy ring proton with side-chain protons were obtained and shown to be dependent on both the H-C-C-H and H-C-C-O orientations. Both density functional theory calculations and a simple Karplus-type equation gave general agreement with the observed couplings (root mean square error 0.5 Hz over a 10-Hz range).

  6. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  7. J-edited pure shift NMR for the facile measurement of (n)J(HH) for specific protons.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N

    2015-04-07

    We report a novel 1D J-edited pure shift NMR experiment (J-PSHIFT) that was constructed from a pseudo 2D experiment for the direct measurement of proton-proton scalar couplings. The experiment gives homonuclear broad-band (1)H-decoupled (1)H NMR spectra, which provide a single peak for chemically distinct protons, and only retain the homonuclear-scalar-coupled doublet pattern at the chemical-shift positions of the protons in the coupled network of a specific proton. This permits the direct and unambiguous measurement of the magnitudes of the couplings. The incorporation of a 1D selective correlation spectroscopy (COSY)/ total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) block in lieu of the initial selective pulse, results in the exclusive detection of the correlated spectrum of a specific proton.

  8. NMR spectroscopy of hydroxyl protons in aqueous solutions of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, E; Otting, G; Wüthrich, K

    1992-09-01

    Hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine, and to some extent also tyrosine are usually located on or near the surface of proteins. NMR observations of the hydroxyl protons is therefore of interest to support investigations of the protein surface in solution, and knowledge of the hydroxyl NMR lines is indispensable as a reference for studies of protein hydration in solution. In this paper, solvent suppression schemes recently developed for observation of hydration water resonances were used to observe hydroxyl protons of serine, threonine and tyrosine in aqueous solutions of small model peptides and the protein basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). The chemical shifts of the hydroxyl protons of serine and threonine were found to be between 5.4 and 6.2 ppm, with random-coil shifts at 4 degrees C of 5.92 ppm and 5.88 ppm, respectively, and those of tyrosine between 9.6 and 10.1 ppm, with a random-coil shift of 9.78 ppm. Since these spectral regions are virtually free of other polypeptide 1H NMR signals, cross peaks with the hydroxyl protons are usually well separated even in homonuclear two-dimensional 1H NMR spectra. To illustrate the practical use of hydroxyl proton NMR in polypeptides, the conformations of the side-chain hydroxyl groups in BPTI were characterized by measurements of nuclear Overhauser effects and scalar coupling constants involving the hydroxyl protons. In addition, hydroxyl proton exchange rates were measured as a function of pH, where simple first-order rate processes were observed for both acid- and base-catalysed exchange of all but one of the hydroxyl-bearing residues in BPTI. For the conformations of the individual Ser, Thr and Tyr side chains characterized in the solution structure with the use of hydroxyl proton NMR, both exact coincidence and significant differences relative to the corresponding BPTI crystal structure data were observed.

  9. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  10. NMR analysis, protonation equilibria and decomposition kinetics of tolperisone.

    PubMed

    Orgován, Gábor; Tihanyi, Károly; Noszál, Béla

    2009-12-05

    The rate constants of spontaneous and hydroxide-catalyzed decomposition and the tautomer-specific protonation constants of tolperisone, a classical muscle relaxant were determined. A solution NMR method without any separation techniques was elaborated to quantitate the progress of decomposition. All the rate and equilibrium constants were determined at four different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The molecular mechanism of decomposition is proposed.

  11. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3 - 4 fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8 - 13 fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling. PMID:19857977

  12. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Holland, Gregory P; Cherry, Brian R; Jenkins, Janelle E; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3- to 4-fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8- to 13-fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling.

  13. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    in high-resolution NMR spectra. This technique is selective for protons on the surface organic functional groups due to their motional averaging in solution. In this study, 1H solution NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the interface of the organic functional groups in D2O. The pKa for these functional groups covalently bound to the surface of nanoparticles was determined using an NMR-pH titration method based on the variation in the proton chemical shift for the alkyl group protons closest to the amine group with pH. The adsorption of toxic contaminants (chromate and arsenate anions) on the surface of functionalized silicalite-1 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been studied by 1H solution NMR spectroscopy. With this method, the surface bound contaminants are detected. The analysis of the intensity and position of these peaks allows quantitative assessment of the relative amounts of functional groups with adsorbed metal ions. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy to the electronic environment and structure of the surface functional groups on porous nanomaterials.

  14. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  15. Fluorine-proton correlation from isolated trifluoromethyl groups using unresolved J-couplings.

    PubMed

    Howe, Peter W A

    2012-10-01

    Fluorine-containing compounds are rare in biological systems, so fluorine NMR spectroscopy can selectively detect and quantify fluorinated xenobiotics in crude biological extracts. The high sensitivity of fluorine NMR allows the detection of compounds containing isolated trifluoromethyl groups at nanogramme levels. However, it only provides limited structural information about trifluoromethyl-containing compounds owing to the difficulty of interpreting fluorine chemical shifts and the low sensitivity of HOESY experiments used to correlate fluorine nuclei with protons in the same compound. This paper demonstrates that long-range fluorine-proton J-couplings can be used to correlate isolated trifluoromethyl groups with nearby protons with significantly higher sensitivity than HOESY. Fluorine-observe fluorine-proton HMQC can even give correlations when the fluorine-proton J-couplings are less than the observed fluorine resonance linewidth, so it provides a useful alternative source of structural information about fluorinated xenobiotics.

  16. Proton clouds to measure long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinnige, Tessa; Daniëls, Mark; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2014-03-26

    We show that selective labeling of proteins with protonated amino acids embedded in a perdeuterated matrix, dubbed 'proton clouds', provides general access to long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in proton-detected solid-state NMR, which is important to study protein tertiary structure. Proton-cloud labeling significantly improves spectral resolution by simultaneously reducing proton line width and spectral crowding despite a high local proton density in clouds. The approach is amenable to almost all canonical amino acids. Our method is demonstrated on ubiquitin and the β-barrel membrane protein BamA.

  17. Proton-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Bone with Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Kumar Pandey, Manoj; Gong, Bo; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    While obtaining high-resolution structural details from bone is highly important to better understand its mechanical strength and the effects of aging and disease on bone ultrastructure, it has been a major challenge to do so with existing biophysical techniques. Though solid-state NMR spectroscopy has the potential to reveal the structural details of bone, it suffers from poor spectral resolution and sensitivity. Nonetheless, recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR technology have made it possible to spin solid samples up to 110 kHz frequency. With such remarkable capabilities, 1H-detected NMR experiments that have traditionally been challenging on rigid solids can now be implemented. Here, we report the first application of multidimensional 1H-detected NMR measurements on bone under ultrafast MAS conditions to provide atomistic-level elucidation of the complex heterogeneous structure of bone. Our investigations demonstrate that two-dimensional 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectra for bone are obtainable using fp-RFDR (finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling) pulse sequence under ultrafast MAS. Our results infer that water exhibits distinct 1H-1H dipolar coupling networks with the backbone and side-chain regions in collagen. These results show the promising potential of proton-detected ultrafast MAS NMR for monitoring structural and dynamic changes caused by mechanical loading and disease in bone.

  18. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-05

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication.

  19. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  20. Portable microcoil NMR detection coupled to capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Joana; Adams, Kristl L; Klunder, Gregory L; Evans, Lee; Steele, Paul; Vogt, Carla; Herberg, Julie L

    2011-02-15

    High-efficiency separation techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis (CE), coupled to a nondestructive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer offer the ability to separate, chemically identify, and provide structural information on analytes in small sample volumes. Previous CE-NMR coupled systems utilized laboratory-scale NMR magnets and spectrometers, which require very long separation capillaries. New technological developments in electronics have reduced the size of the NMR system, and small 1-2 T permanent magnets provide the possibilities of a truly portable NMR. The microcoils used in portable and laboratory-scale NMR may offer the advantage of improved mass sensitivity because the limit of detection (LOD) is proportional to the coil diameter. In this work, CE is coupled with a portable, briefcase-sized NMR system that incorporates a microcoil probe and a 1.8 T permanent magnet to measure (19)F NMR spectra. Separations of fluorinated molecules are demonstrated with stopped- and continuous-flow NMR detection. The results demonstrate that coupling CE to a portable NMR instrument is feasible and can provide a low-cost method to obtain structural information on microliter samples. An LOD of 31.8 nmol for perfluorotributylamine with a resolution of 4 ppm has been achieved with this system.

  1. A microcoil NMR probe for coupling microscale HPLC with on-line NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, R; Kelley, W P; Floyd, P D; Tan, Z J; Webb, A G; Sweedler, J V

    1999-12-01

    An HPLC NMR system is presented that integrates a commercial microbore HPLC system using a 0.5-mm column with a 500-MHz proton NMR spectrometer using a custom NMR probe with an observe volume of 1.1 microL and a coil fill factor of 68%. Careful attention to capillary connections and NMR flow cell design allows on-line NMR detection with no significant loss in separation efficiency when compared with a UV chromatogram. HPLC NMR is performed on mixtures of amino acids and small peptides with analyte injection amounts as small as 750 ng; the separations are accomplished in less than 10 min and individual NMR spectra are acquired with 12 s time resolution. Stopped-flow NMR is achieved by diversion of the chromatographic flow after observation of the beginning of the analyte band within the NMR flow cell. Isolation of the compound of interest within the NMR detection cell allows multidimensional experiments to be performed. A stopped-flow COSY spectrum of the peptide Phe-Ala is acquired in 3.5 h with an injected amount of 5 micrograms.

  2. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins.

  3. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of 1H-1H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins. PMID:27489348

  4. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR.

    PubMed

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) (14)N spectra (I=1) via spy nuclei S=1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T(11)(I)T(11)(S) and T(21)(I)T(11)(S) at the beginning of the evolution interval t(1). The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t(1) to omega(1) may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S-S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected (14)N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the (14)N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of l-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for l-alanine the width of the (14)N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide (14)N in AAG peptide bonds.

  5. Characterization of the protonic distribution and environment in amorphous silicon-hydrogen alloys using proton NMR and ESR

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, F.R.; Lowry, M.E.; Garcia, M.L.S.; Barnes, R.G.; Torgeson, D.E.

    1981-06-01

    We present magnetic resonance data from a series of a-Si(H) samples deposited under varied hydrogen partial pressures. This parameter has been shown to be directly related to the sample-wide average proton density. The other sputtering parameters were maintained such that no dihydride bonding (as determined by the 890 cm/sup -1/ir bending mode) is present. Measurements presented are the NMR absorption spectrum (from the Fourier transform of the free induction decay), relaxation time T/sub 1/, and ESR absorption. The NMR absorption spectrum identifies two distinct forms of H incorporation. One is a tightly clustered form, such as H bonded on the inner surface of a microvoid of maximum dimension 5A, while the other is a randomly distributed phase with local H density of 3.5 x 10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/. The distributed phase H density is independent of the sample-wide average, indicating a fixed composition phase which occupies a larger percentage of the sample as H pressure is increased during deposition. This phase appears to extend to a maximum of 88% of the sample. The protonic spin-lattice relaxation time (T/sub 1/) measures the coupling of the spin system to its enviroment, ''the lattice''. For the series of samples, we find that T/sub 1/ first increases from 2.8 s to 44.8 s with increasing H content and then decreases to 8.1 s as H density is further increased. In an effort to understand this unusual relaxation behavior, we have made temperature dependant T/sub 1/ and ESR measurements. Utilizing these results, the protonic relaxation mechanism is discussed in terms ''disorder mode'' and electronic state models.

  6. Quantum mechanical methods for calculating proton tunneling splittings and proton-coupled electron transfer vibronic couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skone, Jonathan H.

    Development of quantum mechanical methods for the calculation of proton tunneling splittings and proton-coupled electron transfer vibronic couplings is presented in this thesis. The fundamental physical principles underlying proton transfer in the electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic limits are illustrated by applying the quantum mechanical methods we developed to chemical systems exemplary of the electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic proton-tunneling regimes. Overall, this thesis emphasizes the need for quantum chemical methods that avoid the adiabatic separation of the quantum proton and electron, are computationally tractable, and treat all quantum particles three-dimensionally. The nuclear-electronic orbital nonorthogonal configuration interaction (NEO-NOCI) approach is presented for calculating proton tunneling splittings and vibronic couplings. The NEO approach is a molecular orbital based method that avoids the Born-Oppenheimer separation of the select protons and electrons, thereby making methods developed within this scheme, such as NEO-NOCI, applicable to electronically nonadiabatic proton transfer. In the two-state NEO-NOCI approach, the ground and excited state delocalized nuclear-electronic wavefunctions are expressed as linear combinations of two nonorthogonal localized nuclear-electronic wavefunctions obtained at the NEO-Hartree-Fock level. The advantages of the NEO-NOCI approach are the removal of the adiabatic separation between the electrons and the quantum nuclei, the computational efficiency, the potential for systematic improvement by enhancing the basis sets and number of configurations, and the applicability to a broad range of chemical systems. The tunneling splitting is determined by the energy difference between these two delocalized vibronic states. The proton tunneling splittings calculated with the NEO-NOCI approach for the [He-H-He]+ model system with a range of fixed He-He distances are shown to be in excellent agreement with

  7. Optimum levels of exchangeable protons in perdeuterated proteins for proton detection in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Umit; Lange, Sascha; Trent Franks, W; Linser, Rasmus; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Reif, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the level of exchangeable protons on the observed amide proton linewidth obtained in perdeuterated proteins. Decreasing the amount of D(2)O employed in the crystallization buffer from 90 to 0%, we observe a fourfold increase in linewidth for both (1)H and (15)N resonances. At the same time, we find a gradual increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for (1)H-(15)N correlations in dipolar coupling based experiments for H(2)O concentrations of up to 40%. Beyond 40%, a significant reduction in SNR is observed. Scalar-coupling based (1)H-(15)N correlation experiments yield a nearly constant SNR for samples prepared with < or =30% H(2)O. Samples in which more H(2)O is employed for crystallization show a significantly reduced NMR intensity. Calculation of the SNR by taking into account the reduction in (1)H T (1) in samples containing more protons (SNR per unit time), yields a maximum SNR for samples crystallized using 30 and 40% H(2)O for scalar and dipolar coupling based experiments, respectively. A sensitivity gain of 3.8 is obtained by increasing the H(2)O concentration from 10 to 40% in the CP based experiment, whereas the linewidth only becomes 1.5 times broader. In general, we find that CP is more favorable compared to INEPT based transfer when the number of possible (1)H,(1)H interactions increases. At low levels of deuteration (> or =60% H(2)O in the crystallization buffer), resonances from rigid residues are broadened beyond detection. All experiments are carried out at MAS frequency of 24 kHz employing perdeuterated samples of the chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain.

  8. Fast proton exchange in histidine: measurement of rate constants through indirect detection by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Akansha Ashvani; Duma, Luminita; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe

    2014-05-19

    Owing to its imidazole side chain, histidine participates in various processes such as enzyme catalysis, pH regulation, metal binding, and phosphorylation. The determination of exchange rates of labile protons for such a system is important for understanding its functions. However, these rates are too fast to be measured directly in an aqueous solution by using NMR spectroscopy. We have obtained the exchange rates of the NH3(+) amino protons and the labile NH(ε2) and NH(δ1) protons of the imidazole ring by indirect detection through nitrogen-15 as a function of temperature (272 Kprotons H(i) and the three one-bond scalar coupling constants (1)J(N,H(i)) could also be determined accurately.

  9. Intermediate couplings: NMR at the solids-liquids interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Megan

    2006-03-01

    Anisotropic interactions like dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropy have long offered solid-state NMR spectroscopists valuable structural information. Recently, solution-state NMR structural studies have begun to exploit residual dipolar couplings of biological molecules in weakly anisotropic solutions. These residual couplings are about 0.1% of the coupling magnitudes observed in the solid state, allowing simple, high-resolution NMR spectra to be retained. In this work, we examine the membrane-associated opioid, leucine enkephalin (lenk), in which the ordering is ten times larger than that for residual dipolar coupling experiments, requiring a combination of solution-state and solid-state NMR techniques. We adapted conventional solid-state NMR techniques like adiabatic cross- polarization and REDOR for use with such a system, and measured small amide bond dipolar couplings in order to determine the orientation of the amide bonds (and therefore the peptide) with respect to the membrane surface. However, the couplings measured indicate large structural rearrangements on the surface and contradict the published structures obtained by NOESY constraints, a reminder that such methods are of limited use in the presence of large-scale dynamics.

  10. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  11. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Applications: Proton NMR In Biological Objects Subjected To Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Proton NMR in Biological Objects Submitted to Magic Angle Spinning, In Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, Second Edition (Paul J. Worsfold, Alan Townshend and Colin F. Poole, eds.), Elsevier, Oxford 6:333-342. Published January 1, 2005. Proposal Number 10896.

  13. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively.

  14. Proton NMR Spectra: Deceptively Simple and Deceptively Complex Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurst, J. E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes relatively simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that demonstrate unexpected results of the deceptively simple and deceptively complex types. Background information, experimental procedures, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  15. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  16. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-06-17

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid-liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid-liquid phases.

  17. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid–liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid–liquid phases. PMID:27311326

  18. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-09-30

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40/sup 0/C for a tightly bound /sup 15/N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads.

  19. The human proton-coupled folate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Desmoulin, Sita Kugel; Hou, Zhanjun; Gangjee, Aleem; Matherly, Larry H.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). PCFT was identified in 2006 as the primary transporter for intestinal absorption of dietary folates, as mutations in PCFT are causal in hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) syndrome. Since 2006, there have been major advances in understanding the mechanistic roles of critical amino acids and/or domains in the PCFT protein, many of which were identified as mutated in HFM patients, and in characterizing transcriptional control of the human PCFT gene. With the recognition that PCFT is abundantly expressed in human tumors and is active at pHs characterizing the tumor microenvironment, attention turned to exploiting PCFT for delivering novel cytotoxic antifolates for solid tumors. The finding that pemetrexed is an excellent PCFT substrate explains its demonstrated clinical efficacy for mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer, and prompted development of more PCFT-selective tumor-targeted 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates that derive their cytotoxic effects by targeting de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis. PMID:22954694

  20. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  1. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  2. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  3. NMR spectra and translational diffusion of protons in crystals with hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timokhin, V. M.; Garmash, V. M.; Tarasov, V. P.

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of proton transport in hydrogen-bond crystals at low temperatures is currently one of important problems in the semiconductor physics. With the use of the NMR spectra of wide-band-gap hydrogen-bond crystals grown in H2O and D2O solutions, we have succeeded in finding a direct proof of the presence of protons in the mobile phase, determined their activation energy in good agreement with the spectra of thermally stimulated depolarization currents and with the infrared spectra, and, as a result, clarified the mechanism of proton transport and tunneling.

  4. Heteronuclear dipolar couplings, total spin coherence, and bilinear rotations in NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.

    1983-07-01

    In Chapter 1 a variety of different introductory topics are presented. The potential complexity of the nuclear magnetic resonsnace (NMR) spectra of molecules dissolved in liquid crystal solvents serves to motivate the development of multiple quantum (MQ) spectroscopy. The basics of MQ NMR are reviewed in Chapter 2. An experimental search procedure for the optimization of MQ pulse sequences is introduced. Chapter 3 discusses the application of MQ NMR techniques to the measurement of dipolar couplings in heteronuclear spin systems. The advantages of MQ methods in such systems are developed and experimental results for partially oriented (1-/sup 13/C) benzene are presented. Several pulse sequences are introduced which employ a two-step excitation of heteronuclear MQ coherence. A new multiple pulse method, involving the simultaneous irradiation of both rare and abundant spin species, is described. The problem of the broadening of MQ transitions due to magnetic field inhomogeneity is considered in Chapter 4. The method of total spin coherence transfer echo spectroscopy (TSCTES) is presented, with experimets on partially oriented acetaldehyde serving to demonstrate this new technique. TSCTES results in MQ spectra which are sensitive to all chemical shifts and spin-spin couplings and which are free of inhomogeneous broadening. In Chapter 5 the spectroscopy of spin systems of several protons and a /sup 13/C nucleus in the isotropic phase is discussed. The usefulness of the heteronuclear bilinear rotation as a calculational tool is illustrated. Compensated bilinear ..pi.. rotations, which are relatively insensitive to timing parameter missets, are presented. A new technique for homonuclear proton decoupling, Bilinear Rotation Decoupling, is described and its success in weakly coupled systems is demonstrated.

  5. Empirical NMR Chemical Shift Correlations for Methyl and Methylene Protons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrich, Edwin C.; Runkle, Katherine Gates

    1984-01-01

    Presents an internally consistent set of 63 substituent constants developed for use with the Schoolery Relationship to predict the chemical shifts of methylene protons of acyclic compounds. Chemical shift data used in deriving the constants were taken mainly from primary sources of HNMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra. (JN)

  6. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.

    1991-06-10

    The objective of our research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period, including selenium-containing macrocycles, new crown-4 structures, and several new crown structures containing nitrogen based heterocycles as substituents in the principal macrocyclic ring. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction, and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. It was found that the dual hollow fiber system maintains the cation selectivity and permeability of supported liquid membranes, while enhancing membrane stability. The diffusion limited transport model was expanded to account for membrane solvent effects. Furthermore, Eu{sup 2+} transport was found to be similar to that of strontium and much higher than that of the lanthanides, in supported liquid membrane systems.

  7. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  8. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  9. Calculation of nuclear spin-spin couplings. VIII. Vicinal proton-proton coupling constants in ethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, H.; Inomata, H.; Baba, T.; Miura, K.; Matsuda, H.

    1995-10-01

    Ab initio self-consistent-field (SCF) and electron correlation calculations have been carried out for the dihedral angle dependence of the vicinal proton-proton coupling constants, 3JHH, in ethane molecule. The four contributions to 3JHH, (JFC, JSD, JOP, and JOD) have been computed with the three different basis sets, [5s2p1d/2s1p], [5s3p1d/3s1p], and [7s4p2d/5s2p]. The Fermi contact (FC) contribution was largest and the spin-dipole (SD) contribution was smallest. The FC and orbital paramagnetic (OP) contributions showed large basis set dependence, but the SD and orbital diamagnetic (OD) contributions presented little basis set dependence. The calculated total SCF contribution to 3JHH was higher than the experimental coupling. Using the Møller-Plesset perturbation theory we have introduced electron correlation effects on the FC and OP terms. The correlation effects on the OP term was shown to be negligible. The second-order correlation in the FC term was very large and amounted to half of its SCF value in magnitude with opposite sign. However, the third-order correlation in the FC contribution was small. Unfortunately, the calculated 3JHH value including correlation corrections through third order was too small compared to the experimental one. The poor agreement between calculation and experiment is claimed to be due to higher than third-order correlations in the FC term.

  10. Theoretical Analysis of Proton Relays in Electrochemical Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Auer, Benjamin; Fernandez, Laura; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-01

    The coupling of long-range electron transfer to proton transport over multiple sites plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. Recently a molecule with a hydrogen-bond relay inserted between the proton donor and acceptor sites in a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) system was studied electrochemically. The standard rate constants and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were measured experimentally for this system and a related single proton transfer system. In the present paper, these systems are studied theoretically using vibronically nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for electrochemical PCET. Application of this approach to proton relays requires the calculation of multidimensional proton vibrational wavefunctions and incorporation of multiple proton donor-acceptor motions. The calculated KIEs and relative standard rate constants for the single and double proton transfer systems are in agreement with the experimental data. The calculations indicate that the standard rate constant is lower for the double proton transfer system because of the smaller overlap integral between the ground state reduced and oxidized proton vibrational wavefunctions for this system, resulting in greater contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states with higher free energy barriers. The decrease in proton donor-acceptor distances due to thermal fluctuations and the contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states play important roles in proton relay systems. The theory suggests that the PCET rate constant may be increased by decreasing the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distances or modifying the thermal motions of the molecule to facilitate the concurrent decrease of these distances. The submission of this journal article in ERIA is a requirement of the EFRC subcontract with Pennsylvania State University collaborators to get publications to OSTI.

  11. Proton NMR study of spin dynamics in the magnetic organic chains M (hfac)3 NITEt (M =Eu3 +,Gd3 + )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, M.; Lascialfari, A.; Caneschi, A.; Ammannato, L.; Gatteschi, D.; Rettori, A.; Pini, M. G.; Cucci, C.; Borsa, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the spin dynamics in the rare-earth-based low-dimensional molecular magnetic chains Eu (hfac) 3NITEt and Gd (hfac) 3NITEt (in short, Eu-Et and Gd-Et). Although both samples are based on the same chemical building block, [(hfac) 3NITEt ] , their magnetic properties change dramatically when the Eu3 + ion, which is nonmagnetic at low temperatures, is substituted by the magnetic Gd3 + ion. The present proton NMR investigation shows that, down to the lowest investigated temperature (T =1.5 K for Gd-Et and T =3 K for Eu-Et), the Eu-Et chain behaves as a one-dimensional Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling (J =-20 K) between s =1 /2 organic radicals, and has a T -independent exchange frequency (ωe=2.6 ×1012 rad/s). In the Gd-Et chain, in contrast, a competition arises between nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic coupling and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic coupling; moreover, two phase transitions have previously been found, in agreement with Villain's conjecture: a first transition, at T0=2.2 K, from a high temperature paramagnetic phase to a chiral spin liquid phase, and a second transition, at TN=1.9 K, to a three-dimensional helical spin solid phase. Contrary to the Eu-Et chain (whose three-dimensional ordering temperature is estimated to insurge at very low, TN≈0.3 K), critical spin dynamics effects have been measured in the Gd-Et chain on approaching TN=1.9 K: namely, a divergence of the proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 , which in turn produces a sudden wipe-out of the NMR signal in a very narrow (Δ T ˜0.04 K) temperature range above TN. Below TN, an inhomogeneous broadening of the NMR line indicates a complete spin freezing. At T0=2.2 K, instead, such critical effects are not observed because NMR measurements probe the two-spin correlation function, while the chiral spin liquid phase transition is associated with a divergence of the four

  12. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case.

  13. Proton-NMR study on chemisorption of ethylene on platinum powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashi Shibanuma; Toshiji Matsui

    1985-05-01

    The high-temperature phase of ethylene on surfaces of Pt powder has been studied by proton-NMR in order to decide whether the surface species is the ethylidyne species (CH 3C) proposed by Kesmodel et al. or the multiple-bonded species (CH 2CH) proposed by Demuth. The observed NMR spectrum is not attributable to CH 3-groups on the surfaes, but can be interpreted as the superposition of two signals, one originating from CH 2-groups and the other from CH-groups. In other words, the results suggest that the surface species is the multiple-bonded species.

  14. Proton-NMR study on chemisorption of ethylene on platinum powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibanuma, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiji

    The high-temperature phase of ethylene on surfaces of Pt powder has been studied by proton-NMR in order to decide whether the surface species is the ethylidyne species (CH 3-C≡) proposed by Kesmodel et al. or the multiple-bonded species (-CH 2-CH=) proposed by Demuth. The observed NMR spectrum is not attributable to CH 3-groups on the surfaces, but can be interpreted as the superposition of two signals, one originating from CH 2-groups and the other from CH-groups. In other words, the results suggest that the surface species is the multiple-bonded species.

  15. NMR Scalar Couplings across Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds between Zinc-Finger Histidine Side Chains and DNA Phosphate Groups.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Esadze, Alexandre; Roy, Sourav; Iwahara, Junji

    2016-10-10

    NMR scalar couplings across hydrogen bonds represent direct evidence for the partial covalent nature of hydrogen bonds and provide structural and dynamic information on hydrogen bonding. In this article, we report heteronuclear (15)N-(31)P and (1)H-(31)P scalar couplings across the intermolecular hydrogen bonds between protein histidine (His) imidazole and DNA phosphate groups. These hydrogen-bond scalar couplings were observed for the Egr-1 zinc-finger-DNA complex. Although His side-chain NH protons are typically undetectable in heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N correlation spectra due to rapid hydrogen exchange, this complex exhibited two His side-chain NH signals around (1)H 14.3 ppm and (15)N 178 ppm at 35 °C. Through various heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments, these signals were assigned to two zinc-coordinating His side chains in contact with DNA phosphate groups. The data show that the Nδ1 atoms of these His side chains are protonated and exhibit the (1)H-(15)N cross-peaks. Using heteronuclear (1)H, (15)N, and (31)P NMR experiments, we observed the hydrogen-bond scalar couplings between the His (15)Nδ1/(1)Hδ1 and DNA phosphate (31)P nuclei. These results demonstrate the direct involvement of the zinc-coordinating His side chains in the recognition of DNA by the Cys2His2-class zinc fingers in solution.

  16. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Barany, M.; Arus, C.

    1986-03-01

    Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.

  17. Diffusion dependence of proton NMR relaxation rates in the presence of ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Michael; Hammel, P. Chris

    2009-03-01

    Ferritin is the predominant iron-storage protein in living organisms. It may serve as an indicator of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Measuring brain ferritin concentration non-invasively via MRI could enable better diagnoses and treatments of such diseases. Quantitative MRI determination of the ferritin concentration requires an understanding of the NMR relaxation mechanisms of hydrogen protons in the presence of ferritin. In aqueous solutions, ferritin enhances the transverse relaxation rate (R2) of the protons. This is thought to occur due to a diffusive mechanism, where protons diffusing near ferritin pass through a region of elevated magnetic field, and a chemical exchange mechanism, where protons bind to the protein for a period of time, experiencing an even higher magnetic field. These two mechanisms exhibit different dependencies on the self-diffusion coefficient of the protons. By adding glycerol to aqueous solutions, we control the self-diffusion of protons. We measure the R2 of protons in ferritin-containing binary mixtures of water and glycerol using CPMG sequences, and compare the experimental results to theoretical predictions of diffusion dependence in order to distinguish the relative importance of the mechanisms.

  18. NMR Spectroscopic Assignment of Backbone and Side-Chain Protons in Fully Protonated Proteins: Microcrystals, Sedimented Assemblies, and Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Jan; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Cala, Diane; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Schubeis, Tobias; Akopjana, Inara; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Tars, Kaspars; Pica, Andrea; Leone, Serena; Picone, Delia; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Dixon, Nicholas E; Martinez, Denis; Berbon, Mélanie; El Mammeri, Nadia; Noubhani, Abdelmajid; Saupe, Sven; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-12-12

    We demonstrate sensitive detection of alpha protons of fully protonated proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy with 100-111 kHz magic-angle spinning (MAS). The excellent resolution in the Cα-Hα plane is demonstrated for 5 proteins, including microcrystals, a sedimented complex, a capsid and amyloid fibrils. A set of 3D spectra based on a Cα-Hα detection block was developed and applied for the sequence-specific backbone and aliphatic side-chain resonance assignment using only 500 μg of sample. These developments accelerate structural studies of biomolecular assemblies available in submilligram quantities without the need of protein deuteration.

  19. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Bellon, V. , 34 - Montpellier )

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  1. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively.

  2. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, http://doi.org/10.7566/JPSJ.84.113601, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  3. Water exchange in plant tissue studied by proton NMR in the presence of paramagnetic centers.

    PubMed

    Bacić, G; Ratković, S

    1984-04-01

    The proton NMR relaxation of water in maize roots in the presence of paramagnetic centers, Mn2+, Mn- EDTA2 -, and dextran-magnetite was measured. It was shown that the NMR method of Conlon and Outhred (1972, Biochem. Biophys. Acta. 288:354-361) can be applied to a heterogenous multicellular system, and the water exchange time between cortical cells and the extracellular space can be calculated. The water exchange is presumably controlled by the intracellular unstirred layers. The Mn- EDTA2 - complex is a suitable paramagnetic compound for complex tissue, while the application of dextran-magnetite is probably restricted to studies of water exchange in cell suspensions. The water free space of the root and viscosity of the cells cytoplasm was estimated with the use of Mn- EDTA2 -. The convenience of proton NMR for studying the multiphase uptake of paramagnetic ions by plant root as well as their transport to leaves is demonstrated. A simple and rapid NMR technique (spin-echo recovery) for continuous measurement of the uptake process is presented.

  4. Proton and fluorine NMR imaging for the assessment of myocardial perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, B.S.D.

    1985-01-01

    A high field, small bore NMR spectrometer was converted to an imaging system for the detection of fluorine and protons in phantoms and small biological samples. The modified spectrometer system was used to image various phantoms for the assessment of imaging performance. After assessment of the imaging system performance, a water soluble fluorinated compound of relatively low toxicity was investigated for use as an imaging agent for the detection of myocardial perfusion. New Zealand white rabbits were used as the model. Hearts were rapidly extracted and hung via the aorta to a perfusion apparatus which was capable of prolonging heart function throughout the course of the experiment. Perfusion with a standard nutrient solution was followed either by perfusion with a solution to which the fluorinated compound had been added or by ligation of the left coronary artery with subsequent perfusion with the fluorinated compound in perfusate solution. The hearts were then sectioned and imaged. The ligation of the left coronary artery produced a region of impaired perfusion in the left ventricular wall and parts of the septum. The regions of reduced perfusion appeared in the F-19 NMR images as areas of reduced intensity. Proton images of the tissue sections were also obtained for comparison. It was found that infarcted regions may be best visualized by combining the fluorine and proton images. Infarct damage was verified by Gentian violet stain. Relaxation times of fluorine and protons were measured both in perfused tissue and in various concentration solutions.

  5. Thin-film solid-state proton NMR measurements using a synthetic mica substrate: Polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderHart, David L.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; Lavery, Kristopher A.; Dennis, Cindi L.; Rao, Ashwin B.; Lin, Eric K.

    2009-11-01

    Solid-state proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are performed successfully on polymer blend thin films through the use of synthetic mica as a substrate. When used as a substrate, synthetic fluorophlogopite mica with its proton-free, diamagnetic character, allows for adequate measurement sensitivity while minimally perturbing the proton thin-film spectra, especially relative to more commonly available natural micas. Specifically, we use multiple-pulse techniques in the presence of magic-angle spinning to measure the degree of mixing in two different polymer blend thin films, polystyrene/poly(xylylene ether) and poly(1-methyladamantyl methacrylate) (PMAdMA)/triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate (TPS-PFBS), spin-coated onto mica substrates. Our earlier studies had focused on bulk systems where NMR signals are stronger, but may not be representative of thin films of the same systems that are relevant to many applications such as photoresist formulations in the electronics industry. The superiority of synthetic over natural paramagnetic mica is demonstrated by the maintenance of resolution and spinning sideband intensities (relative to bulk samples) for the synthetic mica samples. In contrast, degraded resolution and large spinning sidebands are shown to typify spectra of the natural mica samples. This approach can be applied to many other proton measurements of solid thin films, thereby greatly extending the types of systems to be investigated. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported for all micas used.

  6. Thin-film solid-state proton NMR measurements using a synthetic mica substrate: polymer blends.

    PubMed

    VanderHart, David L; Prabhu, Vivek M; Lavery, Kristopher A; Dennis, Cindi L; Rao, Ashwin B; Lin, Eric K

    2009-11-01

    Solid-state proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are performed successfully on polymer blend thin films through the use of synthetic mica as a substrate. When used as a substrate, synthetic fluorophlogopite mica with its proton-free, diamagnetic character, allows for adequate measurement sensitivity while minimally perturbing the proton thin-film spectra, especially relative to more commonly available natural micas. Specifically, we use multiple-pulse techniques in the presence of magic-angle spinning to measure the degree of mixing in two different polymer blend thin films, polystyrene/poly(xylylene ether) and poly(1-methyladamantyl methacrylate) (PMAdMA)/triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate (TPS-PFBS), spin-coated onto mica substrates. Our earlier studies had focused on bulk systems where NMR signals are stronger, but may not be representative of thin films of the same systems that are relevant to many applications such as photoresist formulations in the electronics industry. The superiority of synthetic over natural paramagnetic mica is demonstrated by the maintenance of resolution and spinning sideband intensities (relative to bulk samples) for the synthetic mica samples. In contrast, degraded resolution and large spinning sidebands are shown to typify spectra of the natural mica samples. This approach can be applied to many other proton measurements of solid thin films, thereby greatly extending the types of systems to be investigated. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported for all micas used.

  7. Diffusion of small molecules in a chitosan/water gel determined by proton localized NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    García-Aparicio, Carlos; Quijada-Garrido, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio

    2012-02-15

    Proton localized NMR spectroscopy (MRS) has been applied to study the diffusion of three small molecules, caffeine, theophylline and caprolactam, in chitosan gels with different concentration of water. This technique allows the non-destructive monitorization of diffusant concentration as a function of time and location. Concentration profiles were compared with theoretical curves based on solutions of Fick's diffusion equation for the best fitting, with the appropriate boundary conditions. The measured concentration profiles show a good agreement with the Fickian law. Values of the diffusion coefficients D ranging from 6.1×10(-6) to 3.4×10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) depending on chitosan concentration and type of diffusant molecule were determined. In addition, measurements of diffusion coefficients at equilibrium conditions with proton pulsed field gradient NMR methods supported the observed Fickian behavior and showed values of D in excellent agreement with those determined by proton MRS. All these facts demonstrate that proton MRS is an appropriate method for investigating diffusion process in complex systems, such as polymer gels.

  8. NMR and IR spectroscopic study of proton exchange between o-nitrophenol and methanol in CCl/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Bureiko, S.F.; Golubev, N.S.; Lange, I.Y.

    1982-08-01

    The kinetics of proton exchange in solution between o-nitrophenol and methanol have been studied by dynamic NMR and IR spectroscopy, and a method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the rate constants for H-H, H-D, and D-H exchange from /sup 1/H NMR spectra.

  9. Orientation-dependent proton double-quantum NMR build-up function for soft materials with anisotropic mobility.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Anna; Tschierske, Carsten; Saalwächter, Kay

    In recent years, the analysis of proton double-quantum NMR build-up curves has become an important tool to quantify anisotropic mobility in different kinds of soft materials such as polymer networks or liquid crystals. In the former case, such data provides a measure of orientation-dependent residual (time-averaged) dipolar couplings arising from anisotropic segmental motions, informing about the length and the state of local stretching of the network chains. Previous studies of macroscopically ordered, i.e. stretched, networks were subject to the limitation that a detailed build-up curve analysis on the basis of a universal "Abragam-like" (A-l) build-up function valid for a proton multi-spin system was only possible for an isotropic orientation-averaged response. This situation is here remedied by introducing a generic orientation-dependent build-up function for an anisotropically mobile protonated molecular segment. We discuss an application to the modeling of data for a stretched network measured at different orientations with respect to the magnetic field, and present a validation by fitting data of different liquid-crystal molecules oriented in the magnetic field.

  10. Hepatitis B virus direct repeat sequence: imino proton exchange rates and distance and torsion angle restraints from NMR.

    PubMed

    Bishop, K D; Blocker, F J; Egan, W; James, T L

    1994-01-18

    Structural features of a trisdecamer duplex, [d(GGCAGAGGTGAAA).d(TTTCACCTCTGCC)], in solution are being investigated by proton one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy. This DNA sequence is comprised of the 11-base-pair direct repeat sequence found in the hepatitis B viral genome with an additional base pair from the genome included on each end to minimize end effects on the 11-bp sequence of interest. The direct repeat sequence occurs twice in the viral genome; both are essential for initiation of DNA synthesis. The critical nature of this sequence suggests it may be a target to control replication of the virus. Elucidation of the structure of the direct repeat sequence could prove to be beneficial in targeting efforts. Structural determination via restrained molecular dynamics requires experimentally derived distance restraints. The ability to determine solution structures of biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy is limited by the quality and quantity of distance and torsion angle restraints that can be extracted from the NMR data. Techniques used to establish these restraints are constantly evolving and improving. Modifications in procedure are applied to the trisdecamer duplex to yield improvements in the determination of sugar conformations from COSY data and a substantial increase in the number of distance restraints typically garnered from 2D NOE intensity data. This increase in the number of distance restraints normally obtained from 2D NOE intensities was accomplished by utilizing a new version of the iterative complete relaxation matrix program MARDIGRAS with intensities extracted from a 2D NOE data set acquired in 90% H2O. The exchange rate of the imino and amino protons with the solvent water protons can now be included in the relaxation matrix calculations, thereby providing more accurate distances when utilizing the 2D NOE cross-peaks involving at least one exchangeable proton. In this lab, analysis of two-quantum-filtered correlation

  11. Phonon coupling effects in proton scattering from Ca40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, R. S.; Keeley, N.

    2014-10-01

    Background: Formal optical model theory shows that coupling to vibrational nuclear states generates a nonlocal and l-dependent dynamical polarization potential (DPP). Little is established concerning the DPP, yet its properties are crucial for explaining the departures of optical model potentials (OMPs) from global behavior and for the rigorous extraction of spectroscopic information from direct reactions. Purpose: To appraise the application of channel coupling followed by S-matrix inversion for the systematic exploration of the contribution of the coupling of collective states to the nucleon OMP and to identify properties of nuclear potentials indicative of l-dependence. Methods: S-matrix to potential, Slj→V(r )+l .sVSO(r), inversion provides local potentials that precisely reproduce the elastic channel S-matrix from coupled channel (CC) calculations. Subtracting the elastic channel uncoupled (bare) potential yields a local and l-independent representation of the DPP. The dependence of this local DPP upon the nature of the coupled states and upon other parameters can be studied. Results: All components of the DPP arising from coupling to vibrational states are substantially undulatory with a point-by-point magnitude therefore disproportionate to their contribution to volume integrals. Information relating to dynamical nonlocality is found. The proton charge leads to a substantial difference between DPPs for protons and neutrons. Conclusions: Undulatory features in potentials found in precision fits to elastic scattering data are significant, are a consequence of coupling to inelastic channels and must be allowed for in phenomenology; they are indirect evidence of l-dependence. Within the model, coupling to excited states magnifies the effect of the proton charge on the difference between proton-nucleus and neutron-nucleus interactions. Coupled channel plus inversion is a procedure of wide applicability, complementary to evaluation of the Feshbach formalism.

  12. Improving resolution in proton solid-state NMR by removing nitrogen-14 residual dipolar broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robin S.; Elena, Bénédicte; Emsley, Lyndon

    2008-06-01

    Residual dipolar coupling between quadrupolar and other nuclei under MAS has not usually been thought to be important in high field NMR spectroscopy. We show that coupling to 14N broadens 1H lineshapes significantly even at 11.7 T, and that we can decouple 14N from 1H during 1H homonuclear decoupling to successfully improve 1H resolution. The method used for decoupling is the application of evenly spaced pulses to the quadrupolar nucleus.

  13. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  14. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject (J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 5241-5249). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action.

  15. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron-Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of timescales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron-proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. The third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes. The proton relay portion of this review is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  16. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of time scales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This Perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. The third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes. The proton relay portion of this review is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca(2+) exchangers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca(2+) transporters encoded by cation/H(+) exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca(2+) into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca(2+) release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Recen...

  18. Critical hydrogen bonds and protonation states of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate revealed by NMR.

    PubMed

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Chan-Huot, Monique; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Shenderovich, Ilya G; Denisov, Gleb S; Toney, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    In this contribution we review recent NMR studies of protonation and hydrogen bond states of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and PLP model Schiff bases in different environments, starting from aqueous solution, the organic solid state to polar organic solution and finally to enzyme environments. We have established hydrogen bond correlations that allow one to estimate hydrogen bond geometries from (15)N chemical shifts. It is shown that protonation of the pyridine ring of PLP in aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) is achieved by (i) an intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond with an aspartate residue, assisted by the imidazole group of a histidine side chain and (ii) a local polarity as found for related model systems in a polar organic solvent exhibiting a dielectric constant of about 30. Model studies indicate that protonation of the pyridine ring of PLP leads to a dominance of the ketoenamine form, where the intramolecular OHN hydrogen bond of PLP exhibits a zwitterionic state. Thus, the PLP moiety in AspAT carries a net positive charge considered as a pre-requisite to initiate the enzyme reaction. However, it is shown that the ketoenamine form dominates in the absence of ring protonation when PLP is solvated by polar groups such as water. Finally, the differences between acid-base interactions in aqueous solution and in the interior of proteins are discussed. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phosphate Enzymology.

  19. Evidence for a dipolar-coupled AM system in carnosine in human calf muscle from in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Bachert, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Spin systems with residual dipolar couplings such as creatine, taurine, and lactate in skeletal muscle tissue exhibit first-order spectra in in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T because the coupled protons are represented by (nearly) symmetrized eigenfunctions. The imidazole ring protons (H2, H4) of carnosine are suspected to form also a coupled system. The ring's stiffness could enable a connectivity between these anisochronous protons with the consequence of second-order spectra at low field strength. Our purpose was to study whether this deviation from the Paschen-Back condition can be used to detect the H2-H4 coupling in localized 1D 1H NMR spectra obtained at 1.5 T (64 MHz) from the human calf in a conventional whole-body scanner. As for the hydrogen hyperfine interaction, a Breit-Rabi equation was derived to describe the transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime for two dipolar-coupled protons. The ratio of the measurable coupling strength ( Sk) and the difference in resonance frequencies of the coupled spins (Δ ω) induces quantum-state mixing of various degree upon definition of an appropriate eigenbase of the coupled spin system. The corresponding Clebsch-Gordan coefficients manifest in characteristic energy corrections in the Breit-Rabi formula. These additional terms were used to define an asymmetry parameter of the line positions as a function of Sk and Δ ω. The observed frequency shifts of the resonances were found to be consistent with this parameter within the accuracy achievable in in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Thus it was possible to identify the origin of satellite peaks of H2, H4 and to describe this so far not investigated type of residual dipolar coupling in vivo.

  20. Effect of proton transfer on the electronic coupling in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Janusz; Makowska, Joanna; Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-06-01

    The effects of single and double proton transfer within Watson-Crick base pairs on donor-acceptor electronic couplings, Vda, in DNA are studied on the bases of quantum chemical calculations. Four dimers [AT,AT], [GC,GC], [GC,AT] and [GC,TA)] are considered. Three techniques - the generalized Mulliken-Hush scheme, the fragment charge method and the diabatic states method - are employed to estimate Vda for hole transfer between base pairs. We show that both single- and double proton transfer (PT) reactions may substantially affect the electronic coupling in DNA. The electronic coupling in [AT,AT] is predicted to be most sensitive to PT. Single PT within the first base pair in the dimer leads to increase in the hole transfer efficiency by a factor of 4, while proton transfer within the second pair should substantially, by 2.7 times, decrease the rate of charge transfer. Thus, directional asymmetry of the PT effects on the electronic coupling is predicted. The changes in the Vda matrix elements correlate with the topological properties of orbitals of donor and acceptor and can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of resonance structures of donor and acceptor. Atomic pair contributions to the Vda matrix elements are also analyzed.

  1. PROTON-COUPLED ELECTRON TRANSFER: A Reaction Chemist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the concerted transfer of an electron and a proton. Such reactions play an important role in many areas of chemistry and biology. Concerted PCET is thermochemically more favorable than the first step in competing consecutive processes involving stepwise electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT), often by >=1 eV. PCET reactions of the form X-H + Y X + H-Y can be termed hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). Another PCET class involves outersphere electron transfer concerted with deprotonation by another reagent, Y+ + XH-B Y + X-HB+ . Many PCET/HAT rate constants are predicted well by the Marcus cross relation. The cross-relation calculation uses rate constants for self-exchange reactions to provide information on intrinsic barriers. Intrinsic barriers for PCET can be comparable to or larger than those for ET. These properties are discussed in light of recent theoretical treatments of PCET.

  2. 1H and 15N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially 1H-15N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate 15N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS 15N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via 1H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D 1H and 2D 1H-15N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  3. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  4. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities.

  5. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups. PMID:26439818

  6. TU-EF-BRA-01: NMR and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbarst, A.

    2015-06-15

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  7. Characterization of filter extractables by proton NMR spectroscopy: studies on intact filters with process buffers.

    PubMed

    Kao, Y H; Bender, J; Hagewiesche, A; Wong, P; Huang, Y; Vanderlaan, M

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize potential extractables from sterilizing grade filters. The focus of this report is the 0.22 micron Durapore (hydrophilic modified PVDF) filter which is used throughout our recovery processes. The objectives of this study are (1) to identify potential filter extractables from the hydrophilic PVDF filters; (2) to show that NMR spectroscopy may be used to detect filter extractables in the presence of product and excipients; and (3) to establish levels of filter extractables obtained by extraction with a variety of buffers. The data show that the primary source of filter extractables is the hydrophilic modification of the PVDF membrane surface. Extractables from the modified hydrophilic PVDF filter include propylene glycol (PG) and soluble oligomers of the hydroxypropyl acrylate and cross-linker. Propylene glycol, arising from the hydrolysis of the hydroxypropyl acrylate, appears to be the primary extractable in buffers above pH 11. Since the 1H-NMR method can easily detect the methyl proton signals of PG, an NMR assay was developed to detect PG in the presence of buffer excipients and final product. Propylene glycol can be used as a marker for the extractables from Durapore hydrophilic PVDF filters. Although numerous buffers were used to generate extractables from the PVDF filter, significant extractables (PG and soluble oligomers) were found only in high pH extraction buffers. As a result of this finding, only a limited number of new buffers or new PVDF filters will require testing for future validation studies. Process validation studies have shown that neither PG nor soluble oligomers are at levels that impact the quality or safety of the product.

  8. Coupling of functional hydrogen bonds in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-enzyme model systems observed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Shasad; Schagen, David; Toney, Michael D; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2007-04-11

    We present a novel series of hydrogen-bonded, polycrystalline 1:1 complexes of Schiff base models of the cofactor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) with carboxylic acids that mimic the cofactor in a variety of enzyme active sites. These systems contain an intramolecular OHN hydrogen bond characterized by a fast proton tautomerism as well as a strong intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond between the pyridine ring of the cofactor and the carboxylic acid. In particular, the aldenamine and aldimine Schiff bases N-(pyridoxylidene)tolylamine and N-(pyridoxylidene)methylamine, as well as their adducts, were synthesized and studied using 15N CP and 1H NMR techniques under static and/or MAS conditions. The geometries of the hydrogen bonds were obtained from X-ray structures, 1H and 15N chemical shift correlations, secondary H/D isotope effects on the 15N chemical shifts, or directly by measuring the dipolar 2H-15N couplings of static samples of the deuterated compounds. An interesting coupling of the two "functional" OHN hydrogen bonds was observed. When the Schiff base nitrogen atoms of the adducts carry an aliphatic substituent such as in the internal and external aldimines of PLP in the enzymatic environment, protonation of the ring nitrogen shifts the proton in the intramolecular OHN hydrogen bond from the oxygen to the Schiff base nitrogen. This effect, which increases the positive charge on the nitrogen atom, has been discussed as a prerequisite for cofactor activity. This coupled proton transfer does not occur if the Schiff base nitrogen atom carries an aromatic substituent.

  9. On the Importance of Exchangeable NH Protons in Creatine for the Magnetic Coupling of Creatine Methyl Protons in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruiskamp, M. J.; Nicolay, K.

    2001-03-01

    The methyl protons of creatine in skeletal muscle exhibit a strong off-resonance magnetization transfer effect. The mechanism of this process is unknown. We previously hypothesized that the exchangeable amide/amino protons of creatine might be involved. To test this the characteristics of the creatine magnetization transfer effect were investigated in excised rat hindleg skeletal muscle that was equilibrated in either H2O or D2O solutions containing creatine. The efficiency of off-resonance magnetization transfer to the protons of mobile creatine in excised muscle was similar to that previously reported in intact muscle in vivo. Equilibrating the isolated muscle in D2O solution had no effect on the magnetic coupling to the immobile protons. It is concluded that exchangeable protons play a negligible role in the magnetic coupling of creatine methyl protons in muscle.

  10. NMR studies of coupled low- and high-barrier hydrogen bonds in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate model systems in polar solution.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Shasad; Denisov, Gleb S; Toney, Michael D; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2007-05-16

    The 1H and 15N NMR spectra of several 15N-labeled pyridoxal-5'-phosphate model systems have been measured at low temperature in various aprotic and protic solvents of different polarity, i.e., dichloromethane-d2, acetonitrile-d3, tetrahydrofuran-d8, freon mixture CDF3/CDClF2, and methanol. In particular, the 15N-labeled 5'-triisopropyl-silyl ether of N-(pyridoxylidene)-tolylamine (1a), N-(pyridoxylidene)-methylamine (2a), and the Schiff base with 15N-2-methylaspartic acid (3a) and their complexes with proton donors such as triphenylmethanol, phenol, and carboxylic acids of increasing strength were studied. With the use of hydrogen bond correlation techniques, the 1H/15N chemical shift and scalar coupling data could be associated with the geometries of the intermolecular O1H1N1 (pyridine nitrogen) and the intramolecular O2H2N2 (Schiff base) hydrogen bonds. Whereas O1H1N1 is characterized by a series of asymmetric low-barrier hydrogen bonds, the proton in O2H2N2 faces a barrier for proton transfer of medium height. When the substituent on the Schiff base nitrogen is an aromatic ring, the shift of the proton in O1H1N1 from oxygen to nitrogen has little effect on the position of the proton in the O2H2N2 hydrogen bond. By contrast, when the substituent on the Schiff base nitrogen is a methyl group, a proton shift from O to N in O1H1N1 drives the tautomeric equilibrium in O2H2N2 from the neutral O2-H2...N2 to the zwitterionic O2-...H2-N(2+) form. This coupling is lost in aqueous solution where the intramolecular O2H2N2 hydrogen bond is broken by solute-solvent interactions. However, in methanol, which mimics hydrogen bonds to the Schiff base in the enzyme active site, the coupling is preserved. Therefore, the reactivity of Schiff base intermediates in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate enzymes can likely be tuned to the requirements of the reaction being catalyzed by differential protonation of the pyridine nitrogen.

  11. Proton NMR studies of PECVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and HWCVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberg, Julie Lynn

    This dissertation discusses a new understanding of the internal structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Recent research in our group has included nuclear spin echo double resonance (SEDOR) measurements on device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic films. Using the SEDOR pulse sequence with and without the perturbing 29Si pulse, we obtain Fourier transform spectra for film at 80K that allows us to distinguish between molecular hydrogen and hydrogen bonded to silicon. Using such an approach, we have demonstrated that high quality a-Si:H films produced by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) from SiH 4 contains about ten atomic percent hydrogen, nearly 40% of which is molecular hydrogen, individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of tetragonal sites (T-sites). The main objective of this dissertation is to examine the difference between a-Si:H made by PECVD techniques and a-Si:H made by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) techniques. Proton NMR and 1H- 29Si SEDOR NMR are used to examine the hydrogen structure of HWCVD a-Si:H films prepared at the University of Utrecht and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Past NMR studies have shown that high quality PECVD a-Si:H films have geometries in which 40% of the contained hydrogen is present as H2 molecules individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of T-sites. A much smaller H2 fraction sometimes is physisorbed on internal surfaces. In this dissertation, similar NMR methods are used to perform structural studies of the two HWCVD aSi:H samples. The 3kHz resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole-burn behavior similar to that found for PECVD a-Si:H films as does the 24kHz FWHM line from clustered hydrogen bonded to silicon. Radio frequency hole-burning is a tool to distinguish between inhomogenous and homogeneous broadening. In the hole-burn experiments, the 3kHz FWHM resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole

  12. Lactonization and protonation of gluconic acid: a thermodynamicand kinetic study by potentiometry, nmr and esi-ms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Gibson, P.; Clark, S.B.; Tian, G.; Zanonato, P.; Rao, L.

    2007-01-10

    In acidic aqueous solutions, gluconate protonation is coupled with lactonization of gluconic acid. With the decrease of pC{sub H}, two lactones ({delta}/{gamma}) are sequentially formed. The {delta}-lactone forms more readily than the {gamma}-lactone. In 0.1 M gluconate solutions, if pC{sub H} is above 2.5, only the {delta}-lactone is generated. When pC{sub H} is decreased below 2.0, the formation of the {gamma}-lactone is observable although the {delta}-lactone predominates. At I = 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} and room temperature, the deprotonation constant of the carboxylic group, using the NMR technique, was determined to be log K{sub a} = 3.30 {+-} 0.02; the {delta}-lactonization constant, by the batch potentiometric titrations, was obtained to be log K{sub L} = - (0.54 {+-} 0.04). Using ESI-MS, the rate constants of the {delta}-lactonization and the hydrolysis at pC{sub H} {approx} 5.0 were estimated to be k{sub 1} = 3.2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and k{sup -1} = 1.1 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  13. Analyzing and Interpreting NMR Spin-Spin Coupling Constants Using Molecular Orbital Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autschbach, Jochen; Le Guennic, Boris

    2007-01-01

    Molecular orbital plots are used to analyze and interpret NMR spin-spin coupling constants, also known as J coupling constants. Students have accepted the concept of contributions to molecular properties from individual orbitals without the requirement to provide explicit equations.

  14. Interpretation of vicinal proton-proton coupling constants of heteroaromatic molecules in terms of topological electron density descriptors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendoza, Ernesto; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús

    2010-11-01

    The indirect vicinal proton-proton coupling constants for pyrrole, furan, thiophene and 15 related heteroaromatic compounds were calculated using the Khon-Sham approximation. An analysis of the four Ramsey contributions to the coupling constants was carried out showing that the Fermi contact term is always positive and dominant, although the remaining contributions have a nonnegligible net negative contribution. The trends observed for the proton-proton coupling constants were rationalized in terms of the properties of the electron density. It was found that electron delocalization between the corresponding hydrogen atoms plays a major role on the observed behavior with the charges of the carbon atoms bonded to them and the accompanying geometric variations being also of importance in the coupling mechanism.

  15. Collection of NMR Scalar and Residual Dipolar Couplings Using a Single Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gil-Silva, Leandro F; Santamaría-Fernández, Raquel; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Gil, Roberto R

    2016-01-11

    A new DMSO-compatible aligning gel based on cross-linked poly(2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (poly-HEMA) has been developed. Due to a significant difference in bulk magnetic susceptibility between the DMSO inside and outside the gel, it is possible to simultaneously collect isotropic and anisotropic NMR data, such as residual dipolar couplings (RDC), in the same NMR tube. RDC-assisted structural analysis of menthol and the alkaloid retrorsine is reported as proof of concept.

  16. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  17. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    PubMed Central

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  18. Kinetic effects of increased proton transfer distance on proton-coupled oxidations of phenol-amines.

    PubMed

    Markle, Todd F; Rhile, Ian J; Mayer, James M

    2011-11-02

    To test the effect of varying the proton donor-acceptor distance in proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, the oxidation of a bicyclic amino-indanol (2) is compared with that of a closely related phenol with an ortho CPh(2)NH(2) substituent (1). Spectroscopic, structural, thermochemical, and computational studies show that the two amino-phenols are very similar, except that the O···N distance (d(ON)) is >0.1 Å longer in 2 than in 1. The difference in d(ON) is 0.13 ± 0.03 Å from X-ray crystallography and 0.165 Å from DFT calculations. Oxidations of these phenols by outer-sphere oxidants yield distonic radical cations (•)OAr-NH(3)(+) by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET). Simple tunneling and classical kinetic models both predict that the longer donor-acceptor distance in 2 should lead to slower reactions, by ca. 2 orders of magnitude, as well as larger H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). However, kinetic studies show that the compound with the longer proton-transfer distance, 2, exhibits smaller KIEs and has rate constants that are quite close to those of 1. For example, the oxidation of 2 by the triarylamminium radical cation N(C(6)H(4)OMe)(3)(•+) (3a(+)) occurs at (1.4 ± 0.1) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), only a factor of 2 slower than the closely related reaction of 1 with N(C(6)H(4)OMe)(2)(C(6)H(4)Br)(•+) (3b(+)). This difference in rate constants is well accounted for by the slightly different free energies of reaction: ΔG° (2 + 3a(+)) = +0.078 V versus ΔG° (1 + 3b(+)) = +0.04 V. The two phenol-amines do display some subtle kinetic differences: for instance, compound 2 has a shallower dependence of CPET rate constants on driving force (Brønsted α, Δ ln(k)/Δ ln(K(eq))). These results show that the simple tunneling model is not a good predictor of the effect of proton donor-acceptor distance on concerted-electron transfer reactions involving strongly hydrogen-bonded systems. Computational analysis of the observed similarity of the

  19. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-17

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency regimes for the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term does not significantly impact the rate constants derived using the cumulant expansion approach in any of the regimes studied. The effects of the quadratic term may become significant when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant, however, particularly at high temperatures and for proton transfer interfaces with extremely soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with extraordinarily weak hydrogen bonds. Even with the thermal averaging procedure, the effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances, and the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer in chemical and biological processes. We are grateful for support from National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (applications to enzymes) and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy

  20. Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provorse, Makenzie R.

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is utilized throughout Nature to facilitate essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and DNA replication and repair. The general approach to studying PCET processes is based on a two-dimensional More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram in which electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) occur in a sequential or concerted fashion. Experimentally, it is difficult to discern the contributing factors of concerted PCET mechanisms. Several theoretical approaches have arisen to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate these reactions. Here, we present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) method to efficiently and accurately model PCET mechanisms. The MSDFT method is validated against experimental and computational data previously reported on an isoelectronic series of small molecule self-exchange hydrogen atom transfer reactions and a model complex specifically designed to study long-range ET through a hydrogen-bonded salt-bridge interface. Further application of this method to the hydrogen atom abstraction of ascorbate by a nitroxyl radical demonstrates the sensitivity of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties to solvent effects. In particular, the origin of the unusual kinetic isotope effect is investigated. Lastly, the MSDFT is employed in a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to explicitly model PCET in condensed phases.

  1. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  2. Gating Topology of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W.; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Radestock, Sebastian; Solcan, Nicolae; Dijkman, Patricia M.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Kwok, Jane; Caffrey, Martin; Watts, Anthony; Forrest, Lucy R.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. Recent crystal structures suggest the MFS fold facilitates transport through rearrangement of their two six-helix bundles around a central ligand binding site; how this is achieved, however, is poorly understood. Using modeling, molecular dynamics, crystallography, functional assays, and site-directed spin labeling combined with double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we present a detailed study of the transport dynamics of two bacterial oligopeptide transporters, PepTSo and PepTSt. Our results identify several salt bridges that stabilize outward-facing conformations and we show that, for all the current structures of MFS transporters, the first two helices of each of the four inverted-topology repeat units form half of either the periplasmic or cytoplasmic gate and that these function cooperatively in a scissor-like motion to control access to the peptide binding site during transport. PMID:25651061

  3. Assignments of proton populations in dough and bread using NMR relaxometry of starch, gluten, and flour model systems.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Geertrui M; Lagrain, Bert; Deleu, Lomme J; Fierens, Ellen; Hills, Brian P; Delcour, Jan A

    2012-05-30

    Starch-water, gluten-water, and flour-water model systems as well as straight-dough bread were investigated with (1)H NMR relaxometry using free induction decay and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. Depending on the degree of interaction between polymers and water, different proton populations could be distinguished. The starch protons in the starch-water model gain mobility owing to amylopectin crystal melting, granule swelling, and amylose leaching, whereas water protons lose mobility due to increased interaction with starch polymers. Heating of the gluten-water sample induces no pronounced changes in proton distributions. Heating changes the proton distributions of the flour-water and starch-water models in a similar way, implying that the changes are primarily attributable to starch gelatinization. Proton distributions of the heated flour-water model system and those of fresh bread crumb are very similar. This allows identifying the different proton populations in bread on the basis of the results from the model systems.

  4. Probing microstructure evolution during the hardening of gypsum by proton NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Jaffel, Hamouda; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Ndobo-Epoy, Jean-Philippe; Morin, Vincent; Guicquero, Jean-Pierre

    2006-04-13

    We report a comprehensive proton NMR relaxation study of the water confined in the evolving porous structure of hardened gypsum prepared with different water-to-plaster ratios (w/p) and increasing additions of crushed gypsum. This study gives some new information on the microstructure, the water distribution, and the hydration kinetics without any drying or perturbing preparation. The bi-exponential transverse magnetization decay reveals the existence of two water populations in slow exchange. However, the different behaviors of these populations during saturation and desaturation experiments show evidence of a fast exchange of each population with the surface. Two modes of organization of the microstructure of this material are identified through an original model of exchange as a function of the water-to-plaster ratio (0.4 < or = w/p < or = 0.6 and 0.7 < or = w/p < or = 1). A clear gap is shown in the exchange rate value above w/p = 0.6 that could be representative of a percolation threshold. Both the method and the theory presented can be applied more widely to other porous media with reactive surface areas.

  5. Quantification of Water-Soluble Metabolites in Medicinal Mushrooms Using Proton NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Mishchuk, Darya O; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble metabolites in 5 mushrooms were identified and quantified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and software for targeted metabolite detection and quantification. In total, 35 compounds were found in Agaricus brasiliensis, 25 in Taiwanofungus camphoratus, 23 in Ganoderma lucidum (Taiwan) and Lentinus edodes, and 16 in G. lucidum (China). Total amounts of all identified metabolites in A. brasiliensis, T. camphoratus, G. lucidum, G. lucidum (China), and L. edodes were 149,950.51, 12,834.18, 9,549.09, 2,788.41, and 111,726.51 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. These metabolites were categorized into 4 groups: free amino acids and derivatives, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and nucleosides. Carbohydrates were the most abundant metabolites among all 4 groups, with mannitol having the highest concentration among all analyzed metabolites (848-94,104 mg/kg dry weight). Principal components analysis (PCA) showed obvious distinction among the metabolites of the 5 different kinds of mushrooms analyzed in this study. Thus PCA could provide an optional analytical way of identifying and recognizing the compositions of flavor products. Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that NMRbased metabolomics is a powerful tool for differentiating between various medicinal mushrooms.

  6. NMR spin locking of proton magnetization under a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Tian, Changlin; Cross, Timothy A

    2002-01-01

    The spin dynamics of NMR spin locking of proton magnetization under a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg (FSLG) pulse sequence is investigated for a better understanding of the line-narrowing mechanism in PISEMA experiments. For the sample of oriented 15N(1,3,5,7)-labeled gramicidin A in hydrated DMPC bilayers, it is found that the spin-lattice relaxation time T(1rho)(H) in the tilted rotating frame is about five times shorter when the 1H magnetization is spin locked at the magic angle by the FSLG sequence compared to the simple Lee-Goldburg sequence. It is believed that the rapid phase alternation of the effective fields during the FSLG cycles results in averaging of the spin lock field so that the spin lock becomes less efficient. A FSLG supercycle has been suggested here to slow the phase alternation. It has been demonstrated experimentally that a modified PISEMA pulse sequence with such supercycles gives rise to about 30% line narrowing in the dipolar dimension in the PISEMA spectra compared to a standard PISEMA pulse sequence.

  7. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome.

  8. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  9. Surface-coupled proton exchange of a membrane-bound proton acceptor.

    PubMed

    Sandén, Tor; Salomonsson, Lina; Brzezinski, Peter; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-03-02

    Proton-transfer reactions across and at the surface of biological membranes are central for maintaining the transmembrane proton electrochemical gradients involved in cellular energy conversion. In this study, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy was used to measure the local protonation and deprotonation rates of single pH-sensitive fluorophores conjugated to liposome membranes, and the dependence of these rates on lipid composition and ion concentration. Measurements of proton exchange rates over a wide proton concentration range, using two different pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pK(a)s, revealed two distinct proton exchange regimes. At high pH (> 8), proton association increases rapidly with increasing proton concentrations, presumably because the whole membrane acts as a proton-collecting antenna for the fluorophore. In contrast, at low pH (< 7), the increase in the proton association rate is slower and comparable to that of direct protonation of the fluorophore from the bulk solution. In the latter case, the proton exchange rates of the two fluorophores are indistinguishable, indicating that their protonation rates are determined by the local membrane environment. Measurements on membranes of different surface charge and at different ion concentrations made it possible to determine surface potentials, as well as the distance between the surface and the fluorophore. The results from this study define the conditions under which biological membranes can act as proton-collecting antennae and provide fundamental information on the relation between the membrane surface charge density and the local proton exchange kinetics.

  10. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  11. Microtesla NMR J-coupling spectroscopy with an unshielded atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Biancalana, Valerio; Baranga, Andrei Ben-Amar; Dancheva, Yordanka; Rossi, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    We present experimental data and theoretical interpretation of NMR spectra of remotely magnetized samples, detected in an unshielded environment by means of a differential atomic magnetometer. The measurements are performed in an ultra-low-field at an intermediate regime, where the J-coupling and the Zeeman energies have comparable values and produce rather complex line sets, which are satisfactorily interpreted.

  12. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-07-22

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced processes, are also described. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. The work described herein was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CHE-13-61293 (theory development), National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (soybean lipoxygenase), Center for Chemical Innovation of the National Science Foundation Solar Fuels Grant CHE-1305124 (cobalt catalysts), Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (nickel catalysts), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Award No. FA9550-14-1-0295 (photoinduced PCET).

  13. 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam: assignment of heme resonances and substrate dependance of one cysteinate beta proton.

    PubMed

    Mouro, C; Bondon, A; Simonneaux, G; Jung, C

    1997-09-08

    The 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam FeII-CO has been performed for the first time. Chemical shifts of the cysteinate fifth ligand protons and of several heme protons have been assigned through 1- and 2-dimensional spectra at 500 MHz. A substrate dependance has been observed for the resonance of the cysteinate proton detected in the high-field region.

  14. Differential protonation and dynamic structure of doxylamine succinate in solution using 1H and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, B S; Nagana Gowda, G A; Ramesha, A R; Khetrapal, C L

    2004-07-01

    A protonation and dynamic structural study of doxylamine succinate, a 1:1 salt of succinic acid with dimethyl-[2-(1-phenyl-1-pyridin-2-yl-ethoxy)ethyl]amine, in solution using one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR experiments at variable temperature and concentration is presented. The two acidic protons of the salt doxylamine succinate are in 'intermediate' exchange at room temperature, as evidenced by the appearance of a broad signal. This signal evolves into two distinct signals below about -30 degrees C. A two-dimensional 1H-1H double quantum filtered correlation experiment carried out at -55 degrees C shows protonation of one of the acidic protons to the dimethylamine nitrogen. A two-dimensional rotating frame 1H-1H NOE experiment at the same temperature reveals that the other proton remains with the succinate moiety. Comparison of the 1H and 13C chemical shifts and the 13C T1 relaxation times of the salt with those of the free base further substantiate the findings.

  15. Quantitative analysis of Earth's field NMR spectra of strongly-coupled heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Halse, Meghan E; Callaghan, Paul T; Feland, Brett C; Wasylishen, Roderick E

    2009-09-01

    In the Earth's magnetic field, it is possible to observe spin systems consisting of unlike spins that exhibit strongly coupled second-order NMR spectra. Such spectra result when the J-coupling between two unlike spins is of the same order of magnitude as the difference in their Larmor precession frequencies. Although the analysis of second-order spectra involving only spin-(1/2) nuclei has been discussed since the early days of NMR spectroscopy, NMR spectra involving spin-(1/2) nuclei and quadrupolar (I>(1/2)) nuclei have rarely been treated. Two examples are presented here, the tetrahydroborate anion, BH4-, and the ammonium cation, NH4+. For the tetrahydroborate anion, (1)J((11)B,(1)H)=80.9Hz, and in an Earth's field of 53.3microT, nu((1)H)=2269Hz and nu((11)B)=728Hz. The (1)H NMR spectra exhibit features that both first- and second-order perturbation theory are unable to reproduce. On the other hand, second-order perturbation theory adequately describes (1)H NMR spectra of the ammonium anion, (14)NH4+, where (1)J((14)N,(1)H)=52.75Hz when nu((1)H)=2269Hz and nu((14)N)=164Hz. Contrary to an early report, we find that the (1)H NMR spectra are independent of the sign of (1)J((14)N,(1)H). Exact analysis of two-spin systems consisting of quadrupolar nuclei and spin-(1/2) nuclei are also discussed.

  16. The local order of supercooled water in solution with LiCl studied by NMR proton chemical shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, C.; Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Cicero, N.; Dugo, G.; Mallamace, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the local order of water molecules in solution with lithium chloride at eutectic concentration. In particular, by measuring the proton chemical shift as a function of the temperature in the interval 203{ K}NMR peak allows the investigation of the mutual difference between the chemical shift of water solvating lithium and chlorine individually. The thermal behavior of this quantity confirms previous results about the role of the temperature in the solvation mechanisms down to about 225K. This temperature coincides with that of the so-called Widom line for water supporting the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  17. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.; Izatt, R.M.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Shirts, R.B.

    1996-08-24

    The objective of this research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period. In addition, new, more convenient synthetic routes were achieved for several nitrogen-containing bicyclic and tricyclic macrocycles. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber and other membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. A study of the effect of methoxyalkyl macrocycle substituents on metal ion transport was completed. A new calorimeter was constructed which made it possible to study the thermodynamics of macrocycle-cation binding to very high temperatures. Measurements of thermodynamic data for the interaction of crown ethers with alkali and alkaline earth cations were achieved to 473 K. Molecular modeling work was begun for the first time on this project and fundamental principles were identified and developed for the establishment of working models in the future.

  18. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  19. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of

  20. Rapid Proton-Detected NMR Assignment for Proteins with Fast Magic Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using a set of six 1H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5–30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide 2H/1H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary 13C/15N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR. PMID:25102442

  1. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-03

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  2. First acceleration of a proton beam in a side coupled drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsivalle, C.; Picardi, L.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Marracino, F.; Nenzi, P.; Snels, C.; Surrenti, V.; Vadrucci, M.; Ambrosini, F.

    2015-07-01

    We report the first experiment aimed at the demonstration of low-energy protons acceleration by a high-efficiency S-band RF linear accelerator. The proton beam has been accelerated from 7 to 11.6 MeV by a 1 meter long SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac) module powered with 1.3 MW. The experiment has been done in the framework of the Italian TOP-IMPLART (Oncological Therapy with Protons-Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Linear Accelerator for Radio-Therapy) project devoted to the realization of a proton therapy centre based on a proton linear accelerator for intensity modulated cancer treatments to be installed at IRE-IFO, the largest oncological hospital in Rome. It is the first proton therapy facility employing a full linear accelerator scheme based on high-frequency technology.

  3. Detection of Phosphomonoester Signals in Proton-Decoupled 31P NMR Spectra of the Myocardium of Patients with Myocardial Hypertrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wulf-Ingo; Sieverding, Ludger; Breuer, Johannes; Schmidt, Oliver; Widmaier, Stefan; Bunse, Michael; van Erckelens, Franz; Apitz, Jürgen; Dietze, Guenther J.; Lutz, Otto

    1998-07-01

    Proton-decoupled31P NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T of the anterior left ventricular myocardium was used to monitor myocardial phosphate metabolism in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM,n= 14) and aortic stenosis (AS,n= 12). In addition to the well-known phosphorus signals a phosphomonoester (PME) signal was detected at about 6.9 ppm in 7 HCM and 2 AS patients. This signal was not observed in the spectra of normal controls (n= 11). We suggest that in spectra of patients with myocardial hypertrophy the presence of a PME signal reflects alterations in myocardial glucose metabolism.

  4. Beta-alanine-hydrochloride (2:1) crystal: structure, 13C NMR and vibrational properties, protonation character.

    PubMed

    Godzisz, D; Ilczyszyn, M; Ciunik, Z

    2003-01-15

    The crystal structure of beta-alanine-hydrochloride (2:1) complex (2A-HCl) has been determined by X-ray diffraction method at 298 and 100 K as monoclinic, space group C2/c, Z=4. The crystal comprises chloride anions and protonated beta-alanine dimers: two beta-alanine zwitterions are joined by strong, symmetric (Ci) hydrogen bond with the O...O distance of 2.473 A at room temperature. Powder FT-IR and FT-Raman as well as solid state 13C NMR spectra provide insights into the solid structure of this complex, character of its hydrogen bonds and the beta-alanine protonation.

  5. Beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate crystal: structure, 13C NMR and vibrational properties, protonation character.

    PubMed

    Godzisz, D; Ilczyszyn, M; Ilczyszyn, M M

    2003-03-01

    The crystal structure of beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate complex has been reinvestigated by X-ray diffraction method at 293 K. Formation of monoclinic crystal system belonging to C2/c space group and consisting of semi-oxalate chains, diprotonated beta-alanine dimers and water molecules bonded to both these units is confirmed. New results are obtained for distances in the carboxylic groups and hydrogen bonds. These structural observations are used for protonation degree monitoring on the carboxylic oxygen atoms. They are in accordance with our vibrational study. The 13C NMR spectra provide insights into the solid structure of this complex, character of its hydrogen bonds and the beta-alanine protonation.

  6. Using magnetic coupling to implement 1H, 19F, 13C experiments in routine high resolution NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Paul; Finnigan, Jim; Marsden, Brian; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the design of 1H, 19F, 13C circuitry using magnetic coupling which can do on demand experiments where one of the three nuclei is observed and the other two are decoupled. The implementation of this circuitry in routine NMR probes is compared with capacitive coupling methods where it was found that by using magnetic coupling the performance of the routine NMR probe was not impacted by the addition of this circuitry. It is surmised that using this type of circuitry would be highly desirable for those chemists doing routine 19F NMR.

  7. Improving the Mass-Limited Performance of Routine NMR Probes using Coupled Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Brian; Lim, Victor; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2016-07-01

    We report a method to convert, on demand, a general use dual-broadband probe to a high performance mass-limited probe for both high band and low band nuclei. This technology uses magnetic coupling of inductors to achieve this capability. The method offers a cost effective way of increasing the performance of routine NMR probes without having to change probes or increase the overall foot print of the spectrometer.

  8. Improving the Mass-Limited Performance of Routine NMR Probes using Coupled Coils.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Brian; Lim, Victor; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2016-07-01

    We report a method to convert, on demand, a general use dual-broadband probe to a high performance mass-limited probe for both high band and low band nuclei. This technology uses magnetic coupling of inductors to achieve this capability. The method offers a cost effective way of increasing the performance of routine NMR probes without having to change probes or increase the overall foot print of the spectrometer.

  9. Indirect NMR spin-spin coupling constants in diatomic alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Jaszuński, Michał; Antušek, Andrej; Demissie, Taye B; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2016-12-28

    We report the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling constants for diatomic alkali halides MX, where M = Li, Na, K, Rb, or Cs and X = F, Cl, Br, or I. The coupling constants are determined by supplementing the non-relativistic coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) values with relativistic corrections evaluated at the four-component density-functional theory (DFT) level. These corrections are calculated as the differences between relativistic and non-relativistic values determined using the PBE0 functional with 50% exact-exchange admixture. The total coupling constants obtained in this approach are in much better agreement with experiment than the standard relativistic DFT values with 25% exact-exchange, and are also noticeably better than the relativistic PBE0 results obtained with 50% exact-exchange. Further improvement is achieved by adding rovibrational corrections, estimated using literature data.

  10. Interactions of hydrogen with alkali promoted Ru/SiO2 catalysts: A proton NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Uner, Denis Ozbay

    1994-05-10

    Role of H spillover to the silica support was studied using chemisorption; a strongly bound component of spilled over H was found in the silica support which interfered with accurate measurements of active metal sites via volumetric strong H chemisorption. The volumetric chemisorption technique was modified so that measurement times were reduced from 12--36 h to 1 h. The active Ru surface was characterized means of changes in proton spin counts and NMR Knight shifts vs alkali loading. Na, K blocked the active surface of Ru metal, but Cs was pushed off by H chemisorption. The alkali promoters restricted H mobility on both metal surface and at the metal support interfaces; this is consistent with effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. 1H NMR was used to study the effect of the active metal and promoter on support hydroxyl groups. The OH group density in the silica support decreased with metal and/or promoter loading, but not on a one-to-one basis; the exchange efficiency of the hydroxyls decreased with atomic size of the alkali metal. An additional downfield proton resonance was detected which was assigned to the alkali hydroxide species in the support.

  11. Proton-coupled electron transfer dynamics in the catalytic mechanism of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-04-08

    The movement of protons and electrons is common to the synthesis of all chemical fuels such as H2. Hydrogenases, which catalyze the reversible reduction of protons, necessitate transport and reactivity between protons and electrons, but a detailed mechanism has thus far been elusive. Here, we use a phototriggered chemical potential jump method to rapidly initiate the proton reduction activity of a [NiFe] hydrogenase. Coupling the photochemical initiation approach to nanosecond transient infrared and visible absorbance spectroscopy afforded direct observation of interfacial electron transfer and active site chemistry. Tuning of intramolecular proton transport by pH and isotopic substitution revealed distinct concerted and stepwise proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in catalysis. The observed heterogeneity in the two sequential proton-associated reduction processes suggests a highly engineered protein environment modulating catalysis and implicates three new reaction intermediates; Nia-I, Nia-D, and Nia-SR(-). The results establish an elementary mechanistic understanding of catalysis in a [NiFe] hydrogenase with implications in enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer and biomimetic catalyst design.

  12. Transient characteristics for proton gating in laterally coupled indium-zinc-oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Zhu, Li Qiang; Xiao, Hui; Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Chao, Jin Yu

    2015-03-25

    The control and detection over processing, transport and delivery of chemical species is of great importance in sensors and biological systems. The transient characteristics of the migration of chemical species reflect the basic properties in the processings of chemical species. Here, we observed the field-configurable proton effects in a laterally coupled transistor gated by phosphorosilicate glass (PSG). The bias on the lateral gate would modulate the interplay between protons and electrons at the PSG/indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) channel interface. Due to the modulation of protons flux within the PSG films, the IZO channel current would be modified correspondingly. The characteristic time for the proton gating is estimated to be on the order of 20 ms. Such laterally coupled oxide based transistors with proton gating are promising for low-cost portable biosensors and neuromorphic system applications.

  13. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  14. Methyl [13C]glucopyranosiduronic acids: effect of COOH ionization and exocyclic structure on NMR spin-couplings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Hu, Xiaosong; Carmichael, Ian; Serianni, Anthony S

    2012-11-02

    Methyl α- and β-D-glucopyranuronides singly labeled with (13)C at C1-C6 were prepared from the corresponding (13)C-labeled methyl D-glucopyranosides, and multiple NMR J-couplings (J(HH), J(CH), and J(CC)) were measured in their protonated and ionized forms in aqueous ((2)H(2)O) solution. Solvated density functional theory (DFT) calculations of J-couplings in structurally related model compounds were performed to determine how well the calculated J-couplings matched the experimental values in saccharides bearing an ionizable substituent. Intraring J(HH) values in both uronide anomers, including (3)J(H4,H5), are unaffected by solution pD, and COOH ionization exerts little effect on J(CH) and J(CC) except for (1)J(C1,H1), (1)J(C4,H4), (1)J(C5,H5), (1)J(C5,C6), and (2)J(C3,C5), where changes of up to 5 Hz were observed. Some of these changes are associated with changes in bond lengths upon ionization; in general, better agreement between theory and experiment was observed for couplings less sensitive to exocyclic C-O bond conformation. Titration of (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts, and some J-couplings, yielded a COOH pK(a) of 3.0 ± 0.1 in both anomers. DFT calculations suggest that substituents proximal to the exocyclic COOH group (i.e., the C4-O4 bond) influence the activation barrier to C5-C6 bond rotation due to transient intramolecular H-bonding. A comparison of J-couplings in the glucopyranuronides to corresponding J-couplings in the glucopyranosides showed that more pervasive changes occur upon conversion from a COOH to a CH(2)OH substituent at C6 than from COOH ionization within the uronides. Twelve J-couplings are affected, with the largest being (1)J(C5,C6) (∼18 Hz larger in the uronides), followed by (2)J(C6,H5) (∼2.5 Hz more negative in the uronides).

  15. Chiral bands for a quasi-proton and quasi-neutron coupled with a triaxial rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Q.; Qi, B.; Wang, S. Y.; Meng, J.

    2007-04-01

    A particle rotor model (PRM) with a quasi-proton and a quasi-neutron coupled with a triaxial rotor is developed and applied to study chiral doublet bands with configurations of an h11/2 proton and an h11/2 quasi-neutron. With pairing treated by the BCS approximation, the present quasiparticle PRM is aimed at simulating one proton and many neutron holes coupled with a triaxial rotor. After a detailed analysis of the angular momentum orientations, energy separation between the partner bands, and behavior of electromagnetic transitions, for the first time we find aplanar rotation or equivalently chiral geometry beyond the usual one proton and one neutron hole coupled with a triaxial rotor.

  16. Chiral Bands for Quasi-Proton and Quasi-Neutron Coupling with a Triaxial Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, B.; Zhang, S. Q.; Wang, S. Y.; Meng, J.

    2008-04-01

    A particle rotor model (PRM) with a quasi-proton and a quasi-neutron coupled with a triaxial rotor is developed and applied to study chiral doublet bands with configurations of an h11/2 proton and an h11/2 quasi-neutron. With pairing treated by the BCS approximation, the present quasi-particle PRM is aimed at simulating one proton and many neutron holes coupled with a triaxial rotor. It is found that aplanar rotation or equivalently chiral geometry exists beyond the usual one proton and one neutron hole coupled with a triaxial rotor. After including the pairing correlation, the model describes the candidate chiral bands in 126Cs successfully, which supports the interpretation of chirality geometry.

  17. Reaction monitoring using hyperpolarized NMR with scaling of heteronuclear couplings by optimal tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guannan; Schilling, Franz; Glaser, Steffen J; Hilty, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Off-resonance decoupling using the method of Scaling of Heteronuclear Couplings by Optimal Tracking (SHOT) enables determination of heteronuclear correlations of chemical shifts in single scan NMR spectra. Through modulation of J-coupling evolution by shaped radio frequency pulses, off resonance decoupling using SHOT pulses causes a user-defined dependence of the observed J-splitting, such as the splitting of (13)C peaks, on the chemical shift offset of coupled nuclei, such as (1)H. Because a decoupling experiment requires only a single scan, this method is suitable for characterizing on-going chemical reactions using hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). We demonstrate the calculation of [(13)C, (1)H] chemical shift correlations of the carbanionic active sites from hyperpolarized styrene polymerized using sodium naphthalene as an initiator. While off resonance decoupling by SHOT pulses does not enhance the resolution in the same way as a 2D NMR spectrum would, the ability to obtain the correlations in single scans makes this method ideal for determination of chemical shifts in on-going reactions on the second time scale. In addition, we present a novel SHOT pulse that allows to scale J-splittings 50% larger than the respective J-coupling constant. This feature can be used to enhance the resolution of the indirectly detected chemical shift and reduce peak overlap, as demonstrated in a model reaction between p-anisaldehyde and isobutylamine. For both pulses, the accuracy is evaluated under changing signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the peaks from reactants and reaction products, with an overall standard deviation of chemical shift differences compared to reference spectra of 0.02ppm when measured on a 400MHz NMR spectrometer. Notably, the appearance of decoupling side-bands, which scale with peak intensity, appears to be of secondary importance.

  18. Reaction monitoring using hyperpolarized NMR with scaling of heteronuclear couplings by optimal tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guannan; Schilling, Franz; Glaser, Steffen J.; Hilty, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Off-resonance decoupling using the method of Scaling of Heteronuclear Couplings by Optimal Tracking (SHOT) enables determination of heteronuclear correlations of chemical shifts in single scan NMR spectra. Through modulation of J-coupling evolution by shaped radio frequency pulses, off resonance decoupling using SHOT pulses causes a user-defined dependence of the observed J-splitting, such as the splitting of 13C peaks, on the chemical shift offset of coupled nuclei, such as 1H. Because a decoupling experiment requires only a single scan, this method is suitable for characterizing on-going chemical reactions using hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP). We demonstrate the calculation of [13C, 1H] chemical shift correlations of the carbanionic active sites from hyperpolarized styrene polymerized using sodium naphthalene as an initiator. While off resonance decoupling by SHOT pulses does not enhance the resolution in the same way as a 2D NMR spectrum would, the ability to obtain the correlations in single scans makes this method ideal for determination of chemical shifts in on-going reactions on the second time scale. In addition, we present a novel SHOT pulse that allows to scale J-splittings 50% larger than the respective J-coupling constant. This feature can be used to enhance the resolution of the indirectly detected chemical shift and reduce peak overlap, as demonstrated in a model reaction between p-anisaldehyde and isobutylamine. For both pulses, the accuracy is evaluated under changing signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the peaks from reactants and reaction products, with an overall standard deviation of chemical shift differences compared to reference spectra of 0.02 ppm when measured on a 400 MHz NMR spectrometer. Notably, the appearance of decoupling side-bands, which scale with peak intensity, appears to be of secondary importance.

  19. 500-MHz proton NMR evidence for two solution structures of the common arm base-paired segment of wheat germ 5S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiejun; Marshall, A.G. )

    1990-02-20

    The base-pair protons of the common arm duplex fragment of wheat germ (Triticum aestivum) ribosomal 5S RNA have been identified and assigned by means of 500-MHz proton NMR spectroscopy. The two previously reported extra base pairs within the fragment are now explained by the presence of two distinct solution structures of the common arm fragment (and its corresponding base-paired segment in intact 5S rRNA). The present conclusions are supported by one- and two-dimensional proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements in H{sub 2}O and by temperature variation and Mg{sup 2+} titration of the downfield {sup 1}H NMR spectrum. The difference between the two conformers is most likely due to difference in helical tightness. Some additional amino proton resonances have also been assigned.

  20. Role of pendant proton relays and proton-coupled electron transfer on the hydrogen evolution reaction by nickel hangman porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Bediako, D. Kwabena; Solis, Brian H.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Roubelakis, Manolis M.; Maher, Andrew G.; Lee, Chang Hoon; Chambers, Matthew B.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2014-10-08

    Here, the hangman motif provides mechanistic insights into the role of pendant proton relays in governing proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) involved in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We now show improved HER activity of Ni compared with Co hangman porphyrins. Cyclic voltammogram data and simulations, together with computational studies using density functional theory, implicate a shift in electrokinetic zone between Co and Ni hangman porphyrins due to a change in the PCET mechanism. Unlike the Co hangman porphyrin, the Ni hangman porphyrin does not require reduction to the formally metal(0) species before protonation by weak acids in acetonitrile. We conclude that protonation likely occurs at the Ni(I) state followed by reduction, in a stepwise proton transfer–electron transfer pathway. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies reveal that upon reduction of the Ni(II) compound, the first electron is transferred to a metal-based orbital, whereas the second electron is transferred to a molecular orbital on the porphyrin ring.

  1. Role of pendant proton relays and proton-coupled electron transfer on the hydrogen evolution reaction by nickel hangman porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Bediako, D. Kwabena; Solis, Brian H.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Roubelakis, Manolis M.; Maher, Andrew G.; Lee, Chang Hoon; Chambers, Matthew B.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    The hangman motif provides mechanistic insights into the role of pendant proton relays in governing proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) involved in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We now show improved HER activity of Ni compared with Co hangman porphyrins. Cyclic voltammogram data and simulations, together with computational studies using density functional theory, implicate a shift in electrokinetic zone between Co and Ni hangman porphyrins due to a change in the PCET mechanism. Unlike the Co hangman porphyrin, the Ni hangman porphyrin does not require reduction to the formally metal(0) species before protonation by weak acids in acetonitrile. We conclude that protonation likely occurs at the Ni(I) state followed by reduction, in a stepwise proton transfer–electron transfer pathway. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies reveal that upon reduction of the Ni(II) compound, the first electron is transferred to a metal-based orbital, whereas the second electron is transferred to a molecular orbital on the porphyrin ring. PMID:25298534

  2. Role of pendant proton relays and proton-coupled electron transfer on the hydrogen evolution reaction by nickel hangman porphyrins

    DOE PAGES

    Bediako, D. Kwabena; Solis, Brian H.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; ...

    2014-10-08

    Here, the hangman motif provides mechanistic insights into the role of pendant proton relays in governing proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) involved in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We now show improved HER activity of Ni compared with Co hangman porphyrins. Cyclic voltammogram data and simulations, together with computational studies using density functional theory, implicate a shift in electrokinetic zone between Co and Ni hangman porphyrins due to a change in the PCET mechanism. Unlike the Co hangman porphyrin, the Ni hangman porphyrin does not require reduction to the formally metal(0) species before protonation by weak acids in acetonitrile. We concludemore » that protonation likely occurs at the Ni(I) state followed by reduction, in a stepwise proton transfer–electron transfer pathway. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies reveal that upon reduction of the Ni(II) compound, the first electron is transferred to a metal-based orbital, whereas the second electron is transferred to a molecular orbital on the porphyrin ring.« less

  3. Molecular dynamics and information on possible sites of interaction of intramyocellular metabolites in vivo from resolved dipolar couplings in localized 1H NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Schmitz, Christian; Bachert, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Proton NMR resonances of the endogenous metabolites creatine and phosphocreatine ((P)Cr), taurine (Tau), and carnosine (Cs, β-alanyl- L-histidine) were studied with regard to residual dipolar couplings and molecular mobility. We present an analysis of the direct 1H- 1H interaction that provides information on motional reorientation of subgroups in these molecules in vivo. For this purpose, localized 1H NMR experiments were performed on m. gastrocnemius of healthy volunteers using a 1.5-T clinical whole-body MR scanner. We evaluated the observable dipolar coupling strength SD0 ( S = order parameter) of the (P)Cr-methyl triplet and the Tau-methylene doublet by means of the apparent line splitting. These were compared to the dipolar coupling strength of the (P)Cr-methylene doublet. In contrast to the aliphatic protons of (P)Cr and Tau, the aromatic H2 ( δ = 8 ppm) and H4 ( δ = 7 ppm) protons of the imidazole ring of Cs exhibit second-order spectra at 1.5 T. This effect is the consequence of incomplete transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime and allows a determination of SD0 from H2 and H4 of Cs as an alternative to evaluating the multiplet splitting which can be measured directly in high-resolution 1H NMR spectra. Experimental data showed striking differences in the mobility of the metabolites when the dipolar coupling constant D0 (calculated with the internuclear distance known from molecular geometry in the case of complete absence of molecular dynamics and motion) is used for comparison. The aliphatic signals involve very small order parameters S ≈ (1.4 - 3) × 10 -4 indicating rapid reorientation of the corresponding subgroups in these metabolites. In contrast, analysis of the Cs resonances yielded S ≈ (113 - 137) × 10 -4. Thus, the immobilization of the Cs imidazole ring owing to an anisotropic cellular substructure in human m. gastrocnemius is much more effective than for (P)Cr and Tau subgroups. Furthermore, 1H NMR experiments on aqueous model

  4. Long-lived states to monitor protein unfolding by proton NMR.

    PubMed

    Bornet, Aurélien; Ahuja, Puneet; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Fernandes, Laetitia; Hadji, Sonia; Lee, Shirley Y; Haririnia, Aydin; Fushman, David; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Vasos, Paul R

    2011-10-24

    The relaxation of long-lived states (LLS) corresponds to the slow return to statistical thermal equilibrium between symmetric and antisymmetric proton spin states. This process is remarkably sensitive to the presence of external spins and can be used to obtain information about partial unfolding of proteins. We detected the appearance of a destabilized conformer of ubiquitin when urea is added to the protein in its native state. This conformer shows increased mobility in the C-terminus, which significantly extends the lifetimes of proton LLS magnetisation in Ser-65. These changes could not be detected by conventional measurements of T(1) and T(2) relaxation times of protons, and would hardly be sensed by carbon-13 or nitrogen-15 relaxation measurements. Conformers with similar dynamic and structural features, as revealed by LLS relaxation times, could be observed, in the absence of urea, in two ubiquitin mutants, L67S and L69S.

  5. Solid-state proton NMR of paramagnetic metal complexes: DANTE spin echoes for selective excitation in inhomogeneously broadened lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Perez Linde, A. J.; Bauer, Gerald; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-08-01

    The paramagnetic complex bis(oxazolinylphenyl)amine-Fe(III)Cl2 is investigated by means of solid-state proton NMR at 18.8 T (800 MHz) using magic-angle spinning at 65 kHz. Spin echoes that are excited and refocused by combs of rotor-synchronized pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) allow one to characterize different chemical environments that severely overlap in conventional MAS spectra. Such sequences combine two apparently contradictory features: an overall bandwidth exceeding several MHz, and very selective irradiation of a few kHz within inhomogeneously broadened sidebands. The experimental hyperfine interactions correlate well with DFT calculations.

  6. A Simple Marcus-Theory Type Model for Hydrogen Atom Transfer/Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mayer, James M

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen atom transfer reactions are the simplest class of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes. These reactions involve transfer of one electron and one proton from one reagent to another, in the same kinetic step: XH + Y → X + HY. A predictive model for these reactions based on the Marcus cross relation is described. The model predicts rate constants within one or two orders of magnitude in most cases, over a very wide range of reactants and solvents. This remarkable result implies a surprising generality of the additivity postulate for the reaction intrinsic barriers, and a smaller role for the quantum mechanical details of the proton and electron transfers.

  7. A LEAN approach toward automated analysis and data processing of polymers using proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Brouwer, Hans; Stegeman, Gerrit

    2011-02-01

    To maximize utilization of expensive laboratory instruments and to make most effective use of skilled human resources, the entire chain of data processing, calculation, and reporting that is needed to transform raw NMR data into meaningful results was automated. The LEAN process improvement tools were used to identify non-value-added steps in the existing process. These steps were eliminated using an in-house developed software package, which allowed us to meet the key requirement of improving quality and reliability compared with the existing process while freeing up valuable human resources and increasing productivity. Reliability and quality were improved by the consistent data treatment as performed by the software and the uniform administration of results. Automating a single NMR spectrophotometer led to a reduction in operator time of 35%, doubling of the annual sample throughput from 1400 to 2800, and reducing the turn around time from 6 days to less than 2.

  8. High-resolution proton-detected NMR of proteins at very fast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Loren B.; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Pintacuda, Guido

    2015-04-01

    When combined with high-frequency (currently ∼60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS), proton detection boosts sensitivity and increases coherence lifetimes, resulting in narrow 1H lines. Herein, we review methods for efficient proton detected techniques and applications in highly deuterated proteins, with an emphasis on 100% selected 1H site concentration for the purpose of sensitivity. We discuss the factors affecting resolution and sensitivity that have resulted in higher and higher frequency MAS. Next we describe the various methods that have been used for backbone and side-chain assignment with proton detection, highlighting the efficient use of scalar-based 13C-13C transfers. Additionally, we show new spectra making use of these schemes for side-chain assignment of methyl 13C-1H resonances. The rapid acquisition of resolved 2D spectra with proton detection allows efficient measurement of relaxation parameters used as a measure of dynamic processes. Under rapid MAS, relaxation times can be measured in a site-specific manner in medium-sized proteins, enabling the investigation of molecular motions at high resolution. Additionally, we discuss methods for measurement of structural parameters, including measurement of internuclear 1H-1H contacts and the use of paramagnetic effects in the determination of global structure.

  9. High-resolution proton-detected NMR of proteins at very fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Pintacuda, Guido

    2015-04-01

    When combined with high-frequency (currently ∼60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS), proton detection boosts sensitivity and increases coherence lifetimes, resulting in narrow ((1))H lines. Herein, we review methods for efficient proton detected techniques and applications in highly deuterated proteins, with an emphasis on 100% selected ((1))H site concentration for the purpose of sensitivity. We discuss the factors affecting resolution and sensitivity that have resulted in higher and higher frequency MAS. Next we describe the various methods that have been used for backbone and side-chain assignment with proton detection, highlighting the efficient use of scalar-based ((13))C-((13))C transfers. Additionally, we show new spectra making use of these schemes for side-chain assignment of methyl ((13))C-((1))H resonances. The rapid acquisition of resolved 2D spectra with proton detection allows efficient measurement of relaxation parameters used as a measure of dynamic processes. Under rapid MAS, relaxation times can be measured in a site-specific manner in medium-sized proteins, enabling the investigation of molecular motions at high resolution. Additionally, we discuss methods for measurement of structural parameters, including measurement of internuclear ((1))H-((1))H contacts and the use of paramagnetic effects in the determination of global structure.

  10. Proton NMR characterization of isomeric sulfmyoglobins: preparation, interconversion, reactivity patterns, and structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Chatfield, M.J.; La Mar, G.N.; Kauten, R.J.

    1987-11-03

    The preparations of sulfmyoglobin (sulf-Mb) by standard procedures have been found heterogeneous by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Presented here are the results of a comprehensive study of the factors that influence the selection among the three dominant isomeric forms of sperm whale sulf-Mb and their resulting detailed optical and /sup 1/H NMR properties as related to their detectability and structural properties of the heme pocket. A single isomer is formed initially in the deoxy state; further treatment in any desired oxidation/ligation state can yield two other major isomers. Acid catalysis and chromatography facilitate formation of a second isomer, particularly in the high-spin state. At neutral pH, a third isomer is formed by a first-order process. The processes that alter oxidation/ligation state are found to be reversible and are judged to affect only the metal center, but the three isomeric sulf-Mbs are found to exhibit significantly different ligand affinity and chemical stability. The present results allow, for the first time, a rational approach for preparing a given isomeric sulf-Mb in an optimally pure state for subsequent characterization by other techniques. While optical spectroscopy can distinguish the alkaline forms, only /sup 1/H NMR clearly distinguishes all three ferric isomers. The hyperfine shift patterns in the various oxidation/spin states of sulf-Mbs indicate relatively small structural alteration, and the proximal and distal sides of the heme suggest that peripheral electronic effects are responsible for the differentially reduced ligand affinities for the three isomeric sulf-Mbs. The first /sup 1/H NMR spectra of sulfhemoglobins are presented, which indicate a structure similar to that of the initially formed sulf-Mb isomer but also suggest the presence of a similar molecular heterogeneity as found for sulf-Mb, albiet to a smaller extent.

  11. Investigating the Dissolution Performance of Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Proton NMR.

    PubMed

    Tres, Francesco; Coombes, Steven R; Phillips, Andrew R; Hughes, Leslie P; Wren, Stephen A C; Aylott, Jonathan W; Burley, Jonathan C

    2015-09-10

    We have investigated the dissolution performance of amorphous solid dispersions of poorly water-soluble bicalutamide in a Kollidon VA64 polymeric matrix as a function of the drug loading (5% vs. 30% bicalutamide). A combined suite of state-of-the-art analytical techniques were employed to obtain a clear picture of the drug release, including an integrated magnetic resonance imaging UV-Vis flow cell system and 1H-NMR. Off-line 1H-NMR was used for the first time to simultaneously measure the dissolution profiles and rates of both the drug and the polymer from a solid dispersion. MRI and 1H-NMR data showed that the 5% drug loading compact erodes linearly, and that bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64 are released at approximately the same rate from the molecular dispersion. For the 30% extrudate, data indicated a slower water ingress into the compact which corresponds to a slower dissolution rate of both bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64.

  12. The Effect of Antitumor Glycosides on Glioma Cells and Tissues as Studied by Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; Campos-Olivas, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the treatment with glycolipid derivatives on the metabolic profile of intact glioma cells and tumor tissues, investigated using proton high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, is reported here. Two compounds were used, a glycoside and its thioglycoside analogue, both showing anti-proliferative activity on glioma C6 cell cultures; however, only the thioglycoside exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. At the drug concentrations showing anti-proliferative activity in cell culture (20 and 40 µM), significant increases in choline containing metabolites were observed in the 1H NMR spectra of the same intact cells. In vivo experiments in nude mice bearing tumors derived from implanted C6 glioma cells, showed that reduction of tumor volume was associated with significant changes in the metabolic profile of the same intact tumor tissues; and were similar to those observed in cell culture. Specifically, the activity of the compounds is mainly associated with an increase in choline and phosphocholine, in both the cell cultures and tumoral tissues. Taurine, a metabolite that has been considered a biomarker of apoptosis, correlated with the reduction of tumor volume. Thus, the results indicate that the mode of action of the glycoside involves, at least in part, alteration of phospholipid metabolism, resulting in cell death. PMID:24194925

  13. New insight into hydration and aging mechanisms of paper by the line shape analysis of proton NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Missori, M.; Corsaro, C.

    2016-05-01

    The action of water within biological systems is strictly linked either with their physical chemical properties and with their functions. Cellulose is one of the most studied biopolymers due to its biological importance and its wide use in manufactured products. Among them, paper is mainly constituted by an almost equimolar ratio of cellulose and water. Therefore the study of the behavior of water within pristine and aged paper samples can help to shed light on the degradation mechanisms that irremediably act over time and spoil paper. In this work we present Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on modern paper samples made of pure cellulose not aged and artificially aged as well as on ancient paper samples made in 1413 in Perpignan (France). The line shape parameters of the proton NMR spectra were studied as a function of the hydration content. Results indicate that water in aged samples is progressively involved in the hydration of the byproducts of cellulose degradation. This enhances the degradation process itself through the progressive consumption of the cellulose amorphous regions.

  14. Proton-coupled sugar transport in the prototypical major facilitator superfamily protein XylE.

    PubMed

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Park, Min-Sun; Iadanza, Matthew G; Zheng, Hongjin; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-08-04

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is the largest collection of structurally related membrane proteins that transport a wide array of substrates. The proton-coupled sugar transporter XylE is the first member of the MFS that has been structurally characterized in multiple transporting conformations, including both the outward and inward-facing states. Here we report the crystal structure of XylE in a new inward-facing open conformation, allowing us to visualize the rocker-switch movement of the N-domain against the C-domain during the transport cycle. Using molecular dynamics simulation, and functional transport assays, we describe the movement of XylE that facilitates sugar translocation across a lipid membrane and identify the likely candidate proton-coupling residues as the conserved Asp27 and Arg133. This study addresses the structural basis for proton-coupled substrate transport and release mechanism for the sugar porter family of proteins.

  15. Coupling between inter-helical hydrogen bonding and water dynamics in a proton transporter.

    PubMed

    del Val, Coral; Bondar, Luiza; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2014-04-01

    Long-distance proton transfers by proton pumps occurs in discrete steps that may involve the direct participation of protein sidechains and water molecules, and coupling of protonation changes to structural rearrangements of the protein matrix. Here we explore the role of inter-helical hydrogen bonding in long-distance protein conformational coupling and dynamics of internal water molecules. From molecular dynamics simulations of wild type and nine different bacteriorhodopsin mutants we find that both intra- and inter-helical hydrogen bonds are important determinants of the local protein structure, dynamics, and water interactions. Based on molecular dynamics and bioinformatics analyses, we identify an aspartate/threonine inter-helical hydrogen-bonding motif involved in controlling the local conformational dynamics. Perturbation of inter-helical hydrogen bonds can couple to rapid changes in water dynamics.

  16. Prospective Real Time Head Motion Correction Using Inductively Coupled Wireless NMR Probes

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat; Tadanki, Sasidhar; Gore, John C.; Welch, E. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Head motion continues to be a major source of artifacts and data quality degradation in MRI. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate a novel technique for prospective, 6 degrees of freedom (6DOF) rigid body motion estimation and real time motion correction using inductively coupled wireless nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe markers. Methods Three wireless probes that are inductively coupled with the scanner’s RF setup serve as fiducials on the subject’s head. A 12 ms linear navigator module is interleaved with the imaging sequence for head position estimation, and scan geometry is updated in real time for motion compensation. Flip angle amplification in the markers allows the use of extremely small navigator flip angles (~1°). A novel algorithm is presented to identify marker positions in the absence of marker specific receive channels. The method is demonstrated for motion correction in 1 mm3 gradient recalled echo experiments in phantoms and humans. Results Significant improvement of image quality is demonstrated in phantoms and human volunteers under different motion conditions. Conclusion A novel real time 6 DOF head motion correction technique based on wireless NMR probes is demonstrated in high resolution imaging at 7 Tesla. PMID:24243810

  17. Hydrogen bond geometries and proton tautomerism of homoconjugated anions of carboxylic acids studied via H/D isotope effects on 13C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    Ten formally symmetric anionic OHO hydrogen bonded complexes, modeling Asp/Glu amino acid side chain interactions in nonaqueous environment (CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl solution, 200-110 K) have been studied by (1)H, (2)H, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, i.e. intermolecularly H-bonded homoconjugated anions of acetic, chloroacetic, dichloroacetic, trifluoroacetic, trimethylacetic, and isobutyric acids, and intramolecularly H-bonded hydrogen succinate, hydrogen rac-dimethylsuccinate, hydrogen maleate, and hydrogen phthalate. In particular, primary H/D isotope effects on the hydrogen bond proton signals as well as secondary H/D isotope effects on the (13)C signals of the carboxylic groups are reported and analyzed. We demonstrate that in most of the studied systems there is a degenerate proton tautomerism between O-H···O(-) and O(-)···H-O structures which is fast in the NMR time scale. The stronger is the proton donating ability of the acid, the shorter and more symmetric are the H-bonds in each tautomer of the homoconjugate. For the maleate and phthalate anions exhibiting intramolecular hydrogen bonds, evidence for symmetric single well potentials is obtained. We propose a correlation between H/D isotope effects on carboxylic carbon chemical shifts and the proton transfer coordinate, q(1) = ½(r(OH) - r(HO)), which allows us to estimate the desired OHO hydrogen bond geometries from the observed (13)C NMR parameters, taking into account the degenerate proton tautomerism.

  18. Proton Dynamics on Goethite Nanoparticles and Coupling to Electron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Smith, Dayle MA; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-04-14

    The surface chemistry of metal oxide particles is governed by the charge that develops at the interface with aqueous solution. Mineral transformation, biogeochemical reactions, remediation, and sorption dynamics are profoundly affected in response. Here we report implementation of replica-exchange constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations that use classical molecular dynamics for exploring configurational space and Metropolis Monte Carlo walking through protonation space with a simulated annealing escape route from metastable configurations. By examining the archetypal metal oxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), we find that electrostatic potential gradients spontaneously arise between intersecting low-index crystal faces and across explicitly treated oxide nanoparticles at a magnitude exceeding the Johnson–Nyquist voltage fluctuation. Fluctuations in adsorbed proton density continuously repolarize the surface potential bias between edge-sharing crystal faces, at a rate slower than the reported electron–polaron hopping rate in goethite interiors. This suggests that these spontaneous surface potential fluctuations will control the net movement of charge carriers in the lattice.

  19. Proton NMR spectral study of UV treated live Escherichia coli Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokopud, Michael

    The lethal effects of ultraviolet radiation on microorganisms have been known and utilized for many years. In sufficiently high photon fluences, light and in particular, UV light, is an effective and subtle means of killing or at least immobilizing most, if not all cells and micro-organisms. Because of their small size, light can penetrate the enclosing protective walls and enter the inner volumes where it can break organic bonds in components that are vital to cell function. Despite the fact that a very low dose of UV light (1-9 mJ/cm2) has been shown to inactivate many micro-organisms, there remains a dearth of biological information about light induced effects in molecules and their interactions within living microbial systems. The use of 1H NMR as a spectroscopic tool was chosen to undertake an examination of the possible effects resulting from exposing E. coli to lethal fluencies of UV radiation. Once sample preparation, treatment, and NMR mounting methods were optimized, the high sensitivity and high resolution capabilities of the method produced reproducible results for a series of experiments. These results reveal significant changes in the ratio of the 1H NMR spectra of the treated to untreated E.coli samples when the treated sample was exposed to a lethal fluence of 275nm light. Photons at the 275nm wavelength, used in this study, have enough energy to break all of the principle bonds in an organic molecule. The difference spectrum between treated to untreated samples appears to be fitted well using specific component spectra from these groups of compounds. Increases in NMR peak amplitudes are observed and appear to be correlated with the spectral locations of several amino acids, membrane components and several sugars/saccharides. Increases in peak intensities of 4-8% were observed in the 0.8-1.1 ppm chemical shift region, characteristic of lipid and amino acid groups. A 3.5-4% increase was observed in the 2 ppm and 3.4-4 ppm region characteristic of

  20. Ligand noninnocence of thiolate/disulfide in dinuclear copper complexes: solvent-dependent redox isomerization and proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew M; Lin, Bo-Lin; Wasinger, Erik C; Stack, T Daniel P

    2013-12-18

    Copper thiolate/disulfide interconversions are related to the functions of several important proteins such as human Sco1, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), and mammalian zinc-bonded metallothionein. The synthesis and characterization of well-defined synthetic analogues for such interconversions are challenging yet provide important insights into the mechanisms of such redox processes. Solvent-dependent redox isomerization and proton-coupled electron transfer mimicking these interconversions are observed in two structurally related dimeric μ,η(2):η(2)-thiolato Cu(II)Cu(II) complexes by various methods, including X-ray diffraction, XAS, NMR, and UV-vis. Spectroscopic evidence shows that a solvent-dependent equilibrium exists between the dimeric μ-thiolato Cu(II)Cu(II) state and its redox isomeric μ-disulfido Cu(I)Cu(I) form. Complete formation of μ-disulfido Cu(I)Cu(I) complexes, however, only occurs after the addition of 2 equiv of protons, which promote electron transfer from thiolate to Cu(II) and formation of disulfide and Cu(I) via protonation of the coordinating ligand. Proton removal reverses this reaction. The reported unusual reductive protonation/oxidative deprotonation of the metal centers may serve as a new chemical precedent for how related proteins manage Cu ions in living organisms.

  1. Thermochemistry of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reagents and its Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Tronic, Tristan A.; Mayer, James M.

    2010-12-08

    Many, if not most, redox reactions are coupled to proton transfers. This includes most common sources of chemical potential energy, from the bioenergetic processes that power cells to the fossil fuel combustion that powers cars. These proton-coupled electron transfer or PCET processes may involve multiple electrons and multiple protons, as in the 4 e–, 4 H+ reduction of dioxygen (O2) to water (eq 1), or can involve one electron and one proton such as the formation of tyrosyl radicals from tyrosine residues (TyrOH) in enzymatic catalytic cycles (eq 2). In addition, many multi-electron, multi-proton processes proceed in one-electron and one-proton steps. Organic reactions that proceed in one-electron steps involve radical intermediates, which play critical roles in a wide range of chemical, biological, and industrial processes. This broad and diverse class of PCET reactions are central to a great many chemical and biochemical processes, from biological catalysis and energy transduction, to bulk industrial chemical processes, to new approaches to solar energy conversion. PCET is therefore of broad and increasing interest, as illustrated by this issue and a number of other recent reviews.

  2. Nickel phlorin intermediate formed by proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen evolution mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Brian H.; Maher, Andrew G.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Nocera, Daniel G.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The development of more effective energy conversion processes is critical for global energy sustainability. The design of molecular electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction is an important component of these efforts. Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer, play an important role in these processes and can be enhanced by incorporating proton relays into the molecular electrocatalysts. Herein nickel porphyrin electrocatalysts with and without an internal proton relay are investigated to elucidate the hydrogen evolution mechanisms and thereby enable the design of more effective catalysts. Density functional theory calculations indicate that electrochemical reduction leads to dearomatization of the porphyrin conjugated system, thereby favoring protonation at the meso carbon of the porphyrin ring to produce a phlorin intermediate. A key step in the proposed mechanisms is a thermodynamically favorable PCET reaction composed of intramolecular electron transfer from the nickel to the porphyrin and proton transfer from a carboxylic acid hanging group or an external acid to the meso carbon of the porphyrin. The C–H bond of the active phlorin acts similarly to the more traditional metal-hydride by reacting with acid to produce H2. Support for the theoretically predicted mechanism is provided by the agreement between simulated and experimental cyclic voltammograms in weak and strong acid and by the detection of a phlorin intermediate through spectroelectrochemical measurements. These results suggest that phlorin species have the potential to perform unique chemistry that could prove useful in designing more effective electrocatalysts. PMID:26655344

  3. Probing Nonadiabaticity in the Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reaction Catalyzed by Soybean Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. PCET rate constant expressions are available for various well-defined regimes, and determining which expression is appropriate for a given system is essential for reliable modeling. Quantitative diagnostics have been devised to characterize the vibronic nonadiabaticity between the electron–proton quantum subsystem and the classical nuclei, as well as the electron–proton nonadiabaticity between the electrons and proton(s) within the quantum subsystem. Herein these diagnostics are applied to a model of the active site of the enzyme soybean lipoxygenase, which catalyzes a PCET reaction that exhibits unusually high deuterium kinetic isotope effects at room temperature. Both semiclassical and electronic charge density diagnostics illustrate vibronic and electron–proton nonadiabaticity for this PCET reaction, supporting the use of the Golden rule nonadiabatic rate constant expression with a specific form of the vibronic coupling. This type of characterization will be useful for theoretical modeling of a broad range of PCET processes. PMID:25258676

  4. A proton NMR relaxation study of water dynamics in bovine serum albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Belotti, Monica; Martinelli, Andrea; Gianferri, Raffaella; Brosio, Elvino

    2010-01-14

    Water dynamics and compartmentation in glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine serum albumin nanoparticles have been investigated by an integrated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) protocol based on water relaxation times and self-diffusion coefficients measurements. Multi-exponentially of water relaxation curves has been accounted for according to a diffusive and chemical exchange model (see B. P. Hills, S. F. Takacs and P. S. Belton, Mol. Phys., 1989, 67(4), 903, and Mol. Phys., 1989, 67(4), 913; E. Brosio, M. Belotti and R. Gianferri, in Food Science and Technology: New Research, ed. L. V. Greco and M. N. Bruno, Nova Science Publishers, Hauppauge (NY), 2008) that made it possible to single out water molecules in the molecular spaces in the interior of albumin nanoparticles, in the meso-cavities formed by packed nanoparticles and in the meniscus on top of the nanoparticles suspension. A quantitative rationalization of T(2) values of water different components allowed morphological information to be acquired as for the size of water filled compartments, while self-diffusion coefficient measurements of water excess or fluxed packed nanoparticles suspensions are describers of transport properties of soft biomaterials. The paper reports an NMR approach that can be seen as a general and relevant method to characterize excess-water-swollen soft biomaterials.

  5. Proton Dynamics in the Anti-ferroelectric CsH3(SeO3)2 by using 1H NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moohee; Ndiaye, B.; Kang, K.; Kim, H.; Sim, J.; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-03-01

    1H NMR techniques have been employed on the anti-ferroelectric CsH3(SeO3)2 to measure spectrum, shift, T1 and T2 from 300 K down to 80 K at 4.85 T. The 1H NMR spectrum at 300 K shows a composite structure; one dominant broad peak and two small narrow peaks. From the temperature dependences of both intensity and T1 for each peak, we identify that the narrow peaks come from rapidly moving protons whereas the broad peaks originate from rigid protons. The spectra below 200 K show several peaks associated with six nonequivalent proton sites and also the T1 decays show a non-exponential curve coming from many proton sites. T1 is very long even at 300 K and becomes even longer at low temperature. By analyzing T1 decays with T1S and T1L, we confirm that 1/T1(T) show an activated behavior; the short component originates from proton dynamics with activation energy of ~ 140 K and the long component is associated with that of ~ 100 K. Further analysis suggests that some protons show an abrupt change in both shift and T1L across Tc and may be responsible for the phase transition.

  6. Density Functional Reactivity Theory Characterizes Charge Separation Propensity in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shubin; Ess, Daniel H.; Schauer, Cynthia

    2011-04-20

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions occur in many biological and artificial solar energy conversion processes. In these reactions the electron is often transferred to a site distant to the proton acceptor site. In this work, we employ the dual descriptor and the electrophilic Fukui function from density functional reactivity theory (DFRT) to characterize the propensity for an electron to be transferred to a site other than the proton acceptor site. The electrophilic regions of hydrogen bond or van der Waal reactant complexes were examined using these DFRT descriptors to determine the region of space to which the electron is most likely to be transferred. This analysis shows that in PCET reactions the electrophilic region of the reactant complex does not include the proton acceptor site.

  7. Coupling of light-induced electron transfer to proton uptake in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Remy, André; Gerwert, Klaus

    2003-08-01

    Light energy is transformed into chemical energy in photosynthesis by coupling a light-induced electron transfer to proton uptake. The resulting proton gradient drives ATP synthesis. In this study, we monitored the light-induced reactions in a 100-kDa photosynthetic protein from 30 ns to 35 s by FTIR difference spectroscopy. The results provide detailed mechanistic insights into the electron and proton transfer reactions of the QA to QB transition: reduction of QA in picoseconds induces protonation of histidines, probably of His126 and His128 in the H subunit at the entrance of the proton uptake channel, and of Asp210 in the L subunit inside the channel at 12 micros and 150 micros. This seems to be a prerequisite for the reduction of QB, mainly at 150 micros. QA- is reoxidized at 1.1 ms, and a proton is transferred from Asp210 to Glu212 in the L subunit, the proton donor to QB-. Notably, our data indicate that QB is not reduced directly by QA- but presumably through an intermediary electron donor.

  8. NMR relaxation of protein and water protons in diamagnetic hemoglobin solutions.

    PubMed

    Eisenstadt, M

    1985-07-02

    We have measured T1 and T2 of protein and water protons in hemoglobin solutions using broad-line pulse techniques; selective excitation and detection methods enabled the intrinsic protein and water relaxation rates, as well as the spin-transfer rate between them, to be obtained at 5, 10, and 20 MHz. Water and protein T1 data were also obtained at 100 and 200 MHz for hemoglobin in H2O/D2O mixtures by using commercial Fourier-transform instruments. The T1 data conform to a simple model of two well-mixed spin systems with single intrinsic relaxation times and an average spin-transfer rate, with each phase recovering from a radio-frequency excitation with a biexponential time dependence. At low frequencies, protein T1 and T2 agree reasonably with a model of dipolar relaxation of an array of fixed protons tumbling in solution, explicitly calculating methyl and methylene relaxation and using a continuum approximation for the others. Differing values in H2O and D2O are mainly ascribed to solvent viscosity. For water-proton relaxation, T1, T2, and spin transfer were measured for H2O and HDO, which enabled a separation of inter-and intramolecular contributions to relaxation. Despite such detail, few firm conclusions could be reached about hydration water. But it seems clear that few long-lived hydration sites are needed to explain T1 and T2, and the spin-transfer value mandates fewer than five sites with a lifetime longer than 10(-8) s.

  9. Proton NMR studies of the electronic structure of ZrH/sub x/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attalla, A.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Craft, B. D.; Venturini, E. L.; Rhim, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    The proton spin lattice relaxation times and Knight shifts were measured in f.c.c. (delta-phase) and f.c.t. (epsilon-phase) ZrH/sub x/ for 1.5 or = to x or = to 2.0. Both parameters indicate that N(E/sub F/) is very dependent upon hydrogen content with a maximum occurring at ZrH1 83. This behavior is ascribed to modifications in N(E/sub F/) through a fcc/fct distortion in ZrH/sub x/ associated with a Jahn-Teller effect.

  10. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of 1H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951-6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the 1H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  11. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  12. Isotope-edited proton NMR study on the structure of a pepsin/inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Erickson, J.W.; Abad-Zapatero, C.

    1988-11-01

    A general approach is illustrated for providing detailed structural information on large enzyme/inhibitor complexes using NMR spectroscopy. The method involves the use of isotopically labeled ligands to simplify two-dimensional NOE spectra of large molecular complexes by isotope-editing techniques. With this approach, the backbone and side-chain conformations (at the P/sub 2/ and P/sub 3/ sites) of a tightly bound inhibitor of porcine pepsin have bene determined. In addition, structural information on the active site of pepsin has been obtained. Due to the sequence homology between porcine pepsin and human renin, this structural information may prove useful for modeling renin/inhibitor complexes with the ultimate goal of designing more effective renin inhibitors. Moreover, this general approach can be applied to study other biological systems of interest such as other enzyme/inhibitor complexes, ligands bound to soluble receptors, and enzyme/substrate interactions.

  13. Thermochemistry of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reagents and its Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey J; Tronic, Tristan A; Mayer, James M

    2010-01-01

    The primary goals of this review are (1) to assemble thermochemical data—reduction potentials, pK{sub a} values, and bond dissociation free energies and enthalpies—from disparate sources and (2) to illustrate the utility of these data in understanding proton-coupled redox chemistry. We hope to have illustrated the value and power of thermochemical cycles (“square schemes”).

  14. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; ...

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implicationsmore » for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.« less

  15. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implications for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.

  16. A flow microslot NMR probe coupled with a capillary isotachophoresis system exhibits improved properties compared to solenoid designs.

    PubMed

    Gogiashvili, Mikheil; Telfah, Ahmad; Lambert, Jörg; Hergenröder, Roland

    2017-03-01

    We report on the hyphenation of capillary isotachophoresis (cITP) separations with online nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection using a planar microslot waveguide probe design. While cITP is commonly coupled with a solenoidal microcoil NMR probe, the structural information provided is limited by broad resonances and poor spectral resolution due to the magnetic field created by the separation current. The microslot probe design described herein allows the separation capillary to be oriented parallel to the static magnetic field, B 0, eliminating the spectral broadening produced by the secondary magnetic field induced by the separation current. This allows high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the charged analytes to be obtained in online mode, whereas conventional solenoidal capillary NMR designs must resort to the stopped flow mode. The potential of the microslot probe for hyphenated electrophoretic separations is demonstrated by performing cITP focusing and online NMR detection of the (1)H NMR spectrum of a system containing spermine and aniline. Graphical Abstract High resolution NMR spectra in flow capillarelectrophoretic separations with microslot NMR probe.

  17. Structural Analysis of N- and O-glycans Using ZIC-HILIC/Dialysis Coupled to NMR Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Feng, Ju; Deng, Shuang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Qibin; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jiang, Yuxuan; Zink, Erika M.; Baker, Scott E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hu, Jian Z.; Wu, Si

    2014-11-19

    Protein glycosylation, an important and complex post-translational modification (PTM), is involved in various biological processes including the receptor-ligand and cell-cell interaction, and plays a crucial role in many biological functions. However, little is known about the glycan structures of important biological complex samples, and the conventional glycan enrichment strategy (i.e., size-exclusion column [SEC] separation,) prior to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection is time-consuming and tedious. In this study, we employed SEC, Zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC), and ZIC-HILIC coupled with dialysis strategies to enrich the glycopeptides from the pronase E digests of RNase B, followed by NMR analysis of the glycoconjugate. Our results suggest that the ZIC-HILIC enrichment coupled with dialysis is the most efficient, which was thus applied to the analysis of biological complex sample, the pronase E digest of the secreted proteins from the fungi Aspergillus niger. The NMR spectra revealed that the secreted proteins from A. niger contain both N-linked glycans with a high-mannose core and O-linked glycans bearing mannose and glucose with 1->3 and 1->6 linkages. In all, our study provides compelling evidence that ZIC-HILIC separation coupled to dialysis is superior to the commonly used SEC separation to prepare glycopeptides for the downstream NMR analysis, which could greatly facilitate the future NMR-based glycoproteomics research.

  18. 13C-detected NMR experiments for measuring chemical shifts and coupling constants in nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Fiala, Radovan; Sklenár, Vladimír

    2007-10-01

    The paper presents a set of two-dimensional experiments that utilize direct (13)C detection to provide proton-carbon, carbon-carbon and carbon-nitrogen correlations in the bases of nucleic acids. The set includes a (13)C-detected proton-carbon correlation experiment for the measurement of (13)C-(13)C couplings, the CaCb experiment for correlating two quaternary carbons, the HCaCb experiment for the (13)C-(13)C correlations in cases where one of the carbons has a proton attached, the HCC-TOCSY experiment for correlating a proton with a network of coupled carbons, and a (13)C-detected (13)C-(15)N correlation experiment for detecting the nitrogen nuclei that cannot be detected via protons. The IPAP procedure is used for extracting the carbon-carbon couplings and/or carbon decoupling in the direct dimension, while the S(3)E procedure is preferred in the indirect dimension of the carbon-nitrogen experiment to obtain the value of the coupling constant. The experiments supply accurate values of (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts and carbon-carbon and carbon-nitrogen coupling constants. These values can help to reveal structural features of nucleic acids either directly or via induced changes when the sample is dissolved in oriented media.

  19. Flexible and rigid structures in HIV-1 p17 matrix protein monitored by relaxation and amide proton exchange with NMR.

    PubMed

    Ohori, Yuka; Okazaki, Honoka; Watanabe, Satoru; Tochio, Naoya; Arai, Munehito; Kigawa, Takanori; Nishimura, Chiaki

    2014-03-01

    The HIV-1 p17 matrix protein is a multifunctional protein that interacts with other molecules including proteins and membranes. The dynamic structure between its folded and partially unfolded states can be critical for the recognition of interacting molecules. One of the most important roles of the p17 matrix protein is its localization to the plasma membrane with the Gag polyprotein. The myristyl group attached to the N-terminus on the p17 matrix protein functions as an anchor for binding to the plasma membrane. Biochemical studies revealed that two regions are important for its function: D14-L31 and V84-V88. Here, the dynamic structures of the p17 matrix protein were studied using NMR for relaxation and amide proton exchange experiments at the physiological pH of 7.0. The results revealed that the α12-loop, which includes the 14-31 region, was relatively flexible, and that helix 4, including the 84-88 region, was the most protected helix in this protein. However, the residues in the α34-loop near helix 4 had a low order parameter and high exchange rate of amide protons, indicating high flexibility. This region is probably flexible because this loop functions as a hinge for optimizing the interactions between helices 3 and 4. The C-terminal long region of K113-Y132 adopted a disordered structure. Furthermore, the C-terminal helix 5 appeared to be slightly destabilized due to the flexible C-terminal tail based on the order parameters. Thus, the dynamic structure of the p17 matrix protein may be related to its multiple functions.

  20. Redox-Coupled Protonation of Respiratory Complex I: The Hydrophilic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Vernon; Popovic, Dragan; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory complex I, NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, is a large and complex integral membrane enzyme found in respiring bacteria and mitochondria. It is responsible in part for generating the proton gradient necessary for ATP production. Complex I serves as both a proton pump and an entry point for electrons into the respiratory chain. Although complex I is one of the most important of the respiratory complexes, it is also one of the least understood, with detailed structural information only recently available. In this study, full-finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann calculations of the protonation state of respiratory complex I in various redox states are presented. Since complex I couples the oxidation and reduction of the NADH/ubiquinone redox couple to proton translocation, the interaction of the protonation and redox states of the enzyme are of the utmost significance. Various aspects of complex I function are presented, including the redox-Bohr effect, intercofactor interactions, and the effects of both the protein dielectric and inclusion of the membrane. PMID:21767496

  1. Proton–proton Overhauser NMR spectroscopy with polypeptide chains in large structures

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Reto; Wider, Gerhard; Fiaux, Jocelyne; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Horwich, Arthur L.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    The use of 1H–1H nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) for structural studies of uniformly deuterated polypeptide chains in large structures is investigated by model calculations and NMR experiments. Detailed analysis of the evolution of the magnetization during 1H–1H NOE experiments under slow-motion conditions shows that the maximal 1H–1H NOE transfer is independent of the overall rotational correlation time, even in the presence of chemical exchange with the bulk water, provided that the mixing time is adjusted for the size of the structure studied. 1H–1H NOE buildup measurements were performed for the 472-kDa complex of the 72-kDa cochaperonin GroES with a 400-kDa single-ring variant of the chaperonin GroEL (SR1). These experiments demonstrate that multidimensional NOESY experiments with cross-correlated relaxation-enhanced polarization transfer and transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy elements can be applied to structures of molecular masses up to several hundred kilodaltabs, which opens new possibilities for studying functional interactions in large maromolecular assemblies in solution. PMID:17032756

  2. Metabolic changes during cellular senescence investigated by proton NMR-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gey, Claudia; Seeger, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    Cellular senescence is of growing interest due to its role in tumour suppression and its contribution to organismic ageing. This cellular state can be reached by replicative loss of telomeres or certain stresses in cell culture and is characterized by the termination of cell division; however, the cells remain metabolically active. To identify metabolites that are characteristic for senescent cells, extracts of human embryonic lung fibroblast (WI-38 cell line) have been investigated with NMR spectroscopy. Three different types of senescence have been characterized: replicative senescence, DNA damage-induced senescence (etoposide treatment) and oncogene-induced senescence (hyperactive RAF kinase). The metabolite pattern allows (I) discrimination of senescent and control cells and (II) discrimination of the three senescence types. Senescent cells show an increased ratio of glycerophosphocholine to phosphocholine independent from the type of senescence. The increase in glycerophosphocholine implicates a key role of phospholipid metabolism in cellular senescence. The observed changes in the choline metabolism are diametrically opposite to the well-known changes in choline metabolism of tumour cells. As tumours responding to chemotherapeutic agents show a "glycerophosphocholine-to-phosphocholine switch" i.e. an increase in glycerophosphocholine, our metabolic data suggests that these malignant cells enter a senescent state emphasizing the role of senescence in tumour suppression.

  3. Image analysis of single event transient effects on charge coupled devices irradiated by protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Xue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jing; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Ma, Wuying

    2016-10-01

    The experiments of single event transient (SET) effects on charge coupled devices (CCDs) irradiated by protons are presented. The radiation experiments have been carried out at the accelerator protons with the energy of 200 MeV and 60 MeV.The incident angles of the protons are at 30°and 90° to the plane of the CCDs to obtain the images induced by the perpendicularity and incline incident angles. The experimental results show that the typical characteristics of the SET effects on a CCD induced by protons are the generation of a large number of dark signal spikes (hot pixels) which are randomly distributed in the "pepper" images. The characteristics of SET effects are investigated by observing the same imaging area at different time during proton radiation to verify the transient effects. The experiment results also show that the number of dark signal spikes increases with increasing integration time during proton radiation. The CCDs were tested at on-line and off-line to distinguish the radiation damage induced by the SET effects or DD effects. The mechanisms of the dark signal spike generation induced by the SET effects and the DD effects are demonstrated respectively.

  4. Redox-Coupled Proton Pumping in Cytochrome c Oxidase: Further insights from Computer Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiancong; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    The membrane-bound enzyme cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal member in the respiratory chain, converts oxygen into water and generates an electrochemical gradient by coupling the electron transfer to proton-pumping across the membrane. Here we have investigated the dynamics of an excess proton and the surrounding protein environment near the active sites. The multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) molecular dynamics method was used to simulate the explicit dynamics of proton transfer through the critically important hydrophobic channel between Glu242 (bovine notation) and the D-propionate of heme a3 (PRDa3) for the first time. The results from these molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the PRDa3 can indeed re-orientate and dissociate from Arg438, despite the high stability of such an ion pair, and has the ability to accept protons via bound water molecules. Any large conformational change of the adjacent heme a D-propionate group is, however, sterically blocked directly by the protein. Free energy calculations of the PRDa3 side chain isomerization and the proton translocation between Glu242 and the PRDa3 site have also been performed. The results exhibit a redox state-dependent dynamical behavior and indicate that reduction of the low-spin heme a may initiate internal transfer of the pumped proton from Glu242 to the PRDa3 site. PMID:18155154

  5. High-resolution (19)F MAS NMR spectroscopy: structural disorder and unusual J couplings in a fluorinated hydroxy-silicate.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Yates, Jonathan R; Berry, Andrew J; Wimperis, Stephen; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2010-11-10

    High-resolution (19)F magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy is used to study disorder and bonding in a crystalline solid. (19)F MAS NMR reveals four distinct F sites in a 50% fluorine-substituted deuterated hydrous magnesium silicate (clinohumite, 4Mg(2)SiO(4)·Mg(OD(1-x)F(x))(2) with x = 0.5), indicating extensive structural disorder. The four (19)F peaks can be assigned using density functional theory (DFT) calculations of NMR parameters for a number of structural models with a range of possible local F environments generated by F(-)/OH(-) substitution. These assignments are supported by two-dimensional (19)F double-quantum MAS NMR experiments that correlate F sites based on either spatial proximity (via dipolar couplings) or through-bond connectivity (via scalar, or J, couplings). The observation of (19)F-(19)F J couplings is unexpected as the fluorines coordinate Mg atoms and the Mg-F interaction is normally considered to be ionic in character (i.e., there is no formal F-Mg-F covalent bonding arrangement). However, DFT calculations predict significant (19)F-(19)F J couplings, and these are in good agreement with the splittings observed in a (19)F J-resolved MAS NMR experiment. The existence of these J couplings is discussed in relation to both the nature of bonding in the solid state and the occurrence of so-called "through-space" (19)F-(19)F J couplings in solution. Finally, we note that we have found similar structural disorder and spin-spin interactions in both synthetic and naturally occurring clinohumite samples.

  6. Proton-coupled oxygen reduction at liquid-liquid interfaces catalyzed by cobalt porphine.

    PubMed

    Hatay, Imren; Su, Bin; Li, Fei; Méndez, Manuel Alejandro; Khoury, Tony; Gros, Claude P; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Ersoz, Mustafa; Samec, Zdenek; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-09-23

    Cobalt porphine (CoP) dissolved in the organic phase of a biphasic system is used to catalyze O(2) reduction by an electron donor, ferrocene (Fc). Using voltammetry at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES), it is possible to drive this catalytic reduction at the interface as a function of the applied potential difference, where aqueous protons and organic electron donors combine to reduce O(2). The current signal observed corresponds to a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction, as no current and no reaction can be observed in the absence of either the aqueous acid, CoP, Fc, or O(2).

  7. Insights into proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms of electrocatalytic H2 oxidation and production

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura E.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The design of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and production is important for the development of alternative renewable energy sources that are abundant, inexpensive, and environmentally benign. Recently, nickel-based molecular electrocatalysts with pendant amines that act as proton relays for the nickel center were shown to effectively catalyze H2 oxidation and production. We developed a quantum mechanical approach for studying proton-coupled electron transfer processes in these types of molecular electrocatalysts. This theoretical approach is applied to a nickel-based catalyst in which phosphorous atoms are directly bonded to the nickel center, and nitrogen atoms of the ligand rings act as proton relays. The catalytic step of interest involves electron transfer between the nickel complex and the electrode as well as intramolecular proton transfer between the nickel and nitrogen atoms. This process can occur sequentially, with either the electron or proton transferring first, or concertedly, with the electron and proton transferring simultaneously without a stable intermediate. The electrochemical rate constants are calculated as functions of overpotential for the concerted electron-proton transfer reaction and the two electron transfer reactions in the sequential mechanisms. Our calculations illustrate that the concerted electron-proton transfer standard rate constant will increase as the equilibrium distance between the nickel and nitrogen atoms decreases and as the pendant amines become more flexible to facilitate the contraction of this distance with a lower energy penalty. This approach identifies the favored mechanisms under various experimental conditions and provides insight into the impact of substituents on the nitrogen and phosphorous atoms. PMID:22529352

  8. Calculation of vibronic couplings for phenoxyl/phenol and benzyl/toluene self-exchange reactions: implications for proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Skone, Jonathan H; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2006-12-27

    The vibronic couplings for the phenoxyl/phenol and the benzyl/toluene self-exchange reactions are calculated with a semiclassical approach, in which all electrons and the transferring hydrogen nucleus are treated quantum mechanically. In this formulation, the vibronic coupling is the Hamiltonian matrix element between the reactant and product mixed electronic-proton vibrational wavefunctions. The magnitude of the vibronic coupling and its dependence on the proton donor-acceptor distance can significantly impact the rates and kinetic isotope effects, as well as the temperature dependences, of proton-coupled electron transfer reactions. Both of these self-exchange reactions are vibronically nonadiabatic with respect to a solvent environment at room temperature, but the proton tunneling is electronically nonadiabatic for the phenoxyl/phenol reaction and electronically adiabatic for the benzyl/toluene reaction. For the phenoxyl/phenol system, the electrons are unable to rearrange fast enough to follow the proton motion on the electronically adiabatic ground state, and the excited electronic state is involved in the reaction. For the benzyl/toluene system, the electrons can respond virtually instantaneously to the proton motion, and the proton moves on the electronically adiabatic ground state. For both systems, the vibronic coupling decreases exponentially with the proton donor-acceptor distance for the range of distances studied. When the transferring hydrogen is replaced with deuterium, the magnitude of the vibronic coupling decreases and the exponential decay with distance becomes faster. Previous studies designated the phenoxyl/phenol reaction as proton-coupled electron transfer and the benzyl/toluene reaction as hydrogen atom transfer. In addition to providing insights into the fundamental physical differences between these two types of reactions, the present analysis provides a new diagnostic for differentiating between the conventionally defined hydrogen atom

  9. Mechanism of binding of the radiosensitizers metronidazole and misonidazole (RO-07-0582) to bovine and human serum albumin: a proton NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkowska, A.; Lubas, B.; Wilczok, T.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution proton NMR spectra of the radiosensitizer metronidazole and its derivative misonidazole (RO-07-0582) were measured in D/sub 2/O at resonance frequency 60 MHz and interpreted in the aliphatic and aromatic regions. The linewidths of the NMR peaks attributed to individual fragments of nitroimidazole molecules were then analyzed in the presence of bovine and human serum albumin. With increasing concentration of serum albumin, a selectively larger broadening of the lines attributable to the protons of the aliphatic moieties than of those of the imidazole rings was observed for both compounds. This broadening for misonidazole strongly depends on the ionic strength of the solution. The results indicate a specific immobilization of the molecules of both radiosensitizers during their interaction with serum albumin and the involvement of the aliphatic chains of misonidazole and metronidazole as the primary binding sites.

  10. Proton NMR Study of Room Temperature Aging in Isotactic Polypropylene and Ethylene/Octene Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhart, David; Snyder, Chad; Alamo, Rufina

    2003-03-01

    The Bloch-decay proton spectra of 2 isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) and 2 ethylene/octene (EO) copolymers have been monitored as a function of room-temperature aging time, t_age, from 10 min to 4 d. Conditions for initiating aging were air-quench from the melt for EO and 6 min annealing near 90 ^oC for iPP. We focused on elucidating the nature of aging, both morphologically and via concepts like secondary crystallization. To this end, some multiple-pulse experiments were also conducted. Aging always reduced the population of the most mobile species. It was linear in log(t_age)and the (minimum) amount of motionally transformed material was only a few percent. In iPP, aging was dominated by secondary crystallization rather than a general densification of the amorphous region. Aging-induced crystallization in EO is less well defined. The iPP samples had significant contrast in defect content, mass dispersion, and amorphous content; however, the contrast in aging amounts was only modest. No definitive morphological placement of the aging structures formed could be deduced; but possibilites consistent with the data will be discussed.

  11. Forms and lability of phosphorus in algae and aquatic macrophytes characterized by solution 31P NMR coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased information on forms and lability of phosphorus (P) in aquatic macrophytes and algae is crucial for better understanding of P biogeochemical cycling in eutrophic lakes. In this work, solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) was used ...

  12. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  13. NMR spin-spin coupling constants in polymethine dyes as polarity indicators.

    PubMed

    Murugan, N Arul; Aidas, Kestutis; Kongsted, Jacob; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ågren, Hans

    2012-09-10

    Herein, we explore the use of spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs) in merocyanine (MCYNE) dyes as indicators of polarity. For this purpose, we use Car-Parrinello hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) to determine the structures of MCYNE in solvents of different polarity, followed by computations of the SSCCs by using QM/MM linear-response theory. The molecular geometry of MCYNE switches between neutral, cyanine-like, and zwitterionic depending on the polarity of the solvent. This structural variation is clearly reflected in the proton SSCCs in the polymethine backbone, which are highly sensitive to the dielectric nature of the environment; this mechanism can be used as a "polarity indicator" for different microenvironments. This result is highlighted by computing the SSCCs of the MCYNE probe in the cavity of the beta-lactoglobulin protein. The computed SSCCs clearly indicate a non-polar hydrophobic dielectric nature of this cavity.

  14. Dipolar Coupling Information in Multispin Systems: Application of a Compensated REDOR NMR Approach to Inorganic Phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jerry C. C.; Eckert, Hellmut

    2000-12-01

    Anexperimental strategy has been developed for measuring multiple dipole-dipole interactions in inorganic compounds using the technique of rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) NMR. Geometry-independent information about the dipole couplings between the observe nuclear species S (arbitrary quantum number) and the heteronuclear species I (spin-{1}/{2}) can be conveniently obtained from the experimental curve of ΔS/S0 versus dipolar evolution time by limiting the analysis to the initial data range 0 < ΔS/S0 < 0.30. Numerical simulations have been carried out on a three-spin system of type SI2 in order to assess the effect of the I-I homonuclear dipole-dipole coupling and the influence of experimental imperfections such as finite pulse length and misadjustments of the 180° pulses applied to the I-spin species. The simulations show further that within the initial data range the effects of such misadjustments can be internally compensated by a modified sequence having an additional 180° pulse on the I channel in the middle of the dipolar evolution periods. Experimental 27Al{31P} REDOR results on the multispin systems Al(PO3)3, AlPO4, [AlPO4]12(C3H7)4NF, and Na3PO4 confirm the general utility of this approach. Thus, for applications to unknown systems the compensation strategy obviates calibration procedures with model compounds.

  15. Sensitivity enhancement of remotely coupled NMR detectors using wirelessly powered parametric amplification.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chunqi; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; Dodd, Stephen; Koretsky, Alan

    2012-09-01

    A completely wireless detection coil with an integrated parametric amplifier has been constructed to provide local amplification and transmission of MR signals. The sample coil is one element of a parametric amplifier using a zero-bias diode that mixes the weak MR signal with a strong pump signal that is obtained from an inductively coupled external loop. The NMR sample coil develops current gain via reduction in the effective coil resistance. Higher gain can be obtained by adjusting the level of the pumping power closer to the oscillation threshold, but the gain is ultimately constrained by the bandwidth requirement of MRI experiments. A feasibility study here shows that on a NaCl/D(2) O phantom, (23) Na signals with 20 dB of gain can be readily obtained with a concomitant bandwidth of 144 kHz. This gain is high enough that the integrated coil with parametric amplifier, which is coupled inductively to external loops, can provide sensitivity approaching that of direct wire connection.

  16. Sensitivity Enhancement of Remotely Coupled NMR Detectors using Wirelessly Powered Parametric Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chunqi; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; Dodd, Stephen; Koretsky, Alan

    2011-01-01

    A completely wireless detection coil with an integrated parametric amplifier has been constructed to provide local amplification and transmission of MR signals. The sample coil is one element of a parametric amplifier using a zero-bias diode that mixes the weak MR signal with a strong pump signal that is obtained from an inductively coupled external loop. The NMR sample coil develops current gain via reduction in the effective coil resistance. Higher gain can be obtained by adjusting the level of the pumping power closer to the oscillation threshold, but the gain is ultimately constrained by the bandwidth requirement of MRI experiments. A feasibility study here shows that on a NaCl/D2O phantom, 23Na signals with 20 dB of gain can be readily obtained with a concomitant bandwidth of 144 kHz. This gain is high enough that the integrated coil with parametric amplifier, which is coupled inductively to external loops, can provide sensitivity approaching that of direct wire connection. PMID:22246567

  17. Using HMBC and ADEQUATE NMR data to define and differentiate long-range coupling pathways: is the Crews rule obsolete?

    PubMed

    Senior, Mary M; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E

    2013-11-22

    It is well known that as molecules become progressively more proton-deficient, structure elucidation becomes correspondingly more challenging. When the ratio of (1)H to (13)C and the sum of other heavy atoms falls below 2, an axiom that has been dubbed the "Crews rule" comes into play. The general premise of the Crews rule is that highly proton-deficient molecules may have structures that are difficult, and in some cases impossible, to elucidate using conventional suites of NMR experiments that include proton and carbon reference spectra, COSY, multiplicity-edited HSQC, and HMBC (both (1)H-(13)C and (1)H-(15)N). However, with access to modern cryogenic probes and microcyroprobes, experiments that have been less commonly utilized in the past and new experiments such as inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE are feasible with modest sized samples. In this light, it may well be time to consider revising the Crews rule. The complex, highly proton-deficient alkaloid staurosporine (1) is used as a model proton-deficient compound for this investigation to highlight the combination of inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE with 1.7 mm cryoprobe technology.

  18. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine.

  19. 1H-19F spin-lattice relaxation spectroscopy: proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bond studied by field-cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Noble, D L; Aibout, A; Horsewill, A J

    2009-12-01

    Proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bonds of two fluorine substituted benzoic acid dimers has been investigated using field-cycling NMR relaxometry. The close proximity of the (19)F nuclei to the hydrogen bond protons introduces heteronuclear (19)F-(1)H dipolar interactions into the spin-lattice relaxation processes. This renders the (1)H magnetisation-recovery biexponential and introduces multiple spectral density components into the relaxation matrix characterised by frequencies that are sums and differences of the (19)F and (1)H Larmor frequencies. Using field-cycling NMR pulse sequences that measure the spin-lattice relaxation and cross-relaxation rates we demonstrate how some of these multiple spectral density components can be separately resolved. This leads to an accurate determination of the correlation times that characterise the proton tunnelling motion. A broad spectrum of relaxation behaviour is illustrated and explored in the chosen samples and the investigation is used to explore the theory and practise of field-cycling NMR relaxometry in cases where heteronuclear interactions are significant.

  20. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pH regulation has a fundamental role in several intracellular processes and its variation via exogenous compounds is a potential tool for intervening in the intracellular processes. Proton caged compounds (PPCs) release protons upon UV irradiation and may efficiently provoke intracellular on-command acidification. Here, we explore the intracellular pH variation, when purposely synthesized PCCs are coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dosed to HEK-293 cells. We detected the acidification process caused by the UV irradiation by monitoring the intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode of the CO(2) molecule at 2343 cm(-1). The comparison between free and AuNPs functionalized proton caged compound demonstrates a highly enhanced CO(2) yield, hence pH variation, in the latter case. Finally, PCC functionalized AuNPs were marked with a purposely synthesized fluorescent marker and dosed to HEK-293 cells. The corresponding fluorescence optical images show green grains throughout the whole cytoplasm.

  1. Surface Proton Hopping and Coupling Pathway of Water Oxidation on Cobalt Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hieu; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Frei, Heinz; Wang, Lin-Wang

    We propose an oxidation pathway of water splitting on cobalt oxide surface with clear thermodynamic and kinetic details. The density-functional theory studies suggest that the coupled proton-electron transfer is not necessarily sequential and implicit in every elementary step of this mechanistic cycle. Instead, the initial O-O bond could be formed by the landing of water molecule on the surface oxos, which is then followed by the dispatch of protons through the hopping manner and subsequent release of di-oxygen. Our theoretical investigations of intermediates and transition states indicate that all chemical conversions in this pathway, including the proton transfers, are possible with low activation barriers, in addition to their favorable thermodynamics. Our hypothesis is supported by recent experimental observations of surface superoxide that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding to adjacent hydroxyl group, as an intermediate on fast-kinetics catalytic site.

  2. DFT investigation of the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the NMR shifts in paramagnetic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigliapochi, Roberta; Pell, Andrew J.; Seymour, Ieuan D.; Grey, Clare P.; Ceresoli, Davide; Kaupp, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the structural and electronic properties of paramagnetic solids. However, the interpretation of paramagnetic NMR spectra is often challenging as a result of the interactions of unpaired electrons with the nuclear spins of interest. In this work, we extend the formalism of the paramagnetic NMR shielding in the presence of spin-orbit coupling towards solid systems with multiple paramagnetic centers. We demonstrate how the single-ion electron paramagnetic resonance g tensor is defined and calculated in periodic paramagnetic solids. We then calculate the hyperfine tensor and the g tensor with density functional theory to show the validity of the presented model and we further demonstrate how these interactions can be combined to give the overall paramagnetic shielding tensor, σs. The method is applied to a series of olivine-type LiTMPO4 materials (with TM=Mn , Fe, Co, and Ni) and the corresponding 7Li and 31P NMR spectra are simulated. We analyze the effects of spin-orbit coupling and of the electron-nuclear magnetic interactions on the calculated NMR parameters. A detailed comparison is presented between contact and dipolar interactions across the LiTMPO4 series, in which the magnitudes and signs of the nonrelativistic and relativistic components of the overall isotropic shift and shift anisotropy are computed and rationalized.

  3. HIFI-C: a robust and fast method for determining NMR couplings from adaptive 3D to 2D projections.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Eghbalnia, Hamid R

    2007-08-01

    We describe a novel method for the robust, rapid, and reliable determination of J couplings in multi-dimensional NMR coupling data, including small couplings from larger proteins. The method, "High-resolution Iterative Frequency Identification of Couplings" (HIFI-C) is an extension of the adaptive and intelligent data collection approach introduced earlier in HIFI-NMR. HIFI-C collects one or more optimally tilted two-dimensional (2D) planes of a 3D experiment, identifies peaks, and determines couplings with high resolution and precision. The HIFI-C approach, demonstrated here for the 3D quantitative J method, offers vital features that advance the goal of rapid and robust collection of NMR coupling data. (1) Tilted plane residual dipolar couplings (RDC) data are collected adaptively in order to offer an intelligent trade off between data collection time and accuracy. (2) Data from independent planes can provide a statistical measure of reliability for each measured coupling. (3) Fast data collection enables measurements in cases where sample stability is a limiting factor (for example in the presence of an orienting medium required for residual dipolar coupling measurements). (4) For samples that are stable, or in experiments involving relatively stronger couplings, robust data collection enables more reliable determinations of couplings in shorter time, particularly for larger biomolecules. As a proof of principle, we have applied the HIFI-C approach to the 3D quantitative J experiment to determine N-C' RDC values for three proteins ranging from 56 to 159 residues (including a homodimer with 111 residues in each subunit). A number of factors influence the robustness and speed of data collection. These factors include the size of the protein, the experimental set up, and the coupling being measured, among others. To exhibit a lower bound on robustness and the potential for time saving, the measurement of dipolar couplings for the N-C' vector represents a realistic

  4. Strong-coupling s-wave Superconductor MgB2 : ^11B NMR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Ishida, Kenji; Kitaoka, Yoshio; Muranaka, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Norimasa; Takagiwa, Hiroyuki; Akimitsu, Jun

    2002-03-01

    We report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results on the recently discovered superconductor MgB_2. This binary compound exhibits a remarkably high superconducting (SC) transition temperature, Tc of ~40K, and thus attracts a great deal of attention. Numerous theoretical and experimental approaches have been performed in order to investigate SC characteristics in this compound. We have investigated a SC gap structure of MgB2 through the measurement of ^11B nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time, T_1. ^11(1/T_1T) is independent of the temperature (T) in the normal state, and decreases exponentially in the SC state, accompanied with a tiny coherence peak just below T_c. The T dependence of 1/T_1T in the SC state can be accounted for by an s-wave SC model with a large gap size of 2Δ /k_BTc ~ 5 which suggests to be in a strong-coupling regime. We carried out the measurement in Al-doped Mg_1-xAl_xB_2. 1/T1 in the SC state revealed that the size in SC gap is not changed by substituting Al for Mg. The reduction in Tc is shown to be due to the decrease of N(E_F). According to the McMillan equation, the experimental relation between Tc and the relative change in N(E_F) allowed us to estimate a characteristic phonon frequency ω ~ 700K and an electron-phonon coupling constant λ ~ 0.87. These results suggest that the high-Tc superconductivity in MgB2 is mediated by the strong electron-phonon coupling with high-frequency phonons.

  5. Some perspectives on the interpretation of proton NMR spin diffusion data in terms of polymer morphologies.

    PubMed

    VanderHart, D L; McFadden, G B

    1996-08-01

    Proton spin diffusion data yield morphological information over dimensions covering approximately the 2-50 nm range. In this article, the interpretation of such data for polymers is emphasized, recognizing that the mathematical framework for much of this interpretation already exists in the literature. Practical issues are considered, for example, a useful scaling of plotted data is suggested, key attributes of the data are identified and ambiguities in the mapping of data into morphological models are spelled out. Discussion is limited to two-phase systems, where it is assumed that, by employing multiple-pulse methods polarization gradients can be generated, whose spunal sharpness is limited solety by the morphological definition of the interfaces. Interpretation of data in terms of morphology and stoichiometry is emphasized, where stoichiometric issues pertain only to chemically heterogeneous systems. Extraction of stoichiometric information from spin diffusion data is not commonly attempted; the discussion included herein allows for the possibility that the composition of phases may be chemically mixed. Methods for generating gradients are discussed only briefly. A standardized spin diffusion plot is proposed and the initial slope of this plot is tocussed on for providing information about morphology and stoichiometry. Ambiguities of interpretation considered include the dimensionality of the deduced morphology and, for systems with chemical heterogeneity the uniqueness of the compositional characterization of each phase. In addition, funite difference methods are used to simulate entire spin diffusion curves for idealized lamellar and hexagonal rod/matrix morphologies. Comparisons of these curves show that distinguishing 1-D and 2-D morphologies on the basis of experimental data is unlikely to be successful over the range of stoichiometrics where such morphologies are expected. Several examples of spin diffusion data are presented. Brief treatments of the

  6. Mixed Quantum-Classical Liouville Approach for Calculating Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-07-12

    In this work, we derive a general mixed quantum-classical formula for calculating thermal proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) rate constants, starting from the time integral of the quantum flux-flux correlation function. This formula allows for the direct simulation of PCET reaction dynamics via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach. Owing to the general nature of the derivation, this formula does not rely on any prior mechanistic assumptions and can be applied across a wide range of electronic and protonic coupling regimes. To test the validity of this formula, we applied it to a reduced model of a condensed-phase PCET reaction. Good agreement with the numerically exact rate constant is obtained, demonstrating the accuracy of our formalism. We believe that this approach constitutes a solid foundation for future investigations of the rates and mechanisms of a wide range of PCET reactions.

  7. NMR study of the exchange coupling in the trinuclear cluster of the multicopper oxidase Fet3p

    PubMed Central

    Zaballa, María-Eugenia; Ziegler, Lynn; Kosman, Daniel J.; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2010-01-01

    Fet3p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a multicopper oxidase (MCO) which oxidizes Fe2+ to Fe3+. The electronic structure of the different copper centers in this family of enzymes has been extensively studied and discussed for years with a particular focus on the exchange coupling regime in the trinuclear cluster (TNC). Using NMR spectroscopy we have quantified the exchange coupling constant in the type 3 center in a fully metallated oxidase; this value in Fet3p is significantly higher than that reported for proteins containing isolated type 3 centers as in tyrosinase. We also provide evidence of exchange coupling between the type 2 and the type 3 Cu2+ ions, which supports the crystallographic evidence of dioxygen binding to the TNC. This work provides the foundation for the application of NMR to these complex systems. PMID:20698686

  8. Exploring Autoionization and Photoinduced Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Pathways of Phenol in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Thomas A A; Zhang, Yuyuan; Roy, Anirban; Ashfold, Michael N R; Bradforth, Stephen E

    2015-10-15

    The excited state dynamics of phenol in water have been investigated using transient absorption spectroscopy. Solvated electrons and vibrationally cold phenoxyl radicals are observed upon 200 and 267 nm excitation, but with formation time scales that differ by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The impact of these findings is assessed in terms of the relative importance of autoionization versus proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in this computationally tractable model system.

  9. NMR-based approach to the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals: radiochemical purity, specific activity, and radioactive concentration values by proton and tritium NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schenk, David J; Dormer, Peter G; Hesk, David; Pollack, Scott R; Lavey, Carolee Flader

    2015-06-15

    Compounds containing tritium are widely used across the drug discovery and development landscape. These materials are widely utilized because they can be efficiently synthesized and produced at high specific activity. Results from internally calibrated (3)H and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggests that at least in some cases, this calibrated approach could supplement or potentially replace radio-high-performance liquid chromatography for radiochemical purity, dilution and scintillation counting for the measurement of radioactivity per volume, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis for the determination of specific activity. In summary, the NMR-derived values agreed with those from the standard approaches to within 1% to 9% for solution count and specific activity. Additionally, the NMR-derived values for radiochemical purity deviated by less than 5%. A benefit of this method is that these values may be calculated at the same time that (3)H NMR analysis provides the location and distribution of tritium atoms within the molecule. Presented and discussed here is the application of this method, advantages and disadvantages of the approach, and a rationale for utilizing internally calibrated (1)H and (3)H NMR spectroscopy for specific activity, radioactive concentration, and radiochemical purity whenever acquiring (3)H NMR for tritium location.

  10. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Progress report, 1 December 1988--31 May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.

    1991-06-10

    The objective of our research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period, including selenium-containing macrocycles, new crown-4 structures, and several new crown structures containing nitrogen based heterocycles as substituents in the principal macrocyclic ring. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction, and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. It was found that the dual hollow fiber system maintains the cation selectivity and permeability of supported liquid membranes, while enhancing membrane stability. The diffusion limited transport model was expanded to account for membrane solvent effects. Furthermore, Eu{sup 2+} transport was found to be similar to that of strontium and much higher than that of the lanthanides, in supported liquid membrane systems.

  11. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  12. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    17O NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations was employed to understand the local structure and dynamics of the phosphate ions and protons in the paraelectric phase of the proton conductor CsH2PO4. For the room-temperature structure, the results confirm that one proton (H1) is localized in an asymmetric H-bond (between O1 donor and O2 acceptor oxygen atoms), whereas the H2 proton undergoes rapid exchange between two sites in a hydrogen bond with a symmetric double potential well at a rate ≥107 Hz. Variable-temperature 17O NMR spectra recorded from 22 to 214 °C were interpreted by considering different models for the rotation of the phosphate anions. At least two distinct rate constants for rotations about four pseudo C3 axes of the phosphate ion were required in order to achieve good agreement with the experimental data. An activation energy of 0.21 ± 0.06 eV was observed for rotation about the P–O1 axis, with a higher activation energy of 0.50 ± 0.07 eV being obtained for rotation about the P–O2, P–O3d, and P–O3a axes, with the superscripts denoting, respectively, dynamic donor and acceptor oxygen atoms of the H-bond. The higher activation energy of the second process is most likely associated with the cost of breaking an O1–H1 bond. The activation energy of this process is slightly lower than that obtained from the 1H exchange process (0.70 ± 0.07 eV) (Kim, G.; Blanc, F.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Grey, C. P. J. Phys. Chem. C2013, 117, 6504−6515) associated with the translational motion of the protons. The relationship between proton jumps and phosphate rotation was analyzed in detail by considering uncorrelated motion, motion of individual PO4 ions and the four connected/H-bonded protons, and concerted motions of adjacent phosphate units, mediated by proton hops. We conclude that, while phosphate rotations aid proton motion, not all phosphate rotations result in proton jumps. PMID:25732257

  13. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Demonstration of a functional relationship between aspartate 93 and Mg2+ by site-directed mutagenesis and proton, phosphorus-31, and magnesium-25 NMR.

    PubMed

    Yan, H G; Tsai, M D

    1991-06-04

    Earlier magnetic resonance studies suggested no direct interaction between Mg2+ ions and adenylate kinase (AK) in the AK.MgATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) complex. However, recent NMR studies concluded that the carboxylate of aspartate 119 accepts a hydrogen bond from a water ligand of the bound Mg2+ ion in the muscle AK.MgATP complex [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. On the other hand, in the 2.6-A crystal structure of the yeast AK.MgAP5A [P1,P5-bis(5'-adenosyl)pentaphosphate] complex, the Mg2+ ion is in proximity to aspartate 93 [Egner, U., Tomasselli, A.G., & Schulz, G.E. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 195, 649-658]. Substitution of Asp-93 with alanine resulted in no change in dissociation constants, 4-fold increases in Km, and a 650-fold decrease in kcat. Notable changes have been observed in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of histidine 36 and a few other aromatic residues. However, the results of detailed analyses of the free enzymes and the AK.MgAP5A complexes by one- and two-dimensional NMR suggested that the changes are due to localized perturbations. Thus it is concluded that Asp-93 stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3.9 kcal/mol. The next question is how. Since proton NMR results indicated that binding of Mg2+ to the AK.AP5A complex induces some changes in the proton NMR signals of WT but not those of D93A, the functional role of Asp-93 should be in binding to Mg2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Theoretical study of homonuclear J coupling between quadrupolar spins: single-crystal, DOR, and J-resolved NMR.

    PubMed

    Perras, Frédéric A; Bryce, David L

    2014-05-01

    The theory describing homonuclear indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling (J) interactions between pairs of quadrupolar nuclei is outlined and supported by numerical calculations. The expected first-order multiplets for pairs of magnetically equivalent (A2), chemically equivalent (AA'), and non-equivalent (AX) quadrupolar nuclei are given. The various spectral changeovers from one first-order multiplet to another are investigated with numerical simulations using the SIMPSON program and the various thresholds defining each situation are given. The effects of chemical equivalence, as well as quadrupolar coupling, chemical shift differences, and dipolar coupling on double-rotation (DOR) and J-resolved NMR experiments for measuring homonuclear J coupling constants are investigated. The simulated J coupling multiplets under DOR conditions largely resemble the ideal multiplets predicted for single crystals, and a characteristic multiplet is expected for each of the A2, AA', and AX cases. The simulations demonstrate that it should be straightforward to distinguish between magnetic inequivalence and equivalence using J-resolved NMR, as was speculated previously. Additionally, it is shown that the second-order quadrupolar-dipolar cross-term does not affect the splittings in J-resolved experiments. Overall, the homonuclear J-resolved experiment for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei is demonstrated to be robust with respect to the effects of first- and second-order quadrupolar coupling, dipolar coupling, and chemical shift differences.

  15. Dual microcoil NMR probe coupled to cyclic ce for continuous separation and analyte isolation.

    PubMed

    Jayawickrama, Dimuthu A; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2004-08-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE)-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy combines the separation efficiency of CE and the information-rich detection capabilities of NMR. However, the temporally narrow CE peaks reduce NMR sensitivity and prevent on-line multidimensional NMR acquisitions. In this work, cyclic CE with multicoil NMR instrumentation is developed to perform CE in multiple closed loops. As a proof of concept, a two-loop five-junction capillary configuration creates two connected yet independently operable fluidic loops. With appropriate voltage switching, analytes can be directed as desired around or between the loops, and a particular analyte band can be parked in one NMR detector coil while CE continues in the second loop and monitored with a second NMR detector coil. The separation of a mixture of amino acids (Ala, Val, Thr) is achieved in two cycles. After one CE cycle, Ala is separated and COSY data are recorded in one loop while Val and Thr are separated in the second loop. At the end of the second cycle, both Val and Thr are separated and multidimensional NMR spectra acquired. With this instrumentation and appropriate protocols, two-dimensional NMR data acquisition and CE separation are achieved simultaneously.

  16. Site-specific protonation kinetics of acidic side chains in proteins determined by pH-dependent carboxyl (13)C NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Johan; Weininger, Ulrich; Khan, M Ashhar I; Linse, Sara; Akke, Mikael

    2015-03-04

    Proton-transfer dynamics plays a critical role in many biochemical processes, such as proton pumping across membranes and enzyme catalysis. The large majority of enzymes utilize acid-base catalysis and proton-transfer mechanisms, where the rates of proton transfer can be rate limiting for the overall reaction. However, measurement of proton-exchange kinetics for individual side-chain carboxyl groups in proteins has been achieved in only a handful of cases, which typically have involved comparative analysis of mutant proteins in the context of reaction network modeling. Here we describe an approach to determine site-specific protonation and deprotonation rate constants (kon and koff, respectively) of carboxyl side chains, based on (13)C NMR relaxation measurements as a function of pH. We validated the method using an extensively studied model system, the B1 domain of protein G, for which we measured rate constants koff in the range (0.1-3) × 10(6) s(-1) and kon in the range (0.6-300) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which correspond to acid-base equilibrium dissociation constants (Ka) in excellent agreement with previous results determined by chemical shift titrations. Our results further reveal a linear free-energy relationship between log kon and pKa, which provides information on the free-energy landscape of the protonation reaction, showing that the variability among residues in these parameters arises primarily from the extent of charge stabilization of the deprotonated state by the protein environment. We find that side-chain carboxyls with extreme values of koff or kon are involved in hydrogen bonding, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilization of the protonated or deprotonated state.

  17. Combined NMR analysis of huge residual dipolar couplings and pseudocontact shifts in terbium(III)-phthalocyaninato single molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Damjanovic, Marko; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Enders, Markus

    2013-09-25

    Several small paramagnetic complexes combine large hyperfine NMR shifts with large magnetic anisotropies. The latter are a prerequisite for single molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. We choose the SMM tris(octabutoxyphthalocyaninato) diterbium (1) for a high resolution NMR study where we combined for the first time a comprehensive (1)H and (13)C chemical shift analysis of a SMM with the evaluation of large residual dipolar couplings (RDCs). The latter are a consequence of partial alignment of SMM 1 in the strong magnetic field of the NMR spectrometer. To the best of our knowledge RDCs in SMMs have never been reported before. We measured RDCs between -78 and +99 Hz for the (13)C-(1)H vectors of CH bonds and up to -109 Hz for (1)H-(1)H vectors of geminal hydrogen atoms (magnetic field of 14.09 T, temperature 295 K). Considerable negative Fermi contact shifts (up to -60 ppm) were determined for (13)C atoms at the phthalocyaninato core. Paramagnetic (13)C NMR shifts of the butoxy chains as well as all (1)H NMR chemical shifts are a result of pseudocontact shifts (pcs), and therefore it is easily possible to determine the positions of the respective nuclei in solution. Measurements of CH and HH vectors by RDC analysis are in accordance with the geometry as determined by the pseudocontact shifts, but in addition to that, RDCs give information about internal mobility. The axial component of the magnetic susceptibility tensor has been determined independently by pcs and by RDC.

  18. Magnetic resonance microimaging and numerical simulations of velocity fields inside enlarged flow cells used for coupled NMR microseparations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Webb, Andrew G

    2005-03-01

    The coupling of various chemical microseparation methods with small-scale NMR detection is a growing area in analytical chemistry. The formation of enlarged flow cells within the active volume of the NMR detector can significantly increase the coil filling factor and hence the signal-to-noise ratio of the NMR spectra. However, flow cells can also lead to deterioration of the separation efficiency due to the development of complex flow patterns, the form of which depend on the particular geometry of the flow cell and the flow rate used. In this study, we investigated the flow characteristics in different flow cell geometries relevant to the coupling of capillary liquid chromatography and NMR. Computational fluid dynamics was used to simulate fluid flow inside flow cells with a volume of approximately 1 microL. Magnetic resonance microimaging was used to measure experimentally the velocity fields inside these flow cells. The results showed good agreement between experiment and simulation and demonstrated that a relatively gradual expansion and contraction is necessary to avoid areas of weak recirculation and strong radial velocities, both of which can potentially compromise separation efficiency.

  19. Proton-coupled electron transfer: the mechanistic underpinning for radical transport and catalysis in biology.

    PubMed

    Reece, Steven Y; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G

    2006-08-29

    Charge transport and catalysis in enzymes often rely on amino acid radicals as intermediates. The generation and transport of these radicals are synonymous with proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which intrinsically is a quantum mechanical effect as both the electron and proton tunnel. The caveat to PCET is that proton transfer (PT) is fundamentally limited to short distances relative to electron transfer (ET). This predicament is resolved in biology by the evolution of enzymes to control PT and ET coordinates on highly different length scales. In doing so, the enzyme imparts exquisite thermodynamic and kinetic controls over radical transport and radical-based catalysis at cofactor active sites. This discussion will present model systems containing orthogonal ET and PT pathways, thereby allowing the proton and electron tunnelling events to be disentangled. Against this mechanistic backdrop, PCET catalysis of oxygen-oxygen bond activation by mono-oxygenases is captured at biomimetic porphyrin redox platforms. The discussion concludes with the case study of radical-based quantum catalysis in a natural biological enzyme, class I Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase. Studies are presented that show the enzyme utilizes both collinear and orthogonal PCET to transport charge from an assembled diiron-tyrosyl radical cofactor to the active site over 35A away via an amino acid radical-hopping pathway spanning two protein subunits.

  20. Polar solvent fluctuations drive proton transfer in hydrogen bonded complexes of carboxylic acid with pyridines: NMR, IR and ab initio MD study.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, B; Pylaeva, S A; Allolio, C; Sebastiani, D; Nibbering, E T J; Denisov, G S; Limbach, H-H; Tolstoy, P M

    2017-01-04

    We study a series of intermolecular hydrogen-bonded 1 : 1 complexes formed by chloroacetic acid with 19 substituted pyridines and one aliphatic amine dissolved in CD2Cl2 at low temperature by (1)H and (13)C NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The hydrogen bond geometries in these complexes vary from molecular (O-HN) to zwitterionic (O(-)H-N(+)) ones, while NMR spectra show the formation of short strong hydrogen bonds in intermediate cases. Analysis of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching and asymmetric CO2(-) stretching bands in FTIR spectra reveal the presence of proton tautomerism. On the basis of these data, we construct the overall proton transfer pathway. In addition to that, we also study by use of ab initio molecular dynamics the complex formed by chloroacetic acid with 2-methylpyridine, surrounded by 71 CD2Cl2 molecules, revealing a dual-maximum distribution of hydrogen bond geometries in solution. The analysis of the calculated trajectory shows that the proton jumps between molecular and zwitterionic forms are indeed driven by dipole-dipole solvent-solute interactions, but the primary cause of the jumps is the formation/breaking of weak CHO bonds from solvent molecules to oxygen atoms of the carboxylate group.

  1. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Biology: Results from Synergistic Studies in Natural and Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Steven Y.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) underpins energy conversion in biology. PCET may occur with the unidirectional or bidirectional transfer of a proton and electron and may proceed synchronously or asynchronously. To illustrate the role of PCET in biology, this review presents complementary biological and model systems that explore PCET in electron transfer (ET) through hydrogen bonds [azurin as compared to donor-acceptor (D–A) hydrogen-bonded networks], the activation of C–H bonds [alcohol dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase (SLO) as compared to Fe(III) metal complexes], and the generation and transport of amino acid radicals [photosystem II (PSII) and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR)as compared to tyrosine-modified photoactive Re(I) and Ru(II) complexes]. In providing these comparisons, the fundamental principles of PCET in biology are illustrated in a tangible way. PMID:19344235

  2. Absence of Rapid Proton Decay and Origin of Low-Energy Particlesand Yukawa Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Watari, Taizan

    2006-01-01

    In string theory, massless particles often originate from a symmetry breaking of a large gauge symmetry G to its subgroup H. The absence of dimension-4 proton decay in supersymmetric theories suggests that ({bar D},L) are different from {bar H}({bar 5}) in their origins. In this article, we consider a possibility that they come from different irreducible components in g/h. Requiring that all the Yukawa coupling constants of quarks and leptons be generated from the super Yang-Mills interactions of G, we found in the context of Georgi-Glashow H = SU(5) unification that the minimal choice of G is E{sub 7} and E{sub 8} is the only alternative. This idea is systematically implemented in Heterotic String, M theory and F theory, confirming the absence of dimension 4 proton decay operators. Not only H = SU(5) but also G constrain operators of effective field theories, providing non-trivial information.

  3. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Organic Synthesis: Fundamentals, Applications, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Miller, David C; Tarantino, Kyle T; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) are unconventional redox processes in which both protons and electrons are exchanged, often in a concerted elementary step. While PCET is now recognized to play a central a role in biological redox catalysis and inorganic energy conversion technologies, its applications in organic synthesis are only beginning to be explored. In this chapter, we aim to highlight the origins, development, and evolution of the PCET processes most relevant to applications in organic synthesis. Particular emphasis is given to the ability of PCET to serve as a non-classical mechanism for homolytic bond activation that is complimentary to more traditional hydrogen atom transfer processes, enabling the direct generation of valuable organic radical intermediates directly from their native functional group precursors under comparatively mild catalytic conditions. The synthetically advantageous features of PCET reactivity are described in detail, along with examples from the literature describing the PCET activation of common organic functional groups.

  4. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer across multiple regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F. III

    2013-04-07

    The coupled transfer of electrons and protons is a central feature of biological and molecular catalysis, yet fundamental aspects of these reactions remain poorly understood. In this study, we extend the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method to enable direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions across a wide range of physically relevant regimes. In a system-bath model for symmetric, co-linear PCET in the condensed phase, RPMD trajectories reveal distinct kinetic pathways associated with sequential and concerted PCET reaction mechanisms, and it is demonstrated that concerted PCET proceeds by a solvent-gating mechanism in which the reorganization energy is mitigated by charge cancellation among the transferring particles. We further employ RPMD to study the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across multiple coupling regimes, including the fully non-adiabatic (both electronically and vibrationally non-adiabatic), partially adiabatic (electronically adiabatic, but vibrationally non-adiabatic), and fully adiabatic (both electronically and vibrationally adiabatic) limits. Comparison of RPMD with the results of PCET rate theories demonstrates the applicability of the direct simulation method over a broad range of conditions; it is particularly notable that RPMD accurately predicts the crossover in the thermal reaction rates between different coupling regimes while avoiding a priori assumptions about the PCET reaction mechanism. Finally, by utilizing the connections between RPMD rate theory and semiclassical instanton theory, we show that analysis of ring-polymer configurations in the RPMD transition path ensemble enables the a posteriori determination of the coupling regime for the PCET reaction. This analysis reveals an intriguing and distinct 'transient-proton-bridge' mechanism for concerted PCET that emerges in the transition between the proton-mediated electron superexchange mechanism for fully non

  5. Calculated coupling of electron and proton transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, C R; Michel, H; Honig, B; Gunner, M R

    1996-01-01

    Based on new Rhodopseudomonas (Rp.) viridis reaction center (RC) coordinates with a reliable structure of the secondary acceptor quinone (QB) site, a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique have been used to identify clusters of electrostatically interacting ionizable residues. Twenty-three residues within a distance of 25 A from QB (QB cluster) have been shown to be strongly electrostatically coupled to QB, either directly or indirectly. An analogous cluster of 24 residues is found to interact with QA (QA cluster). Both clusters extend to the cytoplasmic surface in at least two directions. However, the QB cluster differs from the QA cluster in that it has a surplus of acidic residues, more strong electrostatic interactions, is less solvated, and experiences a strong positive electrostatic field arising from the polypeptide backbone. Consequently, upon reduction of QA or QB, it is the QB cluster, and not the QA cluster, which is responsible for substoichiometric proton uptake at neutral pH. The bulk of the changes in the QB cluster are calculated to be due to the protonation of a tightly coupled cluster of the three Glu residues (L212, H177, and M234) within the QB cluster. If the lifetime of the doubly reduced state QB2- is long enough, Asp M43 and Ser L223 are predicted to also become protonated. The calculated complex titration behavior of the strongly interacting residues of the QB cluster and the resulting electrostatic response to electron transfer may be a common feature in proton-transferring membrane protein complexes. Images FIGURE 2 p2482-a FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8744288

  6. Compositional differences among Chinese soy sauce types studied by (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Wang, Xiaohua; Bin Yuan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-09-01

    Soy sauce a well known seasoning all over the world, especially in Asia, is available in global market in a wide range of types based on its purpose and the processing methods. Its composition varies with respect to the fermentation processes and addition of additives, preservatives and flavor enhancers. A comprehensive (1)H NMR based study regarding the metabonomic variations of soy sauce to differentiate among different types of soy sauce available on the global market has been limited due to the complexity of the mixture. In present study, (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis like principle component analysis (PCA), and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was applied to investigate metabonomic variations among different types of soy sauce, namely super light, super dark, red cooking and mushroom soy sauce. The main additives in soy sauce like glutamate, sucrose and glucose were easily distinguished and quantified using (13)C NMR spectroscopy which were otherwise difficult to be assigned and quantified due to serious signal overlaps in (1)H NMR spectra. The significantly higher concentration of sucrose in dark, red cooking and mushroom flavored soy sauce can directly be linked to the addition of caramel in soy sauce. Similarly, significantly higher level of glutamate in super light as compared to super dark and mushroom flavored soy sauce may come from the addition of monosodium glutamate. The study highlights the potentiality of (13)C NMR based metabonomics coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis in differentiating between the types of soy sauce on the basis of level of additives, raw materials and fermentation procedures.

  7. Minimal nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) model: Gauge coupling unification, proton decay, and fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; Khan, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present a minimal renormalizable nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) grand unified model with a symmetry breaking sector consisting of Higgs fields in the 5 4H+12 6H+1 0H representations. This model admits a single intermediate scale associated with Pati-Salam symmetry along with a discrete parity. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the unification of gauge couplings, and proton lifetime estimates are studied in detail in this framework. Including threshold corrections self-consistently obtained from a full analysis of the Higgs potential, we show that the model is compatible with the current experimental bound on proton lifetime. The model generally predicts an upper bound of few times 1035 yr for proton lifetime, which is not too far from the present Super-Kamiokande limit of τp≳1.29 ×1034 yr . With the help of a Pecci-Quinn symmetry and the resulting axion, the model provides a suitable dark matter candidate while also solving the strong C P problem. The intermediate scale, MI≈(1013- 1014) GeV which is also the B -L scale, is of the right order for the right-handed neutrino mass which enables a successful description of light neutrino masses and oscillations. The Yukawa sector of the model consists of only two matrices in family space and leads to a predictive scenario for quark and lepton masses and mixings. The branching ratios for proton decay are calculable with the leading modes being p →e+π0 and p →ν ¯π+. Even though the model predicts no new physics within the reach of the LHC, the next-generation proton decay detectors and axion search experiments have the capability to reach a verdict on this minimal scenario.

  8. Electrogenic, proton-coupled, intestinal dipeptide transport in herbivorous and carnivorous teleosts.

    PubMed

    Thamotharan, M; Gomme, J; Zonno, V; Maffia, M; Storelli, C; Ahearn, G A

    1996-05-01

    In both herbivorous tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and carnivorous rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) intestinal and pyloric cecal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV), [14C]glycylsarcosine ([14C]Gly-Sar) uptake was stimulated by a transmembrane proton gradient. A transmembrane K(+)-diffusion potential (inside negative) stimulated [14C]Gly-Sar uptake above that observed with short-circuited vesicles, whereas an inwardly directed Na+ gradient in both fishes had no effect on peptide uptake. In tilapia, [14C]Gly-Sar influx occurred by the combination of 1) a high-affinity, saturable, proton gradient-dependent carrier system [Kt [concentration that equals one-half of maximum influx (Jmax)] = 0.56 +/- 0.08 mM; Jmax = 1,945.0 +/- 174.6 pmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1]; 2) a low-affinity, nonsaturable (within 1-10 mM), proton gradient-dependent carrier system (nonsaturable carrier-mediated transport component = 4,514.0 +/- 28.1 pmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1.mM-1); and 3) a diffusional component accounting for < 10% of total influx within the concentration range tested. Influx (10 s) of 1-10 mM [14C]Gly-Sar in tilapia intestine was significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited by 10 mM diethylpyrocarbonate, a specific inhibitor of proton-coupled peptide transport systems. [14C]Gly-Sar influx into tilapia BBMV showed cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation by Gly-Pro, suggesting that [14C]Gly-Sar and Gly-Pro shared the same mucosal peptide transporter in fish. These observations strongly suggest that intestinal transport of peptides in herbivorous and carnivorous fishes is proton gradient dependent, electrogenic, sodium independent, and qualitatively resembles the peptide transport paradigm proposed for mammals.

  9. Reaction pathways of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylate complexes explored by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Tolstoy, Peter M; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2011-05-25

    Combined low-temperature NMR/UV-vis spectroscopy (UVNMR), where optical and NMR spectra are measured in the NMR spectrometer under the same conditions, has been set up and applied to the study of H-bonded anions A··H··X(-) (AH = 1-(13)C-2-chloro-4-nitrophenol, X(-) = 15 carboxylic acid anions, 5 phenolates, Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), and BF(4)(-)). In this series, H is shifted from A to X, modeling the proton-transfer pathway. The (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and the H/D isotope effects on the latter provide information about averaged H-bond geometries. At the same time, red shifts of the π-π* UV-vis absorption bands are observed which correlate with the averaged H-bond geometries. However, on the UV-vis time scale, different tautomeric states and solvent configurations are in slow exchange. The combined data sets indicate that the proton transfer starts with a H-bond compression and a displacement of the proton toward the H-bond center, involving single-well configurations A-H···X(-). In the strong H-bond regime, coexisting tautomers A··H···X(-) and A(-)···H··X are observed by UV. Their geometries and statistical weights change continuously when the basicity of X(-) is increased. Finally, again a series of single-well structures of the type A(-)···H-X is observed. Interestingly, the UV-vis absorption bands are broadened inhomogeneously because of a distribution of H-bond geometries arising from different solvent configurations.

  10. Proton-impact excitation of lithium using a time-dependent close-coupling method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teck-Ghee; Pindzola, M. S.

    2011-11-15

    A time-dependent close-coupling method, formulated within the framework of a rotational function expansion in two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, is used to investigate excitation processes in proton-lithium collisions. As a first check, the calculated Li(1s{sup 2}2s){yields}Li(1s{sup 2}2p) excitation cross sections are compared and shown to be in reasonable agreement with the previous Cartesian lattice time-dependent Schroedinger equation results for collision energies at 5, 10, and 15 keV. As a result, additional calculations are carried out to determine the cross sections not only for the Li(1s{sup 2}2s){yields}Li(1s{sup 2}2p) transitions, but also for the Li(1s{sup 2}3l) transitions for a wider range of proton-impact energies from 2 to 50 keV. Reasonable agreement is found when further comparison of the dominant Li(1s{sup 2}2p) excitation cross sections is made with data obtained from crossed-beams experiments and other close-coupling methods. With the present extensive and large-scale calculations, the convergence for the reported results is also addressed, especially for the less-dominant Li(1s{sup 2}3l) transitions, with respect to the box sizes, number of coupled channels, and propagation time.

  11. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Guangjin E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu; Lu, Xingyu E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Vega, Alexander J. E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Polenova, Tatyana E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu

    2014-09-14

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear {sup 1}H-X (X = {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, {sup 31}P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the {sup 1}H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the {sup 1}H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from {sup 1}H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the {sup 1}H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [{sup 15}N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  12. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Guangjin; Lu, Xingyu; Vega, Alexander J; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-09-14

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear (1)H-X (X = (13)C, (15)N, (31)P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the (1)H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the (1)H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from (1)H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the (1)H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [(15)N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-(13)C,(15)N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-(13)C,(15)N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  13. Forms and Lability of Phosphorus in Algae and Aquatic Macrophytes Characterized by Solution 31P NMR Coupled with Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P.

    2016-11-01

    Solution Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) with commercially available phosphatases was used to characterize phosphorus (P) compounds in extracts of the dominant aquatic macrophytes and algae in a eutrophic lake. Total extractable organic P (Po) concentrations ranged from 504 to 1643 mg kg‑1 and 2318 to 8395 mg kg‑1 for aquatic macrophytes and algae, respectively. Using 31P NMR spectroscopy, 11 Po species were detected in the mono- and diester region. Additionally, orthophosphate, pyrophosphate and phosphonates were also detected. Using EH, phytate-like P was identified as the prevalent class of enzyme-labile Po, followed by labile monoester- and diester-P. Comparison of the NMR and EH data indicated that the distribution pattern of major P forms in the samples determined by the two methods was similar (r = 0.712, p < 0.05). Additional 31P NMR spectroscopic analysis of extracts following EH showed significant decreases in the monoester and pyrophosphate regions, with a corresponding increase in the orthophosphate signal, as compared to unhydrolyzed extracts. Based on these quantity and hydrolysis data, we proposed that recycling of Po in vegetative biomass residues is an important mechanism for long-term self-regulation of available P for algal blooming in eutrophic lakes.

  14. Forms and Lability of Phosphorus in Algae and Aquatic Macrophytes Characterized by Solution 31P NMR Coupled with Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; He, Zhongqi; Zhang, Chen; Giesy, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Solution Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy coupled with enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) with commercially available phosphatases was used to characterize phosphorus (P) compounds in extracts of the dominant aquatic macrophytes and algae in a eutrophic lake. Total extractable organic P (Po) concentrations ranged from 504 to 1643 mg kg−1 and 2318 to 8395 mg kg−1 for aquatic macrophytes and algae, respectively. Using 31P NMR spectroscopy, 11 Po species were detected in the mono- and diester region. Additionally, orthophosphate, pyrophosphate and phosphonates were also detected. Using EH, phytate-like P was identified as the prevalent class of enzyme-labile Po, followed by labile monoester- and diester-P. Comparison of the NMR and EH data indicated that the distribution pattern of major P forms in the samples determined by the two methods was similar (r = 0.712, p < 0.05). Additional 31P NMR spectroscopic analysis of extracts following EH showed significant decreases in the monoester and pyrophosphate regions, with a corresponding increase in the orthophosphate signal, as compared to unhydrolyzed extracts. Based on these quantity and hydrolysis data, we proposed that recycling of Po in vegetative biomass residues is an important mechanism for long-term self-regulation of available P for algal blooming in eutrophic lakes. PMID:27849040

  15. Photoregenerative I-/I3- couple as a liquid cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yadong; Ai, Xinping; Tu, Wenmao; Pan, Mu

    2014-10-01

    A photoassisted oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) through I-/I3- redox couple was investigated for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cathode reaction. The I-/I3--based liquid cathode was used to replace conventional oxygen cathode, and its discharge product I- was regenerated to I3- by photocatalytic oxidation with the participation of oxygen. This new and innovative approach may provide a strategy to eliminate the usage of challenging ORR electrocatalysts, resulting in an avenue for developing low-cost and high-efficiency PEM fuel cells.

  16. Proton-coupled electron transfer and multielectron oxidations in complexes of ruthenium and osmium

    SciTech Connect

    Dovletoglou, A.

    1992-01-01

    This doctoral research concerns the mechanism of proton-coupled electron transfer over an extended pH range. These processes between ruthenium and osmium complexes and hydroquinones have been studied using spectrophotometric methods and cyclic voltammetry. Elucidation of the mechanistic details has been attempted by using isotopic labelling, kinetic analysis, and numerical simulation of complex kinetic schemes. The coordination and redox chemistry of polypyridyl-acetylacetonato and -oxalato complexes of ruthenium and the role of ancillary ligands in defining the properties of Ru[sup IV]O complexes were explored. These studies represent the first attempt to probe possible 2e[sup [minus

  17. A Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Method for the Site-Specific Measurement of Proton Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Biological and Organic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Gupta, Rupal; Polenova, Tatyana; Vega, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Proton chemical shifts are a rich probe of structure and hydrogen bonding environments in organic and biological molecules. Until recently, measurements of 1H chemical shift tensors have been restricted to either solid systems with sparse proton sites or were based on the indirect determination of anisotropic tensor components from cross-relaxation and liquid-crystal experiments. We have introduced an MAS approach that permits site-resolved determination of CSA tensors of protons forming chemical bonds with labeled spin-1/2 nuclei in fully protonated solids with multiple sites, including organic molecules and proteins. This approach, originally introduced for the measurements of chemical shift tensors of amide protons, is based on three RN-symmetry based experiments, from which the principal components of the 1H CS tensor can be reliably extracted by simultaneous triple fit of the data. In this article, we expand our approach to a much more challenging system involving aliphatic and aromatic protons. We start with a review of the prior work on experimental-NMR and computational-quantum-chemical approaches for the measurements of 1H chemical shift tensors and for relating these to the electronic structures. We then present our experimental results on U-13C,15N-labeled histdine demonstrating that 1H chemical shift tensors can be reliably determined for the 1H15N and 1H13C spin pairs in cationic and neutral forms of histidine. Finally, we demonstrate that the experimental 1H(C) and 1H(N) chemical shift tensors are in agreement with Density Functional Theory calculations, therefore establishing the usefulness of our method for characterization of structure and hydrogen bonding environment in organic and biological solids. PMID:25484446

  18. 1H–13C hetero-nuclear dipole–dipole couplings of methyl groups in stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments of peptides and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin H.; Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2010-01-01

    13C NMR of isotopically labeled methyl groups has the potential to combine spectroscopic simplicity with ease of labeling for protein NMR studies. However, in most high resolution separated local field experiments, such as polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA), that are used to measure 1H–13C hetero-nuclear dipolar couplings, the four-spin system of the methyl group presents complications. In this study, the properties of the 1H–13C hetero-nuclear dipolar interactions of 13C-labeled methyl groups are revealed through solid-state NMR experiments on a range of samples, including single crystals, stationary powders, and magic angle spinning of powders, of 13C3 labeled alanine alone and incorporated into a protein. The spectral simplifications resulting from proton detected local field (PDLF) experiments are shown to enhance resolution and simplify the interpretation of results on single crystals, magnetically aligned samples, and powders. The complementarity of stationary sample and magic angle spinning (MAS) measurements of dipolar couplings is demonstrated by applying polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle and magic angle spinning (PISEMAMAS) to unoriented samples. PMID:19896874

  19. Expression, Functional Characterization, and Solid-State NMR Investigation of the G Protein-Coupled GHS Receptor in Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schrottke, Stefanie; Kaiser, Anette; Vortmeier, Gerrit; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Worm, Dennis; Bosse, Mathias; Schmidt, Peter; Scheidt, Holger A.; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Huster, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The expression, functional reconstitution and first NMR characterization of the human growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor reconstituted into either DMPC or POPC membranes is described. The receptor was expressed in E. coli. refolded, and reconstituted into bilayer membranes. The molecule was characterized by 15N and 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of its natural agonist ghrelin or an inverse agonist. Static 15N NMR spectra of the uniformly labeled receptor are indicative of axially symmetric rotational diffusion of the G protein-coupled receptor in the membrane. In addition, about 25% of the 15N sites undergo large amplitude motions giving rise to very narrow spectral components. For an initial quantitative assessment of the receptor mobility, 1H-13C dipolar coupling values, which are scaled by molecular motions, were determined quantitatively. From these values, average order parameters, reporting the motional amplitudes of the individual receptor segments can be derived. Average backbone order parameters were determined with values between 0.56 and 0.69, corresponding to average motional amplitudes of 40–50° of these segments. Differences between the receptor dynamics in DMPC or POPC membranes were within experimental error. Furthermore, agonist or inverse agonist binding only insignificantly influenced the average molecular dynamics of the receptor. PMID:28387359

  20. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at the Surface of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braten, Miles N.

    Nanostructured metal oxide materials are found in many products and processes in our society today, but they play a particularly important role in the conversion and storage of energy. The materials are used as catalysts and redox active supports in devices such as dye sensitized solar cells, solid oxide fuel cells, and flow batteries, where they transfer and store electrons and charge balancing cations. Oftentimes electron transfer is modulated by the cations and when the cation is a proton, these redox reactions are known as proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. The work described in this dissertation focuses on understanding the PCET reactivity of nanocrystalline metal oxide materials. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of PCET and provides background information on the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) which the majority of the research is focused on. Chapter 2 examines the chemistry that occurs during the photoreduction of ZnO NCs. Chapter 3 describes experiments probing how ZnO NC capping ligand concentration and NC size modulate PCET reaction rates. Chapter 4 describes experiments that compare the PCET reactivity of ZnO NCs with different numbers of electrons and protons stored on them. Chapter 5 describes attempts to observe the electrochemical reduction of ZnO NCs attached to gold electrodes. Finally, Chapter 6 contains attempts to identify a nanostructured metal oxide alkane oxidation catalyst for use in fuel cell.

  1. Site selectivity in the protonation of a phosphinito bridged Pt(I)-Pt(I) complex: a combined NMR and density-functional theory mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Mario; Polini, Flavia; Gallo, Vito; Mastrorilli, Piero; Calmuschi-Cula, Beatrice; Englert, Ulli; Re, Nazzareno; Repo, Timo; Räisänen, Minna

    2008-11-03

    The protonation of the dinuclear phosphinito bridged complex [(PHCy2)Pt(mu-PCy2){kappa(2)P,O-mu-P(O)Cy2}Pt(PHCy2)] (Pt-Pt) (1) by Brønsted acids affords hydrido bridged Pt-Pt species the structure of which depends on the nature and on the amount of the acid used. The addition of 1 equiv of HX (X = Cl, Br, I) gives products of formal protonation of the Pt-Pt bond of formula syn-[(PHCy2)(X)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2){kappaP-P(O)Cy2}] (Pt-Pt) (5, X = Cl; 6, X = Br; 8, X = I), containing a Pt-X bond and a dangling kappa P-P(O)Cy2 ligand. Uptake of a second equivalent of HX results in the protonation of the P(O)Cy2 ligand with formation of the complexes [(PHCy2)(X)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2){kappaP-P(OH)Cy2}]X (Pt-Pt) (3, X = Cl; 4, X = Br; 9, X = I). Each step of protonation is reversible, thus reactions of 3, 4, with NaOH give, first, the corresponding neutral complexes 5, 6, and then the parent compound 1. While the complexes 3 and 4 are indefinitely stable, the iodine analogue 9 transforms into anti-[(PHCy2)(I)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2)(I)] (Pt-Pt) (7) deriving from substitution of an iodo group for the P(OH)Cy2 ligand. Complexes 3 and 4 are isomorphous crystallizing in the triclinic space group P1 and show an intramolecular hydrogen bond and an interaction between the halide counteranion and the POH hydrogen. The occurrence of such an interaction also in solution was ascertained for 3 by (35)Cl NMR. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy (including (31)P-(1)H HOESY) and density-functional theory calculations indicate that the mechanism of the reaction starts with a prior protonation of the oxygen with formation of an intermediate (12) endowed with a six membered Pt(1)-X...H-O-P-Pt(2) ring that evolves into thermodynamically stable products featuring the hydride ligand bridging the Pt atoms. Energy profiles calculated for the various steps of the reaction between 1 and HCl showed very low barriers for the proton transfer and the subsequent rearrangement to 12, while a barrier

  2. Graphitic carbon coupled poly(anthraquinone) for proton shuttle flow-in-a-cell application.

    PubMed

    Mathi, Selvam; Kumar, Rudra; Nagarale, Rajaram K; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2017-03-13

    Coupled electron and proton transport are an integral part of non-gassing electro-osmotic pumps (EOP). The kinetics of the electrode limits the kinetics of the electron transfer and hence the flow. This is observed in the present study with newly synthesized graphitic carbon covalently coupled to poly(anthraquinone) (PAQ). When EOP with identical electrodes were assembled, proton shuttle maintained the reversible flow, which was linearly dependent on the ks values. A Laviron plot was used to calculate the electron-transfer rate constant ks and transfer coefficient α, and their linear dependency on content of graphitic carbon was observed. The best ks value obtained was 0.67 s(-1) for 15PAQ. The sandwich-type flow-in-a-cell showed the best result of ∼40 μL min(-1) cm(-1) V(-1) electro-osmotic flux for 15PAQ. It reveals that a balanced combination of graphitic carbon and PAQ is the prime requirement for high-performance electrode materials to be used in microfluidic devices and energy applications.

  3. Catalytic alkylation of remote C-H bonds enabled by proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gilbert J.; Zhu, Qilei; Miller, David C.; Gu, Carol J.; Knowles, Robert R.

    2016-11-01

    Despite advances in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis, there are currently no molecular HAT catalysts that are capable of homolysing the strong nitrogen-hydrogen (N-H) bonds of N-alkyl amides. The motivation to develop amide homolysis protocols stems from the utility of the resultant amidyl radicals, which are involved in various synthetically useful transformations, including olefin amination and directed carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond functionalization. In the latter process—a subset of the classical Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction—amidyl radicals remove hydrogen atoms from unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds. Although powerful, these transformations typically require oxidative N-prefunctionalization of the amide starting materials to achieve efficient amidyl generation. Moreover, because these N-activating groups are often incorporated into the final products, these methods are generally not amenable to the direct construction of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds. Here we report an approach that overcomes these limitations by homolysing the N-H bonds of N-alkyl amides via proton-coupled electron transfer. In this protocol, an excited-state iridium photocatalyst and a weak phosphate base cooperatively serve to remove both a proton and an electron from an amide substrate in a concerted elementary step. The resultant amidyl radical intermediates are shown to promote subsequent C-H abstraction and radical alkylation steps. This C-H alkylation represents a catalytic variant of the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction, using simple, unfunctionalized amides to direct the formation of new C-C bonds. Given the prevalence of amides in pharmaceuticals and natural products, we anticipate that this method will simplify the synthesis and structural elaboration of amine-containing targets. Moreover, this study demonstrates that concerted proton-coupled electron transfer can enable homolytic activation of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using

  4. Catalytic alkylation of remote C-H bonds enabled by proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gilbert J; Zhu, Qilei; Miller, David C; Gu, Carol J; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-11-10

    Despite advances in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis, there are currently no molecular HAT catalysts that are capable of homolysing the strong nitrogen-hydrogen (N-H) bonds of N-alkyl amides. The motivation to develop amide homolysis protocols stems from the utility of the resultant amidyl radicals, which are involved in various synthetically useful transformations, including olefin amination and directed carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond functionalization. In the latter process-a subset of the classical Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction-amidyl radicals remove hydrogen atoms from unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds. Although powerful, these transformations typically require oxidative N-prefunctionalization of the amide starting materials to achieve efficient amidyl generation. Moreover, because these N-activating groups are often incorporated into the final products, these methods are generally not amenable to the direct construction of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds. Here we report an approach that overcomes these limitations by homolysing the N-H bonds of N-alkyl amides via proton-coupled electron transfer. In this protocol, an excited-state iridium photocatalyst and a weak phosphate base cooperatively serve to remove both a proton and an electron from an amide substrate in a concerted elementary step. The resultant amidyl radical intermediates are shown to promote subsequent C-H abstraction and radical alkylation steps. This C-H alkylation represents a catalytic variant of the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction, using simple, unfunctionalized amides to direct the formation of new C-C bonds. Given the prevalence of amides in pharmaceuticals and natural products, we anticipate that this method will simplify the synthesis and structural elaboration of amine-containing targets. Moreover, this study demonstrates that concerted proton-coupled electron transfer can enable homolytic activation of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using

  5. Importance of Triples Contributions to NMR Spin-Spin Coupling Constants Computed at the CC3 and CCSDT Levels.

    PubMed

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P A; Gauss, Jürgen

    2017-02-14

    We present the first analytical implementation of CC3 second derivatives using the spin-unrestricted approach. This allows, for the first time, the calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) relevant to NMR spectroscopy at the CC3 level of theory in a fully analytical manner. CC3 results for the SSCCs of a number of small molecules and their fluorine substituted derivatives are compared with the corresponding coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) results obtained using specialized basis sets. For one-bond couplings the change when going from CCSD to CC3 is typically 1-3%, but much higher corrections were found for (1)JCN in FCN, 15.7%, and (1)JOF in OF2, 6.4%. The changes vary significantly in the case of multibond couplings, with differences of up to 10%, and even 13.6% for (3)JFH in fluoroacetylene. Calculations at the coupled cluster singles, doubles, and triples (CCSDT) level indicate that the most important contributions arising from connected triple excitations in the coupled cluster expansion are accounted for at the CC3 level. Thus, we believe that the CC3 method will become the standard approach for the calculation of reference values of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants.

  6. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3− to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments. PMID:26870760

  7. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3 (-) to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments.

  8. Model system-bath Hamiltonian and nonadiabatic rate constants for proton-coupled electron transfer at electrode-solution interfaces.

    PubMed

    Navrotskaya, Irina; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2008-06-28

    An extension of the Anderson-Newns-Schmickler model for electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is presented. This model describes reactions in which electron transfer between a solute complex in solution and an electrode is coupled to proton transfer within the solute complex. The model Hamiltonian is derived in a basis of electron-proton vibronic states defined within a double adiabatic approximation for the electrons, transferring proton, and bath modes. The interaction term responsible for electronic transitions between the solute complex and the electrode depends on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode within the solute complex. This model Hamiltonian is used to derive the anodic and cathodic rate constants for nonadiabatic electrochemical PCET. The derivation is based on the master equations for the reduced density matrix of the electron-proton subsystem, which includes the electrons of the solute complex and the electrode, as well as the transferring proton. The rate constant expressions differ from analogous expressions for electrochemical electron transfer because of the summation over electron-proton vibronic states and the dependence of the couplings on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. These differences lead to additional contributions to the total reorganization energy, an additional exponential temperature-dependent prefactor, and a temperature-dependent term in the effective activation energy that has different signs for the anodic and cathodic processes. This model can be generalized to describe both nonadiabatic and adiabatic electrochemical PCET reactions and provides the framework for the inclusion of additional effects, such as the breaking and forming of other chemical bonds.

  9. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ward, Meaghan E; Ritz, Emily; Ahmed, Mumdooh A M; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  10. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  11. Residence Times of Molecular Complexes in Solution from NMR Data of Intermolecular Hydrogen-Bond Scalar Coupling.

    PubMed

    Zandarashvili, Levani; Esadze, Alexandre; Kemme, Catherine A; Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Nguyen, Dan; Iwahara, Junji

    2016-03-03

    The residence times of molecular complexes in solution are important for understanding biomolecular functions and drug actions. We show that NMR data of intermolecular hydrogen-bond scalar couplings can yield information on the residence times of molecular complexes in solution. The molecular exchange of binding partners via the breakage and reformation of a complex causes self-decoupling of intermolecular hydrogen-bond scalar couplings, and this self-decoupling effect depends on the residence time of the complex. For protein-DNA complexes, we investigated the salt concentration dependence of intermolecular hydrogen-bond scalar couplings between the protein side-chain (15)N and DNA phosphate (31)P nuclei, from which the residence times were analyzed. The results were consistent with those obtained by (15)Nz-exchange spectroscopy. This self-decoupling-based kinetic analysis is unique in that it does not require any different signatures for the states involved in the exchange, whereas such conditions are crucial for kinetic analyses by typical NMR and other methods.

  12. Conformational Populations of β-(1→4) O-Glycosidic Linkages Using Redundant NMR J-Couplings and Circular Statistics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Turney, Toby; Meredith, Reagan; Pan, Qingfeng; Sernau, Luke; Wang, Xiaocong; Hu, Xiaosong; Woods, Robert J; Carmichael, Ian; Serianni, Anthony S

    2017-03-30

    Twelve disaccharides containing β-(1→4) linkages and displaying systematic structural variations in the vicinity of these linkages were selectively labeled with (13)C to facilitate measurements of multiple NMR spin-spin (scalar; J) coupling constants (JCH and JCC values) across their O-glycosidic linkages. Ensembles of spin-couplings ((2)JCOC, (3)JCOCH, (3)JCOCC) sensitive to the two linkage torsion angles, phi (ϕ) and psi (ψ), were analyzed by using parametrized equations obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations, Fredholm theory, and circular statistics to calculate experiment-based rotamer populations for ϕ and ψ in each disaccharide. With the statistical program MA'AT, torsion angles ϕ and ψ were modeled as a single von Mises distribution, which yielded two parameters, the mean position and the circular standard deviation (CSD) for each angle. The NMR-derived rotamer populations were compared to those obtained from 1 μs aqueous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and crystallographic database statistical analyses. Conformer populations obtained exclusively from the MA'AT treatment of redundant J-couplings were in very good agreement with those obtained from the MD simulations, providing evidence that conformational populations can be determined by NMR for mobile molecular elements such as O-glycosidic linkages with minimal input from theory. The approach also provides an experimental means to validate the conformational preferences predicted from MD simulations. The conformational behaviors of ϕ in the 12 disaccharides were very similar, but those of ψ varied significantly, allowing a classification of the 12 disaccharides based on preferred linkage conformation in solution.

  13. Paramagnetic-based NMR restraints lift residual dipolar coupling degeneracy in multidomain detergent-solubilized membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Verardi, Raffaello; Gustavsson, Martin; Gao, Jiali; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-02-23

    Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are widely used as orientation-dependent NMR restraints to improve the resolution of the NMR conformational ensemble of biomacromolecules and define the relative orientation of multidomain proteins and protein complexes. However, the interpretation of RDCs is complicated by the intrinsic degeneracy of analytical solutions and protein dynamics that lead to ill-defined orientations of the structural domains (ghost orientations). Here, we illustrate how restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments lift the orientational ambiguity of multidomain membrane proteins solubilized in detergent micelles. We tested this approach on monomeric phospholamban (PLN), a 52-residue membrane protein, which is composed of two helical domains connected by a flexible loop. We show that the combination of classical solution NMR restraints (NOEs and dihedral angles) with RDC and PRE constraints resolves topological ambiguities, improving the convergence of the PLN structural ensemble and giving the depth of insertion of the protein within the micelle. The combination of RDCs with PREs will be necessary for improving the accuracy and precision of membrane protein conformational ensembles, where three-dimensional structures are dictated by interactions with the membrane-mimicking environment rather than compact tertiary folds common in globular proteins.

  14. Assignment of selected hyperfine proton NMR resonances in the met forms of Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and comparisons with sperm whale metmyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.; Pandey, R.K.; Leung, H.K.; Smith, K.M.

    1988-04-19

    This work indicates a high degree of purity for our preparations of all three of the primary Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and details assignments of the heme methyl and vinyl protons in the hyperfine shift region of the ferric (aquo.) protein forms. The assignments were carried out by reconstituting the apoproteins of each component with selectively deuteriated hemes. The results indicate that even though the individual component preparations consist of essentially a single protein, the proton NMR spectra indicate spectroscopic heterogeneity. Evidence is presented for identification and classification of major and minor protein forms that are present in solutions of each component. Finally, in contrast to previous results, a detailed analysis of the proton hyperfine shift patterns of the major and minor forms of each component, in comparison to the major and minor forms of metmyoglobin, leads to the conclusions that the corresponding forms of the proteins from each species have strikingly similar heme-globin contacts and display nearly identical heme electronic structures and coordination numbers.

  15. NMR and DFT study on media effects on proton transfer in hydrogen bonding: concept of molecular probe with an application to ionic and super-polar liquids.

    PubMed

    Balevicius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Aidas, Kestutis

    2009-10-14

    Media effects of ionic and super-polar liquids on the state of H-bonding were studied by NMR and DFT methods. The proton sharing (positioning) in the H-bond was monitored following the chemical shifts of picolinic acid N-oxide (PANO) used as the molecular probe. The relationships between PANO 1H and 13C chemical shifts and proton position in the O-H...O bridge were calibrated using traditional organic solvents and other H-bond complexes of pyridine N-oxide with acids to increase the H-bond strength. A reliable parameter for H-bond monitoring was proposed. The state of the H-bond in ionic liquid media is largely governed by the dielectric properties of the bulk media. A drastic fall-out of PANO/[BuMePyr][TfO] from the general dielectric scheme built using solvents with increasing dielectric constant (from chloroform to water and culminating with formamide) was observed. On a molecular level this effect indicates that the ionic liquid [BuMePyr][TfO] can act on H-bonded systems as a stimulant of proton transfer. In 'super-polar' media (formamide) the intramolecular H-bond system converts into an intermolecular one forming a neutral H-bond complex of PANO with the formamide molecule.

  16. Sensitivity of proton NMR relaxation times in a HTPB based polyurethane elastomer to thermo-oxidative aging.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Mowery, Daniel Michael; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2004-09-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry studies were conducted on a hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based polyurethane elastomer thermo-oxidatively aged at 80 C. The {sup 1}H T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1{rho}} relaxation times of samples thermally aged for various periods of time were determined as a function of NMR measurement temperature. The response of each measurement was calculated from a best-fit linear function of the relaxation time vs. aging time. It was found that the T{sub 2,H} and T{sub 1{rho},H} relaxation times exhibited the largest response to thermal degradation, whereas T{sub 1,H} showed minimal change. All of the NMR relaxation measurements on solid samples showed significantly less sensitivity to thermal aging than the T{sub 2,H} relaxation times of solvent-swollen samples.

  17. The Origin of Coupled Chloride and Proton Transport in a Cl–/H+ Antiporter

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ClC family of transmembrane proteins functions throughout nature to control the transport of Cl– ions across biological membranes. ClC-ec1 from Escherichia coli is an antiporter, coupling the transport of Cl– and H+ ions in opposite directions and driven by the concentration gradients of the ions. Despite keen interest in this protein, the molecular mechanism of the Cl–/H+ coupling has not been fully elucidated. Here, we have used multiscale simulation to help identify the essential mechanism of the Cl–/H+ coupling. We find that the highest barrier for proton transport (PT) from the intra- to extracellular solution is attributable to a chemical reaction, the deprotonation of glutamic acid 148 (E148). This barrier is significantly reduced by the binding of Cl– in the “central” site (Cl–cen), which displaces E148 and thereby facilitates its deprotonation. Conversely, in the absence of Cl–cen E148 favors the “down” conformation, which results in a much higher cumulative rotation and deprotonation barrier that effectively blocks PT to the extracellular solution. Thus, the rotation of E148 plays a critical role in defining the Cl–/H+ coupling. As a control, we have also simulated PT in the ClC-ec1 E148A mutant to further understand the role of this residue. Replacement with a non-protonatable residue greatly increases the free energy barrier for PT from E203 to the extracellular solution, explaining the experimental result that PT in E148A is blocked whether or not Cl–cen is present. The results presented here suggest both how a chemical reaction can control the rate of PT and also how it can provide a mechanism for a coupling of the two ion transport processes. PMID:27783900

  18. Ionosphere-exosphere coupling through charge exchange and momentum transfer in hydrogen-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The implications of a traditional assumption of exospheric physics, that collisions of hydrogen atoms and protons preferentially result in charge exchange with negligible momentum transfer are examined. Initially adopted as a necessary convenience to accommodate limited computer resources in exosphere model calculations, this approximation results in a direct transformation of the proton velocity distribution into a hot component of neutral hydrogen. With expanding computational facilities, the need for the approximation has passed. As the first step toward its replacement with a realistic, quantum mechanical model of the H - H(+) collision process, differential and cumulative cross sections were calculated for quantum elastic scattering of indistinguishable nuclei for a fine grid of encounter energies and scattering angles. These data are used to study the nature of ionosphere-exosphere coupling through H - H(+) collisions, and to demonstrate that the distribution of velocities of scattered H produced in the traditional exospheric charge exchange approximation, as well as that arising from an alternative, fluid dynamic approach, leads to unacceptable abundances of coronal atoms in long-term, highly elliptic trajectories.

  19. Non-Radiative Relaxation of Electronically Excited DNA Oligomers: Proton Coupled Charge Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Adrian W.; Herbert, John M.

    2009-06-01

    We address possible relaxation mechanisms of electronically excited DNA oligomers with a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. Using long-range corrected density functional theory (LRC-DFT), we show that charge transfer (CT) states between neighboring nucleobases appear at energies just above optically bright ^{1}ππ^{ast} excitonic states in aqueous solution. In double stranded DNA systems, both intrastrand and interstrand CT states are observed. It has been hypothesized that excitonic states may decay via a conical intersection into a CT state on a subpicosecond timescale. The proximity in energy of such states in out calculations appears consistent with this claim. Assuming that such a non-radiative mechanism occurs, we investigate subsequent relaxation of CT states by constructing and optimizing the geometry of model CT systems with constrained density functional theory (CDFT). We find that CT states relax in double stranded DNA through proton transfer across Watson-Crick base pairs with little to no energy barrier. Furthermore, the ground state energy shifts upwards along this reaction coordinate to nearly the same as that of the proton coupled charge transfer state, creating the possibility for a non-radiative pathway to the ground state. Q. Wu and T. Van Voorhis Phys. Rev. A (2005)

  20. Theoretical Study of Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions: The Effect of Hydrogen Bond Bending Motion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Hao; Song, Kai; Xu, Yang; Shi, Qiang

    2015-06-25

    We investigate theoretically the effect of hydrogen bond bending motion on the proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction, using a model system where an intramolecular hydrogen-bonded phenol group is the proton donor. It is shown that, in a two-dimensional (2D) model of the PCET reaction, the bending and stretching vibrational motions are separated, and due to the hydrogen bond configuration and anharmonicity of the potential energy surface, the bending vibration can play a role in the PCET reaction. The results are also compared with two different sets of one-dimensional models (1D-linear and 1D-curved). Due to contributions of the bending motion, the rate constants in the 2D model are larger than those in the 1D-linear model, although the differences between the total rate constants and KIEs for 2D and 1D models are not major. Results from the 1D-curved model lie between the 2D- and 1D-linear models, indicating that it can include some effect of bending motion in reducing the potential energies along the reaction path.

  1. Proton-Nucleus Total Cross Sections in Coupled-Channel Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross sections in the medium have been extracted directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the Langley Research Center. In the present study the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium was investigated. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  2. Elastic Proton Scattering of Medium Mass Nuclei from Coupled-Cluster Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, G.; MichelN.,

    2012-01-01

    Using coupled-cluster theory and interactions from chiral effective field theory, we compute overlap functions for transfer and scattering of low-energy protons on the target nucleus 40Ca. Effects of three-nucleon forces are included phenomenologically as in-medium two-nucleon interactions. Using known asymptotic forms for one-nucleon overlap functions we derive a simple and intuitive way of computing scattering observables such as elastic scattering phase shifts and cross sections. As a first application and proof of principle, we compute phase shifts and differential interaction cross sections at energies of 9.6 and 12.44 MeV and compare with experimental data. Our computed diffraction minima are in fair agreement with experimental results, while we tend to overestimate the cross sections at large scattering angles.

  3. Proton-coupled electron hopping in Ru-modified P. aeruginosa azurin

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Shafaat, Oliver S.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2016-01-01

    We constructed two artificial multiple-step electron transfer (hopping) systems based on Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin where a tyrosine (YOH) is situated between Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)2(imidazole)(histidine) and the native copper site: RuH107YOH109 and RuH124-YOH122. We investigated the rates of CuI oxidation by flash-quench generated RuIII over a range of conditions that probed the role of proton-coupled oxidation/reduction of YOH in the reaction. Rates of CuI oxidation were enhanced over single-step electron transfer by factors between 3 and 80, depending on specific scaffold and buffer conditions. PMID:26790882

  4. Proton-coupled electron hopping in Ru-modified P. aeruginosa azurin.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeffrey J; Shafaat, Oliver S; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2016-03-01

    We constructed two artificial multiple-step electron transfer (hopping) systems based on Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin where a tyrosine (YOH) is situated between Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)2(imidazole)(histidine) and the native copper site: RuH107YOH109 and RuH124-YOH122. We investigated the rates of Cu(I) oxidation by flash-quench generated Ru(III) over a range of conditions that probed the role of proton-coupled oxidation/reduction of YOH in the reaction. Rates of Cu(I) oxidation were enhanced over single-step electron transfer by factors between 3 and 80, depending on specific scaffold and buffer conditions.

  5. Elucidation of the electronic structure of molecules with the help of NMR spin-spin coupling constants: the FH molecule.

    PubMed

    Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Tuttle, Tell; Cremer, Dieter

    2005-03-17

    It is demonstrated how the one-bond NMR spin-spin coupling constant (SSCC) (1)J(FH) can be used as a source of information on the electronic structure of the FH molecule. For this purpose, the best possible agreement between measured and calculated SSCC is achieved by large basis set coupled perturbed density functional theory calculations. Then, the calculated value is dissected into its four Ramsey terms: Fermi contact, the paramagnetic spin-orbit term, the diamagnetic spin-orbit term, and the spin dipole term, which in turn are decomposed into orbital contributions and then described by their spin densities and orbital current densities. In this way, the SSCC gives detailed information about the electronegativity of F, the bond polarity, the bond polarizability, the volume and the polarizability of sigma and pi lone pair orbitals, the s- or p-character of the bond orbital, the nature of the LUMO, and the density distribution around F.

  6. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by 15N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons.

    PubMed

    Live, D H; Cowburn, D; Breslow, E

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, 15N labeling being used to identify specific backbone 15N and 1H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence of hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neurophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of 15N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Synthesis of 24-phenyl-24-oxo steroids derived from bile acids by palladium-catalyzed cross coupling with phenylboronic acid. NMR characterization and X-ray structures.

    PubMed

    Mayorquín-Torres, Martha C; Romero-Ávila, Margarita; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martin A

    2013-11-01

    Palladium-catalyzed cross coupling of phenyboronic acid with acetylated bile acids in which the carboxyl functions have been activated by formation of a mixed anhydride with pivalic anhydride afforded moderate to good yield of 24-phenyl-24-oxo-steroids. Unambiguous assignments of the NMR signals were made with the aid of combined 1D and 2D NMR techniques. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the obtained structures.

  8. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the past reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have been reinvestigating the prospects of using zero field NMR types of techniques for two dimensional NMR structural analysis of complex organic solids such as coals. Currently MAS spin rates are not sufficiently high to permit zero field in high field NMR for protons in typical organic solids, however they are compatible with {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C dipolar couplings. In collaboration with Dr. Robert Tycko of AT T Bell Laboratories, inventor of the zero field in high field NMR method, the authors have performed the first zero field in high field {sup 13}C NMR experiments. These results are described. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Structural and mechanistic basis of proton-coupled metal ion transport in the SLC11/NRAMP family

    PubMed Central

    Ehrnstorfer, Ines A.; Manatschal, Cristina; Arnold, Fabian M.; Laederach, Juerg; Dutzler, Raimund

    2017-01-01

    Secondary active transporters of the SLC11/NRAMP family catalyse the uptake of iron and manganese into cells. These proteins are highly conserved across all kingdoms of life and thus likely share a common transport mechanism. Here we describe the structural and functional properties of the prokaryotic SLC11 transporter EcoDMT. Its crystal structure reveals a previously unknown outward-facing state of the protein family. In proteoliposomes EcoDMT mediates proton-coupled uptake of manganese at low micromolar concentrations. Mutants of residues in the transition-metal ion-binding site severely affect transport, whereas a mutation of a conserved histidine located near this site results in metal ion transport that appears uncoupled to proton transport. Combined with previous results, our study defines the conformational changes underlying transition-metal ion transport in the SLC11 family and it provides molecular insight to its coupling to protons. PMID:28059071

  10. Structural and mechanistic basis of proton-coupled metal ion transport in the SLC11/NRAMP family.

    PubMed

    Ehrnstorfer, Ines A; Manatschal, Cristina; Arnold, Fabian M; Laederach, Juerg; Dutzler, Raimund

    2017-01-06

    Secondary active transporters of the SLC11/NRAMP family catalyse the uptake of iron and manganese into cells. These proteins are highly conserved across all kingdoms of life and thus likely share a common transport mechanism. Here we describe the structural and functional properties of the prokaryotic SLC11 transporter EcoDMT. Its crystal structure reveals a previously unknown outward-facing state of the protein family. In proteoliposomes EcoDMT mediates proton-coupled uptake of manganese at low micromolar concentrations. Mutants of residues in the transition-metal ion-binding site severely affect transport, whereas a mutation of a conserved histidine located near this site results in metal ion transport that appears uncoupled to proton transport. Combined with previous results, our study defines the conformational changes underlying transition-metal ion transport in the SLC11 family and it provides molecular insight to its coupling to protons.

  11. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  12. Imino proton NMR guides the reprogramming of A•T specific minor groove binders for mixed base pair recognition

    PubMed Central

    Harika, Narinder K.; Paul, Ananya; Stroeva, Ekaterina; Chai, Yun; Boykin, David W.; Germann, Markus W.; Wilson, W. David

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific binding to DNA is crucial for targeting transcription factor-DNA complexes to modulate gene expression. The heterocyclic diamidine, DB2277, specifically recognizes a single G•C base pair in the minor groove of mixed base pair sequences of the type AAAGTTT. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence of major and minor species of the bound compound. To understand the principles that determine the binding affinity and orientation in mixed sequences of DNA, over thirty DNA hairpin substrates were examined by NMR and thermal melting. The NMR exchange dynamics between major and minor species shows that the exchange is much faster than compound dissociation determined from biosensor–surface plasmon resonance. Extensive modifications of DNA sequences resulted in a unique DNA sequence with binding site AAGATA that binds DB2277 in a single orientation. A molecular docking result agrees with the model representing rapid flipping of DB2277 between major and minor species. Imino spectral analysis of a 15N-labeled central G clearly shows the crucial role of the exocyclic amino group of G in sequence-specific recognition. Our results suggest that this approach can be expanded to additional modules for recognition of more sequence-specific DNA complexes. This approach provides substantial information about the sequence-specific, highly efficient, dynamic nature of minor groove binding agents. PMID:27131382

  13. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    PubMed Central

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John-Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) uses a Zn-bound OH−/H2O mechanism to catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2. This catalysis also involves a separate proton transfer step, mediated by an ordered solvent network coordinated by hydrophilic residues. One of these residues, Tyr7, was previously shown to be deprotonated in the neutron crystal structure at pH 10. This observation indicated that Tyr7 has a perturbed pKa compared with free tyrosine. To further probe the pKa of this residue, NMR spectroscopic measurements of [13C]Tyr-labeled holo HCA II (with active-site Zn present) were preformed to titrate all Tyr residues between pH 5.4–11.0. In addition, neutron studies of apo HCA II (with Zn removed from the active site) at pH 7.5 and holo HCA II at pH 6 were conducted. This detailed interrogation of tyrosines in HCA II by NMR and neutron crystallography revealed a significantly lowered pKa of Tyr7 and how pH and Tyr proximity to Zn affect hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:25902526

  14. SOPPA and CCSD vibrational corrections to NMR indirect spin-spin coupling constants of small hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-31

    We present zero-point vibrational corrections to the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in ethyne, ethene, cyclopropene and allene. The calculations have been carried out both at the level of the second order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) employing a new implementation in the DALTON program, at the density functional theory level with the B3LYP functional employing also the Dalton program and at the level of coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theory employing the implementation in the CFOUR program. Specialized coupling constant basis sets, aug-cc-pVTZ-J, have been employed in the calculations. We find that on average the SOPPA results for both the equilibrium geometry values and the zero-point vibrational corrections are in better agreement with the CCSD results than the corresponding B3LYP results. Furthermore we observed that the vibrational corrections are in the order of 5 Hz for the one-bond carbon-hydrogen couplings and about 1 Hz or smaller for the other couplings apart from the one-bond carbon-carbon coupling (11 Hz) and the two-bond carbon-hydrogen coupling (4 Hz) in ethyne. However, not for all couplings lead the inclusion of zero-point vibrational corrections to better agreement with experiment.

  15. SOPPA and CCSD vibrational corrections to NMR indirect spin-spin coupling constants of small hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present zero-point vibrational corrections to the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in ethyne, ethene, cyclopropene and allene. The calculations have been carried out both at the level of the second order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) employing a new implementation in the DALTON program, at the density functional theory level with the B3LYP functional employing also the Dalton program and at the level of coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theory employing the implementation in the CFOUR program. Specialized coupling constant basis sets, aug-cc-pVTZ-J, have been employed in the calculations. We find that on average the SOPPA results for both the equilibrium geometry values and the zero-point vibrational corrections are in better agreement with the CCSD results than the corresponding B3LYP results. Furthermore we observed that the vibrational corrections are in the order of 5 Hz for the one-bond carbon-hydrogen couplings and about 1 Hz or smaller for the other couplings apart from the one-bond carbon-carbon coupling (11 Hz) and the two-bond carbon-hydrogen coupling (4 Hz) in ethyne. However, not for all couplings lead the inclusion of zero-point vibrational corrections to better agreement with experiment.

  16. Photochemical tyrosine oxidation in the structurally well-defined α3Y protein: proton-coupled electron transfer and a long-lived tyrosine radical.

    PubMed

    Glover, Starla D; Jorge, Christine; Liang, Li; Valentine, Kathleen G; Hammarström, Leif; Tommos, Cecilia

    2014-10-08

    Tyrosine oxidation-reduction involves proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and a reactive radical state. These properties are effectively controlled in enzymes that use tyrosine as a high-potential, one-electron redox cofactor. The α3Y model protein contains Y32, which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced in voltammetry measurements. Structural and kinetic properties of α3Y are presented. A solution NMR structural analysis reveals that Y32 is the most deeply buried residue in α3Y. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a soluble flash-quench generated [Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3](3+) oxidant provides high-quality Y32-O• absorption spectra. The rate constant of Y32 oxidation (kPCET) is pH dependent: 1.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (pH 5.5), 1.8 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (pH 8.5), 5.4 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) (pD 5.5), and 4.0 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (pD 8.5). k(H)/k(D) of Y32 oxidation is 2.5 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.9 at pH(D) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. These pH and isotope characteristics suggest a concerted or stepwise, proton-first Y32 oxidation mechanism. The photochemical yield of Y32-O• is 28-58% versus the concentration of [Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3](3+). Y32-O• decays slowly, t1/2 in the range of 2-10 s, at both pH 5.5 and 8.5, via radical-radical dimerization as shown by second-order kinetics and fluorescence data. The high stability of Y32-O• is discussed relative to the structural properties of the Y32 site. Finally, the static α3Y NMR structure cannot explain (i) how the phenolic proton released upon oxidation is removed or (ii) how two Y32-O• come together to form dityrosine. These observations suggest that the dynamic properties of the protein ensemble may play an essential role in controlling the PCET and radical decay characteristics of α3Y.

  17. Vicinal fluorine-proton coupling constants. Ab initio calculations of angular dependence and substituent effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Fabián, J.; Guilleme, J.

    1996-06-01

    A data set of vicinal fluorine-proton coupling constants has been calculated by means of the SCF ab initio and semiempirical INDO/FPT methods. The angular dependence, the effect of individual substituents, and the effect of interaction between two substituents upon the 3JFH couplings have been studied for the molecules CH 2FCH 3, CHF 2CH 3, CH 2FCH 2F, CF 3CH 3, and CHF 2CH 2F. The four contributions to 3JFH ( JFC, JSD, JOD and JOP) have been computed using the standard basis sets 6-31G, 6-31G ∗, 6-31G ∗∗ and 6-311G ∗∗ and a double zeta basis set [4s2p1d/2s1p] with additional tight s functions on the H and F. The agreement with the experimental data is better for the last basis set but the trends of the angular dependence and substituent effects are also reproduced by the remaining basis sets. The major contribution arises from the FC term and the remaining contributions are much smaller being the OP the most important. The individual effect of an electronegative substituent depends on the carbon to which is bonded, being more important when the substituent is bonded to the carbon with the coupled hydrogen. The effect of interaction between two substituents seems to be not negligible, reaching values up to 6 Hz. The most important calculated interaction effects are the geminal δC012FF, δC034FF and δC134FF as well as the vicinal δC213FF and δC214FF.

  18. Effect of solvent on proton location and dynamic behavior in short intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yukie; Masuda, Yuichi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen phthalate anion has a short strong O-H-O hydrogen bond (H-bond). According to previous experimental studies, the H-bond is asymmetric and two tautomers are interconverted in aqueous solutions. In the present study, the effects of polar solvents on the H-bond in a zwitterionic hydrogen phthalate derivative 1 were investigated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analyses of the trajectories for the methanol solution showed that the H-bonding proton tends to be located closer to the carboxylate group that forms fewer intermolecular H-bonds, than to the other carboxylate group and that the intramolecular proton transfer in 1 is triggered by the breakage and/or formation of an intermolecular H-bond. The enol form of dibenzoylmethane (2) also has a short H-bond, and the OH bond is reported to be rather long (>1.1 Å) in the crystal. In the present study, the effects of the solvent on the H-bond in 2 were investigated by molecular orbital (MO) calculations, MD simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for 2 in vacuum indicated that the barrier height for the intramolecular proton transfer is almost the same as the zero-point energy of the vibrational ground state, resulting in broad distribution of the proton density along the H-bond, owing to the nuclear quantum effect. The OH distances were determined in CCl4, acetonitrile, and dimethylsulfoxide solutions from the magnetic dipolar interactions between the 17O and 1H nuclei monitoring the nuclear magnetic relaxation times of 1H. The experimental results indicated that the H-bond geometry of 2 is influenced by the interactions with dimethylsulfoxide, suggesting the formation of a bifurcated H-bond, which was supported by the DFT calculations. The MD simulations for the methanol solution of 2 showed that the asymmetry of the OH distance is correlated with the asymmetry in the electrostatic field of the

  19. Metabolic Profiling and Classification of Propolis Samples from Southern Brazil: An NMR-Based Platform Coupled with Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Maraschin, Marcelo; Somensi-Zeggio, Amélia; Oliveira, Simone K; Kuhnen, Shirley; Tomazzoli, Maíra M; Raguzzoni, Josiane C; Zeri, Ana C M; Carreira, Rafael; Correia, Sara; Costa, Christopher; Rocha, Miguel

    2016-01-22

    The chemical composition of propolis is affected by environmental factors and harvest season, making it difficult to standardize its extracts for medicinal usage. By detecting a typical chemical profile associated with propolis from a specific production region or season, certain types of propolis may be used to obtain a specific pharmacological activity. In this study, propolis from three agroecological regions (plain, plateau, and highlands) from southern Brazil, collected over the four seasons of 2010, were investigated through a novel NMR-based metabolomics data analysis workflow. Chemometrics and machine learning algorithms (PLS-DA and RF), including methods to estimate variable importance in classification, were used in this study. The machine learning and feature selection methods permitted construction of models for propolis sample classification with high accuracy (>75%, reaching ∼90% in the best case), better discriminating samples regarding their collection seasons comparatively to the harvest regions. PLS-DA and RF allowed the identification of biomarkers for sample discrimination, expanding the set of discriminating features and adding relevant information for the identification of the class-determining metabolites. The NMR-based metabolomics analytical platform, coupled to bioinformatic tools, allowed characterization and classification of Brazilian propolis samples regarding the metabolite signature of important compounds, i.e., chemical fingerprint, harvest seasons, and production regions.

  20. MP4 Study of the Anharmonic Coupling of the Shared Proton Stretching Vibration of the Protonated Water Dimer in Equilibrium and Transition States.

    PubMed

    Pitsevich, G; Malevich, A; Kozlovskaya, E; Mahnach, E; Doroshenko, I; Pogorelov, V; Pettersson, Lars G M; Sablinskas, V; Balevicius, V

    2017-03-16

    The structure and harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra of the protonated water dimer (PWD) were calculated in C1, C2, and Cs symmetry at the MP4/acc-pVTZ level of theory. We found that structure and IR spectra are practically identical in C2 and C1 symmetry, demonstrating that an equilibrium C1 configuration of the PWD is not realized. Anharmonic coupling of the shared proton stretching vibration with all other modes in the PWD in C2 and Cs symmetry was the focus of this investigation. For this purpose, 28 two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (2D PES) were built at the MP4/acc-pVTZ level of theory and the corresponding vibrational Schrödinger equations were solved using the DVR method. Differences in the coupling of the investigated mode with other modes in the C2 and Cs configurations, along with some factors that determine the red- or blue-shift of the stretching vibration frequency, were analyzed. We obtained a rather reasonable value of the stretching frequency of the bridging proton (1058.4 cm(-1)) unperturbed by Fermi resonance. The Fermi resonance between the fundamental vibration ν7 and the combined vibration ν2 + ν6 of the same symmetry was analyzed through anharmonic second-order perturbation theory calculations, as well as by 3D PES constructed using Q2, Q6, and Q7 as normal coordinates. A significant (up to 50%) transfer of intensity from the fundamental vibration to the combined one was found. We have estimated the frequency of the bridging proton stretching vibration in the Cs configuration of the PWD based on calculations of the intrinsic anharmonicity and anharmonic double modes interactions at the MP4/acc-pVTZ level of theory (1261 cm(-1)).

  1. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of tocopherols in toothpastes and gingival tissue employing HPLC NMR and HPLC MS coupling.

    PubMed

    Lienau, Annette; Glaser, Tobias; Krucker, Manfred; Zeeb, Daniel; Ley, Fritz; Curro, Frederick; Albert, Klaus

    2002-10-15

    Gingival samples treated with toothpastes containing tocopherols (vitamin E) were investigated employing HPLC chromatography. The aim was to verify that vitamin E is actually enriched in the tissue, which could have beneficial effects on oral health. After determination of the tocopherols available in the toothpastes, control samples from healthy test persons and subjects suffering from gingivitis were analyzed. Subsequently, gingival tissues from diseased test persons who treated their teeth with the toothpastes containing tocopherols using various kinds of concentrations or applications were investigated. The first step of the analysis was a fast and careful extraction employing matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD). Afterward, the separation of the different tocopherol homologues existing was performed by HPLC chromatography on highly selective C30 RP phases. The identification of the tocopherol homologues was performed using the on-line coupling of HPLC with NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  2. Janocchio--a Java applet for viewing 3D structures and calculating NMR couplings and NOEs.

    PubMed

    Evans, David A; Bodkin, Michael J; Baker, S Richard; Sharman, Gary J

    2007-07-01

    We present a Java applet, based on the open source Jmol program, which allows the calculation of coupling constants and NOEs from a three-dimensional structure. The program has all the viewing features of Jmol, but adds the capability to calculate both H-H and H-C 3-bond couplings constants. In the case of H--H couplings, the Altona equation is used to perform this. The program also calculates NOEs using the full relaxation matrix approach. All these calculations are driven from a simple point and click interface. The program can calculate values for multi-structure files, and can produce input files for the conformational fitting program NAMFIS.

  3. Kinetic isotope effects and tunneling in cyclic double and triple proton transfer between acetic acid and methanol in tetrahydrofuran studied by dynamic /sup 1/H and /sup 2/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritzen, D.; Limbach, H.H.

    1984-02-22

    Previous studies of proton exchange and hydrogen bonding between acetic acid (A) and methanol (B) in tetrahydrofuran-d/sub 8/ have been extended to the study of the primary kinetic H/D isotope effects of the exchange. For this purpose a new combination of dynamic /sup 1/H and /sup 2/H NMR spectroscopy has been used to perform an ''NMR proton inventory''. The following rate law was obtained at deuterium fractions D=0 and D=1 of the exchangeable protonic sites: NU=k/sup LL/ C/sub A/C/sub B/+k/sub LLL/C/sub A//sup 2/C/sub B/ (L=H,D). This was attributed to a superposition of cyclic double and triple proton exchange involving one and two molecules of acetic acid and one molecule of methanol. Additional experiments were carried out at intermediate deuterium fractions. Thus, the kinetic HH/HD/DD and HHH/HHD/DDD isotope effects of the exchange as a function of the temperature was measured successfully. This has been achieved for the first time for well-defined intermolecular multiple-proton-transfer reactions. The possibility of determining the number of protons transferred in a chemical reaction by performing an NMR proton inventory is discussed. The rule of the geometric mean (RGM) is fulfilled for the kinetic isotope effects of the LLL process, which are almost independent of temperature within the margin of error. By contrast, the RGM is not fullfilled for the LL process, and the kinetic isotope effects depend strongly on the temperature. The energies of activation and frequency factors fit Bell's criteria of tunneling. The kinetic results are in good agreement with predictions of transition-state theory but can be explained by an intermolecular tunneling model. The results are proof that acetic acid and methanol form cyclic hydrogen-bonded 1:1 and 2:1 complexes which have very low concentration in tetrahydrofuran.

  4. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    SciTech Connect

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun E-mail: koreasds@naver.com

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We discuss large modulated fractions in the Maxwellian case showing that they imply a departure from the usual cosine time dependence of the expected signal in DAMA. However we explicitly show that the DAMA data is not sensitive to this distortion, both in time and frequency space, even in the extreme case of a 100 % modulated fraction. Moreover the same scenario provides an explanation of the maximum in the energy spectrum of the modulation amplitude detected by DAMA in terms of WIMPs whose minimal incoming speed matches the kinematic threshold for inelastic upscatters. For the elastic case the detection of such maximum suggests an inversion of the modulation phase below the present DAMA energy threshold, while this is not expected for inelastic scattering. This may allow to discriminate between the two scenarios in a future low-threshold analysis of the DAMA data.

  5. Reversible severe combined immunodeficiency phenotype secondary to a mutation of the proton-coupled folate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Borzutzky, Arturo; Crompton, Brian; Bergmann, Anke K.; Giliani, Silvia; Baxi, Sachin; Martin, Madelena; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary folate malabsorption is a rare inborn error of metabolism due to mutations in the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). Clinical presentation of PCFT deficiency may mimic severe combined immune deficiency (SCID). We report a 4-month-old female who presented with failure to thrive, normocytic anemia, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and systemic cytomegalovirus infection. Immunological evaluation revealed hypogammaglobulinemia, absent antibody responses, and lack of mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferative responses. However, the absolute number and distribution of lymphocyte subsets, including naïve T cells and recent thymic emigrants, were normal, arguing against primary SCID. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid folate levels were undetectable. A homozygous 1082-1G>A mutation of the PCFT gene was found, resulting in skipping of exon 3. Parenteral folinic acid repletion resulted in normalization of anemia, humoral and cellular immunity, and full clinical recovery. PCFT mutations should be considered in infants with SCID-like phenotype, as the immunodeficiency is reversible with parenteral folinic acid repletion. PMID:19740703

  6. Analysis of electron correlation effects and contributions of NMR J-couplings from occupied localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Zarycz, Natalia; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2012-02-02

    NMR J-coupling calculations at the second-order of polarization propagator approach, SOPPA, are among the most reliable. They include a high percentage of the total electron correlation effects in saturated and unsaturated molecular systems. Furthermore, J-couplings are quite sensitive to the whole electronic molecular framework. We present in this article the first study of all three response mechanisms, Fermi contact, FC, spin-dipolar, SD and paramagnetic spin-orbital, PSO, for J-couplings with occupied localized molecular orbitals at the SOPPA level of approach. Even though SOPPA results are not invariant under unitary transformations, the difference between results obtained with canonical and localized molecular orbitals, LMOs, are small enough to permit its application with confidence. The following small-size saturated and unsaturated compounds were analyzed: CH(4), CH(3)F, C(2)H(6), NH(3), C(2)H(4), CH(2)NH, H(2)C═CHF, and FHC═CHF. The local character of the FC mechanism that appears in J-couplings of these molecular models is shown through the analysis of contributions from LMOs. The importance of including the electron correlation on the engaged bonding orbitals for one-bond couplings is emphasized. Almost all electron correlation effects are included in such orbitals. Interesting findings were the large contributions by s-type LMOs to the C-H and C-C J-couplings; they are responsible for the variation of (1)J(C-C) when going from ethane to ethene and to 1,2-difluoroethene. The previously proposed hyperconjugative transfer mechanism has been tested. Among other tests we found the difference anti-syn of one-bond (1)J(C-H) in imine as due to both the corresponding σ(C-H) and the lone-pair, LP, contribution. Geminal and vicinal J-couplings were also analyzed. Our findings are in accord with a previous work by Pople and Bothner-by, who considered results taken from calculations or empirical data. For all geminal couplings the pattern of J-couplings, like

  7. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a zinc diffusion facilitator protein in native nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Bersch, Beate; Dörr, Jonas M.; Hessel, Audrey; Killian, J. Antoinette; Schanda, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The structure, dynamics and function of membrane proteins are intimately linked to the properties of the membrane environment in which the proteins are embedded. For structural and biophysical characterization, membrane proteins generally need to be extracted from the membrane, and reconstituted in a suitable membrane-mimicking environment. Ensuring functional and structural integrity in these environments is often a major concern. The styrene/maleic acid co-polymer has recently been shown to be able to extract lipid/membrane protein patches directly from native membranes, forming nanosize discoidal proteolipid particles, also referred to as native nanodiscs. Here we show, for the first time, that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from an integral membrane protein in native nanodiscs, as exemplified with the 2 x 34 kDa-large bacterial cation diffusion facilitator CzcD from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. PMID:28128538

  8. Deciphering the Conformational Choreography of Zinc Coordination Complexes with Standard and Novel Proton NMR Techniques Combined with DFT Methods.

    PubMed

    Pucheta, Jose Enrique Herbert; Prim, Damien; Gillet, Jean Michel; Farjon, Jonathan

    2016-04-04

    The presence of water has been shown to deeply impact the stability and geometry of Zn complexes in solution. Evidence for tetra- and penta-coordinated species in a pyridylmethylamine-Zn(II) model complex is presented. Novel (1) H NMR tools such as T1 -filtered selective exchange spectroscopy and pure shifted gradient-encoded selective refocusing as well as classical 2D ((1) H-(1) H) exchange spectroscopy, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy and T1 ((1) H) measurements, in combination with density functional theory methods allow the full conformational dynamics of a pyridylmethylamine-Zn(II) complex to be revealed. Four conformers and two families of complexes depending on the hydration states are elucidated.

  9. Proton NMR for detection, identification and quantification of adulterants in 160 herbal food supplements marketed for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Rabab; Assemat, Gaëtan; Martins, Nathalie; Balayssac, Stéphane; Gilard, Véronique; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2016-05-30

    One hundred and sixty food supplements (FS) marketed for weight loss and mainly purchased on the Internet were analyzed. All the FS were claimed as 100% natural containing only natural compounds, plant extracts and/or vitamins and the presence of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was never mentioned. (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used for detecting the presence of adulterants and for their identification and quantification. Mass spectrometry was used as a complementary method for supporting their identification. Among the 164 samples considered because capsules from 5 different blisters of the same FS were analyzed, 56% were tainted with six API. Forty three contained sibutramine as single adulterant (26%), 9 phenolphthalein (6%) and 23 a mixture of these API (14%) that were both withdrawn from the market several years ago because of toxicity concerns. Sildenafil was found in 12 samples, either as a single adulterant (n=5) or in combination with sibutramine (n=3), phenolphthalein (n=3) and both sibutramine and phenolphthalein (n=1). Fluoxetine was present in 4 formulations, alone (n=3) or in combination with sibutramine and orlistat (n=1). At last, lorcaserine was detected in one FS. The content of sibutramine per dosage unit was comprised between 0.1 and 22 mg and that of phenolphthalein between 0.05 and 56 mg. The study also highlights poor manufacturing practices as evidenced for instance by the variability of API in capsules from different blisters of the same box. This paper demonstrates the need for more effective quality control of weight loss FS and the efficiency of (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the detection of tainted FS.

  10. Simulation of electron-proton coupling with a Monte Carlo method: application to cytochrome c3 using continuum electrostatics.

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, A M; Martel, P J; Soares, C M

    1999-01-01

    A new method is presented for simulating the simultaneous binding equilibrium of electrons and protons on protein molecules, which makes it possible to study the full equilibrium thermodynamics of redox and protonation processes, including electron-proton coupling. The simulations using this method reflect directly the pH and electrostatic potential of the environment, thus providing a much closer and realistic connection with experimental parameters than do usual methods. By ignoring the full binding equilibrium, calculations usually overlook the twofold effect that binding fluctuations have on the behavior of redox proteins: first, they affect the energy of the system by creating partially occupied sites; second, they affect its entropy by introducing an additional empty/occupied site disorder (here named occupational entropy). The proposed method is applied to cytochrome c3 of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to study its redox properties and electron-proton coupling (redox-Bohr effect), using a continuum electrostatic method based on the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Unlike previous studies using other methods, the full reduction order of the four hemes at physiological pH is successfully predicted. The sites more strongly involved in the redox-Bohr effect are identified by analysis of their titration curves/surfaces and the shifts of their midpoint redox potentials and pKa values. Site-site couplings are analyzed using statistical correlations, a method much more realistic than the usual analysis based on direct interactions. The site found to be more strongly involved in the redox-Bohr effect is propionate D of heme I, in agreement with previous studies; other likely candidates are His67, the N-terminus, and propionate D of heme IV. Even though the present study is limited to equilibrium conditions, the possible role of binding fluctuations in the concerted transfer of protons and electrons under nonequilibrium conditions is also discussed. The

  11. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) in Photocatalysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-08

    how to control and tune it. Such molecules, when incorporated in oxidation catalysts , can serve as proton removal agents. Figure 4. The concept...below.  Use of photobasicity in catalysts : We propose that a photobase be incorporated as a functional component of a conventional organometallic... catalyst and tuned to transduce light excitation to proton removal power. This will be the first time that the proton removal barrier of a redox

  12. Kinetic coupling between electron and proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase: simultaneous measurements of conductance and absorbance changes.

    PubMed Central

    Adelroth, P; Sigurdson, H; Hallén, S; Brzezinski, P

    1996-01-01

    Bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase is an electron-current driven proton pump. To investigate the mechanism by which this pump operates it is important to study individual electron- and proton-transfer reactions in the enzyme, and key reactions in which they are kinetically and thermodynamically coupled. In this work, we have simultaneously measured absorbance changes associated with electron-transfer reactions and conductance changes associated with protonation reactions following pulsed illumination of the photolabile complex of partly reduced bovine cytochrome c oxidase and carbon monoxide. Following CO dissociation, several kinetic phases in the absorbance changes were observed with time constants ranging from approximately 3 microseconds to several milliseconds, reflecting internal electron-transfer reactions within the enzyme. The data show that the rate of one of these electron-transfer reactions, from cytochrome a3 to a on a millisecond time scale, is controlled by a proton-transfer reaction. These results are discussed in terms of a model in which cytochrome a3 interacts electrostatically with a protonatable group, L, in the vicinity of the binuclear center, in equilibrium with the bulk through a proton-conducting pathway, which determines the rate of proton transfer (and indirectly also of electron transfer). The interaction energy of cytochrome a3 with L was determined independently from the pH dependence of the extent of the millisecond-electron transfer and the number of protons released, as determined from the conductance measurements. The magnitude of the interaction energy, 70 meV (1 eV = 1.602 x 10(-19) J), is consistent with a distance of 5-10 A between cytochrome a3 and L. Based on the recently determined high-resolution x-ray structures of bovine and a bacterial cytochrome c oxidase, possible candidates for L and a physiological role for L are discussed. PMID:8901574

  13. Water promoting electron hole transport between tyrosine and cysteine in proteins via a special mechanism: double proton coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Ma, Guangcai; Sun, Weichao; Dai, Hongjing; Xiao, Dong; Zhang, Yanfang; Qin, Xin; Liu, Yongjun; Bu, Yuxiang

    2014-03-26

    The proton/electron transfer reactions between cysteine residue (Cys) and tyrosinyl radical (Tyr(•)) are an important step for many enzyme-catalyzed processes. On the basis of the statistical analysis of protein data bank, we designed three representative models to explore the possible proton/electron transfer mechanisms from Cys to Tyr(•) in proteins. Our ab initio calculations on simplified models and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations on real protein environment reveal that the direct electron transfer between Cys and Tyr(•) is difficult to occur, but an inserted water molecule can greatly promote the proton/electron transfer reactions by a double-proton-coupled electron transfer (dPCET) mechanism. The inserted H2O plays two assistant roles in these reactions. The first one is to bridge the side chains of Tyr(•) and Cys via two hydrogen bonds, which act as the proton pathway, and the other one is to enhance the electron overlap between the lone-pair orbital of sulfur atom and the π-orbital of phenol moiety and to function as electron transfer pathway. This water-mediated dPCET mechanism may offer great help to understand the detailed electron transfer processes between Tyr and Cys residues in proteins, such as the electron transfer from Cys439 to Tyr730(•) in the class I ribonucleotide reductase.

  14. Pneumatic switched angle spinning NMR probe with capacitively coupled double saddle coil.

    PubMed

    Litvak, Ilya M; Espinosa, Catalina A; Shapiro, Rebecca A; Oldham, Andrew N; Duong, Vincent V; Martin, Rachel W

    2010-10-01

    Switched angle spinning (SAS) experiments can be used for generating isotropic-anisotropic correlations in oriented samples in a single experiment. In order for these methods to become widespread, specialized hardware is required. Here we describe the electronic and mechanical design and performance of a double-resonance SAS probe. Unlike many previous SAS probe implementations, the focus here is on systems where the dipolar couplings are partially averaged by molecular motion. This probe has a moving double saddle coil capacitively coupled to the stationary circuit. Angle switching is accomplished by a steam engine-type pneumatic mechanism. The speed and stability of the switching hardware for SAS experiments are demonstrated using spectra of model compounds.

  15. Pneumatic switched angle spinning NMR probe with capacitively coupled double saddle coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Ilya M.; Espinosa, Catalina A.; Shapiro, Rebecca A.; Oldham, Andrew N.; Duong, Vincent V.; Martin, Rachel W.

    2010-10-01

    Switched angle spinning (SAS) experiments can be used for generating isotropic-anisotropic correlations in oriented samples in a single experiment. In order for these methods to become widespread, specialized hardware is required. Here we describe the electronic and mechanical design and performance of a double-resonance SAS probe. Unlike many previous SAS probe implementations, the focus here is on systems where the dipolar couplings are partially averaged by molecular motion. This probe has a moving double saddle coil capacitively coupled to the stationary circuit. Angle switching is accomplished by a steam engine-type pneumatic mechanism. The speed and stability of the switching hardware for SAS experiments are demonstrated using spectra of model compounds.

  16. Solid-state Hadamard NMR spectroscopy: simultaneous measurements of multiple selective homonuclear scalar couplings.

    PubMed

    Kakita, Veera Mohana Rao; Kupče, Eriks; Bharatam, Jagadeesh

    2015-02-01

    Unambiguous measurement of homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in multi-spin scalar network systems is not straightforward. Further, the direct measurement of J-couplings is obscured in solid-state samples due to the dipolar and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA)-dominated line broadening, even under the magic angle spinning (MAS). We present a new multiple frequency selective spin-echo method based on Hadamard matrix encoding, for simultaneous measurement of multiple homonuclear scalar couplings (J) in the solid-state. In contrast to the Hadamard encoded selective excitation schemes known for the solution-state, herein the selectivity is achieved during refocusing period. The Hadamard encoded refocusing scheme concurrently allows to create the spin-spin commutation property between number of spin-pairs of choice in uniformly labelled molecules, which, therefore avoids (1) the repetition of the double selective refocusing experiments for each spin-pair and (2) the synthesis of expensive selective labelled molecules. The experimental scheme is exemplified for determining (1)JCC and (3)JCC values in (13)C6l-Histidine.HCl molecule, which are found to be in excellent agreement with those measured in conventional double frequency selective refocusing mode as well as in the solution-state. This method can be simply extended to 2D/3D pulse schemes and be applied to small bio-molecular solids.

  17. Understanding interactions of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) with its G-protein coupled receptor through NMR and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Malde, Alpeshkumar K; Srivastava, Sudha S; Coutinho, Evans C

    2007-05-01

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP, or glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide) is a 42-amino acid incretin hormone moderating glucose-induced insulin secretion. Antidiabetic therapy based on GIP holds great promise because of the fact that its insulinotropic action is highly dependent on the level of glucose, overcoming the sideeffects of hypoglycemia associated with the current therapy of Type 2 diabetes. The truncated peptide, GIP(1-30)NH2, has the same activity as the full length native peptide. We have studied the structure of GIP(1-30)NH2 and built a model of its G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). The structure of GIP(1-30)NH2 in DMSO-d6 and H2O has been studied using 2D NMR (total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), double quantum filtered-COSY (DQF-COSY), 13C-heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) experiments, and its conformation built by MD simulations with the NMR data as constraints. The peptide in DMSO-d6 exhibits an alpha-helix between residues Ile12 and Lys30 with a discontinuity at residues Gln19 and Gln20. In H2O, the alpha-helix starts at Ile7, breaks off at Gln19, and then continues right through to Lys30. GIP(1-30)NH2 has all the structural features of peptides belonging to family B1 GPCRs, which are characterized by a coil at the N-terminal and a long C-terminal alpha-helix with or without a break. A model of the seven transmembrane (TM) helices of the GIP receptor (GIPR) has been built on the principles of comparative protein modeling, using the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. The N-terminal domain of GIPR has been constructed from the NMR structure of the N-terminal of corticoptropin releasing factor receptor (CRFR), a family B1 GCPR. The intra and extra cellular loops and the C-terminal have been modeled from fragments retrieved from the PDB. On the basis of the experimental data available for some members of family B1 GPCRs, four pairs of constraints between

  18. Solid-State NMR Structure Determination from Diagonal-Compensated, Sparsely Nonuniform-Sampled 4D Proton–Proton Restraints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report acquisition of diagonal-compensated protein structural restraints from four-dimensional solid-state NMR spectra on extensively deuterated and 1H back-exchanged proteins. To achieve this, we use homonuclear 1H–1H correlations with diagonal suppression and nonuniform sampling (NUS). Suppression of the diagonal allows the accurate identification of cross-peaks which are otherwise obscured by the strong autocorrelation or whose intensity is biased due to partial overlap with the diagonal. The approach results in unambiguous spectral interpretation and relatively few but reliable restraints for structure calculation. In addition, the diagonal suppression produces a spectrum with low dynamic range for which ultrasparse NUS data sets can be readily reconstructed, allowing straightforward application of NUS with only 2% sampling density with the advantage of more heavily sampling time-domain regions of high signal intensity. The method is demonstrated here for two proteins, α-spectrin SH3 microcrystals and hydrophobin functional amyloids. For the case of SH3, suppression of the diagonal results in facilitated identification of unambiguous restraints and improvement of the quality of the calculated structural ensemble compared to nondiagonal-suppressed 4D spectra. For the only partly assigned hydrophobin rodlets, the structure is yet unknown. Applied to this protein of biological significance with large inhomogeneous broadening, the method allows identification of unambiguous crosspeaks that are otherwise obscured by the diagonal. PMID:24988008

  19. A proton NMR study of the effect of a new intravasal injectable male contraceptive RISUG on seminal plasma metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sharma, U; Chaudhury, K; Jagannathan, N R; Guha, S K

    2001-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to quantify citrate, glucose, lactate, glycerophosphorylcholine and choline in seminal plasma from subjects injected with a new male contraceptive RISUG, a copolymer of styrene maleic anhydride dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide, and in seminal plasma from normal ejaculates. No significant difference in the concentration of citrate was observed between the groups, indicating that the prostate is not affected by the contraceptive. The concentrations of glucose, lactate, glycerophosphorylcholine and choline were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in subjects injected with RISUG compared with controls. In addition, metabolite ratios such as choline:citrate, citrate:lactate, choline:lactate and glycerophosphorylcholine:choline were calculated. Citrate:lactate and glycerophosphorylcholine:choline ratios were significantly lower in RISUG-injected subjects than in controls (P < 0.01), thereby indicating the occurrence of partial obstructive azoospermia. The most important finding of the present study was that the intervention of RISUG in the vas deferens even for a period as long as 8 years is absolutely safe and does not lead to prostatic diseases.

  20. Effect of the coupling channel on the excitation of hydrogenic atoms by the impact of protons and antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Reda S.

    2014-02-01

    Excitation of hydrogenic atoms H, He+ and Li++ initially in the 2p excited state to the n = 3 states by impact of protons and antiprotons is studied using the single-center atomic orbital close-coupling formalism in its impact parameter approach. The calculations cover the incident energy range from 1 to 1000 keV, in which the straight-line trajectory description of nuclear motion is applicable and the inertial confinement plasma research is of main interest. The influences of couplings between the n = 2 states, as well as the back coupling to the 2p initial state, on the excitation processes are investigated. Including the back couplings is found to be more important in the case of proton scattering than in the case of antiproton, and neglecting couplings between the n = 2 states is found to increase the effect of the sign of the projectile's charge. The calculated cross sections for the H atom are compared with those obtained by previous theoretical calculations.

  1. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  2. Dependence of Vibronic Coupling on Molecular Geometry and Environment: Bridging Hydrogen Atom Transfer and Electron-Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Harshan, Aparna Karippara; Yu, Tao; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-10-28

    The rate constants for typical concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions depend on the vibronic coupling between the diabatic reactant and product states. The form of the vibronic coupling is different for electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, which are associated with hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and electron-proton transfer (EPT) mechanisms, respectively. Most PCET rate constant expressions rely on the Condon approximation, which assumes that the vibronic coupling is independent of the nuclear coordinates of the solute and the solvent or protein. Herein we test the Condon approximation for PCET vibronic couplings. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on molecular geometry is investigated for an open and a stacked transition state geometry of the phenoxyl-phenol self-exchange reaction. The calculations indicate that the open geometry is electronically nonadiabatic, corresponding to an EPT mechanism that involves significant electronic charge redistribution, while the stacked geometry is predominantly electronically adiabatic, corresponding primarily to an HAT mechanism. Consequently, a single molecular system can exhibit both HAT and EPT character. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on the solvent or protein configuration is examined for the soybean lipoxygenase enzyme. The calculations indicate that this PCET reaction is electronically nonadiabatic with a vibronic coupling that does not depend significantly on the protein environment. Thus, the Condon approximation is shown to be valid for the solvent and protein nuclear coordinates but invalid for the solute nuclear coordinates in certain PCET systems. These results have significant implications for the calculation of rate constants, as well as mechanistic interpretations, of PCET reactions.

  3. EPR and ENDOR studies of cryoreduced compounds II of peroxidases and myoglobin. Proton-coupled electron transfer and protonation status of ferryl hemes.

    PubMed

    Davydov, Roman; Osborne, Robert L; Kim, Sun Hee; Dawson, John H; Hoffman, Brian M

    2008-05-06

    The nature of the [Fe(IV)-O] center in hemoprotein Compounds II has recently received considerable attention, as several experimental and theoretical investigations have suggested that this group is not necessarily the traditionally assumed ferryl ion, [Fe(IV)=O]2+, but can be the protonated ferryl, [Fe(IV)-OH]3+. We show here that cryoreduction of the EPR-silent Compound II by gamma-irradiation at 77 K produces Fe(III) species retaining the structure of the precursor [Fe(IV)=O]2+ or [Fe(IV)-OH]3+, and that the properties of the cryogenerated species provide a report on structural features and the protonation state of the parent Compound II when studied by EPR and 1H and 14N ENDOR spectroscopies. To give the broadest view of the properties of Compounds II we have carried out such measurements on cryoreduced Compounds II of HRP, Mb, DHP and CPO and on CCP Compound ES. EPR and ENDOR spectra of cryoreduced HRP II, CPO II and CCP ES are characteristic of low-spin hydroxy-Fe(III) heme species. In contrast, cryoreduced "globins", Mb II, Hb II, and DHP II, show EPR spectra having lower rhombicity. In addition the cryogenerated ferric "globin" species display strongly coupled exchangeable (1)H ENDOR signals, with A max approximately 20 MHz and a iso approximately 14 MHz, both substantially greater than for hydroxide/water ligand protons. Upon annealing at T > 180 K the cryoreduced globin compounds II relax to the low-spin hydroxy-ferric form with a solvent kinetic isotope effect, KIE > 6. The results presented here together with published resonance Raman and Mossbauer data suggest that the high-valent iron center of globin and HRP compounds II, as well as of CCP ES, is [Fe(IV)=O]2+, and that its cryoreduction produces [Fe(III)-O]+. Instead, as proposed by Green and co-workers, CPO II contains [Fe(IV)-OH]3+ which forms [Fe(III)-OH]2+ upon radiolysis. The [Fe(III)-O]+ generated by cryoreduction of HRP II and CCP ES protonate at 77 K, presumably because the heme is linked to

  4. Effect of a new injectable male contraceptive on the seminal plasma amino acids studied by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Koel; Sharma, Uma; Jagannathan, N R; Guha, Sujoy K

    2002-09-01

    Effect of RISUG, a newly developed male contraceptive, on various amino acids of seminal plasma ejaculates was studied by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 400 MHz. Levels of amino acids were compared with the seminal plasma of obstructive azoospermia and controls. Glutamic acid, glutamine, and arginine were found to be high in concentration in human seminal plasma. The concentration of aromatic amino acids such as tyrosine, histidine, and phenylalanine in RISUG-injected subjects showed no significant difference compared to controls (p > 0.1); however, there was a statistically significant decrease in the concentration of these amino acids in obstructive azoospermia. The concentration of some prominent amino acids that showed overlapping resonances, such as isoleucine+leucine+valine (p < 0.01), alanine+isoleucine+lysine (p < 0.01), arginine+lysine+leucine (p < 0.01), and glutamic acid+glutamine (p < 0.01), showed a statistically significant decrease in RISUG-injected subjects compared to controls. Overlap of these amino acid resonances were noticed even at 600 MHz. In general, the total amino acids concentration in RISUG-injected subjects was found to be higher than in azoospermic subjects, confirming the occurrence of 'partial' obstructive azoospermia in subjects injected with this contraceptive.

  5. Mixed micelles of polyethylene glycol (23) lauryl ether with ionic surfactants studied by proton 1D and 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Chang; Zhao, Sui; Mao, Shi-Zhen; Yuan, Han-Zhen; Yu, Jia-Yong; Shen, Lian-Fang; Du, You-Ru

    2002-05-01

    (1)H NMR chemical shift, spin-lattice relaxation time, spin-spin relaxation time, self-diffusion coefficient, and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (2D NOESY) measurements have been used to study the nonionic-ionic surfactant mixed micelles. Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were used as the ionic surfactants and polyethylene glycol (23) lauryl ether (Brij-35) as the nonionic surfactant. The two systems are both with varying molar ratios of CTAB/Brij-35 (C/B) and SDS/Brij-35 (S/B) ranging from 0.5 to 2, respectively, at a constant concentration of 6 mM for Brij-35 in aqueous solutions. Results give information about the relative arrangement of the surfactant molecules in the mixed micelles. In the former system, the trimethyl groups attached to the polar heads of the CTAB molecules are located between the first oxy-ethylene groups next to the hydrophobic chains of Brij-35 molecules. These oxy-ethylene groups gradually move outward from the hydrophobic core of the mixed micelle with an increase in C/B in the mixed solution. In contrast to the case of the CTAB/Triton X-100 system, the long flexible hydrophilic poly oxy-ethylene chains, which are in the exterior part of the mixed micelles, remain coiled, but looser, surrounding the hydrophobic core. There is almost no variation in conformation of the hydrophilic chains of Brij-35 molecules in the mixed micelles of the SDS/Brij-35 system as the S/B increases. The hydrophobic chains of both CTAB and SDS are co-aggregated with Brij-35, respectively, in their mixed micellar cores.

  6. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Strongly Coupled Photosystem II-Inspired Chromophore–Imidazole–Phenol Complex: Stepwise Oxidation and Concerted Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Fujita, Etsuko; Concepcion, Javier J.

    2016-08-18

    Proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions were studied in acetonitrile for a Photosystem II (PSII) inspired [Ru(bpy)2(phen-imidazole-Ph(OH)(tBu)2)]2+, in which Ru(III) generated by a flash-quench sequence oxidizes the appended phenol and the proton is transferred to the hydrogen bonded imidazole base. In contrast to related systems, the donor and acceptor are strongly coupled, as indicated by the shift in the RuIII/IIcouple upon phenol oxidation, and intramolecular oxidation of the phenol by Ru(III) is energetically favorable by both stepwise or concerted pathways. The phenol oxidation occurs via a stepwise ET-PT mechanism with kET = 2.7 × 107 s₋1 and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 0.99 ± 0.03. The electron transfer reaction was characterized as adiabatic with λDA = 1.16 eV and 280 < HDA < 540 cm₋1 consistent with strong electronic coupling and slow solvent dynamics. Reduction of the phenoxyl radical by the quencher radical was examined as the analogue of the redox reaction between the PSII tyrosyl radical and the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). In our PSII-inspired complex, the recombination reaction activation energy is < 2 kcal mol₋1. In conclusion, the reaction is nonadiabatic (VPCET ~ 22 cm₋1 (H) and 49 cm₋1 (D)), concerted, and exhibits an unexpected inverse KIE of 0.55 that is attributed to greater overlap of the reactant vibronic ground state with the OD vibronic states of the proton acceptor due to the smaller quantum spacing of the deuterium vibrational levels.

  7. On the use of time-averaging restraints when deriving biomolecular structure from [Formula: see text]-coupling values obtained from NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lorna J; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hansen, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Deriving molecular structure from [Formula: see text]-couplings obtained from NMR experiments is a challenge due to (1) the uncertainty in the Karplus relation [Formula: see text] connecting a [Formula: see text]-coupling value to a torsional angle [Formula: see text], (2) the need to account for the averaging inherent to the measurement of [Formula: see text]-couplings, and (3) the sampling road blocks that may emerge due to the multiple-valuedness of the inverse function [Formula: see text] of the function [Formula: see text]. Ways to properly handle these issues in structure refinement of biomolecules are discussed and illustrated using the protein hen egg white lysozyme as example.

  8. An analysis of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz A; Hanna, Gabriel

    2014-07-28

    The nonadiabatic dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions is investigated for the first time using a surface-hopping algorithm based on the solution of the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE). This method provides a rigorous treatment of quantum coherence/decoherence effects in the dynamics of mixed quantum-classical systems, which is lacking in the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions surface-hopping approach commonly used for simulating PCET reactions. Within this approach, the protonic and electronic coordinates are treated quantum mechanically and the solvent coordinate evolves classically on both single adiabatic surfaces and on coherently coupled pairs of adiabatic surfaces. Both concerted and sequential PCET reactions are studied in detail under various subsystem-bath coupling conditions and insights into the dynamical principles underlying PCET reactions are gained. Notably, an examination of the trajectories reveals that the system spends the majority of its time on the average of two coherently coupled adiabatic surfaces, during which a phase enters into the calculation of an observable. In general, the results of this paper demonstrate the applicability of QCLE-based surface-hopping dynamics to the study of PCET and emphasize the importance of mean surface evolution and decoherence effects in the calculation of PCET rate constants.

  9. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfer from a metal-hydride complex.

    PubMed

    Bourrez, Marc; Steinmetz, Romain; Ott, Sascha; Gloaguen, Frederic; Hammarström, Leif

    2014-02-01

    Metal hydrides are key intermediates in the catalytic reduction of protons and CO2 as well as in the oxidation of H2. In these reactions, electrons and protons are transferred to or from separate acceptors or donors in bidirectional protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The mechanistic interpretation of PCET reactions of metal hydrides has focused on the stepwise transfer of electrons and protons. A concerted transfer may, however, occur with a lower reaction barrier and therefore proceed at higher catalytic rates. Here we investigate the feasibility of such a reaction by studying the oxidation–deprotonation reactions of a tungsten hydride complex. The rate dependence on the driving force for both electron transfer and proton transfer—employing different combinations of oxidants and bases—was used to establish experimentally the concerted, bidirectional PCET of a metal-hydride species. Consideration of the findings presented here in future catalyst designs may lead to more-efficient catalysts.

  10. Anisotropic indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling in InP: 31P CP NMR study under slow MAS condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Takahiro; Hashi, Kenjiro; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Ohki, Shinobu

    2006-02-01

    The indirect nuclear spin-spin interaction tensor between neighboring 113,115In- 31P spins in Fe-doped InP semiconductor has been studied by 31P NMR spectra measured using CP of 113In → 31P and 115In → 31P under slow MAS condition. The isotropic ( Jiso) and anisotropic ( Janiso = 2/3[ J∥ - J⊥]) parts of the indirect interaction tensor are obtained from the spectral simulation. The acceptable combinations of these values are found to be as follows: ( Jiso, Janiso) = (224 ± 5, 500 ± 100 Hz) or (-224 ± 5, 2100 ± 100 Hz). Although, the coupling constants estimated in this study are slightly different from previously reported values of ∣ Jiso∣ = 350 Hz, Janiso = 1298 Hz [M. Engelsberg, R.E. Norberg, Phys. Rev. B 5 (1972) 3395] and of ∣ Jiso∣ = 225 ± 10, Janiso = (813 ± 50) or (1733 ± 50) Hz [M. Tomaselli et al., Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 8627], all of these has the trend that Janiso is rather larger than Jiso.

  11. Ground-State Proton Transfer Kinetics in Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proton transfer plays an important role in the optical properties of green fluorescent protein (GFP). While much is known about excited-state proton transfer reactions (ESPT) in GFP occurring on ultrafast time scales, comparatively little is understood about the factors governing the rates and pathways of ground-state proton transfer. We have utilized a specific isotopic labeling strategy in combination with one-dimensional 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to install and monitor a 13C directly adjacent to the GFP chromophore ionization site. The chemical shift of this probe is highly sensitive to the protonation state of the chromophore, and the resulting spectra reflect the thermodynamics and kinetics of the proton transfer in the NMR line shapes. This information is complemented by time-resolved NMR, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and steady-state absorbance and fluorescence measurements to provide a picture of chromophore ionization reactions spanning a wide time domain. Our findings indicate that proton transfer in GFP is described well by a two-site model in which the chromophore is energetically coupled to a secondary site, likely the terminal proton acceptor of ESPT, Glu222. Additionally, experiments on a selection of GFP circular permutants suggest an important role played by the structural dynamics of the seventh β-strand in gating proton transfer from bulk solution to the buried chromophore. PMID:25184668

  12. Measuring JHH values with a selective constant-time 2D NMR protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Proton-proton scalar couplings play important roles in molecule structure elucidation. However, measurements of JHH values in complex coupled spin systems remain challenging. In this study, we develop a selective constant-time (SECT) 2D NMR protocol with which scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons can be revealed, and corresponding JHH values can be measured through doublets along the F1 dimension. All JHH values within a network of n fully coupled protons can be separately determined with (n - 1) SECT experiments. Additionally, the proposed pulse sequence possesses satisfactory sensitivity and handy implementation. Therefore, it will interest scientists who intend to address structural analyzes of molecules with overcrowded spectra, and may greatly facilitate the applications of scalar-coupling constants in molecule structure studies.

  13. Interrogation of the intersubunit interface of the open Hv1 proton channel with a probe of allosteric coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Singh, Vikrant; Wulff, Heike; Tombola, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The Hv1 voltage-gated proton channel is a dimeric complex consisting of two voltage-sensing domains (VSDs), each containing a gated proton permeation pathway. Dimerization is controlled by a cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain. The transitions from the closed to the open state in the two VSDs are known to occur cooperatively; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Intersubunit interfaces play a critical role in allosteric processes; but, such interfaces have not been determined in the open Hv1 channel. Here we show that 2-guanidinothiazole derivatives block the two Hv1 VSDs in a cooperative way, and use one of the compounds as a probe of allosteric coupling between open subunits. We find that the extracellular ends of the first transmembrane segments of the VSDs form the intersubunit interface that mediates coupling between binding sites, while the coiled-coil domain does not directly participate in the process. We also find strong evidence that the channel’s proton selectivity filter controls blocker binding cooperativity. PMID:26365828

  14. Change of translational-rotational coupling in liquids revealed by field-cycling 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Schneider, E.; Rössler, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Applying the field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance technique, the frequency dependence of the 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate, R 1 ω = T1 - 1 ω , is measured for propylene glycol (PG) which is increasingly diluted with deuterated chloroform. A frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz and a broad temperature interval from 220 to about 100 K are covered. The results are compared to those of experiments, where glycerol and o-terphenyl are diluted with their deuterated counter-part. Reflecting intra- as well as intermolecular relaxation, the dispersion curves R 1 ω , x (x denotes mole fraction PG) allow to extract the rotational time constant τrot(T, x) and the self-diffusion coefficient D(T, x) in a single experiment. The Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relation is tested in terms of the quantity D(T, x) τrot(T, x) which provides a measure of an effective hydrodynamic radius or equivalently of the spectral separation of the translational and the rotational relaxation contribution. In contrast to o-terphenyl, glycerol and PG show a spectral separation much larger than suggested by the SED relation. In the case of PG/chloroform mixtures, not only an acceleration of the PG dynamics is observed with increasing dilution but also the spectral separation of rotational and translational relaxation contributions continuously decreases. Finally, following a behavior similar to that of o-terphenyl already at about x = 0.6; i.e., while D(T, x) τrot(T, x) in the mixture is essentially temperature independent, it strongly increases with x signaling thus a change of translational-rotational coupling. This directly reflects the dissolution of the hydrogen-bond network and thus a change of solution structure.

  15. Semiclassical study of quantum coherence and isotope effects in ultrafast electron transfer reactions coupled to a proton and a phonon bath.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Charulatha

    2011-11-28

    The linearized semiclassical initial value representation is employed to describe ultrafast electron transfer processes coupled to a phonon bath and weakly coupled to a proton mode. The goal of our theoretical investigation is to understand the influence of the proton on the electronic dynamics in various bath relaxation regimes. More specifically, we study the impact of the proton on coherences and analyze if the coupling to the proton is revealed in the form of an isotope effect. This will be important in distinguishing reactions in which the proton does not undergo significant rearrangement from those in which the electron transfer is accompanied by proton transfer. Unlike other methodologies widely employed to describe nonadiabatic electron transfer, this approach treats the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom consistently. However, due to the linearized approximation, quantum interference effects are not captured accurately. Our study shows that at small phonon bath reorganization energies, coherent oscillations and isotope effect are observed in both slow and fast bath regimes. The coherences are more substantially damped by deuterium in comparison to the proton. Further, in contrast to the dynamics of the spin-boson model, the coherences are not long-lived. At large bath reorganization energies, the decay is incoherent in the slow and fast bath regimes. In this case, the extent of the isotope effect depends on the relative relaxation timescales of the proton mode and the phonon bath. The isotope effect is magnified for baths that relax on picosecond timescales in contrast to baths that relax in femtoseconds.

  16. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one- and two-proton transfer reactions for the 28Si + 90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Sandal, Rohit; Chakraborty, Santosh; Verma, Shashi; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one- and two-proton stripping reactions for 28Si + 90,94Zr systems were performed at 120 MeV. The experiment was carried out with the 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. The theoretical calculations were performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code fresco. The distorted wave Born approximation calculations reproduced the experimental angular distributions for the one-proton transfer channel for both the systems reasonably well but failed for the two-proton transfer channel. Coupled channels calculations including various intermediate states (involving target and projectile inelastic excitations before and/or after transfer) along with the sequential transfer were able to reproduce the two-proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It seems that at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, there is significant contribution of the indirect multistep and sequential transfer to the two-proton stripping reaction.

  17. Structure determination of Ba5AlF13 by coupling electron, synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction, solid-state NMR and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Charlotte; Allix, Mathieu; Suchomel, Matthew R; Porcher, Florence; Vivet, François; Legein, Christophe; Body, Monique; Massiot, Dominique; Taulelle, Francis; Fayon, Franck

    2016-10-04

    The room temperature structure of Ba5AlF13 has been investigated by coupling electron, synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction, solid-state high-resolution NMR ((19)F and (27)Al) and first principles calculations. An initial structural model has been obtained from electron and synchrotron powder diffraction data, and its main features have been confirmed by one- and two-dimensional NMR measurements. However, DFT GIPAW calculations of the (19)F isotropic shieldings revealed an inaccurate location of one fluorine site (F3, site 8a), which exhibited unusual long F-Ba distances. The atomic arrangement was reinvestigated using neutron powder diffraction data. Subsequent Fourier maps showed that this fluorine atom occupies a crystallographic site of lower symmetry (32e) with partial occupancy (25%). GIPAW computations of the NMR parameters validate the refined structural model, ruling out the presence of local static disorder and indicating that the partial occupancy of this F site reflects a local motional process. Visualisation of the dynamic process was then obtained from the Rietveld refinement of neutron diffraction data using an anharmonic description of the displacement parameters to account for the thermal motion of the mobile fluorine. The whole ensemble of powder diffraction and NMR data, coupled with first principles calculations, allowed drawing an accurate structural model of Ba5AlF13, including site-specific dynamical disorder in the fluorine sub-network.

  18. Strong coupling between Eu2+ spins and Fe2As2 layers in EuFe1.9Co0.1As2 observed with NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguchia, Z.; Roos, J.; Shengelaya, A.; Katrych, S.; Bukowski, Z.; Weyeneth, S.; Murányi, F.; Strässle, S.; Maisuradze, A.; Karpinski, J.; Keller, H.

    2011-04-01

    A combination of x-ray diffraction, magnetization, and As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were performed on single-crystal EuFe1.9Co0.1As2. The strength of the hyperfine interaction between the As75 nuclei and the Eu2+ 4f states suggests a strong coupling between the Eu2+ moments and the Fe1.9Co0.1As2 layers. Such a strong interlayer coupling may be due to an indirect exchange interaction between the localized Eu2+ 4f moments, mediated by the Fe 3d conduction electrons. Magnetic susceptibility as well as As75-NMR measurements reveal a decrease of the SDW transition temperature to TSDW = 120 K as a result of Co doping. A change of the slope in the temperature dependence of the NMR frequency of the As75 lower-satellite line was observed at 225 K. At the same temperature also a change of the satellite line shape was found. These changes of the NMR spectra may be caused by the formation of a nematic phase below 225 K in EuFe1.9Co0.1As2.

  19. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Strongly Coupled Photosystem II-Inspired Chromophore–Imidazole–Phenol Complex: Stepwise Oxidation and Concerted Reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Fujita, Etsuko; Concepcion, Javier J.

    2016-08-18

    Proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions were studied in acetonitrile for a Photosystem II (PSII) inspired [Ru(bpy)2(phen-imidazole-Ph(OH)(tBu)2)]2+, in which Ru(III) generated by a flash-quench sequence oxidizes the appended phenol and the proton is transferred to the hydrogen bonded imidazole base. In contrast to related systems, the donor and acceptor are strongly coupled, as indicated by the shift in the RuIII/IIcouple upon phenol oxidation, and intramolecular oxidation of the phenol by Ru(III) is energetically favorable by both stepwise or concerted pathways. The phenol oxidation occurs via a stepwise ET-PT mechanism with kET = 2.7 × 107 s₋1 and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE)more » of 0.99 ± 0.03. The electron transfer reaction was characterized as adiabatic with λDA = 1.16 eV and 280 < HDA < 540 cm₋1 consistent with strong electronic coupling and slow solvent dynamics. Reduction of the phenoxyl radical by the quencher radical was examined as the analogue of the redox reaction between the PSII tyrosyl radical and the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). In our PSII-inspired complex, the recombination reaction activation energy is < 2 kcal mol₋1. In conclusion, the reaction is nonadiabatic (VPCET ~ 22 cm₋1 (H) and 49 cm₋1 (D)), concerted, and exhibits an unexpected inverse KIE of 0.55 that is attributed to greater overlap of the reactant vibronic ground state with the OD vibronic states of the proton acceptor due to the smaller quantum spacing of the deuterium vibrational levels.« less

  20. Long-range proton-coupled electron transfer in phenol-Ru(2,2'-bipyrazine)3(2+) dyads.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Catherine; Wenger, Oliver S

    2014-02-28

    Two dyads in which either 4-cyanophenol or un-substituted phenol is connected via a p-xylene spacer to a Ru(bpz)3(2+) (bpz = 2,2'-bipyrazine) complex were synthesized and investigated. Selective photo-excitation of Ru(bpz)3(2+) at 532 nm in a CH3CN-H2O mixture leads to the formation of 4-cyanophenolate or phenolate along with Ru(bpz)3(2+) in its electronic ground state. This apparent photoacid behavior can be understood on the basis of a reaction sequence comprised of an initial photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) during which 4-cyanophenol or phenol is oxidized and deprotonated, followed by a thermal electron transfer event in the course of which 4-cyanophenoxyl or phenoxyl is reduced by Ru(bpz)3(+) to 4-cyanophenolate or phenolate. Conceptually, this reaction sequence is identical to a sequence of photoinduced charge-separation and thermal charge-recombination events as observed previously for many electron transfer dyads, with the important difference that the initial photoinduced electron transfer process is proton-coupled. The dyad containing 4-cyanophenol reacts via concerted-proton electron transfer (CPET) whereas the dyad containing un-substituted phenol appears to react predominantly via a stepwise PCET mechanism. Long-range PCET is a key reaction in photosystem II. Understanding the factors that govern the kinetics of long-range PCET is desirable in the broader context of light-to-energy conversion by means of proton-electron separation across natural or artificial membranes.

  1. Crystal structure of the pristine peroxidase ferryl center and its relevance to proton-coupled electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Chreifi, Georges; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Doukov, Tzanko; Cohen, Aina E.; McPhillips, Scott E.; Song, Jinhu; Meharenna, Yergalem T.; Soltis, S. Michael; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of peroxides with peroxidases oxidizes the heme iron from Fe(III) to Fe(IV)=O and a porphyrin or aromatic side chain to a cationic radical. X-ray–generated hydrated electrons rapidly reduce Fe(IV), thereby requiring very short exposures using many crystals, and, even then, some reduction cannot be avoided. The new generation of X-ray free electron lasers capable of generating intense X-rays on the tenths of femtosecond time scale enables structure determination with no reduction or X-ray damage. Here, we report the 1.5-Å crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) compound I (CmpI) using data obtained with the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This structure is consistent with previous structures. Of particular importance is the active site water structure that can mediate the proton transfer reactions required for both CmpI formation and reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. The structures indicate that a water molecule is ideally positioned to shuttle protons between an iron-linked oxygen and the active site catalytic His. We therefore have carried out both computational and kinetic studies to probe the reduction of Fe(IV)=O. Kinetic solvent isotope experiments show that the transfer of a single proton is critical in the peroxidase rate-limiting step, which is very likely the proton-coupled reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. We also find that the pKa of the catalytic His substantially increases in CmpI, indicating that this active site His is the source of the proton required in the reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(IV)-OH. PMID:26787871

  2. A minimal non-supersymmetric S O(10) model: Gauge coupling unification, proton decay and fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saki

    2016-06-01

    We present a minimal renormalizable non-supersymmetric S O(10) grand unified model with a symmetry breaking sector consisting of Higgs fields in the 54H + 126H + 10H representations. This model admits a single intermediate scale associated with Pati-Salam symmetry along with a discrete parity. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the unification of gauge couplings and proton lifetime estimates are studied in detail in this framework. Including threshold corrections self-consistently, obtained from a full analysis of the Higgs potential, we show that the model is compatible with the current experimental bound on proton lifetime. The model generally predicts an upper bound of few times 1035 yrs for proton lifetime, which is not too far from the present Super-Kamiokande limit of τp ≳ 1.29 × 1034 yrs. With the help of a Pecci-Quinn symmetry and the resulting axion, the model provides a suitable dark matter candidate while also solving the strong CP problem. The intermediate scale, MI ≈ (1013 - 1014) GeV which is also the B - L scale, is of the right order for the right-handed neutrino mass which enables a successful description of light neutrino masses and oscillations. The Yukawa sector of the model consists of only two matrices in family space and leads to a predictive scenario for quark and lepton masses and mixings. The branching ratios for proton decay are calculable with the leading modes being p → e+π0 and p →v ¯π+ . Even though the model predicts no new physics within the reach of LHC, the next generation proton decay detectors and axion search experiments have the capability to pass verdict on this minimal scenario.

  3. Identification of a higher-order organozincate intermediate involved in Negishi cross-coupling reactions by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Howard N; Hadei, Niloufar; Blagojevic, Voislav; Patschinski, Pascal; Achonduh, George T; Avola, Stephanie; Bohme, Diethard K; Organ, Michael G

    2011-07-04

    Negishi cross-coupling reactions were analyzed in solution by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy to identify both the effect of LiBr as an additive as well as the purpose of 3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as a co-solvent. The results suggest that the main role of DMI is to facilitate a higher order bromozincate formation during the addition of LiBr.

  4. Cooperative coupling and role of heme a in the proton pump of heme-copper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Papa, S; Capitanio, N; Villani, G; Capitanio, G; Bizzoca, A; Palese, L L; Carlino, V; De Nitto, E

    1998-10-01

    In the last few years, evidence has accumulated supporting the applicability of the cooperative model of proton pumps in cytochrome systems, vectorial Bohr mechanisms, to heme-copper oxidases. The vectorial Bohr mechanism is based on short- and long-range protonmotive cooperative effects linked to redox transitions of the metal centers. The crystal structure of oxidized and reduced bovine-heart cytochrome c oxidase reveals, upon reduction, the occurrence of long-range conformational changes in subunit I of the oxidase. Analysis of the crystal structure of cytochrome c oxidase shows the existence of hydrogen-bonded networks of amino acid residues which could undergo redox-linked pK shifts resulting in transmembrane proton translocation. Our group has identified four proteolytic groups undergoing reversible redox-linked pK shifts. Two groups result in being linked to redox transitions of heme a3. One group is apparently linked to CuB. The fourth group is linked to oxido-reduction of heme a. We have shown that the proton transfer resulting from the redox Bohr effects linked to heme a and CuB in the bovine oxidase displays membrane vectorial asymmetry, i.e., protons are taken up from the inner aqueous space (N), upon reduction, and released in the external space (P), upon oxidation of the metals. This direction of proton uptake and release is just what is expected from the vectorial Bohr mechanism. The group linked to heme a, which can transfer up to 0.9 H+/e- at pHs around neutrality, can provide the major contribution to the proton pump. It is proposed that translocation of pumped protons, linked to electron flow through heme a, utilizes a channel (channel D) which extends from a conserved aspartate at the N entrance to a conserved glutamate located between heme a and the binuclear center. The carboxylic group of this glutamic acid, after having delivered, upon electron flow through heme a, pumped protons towards the P phase, once reprotonated from the N phase, moves

  5. 13C NMR of tunnelling methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detken, A.

    The dipolar interactions between the protons and the central 13C nucleus of a 13CH3 group are used to study rotational tunnelling and incoherent dynamics of such groups in molecular solids. Single-crystal 13C NMR spectra are derived for arbitrary values of the tunnel frequency upsilon t. Similarities to ESR and 2H NMR are pointed out. The method is applied to three different materials. In the hydroquinone/acetonitrile clathrate, the unique features in the 13C NMR spectra which arise from tunnelling with a tunnel frequency that is much larger than the dipolar coupling between the methyl protons and the 13C nucleus are demonstrated, and the effects of incoherent dynamics are studied. The broadening of the 13C resonances is related to the width of the quasi-elastic line in neutron scattering. Selective magnetization transfer experiments for studying slow incoherent dynamics are proposed. For the strongly hindered methyl groups of L-alanine, an upper limit for upsilon is derived from the 13C NMR spectrum. In aspirinTM (acetylsalicylic acid), incoherent reorientations dominate the spectra down to the lowest temperatures studied; their rate apparently increases with decreasing temperature below 25K.

  6. Hydration of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II probed in the dark-stable S1 state using proton NMR dispersion profiles.

    PubMed

    Han, Guangye; Huang, Yang; Koua, Faisal Hammad Mekky; Shen, Jian-Ren; Westlund, Per-Olof; Messinger, Johannes

    2014-06-28

    The hydration of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) was characterized in the dark stable S1 state of photosystem II using water R1(ω) NMR dispersion (NMRD) profiles. The R1(ω) NMRD profiles were recorded over a frequency range from 0.01 MHz to 40 MHz for both intact and Mn-depleted photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus (T. vulcanus). The intact-minus-(Mn)-depleted difference NMRD profiles show a characteristic dispersion from approximately 0.03 MHz to 1 MHz, which is interpreted on the basis of the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) and the slow motion theories as being due to a paramagnetic enhanced relaxation (PRE) of water protons. Both theories are qualitatively consistent with the ST = 1, g = 4.9 paramagnetic state previously described for the S1 state of the OEC; however, an alternative explanation involving the loss of a separate class of long-lived internal waters due to the Mn-depletion procedure can presently not be ruled out. Using a point-dipole approximation the PRE-NMRD effect can be described as being caused by 1-2 water molecules that are located about 10 Å away from the spin center of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC. The application of the SBM theory to the dispersion observed for PSII in the S1 state is questionable, because the parameters extracted do not fulfil the presupposed perturbation criterion. In contrast, the slow motion theory gives a consistent picture indicating that the water molecules are in fast chemical exchange with the bulk (τw < 1 μs). The modulation of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction suggests a (restricted) reorientation/structural equilibrium of the Mn4CaO5 cluster with a characteristic time constant of τZFS = 0.6-0.9 μs.

  7. Determination of NH proton chemical shift anisotropy with 14N-1H heteronuclear decoupling using ultrafast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors of protons either directly bonded to 14N nuclei (I = 1) or lying in their vicinity using rotor-synchronous recoupling pulse sequence is always fraught with difficulty due to simultaneous recoupling of 14N-1H heteronuclear dipolar couplings and the lack of methods to efficiently decouple these interactions. This difficulty mainly arises from the presence of large 14N quadrupolar interactions in comparison to the rf field that can practically be achieved. In the present work it is demonstrated that the application of on-resonance 14N-1H decoupling with rf field strength ∼30 times weaker than the 14N quadrupolar coupling during 1H CSA recoupling under ultrafast MAS (90 kHz) results in CSA lineshapes that are free from any distortions from recoupled 14N-1H interactions. With the use of extensive numerical simulations we have shown the applicability of our proposed method on a naturally abundant L-Histidine HCl·H2O sample.

  8. Understanding NMR Multiplet Structure with WinDNMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bampos, N.; Vidal-Ferran, A.

    2000-01-01

    Interpreting the information encoded in the structure of a multiplet representing a nucleus (e.g., a proton) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows us to construct a detailed picture of the molecule to which the nucleus belongs. To gain this understanding, we can employ interactive, user-friendly software packages (such as WinDNMR) on a conventional personal computer to investigate the effect of changing the constituent coupling constants on the appearance of a multiplet. As an example, a multiplet representing a proton coupled to three neighboring environments (four-spin system) is treated in detail. Exercises similar to those presented in this work could be incorporated into a practical component of a course dealing with the basic theoretical concepts of one-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Effect of fast protons and neutrons on charge-coupled devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, N. A.; Lobanov, O. V.; Mitin, E. V.; Pashuk, V. V.; Tverskoi, M. G.

    2013-09-01

    Sony ICX 259AL CCD matrices were irradiated by proton and neutron beams of a synchrocyclotron of the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. The data on production cross sections, as well as the spatial and time distributions of pixels of the irradiated matrices with high dark current, are presented. The experimental data are compared with the calculation results.

  10. Tunable electrochemical pH modulation in a microchannel monitored via the proton-coupled electro-oxidation of hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Contento, Nicholas M; Bohn, Paul W

    2014-07-01

    Electrochemistry is a promising tool for microfluidic systems because it is relatively inexpensive, structures are simple to fabricate, and it is straight-forward to interface electronically. While most widely used in microfluidics for chemical detection or as the transduction mechanism for molecular probes, electrochemical methods can also be used to efficiently alter the chemical composition of small (typically <100 nl) microfluidic volumes in a manner that improves or enables subsequent measurements and sample processing steps. Here, solvent (H2O) electrolysis is performed quantitatively at a microchannel Pt band electrode to increase microchannel pH. The change in microchannel pH is simultaneously tracked at a downstream electrode by monitoring changes in the i-V characteristics of the proton-coupled electro-oxidation of hydroquinone, thus providing real-time measurement of the protonated forms of hydroquinone from which the pH can be determined in a straightforward manner. Relative peak heights for protonated and deprotonated hydroquinone forms are in good agreement with expected pH changes by measured electrolysis rates, demonstrating that solvent electrolysis can be used to provide tunable, quantitative pH control within a microchannel.

  11. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer in a solvated phenol-amine complex.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Puja; Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-02-12

    Photoinduced concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT), denoted photo-EPT, is important for a wide range of energy conversion processes. Transient absorption and Raman spectroscopy experiments on the hydrogen-bonded p-nitrophenylphenol-t-butylamine complex, solvated in 1,2-dichloroethane, suggested that this complex may undergo photo-EPT. The experiments probed two excited electronic states that were interpreted as an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state and an EPT state. Herein mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical nonadiabatic surface hopping dynamics is used to investigate the relaxation pathways following photoexcitation. The potential energy surface is generated on the fly with a semiempirical floating occupation molecular orbital complete active space configuration interaction method for the solute molecule and a molecular mechanical force field for the explicit solvent molecules. The free energy curves along the proton transfer coordinate illustrate that proton transfer is thermodynamically and kinetically favorable on the lower-energy excited state but not on the higher-energy excited state, supporting the characterization of these states as EPT and ICT, respectively. The nonadiabatic dynamics simulations indicate that the population decays from the ICT state to the EPT state in ∼100 fs and from the EPT state to the ground state on the slower time scale of ∼1 ps, qualitatively consistent with the experimental measurements. For ∼54% of the trajectories, the proton transfers from the phenol to the amine in ∼400 fs on the EPT state and then transfers back to the phenol rapidly upon decay to the ground state. Thus, these calculations augment the original interpretation of the experimental data by providing evidence of proton transfer on the EPT state prior to decay to the ground state. The fundamental insights obtained from these simulations are also relevant to other photo-EPT processes.

  12. Probing cation and vacancy ordering in the dry and hydrated yttrium-substituted BaSnO3 perovskite by NMR spectroscopy and first principles calculations: implications for proton mobility.

    PubMed

    Buannic, Lucienne; Blanc, Frédéric; Middlemiss, Derek S; Grey, Clare P

    2012-09-05

    Hydrated BaSn(1-x)Y(x)O(3-x/2) is a protonic conductor that, unlike many other related perovskites, shows high conductivity even at high substitution levels. A joint multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (total energy and GIPAW NMR calculations) investigation of BaSn(1-x)Y(x)O(3-x/2) (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.50) was performed to investigate cation ordering and the location of the oxygen vacancies in the dry material. The DFT energetics show that Y doping on the Sn site is favored over doping on the Ba site. The (119)Sn chemical shifts are sensitive to the number of neighboring Sn and Y cations, an experimental observation that is supported by the GIPAW calculations and that allows clustering to be monitored: Y substitution on the Sn sublattice is close to random up to x = 0.20, while at higher substitution levels, Y-O-Y linkages are avoided, leading, at x = 0.50, to strict Y-O-Sn alternation of B-site cations. These results are confirmed by the absence of a "Y-O-Y" (17)O resonance and supported by the (17)O NMR shift calculations. Although resonances due to six-coordinate Y cations were observed by (89)Y NMR, the agreement between the experimental and calculated shifts was poor. Five-coordinate Sn and Y sites (i.e., sites next to the vacancy) were observed by (119)Sn and (89)Y NMR, respectively, these sites disappearing on hydration. More five-coordinated Sn than five-coordinated Y sites are seen, even at x = 0.50, which is ascribed to the presence of residual Sn-O-Sn defects in the cation-ordered material and their ability to accommodate O vacancies. High-temperature (119)Sn NMR reveals that the O ions are mobile above 400 °C, oxygen mobility being required to hydrate these materials. The high protonic mobility, even in the high Y-content materials, is ascribed to the Y-O-Sn cation ordering, which prevents proton trapping on the more basic Y-O-Y sites.

  13. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in MAS solid-state NMR provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanoseconds-to-milliseconds (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear (13C, 15N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radio-frequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins has been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely (i) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR), and (ii) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e. proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable, and that this cross-correlated relaxation rate constant depends on ns-ms motions, and can thus itself provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin-diffusion attenuates this cross-correlated relaxation, due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and the present manuscript reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  14. Solvent and H/D isotope effects on the proton transfer pathways in heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylic acid anions observed by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-05-22

    Heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded anions A···H···X(-) of phenols (AH) and carboxylic/inorganic acids (HX) dissolved in CD2Cl2 and CDF3/CDF2Cl have been studied by combined low-temperature UV-vis and (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy (UVNMR). The systems constitute small molecular models of hydrogen-bonded cofactors in proteins such as the photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Thus, the phenols studied include the PYP cofactor 4-hydroxycinnamic acid methyl thioester, and the more acidic 4-nitrophenol and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol which mimic electronically excited cofactor states. It is shown that the (13)C chemical shifts of the phenolic residues of A···H···X(-), referenced to the corresponding values of A···H···A(-), constitute excellent probes for the average proton positions. These shifts correlate with those of the H-bonded protons, as well as with the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts. A combined analysis of UV-vis and NMR data was employed to elucidate the proton transfer pathways in a qualitative way. Dual absorption bands of the phenolic moiety indicate a double-well situation for the shortest OHO hydrogen bonds studied. Surprisingly, when the solvent polarity is low the carboxylates are protonated whereas the proton shifts toward the phenolic oxygens when the polarity is increased. This finding indicates that because of stronger ion-dipole interactions small anions are stabilized at high solvent polarity and large anions exhibiting delocalized charges at low solvent polarities. It also explains the large acidity difference of phenols and carboxylic acids in water, and the observation that this difference is strongly reduced in the interior of proteins when both partners form mutual hydrogen bonds.

  15. Neutron-Proton Coupling and the Lifetime of the First Excited State in ^16C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Nuclei near the valley of β-stability have strongly correlated proton and neutron spatial distributions. This need not be the case for nuclei with a large excess of one nucleon type and the search for new phenomena and structure effects due to the ``decoupling'' of neutrons and protons is of great interest in nuclear structure physics. Cited examples of decoupled behavior include neutron-halo nuclei with measurably different proton and neutron radial distributions, and low-energy dipole modes such as ``pygmy'' resonances where, simplistically, a core of equal numbers of protons and neutrons oscillates against the excess neutron ``skin'''. Recently, another example was suggested to occur in ^16C where the measurement of an anomalously quenched B(E2;2^+->^ 0^+) value of 0.63 e^2fm^4 combined with a large nuclear deformation led to the suggestion that the ^16C valence neutrons were decoupled from its near-spherical proton core (N.Imai et al., PRL 92 (2004) 062501; Z.Elekes et al., PLB 586 (2004) 34; H.J.Ong et al., PRC 73 (2006) 024610). In this talk I will discuss a new lifetime measurement for the first-excited 2^+ state in ^16C carried out at the LBNL 88-Inch Cyclotron using the Recoil Distance Method and ^9Be(^9Be,2p) fusion-evaporation reaction. The mean lifetime was found to be 11.7(20) ps corresponding to a B(E2) of 4.15(73) e^2fm^4, consistent with other even-even closed shell nuclei and neighboring systematics. Our result does not support the interpretation of decoupled protons and neutrons in ^16C. The revised value provides an important benchmark for theory. Time permitting I will present results on the neutron-rich nucleus ^30Ne produced in a 2p knockout reaction performed at the NSCL using the S800 spectrometer and SeGA gamma-ray detector. The measured (quenched) 2p knockout cross-section, when compared to theory, suggests a significant difference in the neutron intruder content between ^32Mg and ^30Ne, contrary to current shell models.

  16. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Coupled electron and proton transfer processes in 4-dimethylamino-2-hydroxy-benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Zgierski, Marek Z; Fujiwara, Takashige; Lim, Edward C

    2011-09-08

    TDDFT calculations, picosecond transient absorption, and time-resolved fluorescence studies of 4-dimethylamino-2-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (DMAHBA) have been carried out to study the electron and proton transfer processes in polar (acetonitrile) and nonpolar (n-hexane) solvents. In n-hexane, the transient absorption (TA) as well as the fluorescence originate from the ππ* state of the keto form (with the carbonyl group in the benzaldehyde ring), which is produced by an intramolecular proton transfer from the initially excited ππ* state of the enol form (OH group in the ring). The decay rate of TA and fluorescence are essentially identical in n-hexane. In acetonitrile, on the other hand, the TA exhibits features that can be assigned to the highly polar twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) states of enol forms, as evidenced by the similarity of the absorption to the TICT-state absorption spectra of the closely related 4-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (DMABA). As expected, the decay rate of the TICT-state of DMAHBA is different from the fluorescence lifetime of the ππ* state of the keto form. The occurrence of the proton and electron transfers in acetonitrile is in good agreement with the predictions of the TDDFT calculations. The very short-lived (∼1 ps) fluorescence from the ππ* state of the enol form has been observed at about 380 nm in n-hexane and at about 400 nm in acetonitrile.

  18. Alignment of druglike compounds in lipid bilayers analyzed by solid-state (19)F-NMR and molecular dynamics, based on dipolar couplings of adjacent CF3 groups.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Ulrich H N; Afonin, Sergii; Hoff, Barbara; de Luca, Giuseppina; Emsley, James W; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-04-26

    Solid-state (19)F-NMR spectroscopy is frequently used to analyze the structure and dynamics of lipophilic drugs and peptides embedded in biomembranes. The homonuclear dipolar couplings of trifluoromethyl (CF3) labels can provide valuable parameters such as orientational constraints and/or distances. To characterize the complex dipolar patterns of multiple (19)F spin interactions, three different model compounds carrying two CF3 groups in meta-position on a phenyl ring were incorporated in macroscopically aligned DMPC bilayers. The dipolar patterns obtained with the CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) multipulse sequence were analyzed to yield simultaneously the intra-CF3 and intergroup dipolar coupling values. The fluorine-fluorine distances were predicted by a density functional calculation, and the alignment of the labeled molecular segment could be determined from these distances and the dipolar coupling values. The different compounds were found to align in the lipid bilayer according to their amphiphilic properties, though with a weak anisotropic preference that is typical of solutes in liquid crystals. The residual dipolar couplings were used to calculate Saupe order parameters. For the least complex molecule, (CF3)2-BA, an orientational probability function for the solute in the lipid matrix could be derived. The overall description of how (CF3)2-BA is embedded in the bilayer was independently assessed by molecular dynamics simulations, and compared in structural and dynamical terms with the results of the NMR experiments.

  19. Electrostatic effects on proton coupled electron transfer in oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Vassiliev, Serguei; Rivalta, Ivan; Sultan, Mohammad M; Bruce, Doug; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S; Gunner, M R

    2013-05-23

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on the free energy of proton coupled electron transfer in biomimetic oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) are investigated. The reported study introduces an enhanced multiconformer continuum electrostatics (MCCE) model, parametrized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with a classical valence model for the oxomanganese core. The calculated pKa's and oxidation midpoint potentials (E(m)'s) match experimental values for eight complexes, indicating that purely electrostatic contributions account for most of the observed couplings between deprotonation and oxidation state transitions. We focus on pKa's of terminal water ligands in [Mn(II/III)(H2O)6](2+/3+) (1), [Mn(III)(P)(H2O)2](3-) (2, P = 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato), [Mn2(IV,IV)(μ-O)2(terpy)2(H2O)2](4+) (3, terpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), and [Mn3(IV,IV,IV)(μ-O)4(phen)4(H2O)2](4+) (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and the pKa's of μ-oxo bridges and Mn E(m)'s in [Mn2(μ-O)2(bpy)4] (5, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridyl), [Mn2(μ-O)2(salpn)2] (6, salpn = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine), [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(Cl)-salpn)2] (7), and [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(NO2)-salpn)2] (8). The analysis of complexes 6-8 highlights the strong coupling between electron and proton transfers, with any Mn oxidation lowering the pKa of an oxo bridge by 10.5 ± 0.9 pH units. The model also accounts for changes in the E(m)'s by ligand substituents, such as found in complexes 6-8, due to the electron withdrawing Cl (7) and NO2 (8). The reported study provides the foundation for analysis of electrostatic effects in other oxomanganese complexes and metalloenzymes, where proton coupled electron transfer plays a fundamental role in redox-leveling mechanisms.

  20. Ab initio calculation of the NMR shielding constants for histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, A. P.; Dobrowolski, J. Cz.; Sadlej, J.

    1997-12-01

    The gage-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) approach is used within the coupled Hartree-Fock approximation to compute the 1H, 13C and 15N NMR shielding constants in two tautomeric forms of both the histamine molecule and its protonated form. An analysis of the results shows that the protonation on the end of the chain changes its nitrogen shielding constants of the pyridine and pyrrole type. These changes are much higher for the N(3)-H than for the N(1)-H tautomer.

  1. Complete 1H assignments of the non-exchangeable protons of the non self-complementary heptadeoxyribonucleotide d[(GTCGTCA).(TGACGAC)] and its component strands by high field NMR.

    PubMed

    Lown, J W; Hanstock, C C; Lobe, C G; Bleackley, C

    1985-06-01

    The non self complementary heptadeoxyribonucleotides d(GTCGTCA) and d(TGACGAC) were synthesized by the phosphotriester method. While complete 1H-NMR assignments of the former were obtained by a combination of one and two-dimensional techniques at room temperature, extensive stacking of the latter under these conditions dictated analysis at 50 degrees C when the lines were sharply resolved. The duplex form of the annealed strands under the conditions of the 1H-NMR experiment was established independently of the NMR evidence by 32P end labeling with T4 polynucleotide kinase followed by butt end joining using the absolute specificity of T4 ligase for double strand DNA. Analysis of the resulting ladder of polymers was performed using gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Complete 1H-NMR assignments of the non-exchangeable protons in the self complementary heptamer was achieved. The assignments were confirmed using NOE differences, and two-dimensional COSY, and HH-INADEQUATE experiments at 400 and 500 MHz. The assignments are in accord with a conformation for the heptamer belonging to the B family of structures.

  2. Vicinal 1H-1H NMR coupling constants from density functional theory as reliable tools for stereochemical analysis of highly flexible multichiral center molecules.

    PubMed

    López-Vallejo, Fabian; Fragoso-Serrano, Mabel; Suárez-Ortiz, Gloria Alejandra; Hernández-Rojas, Adriana C; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio

    2011-08-05

    A protocol for stereochemical analysis, based on the systematic comparison between theoretical and experimental vicinal (1)H-(1)H NMR coupling constants, was developed and applied to a series of flexible compounds (1-8) derived from the 6-heptenyl-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one framework. The method included a broad conformational search, followed by geometry optimization at the DFT B3LYP/DGDZVP level, calculation of the vibrational frequencies, thermochemical parameters, magnetic shielding tensors, and the total NMR spin-spin coupling constants. Three scaling factors, depending on the carbon atom hybridizations, were found for the (1)H-C-C-(1)H vicinal coupling constants: f((sp3)-(sp3)) = 0.910, f((sp3)-(sp2)) = 0.929, and f((sp2)-(sp2))= 0.977. A remarkable correlation between the theoretical (J(pre)) and experimental (1)H-(1)H NMR (J(exp)) coupling constants for spicigerolide (1), a cytotoxic natural product, and some of its synthetic stereoisomers (2-4) demonstrated the predictive value of this approach for the stereochemical assignment of highly flexible compounds containing multiple chiral centers. The stereochemistry of two natural 6-heptenyl-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-ones (14 and 15) containing diverse functional groups in the heptenyl side chain was also analyzed by application of this combined theoretical and experimental approach, confirming its reliability. Additionally, a geometrical analysis for the conformations of 1-8 revealed that weak hydrogen bonds substantially guide the conformational behavior of the tetraacyloxy-6-heptenyl-2H-pyran-2-ones.

  3. Phase modulation in dipolar-coupled A 2 spin systems: effect of maximum state mixing in 1H NMR in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Schmitz, Christian; Bachert, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Coupling constants of nuclear spin systems can be determined from phase modulation of multiplet resonances. Strongly coupled systems such as citrate in prostatic tissue exhibit a more complex modulation than AX connectivities, because of substantial mixing of quantum states. An extreme limit is the coupling of n isochronous spins (A n system). It is observable only for directly connected spins like the methylene protons of creatine and phosphocreatine which experience residual dipolar coupling in intact muscle tissue in vivo. We will demonstrate that phase modulation of this "pseudo-strong" system is quite simple compared to those of AB systems. Theory predicts that the spin-echo experiment yields conditions as in the case of weak interactions, in particular, the phase modulation depends linearly on the line splitting and the echo time.

  4. NMR Evidences of the Coupling between Conduction Electrons and Molecular Degrees of Freedom in the Exotic Member of the Bechgaard Salt (TMTSF)2FSO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satsukawa, Hidetaka; Yajima, Akio; Hiraki, Ko-ichi; Takahashi, Toshihiro; Kang, Haeyong; Jo, Younjung; Kang, Woun; Chung, Ok-Hee

    2016-12-01

    We performed 77Se- and 19F-NMR measurements on single crystals of (TMTSF)2FSO3 to characterize the electronic structures of different phases in the temperature-pressure phase diagram, determined by precise transport measurements [Jo et al., Phys. Rev. B 67, 014516 (2003)]. We claim that such varieties of electronic states in the refined phase diagram are caused by strong couplings of the conduction electrons with FSO3 anions, especially with the permanent electric dipoles on the anions. We suggest that as temperature decreases, the FSO3 anions form orientational ordering through two steps; first, only the tetrahedrons form an orientational order leaving the orientations of the electronic dipoles in random (transition I); then the dipoles form a perfect orientational order at a lower temperature (transition II). In the intermediate temperature range between transitions I and II, we found an appreciable enhancement of homogeneous and inhomogeneous widths of the 77Se-NMR spectrum. From the analysis of the angular dependence of the linewidth, we attributed these anomalies to the intramolecular charge disproportionation or imbalance and its slow dynamics caused by the coupling with the permanent electric dipole of the anion. Results of 19F-NMR relaxation and lineshape measurements support this picture very well. Electronic structures at higher pressures up to 1.25 GPa are discussed on the basis of the results of the 77Se- and 19F-NMR measurements.

  5. Positional Enrichment by Proton Analysis (PEPA): A One-Dimensional (1) H-NMR Approach for (13) C Stable Isotope Tracer Studies in Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Vinaixa, Maria; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Aivio, Suvi; Capellades, Jordi; Gómez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau; Stracker, Travis H; Yanes, Oscar

    2017-03-20

    A novel metabolomics approach for NMR-based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of (13) C-satellite peaks using 1D-(1) H-NMR spectra. In comparison with (13) C-NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of (13) C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high-throughput of (1) H-NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D-NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts.

  6. Proton-coupled electron transfer in tyrosine and a β-hairpin maquette: reaction dynamics on the picosecond time scale.

    PubMed

    Pagba, Cynthia V; Chi, San-Hui; Perry, Joseph; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-02-12

    In proteins, proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) can involve the transient oxidation and reduction of the aromatic amino acid tyrosine. Due to the short life time of tyrosyl radical intermediates, transient absorption spectroscopy provides an important tool in deciphering electron-transfer mechanisms. In this report, the photoionization of solution tyrosine and tyrosinate was investigated using transient, picosecond absorption spectroscopy. The results were compared to data acquired from a tyrosine-containing β-hairpin peptide. This maquette, peptide A, is an 18-mer that exhibits π-π interaction between tyrosine (Y5) and histidine (H14). Y5 and H14 carry out an orthogonal PCET reaction when Y5 is oxidized in the mid-pH range. Photolysis of all samples (280 nm, instrument response: 360 fs) generated a solvated electron signal within 3 ps. A signal from the S1 state and a 410 nm signal from the neutral tyrosyl radical were also formed in 3 ps. Fits to S1 and tyrosyl radical decay profiles revealed biphasic kinetics with time constants of 10-50 and 400-1300 ps. The PCET reaction at pH 9 was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of tyrosyl radical and S1 decay compared to electron transfer (ET) alone (pH 11). This pH dependence was observed both in solution and peptide samples. The pH 9 reaction may occur with a sequential electron-transfer, proton-transfer (ETPT) mechanism. Alternatively, the pH 9 reaction may occur by coupled proton and electron transfer (CPET). CPET would be associated with a reorganization energy larger than that of the pH 11 reaction. Significantly, the decay kinetics of S1 and the tyrosyl radical were accelerated in peptide A compared to solution samples at both pH values. These data suggest either an increase in electronic coupling or a specific, sequence-dependent interaction, which facilitates ET and PCET in the β hairpin.

  7. Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Haruhiro; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin (OXT) in phosphate buffer was elucidated by one-dimensional (1D)- and two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques, which involve the assignment of peptide amide NH protons and carbamoyl NH(2) protons. The (1)H-(15)N correlation of seven amide NH protons and three carbamoyl NH(2) protons were also shown by HSQC NMR of OXT without (15)N enrichment.

  8. Nonequilibrium Spin Dynamics: from Protons in Water to a Gauge Theory of Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokatly, I. V.; Sherman, E. Ya.

    Nonequilibrium dynamics of spin degrees of freedom in condensed matter, ranging from classical liquids to solids and ultracold atomic gases, is one of the focus topics in physics. Here we present a gauge theory of spin dynamics in spinorbit coupled gases for a "pure" gauge realization of the spin-orbit coupling field. This approach allows one to describe the spin dynamics in fermionic systems in terms of exact general response functions and to map it on the density dynamics in a dual system without spin-orbit coupling. We apply this approach to electrons in disordered two-dimensional structures and to cold atomic gases of interacting fermions with synthetic spin-orbit coupling at very low temperatures.

  9. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  10. Involvement of a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in the blood-brain barrier transport of amantadine.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toyofumi; Aoyama, Takahiko; Suzuki, Naoto; Kobayashi, Masaru; Fukami, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Tomono, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    The blood-to-brain transport of amantadine, a weak N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, has been shown previously to participate in the cationic drug-sensitive transport system across the mouse blood-brain barrier (BBB). The purpose of the present study was to characterize the influx transport system by means of both an in situ mouse brain perfusion technique and in vitro studies using rat immortalized brain capillary endothelial cells (GPNT). The observed concentration-dependent initial uptake rate of [(3) H]amantadine suggested the involvement of a carrier-mediated transport mechanism. The normal uptake at physiological pH 7.4 was decreased by 72.9% in acidic perfusate, while it was increased by 35.3% in alkaline perfusate. These results suggest that pH-dependent transport is regulated by utilizing an oppositely directed proton gradient as a driving force. In addition, the [(3) H]amantadine uptake was moderately inhibited by the adamantane structural analogs (rimantadine and memantine) and other cationic drugs (pyrilamine, clonidine, nicotine, etc.), but not by substrates or inhibitors of the well-characterized organic cation transporters (tetraethylammonium, l-carnitine and choline). A similar inhibition pattern was observed between the in vivo studies and the in vitro experiments. These results indicate that the influx transport for amantadine across the BBB involves a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. NMR study of strontium binding by a micaceous mineral.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Geoffrey M; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, Sridhar; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na(4)Mg(6)Al(4)Si(4)O(20)F(4). Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a (1)H-(87)Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by (87)Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct (87)Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  12. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  13. Measurement of muon capture on the proton to 1% precision and determination of the pseudoscalar coupling gP.

    PubMed

    Andreev, V A; Banks, T I; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2013-01-04

    The MuCap experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute has measured the rate Λ(S) of muon capture from the singlet state of the muonic hydrogen atom to a precision of 1%. A muon beam was stopped in a time projection chamber filled with 10-bar, ultrapure hydrogen gas. Cylindrical wire chambers and a segmented scintillator barrel detected electrons from muon decay. Λ(S) is determined from the difference between the μ(-) disappearance rate in hydrogen and the free muon decay rate. The result is based on the analysis of 1.2 × 10(10) μ(-) decays, from which we extract the capture rate Λ(S) = (714.9 ± 5.4(stat) ± 5.1(syst)) s(-1) and derive the proton's pseudoscalar coupling g(P)(q(0)(2) = -0.88 m(μ)(2)) = 8.06 ± 0.55.

  14. Proton coupled electron transfer and redox-active tyrosine Z in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Keough, James M; Jenson, David L; Zuniga, Ashley N; Barry, Bridgette A

    2011-07-27

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in many enzymatic processes. In PCET, redox-active tyrosines may be involved as intermediates when the oxidized phenolic side chain deprotonates. Photosystem II (PSII) is an excellent framework for studying PCET reactions, because it contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD and YZ, with different roles in catalysis. One of the redox-active tyrosines, YZ, is essential for oxygen evolution and is rapidly reduced by the manganese-catalytic site. In this report, we investigate the mechanism of YZ PCET in oxygen-evolving PSII. To isolate YZ(•) reactions, but retain the manganese-calcium cluster, low temperatures were used to block the oxidation of the metal cluster, high microwave powers were used to saturate the YD(•) EPR signal, and YZ(•) decay kinetics were measured with EPR spectroscopy. Analysis of the pH and solvent isotope dependence was performed. The rate of YZ(•) decay exhibited a significant solvent isotope effect, and the rate of recombination and the solvent isotope effect were pH independent from pH 5.0 to 7.5. These results are consistent with a rate-limiting, coupled proton electron transfer (CPET) reaction and are contrasted to results obtained for YD(•) decay kinetics at low pH. This effect may be mediated by an extensive hydrogen-bond network around YZ. These experiments imply that PCET reactions distinguish the two PSII redox-active tyrosines.

  15. Probing anomalous couplings using di-Higgs production in electron-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Ruan, Xifeng; Islam, Rashidul; Cornell, Alan S.; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Mellado, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    A proposed high energy Future Circular Hadron-Electron Collider would provide sufficient energy in a clean environment to probe di-Higgs production. Using this channel we show that the azimuthal angle correlation between the missing transverse energy and the forward jet is a very good probe for the non-standard hhh and hhWW couplings. We give the exclusion limits on these couplings as a function of integrated luminosity at a 95% C.L. using the fiducial cross sections. With appropriate error fitting methodology we find that the Higgs boson self coupling could be measured to be ghhh(1) = 1.00-0.17(0.12)+0.24(0.14) of its expected Standard Model value at √{ s} = 3.5 (5.0) TeV for an ultimate 10 ab-1 of integrated luminosity.

  16. The effect of pH on the exchangeability with deuterium of protons coupled to molybdenum(V) in the active and the desulpho forms of xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Malthouse, J P; Bray, R C

    1983-01-01

    The effect of pH variation on the exchangeability with deuterium of protons strongly coupled to Mo(V) in the active and desulpho forms of xanthine oxidase was studied by e.p.r. and rapid freezing, in extension of the work of Gutteridge, Tanner & Bray [Biochem. J. (1978) 175, 887-897]. Above neutrality, exchange rates increased with increasing pH. Detailed studies were made on the desulpho enzyme under a variety of conditions, and exchange rate constants at 22 degrees C ranged from 0.16s -1 at pH 6.6 to 1.6s -1 at pH 11.3. The mechanism of proton exchange in the enzyme is discussed. The interpretation by the above workers that the strongly coupled proton of the active enzyme is on sulphur and that of the desulpho enzyme is on oxygen remains valid (and is in agreement with other work), as do their proposals for the structures of the protonated and deprotonated species. However, pK values cannot be calculated from the exchange data. It is likely that the relatively low rates of exchange observed are due to the difference of structure between the protonated and the deprotonated forms. In the case of the desulpho enzyme, an exchange mechanism, which involves the proton exchanging both as such and along with oxygen in the form of a hydroxyl ion, is discussed. PMID:6312970

  17. Coupled electron transfer and proton hopping in the final step of CYP19-catalyzed androgen aromatization†

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Kakali; Hackett, John C

    2012-01-01

    Aromatase (CYP19) catalyzes the terminal step in estrogen biosynthesis, which requires three separate oxidation reactions, culminating in an enigmatic aromatization that converts an androgen to an estrogen. A stable ferric peroxo (Fe3+O22−) intermediate is seen by electron paramagnetic resonance but its role in this complex reaction remains controversial. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics, we show that ferric peroxo addition to the 19-aldehyde initiates the reaction. Stepwise cleavage of the C10-C19 and O-O bonds of the peroxohemiacetal extrudes formate and yields Compound II, which in turn desaturates the steroid through successive abstraction of the 1β-hydrogen atom and deprotonation of the 2β-position. Throughout the transformation, a proton is cyclically relayed between D309 and the substrate to stabilize reaction intermediates. This mechanism invokes novel oxygen intermediates and provides a unifying interpretation of past experimental mechanistic studies. PMID:22439696

  18. Positional Enrichment by Proton Analysis (PEPA): A One‐Dimensional 1H‐NMR Approach for 13C Stable Isotope Tracer Studies in Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Aivio, Suvi; Capellades, Jordi; Gómez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau; Stracker, Travis H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A novel metabolomics approach for NMR‐based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of 13C‐satellite peaks using 1D‐1H‐NMR spectra. In comparison with 13C‐NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of 13C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high‐throughput of 1H‐NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D‐NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts. PMID:28220994

  19. Probing local structures of siliceous zeolite frameworks by solid-state NMR and first-principles calculations of 29Si-O-29Si scalar couplings.

    PubMed

    Cadars, Sylvian; Brouwer, Darren H; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2009-03-21

    Subtle structural details of siliceous zeolites are probed by using two-bond scalar (J) coupling constants to characterize covalently bonded 29Si-O-29Si site pairs and local framework order. Solid-state two-dimensional (2D) 29Si{29Si} NMR measurements and first-principles calculations of 2J(29Si-O-29Si) couplings shed insights on both the local structures of siliceous zeolites Sigma-2 and ZSM-12, as well as the sensitivity of J couplings for detailed characterization analyses. DFT calculations on a model linear silicate dimer show that 2J(Si-O-Si) couplings have complicated multiple angular dependencies that make semi-empirical treatments impractical, but which are amenable to cluster approaches for accurate J-coupling calculations in zeolites. DFT calculations of 2J(29Si-O-29Si) couplings of the siliceous zeolite Sigma-2, whose framework structure is known to high accuracy from single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies, yield excellent agreement between calculated and experimentally measured 2J(Si-O-Si) couplings. For the siliceous zeolite ZSM-12, calculated 2J(29Si-O-29Si) couplings based on less-certain powder X-ray diffraction analyses deviate significantly from experimental values, while a refined structure based on 29Si chemical-shift-tensor analyses shows substantially improved agreement. 29Si J-coupling interactions can be used as sensitive probes of local structures of zeolitic frameworks and offer new opportunities for refining and solving complicated structures, in combination with complementary scattering, modeling, and other nuclear spin interactions.

  20. Redox-Linked Conformational Control of Proton Coupled Electron Transfer: Y122 in the Ribonucleotide Reductase β2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Offenbacher, Adam R.; Burns, Lori A.; Sherrill, C. David; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosyl radicals play essential roles in biological proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides and is vital in DNA replication in all organisms. Class Ia RNRs consist of α2 and β2 homodimeric subunits. In class 1a RNR, such as the E. coli enzyme, an essential tyrosyl radical (Y122O•)-diferric cofactor is located in β2. While Y122O• is extremely stable in free β2, Y122O• is highly reactive in the quaternary substrate-α2β2 complex and serves as a radical initiator in catalytic PCET between β2 and α2. In this report, we investigate the structural interactions that control the reactivity of Y122O• in a model system, isolated E. coli β2. Y122O• was reduced with hydroxyurea (HU), a radical scavenger that quenches the radical in a clinically relevant reaction. In the difference FT-IR spectrum, associated with this PCET reaction, amide I (CO) and amide II (CN/NH) bands were observed. Specific 13C-labeling of the tyrosine C1 carbon assigned a component of these bands to the Y122-T123 amide bond. Comparison to density functional calculations on a model dipeptide, tyrosine-threonine, and structural modeling demonstrated that PCET is associated with a Y122 rotation and a 7.2 Å translation of the Y122 phenolic oxygen. To test for the functional consequences of this structural change, a proton inventory defined the origin of the large solvent isotope effect (SIE=16.7±1.0 at 25°C) on this reaction. These data suggest that the one electron, HU-mediated reduction of Y122O• is associated with two, rate-limiting (full or partial) proton transfer reactions. One is attributable to HU oxidation (SIE=11.9, net H atom transfer), and the other is attributable to coupled, hydrogen-bonding changes in the Y122O•-diferric cofactor (SIE=1.4). These results illustrate the importance of redox-linked changes to backbone and ring dihedral angles in high potential PCET and provide evidence for

  1. Effective rotational correlation times of proteins from NMR relaxation interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghan; Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effective rotational correlation times, τc, for the modulation of anisotropic spin-spin interactions in macromolecules subject to Brownian motion in solution is of key interest for the practice of NMR spectroscopy in structural biology. The value of τc enables an estimate of the NMR spin relaxation rates, and indicates possible aggregation of the macromolecular species. This paper reports a novel NMR pulse scheme, [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT, which is based on transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy and permits to determine τc for 15N- 1H bonds without interference from dipole-dipole coupling of the amide proton with remote protons. [ 15N, 1H]-TRACT is highly efficient since only a series of one-dimensional NMR spectra need to be recorded. Its use is suggested for a quick estimate of the rotational correlation time, to monitor sample quality and to determine optimal parameters for complex multidimensional NMR experiments. Practical applications are illustrated with the 110 kDa 7,8-dihydroneopterin aldolase from Staphylococcus aureus, the uniformly 15N-labeled Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) in 60 kDa mixed OmpX/DHPC micelles with approximately 90 molecules of unlabeled 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), and the 16 kDa pheromone-binding protein from Bombyx mori, which cover a wide range of correlation times.

  2. Dosimetry of {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir gamma-irradiated agarose gels by proton relaxation time measurement and NMR imaging, in a 0-100 Gy dose range

    SciTech Connect

    Chalansonnet, A.; Briguet, A.; Bonnat, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    Localized irradiation of the skin and subcutaneous tissues with large single doses of gamma rays can induce immediate effects characterized by erythema, desquamation, and necrosis. Correlations between the evolution of the lesions and dosimetry studies have to be established by biophysical methods. NMR studies of the effects of an irradiated Fricke solution might be a means of controlling the delivered irradiation doses. After exposition to ionizing radiations, ferrous ions are transformed into ferric ions. Both are paramagnetic ions, and proton spin-lattice relaxation is accelerated depending on the oxidation reaction. In this study, solution of ammonium ferrous sulfate in an acid environment was incorporated into a gelling substance made with agarose, so that T{sub 1} weighted image contrast could be used to detect ferric ion formation. Experiments with {sup 192}Ir and {sup 90}Co gamma rays with doses in the 0 to 100 Gy range were conducted with Fe{sup 2+} concentrations of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mM in a gelling substance containing 4% agarose. A relationship was established between the amount of Fe{sup 3+} created and the spin-lattice proton relaxation rate, which led to a straightforward dose-effect relation. The use of such high doses allowed us to reproduce realistic conditions of accidental overexposure. A linear relationship was obtained between the doses absorbed and the NMR parameters measured (T{sub 1} and relative image intensity). 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one and two proton transfer reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Verma, S.; Sandal, Rohit; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one and two proton stripping reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems were performed at lab energy 120 MeV with 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. Theoretical calculations performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code FRESCO (including various intermediate states involving target and projectile excitations before and/or after transfer along with sequential transfer) were able to reproduce one and two proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It was found that the DWBA calculations could describe the one proton transfer data well for both the systems but failed to reproduce the angular distributions for two proton transfer channels. The present measurements underline the importance of sequential transfer at energies much above the Coulomb barrier. We had also performed transfer reaction measurements for these systems in the sub- and near barrier region using recoil mass separator.

  4. The Nickel-Pincer Complex in Lactate Racemase Is an Electron Relay and Sink that acts through Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binju; Shaik, Sason

    2017-02-03

    QM/MM calculations reveal that the nickel pincer complex in lactate racemase functions as a reversible "single-center electrode" that accepts and donates back an electron. In this way, it catalyzes the isomerization process d-lactate⇌l-lactate through successive proton-coupled electron-transfer steps.

  5. (13)C-Decoupled J-Coupling Spectroscopy Using Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Zero-Field.

    PubMed

    Sjolander, Tobias F; Tayler, Michael C D; Kentner, Arne; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2017-04-06

    We present a two-dimensional method for obtaining (13)C-decoupled, (1)H-coupled nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra in zero magnetic field using coherent spin-decoupling. The result is a spectrum determined only by the proton-proton J-coupling network. Detection of NMR signals in zero magnetic field requires at least two different nuclear spin species, but the proton J-spectrum is independent of isotopomer, thus potentially simplifying spectra and thereby improving the analytical capabilities of zero-field NMR. The protocol does not rely on a difference in Larmor frequency between the coupled nuclei, allowing for the direct determination of J-coupling constants between chemically equivalent spins. We obtain the (13)C-decoupled zero-field spectrum of [1-(13)C]-propionic acid and identify conserved quantum numbers governing the appearance of cross peaks in the two-dimensional spectrum.

  6. Pseudo-scalar pi N coupling and relativistic proton-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Franz; Maung, Khin Maung; Tjon, J. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wallace, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    Relativistic p-Ca-40 elastic scattering observables are calculated using relativistic NN amplitudes obtained from the solution of a two-body relativistic equation in which one particle is kept on its mass-shell. Results at 200 MeV are presented for two sets of NN amplitudes, one with pure pseudo-vector coupling for the pion and another with a 25 percent admixture of pseudo-scaling coupling. Both give a very good fit to the positive energy on-shell NN data. Differences between the predictions of these two models (which are shown to be due only to the differences in their corresponding negative energy amplitudes) provide a measure of the uncertainty in contructing Dirac optical potentials from NN amplitudes.

  7. Determination of magnetic and structural properties in solids containing antiferromagnetically coupled metal centers using NMR methods. Magneto-structural correlations in anhydrous copper(II) n-butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G.C.; Haw, J.F.

    1988-10-19

    A new approach to the investigation of magneto-structural correlations in solids containing antiferromagnetically coupled transition-metal centers is described that illustrates the potential of NMR spectroscopy in such work. The results of a variable-temperature (VT) /sup 13/C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) NMR investigation of anhydrous copper(II) n-butyrate, (Cu(C/sub 3/H/sub 7/COO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/ are reported. Isotropic shifts are found to be primarily contact in origin, and a statistical analysis of their temperature dependence allows the calculation of singlet-triplet energy level separations (-2J), diamagnetic shifts (delta/sub dia/), and electron-nucleus hyperfine coupling constants (A), which are shown to give insight into the mechanisms of electron delocalization along the superexchange pathway. Signal multiplicity can be related to compound structure, which was determined by using x-ray crystallography. The title compound is triclinic and has a space group of P/anti 1/ with a = 9.035 (2) /angstrom/, b = 5.192 (2) /angstrom/, c = 11.695 (3) /angstrom/, ..cap alpha.. = 85.88 (2)/degrees/, ..gamma.. = 109.32 (2)/degrees/, Z = 1, and V = 515.2 (3) /angstrom//sup 3/; the final weighted R value for 2169 reflections was 0.048. 21 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in glacial ice: coupling natural abundance 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Woods, Gwen C; Dubnick, Ashley; Simpson, André J; Sharp, Martin J; Fitzsimons, Sean J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2012-04-03

    Glaciers and ice sheets are the second largest freshwater reservoir in the global hydrologic cycle, and the onset of global climate warming has necessitated an assessment of their contributions to sea-level rise and the potential release of nutrients to nearby aquatic environments. In particular, the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from glacier melt could stimulate microbial activity in both glacial ecosystems and adjacent watersheds, but this would largely depend on the composition of the material released. Using fluorescence and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, we characterize DOM at its natural abundance in unaltered samples from a number of glaciers that differ in geographic location, thermal regime, and sample depth. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling of DOM fluorophores identifies components in the ice that are predominantly proteinaceous in character, while (1)H NMR spectroscopy reveals a mixture of small molecules that likely originate from native microbes. Spectrofluorescence also reveals a terrestrial contribution that was below the detection limits of NMR; however, (1)H nuclei from levoglucosan was identified in Arctic glacier ice samples. This study suggests that the bulk of the DOM from these glaciers is a mixture of biologically labile molecules derived from microbes.

  9. Solar-Driven Water Oxidation and Decoupled Hydrogen Production Mediated by an Electron-Coupled-Proton Buffer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solar-to-hydrogen photoelectrochemical cells (PECs) have been proposed as a means of converting sunlight into H2 fuel. However, in traditional PECs, the oxygen evolution reaction and the hydrogen evolution reaction are coupled, and so the rate of both of these is limited by the photocurrents that can be generated from the solar flux. This in turn leads to slow rates of gas evolution that favor crossover of H2 into the O2 stream and vice versa, even through ostensibly impermeable membranes such as Nafion. Herein, we show that the use of the electron-coupled-proton buffer (ECPB) H3PMo12O40 allows solar-driven O2 evolution from water to proceed at rates of over 1 mA cm–2 on WO3 photoanodes without the need for any additional electrochemical bias. No H2 is produced in the PEC, and instead H3PMo12O40 is reduced to H5PMo12O40. If the reduced ECPB is subjected to a separate electrochemical reoxidation, then H2 is produced with full overall Faradaic efficiency. PMID:27159121

  10. Overexpression of a proton-coupled vacuolar glucose exporter impairs freezing tolerance and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Trentmann, Oliver; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schulz, Alexander; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Arabidopsis vacuoles harbor, besides sugar transporter of the TMT-type, an early response to dehydration like 6 (ERDL6) protein involved in glucose export into the cytosol. However, the mode of transport of ERDL6 and the plant's feedback to overexpression of its activity on essential properties such as, for example, seed germination or freezing tolerance, remain unexplored. Using patch-clamp studies on vacuoles expressing AtERDL6 we demonstrated directly that this carrier operates as a proton-driven glucose exporter. Overexpression of BvIMP, the closest sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) homolog to AtERDL6, in Arabidopsis leads surprisingly to impaired seed germination under both conditions, sugar application and low environmental temperatures, but not under standard conditions. Upon cold treatment, BvIMP overexpressor plants accumulated lower quantities of monosaccharides than the wild-type, a response in line with the reduced frost tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and the fact that cold temperatures inhibits BvIMP transcription in sugar beet leaves. With these findings we show that the tight control of vacuolar sugar import and export is a key requisite for cold tolerance and seed germination of plants.

  11. Coupling of proton flow to ATP synthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus: F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase is absent from about half of chromatophores.

    PubMed

    Feniouk, B A; Cherepanov, D A; Junge, W; Mulkidjanian, A Y

    2001-11-01

    F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase (H(+)-ATP synthase, F(0)F(1)) utilizes the transmembrane protonmotive force to catalyze the formation of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate (P(i)). Structurally the enzyme consists of a membrane-embedded proton-translocating F(0) portion and a protruding hydrophilic F(1) part that catalyzes the synthesis of ATP. In photosynthetic purple bacteria a single turnover of the photosynthetic reaction centers (driven by a short saturating flash of light) generates protonmotive force that is sufficiently large to drive ATP synthesis. Using isolated chromatophore vesicles of Rhodobacter capsulatus, we monitored the flash induced ATP synthesis (by chemoluminescence of luciferin/luciferase) in parallel to the transmembrane charge transfer through F(0)F(1) (by following the decay of electrochromic bandshifts of intrinsic carotenoids). With the help of specific inhibitors of F(1) (efrapeptin) and of F(0) (venturicidin), we decomposed the kinetics of the total proton flow through F(0)F(1) into (i) those coupled to the ATP synthesis and (ii) the de-coupled proton escape through F(0). Taking the coupled proton flow, we calculated the H(+)/ATP ratio; it was found to be 3.3+/-0.6 at a large driving force (after one saturating flash of light) but to increase up to 5.1+/-0.9 at a smaller driving force (after a half-saturating flash). From the results obtained, we conclude that our routine chromatophore preparations contained three subsets of chromatophore vesicles. Chromatophores with coupled F(0)F(1) dominated in fresh material. Freezing/thawing or pre-illumination in the absence of ADP and P(i) led to an increase in the fraction of chromatophores with at least one de-coupled F(0)(F(1)). The disclosed fraction of chromatophores that lacked proton-conducting F(0)(F(1)) (approx. 40% of the total amount) remained constant upon these treatments.

  12. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, quantitative, reproducible, untargeted and unbiased method that requires no or minimal sample preparation, and is one of the leading analytical tools for metabonomics research [1-3]. The easy quantification and the no need of prior knowledge about compounds present in a sample associated with NMR are advantageous over other techniques [1,4]. 1H NMR is especially attractive because protons are present in virtually all metabolites and its NMR sensitivity is high, enabling the simultaneous identification and monitoring of a wide range of low molecular weight metabolites.

  13. O-Acetyl Side-Chains in Monosaccharides: Redundant NMR Spin-Couplings and Statistical Models for Acetate Ester Conformational Analysis.

    PubMed

    Turney, Toby; Pan, Qingfeng; Sernau, Luke; Carmichael, Ian; Zhang, Wenhui; Wang, Xiaocong; Woods, Robert J; Serianni, Anthony S

    2017-01-12

    α- and β-d-glucopyranose monoacetates 1-3 were prepared with selective (13)C enrichment in the O-acetyl side-chain, and ensembles of (13)C-(1)H and (13)C-(13)C NMR spin-couplings (J-couplings) were measured involving the labeled carbons. Density functional theory (DFT) was applied to a set of model structures to determine which J-couplings are sensitive to rotation of the ester bond θ. Eight J-couplings ((1)JCC, (2)JCH, (2)JCC, (3)JCH, and (3)JCC) were found to be sensitive to θ, and four equations were parametrized to allow quantitative interpretations of experimental J-values. Inspection of J-coupling ensembles in 1-3 showed that O-acetyl side-chain conformation depends on molecular context, with flanking groups playing a dominant role in determining the properties of θ in solution. To quantify these effects, ensembles of J-couplings containing four values were used to determine the precision and accuracy of several 2-parameter statistical models of rotamer distributions across θ in 1-3. The statistical method used to generate these models has been encoded in a newly developed program, MA'AT, which is available for public use. These models were compared to O-acetyl side-chain behavior observed in a representative sample of crystal structures, and in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of O-acetylated model structures. While the functional form of the model had little effect on the precision of the calculated mean of θ in 1-3, platykurtic models were found to give more precise estimates of the width of the distribution about the mean (expressed as circular standard deviations). Validation of these 2-parameter models to interpret ensembles of redundant J-couplings using the O-acetyl system as a test case enables future extension of the approach to other flexible elements in saccharides, such as glycosidic linkage conformation.

  14. Functional and mechanistic roles of the human proton-coupled folate transporter transmembrane domain 6–7 linker

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mike R.; Hou, Zhanjun; Wilson, Lucas J.; Ye, Jun; Matherly, Larry H.

    2016-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT; SLC46A1) is a folate–proton symporter expressed in solid tumors and is used for tumor-targeted delivery of cytotoxic antifolates. Topology modeling suggests that the PCFT secondary structure includes 12 transmembrane domains (TMDs) with TMDs 6 and 7 linked by an intracellular loop (positions 236–265) including His247, implicated as functionally important. Single-cysteine (Cys) mutants were inserted from positions 241 to 251 in Cys-less PCFT and mutant proteins were expressed in PCFT-null (R1–11) HeLa cells; none were reactive with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate biotin, suggesting that the TMD6–7 loop is intracellular. Twenty-nine single alanine mutants spanning the entire TMD6–7 loop were expressed in R1–11 cells; activity was generally preserved, with the exception of the 247, 250, and 251 mutants, partly due to decreased surface expression. Coexpression of PCFT TMD1–6 and TMD7–12 half-molecules in R1–11 cells partially restored transport activity, although removal of residues 252–265 from TMD7–12 abolished transport. Chimeric proteins, including a nonhomologous sequence from a thiamine transporter (ThTr1) inserted into the PCFT TMD6–7 loop (positions 236–250 or 251–265), were active, although replacement of the entire loop with the ThTr1 sequence resulted in substantial loss of activity. Amino acid replacements (Ala, Arg, His, Gln, and Glu) or deletions at position 247 in wild-type and PCFT–ThTr1 chimeras resulted in differential effects on transport. Collectively, our findings suggest that the PCFT TMD6–7 connecting loop confers protein stability and may serve a unique functional role that depends on secondary structure rather than particular sequence elements. PMID:27514717

  15. Photoacid behavior versus proton-coupled electron transfer in phenol-Ru(bpy)3(2+) dyads.

    PubMed

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2013-07-18

    Two dyads composed of a Ru(bpy)3(2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) photosensitizer and a covalently attached phenol were synthesized and investigated. In the shorter dyad (Ru-PhOH) the ruthenium complex and the phenol are attached directly to each other whereas in the longer dyad there is a p-xylene (xy) spacer in between (Ru-xy-PhOH). Electrochemical investigations indicate that intramolecular electron transfer (ET) from phenol to the photoexcited metal complex is endergonic by more than 0.3 eV in both dyads, explaining the absence of any (3)MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) excited-state quenching by the phenols in pure CH3CN and CH2Cl2. When pyridine is added to a CH2Cl2 solution, significant excited-state quenching can be observed for both dyads, but the bimolecular quenching rate constants differ by 2 orders of magnitude between Ru-PhOH and Ru-xy-PhOH. Transient absorption spectroscopy shows that in the presence of pyridine both dyads react to photoproducts containing Ru(II) and phenolate. The activation energies associated with the photoreactions in the two dyads differ by 1 order of magnitude, and this might suggest that the formation of identical photoproducts proceeds through fundamentally different reaction pathways in Ru-PhOH and Ru-xy-PhOH. For Ru-PhOH direct proton release from the photoexcited dyad is a plausible reaction pathway. For Ru-xy-PhOH a sequence of a photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) followed by an intramolecular (thermal) electron transfer in the reverse direction is a plausible reaction pathway; this two-step process involves a reaction intermediate containing Ru(I) and phenoxyl radical that reacts very rapidly to Ru(II) and phenolate. Thermal back-reactions to restore the initial starting materials occur on a 30-50 μs time scale in both dyads; i.e., due to proton release the photoproducts are very long-lived. These back-reactions exhibit inverse H/D kinetic isotope effects of 0.7 ± 0.1 (Ru-PhOH) and 0.6 ± 0.1 (Ru

  16. pH-Dependent Reduction Potentials and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Hydrogen-Producing Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Appel, Aaron M.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-04-01

    The nickel-based Ph Bz 2 2 P N electrocatalysts, which are comprised of a nickel atom and two 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands, have been shown to effectively catalyze H2 production in acetonitrile. Recent electrochemical experiments revealed a linear dependence of the NiII/I reduction potential on pH, suggesting a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. In the proposed mechanism, the catalytic cycle begins with a PCET process involving electrochemical electron transfer to the nickel center and intermolecular proton transfer from an acid to the pendant amine ligand. This paper presents quantum mechanical calculations of this PCET process to examine the thermodynamics of the sequential mechanisms, in which either the electron or the proton transfers first (ET–PT and PT–ET, respectively), and the concerted mechanism (EPT). The favored mechanism depends on a balance among many factors, including the acid strength, association free energy for the acid–catalyst complex, PT free energy barrier, and ET reduction potential. The ET reduction potential is less negative after PT, favoring the PT–ET mechanism, and the association free energy is less positive after reduction, favoring the ET–PT mechanism. The calculations, along with analysis of the experimental data, indicate that the sequential ET–PT mechanism is favored for weak acids because of the substantial decrease in the association free energy after reduction. For strong acids, however, the PT–ET mechanism may be favored because the association free energy is somewhat smaller and PT is more thermodynamically favorable. The concerted mechanism could also occur, particularly for intermediate acid strengths. In the context of the entire catalytic cycle for H2 production, the initial PCET process involving intermolecular PT has a more negative reduction potential than the subsequent PCET process involving intramolecular PT. As a result, the second PCET should

  17. Vicinal proton—proton coupling constants. Basis set dependence in SCF ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San-Fabián, Jesús; Guilleme, Joaquín; Díez, Ernesto; Lazzeretti, Paolo; Malagoli, Massimo; Zanasi, Riccardo

    1993-04-01

    An SCF ab initio study of the angular dependence and substituent effects upon the vicinal coupling constants has been carried out for the molecules CH 3CH 3, CH 2FCH 3 and CHF 2CH 3. The four contributions to 3JHH ( JFC, JSD, JOD and JOP) have been computed using the STO-3G, 6-31G, 6-31G * and 6-31G ** basis sets. The major contributions arise from the FC term. The magnitude of the SD contributions is very small and near independent of the size of the basis set. The magnitude of the orbital contributions OR (=OD+OP) decreases as the size of the basis set increases. The FC term slightly overestimates both the individual and the interaction substituent effects for basis sets larger than the STO-3G one. For this basis such effects are underestimated.

  18. A quantum chemical study of the mechanism for proton-coupled electron transfer leading to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.; Siegbahn, Per E. M.

    2010-10-01

    The proton pumping mechanism in cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory chain, has been investigated using hybrid DFT with large chemical models. In previous studies, a gating mechanism was suggested based on electrostatic interpretations of kinetic experiments. The predictions from that analysis are tested here. The main result is that the suggestion of a positively charged transition state for proton transfer is confirmed, while some other suggestions for the gating are not supported. It is shown that a few critical relative energy values from the earlier studies are reproduced with quite high accuracy using the present model calculations. Examples are the forward barrier for proton transfer from the N-side of the membrane to the pump-loading site when the heme a cofactor is reduced, and the corresponding back leakage barrier when heme a is oxidised. An interesting new finding is an unexpected double-well potential for proton transfer from the N-side to the pump-loading site. In the intermediate between the two transition states found, the proton is bound to PropD on heme a. A possible purpose of this type of potential surface is suggested here. The accuracy of the present values are discussed in terms of their sensitivity to the choice of dielectric constant. Only one energy value, which is not critical for the present mechanism, varies significantly with this choice and is therefore less certain.

  19. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  20. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  1. A Nickel Dithiolate Water Reduction Catalyst Providing Ligand-Based Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Pathways.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Keita; Yamauchi, Kosei; Sakai, Ken

    2017-03-09

    A nickel pyrazinedithiolate ([Ni(dcpdt)2 ](2-) ; dcpdt=5,6-dicyanopyrazine-2,3-dithiolate), bearing a NiS4 core similar to the active center of [NiFe] hydrogenase, is shown to serve as an efficient molecular catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). This catalyst shows effectively low overpotentials for HER (330-400 mV at pH 4-6). Moreover, the turnover number of catalysis reaches 20 000 over the 24 h electrolysis with a high Faradaic efficiency, 92-100 %. The electrochemical and DFT studies reveal that diprotonated one-electron-reduced species (i.e., [Ni(II) (dcpdt)(dcpdtH2 )](-) or [Ni(II) (dcpdtH)2 ](-) ) forms at pH<6.4 via ligand-based proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) pathways, leading to electrocatalytic HER without applying the highly negative potential required to generate low-valent nickel intermediates. This is the first example of catalysts exhibiting such behavior.

  2. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of J-coupled resonances in human brain at 3 and 4 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Bustillo, Juan; Chen, Hongji; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Gasparovic, Charles; Zuo, Chun; Magnotta, Vincent; Mueller, Bryon; Mullins, Paul; Renshaw, Perry; Ugurbil, Kamil; Lim, Kelvin O; Alger, Jeffry R

    2007-08-01

    In this multicenter study, 2D spatial mapping of J-coupled resonances at 3T and 4T was performed using short-TE (15 ms) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI). Water-suppressed (WS) data were acquired in 8.5 min with 1-cm(3) spatial resolution from a supraventricular axial slice. Optimized outer volume suppression (OVS) enabled mapping in close proximity to peripheral scalp regions. Constrained spectral fitting in reference to a non-WS (NWS) scan was performed with LCModel using correction for relaxation attenuation and partial-volume effects. The concentrations of total choline (tCho), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamate + glutamine (Glu+Gln), myo-inositol (Ins), NAA, NAA+NAAG, and two macromolecular resonances at 0.9 and 2.0 ppm were mapped with mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) between 6% and 18% and approximately 150-cm(3) sensitive volumes. Aspartate, GABA, glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and macromolecules (MMs) at 1.2 ppm were also mapped, although with larger mean CRLBs between 30% and 44%. The CRLBs at 4T were 19% lower on average as compared to 3T, consistent with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral resolution. Metabolite concentrations were in the ranges reported in previous studies. Glu concentration was significantly higher in gray matter (GM) compared to white matter (WM), as anticipated. The short acquisition time makes this methodology suitable for clinical studies.

  3. Coupled modeling of water transport and air-droplet interaction in the electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Pianese, Cesare; Guezennec, Yann G.

    In this work, an accurate and computationally fast model for liquid water transport within a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) electrode is developed by lumping the space-dependence of the relevant variables. Capillarity is considered as the main transport mechanism within the gas diffusion layer (GDL). The novelty of the model lies in the coupled simulation of the water transport at the interface between gas diffusion layer and gas flow channel (GFC). This is achieved with a phenomenological description of the process that allows its simulation with relative simplicity. Moreover, a detailed two-dimensional visualization of such interface is achieved via geometric simulation of water droplets formation, growth, coalescence and detachment on the surface of the GDL. The model is useful for optimization analysis oriented to both PEMFC design and balance of plant. Furthermore, the accomplishment of reduced computational time and good accuracy makes the model suitable for control strategy implementation to ensure PEM fuel cells operation within optimal electrode water content.

  4. On the Usage of Locally Dense Basis Sets in the Calculation of NMR Indirect Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Marina; Provasi, Patricio F.; Aucar, Gustavo A.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    Locally dense basis sets (couplings in several saturated and unsaturated fluorinated hydrocarbons. We find that the choice of the basis set for each atom belonging to our studied model compounds depends on its location with respect to the coupled fluorine atoms and on the cis/trans or synperiplanar/antiperiplanar conformation of the molecule. Carbon atoms in the bonding path connecting the coupled fluorine atoms have to be described with better basis sets than the carbon atoms outside this path. For the hydrogen atoms directly connected to the coupling pathway in molecules with trans or antiperiplanar conformations and for all hydrogen atoms not directly connected to the coupling pathway one can employ a minimal basis set with only one s-function. Employing these type of LDBSs we can reduce the number of necessary basis functions by about 30% without losing more than about 1 Hz in accuracy. The analysis of the four contributions to the vicinal fluorine-fluorine coupling constants shows that the non-contact orbital paramagnetic term is the most important contribution followed by the also non-contact spin-dipolar term. The Fermi contact term is the largest contribution only in the synperiplanar conformations of 1,2-difluoroethane and -propane.

  5. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio

  6. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified into primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and of gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance with wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C

  7. Combined HPLC-MS and HPLC-NMR on-line coupling for the separation and determination of lutein and zeaxanthin stereoisomers in spinach and in retina.

    PubMed

    Dachtler, M; Glaser, T; Kohler, K; Albert, K

    2001-02-01

    The determination and unambiguous identification of carotenoid stereoisomers from biological tissues, avoiding isomerization and oxidation due to the extraction process, is still a major challenge. Particularly, the analysis of lutein and zeaxanthin stereoisomers is of great importance, as these are the main constituents of the macula lutea, the central part of the human retina, and act as possible agents in the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). By combining a mild and quick extraction technique such as matrix solid-phase dispersion together with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the extremely light and oxygen sensitive lutein and zeaxanthin stereoisomers are extracted, enriched, and separated directly from the solid plant or tissue samples, excluding preparation of artifacts. HPLC separations are performed with C30 phases due to their enhanced shape selectivity compared to C18 phases and on-line coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. By using HPLC-MS with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, the lutein stereoisomers can be distinguished from the zeaxanthin stereoisomers within one chromatographic run in the upper picogram range, whereas HPLC-NMR coupling allows the unequivocal identification of each stereoisomer with a concentration in the upper nanogram range. This article provides an analytical method for the artifact-free determination of lutein and zeaxanthin stereoisomers directly from the solid biological tissue spinach as a source of carotenoids and retina as the sphere of activity for AMD. In addition, the structures of these stereoisomers were unambiguously elucidated by employing hyphenated analytical techniques.

  8. Roles of multiple-proton transfer pathways and proton-coupled electron transfer in the reactivity of the bis-FeIV state of MauG.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongxin; Williamson, Heather R; Davidson, Victor L

    2015-09-01

    The high-valent state of the diheme enzyme MauG exhibits charge-resonance (CR) stabilization in which the major species is a bis-Fe(IV) state with one heme present as Fe(IV)=O and the other as Fe(IV) with axial heme ligands provided by His and Tyr side chains. In the absence of its substrate, the high-valent state is relatively stable and returns to the diferric state over several minutes. It is shown that this process occurs in two phases. The first phase is redistribution of the resonance species that support the CR. The second phase is the loss of CR and reduction to the diferric state. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the rates of the two phases exhibited different temperature dependencies and activation energies of 8.9 and 19.6 kcal/mol. The two phases exhibited kinetic solvent isotope effects of 2.5 and 2.3. Proton inventory plots of each reaction phase exhibited extreme curvature that could not be fit to models for one- or multiple-proton transfers in the transition state. Each did fit well to a model for two alternative pathways for proton transfer, each involving multiple protons. In each case the experimentally determined fractionation factors were consistent with one of the pathways involving tunneling. The percent of the reaction that involved the tunneling pathway differed for the two reaction phases. Using the crystal structure of MauG it was possible to propose proton-transfer pathways consistent with the experimental data using water molecules and amino acid side chains in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme.

  9. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets.

  10. First half-reaction mechanism of nitric oxide synthase: the role of proton and oxygen coupled electron transfer in the reaction by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Bin; Carvajal, Maria Angels; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-08

    The first half-reaction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is investigated by means of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. An energetically feasible arginine hydroxylation path was found only when the iron-oxy complex accepted one proton from an external source. The so formed species has not been considered in heme chemistry; it is described as Por(+*)Fe(III)-OOH and is characterized by the same molecular constituency as the more known ferric-hydroperoxide species, compound 0, but has a cation-radical porphyrin moiety. The reaction itself is found to involve proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and oxygen coupled electron transfer (OCET) steps en route to the formation of compound I and the ultimate monooxygenation of arginine. The cofactor H(4)B turns out to be a key player in the mechanism acting alternatively as an electron donor (when neutral) and an electron sink (when in its radical-cation state) and, thereby, providing the electron transfer component in the various coupled proton and oxygen transfer steps (see Scheme 4 ). The various pieces of this mechanism account for many of the experimental observations, such as the following: (a) the origins of the second proton supplied to the heme, (b) the elusiveness of compound I, (c) the inactivity of peroxide-shunt pathways in NOS first half-reaction, (d) the inhibition of the H(4)B analogue 4-amino-H(4)B due to protonation at the N3 position, (e) the roles of Trp188 (iNOS numbering) and the crystal water at the active site (W115), and so on. Alternative mechanistic hypotheses are tested and excluded, and a new mechanism for the NOS second half-reaction is proposed.

  11. Ab initio multireference configuration interaction and coupled cluster studies of potential surfaces for proton transfer in (H{sub 3}N---H---OH{sub 2}){sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, S.; Chapman, D.A.; Kaufman, J.J.; Kaldor, U.

    1992-03-05

    Proton-transfer reactions are important in chemical and biological processes, including photosynthesis and vision. The multiple reference double-excitation configuration interaction method (MRD-CI) and the coupled cluster method (CCM) were applied for the studies of the ground-state and low-lying excited states for the proton-transfer system (H{sub 3}N---H---OH{sub 2}){sup +}. The geometry optimization at the SCF level indicates the rapid change in geometry of subunits while the proton moves between N and O atoms. The significant difference was found between the structure of potential curves for the short N-O distances (2.707, 2.95, 3.2 {Angstrom}) and the long N-O distance (5.0 {Angstrom}). The complicated multireference structure of potential curves results from the strong interactions between them. The ground state is described by a single determinant wave function for short N-O distances; however, for a distance of 5.0 {Angstrom} the multireference structure becomes significant for intermediate regions of the hydrogen bond. The correlation between the protonation potential surfaces for NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O and the structure of surfaces for the proton-transfer system of the complex can be recognized. The simple interpretation of the gross atomic population on the transferred proton indicates that the reaction proceeds as a {open_quotes}proton transfer{close_quotes} in the ground electronic state and a {open_quotes}hydrogen transfer{close_quotes} in low-lying excited states. 33 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Surface modification of Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles by silane coupling agent: Synthesis and application in proton exchange composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Salarizadeh, Parisa; Javanbakht, Mehran; Pourmahdian, Saeed; Bagheri, Ahmad; Beydaghi, Hossein; Enhessari, Morteza

    2016-06-15

    Modifying surfaces of nanoparticles with silane coupling agent provides a simple method to alter their surface properties and improve their dispersibility in organic solvents and polymer matrix. Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles (IT) were modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as novel reinforcing filler for proton exchange membranes. The main operating parameters such as reaction time (R.T), APTES/IT and triethylamine (TEA)/IT ratios have been optimized for maximum grafting efficiency. The optimum conditions for R.T, APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were 6h, 4 and 0.3 respectively. It was observed that the APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were the most significant parameters affecting the grafting percentage. Modified nanoparticles were characterized using FT-IR, TGA, SEM, TEM and XRD techniques. Effects of modified nanoparticles in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) were evaluated. The resulting nanocomposite membranes exhibited higher proton conductivity in comparison with pristine SPPEK and SPPEK/IT membranes. This increase is attributed to connectivity of the water channels which creates more direct pathways for proton transport. Composite membrane with 3% AIT (6.46% grafting amount) showed 0.024 S cm(-1) proton conductivity at 25 °C and 149 mW cm(-2) power density (at 0.5V) at 80 °C which were about 243% and 51%, respectively higher than that of pure SPPEK.

  13. New insights into the substrate specificities of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters from E. coli by a pH sensitive assay.

    PubMed

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Jensen, Johanne M; Ernst, Heidi A; Iram, Nida; Rahman, Moazur; Mirza, Osman

    2014-02-14

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that facilitate di- and tripeptide uptake by coupling it to an inward directed proton electrochemical gradient. Here the substrate specificities of Escherichia coli POTs YdgR, YhiP and YjdL were investigated by means of a label free transport assay using the hydrophilic pH sensitive dye pyranine and POT overexpressing E. coli cells. The results confirm and extend the functional knowledge on E. coli POTs. In contrast to previous assumptions, alanine and trialanine appears to be substrates of YjdL, albeit poor compared to dipeptides. Similarly tetraalanine apparently is a substrate of both YdgR and YhiP.

  14. Determination of the 14N quadrupole coupling constant of nitroxide spin probes by W-band ELDOR-detected NMR.

    PubMed

    Florent, Marc; Kaminker, Ilia; Nagarajan, Vijayasarathi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2011-06-01

    Nitroxide spin probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has proven to be a very successful method to probe local polarity and solvent hydrogen bonding properties at the molecular level. The g(xx) and the (14)N hyperfine A(zz) principal values are the EPR parameters of the nitroxide spin probe that are sensitive to these properties and are therefore monitored experimentally. Recently, the (14)N quadrupole interaction of nitroxides has been shown to be also highly sensitive to polarity and H-bonding (A. Savitsky et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 112 (2008) 9079). High-field electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) was used successfully to determine the P(xx) and P(yy) principal components of the (14)N quadrupole tensor. The P(zz) value was calculated from the traceless character of the quadrupole tensor. We introduce here high-field (W-band, 95 GHz, 3.5 T) electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR)-detected NMR as a method to obtain the (14)N P(zz) value directly, together with A(zz). This is complemented by W-band hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) measurements carried out along the g(xx) direction to determine the principal P(xx) and P(yy) components. Through measurements of TEMPOL dissolved in solvents of different polarities, we show that A(zz) increases, while |P(zz)| decreases with polarity, as predicted by Savitsky et al.

  15. Determination of the 14N quadrupole coupling constant of nitroxide spin probes by W-band ELDOR-detected NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florent, Marc; Kaminker, Ilia; Nagarajan, Vijayasarathi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2011-06-01

    Nitroxide spin probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has proven to be a very successful method to probe local polarity and solvent hydrogen bonding properties at the molecular level. The g xx and the 14N hyperfine A zz principal values are the EPR parameters of the nitroxide spin probe that are sensitive to these properties and are therefore monitored experimentally. Recently, the 14N quadrupole interaction of nitroxides has been shown to be also highly sensitive to polarity and H-bonding (A. Savitsky et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 112 (2008) 9079). High-field electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) was used successfully to determine the P xx and P yy principal components of the 14N quadrupole tensor. The P zz value was calculated from the traceless character of the quadrupole tensor. We introduce here high-field (W-band, 95 GHz, 3.5 T) electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR)-detected NMR as a method to obtain the 14N P zz value directly, together with A zz. This is complemented by W-band hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) measurements carried out along the g xx direction to determine the principal P xx and P yy components. Through measurements of TEMPOL dissolved in solvents of different polarities, we show that A zz increases, while | P zz| decreases with polarity, as predicted by Savitsky et al.

  16. Slow proton transfer coupled to unfolding explains the puzzling results of single-molecule experiments on BBL, a paradigmatic downhill folding protein.

    PubMed

    Cerminara, Michele; Campos, Luis A; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A battery of thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural approaches has indicated that the small α-helical protein BBL folds-unfolds via the one-state downhill scenario. Yet, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy offers a more conflicting view. Single-molecule experiments at pH 6 show a unique half-unfolded conformational ensemble at mid denaturation, whereas other experiments performed at higher pH show a bimodal distribution, as expected for two-state folding. Here we use thermodynamic and laser T-jump kinetic experiments combined with theoretical modeling to investigate the pH dependence of BBL stability, folding kinetics and mechanism within the pH 6-11 range. We find that BBL unfolding is tightly coupled to the protonation of one of its residues with an apparent pKa of ~ 7. Therefore, in chemical denaturation experiments around neutral pH BBL unfolds gradually, and also converts in binary fashion to the protonated species. Moreover, under the single-molecule experimental conditions (denaturant midpoint and 279 K), we observe that proton transfer is much slower than the ~ 15 microseconds folding-unfolding kinetics of BBL. The relaxation kinetics is distinctly biphasic, and the overall relaxation time (i.e. 0.2-0.5 ms) becomes controlled by the proton transfer step. We then show that a simple theoretical model of protein folding coupled to proton transfer explains quantitatively all these results as well as the two sets of single-molecule experiments, including their more puzzling features. Interestingly, this analysis suggests that BBL unfolds following a one-state downhill folding mechanism at all conditions. Accordingly, the source of the bimodal distributions observed during denaturation at pH 7-8 is the splitting of the unique conformational ensemble of BBL onto two slowly inter-converting protonation species. Both, the unprotonated and protonated species unfold gradually (one-state downhill), but they exhibit different degree of unfolding at any given

  17. Zero-field NMR of small-amplitude motions in a polycrystalline solid

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.; Thayer, A.M.; Zax, D.B.; Pines, A.

    1986-08-20

    The librational motions of the water molecules in polycrystalline barium chlorate monohydrate have been studied by using proton and deuterium zero-field NMR. In contrast to high-field NMR, subtle molecular motions produce readily observable changes in the zero-field spectrum. Computer simulations and application of a novel-pulsed zero-field technique confirm that the splitting observed in the zero-field spectrum of the hydrate results from the motionally induced asymmetry of the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling tensor.

  18. Crystal structure and proton conductivity of BaSn0.6Sc0.4O3-δ : insights from neutron powder diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kinyanjui, Francis G; Norberg, Stefan T; Knee, Christopher S; Ahmed, Istaq; Hull, Stephen; Buannic, Lucienne; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Grey, Clare P; Eriksson, Sten G

    2016-04-14

    The solid-state synthesis and structural characterisation of perovskite BaSn1-x Sc x O3-δ (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) and its corresponding hydrated ceramics are reported. Powder and neutron X-ray diffractions reveal the presence of cubic perovskites (space group Pm3m) with an increasing cell parameter as a function of scandium concentration along with some indication of phase segregation. (119)Sn and (45)Sc solid-state NMR spectroscopy data highlight the existence of oxygen vacancies in the dry materials, and their filling upon hydrothermal treatment with D2O. It also indicates that the Sn(4+) and Sc(3+) local distribution at the B-site of the perovskite is inhomogeneous and suggests that the oxygen vacancies are located in the scandium dopant coordination shell at low concentrations (x ≤ 0.2) and in the tin coordination shell at high concentrations (x ≥ 0.3). (17)O NMR spectra on (17)O enriched BaSn1-x Sc x O3-δ materials show the existence of Sn-O-Sn, Sn-O-Sc and Sc-O-Sc bridging oxygen environments. A further room temperature neutron powder diffraction study on deuterated BaSn0.6Sc0.4O3-δ refines the deuteron position at the 24k crystallographic site (x, y, 0) with x = 0.579(3) and y = 0.217(3) which leads to an O-D bond distance of 0.96(1) Å and suggests tilting of the proton towards the next nearest oxygen. Proton conduction was found to dominate in wet argon below 700 °C with total conductivity values in the range 1.8 × 10(-4) to 1.1 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) between 300 and 600 °C. Electron holes govern the conduction process in dry oxidizing conditions, whilst in wet oxygen they compete with protonic defects leading to a wide mixed conduction region in the 200 to 600 °C temperature region, and a suppression of the conductivity at higher temperature.

  19. NMR and Raman spectroscopy monitoring of proton/deuteron exchange in aqueous solutions of ionic liquids forming hydrogen bond: a role of anions, self-aggregation, and mesophase formation.

    PubMed

    Klimavicius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Kausteklis, Jonas; Aleksa, Valdemaras; Aidas, Kestutis; Balevicius, Vytautas

    2013-09-05

    The H/D exchange process in the imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) 1-decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide- and chloride ([C10mim][Br] and [C10mim][Cl]) in D2O solutions of various concentrations was studied applying (1)H, (13)C NMR, and Raman spectroscopy. The time dependencies of integral intensities in NMR spectra indicate that the H/D exchange in [C10mim][Br] at very high dilution (10(-4) mole fraction of RTIL) runs only slightly faster than in [C10mim][Cl]. The kinetics of this process drastically changes above critical aggregation concentration (CAC). The time required to reach the apparent reaction saturation regime in the solutions of 0.01 mole fraction of RTIL was less 10 h for [C10mim][Br], whereas no such features were seen for [C10mim][Cl] even tens of days after the sample was prepared. The H/D exchange was not observed in the liquid crystalline gel mesophase. The role of anions, self-aggregation (micellization), and mesophase formation has been discussed. Crucial influence of Br(-) and Cl(-) anions on the H/D exchange rates above CAC could be related to the short-range ordering and molecular microdynamics, in particular that of water molecules. The concept of the conformational changes coupled with the H/D exchange in imidazolium-based ionic liquids with longer hydrocarbon chains can be rejected in the light of (13)C NMR experiment. The revealed changes in (13)C NMR spectra are caused by the secondary ((13)C) isotope effects not being the signal shifts due to the conformational trans-gauche transition.

  20. Electrochemical Electron Transfer and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Effects of Double Layer and Ionic Environment on Solvent Reorganization Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Soumya; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-06-14

    Electron transfer and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions at electrochemical interfaces play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes. The reorganization energy, which is a measure of the free energy change associated with solute and solvent rearrangements, is a key quantity for calculating rate constants for these reactions. We present a computational method for including the effects of the double layer and ionic environment of the diffuse layer in calculations of electrochemical solvent reorganization energies. This approach incorporates an accurate electronic charge distribution of the solute within a molecular-shaped cavity in conjunction with a dielectric continuum treatment of the solvent, ions, and electrode using the integral equations formalism polarizable continuum model. The molecule-solvent boundary is treated explicitly, but the effects of the electrode-double layer and double layer-diffuse layer boundaries, as well as the effects of the ionic strength of the solvent, are included through an external Green’s function. The calculated total reorganization energies agree well with experimentally measured values for a series of electrochemical systems, and the effects of including both the double layer and ionic environment are found to be very small. This general approach was also extended to electrochemical PCET and produced total reorganization energies in close agreement with experimental values for two experimentally studied PCET systems. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  1. Using solid 13C NMR coupled with solution 31P NMR spectroscopy to investigate molecular species and lability of organic carbon and phosphorus from aquatic plants in Tai Lake, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic plants are involved in the storage and release capacity for organic matter and nutrients. In this study, solid 13C and solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the biomass samples of six aquatic plants. Solid 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the domin...

  2. Sensitive proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of large proteins with selective CH3 labelling: application to the 50S ribosome subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Crublet, Elodie; Macek, Pavel; Kerfah, Rime; Gauto, Diego F.; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy allows the characterization of structure, interactions and dynamics of insoluble and/or very large proteins. Sensitivity and resolution are often major challenges for obtaining atomic-resolution information, in particular for very large protein complexes. Here we show that the use of deuterated, specifically CH3-labelled proteins result in significant sensitivity gains compared to previously employed CHD2 labelling, while line widths only marginally increase. We apply this labelling strategy to a 468 kDa-large dodecameric aminopeptidase, TET2, and the 1.6 MDa-large 50S ribosome subunit of Thermus thermophilus. PMID:27385633

  3. NMR Studies in Dodecylphosphocholine of a Fragment Containing the Seventh Transmembrane Helix of a G-Protein-Coupled Receptor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Neumoin, Alexey; Arshava, Boris; Becker, Jeff; Zerbe, Oliver; Naider, Fred

    2007-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of a large segment of Ste2p, the G-protein-coupled α-factor receptor from yeast, were studied in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles using solution NMR spectroscopy. We investigated the 73-residue peptide EL3-TM7-CT40 consisting of the third extracellular loop 3 (EL3), the seventh transmembrane helix (TM7), and 40 residues from the cytosolic C-terminal domain (CT40). The structure reveals the presence of an α-helix in the segment encompassing residues 10–30, which is perturbed around the internal Pro-24 residue. Root mean-square deviation values of individually superimposed helical segments 10–20 and 25–30 were 0.91 ± 0.33 Å and 0.76 ± 0.37 Å, respectively. 15N-relaxation and residual dipolar coupling data support a rather stable fold for the TM7 part of EL3-TM7-CT40, whereas the EL3 and CT40 segments are more flexible. Spin-label data indicate that the TM7 helix integrates into DPC micelles but is flexible around the internal Pro-24 site, exposing residues 22–26 to solution and reveal a second site of interaction with the micelle within a region comprising residues 43–58, which forms part of a less well-defined nascent helix. These findings are discussed in light of previous studies in organic-aqueous solvent systems. PMID:17449670

  4. N-H...F hydrogen bonds in fluorinated benzanilides: NMR and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha Reddy, G N; Vasantha Kumar, M V; Guru Row, T N; Suryaprakash, N

    2010-10-28

    Using (19)F and (1)H-NMR (with (14)N decoupling) spectroscopic techniques together with density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, we have investigated weak molecular interactions in isomeric fluorinated benzanilides. Simultaneous presence of through space nuclear spin-spin couplings ((1h)J(N-HF)) of diverse strengths and feeble structural fluctuations are detected as a function of site specific substitution of fluorine atoms within the basic identical molecular framework. The transfer of hydrogen bonding interaction energies through space is established by perturbing their strengths and monitoring the effect on NMR parameters. Multiple quantum (MQ) excitation, up to the highest possible MQ orders of coupled protons, is utilized as a tool for accurate (1)H assignments. Results of NMR studies and DFT calculations are compared with the relevant structural parameters taken from single crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  5. Orientation of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa in lipid membranes determined from 19F-NMR dipolar couplings of 4-CF3-phenylglycine labels.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Ralf W; Sachse, Carsten; Dürr, Ulrich H N; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2004-05-01

    A highly sensitive solid state (19)F-NMR strategy is described to determine the orientation and dynamics of membrane-associated peptides from specific fluorine labels. Several analogues of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa were synthesized with the non-natural amino acid 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylglycine (CF(3)-Phg) at different positions throughout the alpha-helical peptide chain. A simple 1-pulse (19)F experiment allows the simultaneous measurement of both the anisotropic chemical shift and the homonuclear dipolar coupling within the rotating CF(3)-group in a macroscopically oriented membrane sample. The value and sign of the dipolar splitting determines the tilt of the CF(3)-rotational axis, which is rigidly attached to the peptide backbone, with respect to the external magnetic field direction. Using four CF(3)-labeled peptide analogues (with L-CF(3)-Phg at Ile9, Ala10, Ile13, and Ala14) we confirmed that PGLa is aligned at the surface of lipid membranes with its helix axis perpendicular to the bilayer normal at a peptide:lipid ratio of 1:200. We also determined the azimuthal rotation angle of the helix, which agrees well with the orientation expected from its amphiphilic character. Peptide analogues with a D-CF(3)-Phg label resulting from racemization of the amino acid during synthesis were separately collected by HPLC. Their spectra provide additional information about the PGLa structure and orientation but allow only to discriminate qualitatively between multiple solutions. The structural and functional characterization of the individual CF(3)-labeled peptides by circular dichroism and antimicrobial assays showed only small effects for our four substitutions on the hydrophobic face of the helix, but a significant disturbance was observed in a fifth analogue where Ala8 on the hydrophilic face had been replaced. Even though the hydrophobic CF(3)-Phg side chain cannot be utilized in all positions, it allows highly sensitive NMR measurements over a wide range of

  6. Biophysical comparison of ATP-driven proton pumping mechanisms suggests a kinetic advantage for the rotary process depending on coupling ratio.

    PubMed

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Zuckerman, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    ATP-driven proton pumps, which are critical to the operation of a cell, maintain cytosolic and organellar pH levels within a narrow functional range. These pumps employ two very different mechanisms: an elaborate rotary mechanism used by V-ATPase H+ pumps, and a simpler alternating access mechanism used by P-ATPase H+ pumps. Why are two different mechanisms used to perform the same function? Systematic analysis, without parameter fitting, of kinetic models of the rotary, alternating access and other possible mechanisms suggest that, when the ratio of protons transported per ATP hydrolyzed exceeds one, the one-at-a-time proton transport by the rotary mechanism is faster than other possible mechanisms across a wide range of driving conditions. When the ratio is one, there is no intrinsic difference in the free energy landscape between mechanisms, and therefore all mechanisms can exhibit the same kinetic performance. To our knowledge all known rotary pumps have an H+:ATP ratio greater than one, and all known alternating access ATP-driven proton pumps have a ratio of one. Our analysis suggests a possible explanation for this apparent relationship between coupling ratio and mechanism. When the conditions under which the pump must operate permit a coupling ratio greater than one, the rotary mechanism may have been selected for its kinetic advantage. On the other hand, when conditions require a coupling ratio of one or less, the alternating access mechanism may have been selected for other possible advantages resulting from its structural and functional simplicity.

  7. Biophysical comparison of ATP-driven proton pumping mechanisms suggests a kinetic advantage for the rotary process depending on coupling ratio

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    ATP-driven proton pumps, which are critical to the operation of a cell, maintain cytosolic and organellar pH levels within a narrow functional range. These pumps employ two very different mechanisms: an elaborate rotary mechanism used by V-ATPase H+ pumps, and a simpler alternating access mechanism used by P-ATPase H+ pumps. Why are two different mechanisms used to perform the same function? Systematic analysis, without parameter fitting, of kinetic models of the rotary, alternating access and other possible mechanisms suggest that, when the ratio of protons transported per ATP hydrolyzed exceeds one, the one-at-a-time proton transport by the rotary mechanism is faster than other possible mechanisms across a wide range of driving conditions. When the ratio is one, there is no intrinsic difference in the free energy landscape between mechanisms, and therefore all mechanisms can exhibit the same kinetic performance. To our knowledge all known rotary pumps have an H+:ATP ratio greater than one, and all known alternating access ATP-driven proton pumps have a ratio of one. Our analysis suggests a possible explanation for this apparent relationship between coupling ratio and mechanism. When the conditions under which the pump must operate permit a coupling ratio greater than one, the rotary mechanism may have been selected for its kinetic advantage. On the other hand, when conditions require a coupling ratio of one or less, the alternating access mechanism may have been selected for other possible advantages resulting from its structural and functional simplicity. PMID:28319179

  8. Mechanism of dilute-spin-exchange in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-03-28

    In the stationary, aligned samples used in oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings are not attenuated as they are in magic angle spinning solid-state NMR; consequently, they are available for participation in dipolar coupling-based spin-exchange processes. Here we describe analytically the pathways of {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N spin-exchange mediated by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings. The mixed-order proton-relay mechanism can be differentiated from the third spin assisted recoupling mechanism by setting the {sup 1}H to an off-resonance frequency so that it is at the “magic angle” during the spin-exchange interval in the experiment, since the “magic angle” irradiation nearly quenches the former but only slightly attenuates the latter. Experimental spectra from a single crystal of N-acetyl leucine confirm that this proton-relay mechanism plays the dominant role in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N dilute-spin-exchange in OS solid-state NMR in crystalline samples. Remarkably, the “forbidden” spin-exchange condition under “magic angle” irradiation results in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N cross-peaks intensities that are comparable to those observed with on-resonance irradiation in applications to proteins. The mechanism of the proton relay in dilute-spin-exchange is crucial for the design of polarization transfer experiments.

  9. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  10. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  11. Luminescence dynamics and {sup 13}C NMR characteristics of dinuclear complexes exhibiting coupled lanthanide(III) cation pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, K.D.; Bailey-Folkes, S.A.; Kahwa, I.A.

    1992-08-20

    Luminescence and cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) {sup 13}C NMR properties of lanthanide dinuclear macrocyclic complexes of a compartmental Schiff base chelate (1) derived from the condensation of 2,6-diformyl-p-cresol and 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanediamine are reported. The Schiff base chromophore in 1 is a strong light absorber and an efficient sensitizer for intense Tb{sup 3+}({sup 5}D{sub 4}) and Eu{sup 3+}({sup 5}D{sub 0})(T < 110 K ) emission which does not exhibit self-quenching effects. Emission from Tb{sup 3+} is sensitized by the ligand singlet state; in striking contrast, Eu{sup 3+} emission is sensitized by the triplet state and reveals an unusual nonradiative quenching process at T > 110 K with a thermal barrier of {approx} 2300 cm{sup {minus}1}. Weak emission is observed from Dy{sup 3+}({sup 4}F{sub 9/2}), Sm{sup 3+}({sup 4}G{sub 5/2}), and Pr{sup 3+}({sup 1}D{sub 2}) diluted in Gd{sup 3+} (i.e., from Gd{sup 3+}-Ln{sup 3+} heteropairs, Ln = Pr, Sm, Dy). Intramolecular metal-metal (Ln-Ln = 4 {Angstrom}) interactions account for the greatly quenched emission from Sm{sup 3+}-Sm{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+}-Dy{sup 3+} homopairs compared to Gd{sup 3+}-Ln heteropairs (Ln = Sm, Dy). Gd{sup 3+}-Ln{sup 3+} emission lifetimes at 77 K are 1610 (Tb{sup 3+}), 890 (Eu{sup 3+}), 14 (Dy{sup 3+}) and {approx} 13 {mu}s (Sm{sup 3+}). Nonradiative relaxation processes at 77 K in dilute Ln{sup 3+}:Gd{sub 2}1(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, being temperature independent for Sm{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} but temperature dependent for Tb{sup 3+}, follow the energy gap law with {alpha} {approx} - 10{sup {minus}3} cm and B {approx} 2 x 10{sup 8} s{sup {minus}1}. CP-MAS data show paramagnetic broadening of {sup 13}C resonances which increases with the magnetic moment of Ln{sup 3+}. Surprisingly, no significant shifts in resonance positions corresponding to the changing nature of paramagnetic Ln{sup 3+} ions are observed. 43 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Search for heavy neutrinos and [Formula: see text] bosons with right-handed couplings in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dobur, D; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Grebenyuk, A; Léonard, A; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Crucy, S; Dildick, S; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Salva Diblen, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Júnior, W L Aldá; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Pol, M E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Plestina, R; Tao, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Brochet, S; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Xiao, H; Bagaturia, I; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Bontenackels, M; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Asin, I; Bartosik, N; Behr, J; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bell, A J; Bergholz, M; Bethani, A; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Cakir, A; Calligaris, L; Campbell, A; Choudhury, S; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dooling, S; Dorland, T; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Eichhorn, T; Flucke, G; Garcia, J Garay; Geiser, A; Gunnellini, P; Hauk, J; Hellwig, G; Hempel, M; Horton, D; Jung, H; Kalogeropoulos, A; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kieseler, J; Kleinwort, C; Krücker, D; Lange, W; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lobanov, A; Lohmann, W; Lutz, B; Mankel, R; Marfin, I; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Naumann-Emme, S; Nayak, A; Novgorodova, O; Nowak, F; Ntomari, E; Perrey, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Ron, E; Sahin, M Ö; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Saxena, P; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Seitz, C; Spannagel, S; Vargas Trevino, A D R; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Aldaya Martin, M; Blobel, V; Centis Vignali, M; Draeger, A R; Erfle, J; Garutti, E; Goebel, K; Görner, M; Haller, J; Hoffmann, M; Höing, R S; Kirschenmann, H; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; 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Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; 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    A search for heavy, right-handed neutrinos, [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]), and right-handed [Formula: see text] bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model, has been performed by the CMS experiment. The search was based on a sample of two lepton plus two jet events collected in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8[Formula: see text] corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 [Formula: see text]. For models with strict left-right symmetry, and assuming only one [Formula: see text] flavor contributes significantly to the [Formula: see text] decay width, the region in the two-dimensional [Formula: see text] mass plane excluded at a 95 % confidence level extends to approximately [Formula: see text] and covers a large range of neutrino masses below the [Formula: see text] boson mass, depending on the value of [Formula: see text]. This search significantly extends the [Formula: see text] exclusion region beyond previous results.

  13. Multinuclear NMR studies of gaseous and liquid sevoflurane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macięga, E.; Makulski, W.; Jackowski, K.; Blicharska, B.

    2006-03-01

    For the first time, a small amount of sevoflurane ((CF 3) 2CHOCH 2F) in carbon dioxide and xenon as the gaseous solvents has been studied using 19F and 1H NMR spectra. Density-dependent 19F and 1H nuclear magnetic shielding was observed when the pressure of each solvent was increased. After extrapolation of the results to the zero-density limit it was possible to determine the appropriate shielding constants free from intermolecular interactions, σ0(F) and σ0(H). Similar procedure has also been applied for the investigation of fluorine-proton spin-spin couplings and the 2J 0(FH) and 3J 0(FH) constants of an isolated (CF 3) 2CHOCH 2F molecule were also obtained. Additionally, high-resolution 1H, 13C, 17O and 19F NMR spectra of pure liquid sevoflurane were also recorded and all the 1H- 13C, 1H- 19F and 19F- 13C spin-spin coupling constants and NMR chemical shifts were measured. It is shown that the experimental NMR parameters are suitable for comparison with the results of recent quantum-chemical calculations.

  14. Incorporation of FT-NMR into Research Infrastructure and Chemistry Curriculum at Bowie State University

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-09

    undergraduate research education. The Eft FT NMR software system consist of two programs: WinPNMR, a data acquisition program and NUTS (Acorn NMR Inc.) A NMR...3 2. Equipment Purchased I. Eft -GENII : The basic proton only EFT90 Fourier Transform NMR includes 1H observation at 90 MHz. It uses an Anasazi...c. Software- The Eft FT NMR software operating systems consist of two NMR programs: i. WinPNMR (Anasazi Instruments Inc.) - A NMR data

  15. Channel orientation anisotropy in perfluorosulfonic acid/SiO 2 composite proton exchange membranes: Water self-diffusion study using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipoi, Carmen; Demco, Dan E.; Zhu, Xiaomin; Vinokur, Rostislav; Conradi, Oliver; Fechete, Radu; Möller, Martin

    2011-09-01

    A diffusion-exchange model with the assumption of two water pools was applied to describe the water transport in perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA)/SiO 2 nanocomposites. The water diffusivity in-plane and through-plane in solution cast films was measured by NMR revealing higher in-plane mobility. Both diffusion coefficients reached maxima at ˜3%-wt. concentration in SiO 2. The anisotropy of the PFSA channels orientation reflected in the diffusivity anisotropy decreased with the increase in the nanofiller content. Water exchange rates reached a maximum at low concentration of silica. Gaussian displacement distribution for water diffusion was detected in PFSA membrane at 40 °C independent of the direction of gradient for small concentration in silica.

  16. Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Processes in Ultrafast Time Domain: Evidence for Effects of Hydrogen-Bond Stabilization on Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ananta; Dana, Jayanta; Aute, Sunil; Maity, Partha; Das, Amitava; Ghosh, Hirendra N

    2017-03-08

    The proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reaction is investigated for a newly synthesized imidazole-anthraquinone biomimetic model with a photoactive Ru(II) -polypyridyl moiety that is covalently coupled to the imidazole fragment. Intramolecular H-bonding interactions between imidazole and anthraquinone moieties favor the PCET process; this can be correlated to an appreciable positive shift in the one-electron reduction potential of the coordinated anthraquinone moiety functionalized with the imidazole fragment. This can also be attributed to the low luminescence quantum yield of the Ru(II) -polypyridyl complex used. The dynamics of the intramolecular electron-transfer (ET) and PCET processes are studied by using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The steady-state spectroscopic studies and the results of the time-resolved absorption studies confirm that H-bonded water molecules play a major role in both ET and PCET dynamics as a proton relay in the excited state. The electron-transfer process is followed by a change in the H-bonding equilibrium between AQ and imidazole in acetonitrile solvent, and protonation of AQ(.-) by water leads to PCET in the presence of water. A slower forward and backward electron-transfer rate is observed in the presence of D2 O compared with that in H2 O. These results provide further experimental support for a detailed understanding of the PCET process.

  17. Asymmetric protonation of EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Emma A.; Robinson, Anne E.; Liu, Yongjia

    2015-01-01

    The small multidrug resistance transporter EmrE is a homodimer that uses energy provided by the proton motive force to drive the efflux of drug substrates. The pKa values of its “active-site” residues—glutamate 14 (Glu14) from each subunit—must be poised around physiological pH values to efficiently couple proton import to drug export in vivo. To assess the protonation of EmrE, pH titrations were conducted with 1H-15N TROSY-HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Analysis of these spectra indicates that the Glu14 residues have asymmetric pKa values of 7.0 ± 0.1 and 8.2 ± 0.3 at 45°C and 6.8 ± 0.1 and 8.5 ± 0.2 at 25°C. These pKa values are substantially increased compared with typical pKa values for solvent-exposed glutamates but are within the range of published Glu14 pKa values inferred from the pH dependence of substrate binding and transport assays. The active-site mutant, E14D-EmrE, has pKa values below the physiological pH range, consistent with its impaired transport activity. The NMR spectra demonstrate that the protonation states of the active-site Glu14 residues determine both the global structure and the rate of conformational exchange between inward- and outward-facing EmrE. Thus, the pKa values of the asymmetric active-site Glu14 residues are key for proper coupling of proton import to multidrug efflux. However, the results raise new questions regarding the coupling mechanism because they show that EmrE exists in a mixture of protonation states near neutral pH and can interconvert between inward- and outward-facing forms in multiple different protonation states. PMID:26573622

  18. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range.

    PubMed

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    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5[Formula: see text]collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant [Formula: see text] is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of [Formula: see text].

  19. Measurements of the [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] production cross sections in the [Formula: see text] channel in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] and combined constraints on triple gauge couplings.

    PubMed

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    Measurements of the [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8[Formula: see text] are presented. Candidate events for the leptonic decay mode [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6)[Formula: see text] at 7 (8)[Formula: see text] collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, [Formula: see text] at 7[Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] at 8[Formula: see text], are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. The selected data are analyzed to search for anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. These limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] in 4[Formula: see text] final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.

  20. Measurements of the Z Z production cross sections in the 2l 2ν channel in proton-proton collisions at √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV and combined constraints on triple gauge couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. 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E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. 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A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. 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B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. 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P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. 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T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, T. A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. 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