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Sample records for proton nmr coupling

  1. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  2. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min. PMID:25158224

  3. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  4. Minimalist Relativistic Force Field: Prediction of Proton-Proton Coupling Constants in (1)H NMR Spectra Is Perfected with NBO Hybridization Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-05-15

    We previously developed a reliable method for multiparametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. We now report that utilization of NBO hybridization coefficients for carbon atoms in the involved C-H bonds allows for a significant simplification of this parametric scheme, requiring only four general types of SSCCs: geminal, vicinal, 1,3-, and long-range constants. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries. A new DU8 basis set, based on a training set of 475 experimental spin-spin coupling constants, is developed for hydrogen and common non-hydrogen atoms (Li, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl, Se, Br, I) to calculate Fermi contacts. On a test set of 919 SSCCs from a diverse collection of natural products and complex synthetic molecules the method gave excellent accuracy of 0.29 Hz (rmsd) with the maximum unsigned error not exceeding 1 Hz.

  5. Minimalist Relativistic Force Field: Prediction of Proton-Proton Coupling Constants in (1)H NMR Spectra Is Perfected with NBO Hybridization Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-05-15

    We previously developed a reliable method for multiparametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. We now report that utilization of NBO hybridization coefficients for carbon atoms in the involved C-H bonds allows for a significant simplification of this parametric scheme, requiring only four general types of SSCCs: geminal, vicinal, 1,3-, and long-range constants. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries. A new DU8 basis set, based on a training set of 475 experimental spin-spin coupling constants, is developed for hydrogen and common non-hydrogen atoms (Li, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl, Se, Br, I) to calculate Fermi contacts. On a test set of 919 SSCCs from a diverse collection of natural products and complex synthetic molecules the method gave excellent accuracy of 0.29 Hz (rmsd) with the maximum unsigned error not exceeding 1 Hz. PMID:25885091

  6. Biochemical and proton NMR characterization of the isolated functional beta-subunit of coupling factor one from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roux-Fromy, M.; Neumann, J.M.; Andre, F.; Berger, G.; Girault, G.; Galmiche, J.M.; Remy, R.

    1987-04-29

    Beta subunits have been dissociated from CF1 of spinach chloroplasts, purified by HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional electrophoresis and fluorescence emission. The solutions of isolated beta subunits are able to hydrolyze MgATP; this ATPase activity is an intrinsic property of the beta molecule. From proton NMR at 300 and 500 MHz, it is shown that the preparations are fully reproducible and that beta subunits remain monomeric with 75% aliphatic protons associated with rigid parts of the molecule. The other 25% give rise to separate resonances and belong to mobile side-chains and/or to flexible regions. The measurement of the transverse relaxation times T2 has permitted a detailed characterization of the molecular dynamics of the isolated beta subunits.

  7. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the (15)N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H(2)O/D(2)O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu(II) to enable rapid data acquisition. PMID:18462963

  8. The potential utility of predicted one bond carbon-proton coupling constants in the structure elucidation of small organic molecules by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkata, Chandrasekhar; Forster, Mark J; Howe, Peter W A; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is the most popular technique used for structure elucidation of small organic molecules in solution, but incorrect structures are regularly reported. One-bond proton-carbon J-couplings provide additional information about chemical structure because they are determined by different features of molecular structure than are proton and carbon chemical shifts. However, these couplings are not routinely used to validate proposed structures because few software tools exist to predict them. This study assesses the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for predicting them using 396 published experimental observations from a diverse range of small organic molecules. With the B3LYP functional and the TZVP basis set, Density Functional Theory calculations using the open-source software package NWChem can predict one-bond CH J-couplings with good accuracy for most classes of small organic molecule. The root-mean-square deviation after correction is 1.5 Hz for most sp3 CH pairs and 1.9 Hz for sp2 pairs; larger errors are observed for sp3 pairs with multiple electronegative substituents and for sp pairs. These results suggest that prediction of one-bond CH J-couplings by Density Functional Theory is sufficiently accurate for structure validation. This will be of particular use in strained ring systems and heterocycles which have characteristic couplings and which pose challenges for structure elucidation.

  9. The Potential Utility of Predicted One Bond Carbon-Proton Coupling Constants in the Structure Elucidation of Small Organic Molecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Chandrasekhar; Forster, Mark J.; Howe, Peter W. A.; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is the most popular technique used for structure elucidation of small organic molecules in solution, but incorrect structures are regularly reported. One-bond proton-carbon J-couplings provide additional information about chemical structure because they are determined by different features of molecular structure than are proton and carbon chemical shifts. However, these couplings are not routinely used to validate proposed structures because few software tools exist to predict them. This study assesses the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for predicting them using 396 published experimental observations from a diverse range of small organic molecules. With the B3LYP functional and the TZVP basis set, Density Functional Theory calculations using the open-source software package NWChem can predict one-bond CH J-couplings with good accuracy for most classes of small organic molecule. The root-mean-square deviation after correction is 1.5 Hz for most sp3 CH pairs and 1.9 Hz for sp2 pairs; larger errors are observed for sp3 pairs with multiple electronegative substituents and for sp pairs. These results suggest that prediction of one-bond CH J-couplings by Density Functional Theory is sufficiently accurate for structure validation. This will be of particular use in strained ring systems and heterocycles which have characteristic couplings and which pose challenges for structure elucidation. PMID:25365289

  10. Disentangling scalar coupling patterns by real-time SERF NMR.

    PubMed

    Gubensäk, Nina; Fabian, Walter M F; Zangger, Klaus

    2014-10-21

    Scalar coupling constants and signal splitting patterns in NMR spectra contain a wealth of short-range structural information. The extraction of these parameters from (1)H NMR spectra is often prohibited by simultaneous scalar coupling interactions with several other protons. Here we present a high-resolution NMR experiment where scalar coupling to only one selected signal is visible. All other couplings are removed from the spectrum. This real-time selectively refocused NMR experiment is achieved by spatially selective homonuclear broadband decoupling combined with selective refocusing during acquisition. It allows the unperturbed extraction of scalar coupling constants from the highly resolved acquisition dimension of NMR spectra.

  11. Quantum-chemical simulation of 1H NMR spectra. 2. Comparison of DFT-based procedures for computing proton-proton coupling constants in organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bally, Thomas; Rablen, Paul R

    2011-06-17

    The performance of 250 different computational protocols (combinations of density functionals, basis sets and methods) was assessed on a set of 165 well-established experimental (1)H-(1)H nuclear coupling constants (J(H-H)) from 65 molecules spanning a wide range of "chemical space". Thereby we found that, if one uses core-augmented basis sets and allows for linear scaling of the raw results, calculations of only the Fermi contact term yield more accurate predictions than calculations where all four terms that contribute to J(H-H) are evaluated. It turns out that B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)u+1s is the best (and, in addition, one of the most economical) of all tested methods, yielding predictions of J(H-H) with a root-mean-square deviation from experiment of less than 0.5 Hz for our test set. Another method that does similarly well, without the need for additional 1s basis functions, is B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, which is, however, ca. 8 times more "expensive" in terms of CPU time. A selection of the better methods was tested on a probe set comprising 61 J(H-H) values from 37 molecules. In this set we also included five molecules where conformational averaging is required. The rms deviations were better than or equal to those with the training set, which indicates that the method we recommend is generally applicable for organic molecules. We give instructions on how to carry out calculations of (1)H chemical shifts and J(H-H) most economically and provide scripts to extract the relevant information from the outputs of calculations with the Gaussian program in clearly arranged form, e.g., to feed them into programs for simulating entire (1)H NMR spectra.

  12. Resolution and measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings of a noncrystalline protein immobilized in a biological supramolecular assembly by proton-detected MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Ho; Yang, Chen; Opella, Stanley J.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional 15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift and three-dimensional 1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift MAS solid-state NMR correlation spectra of the filamentous bacteriophage Pf1 major coat protein show single-site resolution in noncrystalline, intact-phage preparations. The high sensitivity and resolution result from 1H detection at 600 MHz under 50 kHz magic angle spinning using ∼0.5 mg of perdeuterated and uniformly 15N-labeled protein in which the exchangeable amide sites are partially or completely back-exchanged (reprotonated). Notably, the heteronuclear 1H-15N dipolar coupling frequency dimension is shown to select among 15N resonances, which will be useful in structural studies of larger proteins where the resonances exhibit a high degree of overlap in multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra.

  13. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  14. IFSERF, an isotope-filtered SERF experiment for the precise measurement of proton-proton coupling constants between chemically equivalent protons.

    PubMed

    Nolis, Pau; Roglans, Anna; Parella, Teodor

    2005-04-01

    An isotope-filtered selective refocusing (IFSERF) experiment is presented for the sensitive and precise measurement of the proton-proton coupling constant between chemically equivalent protons. The 2D NMR method combines an initial doubly selective isotope filter based on heteronuclear cross-polarization followed by a selective J-resolved block. The coupling topologies obtained from several 2D variants of the IFSERF experiment are described for the simultaneous measurement of both proton-proton and proton-carbon coupling constants in the involved AA'XX' spin system. Application on the determination of the relative configuration of double bonds in symmetrical molecules is illustrated.

  15. Two-dimensional proton J-resolved NMR spectroscopy of neomycin B

    SciTech Connect

    Botto, R.E.; Coxon, B.

    1984-01-01

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of a solution of neomycin B free base (Structure 1) in D/sub 2/O has been assigned completely by two-dimensional, homonuclear J-resolved NMR spectroscopy and spin decoupling at 400 MHz. Proton chemical shifts and proton-proton couplings are reported for all glycoside residues in neomycin B along with their computer simulated spectra. The /sup 4/C/sub 1/ chair conformation has been assigned to the 2,6-diamino-2,6-dideoxy-..beta..-L-idopyranosyl (ring D) portion of the antibiotic (1b) by analysis of the proton coupling constants and chemical shifts. The ..beta..-furanose form of the ribosyl portion (ring C) has been assigned. Vicinal proton couplings for the 2-deoxystreptaminyl group (ring B) are consistent with a chair conformation in which all ring substituents are equatorial, and proton chemical shift assignments are based on protonation studies. A computer simulated composite of the individual calculated spectra is presented for comparison with the experimental spectrum of neomycin B. 30 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  16. An NMR Protonation Study of Metal Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letkeman, Peter

    1979-01-01

    This experiment is suitable for an integrated laboratory course for senior chemistry majors. It introduces the student to a study of the relative basicity of different proton accepting sites. It serves as an opportunity to learn about nmr techniques and could extend to infrared, as well. (BB)

  17. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  18. Synthesis and proton NMR spectroscopy of intra-vesicular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Luke Y-J; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under (1)H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall.

  19. Review of advances in coupling electrochemistry and liquid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Ugo; Boujtita, Mohammed

    2015-05-01

    The coupling of electrochemistry and NMR spectroscopy (EC-NMR) may present an interesting approach in the environmental oxidative degradation or metabolism studies. This review presents experimental advances in the field of EC-NMR and highlights the main advantages and drawbacks of in situ and on line of NMR spectroelectrochemistry. The analysis of NMR spectra recorded in situ or on line EC-NMR permits to elucidate the reaction pathway of the electrochemical oxidation reactions and could constitute a fast way for monitoring unstable species as for instance quinone and quinone imine structures without using any coupling agents. The use of 1D and 2D NMR coupled with electrochemistry may leads to the elucidation of the major species produced from the electrochemical oxidation process. The present review gives an overview about the development of the electrochemical cells which can operate on line or in situ with NMR measurements. Future developments and potential applications of EC-NMR are also discussed.

  20. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3 - 4 fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8 - 13 fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling. PMID:19857977

  1. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-03-18

    The diffusion properties of H(+) in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface.

  2. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion properties of H+ in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface. PMID:26988733

  3. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion properties of H(+) in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface. PMID:26988733

  4. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    in high-resolution NMR spectra. This technique is selective for protons on the surface organic functional groups due to their motional averaging in solution. In this study, 1H solution NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the interface of the organic functional groups in D2O. The pKa for these functional groups covalently bound to the surface of nanoparticles was determined using an NMR-pH titration method based on the variation in the proton chemical shift for the alkyl group protons closest to the amine group with pH. The adsorption of toxic contaminants (chromate and arsenate anions) on the surface of functionalized silicalite-1 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been studied by 1H solution NMR spectroscopy. With this method, the surface bound contaminants are detected. The analysis of the intensity and position of these peaks allows quantitative assessment of the relative amounts of functional groups with adsorbed metal ions. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy to the electronic environment and structure of the surface functional groups on porous nanomaterials.

  5. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  6. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  7. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  8. Proton clouds to measure long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinnige, Tessa; Daniëls, Mark; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2014-03-26

    We show that selective labeling of proteins with protonated amino acids embedded in a perdeuterated matrix, dubbed 'proton clouds', provides general access to long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in proton-detected solid-state NMR, which is important to study protein tertiary structure. Proton-cloud labeling significantly improves spectral resolution by simultaneously reducing proton line width and spectral crowding despite a high local proton density in clouds. The approach is amenable to almost all canonical amino acids. Our method is demonstrated on ubiquitin and the β-barrel membrane protein BamA.

  9. Analysis of Proton NMR in Hydrogen Bonds in Terms of Lone-Pair and Bond Orbital Contributions.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Kiplangat; Aucar, Gustavo A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-12-01

    NMR spectroscopic parameters of the proton involved in hydrogen bonding are studied theoretically. The set of molecules includes systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds, internal hydrogen bonds but no resonance stabilization, the acetic acid dimer (AAD), a DNA base pair, and the hydrogen succinate anion (HSA). Ethanol and guanine represent reference molecules without hydrogen bonding. The calculations are based on zero-point vibrationally averaged molecular structures in order to include anharmonicity effects in the NMR parameters. An analysis of the calculated NMR shielding and J-coupling is performed in terms of "chemist's orbitals", that is, localized molecular orbitals (LMOs) representing lone-pairs, atomic cores, and bonds. The LMO analysis associates some of the strong de-shielding of the protons in resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds with delocalization involving the π-backbone. Resonance is also shown to be an important factor causing de-shielding of the OH protons for AAD and HSA, but not for the DNA base pair. Nitromalonamide (NMA) and HSA have particularly strong hydrogen bonds exhibiting signs of covalency in the associated J-couplings. The analysis results show how NMR spectroscopic parameters that are characteristic for hydrogen bonded protons are influenced by the geometry and degree of covalency of the hydrogen bond as well as intra- and intermolecular resonance.

  10. HyperBIRD: a sensitivity-enhanced approach to collecting homonuclear-decoupled proton NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Kevin J; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Samples prepared following dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enable the detection of NMR spectra from low-γ nuclei with outstanding sensitivity, yet have limited use for the enhancement of abundant species like (1)H nuclei. Small- and intermediate-sized molecules, however, show strong heteronuclear cross-relaxation effects: spontaneous processes with an inherent isotopic selectivity, whereby only the (13)C-bonded protons receive a polarization enhancement. These effects are here combined with a recently developed method that delivers homonuclear-decoupled (1)H spectra in natural abundance samples based on heteronuclear couplings to these same, (13)C-bonded nuclei. This results in the HyperBIRD methodology; a single-shot combination of these two effects that can simultaneously simplify and resolve complex, congested (1)H NMR spectra with many overlapping spin multiplets, while achieving 50-100 times sensitivity enhancements over conventional thermal counterparts. PMID:25256418

  11. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins. PMID:27489348

  12. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins.

  13. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) 14N spectra ( I = 1) via spy nuclei S = 1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T11IT11S and T21IT11S at the beginning of the evolution interval t1. The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t1 to ω1 may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S- S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected 14N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the 14N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of L-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for L-alanine the width of the 14N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide 14N in AAG peptide bonds.

  14. Optimum levels of exchangeable protons in perdeuterated proteins for proton detection in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Umit; Lange, Sascha; Trent Franks, W; Linser, Rasmus; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Reif, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the level of exchangeable protons on the observed amide proton linewidth obtained in perdeuterated proteins. Decreasing the amount of D(2)O employed in the crystallization buffer from 90 to 0%, we observe a fourfold increase in linewidth for both (1)H and (15)N resonances. At the same time, we find a gradual increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for (1)H-(15)N correlations in dipolar coupling based experiments for H(2)O concentrations of up to 40%. Beyond 40%, a significant reduction in SNR is observed. Scalar-coupling based (1)H-(15)N correlation experiments yield a nearly constant SNR for samples prepared with < or =30% H(2)O. Samples in which more H(2)O is employed for crystallization show a significantly reduced NMR intensity. Calculation of the SNR by taking into account the reduction in (1)H T (1) in samples containing more protons (SNR per unit time), yields a maximum SNR for samples crystallized using 30 and 40% H(2)O for scalar and dipolar coupling based experiments, respectively. A sensitivity gain of 3.8 is obtained by increasing the H(2)O concentration from 10 to 40% in the CP based experiment, whereas the linewidth only becomes 1.5 times broader. In general, we find that CP is more favorable compared to INEPT based transfer when the number of possible (1)H,(1)H interactions increases. At low levels of deuteration (> or =60% H(2)O in the crystallization buffer), resonances from rigid residues are broadened beyond detection. All experiments are carried out at MAS frequency of 24 kHz employing perdeuterated samples of the chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain.

  15. Intermediate couplings: NMR at the solids-liquids interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Megan

    2006-03-01

    Anisotropic interactions like dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropy have long offered solid-state NMR spectroscopists valuable structural information. Recently, solution-state NMR structural studies have begun to exploit residual dipolar couplings of biological molecules in weakly anisotropic solutions. These residual couplings are about 0.1% of the coupling magnitudes observed in the solid state, allowing simple, high-resolution NMR spectra to be retained. In this work, we examine the membrane-associated opioid, leucine enkephalin (lenk), in which the ordering is ten times larger than that for residual dipolar coupling experiments, requiring a combination of solution-state and solid-state NMR techniques. We adapted conventional solid-state NMR techniques like adiabatic cross- polarization and REDOR for use with such a system, and measured small amide bond dipolar couplings in order to determine the orientation of the amide bonds (and therefore the peptide) with respect to the membrane surface. However, the couplings measured indicate large structural rearrangements on the surface and contradict the published structures obtained by NOESY constraints, a reminder that such methods are of limited use in the presence of large-scale dynamics.

  16. High resolution heteronuclear correlation NMR spectroscopy between quadrupolar nuclei and protons in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbourt, A.; Vinogradov, E.; Goobes, G.; Vega, S.

    2004-08-01

    A high resolution two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment is presented that correlates half-integer quadrupolar spins with protons. In this experiment the quadrupolar nuclei evolve during t1 under a split-t1, FAM-enhanced MQMAS pulse scheme. After each t1 period ending at the MQMAS echo position, single quantum magnetization is transferred, via a cross polarization process in the mixing time, from the quadrupolar nuclei to the protons. High-resolution proton signals are then detected in the t2 time domain during wPMLG5* homonuclear decoupling. The experiment has been demonstrated on a powder sample of sodium citrate and 23Na- 1H 2D correlation spectra have been obtained. From the HETCOR spectra and the regular MQMAS spectrum, the three crystallographically inequivalent Na + sites in the asymmetric unit were assigned. This MQMAS- wPMLG HETCOR pulse sequence can be used for spectral editing of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei coupled to protons.

  17. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  18. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  19. NMR Spectra Transformed by Electron-Nuclear Coupling as Indicator of Structural Peculiarities of Magnetically Active Molecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Vladimir K

    2016-09-01

    The peculiarities of nuclear spin relaxation in the paramagnetic systems have been analyzed taking into account the exchange processes. The analysis is based on the modified Solomon-Bloembergen equations. In this line, the conditions of detecting of the NMR signals of samples are discussed depending on resonance frequency of the NMR spectrometer and characteristic relaxation time. On this basis, (1)H NMR spectra of cobalt semiquinolate complex have been analyzed. It has been shown that the satellite signals observed in the spectrum are caused by hyperfine coupling of the tert-butyl group protons with α and β states (localized on pz orbital of the aromatic carbon) of unpaired electron spin. The relaxation process of the resonance protons is controlled by paramagnetic dipole-dipole coupling. The contact hyperfine coupling does not contribute to the paramagnetic broadening. A mechanism involving paramagnetic molecular structures, which are responsible for intramolecular exchange processes in the cobalt semiquinolate complex, is given. PMID:27513208

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Applications: Proton NMR In Biological Objects Subjected To Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Proton NMR in Biological Objects Submitted to Magic Angle Spinning, In Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, Second Edition (Paul J. Worsfold, Alan Townshend and Colin F. Poole, eds.), Elsevier, Oxford 6:333-342. Published January 1, 2005. Proposal Number 10896.

  1. Extrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-03-01

    We studied narrow 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 100-355 K and 42-59 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. The Fourier transformed NMR spectra of the proton free-induction signals show the superposition of broad and narrow components, which can be assigned to immobile protons and extrinsic mobile protons, respectively. We found that a narrow spectrum develops on heating above about Tc = 260 K and widens above a Larmor frequency of about νc = 50 MHz for Mg(OH)2. The temperature-induced NMR spectrum and the characteristic frequency νc of 50 MHz are the noteworthy features of the nuclear spin fluctuation spectra of the extrinsic protons.

  2. Improvements in localized proton NMR spectroscopy of human brain. Water suppression, short echo times, and 1 ml resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, J.; Michaelis, T.; Merboldt, K. D.; Bruhn, H.; Gyngell, M. L.; Hänicke, W.

    Considerable technical improvements are reported for localized proton NMR spectroscopy using stimulated echoes. When compared to previous results, proton NMR spectra of the human brain are now obtainable (i) with in vivo water suppression factors of ⩾1000, (ii) with only minor T2 losses and negligible distortions due to J modulation at short echo times of 10-20 ms, and (iii) from volumes of interest as small as 1-8 ml within measuring times of 1-10 min. As a consequence, the detection of cerebral metabolites is greatly facilitated. This particularly applies to the assignment of those resonances (e.g., glutamate, taurine, inositols) that suffer from strong spin-spin coupling at the field strengths commonly in use for NMR in man. Studies of regional metabolite differences, tissue heterogeneity, and focal lesions in patients benefit from the increased spatial resolution and a concomitant reduction of partial volume effects. Localized proton NMR spectroscopy was performed on young healthy volunteers. Experiments were carried out on a 2.0 T whole-body MRI/MRS system using the standard headcoil for both imaging and spectroscopy.

  3. 1020MHz single-channel proton fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Zhang, Rongchun; Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Shinji; Noguchi, Takashi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Maeda, Hideaki; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Toshio; Iguchi, Seiya; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Tetsuo; Suematsu, Hiroto; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a first successful demonstration of a single channel proton 3D and 2D high-throughput ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR techniques in an ultra-high magnetic field (1020MHz) NMR spectrometer comprised of HTS/LTS magnet. High spectral resolution is well demonstrated.

  4. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively. PMID:23561087

  5. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively.

  6. High-resolution proton NMR studies of intracellular metabolites in yeast using 13C decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Shulman, Robert G.

    The resolution and specificity of 1H NMR in studies of yeast cellular metabolism were increased by feeding a 13C-labeled substrate and observing 1H difference spectra in the presence and absence of 13C decoupling fields. [2- 13C]Acetate was utilized as a respiratory substrate in an aerobic suspension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The broad cellular background proton resonances are removed by the technique, leaving only signals from the protons of the substrate, or its metabolites, that are coupled to 13C. Spectra of the yeast suspension after acetate feeding show the disappearance of label from the acetate pool and the subsequent appearance of 13C in glutamate C 3 and C 4 and in aspartate C 3. These results are in accord with the known fluxes of metabolites. Selective single-frequency 13C decoupling was used to provide assignments for the difference signals. The limitations on single-frequency decoupling coming from finite decoupling fields are investigated. The technique shows a potential for application in a wide variety of systems where the resolution of the 13C spectrum may be combined with the sensitivity for proton detection to observe metabolites that have been previously unobservable.

  7. Configurationally-Coupled Protonation of Polyproline-7.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E; Khanal, Neelam; Russell, David H; Clemmer, David E

    2015-07-15

    Structure and dynamics regulate protein function, but much less is known about how biomolecule-solvent interactions affect the structure-function relationship. Even less is known about the thermodynamics of biomolecule-solvent interactions and how such interactions influence conformational entropy. When transferred from propanol into 40:60 propanol:water under acidic conditions, a remarkably slow protonation reaction coupled with the conversion of the polyproline-I helix (PPI, having all cis-configured peptide bonds) into polyproline-II (PPII, all trans) helix is observed in this work. Kinetics and equilibrium measurements as a function of temperature allow determination of the thermochemistry and insight into how proton transfer is regulated in this system. For the proton-transfer process, PPI(+)(PrOH) + H3O(+) → PPII(2+)(PrOH/aq) + H2O, we determine ΔG = -20 ± 19 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH = -75 ± 14 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS= -188 ± 48 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for the overall reaction, and values of ΔG(⧧) = 91 ± 3 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH(⧧) = 84 ± 9 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS(⧧) = -23 ± 31 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for the transition state. For a minor process, PPI(+)(PrOH) → PPII(+)(PrOH/aq) without protonation, we determine ΔG = -9 ± 20 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH = 64 ± 14 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS= 247 ± 50 J·mol(-1)·K(-1). This thermochemistry yields ΔG = -10 ± 29 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH = -139 ± 20 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS= -435 ± 70 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for PPII(+)(PrOH/aq) + H3O(+) → PPII(2+)(PrOH/aq) +H2O. The extraordinarily slow proton transfer appears to be an outcome of configurational coupling through a PPI-like transition state. PMID:26115587

  8. Experimental estimation of postmortem interval using multivariate analysis of proton NMR metabolomic data.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Keiko; Koike, Kaoru; Uekusa, Kyoko; Nihira, Makoto; Yuta, Kohtaro; Ohno, Youkichi

    2009-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has recently been applied to metabolic studies. In particular, metabolic profiles of tissues or of the whole body can easily be acquired through multivariate analysis of NMR spectra. The present study investigates metabolic changes after death in rat femoral muscles using pattern recognition of proton NMR spectra. Rats were killed by suffocation, cocaine overdose and induced respiratory failure, and then low molecular weight metabolites extracted using perchlorate from excised tissues were measured using proton NMR. All spectral data were processed and assessed by multivariate analysis to obtain metabolic profiles of the tissues. The results of principal component analysis (PCA) score plots soon after death showed that the metabolic profiles of the tissues differed according to the mode of death. The principal component (PC) scores of the data varied hourly and correlated with postmortem interval. The present results showed that NMR-based metabolic profiling could provide useful information with which to estimate postmortem intervals and causes of death.

  9. Protein Mediated Magnetic Coupling between Lactate and Water Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Scott D.

    1998-11-01

    The magnetic coupling between methyl lactate protons and water protons in samples of cross-linked bovine serum albumin (BSA) is studied. Cross-relaxation spectroscopy shows efficient magnetization transfer from immobilized BSA to both water and methyl lactate protons. Transient and steady-state NOE experiments reveal a negative intermolecular NOE between methyl lactate and water protons. Lactate is indirectly detected by selectively saturating the methyl lactate protons and measuring the decrease in water proton magnetization. Indirect detection of methyl lactate protons is an order of magnitude more sensitive than direct detection in these model systems. Lactate was indirectly imaged, via the water proton resonance, with 1.1-μl voxels in 2 min. Immobilized BSA reduces the intermolecular correlation time between water and lactate protons into the spin-diffusion limit where the NOE is negative. Possible molecular mechanisms for this coupling and applications toin vivospectroscopy are discussed.

  10. Improving the resolution in proton-detected through-space heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ming; Trébosc, J.; Lafon, O.; Pourpoint, F.; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, J.-P.

    2014-08-01

    Connectivities and proximities between protons and low-gamma nuclei can be probed in solid-state NMR spectroscopy using two-dimensional (2D) proton-detected heteronuclear correlation, through Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (HMQC) pulse sequence. The indirect detection via protons dramatically enhances the sensitivity. However, the spectra are often broadened along the indirect F1 dimension by the decay of heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherences under the strong 1H-1H dipolar couplings. This work presents a systematic comparison of the performances of various decoupling schemes during the indirect t1 evolution period of dipolar-mediated HMQC (D-HMQC) experiment. We demonstrate that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequences during t1, such as symmetry-based schemes, phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) and Decoupling Using Mind-Boggling Optimization (DUMBO), provide better resolution than continuous wave 1H irradiation. We also report that high resolution requires the preservation of 1H isotropic chemical shifts during the decoupling sequences. When observing indirectly broad spectra presenting numerous spinning sidebands, the D-HMQC sequence must be fully rotor-synchronized owing to the rotor-synchronized indirect sampling and dipolar recoupling sequence employed. In this case, we propose a solution to reduce artefact sidebands caused by the modulation of window delays before and after the decoupling application during the t1 period. Moreover, we show that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequence using Smooth Amplitude Modulation (SAM) minimizes the t1-noise. The performances of the various decoupling schemes are assessed via numerical simulations and compared to 2D 1H-{13C} D-HMQC experiments on [U-13C]-L-histidineṡHClṡH2O at various magnetic fields and Magic Angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. Great resolution and sensitivity enhancements resulting from decoupling during t1 period enable the detection of heteronuclear correlation between aliphatic protons and

  11. Proton NMR Spectra: Deceptively Simple and Deceptively Complex Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurst, J. E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes relatively simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that demonstrate unexpected results of the deceptively simple and deceptively complex types. Background information, experimental procedures, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  12. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  13. Paths from weak to strong coupling in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelt, S.; Häsing, F. W.; Sieling, U.; Gordji-Nejad, A.; Glöggler, S.; Blümich, B.

    2010-02-01

    J-coupled nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the strong coupling regime at low magnetic field (10-7 T 10-3 T) and at ultralow field (B<10-7 T). We show that several upper and lower boundaries Biup and Bilow of the magnetic field B exist, where the complexity of J-coupled NMR spectra changes in terms of the number of lines. The index i=1,2,… for Biup at high field specifies the perturbation order of the dominating Zeeman interaction and for Bilow at ultralow field the perturbation order of the dominating J-coupling interaction. Mathematical expressions for these boundaries are derived for the case of a J-coupled S-IN group where S and I are rare and abundant spins (1)/(2) and N counts the abundant spins I. The entire B-field range can further be delineated into two weak coupling regimes, one at high field with B2upcoupling regime with B2lowNMR spectra for the S-IN group are investigated by experiment and by simulation. In the strong coupling regime, the maximum number of lines is (N+1)2. In the weak coupling regime B1lowcoupled spectra at high field. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy at ultralow field may open up new ways for chemical analysis by small and mobile instruments with many applications in science and technology.

  14. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid–liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid–liquid phases. PMID:27311326

  15. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  16. The human proton-coupled folate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Desmoulin, Sita Kugel; Hou, Zhanjun; Gangjee, Aleem; Matherly, Larry H.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). PCFT was identified in 2006 as the primary transporter for intestinal absorption of dietary folates, as mutations in PCFT are causal in hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) syndrome. Since 2006, there have been major advances in understanding the mechanistic roles of critical amino acids and/or domains in the PCFT protein, many of which were identified as mutated in HFM patients, and in characterizing transcriptional control of the human PCFT gene. With the recognition that PCFT is abundantly expressed in human tumors and is active at pHs characterizing the tumor microenvironment, attention turned to exploiting PCFT for delivering novel cytotoxic antifolates for solid tumors. The finding that pemetrexed is an excellent PCFT substrate explains its demonstrated clinical efficacy for mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer, and prompted development of more PCFT-selective tumor-targeted 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates that derive their cytotoxic effects by targeting de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis. PMID:22954694

  17. Heteronuclear dipolar couplings, total spin coherence, and bilinear rotations in NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.

    1983-07-01

    In Chapter 1 a variety of different introductory topics are presented. The potential complexity of the nuclear magnetic resonsnace (NMR) spectra of molecules dissolved in liquid crystal solvents serves to motivate the development of multiple quantum (MQ) spectroscopy. The basics of MQ NMR are reviewed in Chapter 2. An experimental search procedure for the optimization of MQ pulse sequences is introduced. Chapter 3 discusses the application of MQ NMR techniques to the measurement of dipolar couplings in heteronuclear spin systems. The advantages of MQ methods in such systems are developed and experimental results for partially oriented (1-/sup 13/C) benzene are presented. Several pulse sequences are introduced which employ a two-step excitation of heteronuclear MQ coherence. A new multiple pulse method, involving the simultaneous irradiation of both rare and abundant spin species, is described. The problem of the broadening of MQ transitions due to magnetic field inhomogeneity is considered in Chapter 4. The method of total spin coherence transfer echo spectroscopy (TSCTES) is presented, with experimets on partially oriented acetaldehyde serving to demonstrate this new technique. TSCTES results in MQ spectra which are sensitive to all chemical shifts and spin-spin couplings and which are free of inhomogeneous broadening. In Chapter 5 the spectroscopy of spin systems of several protons and a /sup 13/C nucleus in the isotropic phase is discussed. The usefulness of the heteronuclear bilinear rotation as a calculational tool is illustrated. Compensated bilinear ..pi.. rotations, which are relatively insensitive to timing parameter missets, are presented. A new technique for homonuclear proton decoupling, Bilinear Rotation Decoupling, is described and its success in weakly coupled systems is demonstrated.

  18. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:22986689

  19. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  20. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  1. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  2. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  3. Experimental identification of diffusive coupling using 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Song, Y-Q; Carneiro, G; Schwartz, L M; Johnson, D L

    2014-12-01

    Spin relaxation based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have been used extensively to determine pore size distributions in a variety of materials. This approach is based on the assumption that each pore is in the fast diffusion limit but that diffusion between pores can be neglected. However, in complex materials these assumptions may be violated and the relaxation time distribution is not easily interpreted. We present a 2D NMR technique and an associated data analysis that allow us to work directly with the time dependent experimental data without Laplace inversion to identify the signature of diffusive coupling between different pores. Measurements on microporous glass beads and numerical simulations are used to illustrate the technique. PMID:25526135

  4. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  5. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  6. NMR studies of proton exchange kinetics in aqueous formaldehyde solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Michal; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil

    2014-05-01

    Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, formalin, are commonly used for tissue fixation and preservation. Treatment with formalin is known to shorten the tissue transverse relaxation time T2. Part of this shortening is due to the effect of formalin on the water T2. In the present work we show that the shortening of water T2 is a result of proton exchange between water and the major constituent of aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, methylene glycol. We report the observation of the signal of the hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol at 2 ppm to high frequency of the water signal that can be seen at low temperatures and at pH range of 6.0 ± 1.5 and, at conditions where it cannot be observed by the single pulse experiment, it can be detected indirectly through the water signal by the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment. The above finding made it possible to obtain the exchange rate between the hydroxyl protons of the methylene glycol and water in aqueous formaldehyde solutions, either using the dispersion of the spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (1/T1ρ) or, at the slow exchange regime, from the line width hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol. The exchange rate was ∼104 s-1 at pH 7.4 and 37 °C, the activation energy, 50.2 kJ/mol and its pH dependence at 1.1 °C was fitted to: k (s-1) = 520 + 6.5 × 107[H+] + 3.0 × 109[OH-].

  7. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case. PMID:26574272

  8. Proton NMR study of spin dynamics in the magnetic organic chains M (hfac)3 NITEt (M =Eu3 +,Gd3 + )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, M.; Lascialfari, A.; Caneschi, A.; Ammannato, L.; Gatteschi, D.; Rettori, A.; Pini, M. G.; Cucci, C.; Borsa, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the spin dynamics in the rare-earth-based low-dimensional molecular magnetic chains Eu (hfac) 3NITEt and Gd (hfac) 3NITEt (in short, Eu-Et and Gd-Et). Although both samples are based on the same chemical building block, [(hfac) 3NITEt ] , their magnetic properties change dramatically when the Eu3 + ion, which is nonmagnetic at low temperatures, is substituted by the magnetic Gd3 + ion. The present proton NMR investigation shows that, down to the lowest investigated temperature (T =1.5 K for Gd-Et and T =3 K for Eu-Et), the Eu-Et chain behaves as a one-dimensional Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling (J =-20 K) between s =1 /2 organic radicals, and has a T -independent exchange frequency (ωe=2.6 ×1012 rad/s). In the Gd-Et chain, in contrast, a competition arises between nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic coupling and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic coupling; moreover, two phase transitions have previously been found, in agreement with Villain's conjecture: a first transition, at T0=2.2 K, from a high temperature paramagnetic phase to a chiral spin liquid phase, and a second transition, at TN=1.9 K, to a three-dimensional helical spin solid phase. Contrary to the Eu-Et chain (whose three-dimensional ordering temperature is estimated to insurge at very low, TN≈0.3 K), critical spin dynamics effects have been measured in the Gd-Et chain on approaching TN=1.9 K: namely, a divergence of the proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 , which in turn produces a sudden wipe-out of the NMR signal in a very narrow (Δ T ˜0.04 K) temperature range above TN. Below TN, an inhomogeneous broadening of the NMR line indicates a complete spin freezing. At T0=2.2 K, instead, such critical effects are not observed because NMR measurements probe the two-spin correlation function, while the chiral spin liquid phase transition is associated with a divergence of the four

  9. 1H-NMR measurements of proton mobility in nano-crystalline YSZ.

    PubMed

    Hinterberg, Judith; Adams, Alina; Blümich, Bernhard; Heitjans, Paul; Kim, Sangtae; Munir, Zuhair A; Martin, Manfred

    2013-12-01

    We report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results on water saturated, dense, nano-crystalline YSZ samples (9.5 mol% yttria doped zirconia) which exhibit proton conductivity at temperatures as low as room temperature. (1)H-NMR spectra recorded under static and magic angle spinning conditions show two distinct signals. Their temperature-dependent behavior and their linewidths suggest that one can be attributed to (free) water adsorbed on the surface of the sample and the other one to mobile protons within the sample. This interpretation is supported by comparison with measurements on a single-crystalline sample. For the nano-crystalline samples motional narrowing is observed for the signal originating from protons in the sample interior. For these protons, the analysis of temperature and field dependent spin-lattice relaxation time T1 points towards diffusion in a confined two-dimensional geometry. We attribute this quasi two-dimensional motion to protons that are mobile along internal interfaces or nanopores of nano-crystalline YSZ.

  10. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Barany, M.; Arus, C.

    1986-03-01

    Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.

  11. NMR studies of protonation and hydrogen bond states of internal aldimines of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate acid-base in alanine racemase, aspartate aminotransferase, and poly-L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Dos, Alexandra; Zander, Reinhard; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Compton, Shara; Fogle, Emily; Toney, Michael D; Shenderovich, Ilya; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-12-01

    Using (15)N solid-state NMR, we have studied protonation and H-bonded states of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) linked as an internal aldimine in alanine racemase (AlaR), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), and poly-L-lysine. Protonation of the pyridine nitrogen of PLP and the coupled proton transfer from the phenolic oxygen (enolimine form) to the aldimine nitrogen (ketoenamine form) is often considered to be a prerequisite to the initial step (transimination) of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Indeed, using (15)N NMR and H-bond correlations in AspAT, we observe a strong aspartate-pyridine nitrogen H-bond with H located on nitrogen. After hydration, this hydrogen bond is maintained. By contrast, in the case of solid lyophilized AlaR, we find that the pyridine nitrogen is neither protonated nor hydrogen bonded to the proximal arginine side chain. However, hydration establishes a weak hydrogen bond to pyridine. To clarify how AlaR is activated, we performed (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR experiments on isotopically labeled PLP aldimines formed by lyophilization with poly-L-lysine. In the dry solid, only the enolimine tautomer is observed. However, a fast reversible proton transfer involving the ketoenamine tautomer is observed after treatment with either gaseous water or gaseous dry HCl. Hydrolysis requires the action of both water and HCl. The formation of an external aldimine with aspartic acid at pH 9 also produces the ketoenamine form stabilized by interaction with a second aspartic acid, probably via a H-bond to the phenolic oxygen. We postulate that O-protonation is an effectual mechanism for the activation of PLP, as is N-protonation, and that enzymes that are incapable of N-protonation employ this mechanism. PMID:24147985

  12. Diffusion dependence of proton NMR relaxation rates in the presence of ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Michael; Hammel, P. Chris

    2009-03-01

    Ferritin is the predominant iron-storage protein in living organisms. It may serve as an indicator of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Measuring brain ferritin concentration non-invasively via MRI could enable better diagnoses and treatments of such diseases. Quantitative MRI determination of the ferritin concentration requires an understanding of the NMR relaxation mechanisms of hydrogen protons in the presence of ferritin. In aqueous solutions, ferritin enhances the transverse relaxation rate (R2) of the protons. This is thought to occur due to a diffusive mechanism, where protons diffusing near ferritin pass through a region of elevated magnetic field, and a chemical exchange mechanism, where protons bind to the protein for a period of time, experiencing an even higher magnetic field. These two mechanisms exhibit different dependencies on the self-diffusion coefficient of the protons. By adding glycerol to aqueous solutions, we control the self-diffusion of protons. We measure the R2 of protons in ferritin-containing binary mixtures of water and glycerol using CPMG sequences, and compare the experimental results to theoretical predictions of diffusion dependence in order to distinguish the relative importance of the mechanisms.

  13. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Bellon, V. , 34 - Montpellier )

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  15. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions. PMID:27500804

  16. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions.

  17. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively.

  18. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  19. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, http://doi.org/10.7566/JPSJ.84.113601, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  20. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively. PMID:25241007

  1. PROTON-COUPLED DYNAMICS IN LACTOSE PERMEASE

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Magnus; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Freites, J. Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J.; Kaback, H. Ronald; White, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) catalyzes symport of a galactopyranoside and an H+ via an alternating access mechanism. The transition from an inward- to an outward-facing conformation of LacY involves sugar-release followed by deprotonation. Because the transition depends intimately upon the dynamics of LacY in a bilayer environment, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations may be the only means of following the accompanying structural changes in atomic detail. We describe here MD simulations of wild-type apo LacY in phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) lipids that features two protonation states of the critical Glu325. While the protonated system displays configurational stability, deprotonation of Glu325 causes significant structural rearrangements that bring into proximity sidechains important for H+ translocation and sugar binding and closes the internal cavity. Moreover, protonated LacY in phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids shows that the observed dynamics are lipid-dependent. Together, the simulations describe early dynamics of the inward-to-outward transition of LacY that agree well with experimental data. PMID:23000385

  2. CLOUDS, a protocol for deriving a molecular proton density via NMR.

    PubMed

    Grishaev, Alexander; Llinás, Miguel

    2002-05-14

    We demonstrate the feasibility of computing realistic spatial proton distributions for proteins in solution from experimental NMR nuclear Overhauser effect data only and with minimal assignments. The method, CLOUDS, relies on precise and abundant interproton distance restraints calculated via a relaxation matrix analysis of sets of experimental nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy crosspeaks. The MIDGE protocol was adapted for this purpose. A gas of unassigned, unconnected H atoms is condensed into a structured proton distribution (cloud) via a molecular dynamics simulated-annealing scheme in which the internuclear distances and van der Waals repulsive terms are the only active restraints. Proton densities are generated by combining a large number of such clouds, each computed from a different trajectory. After filtering by reference to the cloud closest to the mean, a minimal dispersion proton density (foc) is identified. The latter affords a quasi-continuous hydrogen-only probability distribution that conveys immediate information on the protein surface topology (grooves, protrusions, potential binding site cavities, etc.), directly related to the molecular structure. Feasibility of the method was tested on NMR data measured on two globular protein domains of low regular secondary structure content, the col 2 domain of human matrix metalloproteinase-2 and the kringle 2 domain of human plasminogen, of 60 and 83 amino acid residues, respectively.

  3. Thermodynamics of proton transport coupled ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Turina, Paola; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio of the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts was measured in proteoliposomes after energization of the membrane by an acid base transition (Turina et al. 2003 [13], 418-422). The method is discussed, and all published data obtained with this system are combined and analyzed as a single dataset. This meta-analysis led to the following results. 1) At equilibrium, the transmembrane ΔpH is energetically equivalent to the transmembrane electric potential difference. 2) The standard free energy for ATP synthesis (reference reaction) is ΔG°(ref)=33.8±1.3kJ/mol. 3) The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio, as obtained from the shift of the ATP synthesis equilibrium induced by changing the transmembrane ΔpH (varying either pH(in) or pH(out)) is 4.0±0.1. The structural H(+)/ATP ratio, calculated from the ratio of proton binding sites on the c-subunit-ring in F(0) to the catalytic nucleotide binding sites on the β-subunits in F(1), is c/β=14/3=4.7. We infer that the energy of 0.7 protons per ATP that flow through the enzyme, but do not contribute to shifting the ATP/(ADP·Pi) ratio, is used for additional processes within the enzyme, such as activation, and/or energy dissipation, due e.g. to internal uncoupling. The ratio between the thermodynamic and the structural H(+)/ATP values is 0.85, and we conclude that this value represents the efficiency of the chemiosmotic energy conversion within the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase.

  4. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K.

    2015-12-01

    1H -detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong 1H -1H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40 kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic 1H -detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30 kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the 1H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60 kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid- β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current 13C -detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  5. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies.

    PubMed

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2015-12-01

    (1)H-detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong (1)H-(1)H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic (1)H-detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the (1)H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid-β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current (13)C-detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  6. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  7. H2O/OH ratio determination in hydrous aluminosilicate glasses by static proton NMR and the effect of chemical shift anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Riemer, T; Schmidt, B; Behrens, H; Dupree, R

    2000-04-01

    Static 1H NMR spectra of hydrous NaAlSi3O8 glasses have been acquired at low temperature (140 K) in order to quantitatively determine OH and H2O concentrations. Since both components overlap in the spectra, an unambiguous determination of the line shapes is required. The structurally bonded hydroxyl groups are well described by a Gaussian line and the water molecules exhibit a Pake doublet-like line shape due to the strong proton-proton dipolar interaction. However, at proton resonance frequencies used in this study (360 MHz), the Pake doublet has an asymmetric line shape due to chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), which is significant and must be included in any simulation in order to reproduce the experimental line shape successfully. The simulations for rigid water molecules dissolved in our hydrous aluminosilicate glasses result in a CSA of 30+/-5 ppm and a dipolar interaction constant of 63.8+/-2.5 kHz (i.e., dipolar coupling constant (DCC) of 42.6+/-1.7 kHz), corresponding to a proton-proton distance of r(ij) = 154+/-2 pm. In contrast to earlier work, water speciation obtained from the simulations of our 1H NMR spectra are in excellent agreement with those obtained from infrared (IR) spectroscopy.

  8. A method for dynamical characterization and high resolution 1H-NMR in dipolar coupled systems: Application to liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattah, Ana K.; Levstein, Patricia R.

    2006-03-01

    We study the variation of C13 spectra as function of off-resonances in protons during decoupling, for continous wave (cw) and small phase incremental alternation with 64-step (SPINAL-64) schemes in the liquid crystals 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) and 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The self-decoupling mechanism induced by the strong homonuclear dipolar interactions provides a method to study the dynamics of the proton system through the C13 spectra. In the n-cyanobiphenyl (nCB) liquid crystals each nonquaternary carbon is coupled through dipolar interactions to more than one proton constituting a SIN group (with N ⩾2). We extend the analytical treatment of the variation of the C13 spectrum with the off-resonance, described for SI groups, to SIN under cw decoupling. The dependence of the maxima of the C13 spectra as a function of proton off-resonance follows a Lorentzian line that depends on the rate of exchange among proton spin states. From the fitting parameters of this curve and the heteronuclear interaction measured in cross-polarization experiments, we extract dynamical information of the intramolecular H1-H1 interactions. In the case of SPINAL-64 we experimentally observe the same behavior. Under both kinds of decouplings, we characterize the chemical shift of the protons through the NMR spectra of carbons. The resulting values are in very good agreement with those obtained by other methods.

  9. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject (J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 5241-5249). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action.

  10. Correlation of the antimicrobial activity of salicylaldehydes with broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton. Possible involvement of proton exchange processes in the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Elo, Hannu; Kuure, Matti; Pelttari, Eila

    2015-03-01

    Certain substituted salicylaldehydes are potent antibacterial and antifungal agents and some of them merit consideration as potential chemotherapeutic agents against Candida infections, but their mechanism of action has remained obscure. We report here a distinct correlation between broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton of salicylaldehydes and their activity against several types of bacteria and fungi. When proton NMR spectra of the compounds were determined using hexadeuterodimethylsulfoxide as solvent and the height of the OH proton signal was measured, using the signal of the aldehyde proton as an internal standard, it was discovered that a prerequisite of potent antimicrobial activity is that the proton signal is either unobservable or relatively very low, i.e. that it is extremely broadened. Thus, none of the congeners whose OH proton signal was high were potent antimicrobial agents. Some congeners that gave a very low OH signal were, however, essentially inactive against the microbes, indicating that although drastic broadening of the OH signal appears to be a prerequisite, also other (so far unknown) factors are needed for high antimicrobial activity. Because broadening of the hydroxyl proton signal is related to the speed of the proton exchange process(es) involving that proton, proton exchange may be involved in the mechanism of action of the compounds. Further studies are needed to analyze the relative importance of different factors (such as electronic effects, strength of the internal hydrogen bond, co-planarity of the ring and the formyl group) that determine the rates of those processes. PMID:25621992

  11. Evidence for a dipolar-coupled AM system in carnosine in human calf muscle from in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Bachert, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Spin systems with residual dipolar couplings such as creatine, taurine, and lactate in skeletal muscle tissue exhibit first-order spectra in in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T because the coupled protons are represented by (nearly) symmetrized eigenfunctions. The imidazole ring protons (H2, H4) of carnosine are suspected to form also a coupled system. The ring's stiffness could enable a connectivity between these anisochronous protons with the consequence of second-order spectra at low field strength. Our purpose was to study whether this deviation from the Paschen-Back condition can be used to detect the H2-H4 coupling in localized 1D 1H NMR spectra obtained at 1.5 T (64 MHz) from the human calf in a conventional whole-body scanner. As for the hydrogen hyperfine interaction, a Breit-Rabi equation was derived to describe the transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime for two dipolar-coupled protons. The ratio of the measurable coupling strength ( Sk) and the difference in resonance frequencies of the coupled spins (Δ ω) induces quantum-state mixing of various degree upon definition of an appropriate eigenbase of the coupled spin system. The corresponding Clebsch-Gordan coefficients manifest in characteristic energy corrections in the Breit-Rabi formula. These additional terms were used to define an asymmetry parameter of the line positions as a function of Sk and Δ ω. The observed frequency shifts of the resonances were found to be consistent with this parameter within the accuracy achievable in in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Thus it was possible to identify the origin of satellite peaks of H2, H4 and to describe this so far not investigated type of residual dipolar coupling in vivo.

  12. Proton-coupled electron transfer in solution, proteins, and electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Soudackov, Alexander V

    2008-11-13

    Recent advances in the theoretical treatment of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions are reviewed. These reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological processes, as well as in fuel cells, solar cells, chemical sensors, and electrochemical devices. A unified theoretical framework has been developed to describe both sequential and concerted PCET, as well as hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). A quantitative diagnostic has been proposed to differentiate between HAT and PCET in terms of the degree of electronic nonadiabaticity, where HAT corresponds to electronically adiabatic proton transfer and PCET corresponds to electronically nonadiabatic proton transfer. In both cases, the overall reaction is typically vibronically nonadiabatic. A series of rate constant expressions have been derived in various limits by describing the PCET reactions in terms of nonadiabatic transitions between electron-proton vibronic states. These expressions account for the solvent response to both electron and proton transfer and the effects of the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. The solvent and protein environment can be represented by a dielectric continuum or described with explicit molecular dynamics. These theoretical treatments have been applied to numerous PCET reactions in solution and proteins. Expressions for heterogeneous rate constants and current densities for electrochemical PCET have also been derived and applied to model systems.

  13. 15N-15N Proton Assisted Recoupling in Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Józef R.; De Paëpe, Gaël; Eddy, Matthew T.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiment for obtaining 15N-15N correlation spectra. The approach yields direct information about the secondary and tertiary structure of proteins, including identification of α-helical stretches and inter-strand connectivity in antiparallel β-sheets, which are of major interest for structural studies of membrane proteins and amyloid fibrils. The method, 15N-15N proton assisted recoupling (PAR), relies on a second order mechanism, third spin assisted recoupling (TSAR), used previously in the context of 15N-13C and 13C-13C polarization transfer schemes. In comparison to 15N-15N proton driven spin diffusion experiments, the PAR technique accelerates polarization transfer between 15N’s by a factor of ~102−103, and is furthermore applicable over the entire range of currently available MAS frequencies (10–70 kHz). PMID:19334788

  14. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca(2+) exchangers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca(2+) transporters encoded by cation/H(+) exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca(2+) into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca(2+) release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Recen...

  15. Effect of proton transfer on the electronic coupling in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Janusz; Makowska, Joanna; Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-06-01

    The effects of single and double proton transfer within Watson-Crick base pairs on donor-acceptor electronic couplings, Vda, in DNA are studied on the bases of quantum chemical calculations. Four dimers [AT,AT], [GC,GC], [GC,AT] and [GC,TA)] are considered. Three techniques - the generalized Mulliken-Hush scheme, the fragment charge method and the diabatic states method - are employed to estimate Vda for hole transfer between base pairs. We show that both single- and double proton transfer (PT) reactions may substantially affect the electronic coupling in DNA. The electronic coupling in [AT,AT] is predicted to be most sensitive to PT. Single PT within the first base pair in the dimer leads to increase in the hole transfer efficiency by a factor of 4, while proton transfer within the second pair should substantially, by 2.7 times, decrease the rate of charge transfer. Thus, directional asymmetry of the PT effects on the electronic coupling is predicted. The changes in the Vda matrix elements correlate with the topological properties of orbitals of donor and acceptor and can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of resonance structures of donor and acceptor. Atomic pair contributions to the Vda matrix elements are also analyzed.

  16. Protonation and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer at S-Ligated [4Fe-4S] Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Wesley D.; Darcy, Julia W.; Mayer, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological [Fe-S] clusters are increasingly recognized to undergo proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), but the site of protonation, mechanism, and role for PCET remains largely unknown. Here we explore this reactivity with synthetic model clusters. Protonation of the arylthiolate-ligated [4Fe-4S] cluster [Fe4S4(SAr)4]2- (1, SAr = S-2,4-6-(iPr)3C6H2) leads to thiol dissociation, reversibly forming [Fe4S4(SAr)3L]1- (2) + ArSH (L = solvent, and/or conjugate base). Solutions of 2 + ArSH react with the nitroxyl radical TEMPO to give [Fe4S4(SAr)4]1- (1ox) and TEMPOH. This reaction involves PCET coupled to thiolate association and may proceed via the unobserved protonated cluster [Fe4S4(SAr)3(HSAr)]1-(1-H). Similar reactions with this and related clusters proceed comparably. An understanding of the PCET thermochemistry of this cluster system has been developed, encompassing three different redox levels and two protonation states. PMID:25965413

  17. Protonation and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer at S-Ligated [4Fe-4S] Clusters.

    PubMed

    Saouma, Caroline T; Morris, Wesley D; Darcy, Julia W; Mayer, James M

    2015-06-15

    Biological [Fe-S] clusters are increasingly recognized to undergo proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), but the site of protonation, mechanism, and role for PCET remains largely unknown. Here we explore this reactivity with synthetic model clusters. Protonation of the arylthiolate-ligated [4Fe-4S] cluster [Fe4 S4 (SAr)4 ](2-) (1, SAr=S-2,4-6-(iPr)3 C6 H2 ) leads to thiol dissociation, reversibly forming [Fe4 S4 (SAr)3 L](1-) (2) and ArSH (L=solvent, and/or conjugate base). Solutions of 2+ArSH react with the nitroxyl radical TEMPO to give [Fe4 S4 (SAr)4 ](1-) (1ox ) and TEMPOH. This reaction involves PCET coupled to thiolate association and may proceed via the unobserved protonated cluster [Fe4 S4 (SAr)3 (HSAr)](1-) (1-H). Similar reactions with this and related clusters proceed comparably. An understanding of the PCET thermochemistry of this cluster system has been developed, encompassing three different redox levels and two protonation states. PMID:25965413

  18. Symmetrization of cationic hydrogen bridges of protonated sponges induced by solvent and counteranion interactions as revealed by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Mariusz; Wehling, Jens P; Kong, Shushu; Tolstoy, Peter M; Shenderovich, Ilya G; López, Concepción; Claramunt, Rosa María; Elguero, José; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-02-01

    The properties of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds of doubly (15)N-labeled protonated sponges of the 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (DMANH(+)) type have been studied as a function of the solvent, counteranion, and temperature using low-temperature NMR spectroscopy. Information about the hydrogen-bond symmetries was obtained by the analysis of the chemical shifts delta(H) and delta(N) and the scalar coupling constants J(N,N), J(N,H), J(H,N) of the (15)NH(15)N hydrogen bonds. Whereas the individual couplings J(N,H) and J(H,N) were averaged by a fast intramolecular proton tautomerism between two forms, it is shown that the sum |J(N,H)+J(H,N)| generally represents a measure of the hydrogen-bond strength in a similar way to delta(H) and J(N,N). The NMR spectroscopic parameters of DMANH(+) and of 4-nitro-DMANH(+) are independent of the anion in the case of CD(3)CN, which indicates ion-pair dissociation in this solvent. By contrast, studies using CD(2)Cl(2), [D(8)]toluene as well as the freon mixture CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl, which is liquid down to 100 K, revealed an influence of temperature and of the counteranions. Whereas a small counteranion such as trifluoroacetate perturbed the hydrogen bond, the large noncoordinating anion tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate B[{C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)](-) (BARF(-)), which exhibits a delocalized charge, made the hydrogen bond more symmetric. Lowering the temperature led to a similar symmetrization, an effect that is discussed in terms of solvent ordering at low temperature and differential solvent order/disorder at high temperatures. By contrast, toluene molecules that are ordered around the cation led to typical high-field shifts of the hydrogen-bonded proton as well as of those bound to carbon, an effect that is absent in the case of neutral NHN chelates. PMID:20024986

  19. Membrane lipids protected from oxidation by red wine tannins: a proton NMR study.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Aurélien L; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Buchoux, Sébastien; Grélard, Axelle; Dufourc, Erick J; Géan, Julie

    2014-12-01

    Dietary polyphenols widespread in vegetables and beverages like red wine and tea have been reported to possess antioxidant properties that could have positive effects on human health. In this study, we propose a new in situ and non-invasive method based on proton liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the antioxidant efficiency of red wine tannins on a twice-unsaturated phospholipid, 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLiPC), embedded in a membrane model. Four tannins were studied: (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The lipid degradation kinetics was determined by measuring the loss of the bis-allylic protons during oxidation induced by a radical initiator, 2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH). The antioxidant efficiency, i.e. the ability of tannins to slow down the lipid oxidation rate, was shown to be higher for galloylated tannins, ECG and EGCG. Furthermore, the mixture of four tannins was more efficient than the most effective tannin, EGCG, demonstrating a synergistic effect. To better understand the antioxidant action mechanism of polyphenols on lipid membranes, the tannin location was investigated by NMR and molecular dynamics. A correlation between antioxidant action of tannins and their location at the membrane interface (inserted at the glycerol backbone level) could thus be established.

  20. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-09-07

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin.

  1. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  2. 1H and 15N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially 1H-15N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate 15N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS 15N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via 1H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D 1H and 2D 1H-15N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  3. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  4. Transverse beam coupling impedance of the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichelli, S.; Migliorati, M.; Biancacci, N.; Gilardoni, S.; Metral, E.; Salvant, B.

    2016-04-01

    Beam coupling impedance is a fundamental parameter to characterize the electromagnetic interaction of a particle beam with the surrounding environment. Synchrotron machine performances are critically affected by instabilities and collective effects triggered by beam coupling impedance. In particular, transverse beam coupling impedance is expected to impact beam dynamics of the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS), since a significant increase in beam intensity is foreseen within the framework of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project. In this paper we describe the study of the transverse beam coupling impedance of the PS, taking into account the main sources of geometrical impedance and the contribution of indirect space charge at different energies. The total machine impedance budget, determined from beam-based dedicated machine measurement sessions, is also discussed and compared with the theoretical model.

  5. NMR studies of the protonation states of pyridoxal-5‧-phosphate in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Niether, Christiane; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M.; Toney, Michael D.; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-07-01

    We have measured the 13C NMR spectra of the cofactor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (vitamin B 6, PLP) at 278 K in aqueous solution as a function of pH. By 13C enrichment of PLP in the C-4' and C-5' positions we were able to measure spectra down to pH 1. From the dependence of the 13C chemical shifts on pH, the p Ka values of PLP could be determined. In particular, the heretofore uncharacterized protonation state of PLP, in which the phosphate group as well as the pyridine ring and the phenolic groups are fully protonated, has been analyzed. The corresponding p Ka value of 2.4 indicates that the phosphate group is solely involved in the first deprotonation step. The 15N chemical shifts of the pyridine ring of PLP published previously are in good agreement with the new results. These shifts contain information about the tautomerism of the different protonation states of PLP. The implications of these findings for the biological function of PLP are discussed.

  6. Integrating proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Kent, Caleb A.; Paul, Jared J.; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-11-01

    In many of the chemical steps in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis, proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays an essential role. An important issue is how excited state reactivity can be integrated with PCET to carry out solar fuel reactions such as water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen or water reduction of CO2 to methanol or hydrocarbons. The principles behind PCET and concerted electron–proton transfer (EPT) pathways are reasonably well understood. In Photosystem II antenna light absorption is followed by sensitization of chlorophyll P680 and electron transfer quenching to give P680+. The oxidized chlorophyll activates the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), a CaMn4 cluster, through an intervening tyrosine–histidine pair, YZ. EPT plays a major role in a series of four activation steps that ultimately result in loss of 4e-/4H+ from the OEC with oxygen evolution. The key elements in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis – light absorption, excited state energy and electron transfer, electron transfer activation of multiple-electron, multiple-proton catalysis – can also be assembled in dye sensitized photoelectrochemical synthesis cells (DS-PEC). In this approach, molecular or nanoscale assemblies are incorporated at separate electrodes for coupled, light driven oxidation and reduction. Separate excited state electron transfer followed by proton transfer can be combined in single semi-concerted steps (photo-EPT) by photolysis of organic charge transfer excited states with H-bonded bases or in metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states in pre-associated assemblies with H-bonded electron transfer donors or acceptors. In these assemblies, photochemically induced electron and proton transfer occur in a single, semi-concerted event to give high-energy, redox active intermediates.

  7. Proton-detected 2D radio frequency driven recoupling solid-state NMR studies on micelle-associated cytochrome-b5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross-peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles.

  8. Mechanism of Efficient Proton Conduction in Diphosphoric Acid Elucidated via First-Principles Simulation and NMR.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Rachel A; Vilčiauskas, Linas; Melchior, Jan-Patrick; Bester, Gabriel; Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-12-31

    Diphosphoric acid (H4P2O7) is the first condensation product of phosphoric acid (H3PO4), the compound with the highest intrinsic proton conductivity in the liquid state. It exists at higher temperature (T > 200 °C) and lower relative humidity (RH ≈ 0.01%) and shows significant ionic conductivity under these conditions. In this work, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of a pure H4P2O7 model system and NMR spectroscopy on nominal H4P2O7 (which contains significant amounts of ortho- and triphosphoric acid in thermodynamic equilibrium) were performed to reveal the nature and underlying mechanisms of the ionic conductivity. The central oxygen of the molecule is found to be excluded from any hydrogen bonding, which has two interesting consequences: (i) compared to H3PO4, the acidity of H4P2O7 is severely increased, and (ii) the condensation reaction only leads to a minor decrease in hydrogen bond network frustration, which is thought to be one of the features enabling high proton conductivity. A topological analysis of diphosphoric acid's hydrogen bond network shows remarkable similarities to that of phosphonic acid (H3PO3). The hydrogen bonding facilitates protonic polarization fluctuations (Zundel polarization) extending over several molecules (Grotthuss chains), the other important ingredient for efficient structural diffusion of protons. At T = 160 °C, this is estimated to make a conductivity contribution of about 0.1 S/cm, which accounts for half of the total ionic conductivity (σ ≈ 0.2 S/cm). The other half is suggested to result from diffusion of charged phosphate species (vehicle mechanism) that are present in high concentration, resembling conduction in ionic liquids. PMID:26633234

  9. Quantitative analysis of cyclic dimer fatty acid content in the dimerization product by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyun Joo; Kim, Minyoung; Seok, Seunghwan; Kim, Young-Wun; Kim, Do Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, (1)H NMR is utilized for the quantitative analysis of a specific cyclic dimer fatty acid in a dimer acid mixture using the pseudo-standard material of mesitylene on the basis of its structural similarity. Mesitylene and cyclic dimer acid levels were determined using the signal of the proton on the cyclic ring (δ=6.8) referenced to the signal of maleic acid (δ=6.2). The content of the cyclic dimer fatty acid was successfully determined through the standard curve of mesitylene and the reported equation. Using the linearity of the mesitylene curve, the cyclic dimer fatty acid in the oil mixture was quantified. The results suggest that the proposed method can be used to quantify cyclic compounds in mixtures to optimize the dimerization process.

  10. Proton NMR investigation into the basis for the relatively high redox potential of lignin peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Turano, P. ); Ming Tien ); Kirk, T.K. )

    1991-08-15

    Lignin peroxidase shares several structural features with the well-studied horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase but carries a higher redox potential. Here the heme domain of lignin peroxidase and the lignin peroxidase cyanide adduct was examined by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, including nuclear Overhauser effect and two-dimensional measurements, and the findings were compared with those for horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase. Structural information was obtained on the orientation of the heme vinyl and propionate groups and the proximal and distal histidines. The shifts of the {var epsilon}1 proton of the proximal histidine were found to be empirically related to the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} redox potentials.

  11. Proton NMR assignments and regular backbone structure of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.D. ); Purisima, E.O. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); Eastman, M.A.; Scheraga, H.A. )

    1989-07-11

    Proton NMR assignments have been made for 121 of the 124 residues of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). During the first stage of assignment, COSY and relayed COSY data were used to identify 40 amino acid spin systems belonging to alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, and serine residues. Approximately 60 other NH-{alpha}CH-{beta}CH systems were also identified but not assigned to specific amino acid type. NOESY data then were used to connect sequentially neighboring spin systems; approximately 475 of the possible 700 resonances in RNase A were assigned in this way. The authors' assignments agree with those for 20 residues assigned previously. NOESY correlations were used to identify regular backbone structure elements in RNase A, which are very similar to those observed in X-ray crystallographic studies.

  12. Proton transfer and energy coupling in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    A description of the rate constants and the energetics of the elementary reaction steps of the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin has been helpful in understanding the mechanism of proton transport in this light-driven pump. The evidence suggests a single unbranched reaction sequence, BR-hv----K in equilibrium with L in equilibrium with M1----M2 in equilibrium with N in equilibrium with O----BR, where coupling to the proton-motive force is at the energetically and mechanistically important M1----M2 step. The consequences of site-specific mutations expressed homologously in Halobacterium halobium have revealed characteristics of the Schiff base deprotonation in the L----M1 reaction, the reorientation of the Schiff base from the extracellular to the cytoplasmic side in the M1----M2 reaction, and the reprotonation of the Schiff base in the M2----N reaction.

  13. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups. PMID:26439818

  14. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Miller, David C; Choi, Gilbert J; Orbe, Hudson S; Knowles, Robert R

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups.

  15. Search for a coupling of the proton spin to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson Kimball, Derek; Dudley, Jordan; Li, Yan; Patel, Dilan

    2016-05-01

    We present an overview of progress in our search for a long-range coupling between rubidium (Rb) nuclear spins and the mass of the Earth, which can be interpreted as a search for a long-range monopole-dipole interaction or a spin-gravity coupling. The experiment consists of simultaneous measurement of the spin precession frequencies of overlapping ensembles of Rb-85 and Rb-87 atoms contained within an evacuated, antirelaxation-coated vapor cell. Because of the nuclear structure of Rb-85 and Rb-87, the experiment is particularly sensitive to anomalous spin-dependent interactions of the proton. We have studied a number of important systematic effects related to vector and tensor light shifts, optical pumping effects, the ac and nonlinear Zeeman effects, and magnetic field gradients. We anticipate that our experiment can improve sensitivity to anomalous long-range spin-mass couplings of the proton compared to previous experiments by more than an order of magnitude. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1307507.

  16. Linear energy relationships in ground state proton transfer and excited state proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Magomedov, Artiom; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-02-12

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes are elementary chemical reactions involved in a broad range of radical and redox reactions. Elucidating fundamental PCET reaction mechanisms are thus of central importance for chemical and biochemical research. Here we use quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), and the algebraic diagrammatic-construction through second-order (ADC(2)) to study the mechanism, thermodynamic driving force effects, and reaction barriers of both ground state proton transfer (pT) and photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) between nitrosylated phenyl-phenol compounds and hydrogen-bonded t-butylamine as an external base. We show that the obtained reaction barriers for the ground state pT reactions depend linearly on the thermodynamic driving force, with a Brønsted slope of 1 or 0. Photoexcitation leads to a PCET reaction, for which we find that the excited state reaction barrier depends on the thermodynamic driving force with a Brønsted slope of 1/2. To support the mechanistic picture arising from the static potential energy surfaces, we perform additional molecular dynamics simulations on the excited state energy surface, in which we observe a spontaneous PCET between the donor and the acceptor groups. Our findings suggest that a Brønsted analysis may distinguish the ground state pT and excited state PCET processes.

  17. Analyzing and Interpreting NMR Spin-Spin Coupling Constants Using Molecular Orbital Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autschbach, Jochen; Le Guennic, Boris

    2007-01-01

    Molecular orbital plots are used to analyze and interpret NMR spin-spin coupling constants, also known as J coupling constants. Students have accepted the concept of contributions to molecular properties from individual orbitals without the requirement to provide explicit equations.

  18. Amide Proton Solvent Protection in Amylin Fibrils Probed by Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2013-01-01

    Amylin is an endocrine hormone that accumulates in amyloid plaques in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes. The amyloid plaques have been implicated in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which synthesize amylin and insulin. To better characterize the secondary structure of amylin in amyloid fibrils we assigned the NMR spectrum of the unfolded state in 95% DMSO and used a quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange technique to look at amide proton solvent protection in the fibrils. In this technique, partially exchanged fibrils are dissolved in 95% DMSO and information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils is determined from DMSO-denatured monomers. Hydrogen exchange lifetimes at pH 7.6 and 37°C vary between ∼5 h for the unstructured N-terminus to 600 h for amide protons in the two β-strands that form inter-molecular hydrogen bonds between amylin monomers along the length of the fibril. Based on the protection data we conclude that residues A8-H18 and I26-Y37 comprise the two β-strands in amylin fibrils. There is variation in protection within the β-strands, particularly for strand β1 where only residues F15-H18 are strongly protected. Differences in protection appear to be due to restrictions on backbone dynamics imposed by the packing of two-layers of C2-symmetry-related β-hairpins in the protofilament structure, with strand β1 positioned on the surface and β2 in the interior. PMID:23457571

  19. J-GFT NMR for precise measurement of mutually correlated nuclear spin-spin couplings.

    PubMed

    Atreya, Hanudatta S; Garcia, Erwin; Shen, Yang; Szyperski, Thomas

    2007-01-24

    G-matrix Fourier transform (GFT) NMR spectroscopy is presented for accurate and precise measurement of chemical shifts and nuclear spin-spin couplings correlated according to spin system. The new approach, named "J-GFT NMR", is based on a largely extended GFT NMR formalism and promises to have a broad impact on projection NMR spectroscopy. Specifically, constant-time J-GFT (6,2)D (HA-CA-CO)-N-HN was implemented for simultaneous measurement of five mutually correlated NMR parameters, that is, 15N backbone chemical shifts and the four one-bond spin-spin couplings 13Calpha-1Halpha, 13Calpha-13C', 15N-13C', and 15N-1HNu. The experiment was applied for measuring residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in an 8 kDa protein Z-domain aligned with Pf1 phages. Comparison with RDC values extracted from conventional NMR experiments reveals that RDCs are measured with high precision and accuracy, which is attributable to the facts that (i) the use of constant time evolution ensures that signals do not broaden whenever multiple RDCs are jointly measured in a single dimension and (ii) RDCs are multiply encoded in the multiplets arising from the joint sampling. This corresponds to measuring the couplings multiple times in a statistically independent manner. A key feature of J-GFT NMR, i.e., the correlation of couplings according to spin systems without reference to sequential resonance assignments, promises to be particularly valuable for rapid identification of backbone conformation and classification of protein fold families on the basis of statistical analysis of dipolar couplings.

  20. Accurate determination of order parameters from 1H,15N dipolar couplings in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2009-10-01

    A reliable site-specific estimate of the individual N-H bond lengths in the protein backbone is the fundamental basis of any relaxation experiment in solution and in the solid-state NMR. The N-H bond length can in principle be influenced by hydrogen bonding, which would result in an increased N-H distance. At the same time, dynamics in the backbone induces a reduction of the experimental dipolar coupling due to motional averaging. We present a 3D dipolar recoupling experiment in which the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling is reintroduced in the indirect dimension using phase-inverted CP to eliminate effects from rf inhomogeneity. We find no variation of the N-H dipolar coupling as a function of hydrogen bonding. Instead, variations in the (1)H,(15)N dipolar coupling seem to be due to dynamics of the protein backbone. This is supported by the observed correlation between the H(N)-N dipolar coupling and the amide proton chemical shift. The experiment is demonstrated for a perdeuterated sample of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain. Perdeuteration is a prerequisite to achieve high accuracy. The average error in the analysis of the H-N dipolar couplings is on the order of +/-370 Hz (+/-0.012 A) and can be as small as 150 Hz, corresponding to a variation of the bond length of +/-0.005 A.

  1. Lactonization and protonation of gluconic acid: a thermodynamicand kinetic study by potentiometry, nmr and esi-ms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Gibson, P.; Clark, S.B.; Tian, G.; Zanonato, P.; Rao, L.

    2007-01-10

    In acidic aqueous solutions, gluconate protonation is coupled with lactonization of gluconic acid. With the decrease of pC{sub H}, two lactones ({delta}/{gamma}) are sequentially formed. The {delta}-lactone forms more readily than the {gamma}-lactone. In 0.1 M gluconate solutions, if pC{sub H} is above 2.5, only the {delta}-lactone is generated. When pC{sub H} is decreased below 2.0, the formation of the {gamma}-lactone is observable although the {delta}-lactone predominates. At I = 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} and room temperature, the deprotonation constant of the carboxylic group, using the NMR technique, was determined to be log K{sub a} = 3.30 {+-} 0.02; the {delta}-lactonization constant, by the batch potentiometric titrations, was obtained to be log K{sub L} = - (0.54 {+-} 0.04). Using ESI-MS, the rate constants of the {delta}-lactonization and the hydrolysis at pC{sub H} {approx} 5.0 were estimated to be k{sub 1} = 3.2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and k{sup -1} = 1.1 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  2. Collection of NMR Scalar and Residual Dipolar Couplings Using a Single Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gil-Silva, Leandro F; Santamaría-Fernández, Raquel; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Gil, Roberto R

    2016-01-11

    A new DMSO-compatible aligning gel based on cross-linked poly(2-hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (poly-HEMA) has been developed. Due to a significant difference in bulk magnetic susceptibility between the DMSO inside and outside the gel, it is possible to simultaneously collect isotropic and anisotropic NMR data, such as residual dipolar couplings (RDC), in the same NMR tube. RDC-assisted structural analysis of menthol and the alkaloid retrorsine is reported as proof of concept.

  3. On the Importance of Exchangeable NH Protons in Creatine for the Magnetic Coupling of Creatine Methyl Protons in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruiskamp, M. J.; Nicolay, K.

    2001-03-01

    The methyl protons of creatine in skeletal muscle exhibit a strong off-resonance magnetization transfer effect. The mechanism of this process is unknown. We previously hypothesized that the exchangeable amide/amino protons of creatine might be involved. To test this the characteristics of the creatine magnetization transfer effect were investigated in excised rat hindleg skeletal muscle that was equilibrated in either H2O or D2O solutions containing creatine. The efficiency of off-resonance magnetization transfer to the protons of mobile creatine in excised muscle was similar to that previously reported in intact muscle in vivo. Equilibrating the isolated muscle in D2O solution had no effect on the magnetic coupling to the immobile protons. It is concluded that exchangeable protons play a negligible role in the magnetic coupling of creatine methyl protons in muscle.

  4. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion.

    PubMed

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  5. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  6. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion.

    PubMed

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  7. Kinetic Effects Of Increased Proton Transfer Distance On Proton-Coupled Oxidations Of Phenol-Amines

    PubMed Central

    Rhile, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    To test the effect of varying the proton donor-acceptor distance in proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, the oxidation of a bicyclic amino-indanol (2) is compared with that of a closely related phenol with an ortho CPh2NH2 substituent (1). Spectroscopic, structural, thermochemical and computational studies show that the two amino-phenols are very similar, except that the O⋯N distance (dON) is >0.1 Å longer in 2 than in 1. The difference in dON is 0.13 ± 0.03 Å from X-ray crystallography and 0.165 Å from DFT calculations. Oxidations of these phenols by outer-sphere oxidants yield distonic radical cations •OAr–NH3+ by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET). Simple tunneling and classical kinetic models both predict that the longer donor-acceptor distance in 2 should lead to slower reactions, by ca. two orders of magnitude, as well as larger H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). However, kinetic studies show that the compound with the longer proton-transfer distance, 2, exhibits smaller KIEs and has rate constants that are quite close to those of 1. For example, the oxidation of 2 by the triarylamminium radical cation N(C6H4OMe)3•+ (3a+) occurs at (1.4 ± 0.1) × 104 M-1 s-1, only a factor of two slower than the closely related reaction of 1 with N(C6H4OMe)2(C6H4Br)•+ (3b+). This difference in rate constants is well accounted for by the slightly different free energies of reaction: ΔG°(2 + 3a+) = +0.078 V vs. ΔG°(1 + 3b+) = +0.04 V. The two phenol-amines do display some subtle kinetic differences: for instance, compound 2 has a shallower dependence of CPET rate constants on driving force (Brønsted α, Δln(k)/Δln(Keq)). These results show that the simple tunneling model is not a good predictor of the effect of proton donor-acceptor distance on concerted-electron transfer reactions involving strongly hydrogen-bonded systems. Computational analysis of the observed similarity of the two phenols emphasizes the importance of the highly

  8. Direct and indirect proton proton coupling in quantum-chemical theory of H-bonded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, A. A.; Dolin, S. P.

    2000-09-01

    The direct (electrostatic) and indirect mechanisms of proton-proton coupling in H-bonded solids of different nature and dimensionalities are treated. The 3D crystals of the KH 2PO 4 family, squaric acid (H 2C 4O 4, 2D) as well as the 0D K 3H(SO 4) 2-like compounds are examined as examples. We found out the role of direct and indirect mechanisms in the formation of coupling parameters ( Jij) of the Ising model, commonly applied to describe the thermodynamic and dielectric properties of H-bonded materials. It was shown that the evaluated contribution to any Jij due to the direct mechanism does not exceed 30 K for all the H-bonded materials of interest. In the cases of the KH 2PO 4 family and squaric acid these contributions are minor in comparison with the indirect one, whereas the relative direct contribution in the Ising parameter can be more significant in the case of the K 3H(SO 4) 2-like materials.

  9. Advanced solid-state NMR characterization of marine dissolved organic matter isolated using the coupled reverse osmosis/electrodialysis method.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingdong; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Pignatello, Joseph J; Perdue, E Michael

    2012-06-01

    Advanced (13)C solid-state techniques were employed to investigate the major structural characteristics of two surface-seawater dissolved organic matter (DOM) samples isolated using the novel coupled reverse osmosis/electrodialysis method. The NMR techniques included quantitative (13)C direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) and DP/MAS with recoupled dipolar dephasing, (13)C cross-polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), (13)C chemical shift anisotropy filter, CH, CH(2), and CH(n) selection, two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation NMR (2D HETCOR), 2D HETCOR combined with dipolar dephasing, and (15)N cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS). The two samples (Coastal and Marine DOM) were collected at the mouth of the Ogeechee River and in the Gulf Stream, respectively. The NMR results indicated that they were structurally distinct. Coastal DOM contained significantly more aromatic and carbonyl carbons whereas Marine DOM was markedly enriched in alkoxy carbon (e.g., carbohydrate-like moieties). Both samples contained significant amide N, but Coastal DOM had nitrogen bonded to aromatic carbons. Our dipolar-dephased spectra indicated that a large fraction of alkoxy carbons were not protonated. For Coastal DOM, our NMR results were consistent with the presence of the major structural units of (1) carbohydrate-like moieties, (2) lignin residues, (3) peptides or amino sugars, and (4) COO-bonded alkyls. For Marine DOM, they were (1) carbohydrate-like moieties, (2) peptides or amino sugars, and (3) COO-bonded alkyls. In addition, both samples contained significant amounts of nonpolar alkyl groups. The potential sources of the major structural units of DOM were discussed in detail. Nonprotonated O-alkyl carbon content was proposed as a possible index of humification. PMID:22553962

  10. A field-cycling NMR relaxometry investigation of proton tunnelling in a partially disordered system of hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brougham, D. F.; Horsewill, A. J.; Trommsdorff, H. P.

    1999-05-01

    Double-proton transfer in the hydrogen bonds of the benzoic acid dimer is described by an asymmetric double-well potential. At low temperature, the hydrogen bond dynamics are dominated by phonon-assisted tunnelling and the correlation time for proton transfer is independent of temperature. We report proton transfer measurements on samples that incorporate a small concentration of thioindigo dye molecules as a substitutional impurity. The potential energy surface, particularly the energy asymmetry of the double-well potential, of dimers within a sphere of influence of the guest molecule is perturbed. These dimers exhibit a distribution of energy asymmetries and correlation times. The system is analogous to disordered systems such as glasses and provides insight into low-frequency excitations that are invoked to explain the molecular dynamics in those systems. Field-cycling NMR relaxometry was used to make a direct measurement of the spectral density of the sample at low temperatures and to identify the contribution made by the proton transfer dynamics of the hydrogen bonds in the vicinity of the guest molecules. The mean proton transfer rate and asymmetry of these dimers have been measured and are compared with the values characteristic of dimers that are remote from impurity centres. The proficiency of field-cycling NMR relaxometry, and the advantages over conventional narrow band spin-lattice relaxation measurements, is discussed.

  11. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-17

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency regimes for the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term does not significantly impact the rate constants derived using the cumulant expansion approach in any of the regimes studied. The effects of the quadratic term may become significant when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant, however, particularly at high temperatures and for proton transfer interfaces with extremely soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with extraordinarily weak hydrogen bonds. Even with the thermal averaging procedure, the effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances, and the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer in chemical and biological processes. We are grateful for support from National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (applications to enzymes) and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy

  12. Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provorse, Makenzie R.

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is utilized throughout Nature to facilitate essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and DNA replication and repair. The general approach to studying PCET processes is based on a two-dimensional More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram in which electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) occur in a sequential or concerted fashion. Experimentally, it is difficult to discern the contributing factors of concerted PCET mechanisms. Several theoretical approaches have arisen to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate these reactions. Here, we present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) method to efficiently and accurately model PCET mechanisms. The MSDFT method is validated against experimental and computational data previously reported on an isoelectronic series of small molecule self-exchange hydrogen atom transfer reactions and a model complex specifically designed to study long-range ET through a hydrogen-bonded salt-bridge interface. Further application of this method to the hydrogen atom abstraction of ascorbate by a nitroxyl radical demonstrates the sensitivity of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties to solvent effects. In particular, the origin of the unusual kinetic isotope effect is investigated. Lastly, the MSDFT is employed in a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to explicitly model PCET in condensed phases.

  13. Influence of the incorporation of fibers in biscuit dough on proton mobility characterized by time domain NMR.

    PubMed

    Serial, M R; Blanco Canalis, M S; Carpinella, M; Valentinuzzi, M C; León, A E; Ribotta, P D; Acosta, R H

    2016-02-01

    The effect of fiber addition on the distribution and mobility of protons in biscuits is studied by using low resolution time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR). The proportion of flour is reduced in order to incorporate inulin and oat fiber. NMR temperature dependent experiments are carried out in order to gain insight on the processes occurring in biscuit baking. Proton populations were identified measuring spin-spin relaxation times (T2). The major change in the relaxation profiles upon incorporation of fibers corresponds to mobile water molecules, which appear to be related to dough spreading behavior and biscuit quality. Biscuit samples baked in a commercial oven were studied by two dimensional spin-lattice/spin-spin (T1-T2) relaxation maps. The T1/T2 ratio is used as an indicator of the population mobility, where changes in the mobility of water in contact with flour components as starch, proteins and pentosans are observed. PMID:26304434

  14. Gating Topology of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W.; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Radestock, Sebastian; Solcan, Nicolae; Dijkman, Patricia M.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Kwok, Jane; Caffrey, Martin; Watts, Anthony; Forrest, Lucy R.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. Recent crystal structures suggest the MFS fold facilitates transport through rearrangement of their two six-helix bundles around a central ligand binding site; how this is achieved, however, is poorly understood. Using modeling, molecular dynamics, crystallography, functional assays, and site-directed spin labeling combined with double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we present a detailed study of the transport dynamics of two bacterial oligopeptide transporters, PepTSo and PepTSt. Our results identify several salt bridges that stabilize outward-facing conformations and we show that, for all the current structures of MFS transporters, the first two helices of each of the four inverted-topology repeat units form half of either the periplasmic or cytoplasmic gate and that these function cooperatively in a scissor-like motion to control access to the peptide binding site during transport. PMID:25651061

  15. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  16. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-07-22

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa's for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  17. Probing microstructure evolution during the hardening of gypsum by proton NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Jaffel, Hamouda; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Ndobo-Epoy, Jean-Philippe; Morin, Vincent; Guicquero, Jean-Pierre

    2006-04-13

    We report a comprehensive proton NMR relaxation study of the water confined in the evolving porous structure of hardened gypsum prepared with different water-to-plaster ratios (w/p) and increasing additions of crushed gypsum. This study gives some new information on the microstructure, the water distribution, and the hydration kinetics without any drying or perturbing preparation. The bi-exponential transverse magnetization decay reveals the existence of two water populations in slow exchange. However, the different behaviors of these populations during saturation and desaturation experiments show evidence of a fast exchange of each population with the surface. Two modes of organization of the microstructure of this material are identified through an original model of exchange as a function of the water-to-plaster ratio (0.4 < or = w/p < or = 0.6 and 0.7 < or = w/p < or = 1). A clear gap is shown in the exchange rate value above w/p = 0.6 that could be representative of a percolation threshold. Both the method and the theory presented can be applied more widely to other porous media with reactive surface areas. PMID:16599514

  18. Quantification of Water-Soluble Metabolites in Medicinal Mushrooms Using Proton NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Mishchuk, Darya O; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble metabolites in 5 mushrooms were identified and quantified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and software for targeted metabolite detection and quantification. In total, 35 compounds were found in Agaricus brasiliensis, 25 in Taiwanofungus camphoratus, 23 in Ganoderma lucidum (Taiwan) and Lentinus edodes, and 16 in G. lucidum (China). Total amounts of all identified metabolites in A. brasiliensis, T. camphoratus, G. lucidum, G. lucidum (China), and L. edodes were 149,950.51, 12,834.18, 9,549.09, 2,788.41, and 111,726.51 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. These metabolites were categorized into 4 groups: free amino acids and derivatives, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and nucleosides. Carbohydrates were the most abundant metabolites among all 4 groups, with mannitol having the highest concentration among all analyzed metabolites (848-94,104 mg/kg dry weight). Principal components analysis (PCA) showed obvious distinction among the metabolites of the 5 different kinds of mushrooms analyzed in this study. Thus PCA could provide an optional analytical way of identifying and recognizing the compositions of flavor products. Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that NMRbased metabolomics is a powerful tool for differentiating between various medicinal mushrooms. PMID:27649603

  19. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome.

  20. Multiple active site histidine protonation states in Acetobacter aceti N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase detected by REDOR NMR.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jacob; Jiang, Hong; Ransome, Aaron E; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-08-21

    Class I PurE (N5-carboxyaminoimidazole mutase) catalyzes a chemically unique mutase reaction. A working mechanistic hypothesis involves a histidine (His45 in Escherichia coli PurE) functioning as a general acid, but no evidence for multiple protonation states has been obtained. Solution NMR is a peerless tool for this task but has had limited application to enzymes, most of which are larger than its effective molecular size limit. Solid-state NMR is not subject to this limit. REDOR NMR studies of a 151 kDa complex of uniformly 15N-labeled Acetobacter aceti PurE (AaPurE) and the active site ligand [6-13C]citrate probed a single ionization equilibrium associated with the key histidine (AaPurE His59). In the AaPurE complex, the citrate central carboxylate C6 13C peak moves upfield, indicating diminution of negative charge, and broadens, indicating heterogeneity. Histidine 15N chemical shifts indicate His59 exists in approximately equimolar amounts of an Ndelta-unprotonated (pyridine-like) form and an Ndelta-protonated (pyrrole-like) form, each of which is approximately 4 A from citrate C6. The spectroscopic data are consistent with proton transfers involving His59 Ndelta that are invoked in the class I PurE mechanism.

  1. Microtesla NMR J-coupling spectroscopy with an unshielded atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Biancalana, Valerio; Baranga, Andrei Ben-Amar; Dancheva, Yordanka; Rossi, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    We present experimental data and theoretical interpretation of NMR spectra of remotely magnetized samples, detected in an unshielded environment by means of a differential atomic magnetometer. The measurements are performed in an ultra-low-field at an intermediate regime, where the J-coupling and the Zeeman energies have comparable values and produce rather complex line sets, which are satisfactorily interpreted.

  2. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids.

  3. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids. PMID:27533469

  4. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  5. Conformation of the ATP binding peptide in actin revealed by proton NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barden, J.A.

    1987-09-22

    The actin peptide 106-124 exists in a completely conserved region of the sequence and binds strongly to both ATP and tripolyphosphate. Binding particularly affects residues 116 and 118 and generally affects the two segments 115-118 and 121-124. One-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement difference spectroscopy was used to detect molecular interactions between both adjacent and nonadjacent residues. The N-terminal segment 106-112 was found to be largely extended. A sharp bend was detected between Pro-112 and Lys-113. The triphosphate moiety binds to the strongly hydrophilic central segment of the peptide. Evidence was obtained for a reverse turn involving residues 121-124. Amide proton temperature coefficients and coupling constants provide evidence for a type I ..beta..-turn. A model of the ATP binding site is proposed together with its relationship to other parts of the actin structure and to the phalloidin binding site.

  6. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  7. Solid-State NMR Investigation of the Conformation, Proton Conduction, and Hydration of the Influenza B Virus M2 Transmembrane Proton Channel.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Tietze, Daniel; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Jun; Hong, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Together with the influenza A virus, influenza B virus causes seasonal flu epidemics. The M2 protein of influenza B (BM2) forms a tetrameric proton-conducting channel that is important for the virus lifecycle. BM2 shares little sequence homology with AM2, except for a conserved HxxxW motif in the transmembrane (TM) domain. Unlike AM2, no antiviral drugs have been developed to block the BM2 channel. To elucidate the proton-conduction mechanism of BM2 and to facilitate the development of BM2 inhibitors, we have employed solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation, dynamics, and hydration of the BM2 TM domain in lipid bilayers. BM2 adopts an α-helical conformation in lipid membranes. At physiological temperature and low pH, the proton-selective residue, His19, shows relatively narrow (15)N chemical exchange peaks for the imidazole nitrogens, indicating fast proton shuttling that interconverts cationic and neutral histidines. Importantly, pH-dependent (15)N chemical shifts indicate that His19 retains the neutral population to much lower pH than His37 in AM2, indicating larger acid-dissociation constants or lower pKa's. We attribute these dynamical and equilibrium differences to the presence of a second titratable histidine, His27, which may increase the proton-dissociation rate of His19. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C correlation spectra probing water (1)H polarization transfer to the peptide indicates that the BM2 channel becomes much more hydrated at low pH than at high pH, particularly at Ser12, indicating that the pore-facing serine residues in BM2 mediate proton relay to the proton-selective histidine. PMID:27286559

  8. Proton NMR sequential resonance assignments, secondary structure, and global fold in solution of the major (trans-Pro43) form of bovine calbindin D sub 9k

    SciTech Connect

    Koerdel, J.; Forsen, S.; Chazin, W.J. )

    1989-08-22

    A wide range of two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR experiments have been used to completely assign the 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of recombinant Ca{sup 2+}-saturated bovine calbindin D{sub 9k}. In solution, calbindin D{sub 9k} exists as an equilibrium mixture of isoforms with trans (75%) and cis (25%) isomers of the peptide bond at Pro43 which results in two sets of {sup 1}H NMR signals from approximately half of the amino acids. The complete {sup 1}H NMR assignments for the major, trans-pro43 isoform are presented here. By use of an integrated strategy for spin system identification, 62 of the 76 spin systems could be assigned to the appropriate residue type. Sequence-specific assignments were then obtained by the standard method. Secondary structure elements were identified on the basis of networks of sequential and medium-range nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} spin coupling constants, and the location of slowly exchanging amide protons. Four helical segments and a short {beta}-sheet between the two calcium binding loops are found. These elements of secondary structure and a few additional long-range NOEs provide the global fold. Good agreement is found between the solution and crystal structures of the minor A form of bovine calbindin D{sub 9k} and between the solution structures of the minor A form of bovine calbindin D{sub 9k} and intact porcine calbindin D{sub 9k}.

  9. Single-Quantum Coherence Filter for Strongly Coupled Spin Systems for Localized 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Mueller, D. Christoph; Boesiger, Peter

    2000-08-01

    A pulse sequence for localized in vivo1H NMR spectroscopy is presented, which selectively filters single-quantum coherence built up by strongly coupled spin systems. Uncoupled and weakly coupled spin systems do not contribute to the signal output. Analytical calculations using a product operator description of the strongly coupled AB spin system as well as in vitro tests demonstrate that the proposed filter produces a signal output for a strongly coupled AB spin system, whereas the resonances of a weakly coupled AX spin system and of uncoupled spins are widely suppressed. As a potential application, the detection of the strongly coupled AA‧BB‧ spin system of taurine at 1.5 T is discussed.

  10. Visualizing Unresolved Scalar Couplings by Real-Time J-Upscaled NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Scalar coupling patterns contain a wealth of structural information. The determination, especially of small scalar coupling constants, is often prevented by merging the splittings with the signal line width. Here we show that real-time J-upscaling enables the visualization of unresolved coupling constants in the acquisition dimension of one-dimensional (1D) or multidimensional NMR spectra. This technique, which works by introducing additional scalar coupling evolution delays within the recording of the FID (free induction decay), not only stretches the recorded coupling patterns but also actually enhances the resolution of multiplets, by reducing signal broadening by magnetic field inhomogeneities during the interrupted data acquisition. Enlarging scalar couplings also enables their determination in situations where the spectral resolution is limited, such as in the acquisition dimension of heteronuclear broadband decoupled HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum correlation) spectra. PMID:25837306

  11. Synthetic Applications of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Emily C; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-08-16

    Redox events in which an electron and proton are exchanged in a concerted elementary step are commonly referred to as proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs). PCETs are known to operate in numerous important biological redox processes, as well as recent inorganic technologies for small molecule activation. These studies suggest that PCET catalysis might also function as a general mode of substrate activation in organic synthesis. Over the past three years, our group has worked to advance this hypothesis and to demonstrate the synthetic utility of PCET through the development of novel catalytic radical chemistries. The central aim of these efforts has been to demonstrate the ability of PCET to homolytically activate a wide variety of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using known molecular H atom transfer catalysts. To do so, we made use of a simple formalism first introduced by Mayer and co-workers that allowed us to predict the thermodynamic capacity of any oxidant/base or reductant/acid pair to formally add or remove H· from a given substrate. With this insight, we were able to rationally select catalyst combinations thermodynamically competent to homolyze the extraordinarily strong E-H σ-bonds found in many common protic functional groups (BDFEs > 100 kcal/mol) or to form unusually weak bonds to hydrogen via the reductive action of common organic π-systems (BDFEs < 35 kcal/mol). These ideas were reduced to practice through the development of new catalyst systems for reductive PCET activations of ketones and oxidative PCET activation of amide N-H bonds to directly furnish reactive ketyl and amidyl radicals, respectively. In both systems, the reaction outcomes were found to be successfully predicted using the effective bond strength formalism, suggesting that these simple thermochemical considerations can provide useful and actionable insights into PCET reaction design. The ability of PCET catalysis to control

  12. A General Method for Extracting Individual Coupling Constants from Crowded (1)H NMR Spectra.

    PubMed

    Sinnaeve, Davy; Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A

    2016-01-18

    Couplings between protons, whether scalar or dipolar, provide a wealth of structural information. Unfortunately, the high number of (1)H-(1)H couplings gives rise to complex multiplets and severe overlap in crowded spectra, greatly complicating their measurement. Many different methods exist for disentangling couplings, but none approaches optimum resolution. Here, we present a general new 2D J-resolved method, PSYCHEDELIC, in which all homonuclear couplings are suppressed in F2, and only the couplings to chosen spins appear, as simple doublets, in F1. This approaches the theoretical limit for resolving (1)H-(1)H couplings, with close to natural linewidths and with only chemical shifts in F2. With the same high sensitivity and spectral purity as the parent PSYCHE pure shift experiment, PSYCHEDELIC offers a robust method for chemists seeking to exploit couplings for structural, conformational, or stereochemical analyses.

  13. A General Method for Extracting Individual Coupling Constants from Crowded 1H NMR Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Couplings between protons, whether scalar or dipolar, provide a wealth of structural information. Unfortunately, the high number of 1H‐1H couplings gives rise to complex multiplets and severe overlap in crowded spectra, greatly complicating their measurement. Many different methods exist for disentangling couplings, but none approaches optimum resolution. Here, we present a general new 2D J‐resolved method, PSYCHEDELIC, in which all homonuclear couplings are suppressed in F 2, and only the couplings to chosen spins appear, as simple doublets, in F 1. This approaches the theoretical limit for resolving 1H‐1H couplings, with close to natural linewidths and with only chemical shifts in F 2. With the same high sensitivity and spectral purity as the parent PSYCHE pure shift experiment, PSYCHEDELIC offers a robust method for chemists seeking to exploit couplings for structural, conformational, or stereochemical analyses. PMID:26636773

  14. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-06-25

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced processes, are also described. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. The work described herein was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CHE-13-61293 (theory development), National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (soybean lipoxygenase), Center for Chemical Innovation of the National Science Foundation Solar Fuels Grant CHE-1305124 (cobalt catalysts), Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (nickel catalysts), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Award No. FA9550-14-1-0295 (photoinduced PCET).

  15. Scalar Relativistic Computations and Localized Orbital Analyses of Nuclear Hyperfine Coupling and Paramagnetic NMR Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, Fredy W.; Pritchard, Ben; Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-02-14

    A method is reported by which calculated hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) and paramagnetic NMR (pNMR) chemical shifts can be analyzed in a chemically intuitive way by decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals (LMOs). A new module for density functional calculations with nonhybrid functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids, utilizing the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA), has been implemented in the parallel open-source NWChem quantum chemistry package. Benchmark results are reported for a test set of few-atom molecules with light and heavy elements. Finite nucleus effects on ¹⁹⁹Hg HFCCs are shown to be on the order of -11 to -15%. A proof of concept for the LMO analysis is provided for the metal and fluorine HFCCs of TiF₃ and NpF₆. Calculated pNMR chemical shifts are reported for the 2-methylphenyl-t-butylnitroxide radical and for five cyclopentadienyl (Cp) sandwich complexes with 3d metals. Nickelocene and vanadocene carbon pNMR shifts are analyzed in detail, demonstrating that the large carbon pNMR shifts calculated as +1540 for Ni (exptl.: +1514) and -443 for V (exptl.: -510) are caused by different spin-polarization mechanisms. For Ni, Cp to Ni π back-donation dominates the result, whereas for vanadocene, V to Cp σ donation with relaxation of the carbon 1s shells can be identified as the dominant mechanism.

  16. Solubilization Site of Organic Perfume Molecules in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelles: New Insights from Proton NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Suratkar; Mahapatra

    2000-05-01

    The site of incorporation of solubilizates in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar systems has been investigated by proton NMR spectroscopy. The solubilizate molecules chosen for the present study are phenol, 4-methylphenol, 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol, anisole, 4-methylanisole, 4-propenylanisole, 1,8-cineole, and limonene. These molecules possess a wide variety of functional groups with different degrees of hydrophilic/hydrophobic character and are thereby solubilized at different micellar locations. Aromatic compounds, especially those having a phenolic-OH group, showed a large upfield shift of SDS methylene protons that are closely linked to the terminal sulfate groups. Additionally, in the case of phenolic compounds, the unresolved signals of the nine straight-chain bulk methylene protons of SDS are split into a broad doublet with uneven intensity. This splitting of methylene protons was found to be dependent on the concentration of the substrate. Based on these observations, probable solubilization sites and orientation of the substrate molecule within the micelles are discussed. Phenolic compounds, being the most hydrophilic among the present set, reside at the hydrophilic/hydrophobic boundary of micelle-water interface and thus influence the resonances of SDS protons the most. Aromatic methoxy and aliphatic compounds, being relatively more hydrophobic in nature, reside inside the micellar core and thereby result in smaller shifts. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Precision high-throughput proton NMR spectroscopy of human urine, serum, and plasma for large-scale metabolic phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Dona, Anthony C; Jiménez, Beatriz; Schäfer, Hartmut; Humpfer, Eberhard; Spraul, Manfred; Lewis, Matthew R; Pearce, Jake T M; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2014-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic phenotyping of urine and blood plasma/serum samples provides important prognostic and diagnostic information and permits monitoring of disease progression in an objective manner. Much effort has been made in recent years to develop NMR instrumentation and technology to allow the acquisition of data in an effective, reproducible, and high-throughput approach that allows the study of general population samples from epidemiological collections for biomarkers of disease risk. The challenge remains to develop highly reproducible methods and standardized protocols that minimize technical or experimental bias, allowing realistic interlaboratory comparisons of subtle biomarker information. Here we present a detailed set of updated protocols that carefully consider major experimental conditions, including sample preparation, spectrometer parameters, NMR pulse sequences, throughput, reproducibility, quality control, and resolution. These results provide an experimental platform that facilitates NMR spectroscopy usage across different large cohorts of biofluid samples, enabling integration of global metabolic profiling that is a prerequisite for personalized healthcare. PMID:25180432

  18. Proton NMR study of the organic metal {kappa}-(BETS){sub 2}Mn[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Vyaselev, O. M.; Kushch, N. D.; Yagubskii, E. B.

    2011-11-15

    Magnetic properties of the organic conductor {kappa}-(BETS){sub 2}Mn[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3} above and below the temperature of the metal-insulator transition that occurs at T{sub MI} Almost-Equal-To 25 K are studied by {sup 1}H NMR. The proton spectrum is shown to be determined by the static dipolar fields from Mn{sup 2+} localized moments, while the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation is dominated by fluctuating fields from Mn{sup 2+} electrons. The NMR data, both static (the spectra) and dynamic (the spin-lattice relaxation), indicate the freezing of Mn{sup 2+} moments into a short-range or an incommensurate long-range antiferromagnetic order below T{sub MI}.

  19. Proton NMR study of the organic metal κ-(BETS)2Mn[N(CN)2]3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyaselev, O. M.; Kushch, N. D.; Yagubskii, E. B.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic properties of the organic conductor κ-(BETS)2Mn[N(CN)2]3 above and below the temperature of the metal-insulator transition that occurs at T MI ≈ 25 K are studied by 1H NMR. The proton spectrum is shown to be determined by the static dipolar fields from Mn2+ localized moments, while the 1H spin-lattice relaxation is dominated by fluctuating fields from Mn2+ electrons. The NMR data, both static (the spectra) and dynamic (the spin-lattice relaxation), indicate the freezing of Mn2+ moments into a short-range or an incommensurate long-range antiferromagnetic order below T MI.

  20. Improving the Mass-Limited Performance of Routine NMR Probes using Coupled Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Brian; Lim, Victor; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2016-07-01

    We report a method to convert, on demand, a general use dual-broadband probe to a high performance mass-limited probe for both high band and low band nuclei. This technology uses magnetic coupling of inductors to achieve this capability. The method offers a cost effective way of increasing the performance of routine NMR probes without having to change probes or increase the overall foot print of the spectrometer.

  1. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.; Izatt, R.M.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Shirts, R.B.

    1996-08-24

    The objective of this research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period. In addition, new, more convenient synthetic routes were achieved for several nitrogen-containing bicyclic and tricyclic macrocycles. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber and other membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. A study of the effect of methoxyalkyl macrocycle substituents on metal ion transport was completed. A new calorimeter was constructed which made it possible to study the thermodynamics of macrocycle-cation binding to very high temperatures. Measurements of thermodynamic data for the interaction of crown ethers with alkali and alkaline earth cations were achieved to 473 K. Molecular modeling work was begun for the first time on this project and fundamental principles were identified and developed for the establishment of working models in the future.

  2. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  3. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of

  4. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  5. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovoi, A.; Mattea, C.; Herrmann, A.; Rössler, E. A.; Stapf, S.; Fatkullin, N.

    2016-06-01

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time.

  6. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Lozovoi, A; Mattea, C; Herrmann, A; Rössler, E A; Stapf, S; Fatkullin, N

    2016-06-28

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time. PMID:27369489

  7. The Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectrum of Methyl 7-Cycloheptatrienylacetate: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurch, G. R., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment designed to give the senior chemistry student an opportunity to apply several synthetic and purification techniques as well as possibilities for the application of NMR spectroscopy. (CS)

  8. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  9. Methyl [13C]glucopyranosiduronic acids: effect of COOH ionization and exocyclic structure on NMR spin-couplings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Hu, Xiaosong; Carmichael, Ian; Serianni, Anthony S

    2012-11-01

    Methyl α- and β-D-glucopyranuronides singly labeled with (13)C at C1-C6 were prepared from the corresponding (13)C-labeled methyl D-glucopyranosides, and multiple NMR J-couplings (J(HH), J(CH), and J(CC)) were measured in their protonated and ionized forms in aqueous ((2)H(2)O) solution. Solvated density functional theory (DFT) calculations of J-couplings in structurally related model compounds were performed to determine how well the calculated J-couplings matched the experimental values in saccharides bearing an ionizable substituent. Intraring J(HH) values in both uronide anomers, including (3)J(H4,H5), are unaffected by solution pD, and COOH ionization exerts little effect on J(CH) and J(CC) except for (1)J(C1,H1), (1)J(C4,H4), (1)J(C5,H5), (1)J(C5,C6), and (2)J(C3,C5), where changes of up to 5 Hz were observed. Some of these changes are associated with changes in bond lengths upon ionization; in general, better agreement between theory and experiment was observed for couplings less sensitive to exocyclic C-O bond conformation. Titration of (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts, and some J-couplings, yielded a COOH pK(a) of 3.0 ± 0.1 in both anomers. DFT calculations suggest that substituents proximal to the exocyclic COOH group (i.e., the C4-O4 bond) influence the activation barrier to C5-C6 bond rotation due to transient intramolecular H-bonding. A comparison of J-couplings in the glucopyranuronides to corresponding J-couplings in the glucopyranosides showed that more pervasive changes occur upon conversion from a COOH to a CH(2)OH substituent at C6 than from COOH ionization within the uronides. Twelve J-couplings are affected, with the largest being (1)J(C5,C6) (∼18 Hz larger in the uronides), followed by (2)J(C6,H5) (∼2.5 Hz more negative in the uronides).

  10. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoacetica metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrei V; Sears, Jesse A; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R; Ahring, Birgitte K; Majors, Paul D

    2014-10-01

    An in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600-MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol, and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process, enabling identification of intermediate and endpoint metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  11. Analytic theory of two-dimensional NMR in systems with coupled macro- and micropores.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David Linton; Schwartz, Lawrence M

    2014-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments involve a sequence of longitudinal (T(1)) and transverse (T(2)) measurements. When such experiments are applied to porous media, they are believed to provide new and important information regarding diffusive coupling between distinct pore subpopulations. However, we show in this paper that, in many cases of interest, this is simply not true. One often encounters systems in which the one-dimensional (1D) T(1) and T(2) processes are each controlled by just two distinct decay modes. If these modes form a complete set, then one can derive analytic formulas that describe, exactly, the 2D NMR measurements. Therefore, for such systems, the 2D measurements bring no additional information over that which is already present in the 1D results. Our predictions agree quite well with numerical results based on the microporous grain-consolidation (μ-GC) model. PMID:25314457

  12. Proton-coupled electron transfer dynamics in the catalytic mechanism of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-04-01

    The movement of protons and electrons is common to the synthesis of all chemical fuels such as H2. Hydrogenases, which catalyze the reversible reduction of protons, necessitate transport and reactivity between protons and electrons, but a detailed mechanism has thus far been elusive. Here, we use a phototriggered chemical potential jump method to rapidly initiate the proton reduction activity of a [NiFe] hydrogenase. Coupling the photochemical initiation approach to nanosecond transient infrared and visible absorbance spectroscopy afforded direct observation of interfacial electron transfer and active site chemistry. Tuning of intramolecular proton transport by pH and isotopic substitution revealed distinct concerted and stepwise proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in catalysis. The observed heterogeneity in the two sequential proton-associated reduction processes suggests a highly engineered protein environment modulating catalysis and implicates three new reaction intermediates; Nia-I, Nia-D, and Nia-SR(-). The results establish an elementary mechanistic understanding of catalysis in a [NiFe] hydrogenase with implications in enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer and biomimetic catalyst design.

  13. Transient characteristics for proton gating in laterally coupled indium-zinc-oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Zhu, Li Qiang; Xiao, Hui; Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Chao, Jin Yu

    2015-03-25

    The control and detection over processing, transport and delivery of chemical species is of great importance in sensors and biological systems. The transient characteristics of the migration of chemical species reflect the basic properties in the processings of chemical species. Here, we observed the field-configurable proton effects in a laterally coupled transistor gated by phosphorosilicate glass (PSG). The bias on the lateral gate would modulate the interplay between protons and electrons at the PSG/indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) channel interface. Due to the modulation of protons flux within the PSG films, the IZO channel current would be modified correspondingly. The characteristic time for the proton gating is estimated to be on the order of 20 ms. Such laterally coupled oxide based transistors with proton gating are promising for low-cost portable biosensors and neuromorphic system applications. PMID:25741771

  14. Transient characteristics for proton gating in laterally coupled indium-zinc-oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Zhu, Li Qiang; Xiao, Hui; Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Chao, Jin Yu

    2015-03-25

    The control and detection over processing, transport and delivery of chemical species is of great importance in sensors and biological systems. The transient characteristics of the migration of chemical species reflect the basic properties in the processings of chemical species. Here, we observed the field-configurable proton effects in a laterally coupled transistor gated by phosphorosilicate glass (PSG). The bias on the lateral gate would modulate the interplay between protons and electrons at the PSG/indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) channel interface. Due to the modulation of protons flux within the PSG films, the IZO channel current would be modified correspondingly. The characteristic time for the proton gating is estimated to be on the order of 20 ms. Such laterally coupled oxide based transistors with proton gating are promising for low-cost portable biosensors and neuromorphic system applications.

  15. High-Affinity Proton Donors Promote Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer by Samarium Diiodide.

    PubMed

    Chciuk, Tesia V; Anderson, William R; Flowers, Robert A

    2016-05-10

    The relationship between proton-donor affinity for Sm(II) ions and the reduction of two substrates (anthracene and benzyl chloride) was examined. A combination of spectroscopic, thermochemical, and kinetic studies show that only those proton donors that coordinate or chelate strongly to Sm(II) promote anthracene reduction through a PCET process. These studies demonstrate that the combination of Sm(II) ions and water does not provide a unique reagent system for formal hydrogen atom transfer to substrates. PMID:27061351

  16. Carbon relaxation analysis in proton coupled spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Claudio; Marchettini, Nadia; Bastianoni, Simone; Dongti, Alessandro

    1995-07-01

    Selective, non-selective and biselective carbon spin-lattice relaxation measurements were determined in methyl-salicylate DMSO-d 6 solution. The frequency dependence of biselective relaxation measurements of protonated aromatic carbons showed the effects of J-scalar modulation. The dipolar contribution induced by asymmetric selective proton inversion of the spin population of a single satellite peak could be useful for investigating of the Shimizu-Fujiwara-Mackor-Maclean relaxation rate. Analysis of the ratios is also proposed for the calculation of dipolar relaxation mechanism efficiency.

  17. Narrow carbonyl resonances in proton-diluted proteins facilitate NMR assignments in the solid-state.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    HNCO/HNCACO type correlation experiments are an alternative for assignment of backbone resonances in extensively deuterated proteins in the solid-state, given the fact that line widths on the order of 14-17 Hz are achieved in the carbonyl dimension without the need of high power decoupling. The achieved resolution demonstrates that MAS solid-state NMR on extensively deuterated proteins is able to compete with solution-state NMR spectroscopy if proteins are investigated with correlation times tau(c) that exceed 25 ns. PMID:20232230

  18. Molecular dynamics and information on possible sites of interaction of intramyocellular metabolites in vivo from resolved dipolar couplings in localized 1H NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Schmitz, Christian; Bachert, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Proton NMR resonances of the endogenous metabolites creatine and phosphocreatine ((P)Cr), taurine (Tau), and carnosine (Cs, β-alanyl- L-histidine) were studied with regard to residual dipolar couplings and molecular mobility. We present an analysis of the direct 1H- 1H interaction that provides information on motional reorientation of subgroups in these molecules in vivo. For this purpose, localized 1H NMR experiments were performed on m. gastrocnemius of healthy volunteers using a 1.5-T clinical whole-body MR scanner. We evaluated the observable dipolar coupling strength SD0 ( S = order parameter) of the (P)Cr-methyl triplet and the Tau-methylene doublet by means of the apparent line splitting. These were compared to the dipolar coupling strength of the (P)Cr-methylene doublet. In contrast to the aliphatic protons of (P)Cr and Tau, the aromatic H2 ( δ = 8 ppm) and H4 ( δ = 7 ppm) protons of the imidazole ring of Cs exhibit second-order spectra at 1.5 T. This effect is the consequence of incomplete transition from Zeeman to Paschen-Back regime and allows a determination of SD0 from H2 and H4 of Cs as an alternative to evaluating the multiplet splitting which can be measured directly in high-resolution 1H NMR spectra. Experimental data showed striking differences in the mobility of the metabolites when the dipolar coupling constant D0 (calculated with the internuclear distance known from molecular geometry in the case of complete absence of molecular dynamics and motion) is used for comparison. The aliphatic signals involve very small order parameters S ≈ (1.4 - 3) × 10 -4 indicating rapid reorientation of the corresponding subgroups in these metabolites. In contrast, analysis of the Cs resonances yielded S ≈ (113 - 137) × 10 -4. Thus, the immobilization of the Cs imidazole ring owing to an anisotropic cellular substructure in human m. gastrocnemius is much more effective than for (P)Cr and Tau subgroups. Furthermore, 1H NMR experiments on aqueous model

  19. Visualizing the kinetic power stroke that drives proton-coupled Zn(II) transport

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Chai, Jin; Cheng, Jie; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Chance, Mark R.; Fu, Dax

    2014-01-01

    The proton gradient is a principal energy source for respiration-dependent active transport, but the structural mechanisms of proton-coupled transport processes are poorly understood. YiiP is a proton-coupled zinc transporter found in the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, and the transport-site of YiiP receives protons from water molecules that gain access to its hydrophobic environment and transduces the energy of an inward proton gradient to drive Zn(II) efflux1,2. This membrane protein is a well characterized member3-7 of the protein family of cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) that occurs at all phylogenetic levels8-10. X-ray mediated hydroxyl radical labeling of YiiP and mass spectrometric analysis showed that Zn(II) binding triggered a highly localized, all-or-none change of water accessibility to the transport-site and an adjacent hydrophobic gate. Millisecond time-resolved dynamics revealed a concerted and reciprocal pattern of accessibility changes along a transmembrane helix, suggesting a rigid-body helical reorientation linked to Zn(II) binding that triggers the closing of the hydrophobic gate. The gated water access to the transport-site enables a stationary proton gradient to facilitate the conversion of zinc binding energy to the kinetic power stroke of a vectorial zinc transport. The kinetic details provide energetic insights into a proton-coupled active transport reaction. PMID:25043033

  20. Anomalous temperature-isotope dependence in proton-coupled electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Presse, Steve; Silbey, Robert

    2006-04-28

    Motivated by the experiments of Hodgkiss et al. [J. Phys. Chem. (submitted)] on electron transfer (ET) through a H-bonding interface, we present a new theoretical model for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in the condensed phase, that does not involve real proton transfer. These experiments, which directly probe the joint T-isotope effects in coupled charge transfer reactions, show anomalous T dependence in k{sub H}/k{sub D}, where k{sub H} and k{sub D} are the ET rates through the H-bonding interface with H-bonded protons and deuterons, respectively. We address the anomalous T dependence of the k{sub H}/k{sub D} in our model by attributing the modulation of the electron tunneling dynamics to bath-induced fluctuations in the proton coordinate, so that the mechanism for coupled charge transfer might be better termed vibrationally assisted ET rather than PCET. We argue that such a mechanism may be relevant to understanding traditional PCET processes, i.e., those in which protons undergo a transfer from donor to acceptor during the course of ET, provided there is an appropriate time scale separating both coupled charge transfers. Likewise, it may also be useful in understanding long-range ET in proteins, where tunneling pathways between redox cofactors often pass through H-bonded amino acid residues, or other systems with sufficiently decoupled proton and electron donating functionalities.

  1. Solid-state proton NMR of paramagnetic metal complexes: DANTE spin echoes for selective excitation in inhomogeneously broadened lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Perez Linde, A. J.; Bauer, Gerald; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-08-01

    The paramagnetic complex bis(oxazolinylphenyl)amine-Fe(III)Cl2 is investigated by means of solid-state proton NMR at 18.8 T (800 MHz) using magic-angle spinning at 65 kHz. Spin echoes that are excited and refocused by combs of rotor-synchronized pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) allow one to characterize different chemical environments that severely overlap in conventional MAS spectra. Such sequences combine two apparently contradictory features: an overall bandwidth exceeding several MHz, and very selective irradiation of a few kHz within inhomogeneously broadened sidebands. The experimental hyperfine interactions correlate well with DFT calculations.

  2. Predicting the spin state of paramagnetic iron complexes by DFT calculation of proton NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, Andrea; Rastrelli, Federico; Bagno, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    Many transition-metal complexes easily change their spin state S in response to external perturbations (spin crossover). Determining such states and their dynamics can play a central role in the understanding of useful properties such as molecular magnetism or catalytic behavior, but is often far from straightforward. In this work we demonstrate that, at a moderate computational cost, density functional calculations can predict the correct ground spin state of Fe(ii) and Fe(iii) complexes and can then be used to determine the (1)H NMR spectra of all spin states. Since the spectral features are remarkably different according to the spin state, calculated (1)H NMR resonances can be used to infer the correct spin state, along with supporting the structure elucidation of numerous paramagnetic complexes.

  3. Proton NMR characterization of isomeric sulfmyoglobins: preparation, interconversion, reactivity patterns, and structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Chatfield, M.J.; La Mar, G.N.; Kauten, R.J.

    1987-11-03

    The preparations of sulfmyoglobin (sulf-Mb) by standard procedures have been found heterogeneous by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Presented here are the results of a comprehensive study of the factors that influence the selection among the three dominant isomeric forms of sperm whale sulf-Mb and their resulting detailed optical and /sup 1/H NMR properties as related to their detectability and structural properties of the heme pocket. A single isomer is formed initially in the deoxy state; further treatment in any desired oxidation/ligation state can yield two other major isomers. Acid catalysis and chromatography facilitate formation of a second isomer, particularly in the high-spin state. At neutral pH, a third isomer is formed by a first-order process. The processes that alter oxidation/ligation state are found to be reversible and are judged to affect only the metal center, but the three isomeric sulf-Mbs are found to exhibit significantly different ligand affinity and chemical stability. The present results allow, for the first time, a rational approach for preparing a given isomeric sulf-Mb in an optimally pure state for subsequent characterization by other techniques. While optical spectroscopy can distinguish the alkaline forms, only /sup 1/H NMR clearly distinguishes all three ferric isomers. The hyperfine shift patterns in the various oxidation/spin states of sulf-Mbs indicate relatively small structural alteration, and the proximal and distal sides of the heme suggest that peripheral electronic effects are responsible for the differentially reduced ligand affinities for the three isomeric sulf-Mbs. The first /sup 1/H NMR spectra of sulfhemoglobins are presented, which indicate a structure similar to that of the initially formed sulf-Mb isomer but also suggest the presence of a similar molecular heterogeneity as found for sulf-Mb, albiet to a smaller extent.

  4. Interaction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae. alpha. -factor with phospholipid vesicles as revealed by proton and phosphorus NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Jelicks, L.A.; Broido, M.S.; Becker, J.M.; Naider, F.R. )

    1989-05-16

    Proton and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR) studies of the interaction between a tridecapeptide pheromone, the {alpha}-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and sonicated lipid vesicles are reported. {sup 31}P NMR studies demonstrate that there is interaction of the peptide with the phosphorus headgroups, and quasielastic light scattering (QLS) studies indicate that lipid vesicles increase in size upon addition of peptide. Previous solution (aqueous and DMSO) studies from this laboratory indicate that {alpha}-factor is highly flexible with only one long-lived identifiable structural feature, a type II {beta}-turn spanning the central portion of the peptide. Two-dimensional (2D) {sup 1}H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) studies demonstrate a marked ordering of the peptide upon interaction with lipid, suggesting a compact N-terminus, in addition to a stabilized {beta}-turn. In contrast to these results in both solution and lipid environment, Wakamatsu et al. proposed a lipid environment conformation, on the basis of one-dimensional transferred NOE studies in D{sub 2}O, which does not include the {beta}-turn.

  5. The Effect of Antitumor Glycosides on Glioma Cells and Tissues as Studied by Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; Campos-Olivas, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the treatment with glycolipid derivatives on the metabolic profile of intact glioma cells and tumor tissues, investigated using proton high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, is reported here. Two compounds were used, a glycoside and its thioglycoside analogue, both showing anti-proliferative activity on glioma C6 cell cultures; however, only the thioglycoside exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. At the drug concentrations showing anti-proliferative activity in cell culture (20 and 40 µM), significant increases in choline containing metabolites were observed in the 1H NMR spectra of the same intact cells. In vivo experiments in nude mice bearing tumors derived from implanted C6 glioma cells, showed that reduction of tumor volume was associated with significant changes in the metabolic profile of the same intact tumor tissues; and were similar to those observed in cell culture. Specifically, the activity of the compounds is mainly associated with an increase in choline and phosphocholine, in both the cell cultures and tumoral tissues. Taurine, a metabolite that has been considered a biomarker of apoptosis, correlated with the reduction of tumor volume. Thus, the results indicate that the mode of action of the glycoside involves, at least in part, alteration of phospholipid metabolism, resulting in cell death. PMID:24194925

  6. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Izatt, R.M.

    1992-07-01

    A number of new macrocyclic ligands was prepared for transport studies. The cryptands were prpepared (18-40% yield) by a new metal carbonate-catalyzed one-step method from 1 mole oligoethyleneoxy diamine and 2 moles diahlide derivative of oligoethylene glycol. Bis-crown ethers were also isolated in 17-30% yields. Cage compounds were also prepared; they interact with various metal ions and protons. Back extraction and dual module hollow fiber membrane separation experiments were used to study the cation selectivity of new ligands, including crown thioethers. An isothermal flow calorimeter is being constructed for studies of macrocycle-cation reactions. 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  7. NMR J-coupling constants in cisplatin derivatives studied by molecular dynamics and relativistic DFT.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Kiplangat; Truflandier, Lionel A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Solvent effects on J((195)Pt-(15)N) one-bond nuclear spin-spin coupling constants (J(PtN)) of cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)] and three cisplatin derivatives are investigated using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio molecular dynamics (aiMD) and all-electron relativistic DFT NMR calculations employing the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA). Good agreement with experiment is obtained when explicit solvent molecules are considered and when the computations are performed with a hybrid functional. Spin-orbit coupling causes only small effects on J(PtN) . Key factors contributing to the magnitude of coupling constants are elucidated, with the most significant being the presence of solvent as well as the quality of the density functional and basis set combination. The solvent effects are of the same magnitude as J(PtN) calculated for gas-phase geometries. However, the trends of J(PtN) among the complexes are already present in the gas phase. Results obtained with a continuum solvent model agree quite well with the aiMD results, provided that the Pt solvent-accessible radius is carefully chosen. The aiMD results support the existence of a partial hydrogen-bond-like inverse-hydration-type interaction affording a weak (1)J(Pt⋅⋅⋅H(w)) coupling between the complexes and the coordinating water molecule.

  8. Dynamics of anions and cations in cesium hydrogensulfide (CsHS, CsDS): Neutron and x-ray diffraction, calorimetry and proton NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarmann, F.; Jacobs, H.; Kockelmann, W.; Senker, J.; Muller, P.; Kennedy, C. A.; Marriott, R. A.; Qiu, L.; White, M. A.

    2002-09-01

    Protonated and deuterated samples of the hydrogensulfide of cesium were studied by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction, calorimetry and proton NMR investigations in a wide temperature range. Primarily due to reorientational disorder of the anions, three modifications of the title compounds are known: an ordered low-temperature modification--LTM (tetragonal, I4/m, Z=8), a dynamically disordered middle-temperature modification--MTM (tetragonal, P4/mbm, Z=2), and a high-temperature modification--HTM (cubic, Pm3m, Z=1). The LTM[rightleft arrows]MTM phase transition is continuous. Its order parameter, related to an order/disorder and to a displacive part of the phase transition, coupled bilinearly, follows a critical law. The critical temperature TC=123.2plus-or-minus0.5 K determined by neutron diffraction of CsDS is in good agreement with TC=121plus-or-minus2 K obtained by calorimetric investigations. For the protonated title compound a shift to TC=129plus-or-minus2 K was observed by calorimetric measurements. The entropy change of this transition is (0.24plus-or-minus0.04) R and (0.27plus-or-minus0.04) R for CsHS and CsDS, respectively. The MTM[rightleft arrows]HTM phase transition is clearly of first order. The transition temperatures of CsHS and CsDS are T=207.9plus-or-minus0.3 K and T=213.6plus-or-minus0.3 K with entropy changes of (0.86plus-or-minus0.01) R and (0.81plus-or-minus0.01) R, respectively. Second moments (M2) of the proton NMR absorption signal of MTM and HTM are in reasonable agreement with M2 calculated for the known crystal structures. A minimum in spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) in the MTM could not be assigned by dipolar coupling to a two-site 180deg reorientation of the anions, a model of motion presumed by the knowledge of the crystal structure. The activation enthalpies determined by fits of T1 presuming a thermal activated process are in the order of molecular reorientations (Ea=13.5plus-or-minus0.5 kJ mol-1 for the MTM and Ea=9.3plus

  9. Proton Dynamics on Goethite Nanoparticles and Coupling to Electron Transport.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Smith, Dayle M; Rosso, Kevin M

    2015-04-14

    The surface chemistry of metal oxide particles is governed by the charge that develops at the interface with aqueous solution. Mineral transformation, biogeochemical reactions, remediation, and sorption dynamics are profoundly affected in response. Here we report implementation of replica-exchange constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations that use classical molecular dynamics for exploring configurational space and Metropolis Monte Carlo walking through protonation space with a simulated annealing escape route from metastable configurations. By examining the archetypal metal oxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), we find that electrostatic potential gradients spontaneously arise between intersecting low-index crystal faces and across explicitly treated oxide nanoparticles at a magnitude exceeding the Johnson-Nyquist voltage fluctuation. Fluctuations in adsorbed proton density continuously repolarize the surface potential bias between edge-sharing crystal faces, at a rate slower than the reported electron-polaron hopping rate in goethite interiors. This suggests that these spontaneous surface potential fluctuations will control the net movement of charge carriers in the lattice. PMID:26574382

  10. Proton Dynamics on Goethite Nanoparticles and Coupling to Electron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Smith, Dayle MA; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-04-14

    The surface chemistry of metal oxide particles is governed by the charge that develops at the interface with aqueous solution. Mineral transformation, biogeochemical reactions, remediation, and sorption dynamics are profoundly affected in response. Here we report implementation of replica-exchange constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations that use classical molecular dynamics for exploring configurational space and Metropolis Monte Carlo walking through protonation space with a simulated annealing escape route from metastable configurations. By examining the archetypal metal oxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), we find that electrostatic potential gradients spontaneously arise between intersecting low-index crystal faces and across explicitly treated oxide nanoparticles at a magnitude exceeding the Johnson–Nyquist voltage fluctuation. Fluctuations in adsorbed proton density continuously repolarize the surface potential bias between edge-sharing crystal faces, at a rate slower than the reported electron–polaron hopping rate in goethite interiors. This suggests that these spontaneous surface potential fluctuations will control the net movement of charge carriers in the lattice.

  11. Molecular orbital calculation of proton shielding tensors for the interpretation of solid state NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, U.; Rosenberger, H.

    1981-02-01

    We give a short review of the gauge-invariant calculation of shielding constants and susceptibilities from the ground state wvefunction. Since the method is well suited for localizad orbitals, PC ILO bond orbitals are used for the shielding calculation of glycine and its hydrogen bonded dimer (and for testing the theory also CH 4 and C 2H 6). From these values the 1H shielding tensors are constructed in an incrementary way. The calculated data are compared with experimental results and the NH…O hydrogen bond is investigated in detail. The theory gives an anisotropy of a NH…O hydrogen bonded proton of Δσ = 28.3 ppm and a value of a NH proton without hydrogen bond of Δσ = 18.8 ppm and for the CH proton Δσ = 12.5 ppm results. When taking into account the rotation of the NH θ3 groups we find that the qualitative features of the experiment are correctly represented. For the anisotropy Δσ = -6.55 ppm and for the asymmetry η = 0.588 are obtained. The experimental values are -5.63 ppm and 0.805, respectively.

  12. Protein (tyrosine)-chromophore (protonated Schiff base) coupling in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Hanamoto, J.H.; Dupuis, P.; El-Sayed, M.A.

    1984-11-01

    The kinetics of formation of both the tyrosinate ion (from its absorption at 296 nm) and the deprotonated Schiff base (M/sub 412/) (from its absorption at 404 nm) are studied simultaneously at different pH values (7-11) and temperatures (5-25/sup 0/C). Two formation rates are observed for M/sub 412/ in agreement with previous observations. The slow one is dominant under physiological conditions and is found to be slightly faster than that for the tyrosinate formation. This is in disagreement with the proposal that the tyrosinate formation is a prerequisite to the deprotonation of the Schiff base (M/sub 412/). The ratio of the amplitudes of the fast and slow components is found to be sensitive to pH and, at any pH, it can be used to calculate an amino acid pK/sub a/ value of 9.6. This is explained by proposing the existence of two sites for the protonated Schiff base within the protein. In one site, the Schiff base is near the neutral form of an amino acid residue with a pK/sub a/ value of 9.6 (giving rise to the slow component), while in the other, it is near its conjugate base. The formation of the tyrosinate ion as well as the formation of the slow and fast components of M/sub 412/ all have activation energies that are comparable to H-bond energies. A model is suggested to account for this and the comparable deprotonation rates of tyrosine and the slow component of the protonated Schiff base. It involves the reduction of their pK/sub a/ by their exposure to a positively charged species. 43 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Probing Nonadiabaticity in the Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reaction Catalyzed by Soybean Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. PCET rate constant expressions are available for various well-defined regimes, and determining which expression is appropriate for a given system is essential for reliable modeling. Quantitative diagnostics have been devised to characterize the vibronic nonadiabaticity between the electron–proton quantum subsystem and the classical nuclei, as well as the electron–proton nonadiabaticity between the electrons and proton(s) within the quantum subsystem. Herein these diagnostics are applied to a model of the active site of the enzyme soybean lipoxygenase, which catalyzes a PCET reaction that exhibits unusually high deuterium kinetic isotope effects at room temperature. Both semiclassical and electronic charge density diagnostics illustrate vibronic and electron–proton nonadiabaticity for this PCET reaction, supporting the use of the Golden rule nonadiabatic rate constant expression with a specific form of the vibronic coupling. This type of characterization will be useful for theoretical modeling of a broad range of PCET processes. PMID:25258676

  14. Nickel phlorin intermediate formed by proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen evolution mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Brian H.; Maher, Andrew G.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Nocera, Daniel G.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The development of more effective energy conversion processes is critical for global energy sustainability. The design of molecular electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction is an important component of these efforts. Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer, play an important role in these processes and can be enhanced by incorporating proton relays into the molecular electrocatalysts. Herein nickel porphyrin electrocatalysts with and without an internal proton relay are investigated to elucidate the hydrogen evolution mechanisms and thereby enable the design of more effective catalysts. Density functional theory calculations indicate that electrochemical reduction leads to dearomatization of the porphyrin conjugated system, thereby favoring protonation at the meso carbon of the porphyrin ring to produce a phlorin intermediate. A key step in the proposed mechanisms is a thermodynamically favorable PCET reaction composed of intramolecular electron transfer from the nickel to the porphyrin and proton transfer from a carboxylic acid hanging group or an external acid to the meso carbon of the porphyrin. The C–H bond of the active phlorin acts similarly to the more traditional metal-hydride by reacting with acid to produce H2. Support for the theoretically predicted mechanism is provided by the agreement between simulated and experimental cyclic voltammograms in weak and strong acid and by the detection of a phlorin intermediate through spectroelectrochemical measurements. These results suggest that phlorin species have the potential to perform unique chemistry that could prove useful in designing more effective electrocatalysts. PMID:26655344

  15. Thermochemistry of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reagents and its Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Tronic, Tristan A.; Mayer, James M.

    2010-12-08

    Many, if not most, redox reactions are coupled to proton transfers. This includes most common sources of chemical potential energy, from the bioenergetic processes that power cells to the fossil fuel combustion that powers cars. These proton-coupled electron transfer or PCET processes may involve multiple electrons and multiple protons, as in the 4 e–, 4 H+ reduction of dioxygen (O2) to water (eq 1), or can involve one electron and one proton such as the formation of tyrosyl radicals from tyrosine residues (TyrOH) in enzymatic catalytic cycles (eq 2). In addition, many multi-electron, multi-proton processes proceed in one-electron and one-proton steps. Organic reactions that proceed in one-electron steps involve radical intermediates, which play critical roles in a wide range of chemical, biological, and industrial processes. This broad and diverse class of PCET reactions are central to a great many chemical and biochemical processes, from biological catalysis and energy transduction, to bulk industrial chemical processes, to new approaches to solar energy conversion. PCET is therefore of broad and increasing interest, as illustrated by this issue and a number of other recent reviews.

  16. Transverse Mode-Coupling Instability in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métral, E.; Arduini, G.; Benedetto, E.; Burkhardt, H.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Rumolo, G.

    2005-06-01

    A vertical single-bunch instability has been observed in 2003 right after injection at 26 GeV/c in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). High-intensity proton bunches (˜1.2 1011 p/b) with low longitudinal emittance (˜0.2 eVs) are affected by heavy losses after less than one synchrotron period. Such phenomenon has already been observed with leptons in many machines, e.g. in the SPS, or with protons at transition, e.g. in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS). However, to the authors' knowledge, it is the first time with protons far from transition. The absence of transverse mode-coupling instability in hadron machines is generally explained by three mechanisms: (i) the intensity threshold for the longitudinal microwave instability is generally lower than for the transverse mode-coupling instability, (ii) the intensity threshold due to mode-coupling between the two lowest azimuthal modes increases with space charge, and (iii) the intensity threshold increases with bunch length (in the long-bunch regime). In this talk measurements performed in the SPS are compared to analytical and simulation predictions.

  17. Measuring Residual Dipolar Couplings in Excited Conformational States of Nucleic Acids by CEST NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Qi

    2015-10-28

    Nucleic acids undergo structural transitions to access sparsely populated and transiently lived conformational states--or excited conformational states--that play important roles in diverse biological processes. Despite ever-increasing detection of these functionally essential states, 3D structure determination of excited states (ESs) of RNA remains elusive. This is largely due to challenges in obtaining high-resolution structural constraints in these ESs by conventional structural biology approaches. Here, we present nucleic-acid-optimized chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) NMR spectroscopy for measuring residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), which provide unique long-range angular constraints in ESs of nucleic acids. We demonstrate these approaches on a fluoride riboswitch, where one-bond (13)C-(1)H RDCs from both base and sugar moieties provide direct structural probes into an ES of the ligand-free riboswitch.

  18. InP/ZnS nanocrystals: coupling NMR and XPS for fine surface and interface description.

    PubMed

    Virieux, Héloïse; Le Troedec, Marianne; Cros-Gagneux, Arnaud; Ojo, Wilfried-Solo; Delpech, Fabien; Nayral, Céline; Martinez, Hervé; Chaudret, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Advanced (1)H, (13)C, and (31)P solution- and solid-state NMR studies combined with XPS were used to probe, at the molecular scale, the composition (of the core, the shell, and the interface) and the surface chemistry of InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots prepared via a non-coordinating solvent strategy. The interface between the mismatched InP and ZnS phases is composed of an amorphous mixed oxide phase incorporating InPO(x) (with x = 3 and predominantly 4), In(2)O(3), and InO(y)(OH)(3-2y) (y = 0, 1). Thanks to the analysis of the underlying reaction mechanisms, we demonstrate that the oxidation of the upper part of the InP core is the consequence of oxidative conditions brought by decarboxylative coupling reactions (ketonization). These reactions occur during both the core preparation and the coating process, but according to different mechanisms. PMID:23131073

  19. Coupled effect of salt and pH on proteins probed with NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukic, Predrag; O'Meara, Fergal; Hewage, Chandralal; Erik Nielsen, Jens

    2013-07-01

    The coupled effect of ionic strength (50-400 mM) and pH (2-8) on ionization and conformation equilibria of lysozyme was studied using NMR spectroscopy. Observed changes in pKa values of the ionizable groups were found to originate from perturbations in the geometry of hydrogen bonds rather than screening of electric fields. Moreover, at the ionic strengths used here, salt-induced local conformational changes had a dominant effect on chemical shifts measured on 1HN and 15N amide nuclei. Accurate modeling of these localized perturbations in structure-based energy calculations is a necessary prerequisite on the way to complete understanding of any salt-induced processes in proteins.

  20. Proton NMR studies of the electronic structure of ZrH/sub x/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attalla, A.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Craft, B. D.; Venturini, E. L.; Rhim, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    The proton spin lattice relaxation times and Knight shifts were measured in f.c.c. (delta-phase) and f.c.t. (epsilon-phase) ZrH/sub x/ for 1.5 or = to x or = to 2.0. Both parameters indicate that N(E/sub F/) is very dependent upon hydrogen content with a maximum occurring at ZrH1 83. This behavior is ascribed to modifications in N(E/sub F/) through a fcc/fct distortion in ZrH/sub x/ associated with a Jahn-Teller effect.

  1. Photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer: model study of isotope effects on reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Charulatha; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-10-21

    A model Hamiltonian for photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer reactions is presented, and the equations of motion for the reduced density matrix elements in an electron-proton vibronic basis are derived. This formalism enables a detailed analysis of the proton vibrational dynamics, as well as the dynamics of the electronic state populations, following photoexcitation. The application of this theory to model systems provides insight into the fundamental physical principles underlying these types of processes. The initial nonequilibrium state is prepared by vertical photoexcitation from the ground electronic state to a coherent vibrational mixture in the donor electronic state. This nonstationary state relaxes to the equilibrium distributions in the donor and acceptor electronic states via dynamical processes arising from nonadiabatic transitions between the donor and acceptor vibronic states concurrent with energy dissipation to the bath. During the initial stage, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state is distributed among higher vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket is oscillating with large amplitude, the electronic state population dynamics exhibits virtually no hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect. After vibrational relaxation, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state becomes concentrated in the lower vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket becomes more localized near the minimum of the donor potential, a significant hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect on the electronic state population dynamics is exhibited. These model system calculations lead to experimentally testable predictions about the qualitative behavior of these isotope effects. PMID:20568867

  2. Obligatory coupling between proton entry and the synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate in Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, P C

    1977-01-01

    Proton influx was measured after imposition of an electrochemical potential difference for protons (delta muH+) across the cell membrane of the anaerobe, Streptococcus lactis. As delta muH+ was increased, there was an approximately parallel increase in proton entry, until delta muH+ attained 175 to 200 mV. At this point, a new pathway became available for proton entry, allowing an abrupt increase in both the rate and extent of H+ influx. This gated response depended upon the value of delta muH+ itself, and not upon the value of either the membrane potential or the pH gradient. For delta muH+ above 175 to 200 mV, elevated proton entry occurred only in cells having a functional membrane-bound Ca2+-stimulated, Mg2+stimulated adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.3). When present, elevated proton entry coincided with the appearance of net synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate catalyzed by this adenosine 5'-triphosphatase. These observations demonstrate that membrane-bound adenosine 5'-triphosphatase catalyzes an obligatory coupling between the inward movement of protons and synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. PMID:21165

  3. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  4. Proton NMR assignment and secondary structural elements of human transforming growth factor. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.C.; Mueller, L.; Jeffs, P.W. )

    1989-01-24

    The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of human transforming growth factor {alpha} (hTGF-{alpha}) has been completely assigned, and secondary structural elements have been identified as a preliminary step in determining the structure of this protein by distance geometry methods. Many of these structural elements closely correspond to those previously found in a truncated human EGF and murine EGF. These include the presence of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet between residues G19 and C34 with a type I {beta}-turn at V25-D28, a type II {beta}-turn at H35-Y38, and another short {beta}-sheet between residues Y38-V39 and H45-A46.

  5. Structural Analysis of N- and O-glycans Using ZIC-HILIC/Dialysis Coupled to NMR Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Feng, Ju; Deng, Shuang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Qibin; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jiang, Yuxuan; Zink, Erika M.; Baker, Scott E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hu, Jian Z.; Wu, Si

    2014-11-19

    Protein glycosylation, an important and complex post-translational modification (PTM), is involved in various biological processes including the receptor-ligand and cell-cell interaction, and plays a crucial role in many biological functions. However, little is known about the glycan structures of important biological complex samples, and the conventional glycan enrichment strategy (i.e., size-exclusion column [SEC] separation,) prior to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection is time-consuming and tedious. In this study, we employed SEC, Zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC), and ZIC-HILIC coupled with dialysis strategies to enrich the glycopeptides from the pronase E digests of RNase B, followed by NMR analysis of the glycoconjugate. Our results suggest that the ZIC-HILIC enrichment coupled with dialysis is the most efficient, which was thus applied to the analysis of biological complex sample, the pronase E digest of the secreted proteins from the fungi Aspergillus niger. The NMR spectra revealed that the secreted proteins from A. niger contain both N-linked glycans with a high-mannose core and O-linked glycans bearing mannose and glucose with 1->3 and 1->6 linkages. In all, our study provides compelling evidence that ZIC-HILIC separation coupled to dialysis is superior to the commonly used SEC separation to prepare glycopeptides for the downstream NMR analysis, which could greatly facilitate the future NMR-based glycoproteomics research.

  6. Thermal Coupling of Protons and Neutral Hydrogen in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L.; Habbal, S. R.

    1997-05-01

    Motivated by the recent Spartan and UVCS observations [Kohl et al. 1996] of hot protons with temperatures exceeding 4 x 10(6) K below 3.5 R_s in coronal holes, as inferred from the measured broadening of the Lyman alpha spectral line profile, we studied the thermal coupling of neutral hydrogen to protons in the presence of Alfven waves in the solar wind. The approach used is adopted from Olsen et al. [1994] in which the neutral hydrogen atoms are treated as test particles in a background electron-proton solar wind. The model computations show that an anisotropy in the neutral hydrogen temperature in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field develops in the inner corona well below 5 R_s for background solar wind solutions consistent with observational constraints of the high speed wind. In particular, we find that the neutral hydrogen temperature parallel to the magnetic field direction remains strongly coupled to the proton temperature, T_p, while the perpendicular neutral hydrogen temperature exceeds this by ~ 10(6) K for a wide range of proton flow speeds, densities and temperatures for a spectrum of Alfven waves. The neutral hydrogen effective temperature, T_{H(eff)}(perpendicular to ) , incorporating both random thermal motion and wave motion of the particles, is found to be independent of frequency and significantly less than the proton effective temperature, T_{p(eff)}, in the inner corona. Thus, without additional information about the waves, which would allow T_H(perpendicular to ) and T_p to be extracted from the models, T_{H(eff)}(perpendicular to ) provides an upper limit on T_p and a lower limit on T_{p(eff)}. However, with increasing proton temperature, the anisotropy in the inner corona decreases, with a temperature difference of < 8 x 10(5) K between the protons and neutrals below 3 R_s when the latter reach 6 x 10(6) K.

  7. Mass prediction of proton-rich nuclides with the Coulomb displacement energies in the relativistic point-coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, BaoHua; Zhao, PengWei; Meng, Jie

    2011-02-01

    The masses, one- and two-proton separation energies of proton-rich nuclei with Z = 20-55, are computed using the measured masses of mirror neutron-rich nuclei and the Coulomb displacement energies calculated from the relativistic point-coupling model. The implications for the proton drip lines, candidates for two-proton emitters, as well as the impact on the astrophysical rp-process are discussed.

  8. Thermochemistry of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reagents and its Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey J; Tronic, Tristan A; Mayer, James M

    2010-01-01

    The primary goals of this review are (1) to assemble thermochemical data—reduction potentials, pK{sub a} values, and bond dissociation free energies and enthalpies—from disparate sources and (2) to illustrate the utility of these data in understanding proton-coupled redox chemistry. We hope to have illustrated the value and power of thermochemical cycles (“square schemes”).

  9. Ultrafast proton-coupled electron transfer in heterogenous photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin; Onda, Ken; Li, Bin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2006-08-01

    At metal-oxide/protic-solvent interfaces, partially hydrated or "wet electron" states represent the lowest energy pathway for electron transfer. Here we study the photoinduced charge transfer at the H IIO/TiO II(110) interface by means of timeresolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy and electronic structure theory. At ~1 monolayer coverage of H IIO on partially hydroxylated TiO II surfaces we find an unoccupied electronic state 2.4+/-0.1 eV above the Fermi level. Density functional theory shows this to be a two-dimensional "wet electron" state, which is distinct from hydrated electrons observed on water-covered metal surfaces. The decay of electrons from the wet electron state by the resonant charge transfer to the conduction band of TiO II occurs in <=15 femtoseconds. Similar unoccupied electronic structure is observed for CH 3OH covered TiO II(110) surfaces; however, the electron dynamics are considerably more complex. The wet electron state dynamics of CH 3OH/TiO II exhibit both energy and population decay. The excited state lifetime is strongly coverage dependent increasing to >100 fs range above 1 ML CH 3OH coverage. Significantly, a pronounced deuterium isotope effect (CH 3OD) indicates a strong correlation between the interfacial electron transfer and the motion of protons in the molecular overlayer.

  10. Proton NMR investigation of the heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase that mimics manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-07-13

    The heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase [MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 4, 215-221] that closely mimics manganese peroxidase (MnP) has been characterized by both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All hyperfine-shifted resonances from the heme pocket as well as resonances from catalytically relevant amino acid residues in the congested diamagnetic envelope have been assigned. From the NMR spectral assignment and the line broadening pattern of specific protons in NOESY spectra of MnCcP, the location of the engineered Mn(II) center is firmly identified. Furthermore, we found that the creation of the Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in no detectable structural changes on the distal heme pocket of the protein. However, notable structural changes are observed at the proximal side of the heme cavity. Both CepsilonH shift of the proximal histidine and (15)N shift of the bound C(15)N(-) suggest a weaker heme Fe(III)-N(His) bond in MnCcP compared to WtCcP. Our results indicate that the engineered Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in not only a similar Mn(II)-binding affinity and improved MnP activity, but also weakened the Fe(III)-N(His) bond strength of the template protein CcP so that its bond strength is similar to that of the target protein MnP. The results presented here help elucidate the impact of designing a metal-binding site on both the local and global structure of the enzyme, and provide a structural basis for engineering the next generation of MnCcP that mimics MnP more closely. PMID:10413489

  11. Proton NMR study of the interaction of tin(IV) protoporphyrin IX monomers and dimers with apomyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Deeb, R.S.; Peyton, D.H. )

    1992-01-21

    Events during the reconstitution of apomyoglobin to form the holoprotein were probed by porphyrin-metal substitution. Thus interactions between tin(IV) protoporphyrin IX (SnPP) and equine apomyoglobin (apoEqMb), and between tin(IV) protoporphyrin IX dimers ((SnPP){sub 2}) and apoEqMb, were observed by {sup 1}H NMR and optical absorbance spectroscopic techniques. The chief advantages of using SnPP are that products and intermediates can easily be related to SnPP{center dot}EqMb which has been studied and that at least one step during reconstitution is slowed considerably as compared to heme. Reactions of apoEqMb with SnPP and (SnPP){sub 2} produce different intermediates, although the final product, SnPP{center dot}EqMb, is the same for each. An intermediate observed for reaction of SnPP with apoEqMb at pH 10 is in exchange with free SnPP, with the observed rate constant k{sub off} {approximately} 1 s{sup {minus}1}. meso-Proton resonances were assigned for this intermediate by correlation to SnPP resonances via chemical exchange. The intermediate observed for reaction of (SnPP){sub 2} with apoEqMb at pH 7.5 is heterogeneous. The reaction of either SnPP or (SnPP){sub 2} with apoEqMb at neutral pH produces another species which may be the alternate porphyrin-insertion isomer arising from a 180{degree} rotation about the {alpha},{gamma}-meso axis of the porphyrin. Although optical absorbance spectroscopy of the Soret region shows evidence for each reaction, only in combination with {sup 1}H NMR are the various processes assigned.

  12. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implicationsmore » for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.« less

  13. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implications for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.

  14. Proton NMR analysis of octane number for motor gasoline: Part V

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, M.; Nonaka, N.; Amano, H.; Takada, I.; Ishimori, S.; Andoh, H.; Kumamoto, K.

    1992-10-01

    A method to predict the octane number of automobile gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) by proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectrometry was studied. Samples of gasoline whose octane numbers had been identified according to the ASTM standards (commercially available premium gasoline to which MTBE was added at rates of 7 vol % and 14 vol %) were used in this investigation of the effect of MTBE on the octane number. The findings were utilized to introduce a term regarding MTBE into the previously reported linear regression equation for estimating the octane number from the PMR spectrum, and the appropriateness of the linear regression equation was assessed. As a result the MTBE contents in the sample were determined with satisfactory accuracy by using a standard addition method, and a linear regression equation reflecting the effect of MTBE was obtained. These achievements are reported. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. United Atom Rotational Coupling in Proton + Helium Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chiiling

    United-atom 2p(sigma)-2p(pi) rotational coupling in asymmetric collisions is influenced by an avoided crossing between the 2p(sigma) and 2s(sigma) orbitals. This influence is studied using the HeH('+) system as a prototype. In (SIGMA)(,2)-(SIGMA)(,3)-(pi)(,1) three-state calculations, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved numerically. Substantial population of the 2s(sigma) state is found, which disagrees with the estimates based on the Landau-Zener model. The (SIGMA)(,3) level is populated directly by transitions near the avoided crossing at b = 0.4 au and indirectly by (SIGMA)(,2)-(pi)(,1)-(SIGMA)(,3) rotational coupling for b > 0.4 au. The ratios of P(,(SIGMA)(,3))(b)/ P(,(SIGMA)(,3))(b) + P(,(pi)(,1))(b) are calculated and compared with Dr. R. Hippler's experimental data. A six-state calculation, in the basis of (SIGMA)(,1), (SIGMA)(,2), (SIGMA)(,3), (SIGMA)(,4), (pi)(,1) and (pi)(,2) molecular states, is also made. Cross sections and alignment and orientation parameters have been computed from the transition amplitudes for various energies.

  16. Sensitivity enhancement of remotely coupled NMR detectors using wirelessly powered parametric amplification.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chunqi; Murphy-Boesch, Joseph; Dodd, Stephen; Koretsky, Alan

    2012-09-01

    A completely wireless detection coil with an integrated parametric amplifier has been constructed to provide local amplification and transmission of MR signals. The sample coil is one element of a parametric amplifier using a zero-bias diode that mixes the weak MR signal with a strong pump signal that is obtained from an inductively coupled external loop. The NMR sample coil develops current gain via reduction in the effective coil resistance. Higher gain can be obtained by adjusting the level of the pumping power closer to the oscillation threshold, but the gain is ultimately constrained by the bandwidth requirement of MRI experiments. A feasibility study here shows that on a NaCl/D(2) O phantom, (23) Na signals with 20 dB of gain can be readily obtained with a concomitant bandwidth of 144 kHz. This gain is high enough that the integrated coil with parametric amplifier, which is coupled inductively to external loops, can provide sensitivity approaching that of direct wire connection.

  17. NMR spin-spin coupling constants in polymethine dyes as polarity indicators.

    PubMed

    Murugan, N Arul; Aidas, Kestutis; Kongsted, Jacob; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ågren, Hans

    2012-09-10

    Herein, we explore the use of spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs) in merocyanine (MCYNE) dyes as indicators of polarity. For this purpose, we use Car-Parrinello hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) to determine the structures of MCYNE in solvents of different polarity, followed by computations of the SSCCs by using QM/MM linear-response theory. The molecular geometry of MCYNE switches between neutral, cyanine-like, and zwitterionic depending on the polarity of the solvent. This structural variation is clearly reflected in the proton SSCCs in the polymethine backbone, which are highly sensitive to the dielectric nature of the environment; this mechanism can be used as a "polarity indicator" for different microenvironments. This result is highlighted by computing the SSCCs of the MCYNE probe in the cavity of the beta-lactoglobulin protein. The computed SSCCs clearly indicate a non-polar hydrophobic dielectric nature of this cavity. PMID:22887687

  18. Image analysis of single event transient effects on charge coupled devices irradiated by protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Xue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jing; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Ma, Wuying

    2016-10-01

    The experiments of single event transient (SET) effects on charge coupled devices (CCDs) irradiated by protons are presented. The radiation experiments have been carried out at the accelerator protons with the energy of 200 MeV and 60 MeV.The incident angles of the protons are at 30°and 90° to the plane of the CCDs to obtain the images induced by the perpendicularity and incline incident angles. The experimental results show that the typical characteristics of the SET effects on a CCD induced by protons are the generation of a large number of dark signal spikes (hot pixels) which are randomly distributed in the "pepper" images. The characteristics of SET effects are investigated by observing the same imaging area at different time during proton radiation to verify the transient effects. The experiment results also show that the number of dark signal spikes increases with increasing integration time during proton radiation. The CCDs were tested at on-line and off-line to distinguish the radiation damage induced by the SET effects or DD effects. The mechanisms of the dark signal spike generation induced by the SET effects and the DD effects are demonstrated respectively.

  19. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  20. Proton NMR analysis of octane number for motor gasoline: Part IV

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, M.; Nonaka, N.; Amano, H.; Takada, I.; Ishimori, S.; Andoh, H.; Kumamoto, K.

    1992-08-01

    Software for predicting the octane number of motor gasoline by proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectrometry has been formulated. At the same time, a method has been studied to predict the composition of gasoline (in terms of the contents of paraffin, olefin, and aromatic compounds). The formulated program was evaluated by using it to predict the octane numbers of 31 samples of marketed summer gasoline (including 16 regular and 15 premium products), whose octane numbers and compositions were identified according to the ASTM standards. Also, the relationship between the PMR spectrum and gasoline composition was subjected to linear regression analysis by using the 31 samples whose octane numbers were calculated, and the appropriateness of the resultant regression equations was assessed. This report concerns the results of the study in which the octane numbers of the 31 samples were satisfactorily predicted by the formulated program and useful linear regression equation were obtained for the prediction of the composition of gasoline. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Insights into proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms of electrocatalytic H2 oxidation and production

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura E.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The design of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and production is important for the development of alternative renewable energy sources that are abundant, inexpensive, and environmentally benign. Recently, nickel-based molecular electrocatalysts with pendant amines that act as proton relays for the nickel center were shown to effectively catalyze H2 oxidation and production. We developed a quantum mechanical approach for studying proton-coupled electron transfer processes in these types of molecular electrocatalysts. This theoretical approach is applied to a nickel-based catalyst in which phosphorous atoms are directly bonded to the nickel center, and nitrogen atoms of the ligand rings act as proton relays. The catalytic step of interest involves electron transfer between the nickel complex and the electrode as well as intramolecular proton transfer between the nickel and nitrogen atoms. This process can occur sequentially, with either the electron or proton transferring first, or concertedly, with the electron and proton transferring simultaneously without a stable intermediate. The electrochemical rate constants are calculated as functions of overpotential for the concerted electron-proton transfer reaction and the two electron transfer reactions in the sequential mechanisms. Our calculations illustrate that the concerted electron-proton transfer standard rate constant will increase as the equilibrium distance between the nickel and nitrogen atoms decreases and as the pendant amines become more flexible to facilitate the contraction of this distance with a lower energy penalty. This approach identifies the favored mechanisms under various experimental conditions and provides insight into the impact of substituents on the nitrogen and phosphorous atoms. PMID:22529352

  2. Insights into proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms of electrocatalytic H2 oxidation and production

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.; Fernandez, L. E.; Soudackov, A. V.; Hammes-Schiffer, S.

    2012-04-23

    The design of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and production is important for the development of alternative renewable energy sources that are abundant, inexpensive, and environmentally benign. Recently nickel-based molecular electrocatalysts with pendant amines that act as proton relays for the nickel center were shown to effectively catalyze H2 oxidation and production. We developed a quantum mechanical approach for studying proton-coupled electron transfer processes in these types of molecular electrocatalysts. This theoretical approach is applied to a nickel-based catalyst in which phosphorous atoms are directly bonded to the nickel center and nitrogen atoms of the ligand rings act as proton relays. The cataly c step of interest involves electron transfer between the nickel complex and the electrode as well as intramolecular proton transfer between the nickel and nitrogen atoms. This process can occur sequentially, with either the electron or proton transferring first, or concertedly, with the electron and proton transferring simultaneously without a stable intermediate. The heterogeneous rate constants are calculated as functions of overpotential for the concerted electron-proton transfer reaction and the two electron transfer reactions in the sequential mechanisms. Our calculations illustrate that the concerted electron-proton transfer standard rate constant will increase as the equilibrium distance between the nickel and nitrogen atoms decreases and as the nitrogen atoms become more mobile to facilitate the contraction of this distance. This approach assists in the identification of the favored mechanisms under various experimental conditions and provides insight into the qualitative impact of substituents on the nitrogen and phosphorous atoms. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy

  3. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances a protein by two-dimensional NMR: the case of mouse epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kohda, D; Sawada, T; Inagaki, F

    1991-05-21

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p2H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) 1H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable groups which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups (alpha-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and alpha-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal alpha-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the beta-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. We found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins. PMID:2036358

  4. Magnetic field nonuniformities and NMR of protons diffusing in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Bergman, D J; Dunn, K J; LaTorraca, G A

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic field inhomogeneity can arise either because of an externally applied field gradient or because of spatial variations in magnetic susceptibility. The latter are most important when the solid matrix includes paramagnetic substances and when the uniform applied field, and, consequently, also the Larmor precession frequency are very large. Both types of field inhomogeneity add extra phase shifts to the precessing spins. These phase shifts vary with time and position in a complex and random fashion as a result of the diffusive motion of the spins. We have studied these effects by performing detailed calculations for the case of a fluid filled porous medium with a periodic microstructure. Special attention was devoted to the question of whether the statistical distribution of the phase shifts encountered in a Hahn spin echo experiment or in a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) spin-echo train can be approximated as a Gaussian. The mean square phase shift is measured in such experiments as an enhanced relaxation rate of the precessing transverse magnetization. We determine this mean square phase shift for periodic composites from the diffusion eigenstates, which were calculated using a previously developed Fourier expansion method. The enhanced relaxation rate depends on the echo spacing time tau in a way that can be correlated with important length scales of the porous microstructure. Those correlations can be extended also to disordered microstructures, like the ones that are found in natural rocks. We compare these theoretically predicted correlations with CPMG measurements performed on protons in laboratory samples of brine saturated sandstone. PMID:8970094

  5. Thermal coupling between neutral hydrogen and protons in the fast solar wind: Models and inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Lorraine Ann

    2001-10-01

    In response to the recent Spartan and UVCS/SOHO observations of Ly α spectral line profiles in the inner corona implying large temperature anisotropies and proton temperatures as high as 6 × 106 K [ Kohl et al., 1996, 1997]1, we investigate the thermal coupling between neutral hydrogen atoms and protons in the fast solar wind. We include charge exchange between neutrals and protons, radiative recombination, collisional ionization of the neutrals, and the effects of Alfvén waves, described by a single frequency or a spectrum. We follow the approach developed by Olsen et al. [1994]2 to incorporate the collisional interaction between the neutrals and protons and the resulting wave motion of the neutrals. A fluid approach is used in which the neutrals are treated as test particles in a background electron- proton solar wind driven out from the Sun by thermal and Alfvén wave pressure against gravity. Coulomb collisions and thermal conductivity of the electrons and protons are included, as well as the allowance for non- radially expanding flow tubes and additional heating to the electrons and protons. We study the behavior of the neutral hydrogen in the solar wind for cases with isotropic and anisotropic proton temperatures. Our model solutions show, and we confirm by analytical calculation, that the effective temperature, T⊥H(eff) , incorporating both random and wave motions of the neutral hydrogen, is independent of Alfvén wave frequency. We find that for solutions with either isotropic or anisotropic proton temperatures the proton and neutral hydrogen effective temperatures and outflow velocities are comparable, with a temperature difference less than 5 × 105 K, below 3 Rs. For plasma conditions typical of the fast solar wind, these results imply that the measured Ly α spectral line profiles, from which the neutral hydrogen temperature, anisotropy ratio, and outflow velocity are inferred, are equivalent to measurements of protons below 3 R s. To relate our

  6. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine. PMID:24943718

  7. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine.

  8. A protonation-coupled feedback mechanism controls the signalling process in bathy phytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; Piwowarski, Patrick; Salewski, Johannes; Michael, Norbert; Fernandez Lopez, Maria; Rupp, Anna; Muhammad Qureshi, Bilal; Scheerer, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Siebert, Friedrich; Andrea Mroginski, Maria; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Phytochromes are bimodal photoswitches composed of a photosensor and an output module. Photoactivation of the sensor is initiated by a double bond isomerization of the tetrapyrrole chromophore and eventually leads to protein conformational changes. Recently determined structural models of phytochromes identify differences between the inactive and the signalling state but do not reveal the mechanism of photosensor activation or deactivation. Here, we report a vibrational spectroscopic study on bathy phytochromes that demonstrates that the formation of the photoactivated state and thus (de)activation of the output module is based on proton translocations in the chromophore pocket coupling chromophore and protein structural changes. These proton transfer steps, involving the tetrapyrrole and a nearby histidine, also enable thermal back-isomerization of the chromophore via keto-enol tautomerization to afford the initial dark state. Thus, the same proton re-arrangements inducing the (de)activation of the output module simultaneously initiate the reversal of this process, corresponding to a negative feedback mechanism.

  9. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pH regulation has a fundamental role in several intracellular processes and its variation via exogenous compounds is a potential tool for intervening in the intracellular processes. Proton caged compounds (PPCs) release protons upon UV irradiation and may efficiently provoke intracellular on-command acidification. Here, we explore the intracellular pH variation, when purposely synthesized PCCs are coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dosed to HEK-293 cells. We detected the acidification process caused by the UV irradiation by monitoring the intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode of the CO(2) molecule at 2343 cm(-1). The comparison between free and AuNPs functionalized proton caged compound demonstrates a highly enhanced CO(2) yield, hence pH variation, in the latter case. Finally, PCC functionalized AuNPs were marked with a purposely synthesized fluorescent marker and dosed to HEK-293 cells. The corresponding fluorescence optical images show green grains throughout the whole cytoplasm.

  10. Progress toward a search for spin-mass couplings of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, Julian; Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Rios, Cesar; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Kimball, Derek Jackson

    2012-06-01

    We report progress in our experiment to use a dual-isotope rubidium magnetometer to search for a long-range coupling between proton spins and the mass of the Earth. The valence electron dominates magnetic interactions and serves as a precise co-magnetometer for the nuclei in a simultaneous measurement of Rb-85 and Rb-87 spin precession frequencies, enabling accurate subtraction of magnetic perturbations. Both Rb nuclei have valence protons, but in Rb-87 the proton spin is parallel to the nuclear spin and magnetic moment while for Rb-85 the proton spin is anti-parallel to the nuclear spin and magnetic moment. Thus anomalous interactions of the proton spin produce a differential shift between the Rb spin-precession frequencies, whereas many sources of systematic error produce common-mode shifts of the spin-precession frequencies which can be controlled through auxiliary measurements. We discuss optimization of the magnetometer sensitivity, methods to control systematic effects due to light shifts, collisions, and the gyro-compass effect, and preliminary data.

  11. Progress toward a search for spin-mass couplings of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Valdez, Julian; Lacey, Ian; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Kimball, Derek Jackson

    2011-11-01

    We report progress in our development of a dual-isotope rubidium magnetometer to be used to search for a long-range coupling between proton spins and the mass of the Earth. The valence electron dominates magnetic interactions and serves as a precise co-magnetometer for the nuclei in a simultaneous measurement of Rb-85 and Rb-87 spin precession frequencies, enabling accurate subtraction of magnetic perturbations. Both Rb nuclei have valence protons, but in Rb-87 the proton spin is parallel to the nuclear spin and magnetic moment while for Rb-85 the proton spin is anti-parallel to the nuclear spin and magnetic moment. Thus anomalous interactions of the proton spin produce a differential shift between the Rb spin-precession frequencies, whereas many sources of systematic error produce common-mode shifts of the spin-precession frequencies which can be controlled through auxiliary measurements. We discuss our optimization of the magnetometer sensitivity and methods to control systematic effects due to light shifts, collisions, and the gyro-compass effect.

  12. Composite-180° pulse-based symmetry sequences to recouple proton chemical shift anisotropy tensors under ultrafast MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malon, Michal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the measurement of proton ((1)H) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors to obtain deeper insights into H-bonding interactions which find numerous applications in chemical and biological systems. However, the presence of strong (1)H/(1)H dipolar interaction makes it difficult to determine small size (1)H CSAs from the homogeneously broadened NMR spectra. Previously reported pulse sequences for (1)H CSA recoupling are prone to the effects of radio frequency field (B1) inhomogeneity. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study using both numerical and experimental approaches to evaluate γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequences based on R-symmetries that recouple (1)H CSA in the indirect dimension of a 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. The spectral resolution and sensitivity can be significantly improved in both frequency dimensions of the 2D (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum without decoupling (1)H/(1)H dipolar couplings but by using ultrafast MAS rates up to 70 kHz. We successfully demonstrate that with a reasonable RF field requirement (<200 kHz) a set of symmetry-based recoupling sequences, with a series of phase-alternating 270°0-90°180 composite-180° pulses, are more robust in combating B1 inhomogeneity effects. In addition, our results show that the new pulse sequences render remarkable (1)H CSA recoupling efficiency and undistorted CSA lineshapes. Experimental results on citric acid and malonic acid comparing the efficiencies of these newly developed pulse sequences with that of previously reported CSA recoupling pulse sequences are also reported under ultrafast MAS conditions. PMID:25497846

  13. Chemical analysis using J-coupling multiplets in zero-field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John W.; Butler, Mark C.; Ledbetter, Micah P.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a new, potentially portable, and cost-effective NMR modality with the ability to provide information-rich, high-resolution spectra. We present simple rules for analysis of zero-field NMR spectra based on first-order perturbation theory and the addition of angular momenta. These rules allow for the prediction of observed spectral lines without numerical simulation. Results are presented for a few small organic molecules with characteristic spin topologies, demonstrating unambiguous assignment of peaks, highlighting the potential of zero-field NMR as a tool for chemical identification.

  14. Theoretical study of homonuclear J coupling between quadrupolar spins: single-crystal, DOR, and J-resolved NMR.

    PubMed

    Perras, Frédéric A; Bryce, David L

    2014-05-01

    The theory describing homonuclear indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling (J) interactions between pairs of quadrupolar nuclei is outlined and supported by numerical calculations. The expected first-order multiplets for pairs of magnetically equivalent (A2), chemically equivalent (AA'), and non-equivalent (AX) quadrupolar nuclei are given. The various spectral changeovers from one first-order multiplet to another are investigated with numerical simulations using the SIMPSON program and the various thresholds defining each situation are given. The effects of chemical equivalence, as well as quadrupolar coupling, chemical shift differences, and dipolar coupling on double-rotation (DOR) and J-resolved NMR experiments for measuring homonuclear J coupling constants are investigated. The simulated J coupling multiplets under DOR conditions largely resemble the ideal multiplets predicted for single crystals, and a characteristic multiplet is expected for each of the A2, AA', and AX cases. The simulations demonstrate that it should be straightforward to distinguish between magnetic inequivalence and equivalence using J-resolved NMR, as was speculated previously. Additionally, it is shown that the second-order quadrupolar-dipolar cross-term does not affect the splittings in J-resolved experiments. Overall, the homonuclear J-resolved experiment for half-integer quadrupolar nuclei is demonstrated to be robust with respect to the effects of first- and second-order quadrupolar coupling, dipolar coupling, and chemical shift differences.

  15. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  16. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  17. Fourier transform numerical analysis of the long-range proton hyperfine coupling in nitroxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Trousson, P.; Lion, Y.

    1985-05-09

    A study of long-range proton coupling in nitroxide radicals has been performed with a numerical analysis program using the Fourier transform technique. The present method provides a means for further identification of radicals which is particularly useful for species that are otherwise indistinguishable. The superhyperfine structure of piperidine and pyrrolidine-1-oxyl derivatives, showing ..gamma..-nuclei coupling constants as small as 0.2 G, has been brought out. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by other resolution-enhancement methods. 17 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Demonstration of a functional relationship between aspartate 93 and Mg2+ by site-directed mutagenesis and proton, phosphorus-31, and magnesium-25 NMR.

    PubMed

    Yan, H G; Tsai, M D

    1991-06-01

    Earlier magnetic resonance studies suggested no direct interaction between Mg2+ ions and adenylate kinase (AK) in the AK.MgATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) complex. However, recent NMR studies concluded that the carboxylate of aspartate 119 accepts a hydrogen bond from a water ligand of the bound Mg2+ ion in the muscle AK.MgATP complex [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. On the other hand, in the 2.6-A crystal structure of the yeast AK.MgAP5A [P1,P5-bis(5'-adenosyl)pentaphosphate] complex, the Mg2+ ion is in proximity to aspartate 93 [Egner, U., Tomasselli, A.G., & Schulz, G.E. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 195, 649-658]. Substitution of Asp-93 with alanine resulted in no change in dissociation constants, 4-fold increases in Km, and a 650-fold decrease in kcat. Notable changes have been observed in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of histidine 36 and a few other aromatic residues. However, the results of detailed analyses of the free enzymes and the AK.MgAP5A complexes by one- and two-dimensional NMR suggested that the changes are due to localized perturbations. Thus it is concluded that Asp-93 stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3.9 kcal/mol. The next question is how. Since proton NMR results indicated that binding of Mg2+ to the AK.AP5A complex induces some changes in the proton NMR signals of WT but not those of D93A, the functional role of Asp-93 should be in binding to Mg2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Effects of osmotic manipulation of intracellular hydration of HeLa S-3 cells on their proton NMR relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, D N; Rimmington, J E; Foster, M A

    1990-01-01

    Pellets of HeLa from suspension cultured cells in isotonic medium (300 mosmolar) were introduced into a Bruker CXP100 NMR spectrophotometer at 80 mHz within 5 min of the start of centrifugation. T1 and T2 times were measured within a total elapsed time of 20-25 min at 80 mHz and 37 degrees C, and averaged 1430 msec and 120 msec, respectively. Extrapolation to zero extracellular space gave a corrected T1 of 1370 msec. For cells collected after 10 min in hypotonic medium (down to 30 mosmolar) increased proton density correlated well with increased cell water content, but relaxation times did not rise in proportion to that predicted for the entry of "bulk" water (T1 of 4700 msec), except when swelling approached lysis point. Cells partially dehydrated by 10 min in hypertonic medium of up to 1500 mosmolar have also been analyzed, but once again the shortening of T1 was not proportional to the loss of "free" (bulk phase) water. At the upper limit of hypertonic treatment, lacunae or vacuoles of a watery nature separated within the cytomatrix, preventing maximum dehydration. The relationship of cell water to T1 is complex over the whole range of tonicity that HeLa S-3 cells tolerate. The data indicate, however, that hypotonically induced water probably has an average T1 time considerably lower than bulk phase water. In contrast, raising the total extracellular volume with medium had precisely the predicted effect on T1 time, further strengthening the case that water taken up by cell acquires a shorter T1 time. Cells adapting to hypotonic conditions oscillated in size and water content over 2-3 hr before returning to near their initial volume. Under these circumstances, T1 oscillated in the same way but with a reduced amplitude, consistent with the above findings.

  20. Effect of magnetic field and iron content on NMR proton relaxation of liver, spleen and brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Hocq, Aline; Luhmer, Michel; Saussez, Sven; Louryan, Stéphane; Gillis, Pierre; Gossuin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Iron accumulation is observed in liver and spleen during hemochromatosis and important neurodegenerative diseases involve iron overload in brain. Storage of iron is ensured by ferritin, which contains a magnetic core. It causes a darkening on T2 -weighted MR images. This work aims at improving the understanding of the NMR relaxation of iron-loaded human tissues, which is necessary to develop protocols of iron content measurements by MRI. Relaxation times measurements on brain, liver and spleen samples were realized at different magnetic fields. Iron content was determined by atomic emission spectroscopy. For all samples, the longitudinal relaxation rate (1/T1 ) of tissue protons decreases with the magnetic field up to 1 T, independently of iron content, while their transverse relaxation rate (1/T2 ) strongly increases with the field, either linearly or quadratically, or a combination thereof. The extent of the inter-echo time dependence of 1/T2 also varies according to the sample. A combination of theoretical models is necessary to describe the relaxation of iron-containing tissues. This can be due to the presence, inside tissues, of ferritin clusters of different sizes and densities. When considering all samples, a correlation (r(2)  = 0.6) between 1/T1 and iron concentration is observed at 7.0 T. In contrast the correlation between 1/T2 and iron content is poor, even at high field (r(2)  = 0.14 at 7.0 T). Our results show that MRI methods based on T1 or T2 measurements will easily detect an iron overloading at high magnetic field, but will not provide an accurate quantification of tissue iron content at low iron concentrations. PMID:24954138

  1. Basic principles of static proton low-resolution spin diffusion NMR in nanophase-separated materials with mobility contrast.

    PubMed

    Schäler, Kerstin; Roos, Matthias; Micke, Peter; Golitsyn, Yury; Seidlitz, Anne; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Schneider, Horst; Hempel, Günter; Saalwächter, Kay

    2015-11-01

    We review basic principles of low-resolution proton NMR spin diffusion experiments, relying on mobility differences in nm-sized phases of inhomogeneous organic materials such as block-co- or semicrystalline polymers. They are of use for estimates of domain sizes and insights into nanometric dynamic inhomogeneities. Experimental procedures and limitations of mobility-based signal decomposition/filtering prior to spin diffusion are addressed on the example of as yet unpublished data on semicrystalline poly(ϵ-caprolactone), PCL. Specifically, we discuss technical aspects of the quantitative, dead-time free detection of rigid-domain signals by aid of the magic-sandwich echo (MSE), and magic-and-polarization-echo (MAPE) and double-quantum (DQ) magnetization filters to select rigid and mobile components, respectively. Such filters are of general use in reliable fitting approaches for phase composition determinations. Spin diffusion studies at low field using benchtop instruments are challenged by rather short (1)H T1 relaxation times, which calls for simulation-based analyses. Applying these, in combination with domain sizes as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, we have determined spin diffusion coefficients D for PCL (0.34, 0.19 and 0.032nm(2)/ms for crystalline, interphase and amorphous parts, respectively). We further address thermal-history effects related to secondary crystallization. Finally, the state of knowledge concerning the connection between D values determined locally at the atomic level, using (13)C detection and CP- or REDOR-based "(1)H hole burning" procedures, and those obtained by calibration experiments, is summarized. Specifically, the non-trivial dependence of D on the magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequency, with a minimum under static and a local maximum under moderate-MAS conditions, is highlighted.

  2. Protonation States of the Tryptophan Synthase Internal Aldimine Active Site from Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Direct Observation of the Protonated Schiff Base Linkage to Pyridoxal-5′-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acid–base chemistry that drives catalysis in pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes has been the subject of intense interest and investigation since the initial identification of PLP’s role as a coenzyme in this extensive class of enzymes. It was first proposed over 50 years ago that the initial step in the catalytic cycle is facilitated by a protonated Schiff base form of the holoenzyme in which the linking lysine ε-imine nitrogen, which covalently binds the coenzyme, is protonated. Here we provide the first 15N NMR chemical shift measurements of such a Schiff base linkage in the resting holoenzyme form, the internal aldimine state of tryptophan synthase. Double-resonance experiments confirm the assignment of the Schiff base nitrogen, and additional 13C, 15N, and 31P chemical shift measurements of sites on the PLP coenzyme allow a detailed model of coenzyme protonation states to be established. PMID:25148001

  3. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    17O NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations was employed to understand the local structure and dynamics of the phosphate ions and protons in the paraelectric phase of the proton conductor CsH2PO4. For the room-temperature structure, the results confirm that one proton (H1) is localized in an asymmetric H-bond (between O1 donor and O2 acceptor oxygen atoms), whereas the H2 proton undergoes rapid exchange between two sites in a hydrogen bond with a symmetric double potential well at a rate ≥107 Hz. Variable-temperature 17O NMR spectra recorded from 22 to 214 °C were interpreted by considering different models for the rotation of the phosphate anions. At least two distinct rate constants for rotations about four pseudo C3 axes of the phosphate ion were required in order to achieve good agreement with the experimental data. An activation energy of 0.21 ± 0.06 eV was observed for rotation about the P–O1 axis, with a higher activation energy of 0.50 ± 0.07 eV being obtained for rotation about the P–O2, P–O3d, and P–O3a axes, with the superscripts denoting, respectively, dynamic donor and acceptor oxygen atoms of the H-bond. The higher activation energy of the second process is most likely associated with the cost of breaking an O1–H1 bond. The activation energy of this process is slightly lower than that obtained from the 1H exchange process (0.70 ± 0.07 eV) (Kim, G.; Blanc, F.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Grey, C. P. J. Phys. Chem. C2013, 117, 6504−6515) associated with the translational motion of the protons. The relationship between proton jumps and phosphate rotation was analyzed in detail by considering uncorrelated motion, motion of individual PO4 ions and the four connected/H-bonded protons, and concerted motions of adjacent phosphate units, mediated by proton hops. We conclude that, while phosphate rotations aid proton motion, not all phosphate rotations result in proton jumps. PMID:25732257

  4. Quick re-introduction of selective scalar interactions in a pure-shift NMR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lokesh, N; Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N

    2014-12-21

    A new 1D NMR experiment cited as 'Quick G-SERF', which re-introduces selective proton-proton scalar interactions in a pure shift spectrum during real time data acquisition, is reported. The method provides information on multiple proton-proton couplings from a single experiment, analogous to the 2D G-SERF technique, while significantly shortening the experimental time by 1-2 orders of magnitude due to reduced dimension and enhanced sensitivity.

  5. Site-specific protonation kinetics of acidic side chains in proteins determined by pH-dependent carboxyl (13)C NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Johan; Weininger, Ulrich; Khan, M Ashhar I; Linse, Sara; Akke, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Proton-transfer dynamics plays a critical role in many biochemical processes, such as proton pumping across membranes and enzyme catalysis. The large majority of enzymes utilize acid-base catalysis and proton-transfer mechanisms, where the rates of proton transfer can be rate limiting for the overall reaction. However, measurement of proton-exchange kinetics for individual side-chain carboxyl groups in proteins has been achieved in only a handful of cases, which typically have involved comparative analysis of mutant proteins in the context of reaction network modeling. Here we describe an approach to determine site-specific protonation and deprotonation rate constants (kon and koff, respectively) of carboxyl side chains, based on (13)C NMR relaxation measurements as a function of pH. We validated the method using an extensively studied model system, the B1 domain of protein G, for which we measured rate constants koff in the range (0.1-3) × 10(6) s(-1) and kon in the range (0.6-300) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which correspond to acid-base equilibrium dissociation constants (Ka) in excellent agreement with previous results determined by chemical shift titrations. Our results further reveal a linear free-energy relationship between log kon and pKa, which provides information on the free-energy landscape of the protonation reaction, showing that the variability among residues in these parameters arises primarily from the extent of charge stabilization of the deprotonated state by the protein environment. We find that side-chain carboxyls with extreme values of koff or kon are involved in hydrogen bonding, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilization of the protonated or deprotonated state.

  6. Dipolar-coupling-mediated total correlation spectroscopy in solid-state 13C NMR: Selection of individual 13C- 13C dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spano, Justin; Wi, Sungsool

    2010-06-01

    Herein is described a useful approach in solid-state NMR, for selecting homonuclear 13C- 13C spin pairs in a multiple- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupled spin system. This method builds upon the zero-quantum (ZQ) dipolar recoupling method introduced by Levitt and coworkers (Marin-Montesinos et al., 2006 [30]) by extending the originally introduced one-dimensional (1D) experiment into a two-dimensional (2D) method with selective irradiation scheme, while moving the 13C- 13C mixing scheme from the transverse to the longitudinal mode, together with a dramatic improvement in the proton decoupling efficiency. Selective spin-pair recoupling experiments incorporating Gaussian and cosine-modulated Gaussian pulses for inverting specific spins were performed, demonstrating the ability to detect informative, simplified/individualized, long-range 13C- 13C homonuclear dipolar coupling interactions more accurately by removing less informative, stronger, short-range 13C- 13C interactions from 2D correlation spectra. The capability of this new approach was demonstrated experimentally on uniformly 13C-labeled Glutamine and a tripeptide sample, GAL.

  7. Compositional differences among Chinese soy sauce types studied by (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Wang, Xiaohua; Bin Yuan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili

    2016-09-01

    Soy sauce a well known seasoning all over the world, especially in Asia, is available in global market in a wide range of types based on its purpose and the processing methods. Its composition varies with respect to the fermentation processes and addition of additives, preservatives and flavor enhancers. A comprehensive (1)H NMR based study regarding the metabonomic variations of soy sauce to differentiate among different types of soy sauce available on the global market has been limited due to the complexity of the mixture. In present study, (13)C NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis like principle component analysis (PCA), and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was applied to investigate metabonomic variations among different types of soy sauce, namely super light, super dark, red cooking and mushroom soy sauce. The main additives in soy sauce like glutamate, sucrose and glucose were easily distinguished and quantified using (13)C NMR spectroscopy which were otherwise difficult to be assigned and quantified due to serious signal overlaps in (1)H NMR spectra. The significantly higher concentration of sucrose in dark, red cooking and mushroom flavored soy sauce can directly be linked to the addition of caramel in soy sauce. Similarly, significantly higher level of glutamate in super light as compared to super dark and mushroom flavored soy sauce may come from the addition of monosodium glutamate. The study highlights the potentiality of (13)C NMR based metabonomics coupled with multivariate statistical data analysis in differentiating between the types of soy sauce on the basis of level of additives, raw materials and fermentation procedures. PMID:27343582

  8. A 300 MHz and 600 MHz proton NMR study of a 12 base pair restriction fragment: investigation of structure by relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Early, T A; Kearns, D R; Hillen, W; Wells, R D

    1980-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of a 12 base pair DNA restriction fragment has been measured at 300 and 600 MHz and resonances from over 70 protons are individually resolved. Relaxation rate measurements have been carried out at 300 MHz and compared with the theoretical predictions obtained using an isotropic rigid rotor model with coordinates derived from a Dreiding model of DNA. The model gives results that are in excellent agreement with experiment for most protons when a 7 nsec rotational correlation time is used, although agreement is improved for certain base protons by using a shorter correlation time for the sugar group, or by increasing the sugar-base interproton distances. A comparison of non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation rates for carbon bound protons indicates that there is extensive spin diffusion even in this short DNA fragment. Examination of the spin-spin relaxation rates for the same type of proton on different base pairs reveals little sequence effect on conformation. PMID:6258152

  9. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme–substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes. PMID:26929369

  10. Proton coupled electron transfer from the excited state of a ruthenium(II) pyridylimidazole complex.

    PubMed

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-04-28

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the excited state of [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; pyimH = 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole) to N-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (monoquat, MQ(+)) was studied. While this complex has been investigated previously, our study is the first to show that the formal bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the imidazole-N-H bond decreases from (91 ± 1) kcal mol(-1) in the electronic ground state to (43 ± 5) kcal mol(-1) in the lowest-energetic (3)MLCT excited state. This makes the [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) complex a very strong (formal) hydrogen atom donor even when compared to metal hydride complexes, and this is interesting for light-driven (formal) hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with a variety of different substrates. Mechanistically, formal HAT between (3)MLCT excited [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) and monoquat in buffered 1 : 1 (v : v) CH3CN/H2O was found to occur via a sequence of reaction steps involving electron transfer from Ru(ii) to MQ(+) coupled to release of the N-H proton to buffer base, followed by protonation of reduced MQ(+) by buffer acid. Our study is relevant in the larger contexts of photoredox catalysis and light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27094541

  11. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E P; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-03-15

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme-substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes.

  12. Toxicometabolomics approach to urinary biomarkers for mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2})-induced nephrotoxicity using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyu-Bong; Um, So Young; Chung, Myeon Woo; Jung, Seung Chul; Oh, Ji Seon; Kim, Seon Hwa; Na, Han Sung; Lee, Byung Mu; Choi, Ki Hwan

    2010-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine and characterize surrogate biomarkers that can predict nephrotoxicity induced by mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) using urinary proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) spectral data. A procedure for {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis using pattern recognition was proposed to evaluate nephrotoxicity induced by HgCl{sub 2} in Sprague-Dawley rats. HgCl{sub 2} at 0.1 or 0.75 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), and urine was collected every 24 h for 6 days. Animals (n = 6 per group) were sacrificed 3 or 6 days post-dosing in order to perform clinical blood chemistry tests and histopathologic examinations. Urinary {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy revealed apparent differential clustering between the control and HgCl{sub 2} treatment groups as evidenced by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS)-discriminant analysis (DA). Time- and dose-dependent separation of HgCl{sub 2}-treated animals from controls was observed by PCA of {sup 1}H NMR spectral data. In HgCl{sub 2}-treated rats, the concentrations of endogenous urinary metabolites of glucose, acetate, alanine, lactate, succinate, and ethanol were significantly increased, whereas the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, allantoin, citrate, formate, taurine, and hippurate were significantly decreased. These endogenous metabolites were selected as putative biomarkers for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity. A dose response was observed in concentrations of lactate, acetate, succinate, and ethanol, where severe disruption of the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, formate, glucose, and taurine was observed at the higher dose (0.75 mg/kg) of HgCl{sub 2}. Correlation of urinary {sup 1}H NMR PLS-DA data with renal histopathologic changes suggests that {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis can be used to predict or screen for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity{sub .}

  13. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and 13C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Portais, J C; Pianet, I; Allard, M; Merle, M; Raffard, G; Kien, P; Biran, M; Labouesse, J; Caille, J M; Canioni, P

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR [1-13C] glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm3. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the contralateral unaffected side. PMID:1674432

  14. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Guangjin E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu; Lu, Xingyu E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Vega, Alexander J. E-mail: lexvega@comcast.net; Polenova, Tatyana E-mail: tpolenov@udel.edu

    2014-09-14

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear {sup 1}H-X (X = {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, {sup 31}P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the {sup 1}H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the {sup 1}H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from {sup 1}H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the {sup 1}H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [{sup 15}N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  15. Accurate measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings by phase-alternating R-symmetry (PARS) sequences in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangjin; Lu, Xingyu; Vega, Alexander J.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2014-09-01

    We report a Phase-Alternating R-Symmetry (PARS) dipolar recoupling scheme for accurate measurement of heteronuclear 1H-X (X = 13C, 15N, 31P, etc.) dipolar couplings in MAS NMR experiments. It is an improvement of conventional C- and R-symmetry type DIPSHIFT experiments where, in addition to the dipolar interaction, the 1H CSA interaction persists and thereby introduces considerable errors in the dipolar measurements. In PARS, phase-shifted RN symmetry pulse blocks applied on the 1H spins combined with π pulses applied on the X spins at the end of each RN block efficiently suppress the effect from 1H chemical shift anisotropy, while keeping the 1H-X dipolar couplings intact. Another advantage over conventional DIPSHIFT experiments, which require the signal to be detected in the form of a reduced-intensity Hahn echo, is that the series of π pulses refocuses the X chemical shift and avoids the necessity of echo formation. PARS permits determination of accurate dipolar couplings in a single experiment; it is suitable for a wide range of MAS conditions including both slow and fast MAS frequencies; and it assures dipolar truncation from the remote protons. The performance of PARS is tested on two model systems, [15N]-N-acetyl-valine and [U-13C,15N]-N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe tripeptide. The application of PARS for site-resolved measurement of accurate 1H-15N dipolar couplings in the context of 3D experiments is presented on U-13C,15N-enriched dynein light chain protein LC8.

  16. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Biology: Results from Synergistic Studies in Natural and Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Steven Y.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) underpins energy conversion in biology. PCET may occur with the unidirectional or bidirectional transfer of a proton and electron and may proceed synchronously or asynchronously. To illustrate the role of PCET in biology, this review presents complementary biological and model systems that explore PCET in electron transfer (ET) through hydrogen bonds [azurin as compared to donor-acceptor (D–A) hydrogen-bonded networks], the activation of C–H bonds [alcohol dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase (SLO) as compared to Fe(III) metal complexes], and the generation and transport of amino acid radicals [photosystem II (PSII) and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR)as compared to tyrosine-modified photoactive Re(I) and Ru(II) complexes]. In providing these comparisons, the fundamental principles of PCET in biology are illustrated in a tangible way. PMID:19344235

  17. Absence of Rapid Proton Decay and Origin of Low-Energy Particlesand Yukawa Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Watari, Taizan

    2006-01-01

    In string theory, massless particles often originate from a symmetry breaking of a large gauge symmetry G to its subgroup H. The absence of dimension-4 proton decay in supersymmetric theories suggests that ({bar D},L) are different from {bar H}({bar 5}) in their origins. In this article, we consider a possibility that they come from different irreducible components in g/h. Requiring that all the Yukawa coupling constants of quarks and leptons be generated from the super Yang-Mills interactions of G, we found in the context of Georgi-Glashow H = SU(5) unification that the minimal choice of G is E{sub 7} and E{sub 8} is the only alternative. This idea is systematically implemented in Heterotic String, M theory and F theory, confirming the absence of dimension 4 proton decay operators. Not only H = SU(5) but also G constrain operators of effective field theories, providing non-trivial information.

  18. Excited-state proton coupled charge transfer modulated by molecular structure and media polarization.

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Alexander P; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2013-02-01

    Charge and proton transfer reactions in the excited states of organic dyes can be coupled in many different ways. Despite the complementarity of charges, they can occur on different time scales and in different directions of the molecular framework. In certain cases, excited-state equilibrium can be established between the charge-transfer and proton-transfer species. The interplay of these reactions can be modulated and even reversed by variations in dye molecular structures and changes of the surrounding media. With knowledge of the mechanisms of these processes, desired rates and directions can be achieved, and thus the multiple emission spectral features can be harnessed. These features have found versatile applications in a number of cutting-edge technological areas, particularly in fluorescence sensing and imaging.

  19. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Organic Synthesis: Fundamentals, Applications, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Miller, David C; Tarantino, Kyle T; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) are unconventional redox processes in which both protons and electrons are exchanged, often in a concerted elementary step. While PCET is now recognized to play a central a role in biological redox catalysis and inorganic energy conversion technologies, its applications in organic synthesis are only beginning to be explored. In this chapter, we aim to highlight the origins, development, and evolution of the PCET processes most relevant to applications in organic synthesis. Particular emphasis is given to the ability of PCET to serve as a non-classical mechanism for homolytic bond activation that is complimentary to more traditional hydrogen atom transfer processes, enabling the direct generation of valuable organic radical intermediates directly from their native functional group precursors under comparatively mild catalytic conditions. The synthetically advantageous features of PCET reactivity are described in detail, along with examples from the literature describing the PCET activation of common organic functional groups. PMID:27573270

  20. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Organic Synthesis: Fundamentals, Applications, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Miller, David C; Tarantino, Kyle T; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) are unconventional redox processes in which both protons and electrons are exchanged, often in a concerted elementary step. While PCET is now recognized to play a central a role in biological redox catalysis and inorganic energy conversion technologies, its applications in organic synthesis are only beginning to be explored. In this chapter, we aim to highlight the origins, development, and evolution of the PCET processes most relevant to applications in organic synthesis. Particular emphasis is given to the ability of PCET to serve as a non-classical mechanism for homolytic bond activation that is complimentary to more traditional hydrogen atom transfer processes, enabling the direct generation of valuable organic radical intermediates directly from their native functional group precursors under comparatively mild catalytic conditions. The synthetically advantageous features of PCET reactivity are described in detail, along with examples from the literature describing the PCET activation of common organic functional groups.

  1. Calculated coupling of electron and proton transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, C R; Michel, H; Honig, B; Gunner, M R

    1996-01-01

    Based on new Rhodopseudomonas (Rp.) viridis reaction center (RC) coordinates with a reliable structure of the secondary acceptor quinone (QB) site, a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique have been used to identify clusters of electrostatically interacting ionizable residues. Twenty-three residues within a distance of 25 A from QB (QB cluster) have been shown to be strongly electrostatically coupled to QB, either directly or indirectly. An analogous cluster of 24 residues is found to interact with QA (QA cluster). Both clusters extend to the cytoplasmic surface in at least two directions. However, the QB cluster differs from the QA cluster in that it has a surplus of acidic residues, more strong electrostatic interactions, is less solvated, and experiences a strong positive electrostatic field arising from the polypeptide backbone. Consequently, upon reduction of QA or QB, it is the QB cluster, and not the QA cluster, which is responsible for substoichiometric proton uptake at neutral pH. The bulk of the changes in the QB cluster are calculated to be due to the protonation of a tightly coupled cluster of the three Glu residues (L212, H177, and M234) within the QB cluster. If the lifetime of the doubly reduced state QB2- is long enough, Asp M43 and Ser L223 are predicted to also become protonated. The calculated complex titration behavior of the strongly interacting residues of the QB cluster and the resulting electrostatic response to electron transfer may be a common feature in proton-transferring membrane protein complexes. Images FIGURE 2 p2482-a FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8744288

  2. Electrogenic, proton-coupled, intestinal dipeptide transport in herbivorous and carnivorous teleosts.

    PubMed

    Thamotharan, M; Gomme, J; Zonno, V; Maffia, M; Storelli, C; Ahearn, G A

    1996-05-01

    In both herbivorous tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and carnivorous rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) intestinal and pyloric cecal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV), [14C]glycylsarcosine ([14C]Gly-Sar) uptake was stimulated by a transmembrane proton gradient. A transmembrane K(+)-diffusion potential (inside negative) stimulated [14C]Gly-Sar uptake above that observed with short-circuited vesicles, whereas an inwardly directed Na+ gradient in both fishes had no effect on peptide uptake. In tilapia, [14C]Gly-Sar influx occurred by the combination of 1) a high-affinity, saturable, proton gradient-dependent carrier system [Kt [concentration that equals one-half of maximum influx (Jmax)] = 0.56 +/- 0.08 mM; Jmax = 1,945.0 +/- 174.6 pmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1]; 2) a low-affinity, nonsaturable (within 1-10 mM), proton gradient-dependent carrier system (nonsaturable carrier-mediated transport component = 4,514.0 +/- 28.1 pmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1.mM-1); and 3) a diffusional component accounting for < 10% of total influx within the concentration range tested. Influx (10 s) of 1-10 mM [14C]Gly-Sar in tilapia intestine was significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited by 10 mM diethylpyrocarbonate, a specific inhibitor of proton-coupled peptide transport systems. [14C]Gly-Sar influx into tilapia BBMV showed cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation by Gly-Pro, suggesting that [14C]Gly-Sar and Gly-Pro shared the same mucosal peptide transporter in fish. These observations strongly suggest that intestinal transport of peptides in herbivorous and carnivorous fishes is proton gradient dependent, electrogenic, sodium independent, and qualitatively resembles the peptide transport paradigm proposed for mammals. PMID:8928924

  3. Minimal nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) model: Gauge coupling unification, proton decay, and fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; Khan, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present a minimal renormalizable nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) grand unified model with a symmetry breaking sector consisting of Higgs fields in the 5 4H+12 6H+1 0H representations. This model admits a single intermediate scale associated with Pati-Salam symmetry along with a discrete parity. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the unification of gauge couplings, and proton lifetime estimates are studied in detail in this framework. Including threshold corrections self-consistently obtained from a full analysis of the Higgs potential, we show that the model is compatible with the current experimental bound on proton lifetime. The model generally predicts an upper bound of few times 1035 yr for proton lifetime, which is not too far from the present Super-Kamiokande limit of τp≳1.29 ×1034 yr . With the help of a Pecci-Quinn symmetry and the resulting axion, the model provides a suitable dark matter candidate while also solving the strong C P problem. The intermediate scale, MI≈(1013- 1014) GeV which is also the B -L scale, is of the right order for the right-handed neutrino mass which enables a successful description of light neutrino masses and oscillations. The Yukawa sector of the model consists of only two matrices in family space and leads to a predictive scenario for quark and lepton masses and mixings. The branching ratios for proton decay are calculable with the leading modes being p →e+π0 and p →ν ¯π+. Even though the model predicts no new physics within the reach of the LHC, the next-generation proton decay detectors and axion search experiments have the capability to reach a verdict on this minimal scenario.

  4. Detection of aldehydes and their conjugated hydroperoxydiene precursors in thermally-stressed culinary oils and fats: investigations using high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Haywood, R M; Claxson, A W; Hawkes, G E; Richardson, D P; Naughton, D P; Coumbarides, G; Hawkes, J; Lynch, E J; Grootveld, M C

    1995-05-01

    High field (400 and 600 MHz) proton NMR spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the thermally-induced autoxidation of glycerol-bound polyunsaturated fatty acids present in intact culinary frying oils and fats. Heating of these materials at 180 degrees C for periods of 30, 60 and 90 min. generated a variety of peroxidation products, notably aldehydes (alkanals, trans-2-alkenals and alka-2,4-dienals) and their conjugated hydroperoxydiene precursors. Since such aldehydes appear to be absorbed into the systemic circulation from the gut in vivo, the toxicological significance of their production during standard frying practices is discussed.

  5. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Molecular Electrocatalysis: Theoretical Methods and Design Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, Brian H.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-07-07

    Molecular electrocatalysts play an essential role in a wide range of energy conversion processes. The objective of electrocatalyst design is to maximize the turnover frequency and minimize the overpotential for the overall catalytic cycle. Typically the catalytic cycle is dominated by key proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes comprised of sequential or concerted electron transfer and proton transfer steps. A variety of theoretical methods have been developed to investigate the mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics of PCET processes in electrocatalytic cycles. Electronic structure methods can be used to calculate the reduction potentials and pKa’s and to generate thermodynamic schemes, free energy reaction pathways, and Pourbaix diagrams, which indicate the most stable species at each pH and potential. These types of calculations have assisted in identifying the thermodynamically favorable mechanisms under specified experimental conditions, such as acid strength and overpotential. Such calculations have also revealed linear correlations among the thermodynamic properties, which can be used to predict the impact of modifying the ligand, substituents, or metal center. The role of non-innocent ligands, namely ligand protonation or reduction, has also been examined theoretically. In addition, the rate constants for electron and proton transfer reactions, as well as concerted PCET reactions, have been calculated to investigate the kinetics of molecular electrocatalysts. The concerted PCET mechanism is thought to lower the overpotential required for catalysis by avoiding high-energy intermediates. Rate constant calculations have revealed that the concerted mechanism involving intramolecular proton transfer will be favored by designing more flexible ligands that facilitate the proton donor-acceptor motion while also maintaining a sufficiently short equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance. Overall, theoretical methods have assisted in the interpretation

  6. Proton-lattice coupling and vibronic effects in KDP-family thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, A. A.; Dolin, S. P.; Mikhailova, T. Yu; Solin, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Based on the vibronic theory of heteroligand complexes a new model Hamiltonian is proposed for the ferroelectrics of KDP (KH2PO4) family. In local representation three items of this Hamiltonian describe the H-bond protons, the potential energy of lattice's oscillators and the coupling of these two subsystems respectively. In Ising form, convenient for numerical calculations, the Hamiltonian offered includes explicitly the characteristics of the electronic structure as well as the orbital vibronic constants of the AO4 tetrahedra. The Ising version of theory is then applied to numerical studying of some questions for KDP thermodynamics.

  7. Proton-coupled electron transfer and multielectron oxidations in complexes of ruthenium and osmium

    SciTech Connect

    Dovletoglou, A.

    1992-01-01

    This doctoral research concerns the mechanism of proton-coupled electron transfer over an extended pH range. These processes between ruthenium and osmium complexes and hydroquinones have been studied using spectrophotometric methods and cyclic voltammetry. Elucidation of the mechanistic details has been attempted by using isotopic labelling, kinetic analysis, and numerical simulation of complex kinetic schemes. The coordination and redox chemistry of polypyridyl-acetylacetonato and -oxalato complexes of ruthenium and the role of ancillary ligands in defining the properties of Ru[sup IV]O complexes were explored. These studies represent the first attempt to probe possible 2e[sup [minus

  8. Photoregenerative I⁻/I₃⁻ couple as a liquid cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yadong; Ai, Xinping; Tu, Wenmao; Pan, Mu

    2014-10-28

    A photoassisted oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) through I(-)/I3(-) redox couple was investigated for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cathode reaction. The I(-)/I3(-)-based liquid cathode was used to replace conventional oxygen cathode, and its discharge product I(-) was regenerated to I3(-) by photocatalytic oxidation with the participation of oxygen. This new and innovative approach may provide a strategy to eliminate the usage of challenging ORR electrocatalysts, resulting in an avenue for developing low-cost and high-efficiency PEM fuel cells.

  9. Effect of solvent on an NMR chemical shift difference between glycyl geminal α-protons as a probe of β-turn formation of short peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonan, Kenji; Ikawa, Shun-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of short peptides with a glycyl (Gly) or N-methylglycyl (sarcosyl, Sar) residue were measured in various mixed solvents with a wide range of dielectric constants: 78.3-2.3. From analyses of the octet and quartet signals of the geminal α-protons of Gly and Sar residues, respectively, we have estimated chemical shift differences between the two α-protons, Δ δα/α'. It is found that the Δ δα/α' values increase with decreasing solvent polarity and the increasing rates depend significantly on amino acid sequences. By referring to infrared spectra and chemical shift of the terminal NH protons, δNH, of the peptides, the Δ δα/α' values were found to be a good probe of β-turn formation. From solvent-dependent change of Δ δα/α', we estimated the free energies for the β-turn formation and compared the results with those estimated from δNH. Using the resulting free energies, we have discussed effects of solvent on the β-turn formation.

  10. Revealing various coupling of electron transfer and proton pumping in mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Zhou, Qiangjun; Pang, Xiaoyun; Xu, Yingzhi; Rao, Zihe

    2013-08-01

    Cellular respiration is the process that releases energy from food and supplies energy for life processes. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the final and most important step for cellular respiration and is located on the inner membrane of mitochondrion and comprises four large trans-membrane protein complexes (respiratory chain Complexes I, II, III and IV) as well as ubiquinone between Complexes I/II and III and cytochrome c between Complexes III and IV. The function of mitochondrial respiratory chain is biological oxidation by transferring electrons from NADH and succinate to oxygen and then generating proton gradient across the inner membrane. Such proton gradient is utilized by ATP synthase (ATPase, also called as Complex V) to produce energy molecules ATP. Structural studies of mitochondrial respiratory membrane protein complexes are important to understand the mechanism of electron transfer and the redox-coupled proton translocation across the inner membrane. Here, according to the time line, we reviewed the great achievements on structural studies of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in the past twenty years as well as the recent research progresses on the structures of mitochondrial respiratory supra-complexes.

  11. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pH regulation has a fundamental role in several intracellular processes and its variation via exogenous compounds is a potential tool for intervening in the intracellular processes. Proton caged compounds (PPCs) release protons upon UV irradiation and may efficiently provoke intracellular on-command acidification. Here, we explore the intracellular pH variation, when purposely synthesized PCCs are coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dosed to HEK-293 cells. We detected the acidification process caused by the UV irradiation by monitoring the intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode of the CO(2) molecule at 2343 cm(-1). The comparison between free and AuNPs functionalized proton caged compound demonstrates a highly enhanced CO(2) yield, hence pH variation, in the latter case. Finally, PCC functionalized AuNPs were marked with a purposely synthesized fluorescent marker and dosed to HEK-293 cells. The corresponding fluorescence optical images show green grains throughout the whole cytoplasm. PMID:26235337

  12. Peroxyl Radical Reactions in Water Solution: A Gym for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Theories.

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Baschieri, Andrea; Morroni, Gloria; Gambino, Rossana; Valgimigli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The reactions of alkylperoxyl radicals with phenols have remained difficult to investigate in water. We describe herein a simple and reliable method based on the inhibited autoxidation of water/THF mixtures, which we calibrated against pulse radiolysis. With this method we measured the rate constants kinh for the reactions of 2-tetrahydrofuranylperoxyl radicals with reference compounds: urate, ascorbate, ferrocenes, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-chromanol, Trolox, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-acetic acid, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, catechol and 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. The role of pH was investigated: the value of kinh for Trolox and 4-methoxyphenol increased 11- and 50-fold from pH 2.1 to 12, respectively, which indicate the occurrence of a SPLET-like mechanism. H(D) kinetic isotope effects combined with pH and solvent effects suggest that different types of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanisms are involved in water: less electron-rich phenols react at low pH by concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT) to the peroxyl radical, whereas more electron-rich phenols and phenoxide anions react by multi-site EPT in which water acts as proton relay.

  13. Theoretical Studies of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Models and Concepts Relevant to Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Ishikita, Hiroshi; Skone, Jonathan H.; Soudackov, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical studies of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions for model systems provide insight into fundamental concepts relevant to bioenergetics. A dynamical theoretical formulation for vibronically nonadiabatic PCET reactions has been developed. This theory enables the calculation of rates and kinetic isotope effects, as well as the pH and temperature dependences, of PCET reactions. Methods for calculating the vibronic couplings for PCET systems have also been developed and implemented. These theoretical approaches have been applied to a wide range of PCET reactions, including tyrosyl radical generation in a tyrosine-bound rhenium polypyridyl complex, phenoxyl/phenol and benzyl/toluene self-exchange reactions, and hydrogen abstraction catalyzed by the enzyme lipoxygenase. These applications have elucidated some of the key underlying physical principles of PCET reactions. The tools and concepts derived from these theoretical studies provide the foundation for future theoretical studies of PCET in more complex bioenergetic systems such as Photosystem II. PMID:21057592

  14. Theory of proton-coupled electron transfer in energy conversion processes.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-12-21

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes, including photosynthesis and respiration. These reactions also form the basis of many types of solar fuel cells and electrochemical devices. Recent advances in the theory of PCET enable the prediction of the impact of system properties on the reaction rates. These predictions may guide the design of more efficient catalysts for energy production, including those based on artificial photosynthesis and solar energy conversion. This Account summarizes the theoretically predicted dependence of PCET rates on system properties and illustrates potential approaches for tuning the reaction rates in chemical systems. A general theoretical formulation for PCET reactions has been developed over the past decade. In this theory, PCET reactions are described in terms of nonadiabatic transitions between the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states. A series of nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for both homogeneous and electrochemical PCET reactions have been derived in various well-defined limits. Recently this theory has been extended to include the effects of solvent dynamics and to describe ultrafast interfacial PCET. Analysis of the rate constant expressions provides insight into the underlying physical principles of PCET and enables the prediction of the dependence of the rates on the physical properties of the system. Moreover, the kinetic isotope effect, which is the ratio of the rates for hydrogen and deuterium, provides a useful mechanistic probe. Typically the PCET rate will increase as the electronic coupling and temperature increase and as the total reorganization energy and equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance decrease. The rate constant is predicted to increase as the driving force becomes more negative, rather than exhibit turnover behavior in the inverted region, because excited vibronic product states associated with low

  15. Two-dimensional NMR studies of squash family inhibitors. Sequence-specific proton assignments and secondary structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III

    SciTech Connect

    Krisnamoorthi, R.; Yuxi Gong; Chanlan Sun Lin ); VanderVelde, D. )

    1992-01-28

    The solution structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III*) was investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. CMTI-III*, prepared by reacting CMTI-III with trypsin which cleaved the Arg5-Ile6 peptide bond, had the two fragments held together by a disulfide linkage. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H NMR resonance assignments were made for all the 29 amino acid residues of the protein. The secondary structure of CMTI-III*, as deduced from NOESY cross peaks and identification of slowly exchanging hydrogens, contains two turns, a 3{sub 10}-helix, and a triple-stranded {beta}-sheet. Sequential proton assignments were also made for the virgin inhibitor, CMTI-III, at pH 4.71, 30C. Comparison of backbone hydrogen chemical shifts of CMTI-III and CMTI-III* revealed significant changes for residues located far away from the reactive-site region as well as for those located near it, indicating tertiary structural changes that are transmitted through most of the 29 residues of the inhibitor protein. These chemical shift changes were relatively small compared to changes that occurred upon hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond between Arg 5 and Ile6 in CMTI-III.

  16. Spin-spin coupling in the HD molecule determined from 1H and 2H NMR experiments in the gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2014-10-01

    The indirect spin-spin coupling of hydrogen deuteride, J(D, H), was determined from a series of 1H and 2H NMR spectra acquired at various densities of gaseous solvents (He, Ar, CO2, and N2O). The analysis of these spectra shows that accurate determination of J(D, H) from this experimental data requires careful examination of the effects of nuclear relaxation and of HD-solvent gas interactions on hydrogen deuteride line shapes. Particularly, it was found that the first-order corrections of the peak-to-peak separations between HD multiplet peaks due to weak van der Waals interactions are proportional to solvent gas density, while these corrections for nuclear relaxation of the proton and the deuteron are proportional to the second power of the inverse of the gas density. Analysis of the data indicates that J(D, H), obtained by correcting for the effects of nuclear relaxation and intermolecular interactions, is 43.136(7) Hz at 300 K.

  17. Proton-Coupled Organic Cation Antiporter Contributes to the Hepatic Uptake of Matrine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunyong; Sun, Xiaomin; Feng, Chao; Liu, Xiaoying; Wang, Hufang; Feng, Fang; Zhang, Junying

    2016-03-01

    Matrine is the major bioactive alkaloid found in certain Sophora plants and has been used for the treatment of liver diseases and protection of liver function. The aim of this study was to investigate the human liver uptake mechanism of matrine by using HepG2 cells as the in vitro model. Matrine was transported into HepG2 cells in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The cellular uptake was saturable and was significantly reduced by the metabolic inhibitors, such as sodium azide and rotenone. Furthermore, the uptake of matrine was found to be regulated by a protonophore (carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone) and pH, indicating that this influx transporter may be a proton-coupled antiporter. The uptake of matrine was sensitive to inhibition by the cationic drugs including pyrilamine, quinidine, verapamil, amantadine, diphenhydramine, and cimetidine but insensitive to other typical substrates or inhibitors of well-known organic cation transport systems. The present study reveals that, for the first time, in HepG2 cells, the existence of a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter that contributes substantially to the hepatic uptake of matrine.

  18. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer reaction dynamics and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F., III

    2014-03-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which both an electron and an associated proton undergo reactive transfer, play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. Due to the complexity of this class of reactions, a variety of different mechanisms fall under the umbrella of PCET. However, the physical driving forces that determine the preferred mechanism in a given system still remain poorly understood. Towards this end, we extend ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), a path-integral quantum dynamics method, to enable the direct simulation and characterization of PCET reaction dynamics in both fully atomistic and system-bath models of organometallic catalysts. In addition to providing validation for the simulation method via extensive comparison with existing PCET rate theories, we analyze the RPMD trajectories to investigate the competition between the concerted and sequential reaction mechanisms for PCET, elucidating the large role of the solvent in controlling the preferred mechanism. We further employ RPMD to determine the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across different regimes of electronic and vibrational coupling, providing evidence for a new and distinct PCET reaction mechanism.

  19. Proton-Coupled Organic Cation Antiporter Contributes to the Hepatic Uptake of Matrine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunyong; Sun, Xiaomin; Feng, Chao; Liu, Xiaoying; Wang, Hufang; Feng, Fang; Zhang, Junying

    2016-03-01

    Matrine is the major bioactive alkaloid found in certain Sophora plants and has been used for the treatment of liver diseases and protection of liver function. The aim of this study was to investigate the human liver uptake mechanism of matrine by using HepG2 cells as the in vitro model. Matrine was transported into HepG2 cells in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The cellular uptake was saturable and was significantly reduced by the metabolic inhibitors, such as sodium azide and rotenone. Furthermore, the uptake of matrine was found to be regulated by a protonophore (carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone) and pH, indicating that this influx transporter may be a proton-coupled antiporter. The uptake of matrine was sensitive to inhibition by the cationic drugs including pyrilamine, quinidine, verapamil, amantadine, diphenhydramine, and cimetidine but insensitive to other typical substrates or inhibitors of well-known organic cation transport systems. The present study reveals that, for the first time, in HepG2 cells, the existence of a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter that contributes substantially to the hepatic uptake of matrine. PMID:26886331

  20. Non-empirical calculations of NMR indirect carbon-carbon coupling constants. Part 6: propellanes.

    PubMed

    Krivdin, Leonid B

    2004-01-01

    A full set of carbon-carbon coupling constants have been calculated at the SOPPA level in the series of six most representative propellanes. Special attention was focused on spin-spin couplings involving both bridgehead carbons, and these data were rationalized in terms of the multipath coupling mechanism and hybridization effects. Many unknown couplings in the propellane frameworks were predicted with high reliability.

  1. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3− to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments. PMID:26870760

  2. Critical role of a conserved transmembrane lysine in substrate recognition by the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YjdL.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Johanne M; Aduri, Nanda G; Prabhala, Bala K; Jahnsen, Rasmus; Franzyk, Henrik; Mirza, Osman

    2014-10-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) utilize an electrochemical proton gradient to accumulate peptides in the cytoplasm. Changing the highly conserved active-site Lys117 in the Escherichia coli POT YjdL to glutamine resulted in loss of ligand affinity as well as inability to distinguish between a dipeptide ligand and the corresponding dipeptide amide. The radically changed pH(Bulk) profiles of Lys117Gln and Lys117Arg mutants indicate an important role of Lys117 in facilitating protonation of the transporter; a notion that is supported by the close proximity of Lys117 to the conserved ExxERFxYY POT motif previously shown to be involved in proton translocation. These results point toward a novel dual role of Lys117 in direct or indirect interaction with both proton and peptide.

  3. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3 (-) to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments. PMID:26870760

  4. Critical role of a conserved transmembrane lysine in substrate recognition by the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YjdL.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Johanne M; Aduri, Nanda G; Prabhala, Bala K; Jahnsen, Rasmus; Franzyk, Henrik; Mirza, Osman

    2014-10-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) utilize an electrochemical proton gradient to accumulate peptides in the cytoplasm. Changing the highly conserved active-site Lys117 in the Escherichia coli POT YjdL to glutamine resulted in loss of ligand affinity as well as inability to distinguish between a dipeptide ligand and the corresponding dipeptide amide. The radically changed pH(Bulk) profiles of Lys117Gln and Lys117Arg mutants indicate an important role of Lys117 in facilitating protonation of the transporter; a notion that is supported by the close proximity of Lys117 to the conserved ExxERFxYY POT motif previously shown to be involved in proton translocation. These results point toward a novel dual role of Lys117 in direct or indirect interaction with both proton and peptide. PMID:25261786

  5. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3 (-) to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments.

  6. Dynamic NMR study of the mechanisms of double, triple, and quadruple proton and deuteron transfer in cyclic hydrogen bonded solids of pyrazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Klein, Oliver; Aguilar-Parrilla, Francisco; Lopez, Juan Miguel; Jagerovic, Nadine; Elguero, José; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2004-09-22

    Using dynamic solid state (15)N CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization, MAS = magic angle spinning), the kinetics of the degenerate intermolecular double and quadruple proton and deuteron transfers in the cyclic dimer of (15)N labeled polycrystalline 3,5-diphenyl-4-bromopyrazole (DPBrP) and in the cyclic tetramer of (15)N labeled polycrystalline 3,5-diphenylpyrazole (DPP) have been studied in a wide temperature range at different deuterium fractions in the mobile proton sites. Rate constants were measured on a millisecond time scale by line shape analysis of the doubly (15)N labeled compounds, and by magnetization transfer experiments on a second timescale of the singly (15)N labeled compounds in order to minimize the effects of proton-driven (15)N spin diffusion. For DPBrP the multiple kinetic HH/HD/DD isotope effects could be directly obtained. By contrast, four rate constants k(1) to k(4) were obtained for DPP at different deuterium fractions. Whereas k(1) corresponds to the rate constant k(HHHH) of the HHHH isotopolog, an appropriate kinetic reaction model was needed for the kinetic assignment of the other rate constants. Using the model described by Limbach, H. H.; Klein, O.; Lopez Del Amo, J. M.; Elguero, J. Z. Phys. Chem. 2004,218, 17, a concerted quadruple proton-transfer mechanism as well as a stepwise consecutive single transfer mechanism could be excluded. By contrast, using the kinetic assignment k(2) approximately k(3) approximately k(HHHD) approximately k(HDHD) and k(3) approximately k(HDDD) approximately k(DDDD), the results could be explained in terms of a two-step process involving a zwitterionic intermediate. In this mechanism, each reaction step involves the concerted transfer of two hydrons, giving rise to primary kinetic HH/HD/DD isotope effects, whereas the nontransferred hydrons only contribute small secondary effects, which are not resolved experimentally. By contrast, the multiple kinetic isotope effects of the double proton

  7. Hydrogen Bonding Networks Tune Proton-Coupled Redox Steps during the Enzymatic Six-Electron Conversion of Nitrite to Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multielectron multiproton reactions play an important role in both biological systems and chemical reactions involved in energy storage and manipulation. A key strategy employed by nature in achieving such complex chemistry is the use of proton-coupled redox steps. Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) catalyzes the six-electron seven-proton reduction of nitrite to ammonia. While a catalytic mechanism for ccNiR has been proposed on the basis of studies combining computation and crystallography, there have been few studies directly addressing the nature of the proton-coupled events that are predicted to occur along the nitrite reduction pathway. Here we use protein film voltammetry to directly interrogate the proton-coupled steps that occur during nitrite reduction by ccNiR. We find that conversion of nitrite to ammonia by ccNiR adsorbed to graphite electrodes is defined by two distinct phases; one is proton-coupled, and the other is not. Mutation of key active site residues (H257, R103, and Y206) modulates these phases and specifically alters the properties of the detected proton-dependent step but does not inhibit the ability of ccNiR to conduct the full reduction of nitrite to ammonia. We conclude that the active site residues examined are responsible for tuning the protonation steps that occur during catalysis, likely through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, but are not necessarily required for the reaction to proceed. These results provide important insight into how enzymes can specifically tune proton- and electron transfer steps to achieve high turnover numbers in a physiological pH range. PMID:25137350

  8. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  9. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ward, Meaghan E; Ritz, Emily; Ahmed, Mumdooh A M; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  10. Sensitivity of proton NMR relaxation times in a HTPB based polyurethane elastomer to thermo-oxidative aging.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Mowery, Daniel Michael; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2004-09-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry studies were conducted on a hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based polyurethane elastomer thermo-oxidatively aged at 80 C. The {sup 1}H T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1{rho}} relaxation times of samples thermally aged for various periods of time were determined as a function of NMR measurement temperature. The response of each measurement was calculated from a best-fit linear function of the relaxation time vs. aging time. It was found that the T{sub 2,H} and T{sub 1{rho},H} relaxation times exhibited the largest response to thermal degradation, whereas T{sub 1,H} showed minimal change. All of the NMR relaxation measurements on solid samples showed significantly less sensitivity to thermal aging than the T{sub 2,H} relaxation times of solvent-swollen samples.

  11. Two-photon, /sup 13/C and two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopic studies of retinyl Schiff bases, protonated Schiff bases, and Schiff base salts: evidence for a protonation induced. pi pi. * excited state level ordering reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Birge, R.R.; Murray, L.P.; Zidovetzki, R.; Knapp, H.M.

    1987-04-01

    The ..pi pi..* excited singlet state manifolds of the visual chromophores, all-trans-retinylpyrrolidiniminium perchlorate (ATRSBS) and all-trans-N-retinylidene-n-butylimine:HCl (ATRPSB) are studied by using one-photon and two-photon laser spectroscopy. The goal is a better understanding of how protonation and counterion location affect level ordering in retinyl Schiff bases. Ambient temperature two-photon thermal lensing spectra indicate that ATRSBS has a lowest lying /sup 1/A/sub g/*/sup -/-like state as was observed previously for all-trans-retinal and the Schiff base of all-trans-retinal. In contrast, two-photon spectra of ATRPSB indicate that the protonated Schiff base has a lowest lying /sup 1/B/sub u/*/sup +/-like state. The origin of this level ordering reversal is analyzed by using molecular orbital theory as well as /sup 13/C and two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR. They conclude that the relative level ordering of the low-lying covalent and ionic ..pi pi..* excited states of protonated Schiff bases and Schiff base salts is highly sensitive to counterion location (diffuseness). INDO-PSDCI molecular orbital theory is shown to be a reliable theoretical method of predicting the effect of counterion location on the one-photon and two-photon properties of retinyl protonated Schiff bases and Schiff base salts. This study provides further experimental support for the conclusions of a previous two-photon investigation of the rhodopsin binding site which demonstrated that the protein bound 11-cis-retinyl chromophore is protonated and occupies a neutral binding site.

  12. Assignment of selected hyperfine proton NMR resonances in the met forms of Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and comparisons with sperm whale metmyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.; Pandey, R.K.; Leung, H.K.; Smith, K.M.

    1988-04-19

    This work indicates a high degree of purity for our preparations of all three of the primary Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and details assignments of the heme methyl and vinyl protons in the hyperfine shift region of the ferric (aquo.) protein forms. The assignments were carried out by reconstituting the apoproteins of each component with selectively deuteriated hemes. The results indicate that even though the individual component preparations consist of essentially a single protein, the proton NMR spectra indicate spectroscopic heterogeneity. Evidence is presented for identification and classification of major and minor protein forms that are present in solutions of each component. Finally, in contrast to previous results, a detailed analysis of the proton hyperfine shift patterns of the major and minor forms of each component, in comparison to the major and minor forms of metmyoglobin, leads to the conclusions that the corresponding forms of the proteins from each species have strikingly similar heme-globin contacts and display nearly identical heme electronic structures and coordination numbers.

  13. Probing the flexibility of internal rotation in silylated phenols with the NMR scalar spin-spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Sychrovský, Vladimír; Benda, Ladislav; Prokop, Alexandr; Blechta, Vratislav; Schraml, Jan; Spirko, Vladimír

    2008-06-12

    The rotation of a trimethylsiloxy (TMSO) group in three silylated phenols (with three different ortho substituents -H, -CH3, and -C(CH3)3) was studied with the NMR (n)J(Si,C), n = 2, 3, 4, 5, scalar spin-spin coupling between the (29)Si nucleus of the TMSO group and the (13)C nuclei of the phenyl ring. The internal rotation potential calculated with the B3LYP and MP2 calculation methods including the effect of a solvent environment (gas phase, chloroform, and water) was used for the calculation of the dynamical averages of the scalar coupling constants in the framework of the rigid-bender formalism. Solvent effects, the quality of the rotational potential, and the applicability of the classical molecular dynamic to the problem is discussed. Quantum effects have a sizable impact on scalar couplings, particularly for the internal rotational states well localized within the wells of the potential surfaces for the TMSO group. The overall difference between the experimental and theoretical scalar couplings calculated for the global energy-minima structures (static model) decreases substantially for both model potentials (B3LYP, MP2) when the molecular motion of the TMSO group is taken into account. The calculated data indicate that the inclusion of molecular motion is necessary for the accurate calculation of the scalar coupling constants and their reliable structural interpretation for any system which possesses a large-amplitude motion. PMID:18491850

  14. Application of directly coupled HPLC-NMR-MS/MS to the identification of metabolites of 5-trifluoromethylpyridone (2-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethylpyridine) in hydroponically grown plants.

    PubMed

    Bailey, N J; Cooper, P; Hadfield, S T; Lenz, E M; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K; Stanley, P D; Wilson, I D; Wright, B; Taylor, S D

    2000-01-01

    Directly coupled HPLC-NMR-MS was used to characterize two major metabolites of 5-trifluoromethylpyridone (2-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethylpyridine), a model compound for herbicides, after it had been dosed into hydroponically grown maize plants. The combination of NMR and MS data allowed the identification of both of these metabolites, namely, the N-glucoside and O-malonylglucoside conjugates of the parent pyridone. This work demonstrates the efficiency and the potential application of HPLC-NMR-MS to the investigation of the metabolism of agrochemicals. The work also indicates that combination of the use of hydroponically grown plants and directly coupled HPLC-NMR-MS allows rapid identification of metabolites with little sample preparation.

  15. Synthesis of 24-phenyl-24-oxo steroids derived from bile acids by palladium-catalyzed cross coupling with phenylboronic acid. NMR characterization and X-ray structures.

    PubMed

    Mayorquín-Torres, Martha C; Romero-Ávila, Margarita; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martin A

    2013-11-01

    Palladium-catalyzed cross coupling of phenyboronic acid with acetylated bile acids in which the carboxyl functions have been activated by formation of a mixed anhydride with pivalic anhydride afforded moderate to good yield of 24-phenyl-24-oxo-steroids. Unambiguous assignments of the NMR signals were made with the aid of combined 1D and 2D NMR techniques. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the obtained structures.

  16. Electron/proton coupling in bacterial nitric oxide reductase during reduction of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Flock, Ulrika; Watmough, Nicholas J; Adelroth, Pia

    2005-08-01

    The respiratory nitric oxide reductase (NOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans catalyzes the two-electron reduction of NO to N(2)O (2NO + 2H(+) + 2e(-) --> N(2)O + H(2)O), which is an obligatory step in the sequential reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen known as denitrification. NOR has four redox-active cofactors, namely, two low-spin hemes c and b, one high-spin heme b(3), and a non-heme iron Fe(B), and belongs to same superfamily as the oxygen-reducing heme-copper oxidases. NOR can also use oxygen as an electron acceptor; this catalytic activity was investigated in this study. We show that the product in the steady-state reduction of oxygen is water. A single turnover of the fully reduced NOR with oxygen was initiated using the flow-flash technique, and the progress of the reaction monitored by time-resolved optical absorption spectroscopy. Two major phases with time constants of 40 micros and 25 ms (pH 7.5, 1 mM O(2)) were observed. The rate constant for the faster process was dependent on the O(2) concentration and is assigned to O(2) binding to heme b(3) at a bimolecular rate constant of 2 x 10(7) M(-)(1) s(-)(1). The second phase (tau = 25 ms) involves oxidation of the low-spin hemes b and c, and is coupled to the uptake of protons from the bulk solution. The rate constant for this phase shows a pH dependence consistent with rate limitation by proton transfer from an internal group with a pK(a) = 6.6. This group is presumably an amino acid residue that is crucial for proton transfer to the catalytic site also during NO reduction. PMID:16060680

  17. Transport Properties of Ibuprofen Encapsulated in Cyclodextrin Nanosponge Hydrogels: A Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The chemical cross-linking of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) led to branched polymers referred to as cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNSEDTA). Two different preparations are described with 1:4 and 1:8 CD-EDTA molar ratios. The corresponding cross-linked polymers were contacted with 0.27 M aqueous solution of ibuprofen sodium salt (IP) leading to homogeneous, colorless, drug loaded hydrogels. The systems were characterized by high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Pulsed field gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the mean square displacement (MSD) of IP inside the polymeric gel at different observation times td. The data were further processed in order to study the time dependence of MSD: MSD = f(td). The proposed methodology is useful to characterize the different diffusion regimes that, in principle, the solute may experience inside the hydrogel, namely normal or anomalous diffusion. The full protocols including the polymer preparation and purification, the obtainment of drug-loaded hydrogels, the NMR sample preparation, the measurement of MSD by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy and the final data processing to achieve the time dependence of MSD are here reported and discussed. The presented experiments represent a paradigmatic case and the data are discussed in terms of innovative approach to the characterization of the transport properties of an encapsulated guest within a polymeric host of potential application for drug delivery. PMID:27585291

  18. Ionosphere-exosphere coupling through charge exchange and momentum transfer in hydrogen-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The implications of a traditional assumption of exospheric physics, that collisions of hydrogen atoms and protons preferentially result in charge exchange with negligible momentum transfer are examined. Initially adopted as a necessary convenience to accommodate limited computer resources in exosphere model calculations, this approximation results in a direct transformation of the proton velocity distribution into a hot component of neutral hydrogen. With expanding computational facilities, the need for the approximation has passed. As the first step toward its replacement with a realistic, quantum mechanical model of the H - H(+) collision process, differential and cumulative cross sections were calculated for quantum elastic scattering of indistinguishable nuclei for a fine grid of encounter energies and scattering angles. These data are used to study the nature of ionosphere-exosphere coupling through H - H(+) collisions, and to demonstrate that the distribution of velocities of scattered H produced in the traditional exospheric charge exchange approximation, as well as that arising from an alternative, fluid dynamic approach, leads to unacceptable abundances of coronal atoms in long-term, highly elliptic trajectories.

  19. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Constitutes the Photoactivation Mechanism of the Plant Photoreceptor UVR8.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Tilo; Heilmann, Monika; Pandit, Anjali; Zhu, Jingyi; Ravensbergen, Janneke; Kloz, Miroslav; Fu, Yinan; Smith, Brian O; Christie, John M; Jenkins, Gareth I; Kennis, John T M

    2015-07-01

    UVR8 is a novel UV-B photoreceptor that regulates a range of plant responses and is already used as a versatile optogenetic tool. Instead of an exogenous chromophore, UVR8 uniquely employs tryptophan side chains to accomplish UV-B photoreception. UV-B absorption by homodimeric UVR8 induces monomerization and hence signaling, but the underlying photodynamic mechanisms are not known. Here, by using a combination of time-resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy from femto- to microseconds, we provide the first experimental evidence for the UVR8 molecular signaling mechanism. The results indicate that tryptophan residues at the dimer interface engage in photoinduced proton coupled electron transfer reactions that induce monomerization.

  20. Elastic Proton Scattering of Medium Mass Nuclei from Coupled-Cluster Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, G.; MichelN.,

    2012-01-01

    Using coupled-cluster theory and interactions from chiral effective field theory, we compute overlap functions for transfer and scattering of low-energy protons on the target nucleus 40Ca. Effects of three-nucleon forces are included phenomenologically as in-medium two-nucleon interactions. Using known asymptotic forms for one-nucleon overlap functions we derive a simple and intuitive way of computing scattering observables such as elastic scattering phase shifts and cross sections. As a first application and proof of principle, we compute phase shifts and differential interaction cross sections at energies of 9.6 and 12.44 MeV and compare with experimental data. Our computed diffraction minima are in fair agreement with experimental results, while we tend to overestimate the cross sections at large scattering angles.

  1. Core-coupled states and split proton-neutron quasiparticle multiplets in 122-126Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalkovski, S.; Bruce, A. M.; Jungclaus, A.; Górska, M.; Pfützner, M.; Cáceres, L.; Naqvi, F.; Pietri, S.; Podolyák, Zs.; Simpson, G. S.; Andgren, K.; Bednarczyk, P.; Beck, T.; Benlliure, J.; Benzoni, G.; Casarejos, E.; Cederwall, B.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Cuenca-García, J. J.; Cullen, I. J.; Denis Bacelar, A. M.; Detistov, P.; Doornenbal, P.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Geissel, H.; Gelletly, W.; Gerl, J.; Grebosz, J.; Hadinia, B.; Hellström, M.; Hinke, C.; Hoischen, R.; Ilie, G.; Jaworski, G.; Jolie, J.; Khaplanov, A.; Kisyov, S.; Kmiecik, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Kumar, R.; Kurz, N.; Maj, A.; Mandal, S.; Modamio, V.; Montes, F.; Myalski, S.; Palacz, M.; Prokopowicz, W.; Reiter, P.; Regan, P. H.; Rudolph, D.; Schaffner, H.; Sohler, D.; Steer, S. J.; Tashenov, S.; Walker, J.; Walker, P. M.; Weick, H.; Werner-Malento, E.; Wieland, O.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Zhekova, M.

    2013-03-01

    Neutron-rich silver isotopes were populated in the fragmentation of a 136Xe beam and the relativistic fission of 238U. The fragments were mass analyzed with the GSI Fragment Separator and subsequently implanted into a passive stopper. Isomeric transitions were detected by 105 high-purity germanium detectors. Eight isomeric states were observed in 122-126Ag nuclei. The level schemes of 122,123,125Ag were revised and extended with isomeric transitions being observed for the first time. The excited states in the odd-mass silver isotopes are interpreted as core-coupled states. The isomeric states in the even-mass silver isotopes are discussed in the framework of the proton-neutron split multiplets. The results of shell-model calculations, performed for the most neutron-rich silver nuclei are compared to the experimental data.

  2. Catalytic Alkene Carboaminations Enabled by Oxidative Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Gilbert J.; Knowles, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a dual catalyst system comprised of an iridium photocatalyst and weak phosphate base that is capable of both selectively homolyzing the N–H bonds of N-arylamides (bond dissociation free energies ~ 100 kcal/mol) via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and mediating efficient carboamination reactions of the resulting amidyl radicals. This manner of PCET activation, which finds its basis in numerous biological redox processes, enables the formal homolysis of a stronger amide N–H bond in the presence of weaker allylic C–H bonds, a selectivity that is uncommon in conventional molecular H atom acceptors. Moreover, this transformation affords access to a broad range of structurally complex heterocycles from simple amide starting materials. The design, synthetic scope, and mechanistic evaluation of the PCET process are described. PMID:26166022

  3. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in the Reduction of Carbonyls by Samarium Diiodide-Water Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chciuk, Tesia V; Anderson, William R; Flowers, Robert A

    2016-07-20

    Reduction of carbonyls by SmI2 is significantly impacted by the presence of water, but the fundamental step(s) of initial transfer of a formal hydrogen atom from the SmI2-water reagent system to produce an intermediate radical is not fully understood. In this work, we provide evidence consistent with the reduction of carbonyls by SmI2-water proceeding through proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). Combined rate and computational studies show that a model aldehyde and ketone are likely reduced through an asynchronous PCET, whereas reduction of a representative lactone occurs through a concerted PCET. In the latter case, concerted PCET is likely a consequence of significantly endergonic initial electron transfer. PMID:27367158

  4. Proton-Nucleus Total Cross Sections in Coupled-Channel Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross sections in the medium have been extracted directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the Langley Research Center. In the present study the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium was investigated. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  5. Bulk magnetization and 1H NMR spectra of magnetically heterogeneous model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E M; Bud' ko, S L

    2011-04-28

    Bulk magnetization and ¹H static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two magnetically heterogeneous model systems based on laponite (LAP) layered silicate or polystyrene (PS) with low and high proton concentration, respectively, and ferrimagnetic Fe₂O₃ nano- or micro-particles have been studied. In LAP+Fe₂O₃, a major contribution to the NMR signal broadening is due to the dipolar coupling between the magnetic moments of protons and magnetic particles. In PS+Fe₂O₃, due to the higher proton concentration in polystyrene and stronger proton–proton dipolar coupling, an additional broadening is observed, i.e. ¹H MAS NMR spectra of magnetically heterogeneous systems are sensitive to both proton–magnetic particles and proton–proton dipolar couplings. An increase of the volume magnetization by ~1 emu/cm³ affects the ¹H NMR signal width in a way that is similar to an increase of the proton concentration by ~2×10²²/cm³. ¹H MAS NMR spectra, along with bulk magnetization measurements, allow the accurate determination of the hydrogen concentration in magnetically heterogeneous systems.

  6. Local isotropic diffusion approximation for coupled internal and overall molecular motions in NMR spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gill, Michelle L; Palmer, Arthur G

    2014-09-25

    The present work demonstrates that NMR spin relaxation rate constants for molecules interconverting between states with different diffusion tensors can be modeled theoretically by combining orientational correlation functions for exchanging spherical molecules with locally isotropic approximations for the diffusion anisotropic tensors. The resulting expressions are validated by comparison with correlation functions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations and are accurate for moderate degrees of diffusion anisotropy typically encountered in investigations of globular proteins. The results are complementary to an elegant, but more complex, formalism that is accurate for all degrees of diffusion anisotropy [Ryabov, Y.; Clore, G. M.; Schwieters, C. D. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 034108].

  7. SOPPA and CCSD vibrational corrections to NMR indirect spin-spin coupling constants of small hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present zero-point vibrational corrections to the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in ethyne, ethene, cyclopropene and allene. The calculations have been carried out both at the level of the second order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) employing a new implementation in the DALTON program, at the density functional theory level with the B3LYP functional employing also the Dalton program and at the level of coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theory employing the implementation in the CFOUR program. Specialized coupling constant basis sets, aug-cc-pVTZ-J, have been employed in the calculations. We find that on average the SOPPA results for both the equilibrium geometry values and the zero-point vibrational corrections are in better agreement with the CCSD results than the corresponding B3LYP results. Furthermore we observed that the vibrational corrections are in the order of 5 Hz for the one-bond carbon-hydrogen couplings and about 1 Hz or smaller for the other couplings apart from the one-bond carbon-carbon coupling (11 Hz) and the two-bond carbon-hydrogen coupling (4 Hz) in ethyne. However, not for all couplings lead the inclusion of zero-point vibrational corrections to better agreement with experiment.

  8. Weak Te,Te interactions through the looking glass of NMR spin-spin coupling.

    PubMed

    Bühl, Michael; Knight, Fergus R; Křístková, Anezka; Malkin Ondík, Irina; Malkina, Olga L; Randall, Rebecca A M; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Woollins, J Derek

    2013-02-25

    Across the bay: J((125)Te, (125)Te) spin-spin coupling is a highly sensitive probe into the electronic and geometric structure of 1,8-peri-substituted naphthalene tellurium derivatives. The coupling is related to the onset of multicenter bonding in these systems.

  9. SOPPA and CCSD vibrational corrections to NMR indirect spin-spin coupling constants of small hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-12-31

    We present zero-point vibrational corrections to the indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in ethyne, ethene, cyclopropene and allene. The calculations have been carried out both at the level of the second order polarization propagator approximation (SOPPA) employing a new implementation in the DALTON program, at the density functional theory level with the B3LYP functional employing also the Dalton program and at the level of coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theory employing the implementation in the CFOUR program. Specialized coupling constant basis sets, aug-cc-pVTZ-J, have been employed in the calculations. We find that on average the SOPPA results for both the equilibrium geometry values and the zero-point vibrational corrections are in better agreement with the CCSD results than the corresponding B3LYP results. Furthermore we observed that the vibrational corrections are in the order of 5 Hz for the one-bond carbon-hydrogen couplings and about 1 Hz or smaller for the other couplings apart from the one-bond carbon-carbon coupling (11 Hz) and the two-bond carbon-hydrogen coupling (4 Hz) in ethyne. However, not for all couplings lead the inclusion of zero-point vibrational corrections to better agreement with experiment.

  10. Unusual effects in variable temperature powder NMR spectra of the methyl group protons in 9,10-dimethyltriptycene-d₁₂.

    PubMed

    Bernatowicz, P; Ratajczyk, T; Kalicki, P; Szymanski, S

    2014-01-01

    Variable temperature (1)H wide line NMR spectra of polycrystalline 9,10-dimethyltriptycene-d12 deuterated in the aromatic positions were studied. The spectra show different patterns in an unrepeatable dependence on the way of preparation of the powdered samples. Simultaneously, no anomalies were seen in the MAS and CPMAS proton-decoupled room-temperature (13)C spectra as well as in powder X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects observed in the (1)H spectra are tentatively explained in terms of a phenomenological model. For one of the examined samples it afforded a consistent interpretation of the entire series of temperature dependent spectra in terms of structural non uniformity of the solid material studied. Quantum character of the stochastic dynamics of the methyl groups in the investigated compound was confirmed, although these dynamics are close to the classical limit where the familiar random jump model applies. PMID:24656571

  11. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  12. Imino proton NMR guides the reprogramming of A•T specific minor groove binders for mixed base pair recognition

    PubMed Central

    Harika, Narinder K.; Paul, Ananya; Stroeva, Ekaterina; Chai, Yun; Boykin, David W.; Germann, Markus W.; Wilson, W. David

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific binding to DNA is crucial for targeting transcription factor-DNA complexes to modulate gene expression. The heterocyclic diamidine, DB2277, specifically recognizes a single G•C base pair in the minor groove of mixed base pair sequences of the type AAAGTTT. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence of major and minor species of the bound compound. To understand the principles that determine the binding affinity and orientation in mixed sequences of DNA, over thirty DNA hairpin substrates were examined by NMR and thermal melting. The NMR exchange dynamics between major and minor species shows that the exchange is much faster than compound dissociation determined from biosensor–surface plasmon resonance. Extensive modifications of DNA sequences resulted in a unique DNA sequence with binding site AAGATA that binds DB2277 in a single orientation. A molecular docking result agrees with the model representing rapid flipping of DB2277 between major and minor species. Imino spectral analysis of a 15N-labeled central G clearly shows the crucial role of the exocyclic amino group of G in sequence-specific recognition. Our results suggest that this approach can be expanded to additional modules for recognition of more sequence-specific DNA complexes. This approach provides substantial information about the sequence-specific, highly efficient, dynamic nature of minor groove binding agents. PMID:27131382

  13. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-06-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH.

  14. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH. PMID:24977746

  15. Metabolic Profiling and Classification of Propolis Samples from Southern Brazil: An NMR-Based Platform Coupled with Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Maraschin, Marcelo; Somensi-Zeggio, Amélia; Oliveira, Simone K; Kuhnen, Shirley; Tomazzoli, Maíra M; Raguzzoni, Josiane C; Zeri, Ana C M; Carreira, Rafael; Correia, Sara; Costa, Christopher; Rocha, Miguel

    2016-01-22

    The chemical composition of propolis is affected by environmental factors and harvest season, making it difficult to standardize its extracts for medicinal usage. By detecting a typical chemical profile associated with propolis from a specific production region or season, certain types of propolis may be used to obtain a specific pharmacological activity. In this study, propolis from three agroecological regions (plain, plateau, and highlands) from southern Brazil, collected over the four seasons of 2010, were investigated through a novel NMR-based metabolomics data analysis workflow. Chemometrics and machine learning algorithms (PLS-DA and RF), including methods to estimate variable importance in classification, were used in this study. The machine learning and feature selection methods permitted construction of models for propolis sample classification with high accuracy (>75%, reaching ∼90% in the best case), better discriminating samples regarding their collection seasons comparatively to the harvest regions. PLS-DA and RF allowed the identification of biomarkers for sample discrimination, expanding the set of discriminating features and adding relevant information for the identification of the class-determining metabolites. The NMR-based metabolomics analytical platform, coupled to bioinformatic tools, allowed characterization and classification of Brazilian propolis samples regarding the metabolite signature of important compounds, i.e., chemical fingerprint, harvest seasons, and production regions.

  16. Magnitude of finite-nucleus-size effects in relativistic density functional computations of indirect NMR nuclear spin-spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2009-09-14

    A spherical Gaussian nuclear charge distribution model has been implemented for spin-free (scalar) and two-component (spin-orbit) relativistic density functional calculations of indirect NMR nuclear spin-spin coupling (J-coupling) constants. The finite nuclear volume effects on the hyperfine integrals are quite pronounced and as a consequence they noticeably alter coupling constants involving heavy NMR nuclei such as W, Pt, Hg, Tl, and Pb. Typically, the isotropic J-couplings are reduced in magnitude by about 10 to 15 % for couplings between one of the heaviest NMR nuclei and a light atomic ligand, and even more so for couplings between two heavy atoms. For a subset of the systems studied, viz. the Hg atom, Hg(2) (2+), and Tl--X where X=Br, I, the basis set convergence of the hyperfine integrals and the coupling constants was monitored. For the Hg atom, numerical and basis set calculations of the electron density and the 1s and 6s orbital hyperfine integrals are directly compared. The coupling anisotropies of TlBr and TlI increase by about 2 % due to finite-nucleus effects.

  17. Comprehensive triblock copolymer analysis by coupled thermal field-flow fractionation-NMR.

    PubMed

    van Aswegen, Werner; Hiller, Wolf; Hehn, Mathias; Pasch, Harald

    2013-07-12

    Thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) is used as a novel fractionation technique to investigate the molecular heterogeneity of PB-b-PVP-b-PtBMA triblock copolymers. Such copolymers cause major problems in liquid chromatography due to very strong polar interactions with the stationary phase. ThFFF separates the copolymers with regard to size and/or chemical composition based on the normal and thermal diffusion coefficients. The separation mechanism in ThFFF and the chemical composition of the separated species is elucidated by online (1) H NMR. Based on the compositional analysis and a calibration of the system with the respective homopolymers, the samples are quantified regarding their molar masses, chemical compositions, and microstructures providing comprehensive information on the complex structure of these block copolymers. PMID:23722993

  18. Photochemical Tyrosine Oxidation in the Structurally Well-Defined α3Y Protein: Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and a Long-Lived Tyrosine Radical

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine oxidation–reduction involves proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and a reactive radical state. These properties are effectively controlled in enzymes that use tyrosine as a high-potential, one-electron redox cofactor. The α3Y model protein contains Y32, which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced in voltammetry measurements. Structural and kinetic properties of α3Y are presented. A solution NMR structural analysis reveals that Y32 is the most deeply buried residue in α3Y. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a soluble flash-quench generated [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+ oxidant provides high-quality Y32–O• absorption spectra. The rate constant of Y32 oxidation (kPCET) is pH dependent: 1.4 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pH 5.5), 1.8 × 105 M–1 s–1 (pH 8.5), 5.4 × 103 M–1 s–1 (pD 5.5), and 4.0 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pD 8.5). kH/kD of Y32 oxidation is 2.5 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.9 at pH(D) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. These pH and isotope characteristics suggest a concerted or stepwise, proton-first Y32 oxidation mechanism. The photochemical yield of Y32–O• is 28–58% versus the concentration of [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+. Y32–O• decays slowly, t1/2 in the range of 2–10 s, at both pH 5.5 and 8.5, via radical–radical dimerization as shown by second-order kinetics and fluorescence data. The high stability of Y32–O• is discussed relative to the structural properties of the Y32 site. Finally, the static α3Y NMR structure cannot explain (i) how the phenolic proton released upon oxidation is removed or (ii) how two Y32–O• come together to form dityrosine. These observations suggest that the dynamic properties of the protein ensemble may play an essential role in controlling the PCET and radical decay characteristics of α3Y. PMID:25121576

  19. NMR spin-spin coupling constants: bond angle dependence of the sign and magnitude of the vicinal (3)JHF coupling.

    PubMed

    Viesser, Renan V; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2016-08-24

    The dependence of the magnitude and sign of (3)JHFF on the bond angle in fluoro-cycloalkene compounds is evaluated by electronic structure calculations using different levels of theory, viz. DFT, SOPPA(CCSD) and SOPPA(CC2). Localized molecular orbital contributions to (3)JHFF are analyzed to assess which orbitals are responsible for (3)JHFF and which are the most important coupling transmission mechanisms for each compound. Fluoro-ethylene is used as a model system to evaluate the dependence of the (3)JHFF coupling constant on the angle between the σCα-F and σCα'-HF vectors. Through-space and hyperconjugative transmission pathways and ring strain are identified as responsible for the opposite trend between (3)JHFF and bond angle, and for the negative signs obtained for the two molecules, respectively. One of the fluorine lone pairs, σCα'-HF, σCα-F, σCα'-Cβ' bonding orbitals and the σ*Cα-F antibonding orbital are involved in the J-coupling pathways, according to analyses of pairwise-steric and hyperconjugative energies. PMID:27526856

  20. NMR spin-spin coupling constants: bond angle dependence of the sign and magnitude of the vicinal (3)JHF coupling.

    PubMed

    Viesser, Renan V; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2016-08-24

    The dependence of the magnitude and sign of (3)JHFF on the bond angle in fluoro-cycloalkene compounds is evaluated by electronic structure calculations using different levels of theory, viz. DFT, SOPPA(CCSD) and SOPPA(CC2). Localized molecular orbital contributions to (3)JHFF are analyzed to assess which orbitals are responsible for (3)JHFF and which are the most important coupling transmission mechanisms for each compound. Fluoro-ethylene is used as a model system to evaluate the dependence of the (3)JHFF coupling constant on the angle between the σCα-F and σCα'-HF vectors. Through-space and hyperconjugative transmission pathways and ring strain are identified as responsible for the opposite trend between (3)JHFF and bond angle, and for the negative signs obtained for the two molecules, respectively. One of the fluorine lone pairs, σCα'-HF, σCα-F, σCα'-Cβ' bonding orbitals and the σ*Cα-F antibonding orbital are involved in the J-coupling pathways, according to analyses of pairwise-steric and hyperconjugative energies.

  1. ⁵¹V NMR Crystallography of Vanadium Chloroperoxidase and Its Directed Evolution P395D/L241V/T343A Mutant: Protonation Environments of the Active Site.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Hou, Guangjin; Renirie, Rokus; Wever, Ron; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-29

    Vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPOs) perform two-electron oxidation of halides using hydrogen peroxide. Their mechanism, including the factors determining the substrate specificity and the pH-dependence of the catalytic rates, is poorly understood. The vanadate cofactor in the active site of VHPOs contains "spectroscopically silent" V(V), which does not change oxidation state during the reaction. We employed an NMR crystallography approach based on (51)V magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory, to gain insights into the structure and coordination environment of the cofactor in the resting state of vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidases (VCPO). The cofactor environments in the wild-type VCPO and its P395D/L241V/T343A mutant exhibiting 5-100-fold improved catalytic activity are examined at various pH values. Optimal sensitivity attained due to the fast MAS probe technologies enabled the assignment of the location and number of protons on the vanadate as a function of pH. The vanadate cofactor changes its protonation from quadruply protonated at pH 6.3 to triply protonated at pH 7.3 to doubly protonated at pH 8.3. In contrast, in the mutant, the vanadate protonation is the same at pH 5.0 and 8.3, and the cofactor is doubly protonated. This methodology to identify the distinct protonation environments of the cofactor, which are also pH-dependent, could help explain the different reactivities of the wild-type and mutant VCPO and their pH-dependence. This study demonstrates that (51)V-based NMR crystallography can be used to derive the detailed coordination environments of vanadium centers in large biological molecules.

  2. Comparative NMR Analysis of an 80-Residue G Protein-Coupled Receptor Fragment in Two Membrane Mimetic Environments

    PubMed Central

    LS, Cohen; B, Arshava; A, Neumoin; JM, Becker; P, Güntert; O, Zerbe; Naider, F

    2011-01-01

    Fragments of integral membrane proteins have been used to study the physical chemical properties of regions of transporters and receptors. Ste2p(G31-T110) is an 80-residue polypeptide which contains a portion of the N-terminal domain, transmembrane domain 1 (TM1), intracellular loop 1, TM2 and part of extracellular loop 2 of the α-factor receptor (Ste2p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The structure of this peptide was previously determined to form a helical hairpin in lyso-palmitoylphosphatidyl-glycerol micelles (LPPG)[1]. Herein, we perform a systematic comparison of the structure of this protein fragment in micelles and trifluoroethanol(TFE):water in order to understand whether spectra recorded in organic:aqueous medium can facilitate the structure determination in a micellar environment. Using uniformly labeled peptide and peptide selectively protonated on Ile, Val and Leu methyl groups in a perdeuterated background and a broad set of 3D NMR experiments we assigned 89% of the observable atoms. NOEs and chemical shift analysis were used to define the helical regions of the fragment. Together with constraints from paramagnetic spin labeling, NOEs were used to calculate a transiently folded helical hairpin structure for this peptide in TFE:water. Correlation of chemical shifts was insufficient to transfer assignments from TFE:water to LPPG spectra in the absence of further information. PMID:21791199

  3. Effect of solvent on proton location and dynamic behavior in short intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yukie; Masuda, Yuichi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen phthalate anion has a short strong O-H-O hydrogen bond (H-bond). According to previous experimental studies, the H-bond is asymmetric and two tautomers are interconverted in aqueous solutions. In the present study, the effects of polar solvents on the H-bond in a zwitterionic hydrogen phthalate derivative 1 were investigated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analyses of the trajectories for the methanol solution showed that the H-bonding proton tends to be located closer to the carboxylate group that forms fewer intermolecular H-bonds, than to the other carboxylate group and that the intramolecular proton transfer in 1 is triggered by the breakage and/or formation of an intermolecular H-bond. The enol form of dibenzoylmethane (2) also has a short H-bond, and the OH bond is reported to be rather long (>1.1 Å) in the crystal. In the present study, the effects of the solvent on the H-bond in 2 were investigated by molecular orbital (MO) calculations, MD simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for 2 in vacuum indicated that the barrier height for the intramolecular proton transfer is almost the same as the zero-point energy of the vibrational ground state, resulting in broad distribution of the proton density along the H-bond, owing to the nuclear quantum effect. The OH distances were determined in CCl4, acetonitrile, and dimethylsulfoxide solutions from the magnetic dipolar interactions between the 17O and 1H nuclei monitoring the nuclear magnetic relaxation times of 1H. The experimental results indicated that the H-bond geometry of 2 is influenced by the interactions with dimethylsulfoxide, suggesting the formation of a bifurcated H-bond, which was supported by the DFT calculations. The MD simulations for the methanol solution of 2 showed that the asymmetry of the OH distance is correlated with the asymmetry in the electrostatic field of the

  4. Measurement of Heteronuclear Dipolar Coupling by Transferred-Echo Double-Resonance NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hing, A. W.; Vega, S.; Schaefer, J.

    A magic-angle spinning experiment called transferred-echo double resonance (TEDOR) has been introduced recently to measure the I-S dipolar coupling of heteronuclear I-S pairs of spin- {1}/{2} nuclei while eliminating unwanted background signals from uncoupled I and S spins via a coherence-transfer process. In this paper, a quantitative description of the TEDOR experiment is given in terms of the evolution of the density matrix for a pair of heteronuclear spins. The resulting equations provide a theoretical basis for evaluating the selectivity and sensitivity of TEDOR and suggest strategies for determining dipolar coupling constants directly from TEDOR data. Experimental examples illustrating these aspects of TEDOR are provided by studies performed on a range of 13C- 15N dipolar couplings found in double-labeled asparagine, alanine, glycine, and the linear peptide antibiotic, gramicidin.

  5. NMR and rotational angles in solution conformation of polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystrov, V. F.

    1985-01-01

    Professor San-Ichiro Mizushima and Professor Yonezo Morino's classical contributions provided unique means and firm basis for understanding of conformational states and internal rotation in polypeptide molecules. Now the NMR spectroscopy is the best choice to study molecular conformation, mechanism of action and structure-functional relationships of peptide and proteins in solution under conditions approaching those of their physiological environments. Crucial details of spatial structure and interactions of these molecules in solution are revealed by using proton-proton and carbon-proton vicinal coupling constants, proton nuclear Overhauser effect and spectral perturbation techniques. The results of NMR conformational analysis are presented for valinomycin "bracelet", gramicidin A double helices, honey-bee neurotoxin apamin, scorpion insectotoxins and snake neurotoxins of long and short types.

  6. Non-empirical calculations of NMR indirect carbon-carbon coupling constants. Part 7--spiroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Krivdin, Leonid B

    2004-06-01

    Carbon-carbon spin-spin coupling constants were calculated at the SOPPA level for a series of seven classical spiroalkanes, spiro[2.2]pentane, spiro[2.3]hexane, spiro[2.4]heptane, spiro[2.5]octane, spiro[3.3]heptane, spiro[4.4]nonane and spiro[5.5]undecane, with special focus upon couplings involving and/or across spiro carbons. Many interesting structural trends were investigated originating in specific geometries and unusual bonding environments at the spiro carbon.

  7. Coupling between protonation and conformation in cytochrome c oxidase: Insights from constant-pH MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A Sofia F; Campos, Sara R R; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2016-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidases (CcOs) are the terminal enzymes of the respiratory chain in mitochondria and most bacteria. These enzymes reduce dioxygen (O(2)) to water and, simultaneously, generate a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. Despite their importance in the aerobic metabolism and the large amount of structural and biochemical data available for the A1-type CcO family, there is still no consensually accepted description of the molecular mechanisms operating in this protein. A substantial number of questions about the CcO's working mechanism remain to be answered, including how the protonation behavior of some key residues is modulated during a reduction cycle and how is the conformation of the protein affected by protonation. The main objective of this work was to study the protonation-conformation coupling in CcOs and identify the molecular factors that control the protonation state of some key residues. In order to directly capture the interplay between protonation and conformational effects, we have performed constant-pH MD simulations of an A1-type CcO inserted into a lipid bilayer in two redox states (oxidized and reduced) at physiological pH. From the simulations, we were able to identify several groups with unusual titration behavior that are highly dependent on the protein redox state, including the A-propionate from heme a and the D-propionate from heme a3, two key groups possibly involved in proton pumping. The protonation state of these two groups is heavily influenced by subtle conformational changes in the protein (notably of R481(I) and R482(I)) and by small changes in the hydrogen bond network.

  8. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We discuss large modulated fractions in the Maxwellian case showing that they imply a departure from the usual cosine time dependence of the expected signal in DAMA. However we explicitly show that the DAMA data is not sensitive to this distortion, both in time and frequency space, even in the extreme case of a 100 % modulated fraction. Moreover the same scenario provides an explanation of the maximum in the energy spectrum of the modulation amplitude detected by DAMA in terms of WIMPs whose minimal incoming speed matches the kinematic threshold for inelastic upscatters. For the elastic case the detection of such maximum suggests an inversion of the modulation phase below the present DAMA energy threshold, while this is not expected for inelastic scattering. This may allow to discriminate between the two scenarios in a future low-threshold analysis of the DAMA data.

  9. Identification of heparin samples that contain impurities or contaminants by chemometric pattern recognition analysis of proton NMR spectral data.

    PubMed

    Zang, Qingda; Keire, David A; Buhse, Lucinda F; Wood, Richard D; Mital, Dinesh P; Haque, Syed; Srinivasan, Shankar; Moore, Christine M V; Nasr, Moheb; Al-Hakim, Ali; Trehy, Michael L; Welsh, William J

    2011-08-01

    Chemometric analysis of a set of one-dimensional (1D) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data for heparin sodium active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) samples was employed to distinguish USP-grade heparin samples from those containing oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) contaminant and/or unacceptable levels of dermatan sulfate (DS) impurity. Three chemometric pattern recognition approaches were implemented: classification and regression tree (CART), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM). Heparin sodium samples from various manufacturers were analyzed in 2008 and 2009 by 1D (1)H NMR, strong anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and percent galactosamine in total hexosamine tests. Based on these data, the samples were divided into three groups: Heparin, DS ≤ 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; DS, DS > 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; and OSCS, OSCS > 0% with any content of DS. Three data sets corresponding to different chemical shift regions (1.95-2.20, 3.10-5.70, and 1.95-5.70 ppm) were evaluated. While all three chemometric approaches were able to effectively model the data in the 1.95-2.20 ppm region, SVM was found to substantially outperform CART and ANN for data in the 3.10-5.70 ppm region in terms of classification success rate. A 100% prediction rate was frequently achieved for discrimination between heparin and OSCS samples. The majority of classification errors between heparin and DS involved cases where the DS content was close to the 1.0% DS borderline between the two classes. When these borderline samples were removed, nearly perfect classification results were attained. Satisfactory results were achieved when the resulting models were challenged by test samples containing blends of heparin APIs spiked with non-, partially, or fully oversulfated chondroitin sulfate A, heparan sulfate, or DS at the 1.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% (w/w) levels. This study demonstrated that the combination of 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy with

  10. The human proton-coupled folate transporter: Biology and therapeutic applications to cancer.

    PubMed

    Desmoulin, Sita Kugel; Hou, Zhanjun; Gangjee, Aleem; Matherly, Larry H

    2012-12-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). PCFT was identified in 2006 as the primary transporter for intestinal absorption of dietary folates, as mutations in PCFT are causal in hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) syndrome. Since 2006, there have been major advances in understanding the mechanistic roles of critical amino acids and/or domains in the PCFT protein, many of which were identified as mutated in HFM patients, and in characterizing transcriptional control of the human PCFT gene. With the recognition that PCFT is abundantly expressed in human tumors and is active at pHs characterizing the tumor microenvironment, attention turned to exploiting PCFT for delivering novel cytotoxic antifolates for solid tumors. The finding that pemetrexed is an excellent PCFT substrate explains its demonstrated clinical efficacy for mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer, and prompted development of more PCFT-selective tumor-targeted 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates that derive their cytotoxic effects by targeting de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis.

  11. Tyrosine oxidation in heme oxygenase: examination of long-range proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Valeriy V; Roth, Justine P

    2014-10-01

    Heme oxygenase is responsible for the degradation of a histidine-ligated ferric protoporphyrin IX (Por) to biliverdin, CO, and the free ferrous ion. Described here are studies of tyrosyl radical formation reactions that occur after oxidizing Fe(III)(Por) to Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) in human heme oxygenase isoform-1 (hHO-1) and the structurally homologous protein from Corynebacterium diphtheriae (cdHO). Site-directed mutagenesis on hHO-1 probes the reduction of Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) by tyrosine residues within 11 Å of the prosthetic group. In hHO-1, Y58· is implicated as the most likely site of oxidation, based on the pH and pD dependent kinetics. The absence of solvent deuterium isotope effects in basic solutions of hHO-1 and cdHO contrasts with the behavior of these proteins in the acidic solution, suggesting that long-range proton-coupled electron transfer predominates over electron transfer.

  12. Experimental, SOPPA(CCSD), and DFT analysis of substitutent effects on NMR 1JCF coupling constants in fluorobenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vilcachagua, Janaina Dantas; Ducati, Lucas C; Rittner, Roberto; Contreras, Rubén H; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2011-02-24

    Interesting insight into the electronic molecular structure changes associated with substituent effects on the Fermi contact (FC) and paramagnetic spin-orbit (PSO) terms of (1)J(CF) NMR coupling constants (SSCCs) in o-X-, m-X-, and p-X-fluorobenzenes (X = NH(2); NO(2)) is presented. The formulation of this approach is based on the influence of different conjugative and hyperconjugative interactions on a second-order property, which can be qualitatively predicted if it is known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals, which define some experimental trends for (1)J(CF) spin-spin coupling constants. In addition, DFT hybrid functionals were used, and a similar degree of confidence to compute the (1)J(CF) with those observed for the SOPPA(CCSD) method was obtained. The (1)J(CF) SSCCs for ezetimibe, a commercially fluorinated drug used to reduce cholesterol levels, were measured and DFT-calculated, and the qualitative approach quoted above was applied. As a byproduct, a possible method to determine experimentally a significant PSO contribution to (1)J(CF) SSCCs is discussed.

  13. Pneumatic switched angle spinning NMR probe with capacitively coupled double saddle coil.

    PubMed

    Litvak, Ilya M; Espinosa, Catalina A; Shapiro, Rebecca A; Oldham, Andrew N; Duong, Vincent V; Martin, Rachel W

    2010-10-01

    Switched angle spinning (SAS) experiments can be used for generating isotropic-anisotropic correlations in oriented samples in a single experiment. In order for these methods to become widespread, specialized hardware is required. Here we describe the electronic and mechanical design and performance of a double-resonance SAS probe. Unlike many previous SAS probe implementations, the focus here is on systems where the dipolar couplings are partially averaged by molecular motion. This probe has a moving double saddle coil capacitively coupled to the stationary circuit. Angle switching is accomplished by a steam engine-type pneumatic mechanism. The speed and stability of the switching hardware for SAS experiments are demonstrated using spectra of model compounds. PMID:20673643

  14. Pneumatic switched angle spinning NMR probe with capacitively coupled double saddle coil.

    PubMed

    Litvak, Ilya M; Espinosa, Catalina A; Shapiro, Rebecca A; Oldham, Andrew N; Duong, Vincent V; Martin, Rachel W

    2010-10-01

    Switched angle spinning (SAS) experiments can be used for generating isotropic-anisotropic correlations in oriented samples in a single experiment. In order for these methods to become widespread, specialized hardware is required. Here we describe the electronic and mechanical design and performance of a double-resonance SAS probe. Unlike many previous SAS probe implementations, the focus here is on systems where the dipolar couplings are partially averaged by molecular motion. This probe has a moving double saddle coil capacitively coupled to the stationary circuit. Angle switching is accomplished by a steam engine-type pneumatic mechanism. The speed and stability of the switching hardware for SAS experiments are demonstrated using spectra of model compounds.

  15. Pneumatic switched angle spinning NMR probe with capacitively coupled double saddle coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Ilya M.; Espinosa, Catalina A.; Shapiro, Rebecca A.; Oldham, Andrew N.; Duong, Vincent V.; Martin, Rachel W.

    2010-10-01

    Switched angle spinning (SAS) experiments can be used for generating isotropic-anisotropic correlations in oriented samples in a single experiment. In order for these methods to become widespread, specialized hardware is required. Here we describe the electronic and mechanical design and performance of a double-resonance SAS probe. Unlike many previous SAS probe implementations, the focus here is on systems where the dipolar couplings are partially averaged by molecular motion. This probe has a moving double saddle coil capacitively coupled to the stationary circuit. Angle switching is accomplished by a steam engine-type pneumatic mechanism. The speed and stability of the switching hardware for SAS experiments are demonstrated using spectra of model compounds.

  16. Homonuclear J coupling effects in volume localized NMR spectroscopy: pitfalls and solutions.

    PubMed

    Yablonskiy, D A; Neil, J J; Raichle, M E; Ackerman, J J

    1998-02-01

    It has been observed that the signal amplitude of multiplet resonances such as the 1H doublet resonance of lactate varies with pulse sequence timing when echo-driven volume selective methods such as point resolved spectroscopy are used. Herein a standard vectorial description is presented for the mechanism of this artifact, which results from the chemical shift between homonuclear scalar-coupled (i.e., J coupled) nuclei. The chemical shift causes the extent of a signal phase modulation to vary for different spatial regions of the excited voxel. This variation results in spatial interference effects that can lead to marked loss of signal intensity as well as corruption of the size and shape of the voxel from which signal is obtained. The phenomenon is substantial at an imaging field of 1.5 T and becomes especially pronounced at higher field strengths. Several strategies to avoid the artifact are provided.

  17. Resolving Nitrogen-15 and Proton Chemical Shifts for Mobile Segments of Elastin with Two-dimensional NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ohgo, Kosuke; Niemczura, Walter P.; Seacat, Brian C.; Wise, Steven G.; Weiss, Anthony S.; Kumashiro, Kristin K.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments are applied to uniformly 15N-enriched synthetic elastin, a recombinant human tropoelastin that has been cross-linked to form an elastic hydrogel. Hydrated elastin is characterized by large segments that undergo “liquid-like” motions that limit the efficiency of cross-polarization. The refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer experiment is used to target these extensive, mobile regions of this protein. Numerous peaks are detected in the backbone amide region of the protein, and their chemical shifts indicate the completely unstructured, “random coil” model for elastin is unlikely. Instead, more evidence is gathered that supports a characteristic ensemble of conformations in this rubber-like protein. PMID:22474297

  18. Magic-angle-spinning NMR of the drug resistant S31N M2 proton transporter from influenza A.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Eddy, Matthew T; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G

    2012-05-01

    We report chemical shift assignments of the drug-resistant S31N mutant of M2(18-60) determined using 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectra acquired with a (15)N-(13)C ZF-TEDOR transfer followed by (13)C-(13)C mixing by RFDR. The MAS spectra reveal two sets of resonances, indicating that the tetramer assembles as a dimer of dimers, similar to the wild-type channel. Helicies from the two sets of chemical shifts are shown to be in close proximity at residue H37, and the assignments reveal a difference in the helix torsion angles, as predicted by TALOS+, for the key resistance residue N31. In contrast to wild-type M2(18-60), chemical shift changes are minimal upon addition of the inhibitor rimantadine, suggesting that the drug does not bind to S31N M2.

  19. Proton NMR for detection, identification and quantification of adulterants in 160 herbal food supplements marketed for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Rabab; Assemat, Gaëtan; Martins, Nathalie; Balayssac, Stéphane; Gilard, Véronique; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2016-05-30

    One hundred and sixty food supplements (FS) marketed for weight loss and mainly purchased on the Internet were analyzed. All the FS were claimed as 100% natural containing only natural compounds, plant extracts and/or vitamins and the presence of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was never mentioned. (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used for detecting the presence of adulterants and for their identification and quantification. Mass spectrometry was used as a complementary method for supporting their identification. Among the 164 samples considered because capsules from 5 different blisters of the same FS were analyzed, 56% were tainted with six API. Forty three contained sibutramine as single adulterant (26%), 9 phenolphthalein (6%) and 23 a mixture of these API (14%) that were both withdrawn from the market several years ago because of toxicity concerns. Sildenafil was found in 12 samples, either as a single adulterant (n=5) or in combination with sibutramine (n=3), phenolphthalein (n=3) and both sibutramine and phenolphthalein (n=1). Fluoxetine was present in 4 formulations, alone (n=3) or in combination with sibutramine and orlistat (n=1). At last, lorcaserine was detected in one FS. The content of sibutramine per dosage unit was comprised between 0.1 and 22 mg and that of phenolphthalein between 0.05 and 56 mg. The study also highlights poor manufacturing practices as evidenced for instance by the variability of API in capsules from different blisters of the same box. This paper demonstrates the need for more effective quality control of weight loss FS and the efficiency of (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the detection of tainted FS. PMID:26928212

  20. Proton NMR for detection, identification and quantification of adulterants in 160 herbal food supplements marketed for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Rabab; Assemat, Gaëtan; Martins, Nathalie; Balayssac, Stéphane; Gilard, Véronique; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2016-05-30

    One hundred and sixty food supplements (FS) marketed for weight loss and mainly purchased on the Internet were analyzed. All the FS were claimed as 100% natural containing only natural compounds, plant extracts and/or vitamins and the presence of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was never mentioned. (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used for detecting the presence of adulterants and for their identification and quantification. Mass spectrometry was used as a complementary method for supporting their identification. Among the 164 samples considered because capsules from 5 different blisters of the same FS were analyzed, 56% were tainted with six API. Forty three contained sibutramine as single adulterant (26%), 9 phenolphthalein (6%) and 23 a mixture of these API (14%) that were both withdrawn from the market several years ago because of toxicity concerns. Sildenafil was found in 12 samples, either as a single adulterant (n=5) or in combination with sibutramine (n=3), phenolphthalein (n=3) and both sibutramine and phenolphthalein (n=1). Fluoxetine was present in 4 formulations, alone (n=3) or in combination with sibutramine and orlistat (n=1). At last, lorcaserine was detected in one FS. The content of sibutramine per dosage unit was comprised between 0.1 and 22 mg and that of phenolphthalein between 0.05 and 56 mg. The study also highlights poor manufacturing practices as evidenced for instance by the variability of API in capsules from different blisters of the same box. This paper demonstrates the need for more effective quality control of weight loss FS and the efficiency of (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the detection of tainted FS.

  1. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase from baker's yeast: I. Kinetic analysis, chemical modification, and proton NMR spectroscopy of the enzyme substrate complex. II. Amino acid analysis and NMR spectroscopy of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of the effect of pH on the reversible reaction catalyzed by orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) from Baker's yeast revealed that different amino acid residues may enable the enzyme-catalyzed reactions to proceed in the forward and reverse directions, respectively. For the forward reaction, there appear to be at least two critical amino acid residues (pK's 4.6 and 7.1) which must be in a deprotonated state to reach a maximum activity near pH 8 which is maintained through pH 9.5. For the reverse reaction, maximum activity is reached near pH 7 (pK's at 5.4) and then the activity decreases at higher pH (pK's at 7.9 and possibly above 9). A theoretical proton NMR spectrum was generated for OPRTase, based on its amino acid composition. The spectrum thus produced has a similar number of major peaks to that of the actual spectrum taken at 300 MHz. Spectra collected at various pH values between 8 and 5, were consistent with the maintenance of the gross conformational structure of the enzyme over that pH range.

  2. Investigating protein conformational energy landscapes and atomic resolution dynamics from NMR dipolar couplings: a review.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Loïc; Blackledge, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is exquisitely sensitive to protein dynamics. In particular inter-nuclear dipolar couplings, that become measurable in solution when the protein is dissolved in a dilute liquid crystalline solution, report on all conformations sampled up to millisecond timescales. As such they provide the opportunity to describe the Boltzmann distribution present in solution at atomic resolution, and thereby to map the conformational energy landscape in unprecedented detail. The development of analytical methods and approaches based on numerical simulation and their application to numerous biologically important systems is presented. PMID:26517337

  3. Effect of pressure on the proton-proton vicinal coupling constants in 1,1,2-tricholoethane and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane-1- sup 13 C. A new approach to hig-pressure study of molecular conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Kazuoka, T.; Sera, A. )

    1988-10-26

    The first observation of a pressure-induced change in the proton-proton vicinal coupling constants, J{sub vic}, are reported here. It is also demonstrated that the experiment possibly provides a new, straightforward approach to conformation studies at high pressure. The pressure effects on coupling constants of 1,1,2-trichloroethane + 10 mol % of cyclopentane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane 1-{sup 13}C are reported. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Accurate determination of one-bond heteronuclear coupling constants with “pure shift” broadband proton-decoupled CLIP/CLAP-HSQC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timári, István; Kaltschnee, Lukas; Kolmer, Andreas; Adams, Ralph W.; Nilsson, Mathias; Thiele, Christina M.; Morris, Gareth A.; Kövér, Katalin E.

    2014-02-01

    We report broadband proton-decoupled CLIP/CLAP-HSQC experiments for the accurate determination of one-bond heteronuclear couplings and, by extension, for the reliable measurement of small residual dipolar coupling constants. The combination of an isotope-selective BIRD(d) filter module with a non-selective 1H inversion pulse is employed to refocus proton-proton coupling evolution prior to the acquisition of brief chunks of free induction decay that are subsequently assembled to reconstruct the fully-decoupled signal evolution. As a result, the cross-peaks obtained are split only by the heteronuclear one-bond coupling along the F2 dimension, allowing coupling constants to be extracted by measuring simple frequency differences between singlet maxima. The proton decoupling scheme presented has also been utilized in standard HSQC experiments, resulting in a fully-decoupled pure shift correlation map with significantly improved resolution.

  5. On-shell coupled-channel approach to proton-hydrogen collisions without partial-wave expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2006-01-15

    A fully quantal approach to proton collisions with hydrogen based on the atomic-orbital close-coupling method is presented. The method leads to a system of coupled three-dimensional momentum-space integral equations for the scattering amplitudes. These equations are reduced to two-dimensional ones using an on-shell approximation. Furthermore, by considering the symmetry of the problem, we demonstrate that these can be reduced to just one dimension. The resulting equations are solved without partial-wave expansion. Cross sections for electron transfer in proton collisions with the ground state of atomic hydrogen are calculated and shown to agree well with experiment over a wide energy range.

  6. Multidrug Transport Protein NorM from Vibrio cholerae Simultaneously Couples to Sodium- and Proton-Motive Force*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yoonhee; Nair, Asha; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family mediate the efflux of unrelated pharmaceuticals from the interior of the cell in organisms ranging from bacteria to human. These proteins are thought to fall into two classes that couple substrate efflux to the influx of either Na+ or H+. We studied the energetics of drug extrusion by NorM from Vibrio cholerae in proteoliposomes in which purified NorM protein was functionally reconstituted in an inside-out orientation. We establish that NorM simultaneously couples to the sodium-motive force and proton-motive force, and biochemically identify protein regions and residues that play important roles in Na+ or H+ binding. As the positions of protons are not available in current medium and high-resolution crystal structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters, our findings add a previously unrecognized parameter to mechanistic models based of these structures. PMID:24711447

  7. Dynamics, NMR parameters and hyperfine coupling constants of the Fe3O4(1 0 0)-water interface: Implications for MRI probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Mateus A.; Peixoto, Fernando C.; da Cunha, Elaine F. F.; Ramalho, Teodorico C.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetite is an iron oxide widely used as contrast agent in MRI, receiving considerable interest from nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this work, the face 1 0 0 of the magnetite structure was studied with water in order to obtain 1H hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs). Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were performed using the ReaxFF program and for statistical inefficiency, structures were selected for HFCC and NMR calculations. From our theoretical findings, the magnetite in solution considerably increases the 1H HFCC of water molecules. From our results, it is essential to incorporate the dynamics and solvent effects into NMR calculations of relaxation parameters.

  8. Kinetic isotope effect of proton-coupled electron transfer in a hydrogen bonded phenol-pyrrolidino[60]fullerene.

    PubMed

    Ravensbergen, Janneke; Brown, Chelsea L; Moore, Gary F; Frese, Raoul N; van Grondelle, Rienk; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Kennis, John T M

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a central role in photosynthesis and potentially in solar-to-fuel systems. We report a spectroscopy study on a phenol-pyrrolidino[60]fullerene. Quenching of the singlet excited state from 1 ns to 250 ps is assigned to PCET. A H/D exchange study reveals a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 3.0, consistent with a concerted PCET mechanism.

  9. Polymer stabilized silver nanoparticle: An efficient catalyst for proton-coupled electron transfer reaction and the electrochemical recognition of biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Siwal, Samarjeet; Ul Islam, Rafique; Witcomb, Michael J.; Mallick, Kaushik

    2014-07-01

    A facile in situ synthesis route [1] has been described for the preparation of polymer stabilized silver nanoparticles. Such in situ synthesized silver nanoparticles are shown to have excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenolate (4NP), an example of a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction mechanism. Also, the silver-polymer nanocomposite material is shown to perform as an efficient electro-catalyst for the oxidation of ascorbic acid.

  10. Avoiding bias effects in NMR experiments for heteronuclear dipole-dipole coupling determinations: principles and application to organic semiconductor materials.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Ricardo; Cobo, Marcio Fernando; de Azevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro; Sommer, Michael; Wicklein, André; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Hempel, Günter; Saalwächter, Kay

    2013-09-16

    Carbon-proton dipole-dipole couplings between bonded atoms represent a popular probe of molecular dynamics in soft materials or biomolecules. Their site-resolved determination, for example, by using the popular DIPSHIFT experiment, can be challenged by spectral overlap with nonbonded carbon atoms. The problem can be solved by using very short cross-polarization (CP) contact times, however, the measured modulation curves then deviate strongly from the theoretically predicted shape, which is caused by the dependence of the CP efficiency on the orientation of the CH vector, leading to an anisotropic magnetization distribution even for isotropic samples. Herein, we present a detailed demonstration and explanation of this problem, as well as providing a solution. We combine DIPSHIFT experiments with the rotor-directed exchange of orientations (RODEO) method, and modifications of it, to redistribute the magnetization and obtain undistorted modulation curves. Our strategy is general in that it can also be applied to other types of experiments for heteronuclear dipole-dipole coupling determinations that rely on dipolar polarization transfer. It is demonstrated with perylene-bisimide-based organic semiconductor materials, as an example, in which measurements of dynamic order parameters reveal correlations of the molecular dynamics with the phase structure and functional properties.

  11. Review. The mammalian proton-coupled peptide cotransporter PepT1: sitting on the transporter-channel fence?

    PubMed

    Meredith, David

    2009-01-27

    The proton-coupled di- and tripeptide transporter PepT1 (SLC15a1) is the major route by which dietary nitrogen is taken up from the small intestine, as well as being the route of entry for important therapeutic (pro)drugs such as the beta-lactam antibiotics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and antiviral and anti-cancer agents. PepT1 is a member of the major facilitator superfamily of 12 transmembrane domain transporter proteins. Expression studies in Xenopus laevis on rabbit PepT1 that had undergone site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved arginine residue (arginine282 in transmembrane domain 7) to a glutamate revealed that this residue played a role in the coupling of proton and peptide transport and prevented the movement of non-coupled ions during the transporter cycle. Mutations of arginine282 to other non-positive residues did not uncouple proton-peptide cotransport, but did allow additional ion movements when substrate was added. By contrast, mutations to positive residues appeared to function the same as wild-type. These findings are discussed in relation to the functional role that arginine282 may play in the way PepT1 operates, together with structural information from the homology model of PepT1 based on the Escherichia coli lactose permease crystal structure.

  12. On the use of time-averaging restraints when deriving biomolecular structure from [Formula: see text]-coupling values obtained from NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lorna J; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hansen, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Deriving molecular structure from [Formula: see text]-couplings obtained from NMR experiments is a challenge due to (1) the uncertainty in the Karplus relation [Formula: see text] connecting a [Formula: see text]-coupling value to a torsional angle [Formula: see text], (2) the need to account for the averaging inherent to the measurement of [Formula: see text]-couplings, and (3) the sampling road blocks that may emerge due to the multiple-valuedness of the inverse function [Formula: see text] of the function [Formula: see text]. Ways to properly handle these issues in structure refinement of biomolecules are discussed and illustrated using the protein hen egg white lysozyme as example.

  13. Classical and quantum proton vibration in a nonharmonic strongly coupled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. M.; Thorson, W. R.; Choi, J. H.

    1993-09-01

    Classical and quantum descriptions of proton vibration are compared for a coupled nonharmonic model based on an ab initio potential for the bifluoride ion, [FHF]-. Accurate quantum calculations and exact classical dynamics are compared with quantum and classical versions of the self-consistent-field (SCF) approximation. Semiclassical and quantum SCF eigenvalues agree within JWKB-type errors. The SCF scheme closely approximates exact quantum states for the lowest 4-5 vibrational levels of each symmetry, except at avoided crossings where strong CI mixing of SCF levels occurs. True classical motion, however, is mainly irregular except at very low energies, and even where it remains regular it may be strongly reorganized by a 1:1 periodic resonance associated with major potential surface features. Strongly mixed CI states at systematic avoided crossings of SCF levels at higher energies do have classical analogs in the reorganized classical motions seen at low energies; stabilized CI components correspond to a stable periodic 1:1 orbit, destabilized components to an unstable periodic 1:1 elliptical orbit. Canonical perturbation theory is used to study further the sense in which the exactly separable classical SCF Hamiltonian is ``close'' to the true Hamiltonian. Where true motion is modal or SCF-like, first-order perturbed trajectories and second-order perturbed energies describe it very accurately. However since the dynamics can be strongly disturbed even at very low energies, correlation effects are obviously not ``small'' in the sense usually meant in classical dynamics, i.e., that regular trajectories mostly remain regular in the nonseparable perturbed system.

  14. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  15. Dependence of Vibronic Coupling on Molecular Geometry and Environment: Bridging Hydrogen Atom Transfer and Electron–Proton Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The rate constants for typical concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions depend on the vibronic coupling between the diabatic reactant and product states. The form of the vibronic coupling is different for electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, which are associated with hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and electron–proton transfer (EPT) mechanisms, respectively. Most PCET rate constant expressions rely on the Condon approximation, which assumes that the vibronic coupling is independent of the nuclear coordinates of the solute and the solvent or protein. Herein we test the Condon approximation for PCET vibronic couplings. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on molecular geometry is investigated for an open and a stacked transition state geometry of the phenoxyl-phenol self-exchange reaction. The calculations indicate that the open geometry is electronically nonadiabatic, corresponding to an EPT mechanism that involves significant electronic charge redistribution, while the stacked geometry is predominantly electronically adiabatic, corresponding primarily to an HAT mechanism. Consequently, a single molecular system can exhibit both HAT and EPT character. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on the solvent or protein configuration is examined for the soybean lipoxygenase enzyme. The calculations indicate that this PCET reaction is electronically nonadiabatic with a vibronic coupling that does not depend significantly on the protein environment. Thus, the Condon approximation is shown to be valid for the solvent and protein nuclear coordinates but invalid for the solute nuclear coordinates in certain PCET systems. These results have significant implications for the calculation of rate constants, as well as mechanistic interpretations, of PCET reactions. PMID:26412613

  16. Real-time separation of natural products by ultrafast 2D NMR coupled to on-line HPLC.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Luiz H K; Queiroz, Darlene P K; Dhooghe, Liene; Ferreira, Antonio G; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2012-05-21

    Hyphenated HPLC-NMR is an extremely efficient analytical tool, which makes it possible to perform on-flow experiments where 1D NMR spectra are obtained in real time as the analytes are separated and eluted from the chromatographic column. However, it is incompatible with multidimensional NMR methods that form an indispensible tool for the study of complex mixtures. Recently, Frydman and co-workers have proposed an ultrafast 2D NMR approach, where a complete 2D NMR correlation can be recorded in a single scan, thus providing a solution to the irreversibility of hyphenated techniques. This paper presents the first implementation of on-line ultrafast HPLC-NMR. Ultrafast COSY spectra are acquired every 12 s in the course of a chromatographic run performed on a mixture of natural aromatic compounds. The results, obtained on a commercial HPLC-NMR setup, highlight the generality of the ultrafast HPLC-NMR methodology, thus opening the way to a number of applications in the numerous fields in which HPLC-NMR forms a routine analytical tool.

  17. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Strongly Coupled Photosystem II-Inspired Chromophore-Imidazole-Phenol Complex: Stepwise Oxidation and Concerted Reduction.

    PubMed

    Manbeck, Gerald F; Fujita, Etsuko; Concepcion, Javier J

    2016-09-14

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions were studied in acetonitrile for a Photosystem II (PSII)-inspired [Ru(bpy)2(phen-imidazole-Ph(OH)((t)Bu)2)](2+), in which Ru(III) generated by a flash-quench sequence oxidizes the appended phenol and the proton is transferred to the hydrogen-bonded imidazole base. In contrast to related systems, the donor and acceptor are strongly coupled, as indicated by the shift in the Ru(III/II) couple upon phenol oxidation, and intramolecular oxidation of the phenol by Ru(III) is energetically favorable by both stepwise and concerted pathways. The phenol oxidation occurs via a stepwise ET-PT mechanism with kET = 2.7 × 10(7) s(-1) and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 0.99 ± 0.03. The electron transfer reaction was characterized as adiabatic with λDA = 1.16 eV and 280 < HDA < 540 cm(-1) consistent with strong electronic coupling and slow solvent dynamics. Reduction of the phenoxyl radical by the quencher radical was examined as the analogue of the redox reaction between the PSII tyrosyl radical and the oxygen-evolving complex. In our PSII-inspired complex, the recombination reaction activation energy is <2 kcal mol(-1). The reaction is nonadiabatic (VPCET ≈ 22 cm(-1) (H) and 49 cm(-1) (D)) and concerted, and it exhibits an unexpected inverse KIE = 0.55 that is attributed to greater overlap of the reactant vibronic ground state with the OD vibronic states of the proton acceptor due to the smaller quantum spacing of the deuterium vibrational levels.

  18. Measuring JHH values with a selective constant-time 2D NMR protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Proton-proton scalar couplings play important roles in molecule structure elucidation. However, measurements of JHH values in complex coupled spin systems remain challenging. In this study, we develop a selective constant-time (SECT) 2D NMR protocol with which scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons can be revealed, and corresponding JHH values can be measured through doublets along the F1 dimension. All JHH values within a network of n fully coupled protons can be separately determined with (n - 1) SECT experiments. Additionally, the proposed pulse sequence possesses satisfactory sensitivity and handy implementation. Therefore, it will interest scientists who intend to address structural analyzes of molecules with overcrowded spectra, and may greatly facilitate the applications of scalar-coupling constants in molecule structure studies.

  19. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at a Heme-Propionate in an Iron-Protoporphyrin-IX Model Compound

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A heme model system has been developed in which the heme-propionate is the only proton donating/accepting site, using protoporphyrin IX-monomethyl esters (PPIXMME) and N-methylimidazole (MeIm). Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions of these model compounds have been examined in acetonitrile solvent. (PPIXMME)FeIII(MeIm)2-propionate (FeIII~CO2) is readily reduced by the ascorbate derivative 5,6-isopropylidine ascorbate to give (PPIXMME)FeII(MeIm)2-propionic acid (FeII~CO2H). Excess of the hydroxylamine TEMPOH or of hydroquinone similarly reduce FeIII~CO2, and TEMPO and benzoquinone oxidize FeII~CO2H to return to FeIII~CO2. The measured equilibrium constants, and the determined pKa and E1/2 values, indicate that FeII~CO2H has an effective bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of 67.8 ± 0.6 kcal mol–1. In these PPIX models, electron transfer occurs at the iron center and proton transfer occurs at the remote heme propionate. According to thermochemical and other arguments, the TEMPOH reaction occurs by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET), and a similar pathway is indicated for the ascorbate derivative. Based on these results, heme propionates should be considered as potential key components of PCET/CPET active sites in heme proteins. PMID:21524059

  20. Nonlinear QCD meets data: A global analysis of lepton-proton scattering with running coupling Balitsky-Kovchegov evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Armesto, Nestor; Salgado, Carlos A.; Milhano, Jose Guilherme

    2009-08-01

    We perform a global fit to the structure function F{sub 2} measured in lepton-proton experiments at small values of Bjorken-x, x{<=}0.01, for all experimentally available values of Q{sup 2}, 0.045 GeV{sup 2}{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}800 GeV{sup 2}. We show that the recent improvements resulting from the inclusion of running coupling corrections allow for a description of data in terms of nonlinear QCD evolution equations. In this approach F{sub 2} is calculated within the dipole model with all Bjorken-x dependence described by the running coupling Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. Two different initial conditions for the evolution are used, both yielding good fits to data with {chi}{sup 2}/d.o.f.<1.1. The proton longitudinal structure function F{sub L}, not included in the fits, is also well described. Our analysis allows to perform a first principle extrapolation of the proton-dipole scattering amplitude once the initial condition has been fitted to presently available data. We provide predictions for F{sub 2} and F{sub L} in the kinematical regions of interest for future colliders and ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A numerical implementation of our results down to x=10{sup -12} is released as a computer code for public use.

  1. Metal-free aqueous redox capacitor via proton rocking-chair system in an organic-based couple

    PubMed Central

    Tomai, Takaaki; Mitani, Satoshi; Komatsu, Daiki; Kawaguchi, Yuji; Honma, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    Safe and inexpensive energy storage devices with long cycle lifetimes and high power and energy densities are mandatory for the development of electrical power grids that connect with renewable energy sources. In this study, we demonstrated metal-free aqueous redox capacitors using couples comprising low-molecular-weight organic compounds. In addition to the electric double layer formation, proton insertion/extraction reactions between a couple consisting of inexpensive quinones/hydroquinones contributed to the energy storage. This energy storage mechanism, in which protons are shuttled back and forth between two electrodes upon charge and discharge, can be regarded as a proton rocking-chair system. The fabricated capacitor showed a large capacity (>20 Wh/kg), even in the applied potential range between 0–1 V, and high power capability (>5 A/g). The support of the organic compounds in nanoporous carbon facilitated the efficient use of the organic compounds with a lifetime of thousands of cycles. PMID:24395117

  2. Total assignment and structure in solution of tetrandrine by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevand, André; Stanculescu, Ioana; Mandravel, Cristina; Woisel, Patrice; Surpateanu, Gheorghe

    2004-07-01

    High-resolution 1- and 2D NMR spectra of tetrandrine and molecular modelling were employed to characterise its structure in solution. Complete and unambiguous assignment of all proton and carbon resonance signals is reported. Scalar couplings were determined from dihedral angles with the Karplus equation. Inter-proton distances were evaluated from NOE correlation peaks. Comparison of simulated and X-ray conformations of tetrandrine reveals only small differences.

  3. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one- and two-proton transfer reactions for the 28Si + 90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Sandal, Rohit; Chakraborty, Santosh; Verma, Shashi; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one- and two-proton stripping reactions for 28Si + 90,94Zr systems were performed at 120 MeV. The experiment was carried out with the 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. The theoretical calculations were performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code fresco. The distorted wave Born approximation calculations reproduced the experimental angular distributions for the one-proton transfer channel for both the systems reasonably well but failed for the two-proton transfer channel. Coupled channels calculations including various intermediate states (involving target and projectile inelastic excitations before and/or after transfer) along with the sequential transfer were able to reproduce the two-proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It seems that at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, there is significant contribution of the indirect multistep and sequential transfer to the two-proton stripping reaction.

  4. Coupling of proton source and sink via H+-migration along the membrane surface as revealed by double patch-clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Y N; Pohl, P

    1998-06-12

    Long-range proton transfer along the surface of black lipid bilayers was observed between two integral membrane channels (gramicidins), one operating as a proton source, the other as a sink, by patch-clamp technique. In contrast, potassium ions were shown to equilibrate with the aqueous bulk phase before being consumed. Both channels opened and closed simultaneously only if the charge between them was carried by protons. In this case an anomalous high conductance between two patched membrane fragments was measured, each of them containing one single gramicidin channel. The coupled state disappeared when the distance between these two channels was increased above the critical value. The latter was shown to increase with the channel lifetime. Our results support the idea of the 'localized' proton coupling, in which protons that have been pumped across membranes migrate along the membrane surface to reach another membrane protein that utilizes the established pH gradient. PMID:9650589

  5. Crystal structure of the pristine peroxidase ferryl center and its relevance to proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Chreifi, Georges; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Doukov, Tzanko; Cohen, Aina E; McPhillips, Scott E; Song, Jinhu; Meharenna, Yergalem T; Soltis, S Michael; Poulos, Thomas L

    2016-02-01

    The reaction of peroxides with peroxidases oxidizes the heme iron from Fe(III) to Fe(IV)=O and a porphyrin or aromatic side chain to a cationic radical. X-ray-generated hydrated electrons rapidly reduce Fe(IV), thereby requiring very short exposures using many crystals, and, even then, some reduction cannot be avoided. The new generation of X-ray free electron lasers capable of generating intense X-rays on the tenths of femtosecond time scale enables structure determination with no reduction or X-ray damage. Here, we report the 1.5-Å crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) compound I (CmpI) using data obtained with the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This structure is consistent with previous structures. Of particular importance is the active site water structure that can mediate the proton transfer reactions required for both CmpI formation and reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. The structures indicate that a water molecule is ideally positioned to shuttle protons between an iron-linked oxygen and the active site catalytic His. We therefore have carried out both computational and kinetic studies to probe the reduction of Fe(IV)=O. Kinetic solvent isotope experiments show that the transfer of a single proton is critical in the peroxidase rate-limiting step, which is very likely the proton-coupled reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. We also find that the pKa of the catalytic His substantially increases in CmpI, indicating that this active site His is the source of the proton required in the reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(IV)-OH.

  6. A minimal non-supersymmetric S O(10) model: Gauge coupling unification, proton decay and fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saki

    2016-06-01

    We present a minimal renormalizable non-supersymmetric S O(10) grand unified model with a symmetry breaking sector consisting of Higgs fields in the 54H + 126H + 10H representations. This model admits a single intermediate scale associated with Pati-Salam symmetry along with a discrete parity. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the unification of gauge couplings and proton lifetime estimates are studied in detail in this framework. Including threshold corrections self-consistently, obtained from a full analysis of the Higgs potential, we show that the model is compatible with the current experimental bound on proton lifetime. The model generally predicts an upper bound of few times 1035 yrs for proton lifetime, which is not too far from the present Super-Kamiokande limit of τp ≳ 1.29 × 1034 yrs. With the help of a Pecci-Quinn symmetry and the resulting axion, the model provides a suitable dark matter candidate while also solving the strong CP problem. The intermediate scale, MI ≈ (1013 - 1014) GeV which is also the B - L scale, is of the right order for the right-handed neutrino mass which enables a successful description of light neutrino masses and oscillations. The Yukawa sector of the model consists of only two matrices in family space and leads to a predictive scenario for quark and lepton masses and mixings. The branching ratios for proton decay are calculable with the leading modes being p → e+π0 and p →v ¯π+ . Even though the model predicts no new physics within the reach of LHC, the next generation proton decay detectors and axion search experiments have the capability to pass verdict on this minimal scenario.

  7. Crystal structure of the pristine peroxidase ferryl center and its relevance to proton-coupled electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Chreifi, Georges; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Doukov, Tzanko; Cohen, Aina E.; McPhillips, Scott E.; Song, Jinhu; Meharenna, Yergalem T.; Soltis, S. Michael; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of peroxides with peroxidases oxidizes the heme iron from Fe(III) to Fe(IV)=O and a porphyrin or aromatic side chain to a cationic radical. X-ray–generated hydrated electrons rapidly reduce Fe(IV), thereby requiring very short exposures using many crystals, and, even then, some reduction cannot be avoided. The new generation of X-ray free electron lasers capable of generating intense X-rays on the tenths of femtosecond time scale enables structure determination with no reduction or X-ray damage. Here, we report the 1.5-Å crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) compound I (CmpI) using data obtained with the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This structure is consistent with previous structures. Of particular importance is the active site water structure that can mediate the proton transfer reactions required for both CmpI formation and reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. The structures indicate that a water molecule is ideally positioned to shuttle protons between an iron-linked oxygen and the active site catalytic His. We therefore have carried out both computational and kinetic studies to probe the reduction of Fe(IV)=O. Kinetic solvent isotope experiments show that the transfer of a single proton is critical in the peroxidase rate-limiting step, which is very likely the proton-coupled reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. We also find that the pKa of the catalytic His substantially increases in CmpI, indicating that this active site His is the source of the proton required in the reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(IV)-OH. PMID:26787871

  8. A Functional EXXEK Motif is Essential for Proton Coupling and Active Glucosinolate Transport by NPF2.11.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Geiger, Dietmar; Mirza, Osman; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan

    2015-12-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT/PTR) family shares a highly conserved E1X1X2E2RFXYY (E1X1X2E2R) motif across all kingdoms of life. This motif is suggested to have a role in proton coupling and active transport in bacterial homologs. For the plant POT/PTR family, also known as the NRT1/PTR family (NPF), little is known about the role of the E1X1X2E2R motif. Moreover, nothing is known about the role of the X1 and X2 residues within the E1X1X2E2R motif. We used NPF2.11-a proton-coupled glucosinolate (GLS) symporter from Arabidopsis thaliana-to investigate the role of the E1X1X2E2K motif variant in a plant NPF transporter. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based uptake assays and two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) electrophysiology, we demonstrate an essential role for the E1X1X2E2K motif for accumulation of substrate by NPF2.11. Our data suggest that the highly conserved E1, E2 and K residues are involved in translocation of protons, as has been proposed for the E1X1X2E2R motif in bacteria. Furthermore, we show that the two residues X1 and X2 in the E1X1X2E2[K/R] motif are conserved as uncharged amino acids in POT/PTRs from bacteria to mammals and that introducing a positive or negative charge in either position hampers the ability to overaccumulate substrate relative to the assay medium. We hypothesize that introducing a charge at X1 and X2 interferes with the function of the conserved glutamate and lysine residues of the E1X1X2E2K motif and affects the mechanism behind proton coupling. PMID:26443378

  9. A Functional EXXEK Motif is Essential for Proton Coupling and Active Glucosinolate Transport by NPF2.11.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Geiger, Dietmar; Mirza, Osman; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan

    2015-12-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT/PTR) family shares a highly conserved E1X1X2E2RFXYY (E1X1X2E2R) motif across all kingdoms of life. This motif is suggested to have a role in proton coupling and active transport in bacterial homologs. For the plant POT/PTR family, also known as the NRT1/PTR family (NPF), little is known about the role of the E1X1X2E2R motif. Moreover, nothing is known about the role of the X1 and X2 residues within the E1X1X2E2R motif. We used NPF2.11-a proton-coupled glucosinolate (GLS) symporter from Arabidopsis thaliana-to investigate the role of the E1X1X2E2K motif variant in a plant NPF transporter. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based uptake assays and two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) electrophysiology, we demonstrate an essential role for the E1X1X2E2K motif for accumulation of substrate by NPF2.11. Our data suggest that the highly conserved E1, E2 and K residues are involved in translocation of protons, as has been proposed for the E1X1X2E2R motif in bacteria. Furthermore, we show that the two residues X1 and X2 in the E1X1X2E2[K/R] motif are conserved as uncharged amino acids in POT/PTRs from bacteria to mammals and that introducing a positive or negative charge in either position hampers the ability to overaccumulate substrate relative to the assay medium. We hypothesize that introducing a charge at X1 and X2 interferes with the function of the conserved glutamate and lysine residues of the E1X1X2E2K motif and affects the mechanism behind proton coupling.

  10. The quantitative spectrum of inositol phosphate metabolites in avian erythrocytes, analysed by proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. with direct isomer detection.

    PubMed Central

    Radenberg, T; Scholz, P; Bergmann, G; Mayr, G W

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of inositol phosphate isomers present in avian erythrocytes was investigated in qualitative and quantitative terms. Inositol phosphates were isolated in micromolar quantities from turkey blood by anion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and subjected to proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. analysis. We employed a h.p.l.c. technique with a novel, recently described complexometric post-column detection system, called 'metal-dye detection' [Mayr (1988) Biochem. J. 254, 585-591], which enabled us to identify non-radioactively labelled inositol phosphate isomers and to determine their masses. The results indicate that avian erythrocytes contain the same inositol phosphate isomers as mammalian cells. Denoted by the 'lowest-locant rule' [NC-IUB Recommendations (1988) Biochem. J. 258, 1-2] irrespective of true enantiomerism, these are Ins(1,4)P2, Ins(1,6)P2, Ins(1,3,4)P3, Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, Ins(1,3,4,6)P4, Ins(1,4,5,6)P4, Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5, and InsP6. Furthermore, we identified two inositol trisphosphate isomers hitherto not described for mammalian cells, namely Ins(1,5,6)P3 and Ins(2,4,5)P3. The possible position of these two isomers in inositol phosphate metabolism and implications resulting from absolute abundances of inositol phosphates are discussed. PMID:2604720

  11. High resolution proton NMR studies of gangliosides. Structure of two types of GD3 lactones and their reactivity with monoclonal antibody R24.

    PubMed

    Ando, S; Yu, R K; Scarsdale, J N; Kusunoki, S; Prestegard, J H

    1989-02-25

    Ganglioside GD3 was converted at room temperature to two stable lactones, denoted as GD3 lactones I and II. The reaction sequence was presumed to be GD3----GD3 lactone I----GD3 lactone II based on the time course of their production. Lactone I behaved as a monosialoganglioside and lactone II as a neutral species. The two lactones were isolated by DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography. The positions of the inner ester linkages were investigated by two-dimensional J-correlated proton NMR spectroscopy. An ester linkage was most likely formed between the carboxyl group of the external sialic acid residue and C9-OH of the internal sialic acid residue in lactone I. In addition to this ester linkage, a second ester linkage between the carboxyl group of the internal sialic acid and C2-OH of the galactose residue was likely formed in lactone II. The structural changes induced by lactonization were further examined by their reactivity with the monoclonal antibody R24 (Puckel, C. S., Lloyd, K. O., Travassos, L. R., Dippold, W. G., Oettgen, H. F., and Old, L. J. (1982) J. Exp. Med. 155, 1133-1147), which reacted with GD3. R24 was found to bind weakly to GD3 lactone I, but not to GD3 lactone II. The results suggest that the monoclonal antibody requires both sialic acid residues for high affinity binding, and the complete lactonization results in a loss of negative charges and/or a change in the overall conformation of the oligosaccharide moiety which may account for the loss of binding.

  12. Cyclometalated complexes of ruthenium. 3. Spectral, electrochemical, and two-dimensional proton NMR of (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(cyclometalating ligand))/sup +/

    SciTech Connect

    Reveco, P.; Cherry, W.R.; Medley, J.; Garber, A.; Gale, R.J.; Selbin, J.

    1986-05-21

    Cyclometalated complexes of ruthenium(II), (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(L))/sup +/, where L = 2-(3-nitrophenyl)pyridine, phenylpyridine, benzo(h)quinoline, azobenzene, and p-(dimethylamino)azobenzene, have been prepared and characterized by two-dimensional proton NMR (HDCOSY) spectra and by cyclic voltammetry. Excited-state behavior of the complexes of the first three listed ligands has been investigated by absorption and emission spectroscopy and the photochemical stability of these species monitored. A substantial decrease is found in oxidation potential (the oxidations are metal-centered, with the electron coming from a t/sub 2/ orbital) in going from a dication (e.g. (Ru(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/) containing bidentate nitrogen donors only to our monocation containing a cyclometalated anion. This decrease undoubtedly results from both the ion charge decrease and the replacement of a sigma-donor/..pi..-acceptor nitrogen by a much stronger sigma-donor carbanion. The one-electron reduction of (Ru(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/ results in (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(bpy/sup -/))/sup +/. Absorption bands of our new species found in the visible region (450-550 nm) are assigned as metal-to-ligand transitions (MLCT), the lower energy one associated with the bpy ligand and the higher energy one associated with the carbon-bonded anion. All three complexes emit in a glass at 77 K. Temperature dependence of the emission intensities and lifetimes is discussed as is evidence for photoanation or very rapid nonradiative decay for different species.

  13. Proton-coupled electron transfer: Metal hydrides find the sweet spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, Jillian L.

    2015-02-01

    The synchronous movement of protons and electrons orchestrated by enzymes gives rise to highly efficient catalytic processes in nature, such as photosynthesis. Now, researchers have choreographed similar reactivity for a metal hydride complex, setting the stage for efficient solar fuel production in artificial systems.

  14. Tunable electrochemical pH modulation in a microchannel monitored via the proton-coupled electro-oxidation of hydroquinone

    PubMed Central

    Contento, Nicholas M.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemistry is a promising tool for microfluidic systems because it is relatively inexpensive, structures are simple to fabricate, and it is straight-forward to interface electronically. While most widely used in microfluidics for chemical detection or as the transduction mechanism for molecular probes, electrochemical methods can also be used to efficiently alter the chemical composition of small (typically <100 nl) microfluidic volumes in a manner that improves or enables subsequent measurements and sample processing steps. Here, solvent (H2O) electrolysis is performed quantitatively at a microchannel Pt band electrode to increase microchannel pH. The change in microchannel pH is simultaneously tracked at a downstream electrode by monitoring changes in the i-V characteristics of the proton-coupled electro-oxidation of hydroquinone, thus providing real-time measurement of the protonated forms of hydroquinone from which the pH can be determined in a straightforward manner. Relative peak heights for protonated and deprotonated hydroquinone forms are in good agreement with expected pH changes by measured electrolysis rates, demonstrating that solvent electrolysis can be used to provide tunable, quantitative pH control within a microchannel. PMID:25379105

  15. Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex: theoretical analysis of asymmetric tafel plots and transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Michelle K; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-01

    Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex attached to a self-assembled monolayer on a gold electrode is studied with a recently developed theoretical formulation. The calculated hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect for the standard rate constant, the cathodic transfer coefficient at zero overpotential, and the Tafel plot are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The input quantities to the heterogeneous rate constant expressions were calculated with density functional theory in conjunction with dielectric continuum models, and no parameters were fit to experimental data. The theoretical calculations indicate that the asymmetry of the Tafel plot and the deviation of the transfer coefficient at zero overpotential from the standard value of one-half arise from the change in the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance upon electron transfer. The direction of the asymmetry and deviation from one-half is determined by the sign of this distance change, and the magnitude of these effects is determined by the magnitude of this distance change, as well as the reorganization energy and the distance dependence of the overlap between the initial and final proton vibrational wave functions. This theory provides experimentally testable predictions for the impact of specific system properties on the qualitative behavior of the Tafel plots. PMID:20067257

  16. Laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of β-mercaptoethanol mediated photo induced proton coupled electron transfer in proteins.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, S; Satish Rao, B S; Satyamoorthy, K; Mahato, K K

    2015-01-01

    Photo induced proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) is an important process that many organisms use for progression of catalytic reactions leading to energy conversion. In the present study, the influence of SDS and BME on the redox properties of tyrosine and tryptophan for five different globular proteins, BSA, HSA, RNase-A, trypsin and lysozyme were studied using laser induced autofluorescence. The proteins were subjected to denaturation under SDS, SDS plus heat and SDS plus β-mercaptoethanol (BME) plus heat and the corresponding fluorescence were recorded. The influence of BME on the autofluorescence properties of the proteins were evaluated upon tris-2-corboxy-ethyl phosphine (TCEP) denaturation. The BSA and HSA when exposed to SDS alone, exhibited hydrophobic collapse around their tryptophan moieties. However, these proteins when treated with SDS plus BME plus heat, an unusual red shift in the emission was observed, may be due to proton transfer from hydroxyl group of the excited tyrosine residues to the local microenvironments. The observation was further confirmed with similar proton transfer in absence of tryptophan in RNase-A showing involvement of tyrosine in the process. A drastic quenching of fluorescence in all of the proteins under study were also observed, may be due to photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from BME to the intrinsic fluorophores resulting in radical ions formation, evaluated upon DCFDA measurements. PMID:25985124

  17. Solvent and H/D isotope effects on the proton transfer pathways in heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylic acid anions observed by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-05-22

    Heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded anions A···H···X(-) of phenols (AH) and carboxylic/inorganic acids (HX) dissolved in CD2Cl2 and CDF3/CDF2Cl have been studied by combined low-temperature UV-vis and (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy (UVNMR). The systems constitute small molecular models of hydrogen-bonded cofactors in proteins such as the photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Thus, the phenols studied include the PYP cofactor 4-hydroxycinnamic acid methyl thioester, and the more acidic 4-nitrophenol and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol which mimic electronically excited cofactor states. It is shown that the (13)C chemical shifts of the phenolic residues of A···H···X(-), referenced to the corresponding values of A···H···A(-), constitute excellent probes for the average proton positions. These shifts correlate with those of the H-bonded protons, as well as with the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts. A combined analysis of UV-vis and NMR data was employed to elucidate the proton transfer pathways in a qualitative way. Dual absorption bands of the phenolic moiety indicate a double-well situation for the shortest OHO hydrogen bonds studied. Surprisingly, when the solvent polarity is low the carboxylates are protonated whereas the proton shifts toward the phenolic oxygens when the polarity is increased. This finding indicates that because of stronger ion-dipole interactions small anions are stabilized at high solvent polarity and large anions exhibiting delocalized charges at low solvent polarities. It also explains the large acidity difference of phenols and carboxylic acids in water, and the observation that this difference is strongly reduced in the interior of proteins when both partners form mutual hydrogen bonds. PMID:23607931

  18. Ultrafast Photoinduced Interfacial Proton Coupled Electron Transfer from CdSe Quantum Dots to 4,4'-Bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinquan; Wu, Kaifeng; Rudshteyn, Benjamin; Jia, Yanyan; Ding, Wendu; Xie, Zhao-Xiong; Batista, Victor S; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-01-27

    Pyridine and derivatives have been reported as efficient and selective catalysts for the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2 to methanol. Although the catalytic mechanism remains a subject of considerable recent debate, most proposed models involve interfacial proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) to electrode-bound catalysts. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the photoreduction of 4,4'-bipyridium (bPYD) using CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as a model system for interfacial PCET. We observed ultrafast photoinduced PCET from CdSe QDs to form doubly protonated [bPYDH2](+•) radical cations at low pH (4-6). Through studies of the dependence of PCET rate on isotopic substitution, pH and bPYD concentration, the radical formation mechanism was identified to be a sequential interfacial electron and proton transfer (ET/PT) process with a rate-limiting pH independent electron transfer rate constant, kint, of 1.05 ± 0.13 × 10(10) s(-1) between a QD and an adsorbed singly protonated [bPYDH](+). Theoretical studies of the adsorption of [bPYDH](+) and methylviologen on QD surfaces revealed important effects of hydrogen bonding with the capping ligand (3-mercaptopropionic acid) on binding geometry and interfacial PCET. In the presence of sacrificial electron donors, this system was shown to be capable of generating [bPYDH2](+•) radical cations under continuous illumination at 405 nm with a steady-state photoreduction quantum yield of 1.1 ± 0.1% at pH 4. The mechanism of bPYD photoreduction reported in this work may provide useful insights into the catalytic roles of pyridine and pyridine derivatives in the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2. PMID:26713752

  19. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Revisiting NMR through-space J(FF) spin-spin coupling constants for getting insight into proximate F---F interactions.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Ducati, Lucas Colucci; Tormena, Cláudio Francisco

    2014-07-10

    At present times it is usual practice to mark biological compounds replacing an H for an F atom to study, by means of (19)F NMR spectroscopy, aspects such as binding sites and molecular folding features. This interesting methodology could nicely be improved if it is known how proximity interactions on the F atom affect its electronic structure as gauged through high-resolution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. This is the main aim of the present work and, to this end, differently substituted peri-difluoronaphthalenes are chosen as model systems. In such compounds are rationalized some interesting aspects of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic parts of the (19)F nuclear magnetic shielding tensor as well as the transmission mechanisms for the PSO and FC contributions to (4)JF1F8 indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants.

  1. Proton-Coupled Reduction of an Iron Cyanide Complex to Methane and Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Rittle, Jonathan; Peters, Jonas C

    2016-09-26

    Nitrogenase enzymes mediate the six-electron reductive cleavage of cyanide to CH4 and NH3 . Herein we demonstrate for the first time the liberation of CH4 and NH3 from a well-defined iron cyanide coordination complex, [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CN) (where [SiP(iPr) 3 ] represents a tris(phosphine)silyl ligand), on exposure to proton and electron equivalents. [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CN) additionally serves as a useful entry point to rare examples of terminally-bound Fe(CNH) and Fe(CNH2 ) species that, in accord with preliminary mechanistic studies, are plausible intermediates of the cyanide reductive protonation to generate CH4 and NH3 . Comparative studies with a related [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CNMe2 ) complex suggests the possibility of multiple, competing mechanisms for cyanide activation and reduction. PMID:27607732

  2. Ab initio calculation of the NMR shielding constants for histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, A. P.; Dobrowolski, J. Cz.; Sadlej, J.

    1997-12-01

    The gage-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) approach is used within the coupled Hartree-Fock approximation to compute the 1H, 13C and 15N NMR shielding constants in two tautomeric forms of both the histamine molecule and its protonated form. An analysis of the results shows that the protonation on the end of the chain changes its nitrogen shielding constants of the pyridine and pyrrole type. These changes are much higher for the N(3)-H than for the N(1)-H tautomer.

  3. On the use of time-averaging restraints when deriving biomolecular structure from [Formula: see text]-coupling values obtained from NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lorna J; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Hansen, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Deriving molecular structure from [Formula: see text]-couplings obtained from NMR experiments is a challenge due to (1) the uncertainty in the Karplus relation [Formula: see text] connecting a [Formula: see text]-coupling value to a torsional angle [Formula: see text], (2) the need to account for the averaging inherent to the measurement of [Formula: see text]-couplings, and (3) the sampling road blocks that may emerge due to the multiple-valuedness of the inverse function [Formula: see text] of the function [Formula: see text]. Ways to properly handle these issues in structure refinement of biomolecules are discussed and illustrated using the protein hen egg white lysozyme as example. PMID:27627888

  4. Phase modulation in dipolar-coupled A 2 spin systems: effect of maximum state mixing in 1H NMR in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Leif; Schmitz, Christian; Bachert, Peter

    2004-12-01

    Coupling constants of nuclear spin systems can be determined from phase modulation of multiplet resonances. Strongly coupled systems such as citrate in prostatic tissue exhibit a more complex modulation than AX connectivities, because of substantial mixing of quantum states. An extreme limit is the coupling of n isochronous spins (A n system). It is observable only for directly connected spins like the methylene protons of creatine and phosphocreatine which experience residual dipolar coupling in intact muscle tissue in vivo. We will demonstrate that phase modulation of this "pseudo-strong" system is quite simple compared to those of AB systems. Theory predicts that the spin-echo experiment yields conditions as in the case of weak interactions, in particular, the phase modulation depends linearly on the line splitting and the echo time.

  5. Achievement of a 920-MHz High Resolution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Tadashi; Goto, Atsushi; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Hasegawa, Ken-ichi; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ito, Satoshi; Hamada, Mamoru; Hayashi, Seiji

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a 920-MHz NMR system and performed the proton NMR measurement of H 2O and ethylbenzene using the superconducting magnet operating at 21.6 T (920 MHz for proton), which is the highest field produced by a superconducting NMR magnet in the persistent mode. From the NMR measurements, it is verified that both homogeneity and stability of the magnet have a specification sufficient for a high resolution NMR.

  6. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  7. Proton irradiation test to scintillator-directory-coupled CCD onboard FFAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagino, Ryo; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Sadamoto, Masaaki; Sasaki, Masayuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Anabuki, Naohisa; Kitamura, Hisashi; Uchihori, Yukio

    2013-09-01

    FFAST is a large area sky survey mission at hard X-ray region by using a spacecraft formation flying. It consists of two small satellites, a telescope satellite, carrying a multilayer super mirror, and a detector satellite, carrying scintillator-deposited CCDs (SD-CCDs). SD-CCD is the imaging device which realized sensitivity to 80 keV by pasting up a scintillator on CCD directly. Soft X-ray events are directly detected in the CCD. On the other hand, Hard X-ray events are converted to optical photons by the scintillator and then the CCD detects the photons. We have obtained the spectrum with 109Cd and successfully detected the events originated from the CsI. For a space use of a CCD, we have to understand aged deterioration of CCD in high radiative environments. In addition, in the case of SD-CCD, we must investigate the influence of radio-activation of a scintillator. We performed experiments of proton irradiation to the SD-CCD as space environmental tests of cosmic rays. The SD-CCD is irradiated with the protons with the energy of 100 MeV and neglected for about 150 hours. As a result, the derived CTI profile of SD-CCD is similarly to ones of XIS/Suzaku and NeXT4 CCD/ASTRO-H. In contrast, CTIs derived from the data within 4 hours after irradiation is 10 times or more larger than the ones after 150 hours. This may be due to influence of an annealing. We also report a performance study of SD-CCD, including the detection of scintillation events, before proton irradiation.

  8. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  9. NMR study of strontium binding by a micaceous mineral.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Geoffrey M; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, Sridhar; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na(4)Mg(6)Al(4)Si(4)O(20)F(4). Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a (1)H-(87)Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by (87)Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct (87)Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals. PMID:16599480

  10. Analysis of phi and chi 1 torsion angles for hen lysozyme in solution from 1H NMR spin-spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Smith, L J; Sutcliffe, M J; Redfield, C; Dobson, C M

    1991-01-29

    Three-bond 3JHN alpha coupling constants have been determined for 106 residues and 3J alpha beta coupling constants have been measured for 57 residues of the 129-residue protein hen egg white lysozyme. These NMR data have been compared with torsion angles defined in the tetragonal and the triclinic crystal forms of the protein. For most residues the measured 3JHN alpha values were consistent with the phi torsion angles found in both crystal forms; the RMS difference between the coupling constants calculated by using the tetragonal crystal structure phi angles and the experimental 3JHN alpha values is 0.88 Hz. Thus there appears to be no significant averaging of the phi torsion angle either in the interior or at the surface of the protein. For 41 of the residues where 3J alpha beta coupling constants have been determined, the values are consistent with a single staggered conformation about the chi 1 torsion angle and there is complete agreement between the NMR data in solution and the torsion angles defined in the crystalline state. In contrast, for the other 16 residues where 3J alpha beta coupling constant values have been measured, the data indicate extensive motional averaging about the chi 1 torsion angle. These residues occur largely on the surface of the protein and examination of the crystal structures shows that many of these residues adopt a different conformation in the triclinic and tetragonal crystal forms and have high crystallographic temperature factors. It appears, however, that in solution conformational flexibility of the side chains of surface residues is significantly more pronounced than in individual crystal structures.

  11. Inorganic proton conducting electrolyte coupled oxide-based dendritic transistors for synaptic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Zhou, Ju Mei; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Ionic/electronic hybrid devices with synaptic functions are considered to be the essential building blocks for neuromorphic systems and brain-inspired computing. Here, artificial synapses based on indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) transistors gated by nanogranular SiO2 proton-conducting electrolyte films are fabricated on glass substrates. Spike-timing dependent plasticity and paired-pulse facilitation are successfully mimicked in an individual bottom-gate transistor. Most importantly, dynamic logic and dendritic integration established by spatiotemporally correlated spikes are also mimicked in dendritic transistors with two in-plane gates as the presynaptic input terminals.Ionic/electronic hybrid devices with synaptic functions are considered to be the essential building blocks for neuromorphic systems and brain-inspired computing. Here, artificial synapses based on indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) transistors gated by nanogranular SiO2 proton-conducting electrolyte films are fabricated on glass substrates. Spike-timing dependent plasticity and paired-pulse facilitation are successfully mimicked in an individual bottom-gate transistor. Most importantly, dynamic logic and dendritic integration established by spatiotemporally correlated spikes are also mimicked in dendritic transistors with two in-plane gates as the presynaptic input terminals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The structures and transfer characteristics of the IZO junctionless transistor working in bottom-gate mode and in-plane gate mode. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05882d

  12. Weak-coupling structure of proton resonant states in 23Al studied with RI beam at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Michimasa, S.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Gono, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Kato, S.

    2006-07-01

    Proton resonances in 23Al have been investigated for the first time by the resonant elastic and inelastic scattering of 22Mg+p by using a 4.38 MeV/nucleon 22Mg beam bombarding a thick Hydrogen target. The low-energy 22Mg beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB). A new resonant state due to elastic scattering was observed at Ex = 3.00 MeV with a Jπ = (3/2+) assignment. Other three excited states due to resonant inelastic scattering at 3.14, 3.26 and 3.95 MeV were identified and all mainly decay to the first excited state in 22Mg by the proton emissions. The newly observed 3.95-MeV state probably has a spin-parity of Jπ = (7/2+). The resonant properties were determined from an R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions. The weak-coupling structure in 23Al is discussed in conjunction with a shell-model calculation.

  13. Concerted two-dimensional NMR approaches to hydrogen-1, carbon-13, and nitrogen-15 resonance assignments in proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Reily, M.D.; Westler, W.M.; Ulrich, E.L.; Markley, J.L. )

    1989-01-10

    When used in concert, one-bond carbon-carbon correlations, one-bond and multiple-bond proton-carbon correlations, and multiple-bond proton-nitrogen correlations, derived from two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra of isotopically enriched proteins, provide a reliable method of assigning proton, carbon, and nitrogen resonances. In contrast to procedures that simply extend proton assignments to carbon or nitrogen resonances, this technique assigns proton, carbon, and nitrogen resonances coordinately on the basis of their integrated coupling networks. Redundant spin coupling pathways provide ways of resolving overlaps frequently encountered in homonuclear {sup 1}H 2D NMR spectra and facilitate the elucidation of complex proton spin systems. Carbon-carbon and proton-carbon couplings can be used to bridge the aromatic and aliphatic parts of proton spin systems; this avoids possible ambiguities that may result from the use of nuclear Overhauser effects to assign aromatic amino acid signals. The technique is illustrated for Anabaena 7120 flavodoxin and cytochrome c-553, both uniformly enriched with carbon-13 (26%) or nitrogen-15 (98%).

  14. Measurement of muon capture on the proton to 1% precision and determination of the pseudoscalar coupling gP.

    PubMed

    Andreev, V A; Banks, T I; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2013-01-01

    The MuCap experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute has measured the rate Λ(S) of muon capture from the singlet state of the muonic hydrogen atom to a precision of 1%. A muon beam was stopped in a time projection chamber filled with 10-bar, ultrapure hydrogen gas. Cylindrical wire chambers and a segmented scintillator barrel detected electrons from muon decay. Λ(S) is determined from the difference between the μ(-) disappearance rate in hydrogen and the free muon decay rate. The result is based on the analysis of 1.2 × 10(10) μ(-) decays, from which we extract the capture rate Λ(S) = (714.9 ± 5.4(stat) ± 5.1(syst)) s(-1) and derive the proton's pseudoscalar coupling g(P)(q(0)(2) = -0.88 m(μ)(2)) = 8.06 ± 0.55.

  15. Coupled electron transfer and proton hopping in the final step of CYP19-catalyzed androgen aromatization.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kakali; Hackett, John C

    2012-04-10

    Aromatase (CYP19) catalyzes the terminal step in estrogen biosynthesis, which requires three separate oxidation reactions, culminating in an enigmatic aromatization that converts an androgen to an estrogen. A stable ferric peroxo (Fe(3+)O(2)(2-)) intermediate is seen by electron paramagnetic resonance, but its role in this complex reaction remains controversial. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics, we show that ferric peroxo addition to the 19-aldehyde initiates the reaction. Stepwise cleavage of the C10-C19 and O-O bonds of the peroxohemiacetal extrudes formate and yields Compound II, which in turn desaturates the steroid through successive abstraction of the 1β-hydrogen atom and deprotonation of the 2β-position. Throughout the transformation, a proton is cyclically relayed between D309 and the substrate to stabilize reaction intermediates. This mechanism invokes novel oxygen intermediates and provides a unifying interpretation of past experimental mechanistic studies.

  16. Proton conducting sodium alginate electrolyte laterally coupled low-voltage oxide-based transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang Hui; Qiang Zhu, Li; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-03-01

    Solution-processed sodium alginate electrolyte film shows a high proton conductivity of ˜5.5 × 10-3 S/cm and a high lateral electric-double-layer (EDL) capacitance of ˜2.0 μF/cm2 at room temperature with a relative humidity of 57%. Low-voltage in-plane-gate indium-zinc-oxide-based EDL transistors laterally gated by sodium alginate electrolytes are fabricated on glass substrates. The field-effect mobility, current ON/OFF ratio, and subthreshold swing of such EDL transistors are estimated to be 4.2 cm2 V-1 s-1, 2.8 × 106, and 130 mV/decade, respectively. At last, a low-voltage driven resistor-load inverter is also demonstrated. Such in-plane-gate EDL transistors have potential applications in portable electronics and low-cost biosensors.

  17. Proton-coupled self-assembly of a porphyrin-naphthalenediimide dyad.

    PubMed

    Tu, Siyu; Kim, Se Hye; Joseph, Jojo; Modarelli, David A; Parquette, Jon R

    2013-06-01

    The construction of an n-p heterojunction through the self-assembly of a dyad based on tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) and 1,4,5,8-naphthalenedimide (NDI) (1) is described. Proton transfer from the lysine head group of 1 to the porphyrin ring occurs concomitantly with self-assembly into 1D nanorods in CHCl3. TEM and AFM studies showed that the nanorods are formed by the lateral and vertical fusion of multilameller vesicles into networks and hollow ribbons, respectively. These intermediate structures transitioned to nanorods over the course of 4-6 days. Time-resolved spectroscopy revealed that photoinduced charge separation occurs with rate constants that depend on the nature of the aggregation. PMID:23564748

  18. SpinCouple: Development of a Web Tool for Analyzing Metabolite Mixtures via Two-Dimensional J-Resolved NMR Database.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Jun; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Komatsu, Keiko; Gomi, Masahiro; Chikayama, Eisuke; Date, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A new Web-based tool, SpinCouple, which is based on the accumulation of a two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(1)H J-resolved NMR database from 598 metabolite standards, has been developed. The spectra include both J-coupling and (1)H chemical shift information; those are applicable to a wide array of spectral annotation, especially for metabolic mixture samples that are difficult to label through the attachment of (13)C isotopes. In addition, the user-friendly application includes an absolute-quantitative analysis tool. Good agreement was obtained between known concentrations of 20-metabolite mixtures versus the calibration curve-based quantification results obtained from 2D-Jres spectra. We have examined the web tool availability using nine series of biological extracts, obtained from animal gut and waste treatment microbiota, fish, and plant tissues. This web-based tool is publicly available via http://emar.riken.jp/spincpl.

  19. SpinCouple: Development of a Web Tool for Analyzing Metabolite Mixtures via Two-Dimensional J-Resolved NMR Database.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Jun; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Komatsu, Keiko; Gomi, Masahiro; Chikayama, Eisuke; Date, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A new Web-based tool, SpinCouple, which is based on the accumulation of a two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(1)H J-resolved NMR database from 598 metabolite standards, has been developed. The spectra include both J-coupling and (1)H chemical shift information; those are applicable to a wide array of spectral annotation, especially for metabolic mixture samples that are difficult to label through the attachment of (13)C isotopes. In addition, the user-friendly application includes an absolute-quantitative analysis tool. Good agreement was obtained between known concentrations of 20-metabolite mixtures versus the calibration curve-based quantification results obtained from 2D-Jres spectra. We have examined the web tool availability using nine series of biological extracts, obtained from animal gut and waste treatment microbiota, fish, and plant tissues. This web-based tool is publicly available via http://emar.riken.jp/spincpl. PMID:26624790

  20. Determination of magnetic and structural properties in solids containing antiferromagnetically coupled metal centers using NMR methods. Magneto-structural correlations in anhydrous copper(II) n-butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G.C.; Haw, J.F.

    1988-10-19

    A new approach to the investigation of magneto-structural correlations in solids containing antiferromagnetically coupled transition-metal centers is described that illustrates the potential of NMR spectroscopy in such work. The results of a variable-temperature (VT) /sup 13/C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CP/MAS) NMR investigation of anhydrous copper(II) n-butyrate, (Cu(C/sub 3/H/sub 7/COO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/ are reported. Isotropic shifts are found to be primarily contact in origin, and a statistical analysis of their temperature dependence allows the calculation of singlet-triplet energy level separations (-2J), diamagnetic shifts (delta/sub dia/), and electron-nucleus hyperfine coupling constants (A), which are shown to give insight into the mechanisms of electron delocalization along the superexchange pathway. Signal multiplicity can be related to compound structure, which was determined by using x-ray crystallography. The title compound is triclinic and has a space group of P/anti 1/ with a = 9.035 (2) /angstrom/, b = 5.192 (2) /angstrom/, c = 11.695 (3) /angstrom/, ..cap alpha.. = 85.88 (2)/degrees/, ..gamma.. = 109.32 (2)/degrees/, Z = 1, and V = 515.2 (3) /angstrom//sup 3/; the final weighted R value for 2169 reflections was 0.048. 21 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  1. ¹J(CH) couplings in Group 14/IVA tetramethyls from the gas-phase NMR and DFT structural study: a search for the best computational protocol.

    PubMed

    Nazarski, Ryszard B; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2014-08-01

    Four tetramethyl compounds EMe4 (E = C, Si, Ge, and Pb) were studied by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy in gaseous and liquid states at 300 K. Extrapolation of experimental vapor-phase C-H J-couplings to a zero-pressure limit permitted determining the (1)J(0,CH)s in methyl groups of their nearly isolated molecules. Theoretical predictions of the latter NMR parameters were also performed in a locally dense basis sets/pseudopotential (Sn, Pb) approach, by applying a few DFT methods pre-selected in calculations of other gas-phase molecular properties of all these species and SnMe4 (bond lengths, C-H stretching IR vibrations). A very good agreement theory vs. experiment was achieved with some computational protocols for all five systems. The trends observed in their geometry and associated coupling constants ((1)J(CH)s, (2)J(HH)s) are discussed and rationalized in terms of the substituent-induced rehybridization of the methyl group (treated as a ligand) carbon, by using Bent's rule and the newly proposed, theoretically derived values of the Mulliken electronegativity (χ) of related atoms and groups. All these χ data for the Group-14/IVA entities were under a lot of controversy for a very long time. As a result, the recommended χ values are semi-experimentally confirmed for the first time and only a small correction is suggested for χ(Ge) and χ(GeMe3).

  2. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in glacial ice: coupling natural abundance 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Woods, Gwen C; Dubnick, Ashley; Simpson, André J; Sharp, Martin J; Fitzsimons, Sean J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2012-04-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets are the second largest freshwater reservoir in the global hydrologic cycle, and the onset of global climate warming has necessitated an assessment of their contributions to sea-level rise and the potential release of nutrients to nearby aquatic environments. In particular, the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from glacier melt could stimulate microbial activity in both glacial ecosystems and adjacent watersheds, but this would largely depend on the composition of the material released. Using fluorescence and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, we characterize DOM at its natural abundance in unaltered samples from a number of glaciers that differ in geographic location, thermal regime, and sample depth. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling of DOM fluorophores identifies components in the ice that are predominantly proteinaceous in character, while (1)H NMR spectroscopy reveals a mixture of small molecules that likely originate from native microbes. Spectrofluorescence also reveals a terrestrial contribution that was below the detection limits of NMR; however, (1)H nuclei from levoglucosan was identified in Arctic glacier ice samples. This study suggests that the bulk of the DOM from these glaciers is a mixture of biologically labile molecules derived from microbes.

  3. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one and two proton transfer reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Verma, S.; Sandal, Rohit; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one and two proton stripping reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems were performed at lab energy 120 MeV with 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. Theoretical calculations performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code FRESCO (including various intermediate states involving target and projectile excitations before and/or after transfer along with sequential transfer) were able to reproduce one and two proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It was found that the DWBA calculations could describe the one proton transfer data well for both the systems but failed to reproduce the angular distributions for two proton transfer channels. The present measurements underline the importance of sequential transfer at energies much above the Coulomb barrier. We had also performed transfer reaction measurements for these systems in the sub- and near barrier region using recoil mass separator.

  4. Pseudo-scalar pi N coupling and relativistic proton-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Franz; Maung, Khin Maung; Tjon, J. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wallace, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    Relativistic p-Ca-40 elastic scattering observables are calculated using relativistic NN amplitudes obtained from the solution of a two-body relativistic equation in which one particle is kept on its mass-shell. Results at 200 MeV are presented for two sets of NN amplitudes, one with pure pseudo-vector coupling for the pion and another with a 25 percent admixture of pseudo-scaling coupling. Both give a very good fit to the positive energy on-shell NN data. Differences between the predictions of these two models (which are shown to be due only to the differences in their corresponding negative energy amplitudes) provide a measure of the uncertainty in contructing Dirac optical potentials from NN amplitudes.

  5. Overexpression of a proton-coupled vacuolar glucose exporter impairs freezing tolerance and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Trentmann, Oliver; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schulz, Alexander; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Arabidopsis vacuoles harbor, besides sugar transporter of the TMT-type, an early response to dehydration like 6 (ERDL6) protein involved in glucose export into the cytosol. However, the mode of transport of ERDL6 and the plant's feedback to overexpression of its activity on essential properties such as, for example, seed germination or freezing tolerance, remain unexplored. Using patch-clamp studies on vacuoles expressing AtERDL6 we demonstrated directly that this carrier operates as a proton-driven glucose exporter. Overexpression of BvIMP, the closest sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) homolog to AtERDL6, in Arabidopsis leads surprisingly to impaired seed germination under both conditions, sugar application and low environmental temperatures, but not under standard conditions. Upon cold treatment, BvIMP overexpressor plants accumulated lower quantities of monosaccharides than the wild-type, a response in line with the reduced frost tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and the fact that cold temperatures inhibits BvIMP transcription in sugar beet leaves. With these findings we show that the tight control of vacuolar sugar import and export is a key requisite for cold tolerance and seed germination of plants.

  6. Overexpression of a proton-coupled vacuolar glucose exporter impairs freezing tolerance and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Trentmann, Oliver; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schulz, Alexander; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Arabidopsis vacuoles harbor, besides sugar transporter of the TMT-type, an early response to dehydration like 6 (ERDL6) protein involved in glucose export into the cytosol. However, the mode of transport of ERDL6 and the plant's feedback to overexpression of its activity on essential properties such as, for example, seed germination or freezing tolerance, remain unexplored. Using patch-clamp studies on vacuoles expressing AtERDL6 we demonstrated directly that this carrier operates as a proton-driven glucose exporter. Overexpression of BvIMP, the closest sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) homolog to AtERDL6, in Arabidopsis leads surprisingly to impaired seed germination under both conditions, sugar application and low environmental temperatures, but not under standard conditions. Upon cold treatment, BvIMP overexpressor plants accumulated lower quantities of monosaccharides than the wild-type, a response in line with the reduced frost tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and the fact that cold temperatures inhibits BvIMP transcription in sugar beet leaves. With these findings we show that the tight control of vacuolar sugar import and export is a key requisite for cold tolerance and seed germination of plants. PMID:24329902

  7. Proton conducting sodium alginate electrolyte laterally coupled low-voltage oxide-based transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang Hui; Wan, Qing; Qiang Zhu, Li; Shi, Yi

    2014-03-31

    Solution-processed sodium alginate electrolyte film shows a high proton conductivity of ∼5.5 × 10{sup −3} S/cm and a high lateral electric-double-layer (EDL) capacitance of ∼2.0 μF/cm{sup 2} at room temperature with a relative humidity of 57%. Low-voltage in-plane-gate indium-zinc-oxide-based EDL transistors laterally gated by sodium alginate electrolytes are fabricated on glass substrates. The field-effect mobility, current ON/OFF ratio, and subthreshold swing of such EDL transistors are estimated to be 4.2 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, 2.8 × 10{sup 6}, and 130 mV/decade, respectively. At last, a low-voltage driven resistor-load inverter is also demonstrated. Such in-plane-gate EDL transistors have potential applications in portable electronics and low-cost biosensors.

  8. Solar-Driven Water Oxidation and Decoupled Hydrogen Production Mediated by an Electron-Coupled-Proton Buffer.

    PubMed

    Bloor, Leanne G; Solarska, Renata; Bienkowski, Krzysztof; Kulesza, Pawel J; Augustynski, Jan; Symes, Mark D; Cronin, Leroy

    2016-06-01

    Solar-to-hydrogen photoelectrochemical cells (PECs) have been proposed as a means of converting sunlight into H2 fuel. However, in traditional PECs, the oxygen evolution reaction and the hydrogen evolution reaction are coupled, and so the rate of both of these is limited by the photocurrents that can be generated from the solar flux. This in turn leads to slow rates of gas evolution that favor crossover of H2 into the O2 stream and vice versa, even through ostensibly impermeable membranes such as Nafion. Herein, we show that the use of the electron-coupled-proton buffer (ECPB) H3PMo12O40 allows solar-driven O2 evolution from water to proceed at rates of over 1 mA cm(-2) on WO3 photoanodes without the need for any additional electrochemical bias. No H2 is produced in the PEC, and instead H3PMo12O40 is reduced to H5PMo12O40. If the reduced ECPB is subjected to a separate electrochemical reoxidation, then H2 is produced with full overall Faradaic efficiency. PMID:27159121

  9. Solar-Driven Water Oxidation and Decoupled Hydrogen Production Mediated by an Electron-Coupled-Proton Buffer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solar-to-hydrogen photoelectrochemical cells (PECs) have been proposed as a means of converting sunlight into H2 fuel. However, in traditional PECs, the oxygen evolution reaction and the hydrogen evolution reaction are coupled, and so the rate of both of these is limited by the photocurrents that can be generated from the solar flux. This in turn leads to slow rates of gas evolution that favor crossover of H2 into the O2 stream and vice versa, even through ostensibly impermeable membranes such as Nafion. Herein, we show that the use of the electron-coupled-proton buffer (ECPB) H3PMo12O40 allows solar-driven O2 evolution from water to proceed at rates of over 1 mA cm–2 on WO3 photoanodes without the need for any additional electrochemical bias. No H2 is produced in the PEC, and instead H3PMo12O40 is reduced to H5PMo12O40. If the reduced ECPB is subjected to a separate electrochemical reoxidation, then H2 is produced with full overall Faradaic efficiency. PMID:27159121

  10. Indirect spin-spin coupling constants in CH 4, SiH 4 and GeH 4 - Gas-phase NMR experiment and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antušek, Andrej; Keḑziera, Dariusz; Jackowski, Karol; Jaszuński, Michał; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2008-09-01

    New values of the indirect spin-spin coupling constants in CH 4, SiH 4 and GeH 4, derived from experiment and ab initio calculations, are reported. The new experimental values of 1J(CH), 1J(SiH) and 1J(GeH) are obtained from gas-phase NMR spectra. The dependence of the measured one-bond coupling constants on the density is analysed and the results are extrapolated to zero-density point to eliminate the effects due to intermolecular forces. In the calculation of the coupling constants, at the nonrelativistic level coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) perturbation theory is used and the basis set convergence of the results is discussed. The relativistic corrections are estimated from Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) calculations. The final theoretical values are obtained adding available estimates of the vibrational and temperature corrections. The agreement of the calculated and experimental 1J(XH), X = C, Si, Ge, constants is very satisfying, the differences are approximately 1-3%.

  11. Dynamical coupled-channels approach to hadronic and electromagnetic kaon-hyperon production on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Saghai, B.; Tabakin, F.

    2006-05-15

    A dynamical coupled-channels formalism for processes {pi}N{yields}KY and {gamma}N{yields}KY is presented that provides a comprehensive investigation of recent data on the {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda} reaction. The nonresonant interactions within the subspace KY+{pi}N are derived from effective Lagrangians, using a unitary transformation method. The calculations of photoproduction amplitudes are simplified by casting the coupled-channels equations into a form such that the empirical {gamma}N{yields}{pi}N amplitudes are input and only the parameters associated with the KY channel are determined by performing {chi}{sup 2} fits to all of the available data for {pi}{sup -}p{yields}K deg.{lambda},K deg.{sigma} deg., and {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda}. Good agreement between our models and those data are obtained. In the fits to {pi}N{yields}KY channels, most of the parameters are constrained within {+-}20% of the values given by the Particle Data Group and/or quark model predictions, whereas for {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda} parameters, ranges compatible with broken SU(6) x O(3) symmetry are imposed. The main reaction mechanisms in K{sup +}{lambda} photoproduction are singled out and issues related to newly suggested resonances S{sub 11},P{sub 13}, and D{sub 13} are studied. Results illustrating the importance of using a coupled-channels treatment are reported. Meson cloud effects on the {gamma}N{yields}N* transitions are also discussed.

  12. The Protonation Site of para-Dimethylaminobenzoic Acid Using Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yunfeng; Weng, Guofeng; Shen, Shanshan; Sun, Cuirong; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2015-04-01

    The protonation site of para-dimethylaminobenzoic acid ( p-DMABA) was investigated using atmospheric pressure ionization methods (ESI and APCI) coupled with collision-induced dissociation (CID), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational chemistry. Theoretical calculations and NMR experiments indicate that the dimethyl amino group is the preferred site of protonation both in the gas phase and aqueous solution. Protonation of p-DMABA occurs at the nitrogen atom by ESI independent of the solvents and other operation conditions under typical thermodynamic control. However, APCI produces a mixture of the nitrogen- and carbonyl oxygen-protonated p-DMABA when aprotic organic solvents (acetonitrile, acetone, and tetrahydrofuran) are used, exhibiting evident kinetic characteristics of protonation. But using protic organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol) in APCI still leads to the formation of thermodynamically stable N-protonated p-DMABA. These structural assignments were based on the different CID behavior of the N- and O-protonated p-DMABA. The losses of methyl radical and water are the diagnostic fragmentations of the N- and O-protonated p-DMABA, respectively. In addition, the N-protonated p-DMABA is more stable than the O-protonated p-DMABA in CID revealed by energy resolved experiments and theoretical calculations.

  13. An efficient proton-coupled electron-transfer process during oxidation of ferulic acid by horseradish peroxidase: coming full cycle.

    PubMed

    Derat, Etienne; Shaik, Sason

    2006-10-25

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations were utilized to study the process of oxidation of a native substrate (ferulic acid) by the active species of horseradish peroxidase (Dunford, H. B. Heme Peroxidases; Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999), Compound I and Compound II, and the manner by which the enzyme returns to its resting state. The results match experimental findings and reveal additional novel features. The calculations demonstrate that both oxidation processes are initiated by a proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step, in which the active species of the enzyme participate only as electron-transfer partners, while the entire proton-transfer event is being relayed from the substrate to and from the His42 residue by a water molecule (W402). The reason for the observed (Henriksen, A; Smith, A. T.; Gajhede, M. J. Biol. Chem. 1999, 274, 35005-35011) similar reactivities of Compound I and Compound II toward ferulic acid is that the reactive isomer of Compound II is the, hitherto unobserved, Por(*)(+)Fe(III)OH isomer that resembles Compound I. The PCET mechanism reveals that His42 and W402 are crucial moieties and they determine the function of the HRP enzyme and account for its ability to perform substrate oxidation (Poulos, T. L. Peroxidases and Cytochrome P450. In The Porphyrin Handbook; Kadish, K. M., Smith, K. M., Guilard, R., Eds.; Academic Press: New York, 2000; Vol. 4, pp 189). In view of the results, the possibility of manipulating substrate oxidation by magnetic fields is an intriguing possibility. PMID:17044722

  14. Investigations on the role of proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen activation by [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mulder, David W; Ratzloff, Michael W; Bruschi, Maurizio; Greco, Claudio; Koonce, Evangeline; Peters, John W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-29

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is a fundamental process at the core of oxidation-reduction reactions for energy conversion. The [FeFe]-hydrogenases catalyze the reversible activation of molecular H2 through a unique metallocofactor, the H-cluster, which is finely tuned by the surrounding protein environment to undergo fast PCET transitions. The correlation of electronic and structural transitions at the H-cluster with proton-transfer (PT) steps has not been well-resolved experimentally. Here, we explore how modification of the conserved PT network via a Cys → Ser substitution at position 169 proximal to the H-cluster of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CrHydA1) affects the H-cluster using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Despite a substantial decrease in catalytic activity, the EPR and FTIR spectra reveal different H-cluster catalytic states under reducing and oxidizing conditions. Under H2 or sodium dithionite reductive treatments, the EPR spectra show signals that are consistent with a reduced [4Fe-4S]H(+) subcluster. The FTIR spectra showed upshifts of νCO modes to energies that are consistent with an increase in oxidation state of the [2Fe]H subcluster, which was corroborated by DFT analysis. In contrast to the case for wild-type CrHydA1, spectra associated with Hred and Hsred states are less populated in the Cys → Ser variant, demonstrating that the exchange of -SH with -OH alters how the H-cluster equilibrates among different reduced states of the catalytic cycle under steady-state conditions. PMID:25286239

  15. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  16. Characterization of tea cultivated at four different altitudes using 1H NMR analysis coupled with multivariate statistics.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akiko; Oka, Kitaro; Sakuma, Chiseko; Okuda, Haruhiro; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi

    2011-05-25

    The taste of black tea differs according to the different areas in which the tea is grown, even for the same species of tea. A combination of (1)H NMR spectroscopy and partial least-squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) was used to assess the quality differences of tea leaves from four cultivation areas with different elevations, RAN > 1800 m, UDA = 1200 m, MEDA = 600 m, and YATA < 300 m, in Sri Lanka. As a result of a statistical analysis, PLS-DA showed a separation between high- and low-quality black teas derived from the four different tea cultivation areas. RAN from the highest elevation showed characteristic trends in the levels of theaflavin and theaflavin 3,3'-digallate that were found only in RAN, and the levels of theanine and caffeine were higher, and the levels of thearubigins, especially thearubigin 3,3'-digallate, were lower in RAN than in UDA, MEDA, and YATA. The structures of these components were determined by 1D and 2D NMR analyses. These results demonstrate that this method can be used to evaluate black tea quality according to the chemical composition or metabolites, which are characteristic of the tea leaves cultivated in four regions with different elevations in Sri Lanka.

  17. Structural investigations of {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5} by coupling powder XRD, NMR, EPR and spectroscopic parameter calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Body, M. . E-mail: monique.body@univ-lemans.fr; Silly, G.; Legein, C.; Buzare, J.-Y.; Calvayrac, F.; Blaha, P.

    2005-12-15

    {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5} was synthesized by solid-state reaction. The precise structure was refined from X-ray powder diffraction data in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c with lattice constants a=5.3361A, b=9.8298A, c=7.3271A, and {beta}=109.91{sup o} (Z=4). The structure exhibits isolated chains of AlF{sub 6}{sup 3-} octahedra sharing opposite corners.{sup 19}F and {sup 27}Al solid state NMR spectra were recorded using MAS and SATRAS techniques. An EPR spectrum was recorded for {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5}:Cr{sup 3+}. The experimental spectra were simulated in order to extract the NMR and EPR parameter values. Five fluorine sites and one low symmetry aluminium site were found in agreement with the refined structure. These parameters were calculated using empirical and ab-initio methods. The agreement obtained between the calculated {sup 19}F chemical shift values, {sup 27}Al quadrupolar parameters, Cr{sup 3+} EPR fine structure parameters and the experimental results demonstrates the complementarity of XRD, magnetic resonance experiments and theoretical methodologies.

  18. pH-Dependent Reduction Potentials and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Hydrogen-Producing Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Appel, Aaron M.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-04-01

    The nickel-based Ph Bz 2 2 P N electrocatalysts, which are comprised of a nickel atom and two 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands, have been shown to effectively catalyze H2 production in acetonitrile. Recent electrochemical experiments revealed a linear dependence of the NiII/I reduction potential on pH, suggesting a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. In the proposed mechanism, the catalytic cycle begins with a PCET process involving electrochemical electron transfer to the nickel center and intermolecular proton transfer from an acid to the pendant amine ligand. This paper presents quantum mechanical calculations of this PCET process to examine the thermodynamics of the sequential mechanisms, in which either the electron or the proton transfers first (ET–PT and PT–ET, respectively), and the concerted mechanism (EPT). The favored mechanism depends on a balance among many factors, including the acid strength, association free energy for the acid–catalyst complex, PT free energy barrier, and ET reduction potential. The ET reduction potential is less negative after PT, favoring the PT–ET mechanism, and the association free energy is less positive after reduction, favoring the ET–PT mechanism. The calculations, along with analysis of the experimental data, indicate that the sequential ET–PT mechanism is favored for weak acids because of the substantial decrease in the association free energy after reduction. For strong acids, however, the PT–ET mechanism may be favored because the association free energy is somewhat smaller and PT is more thermodynamically favorable. The concerted mechanism could also occur, particularly for intermediate acid strengths. In the context of the entire catalytic cycle for H2 production, the initial PCET process involving intermolecular PT has a more negative reduction potential than the subsequent PCET process involving intramolecular PT. As a result, the second PCET should

  19. Photocatalytic Conversion of Nitrobenzene to Aniline through Sequential Proton-Coupled One-Electron Transfers from a Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stephen C; Homan, Stephanie Bettis; Weiss, Emily A

    2016-02-10

    This paper describes the use of cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) as visible-light photocatalysts for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline through six sequential photoinduced, proton-coupled electron transfers. At pH 3.6-4.3, the internal quantum yield of photons-to-reducing electrons is 37.1% over 54 h of illumination, with no apparent decrease in catalyst activity. Monitoring of the QD exciton by transient absorption reveals that, for each step in the catalytic cycle, the sacrificial reductant, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, scavenges the excitonic hole in ∼5 ps to form QD(•-); electron transfer to nitrobenzene or the intermediates nitrosobenzene and phenylhydroxylamine then occurs on the nanosecond time scale. The rate constants for the single-electron transfer reactions are correlated with the driving forces for the corresponding proton-coupled electron transfers. This result suggests, but does not prove, that electron transfer, not proton transfer, is rate-limiting for these reactions. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the QD-molecule systems shows that the photoproduct aniline, left unprotonated, serves as a poison for the QD catalyst by adsorbing to its surface. Performing the reaction at an acidic pH not only encourages aniline to desorb but also increases the probability of protonated intermediates; the latter effect probably ensures that recruitment of protons is not rate-limiting.

  20. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Bagaturia, I.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Primavera, F.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, T. A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Da Cruz E Silva, C. Beir ao; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Yzquierdo, A. Pérez-Calero; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, [Authorinst]The CMS

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of.

  1. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Series of Ruthenium-Linked Tyrosines with Internal Bases: Evaluation of a Tunneling Model for Experimental Temperature-Dependent Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Markle, Todd F; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Santoni, Marie-Pierre; Johannissen, Linus O; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-09-01

    Photoinitiated proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) kinetics has been investigated in a series of four modified tyrosines linked to a ruthenium photosensitizer in acetonitrile, with each tyrosine bearing an internal hydrogen bond to a covalently linked pyridine or benzimidazole base. After correcting for differences in driving force, it is found that the intrinsic PCET rate constant still varies by 2 orders of magnitude. The differences in rates, as well as the magnitude of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE = kH/kD), both generally correlate with DFT calculated proton donor-acceptor distances. An Arrhenius analysis of temperature dependent data shows that the difference in reactivity arises primarily from differences in activation energies. We use this kinetic data to evaluate a commonly employed theoretical model for proton tunneling which includes a harmonic distribution of proton donor-acceptor distances due to vibrational motions of the molecule. Applying this model to the experimental data yields the conclusion that donor-acceptor compression is more facile in the compounds with shorter PT distance; however, this is contrary to independent calculations for the same compounds. This discrepancy is likely because the assumption in the model of Morse-shaped proton potential energy surfaces is inappropriate for (strongly) hydrogen-bonded systems. These results question the general applicability of this model. The results also suggest that a correlation of rate vs proton tunneling distance for the series of compounds is complicated by a concomitant variation of other relevant parameters.

  2. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Series of Ruthenium-Linked Tyrosines with Internal Bases: Evaluation of a Tunneling Model for Experimental Temperature-Dependent Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Markle, Todd F; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Santoni, Marie-Pierre; Johannissen, Linus O; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-09-01

    Photoinitiated proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) kinetics has been investigated in a series of four modified tyrosines linked to a ruthenium photosensitizer in acetonitrile, with each tyrosine bearing an internal hydrogen bond to a covalently linked pyridine or benzimidazole base. After correcting for differences in driving force, it is found that the intrinsic PCET rate constant still varies by 2 orders of magnitude. The differences in rates, as well as the magnitude of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE = kH/kD), both generally correlate with DFT calculated proton donor-acceptor distances. An Arrhenius analysis of temperature dependent data shows that the difference in reactivity arises primarily from differences in activation energies. We use this kinetic data to evaluate a commonly employed theoretical model for proton tunneling which includes a harmonic distribution of proton donor-acceptor distances due to vibrational motions of the molecule. Applying this model to the experimental data yields the conclusion that donor-acceptor compression is more facile in the compounds with shorter PT distance; however, this is contrary to independent calculations for the same compounds. This discrepancy is likely because the assumption in the model of Morse-shaped proton potential energy surfaces is inappropriate for (strongly) hydrogen-bonded systems. These results question the general applicability of this model. The results also suggest that a correlation of rate vs proton tunneling distance for the series of compounds is complicated by a concomitant variation of other relevant parameters. PMID:27490689

  3. Methods for measuring exchangeable protons in glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Larive, Cynthia K

    2015-01-01

    Recent NMR studies of the exchangeable protons of GAGs in aqueous solution, including those of the amide, sulfamate, and hydroxyl moieties, have demonstrated potential for the detection of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, providing insights into secondary structure preferences. GAG amide protons are observable by NMR over wide pH and temperature ranges; however, specific solution conditions are required to reduce the exchange rate of the sulfamate and hydroxyl protons and allow their detection by NMR. Building on the vast body of knowledge on detection of hydrogen bonds in peptides and proteins, a variety of methods can be used to identify hydrogen bonds in GAGs including temperature coefficient measurements, evaluation of chemical shift differences between oligo- and monosaccharides, and relative exchange rates measured through line shape analysis and EXSY spectra. Emerging strategies to allow direct detection of hydrogen bonds through heteronuclear couplings offer promise for the future. Molecular dynamic simulations are important in this effort both to predict and confirm hydrogen bond donors and acceptors.

  4. Electron Transfer Reactivity of the Aqueous Iron(IV)-Oxo Complex. Outer-Sphere vs Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, Fe(IV)(H2O)5O(2+) (hereafter Fe(IV)aqO(2+)), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)3(2+) (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS(-)/ABTS(2-), phenothiazines, Co(II)(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. Fe(IV)aqO(2+) oxidizes even Ce(III) (E(0) in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7 V) with a rate constant greater than 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)3(2+) (k = 2.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), IrCl6(3-) (1.6 × 10(6)), ABTS(2-) (4.7 × 10(7)), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 10(7)) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)3(2+) and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H(+)] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of Fe(IV)aqO(2+) and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E(0)Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E(0)Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+) couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10(-5) M(-1) s(-1) and thus E(0)(Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+)) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E(0) (Fe(IV)aqO(2+), H(+)/Fe(III)aqOH(2+)) ≥ 1.95 V. PMID:27320290

  5. Non-empirical calculations of NMR indirect carbon-carbon coupling constants. Part 9--Bicyclobutane-containing polycycloalkanes.

    PubMed

    Krivdin, Leonid B

    2004-10-01

    13C--(13)C spin-spin coupling constants characterizing the bicyclobutane moiety of seven well-known bicyclobutane-containing polycycloalkanes were calculated at the SOPPA level. Benchmark calculations on tricyclopentane and octabisvalene revealed an appropriate level of theory and sufficient quality of basis sets used to perform geometry searches and to calculate spin-spin coupling constants. Several experimental uncertainties were resolved and a number of interesting couplings were predicted. The most interesting trend observed in this series of polycycloalkanes is the marked increase (decrease in absolute value) of J(C,C) between bridgehead carbons with increase in the puckering angle of the bicyclobutane moiety. This predicts almost zero coupling between bridgehead carbons of tricyclopentane and explains the positive J(C,C) in tetrahedrane in contrast to the negative bridgehead-bridgehead J(C,C) in bicyclobutane.

  6. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  7. NMR Structure Determination for Larger Proteins Using Backbone-Only Data

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Srivatsan; Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Tyka, Michael; Wang, Xu; Aramini, James; Liu, Gaohua; Ramelot, Theresa; Eletsky, Alexander; Szyperski, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael; Prestegard, James; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2010-01-01

    Conventional protein structure determination from nuclear magnetic resonance data relies heavily on side-chain proton-proton distances. The necessary side-chain resonance assignment, however, is labor intensive and prone to error. Here we show that structures can be accurately determined without NMR information on the sidechains for proteins up to 25 kDa by incorporating backbone chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, and amide proton distances into the Rosetta protein structure modelling methodology. These data, which are too sparse for conventional methods, serve only to guide conformational search towards the lowest energy conformations in the folding landscape; the details of the computed models are determined by the physical chemistry implicit in the Rosetta all atom energy function. The new method is not hindered by the deuteration required to suppress nuclear relaxation processes for proteins greater than 15 kDa, and should enable routine NMR structure determination for larger proteins. PMID:20133520

  8. Characterizing RNA ensembles from NMR data with kinematic models

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Pachov, Dimitar V.; Bernauer, Julie; van den Bedem, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Functional mechanisms of biomolecules often manifest themselves precisely in transient conformational substates. Researchers have long sought to structurally characterize dynamic processes in non-coding RNA, combining experimental data with computer algorithms. However, adequate exploration of conformational space for these highly dynamic molecules, starting from static crystal structures, remains challenging. Here, we report a new conformational sampling procedure, KGSrna, which can efficiently probe the native ensemble of RNA molecules in solution. We found that KGSrna ensembles accurately represent the conformational landscapes of 3D RNA encoded by NMR proton chemical shifts. KGSrna resolves motionally averaged NMR data into structural contributions; when coupled with residual dipolar coupling data, a KGSrna ensemble revealed a previously uncharacterized transient excited state of the HIV-1 trans-activation response element stem–loop. Ensemble-based interpretations of averaged data can aid in formulating and testing dynamic, motion-based hypotheses of functional mechanisms in RNAs with broad implications for RNA engineering and therapeutic intervention. PMID:25114056

  9. Characterizing RNA ensembles from NMR data with kinematic models.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Pachov, Dimitar V; Bernauer, Julie; van den Bedem, Henry

    2014-09-01

    Functional mechanisms of biomolecules often manifest themselves precisely in transient conformational substates. Researchers have long sought to structurally characterize dynamic processes in non-coding RNA, combining experimental data with computer algorithms. However, adequate exploration of conformational space for these highly dynamic molecules, starting from static crystal structures, remains challenging. Here, we report a new conformational sampling procedure, KGSrna, which can efficiently probe the native ensemble of RNA molecules in solution. We found that KGSrna ensembles accurately represent the conformational landscapes of 3D RNA encoded by NMR proton chemical shifts. KGSrna resolves motionally averaged NMR data into structural contributions; when coupled with residual dipolar coupling data, a KGSrna ensemble revealed a previously uncharacterized transient excited state of the HIV-1 trans-activation response element stem-loop. Ensemble-based interpretations of averaged data can aid in formulating and testing dynamic, motion-based hypotheses of functional mechanisms in RNAs with broad implications for RNA engineering and therapeutic intervention.

  10. Characterizing RNA ensembles from NMR data with kinematic models.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Pachov, Dimitar V; Bernauer, Julie; van den Bedem, Henry

    2014-09-01

    Functional mechanisms of biomolecules often manifest themselves precisely in transient conformational substates. Researchers have long sought to structurally characterize dynamic processes in non-coding RNA, combining experimental data with computer algorithms. However, adequate exploration of conformational space for these highly dynamic molecules, starting from static crystal structures, remains challenging. Here, we report a new conformational sampling procedure, KGSrna, which can efficiently probe the native ensemble of RNA molecules in solution. We found that KGSrna ensembles accurately represent the conformational landscapes of 3D RNA encoded by NMR proton chemical shifts. KGSrna resolves motionally averaged NMR data into structural contributions; when coupled with residual dipolar coupling data, a KGSrna ensemble revealed a previously uncharacterized transient excited state of the HIV-1 trans-activation response element stem-loop. Ensemble-based interpretations of averaged data can aid in formulating and testing dynamic, motion-based hypotheses of functional mechanisms in RNAs with broad implications for RNA engineering and therapeutic intervention. PMID:25114056

  11. Measurement of Internal Acyl Migration Reaction Kinetics Using Directly Coupled HPLC-NMR:  Application for the Positional Isomers of Synthetic (2-Fluorobenzoyl)-d-glucopyranuronic Acid.

    PubMed

    Sidelmann, U G; Hansen, S H; Gavaghan, C; Carless, H A; Lindon, J C; Farrant, R D; Wilson, I D; Nicholson, J K

    1996-08-01

    Ester glucuronides (1-O-acyl-β-d-glucopyranuronates) of many drugs may undergo internal acyl migration reactions, resulting in the formation of new positional isomers with both α- and β-anomers. We illustrate here a novel approach for the direct investigation of the acyl migration kinetics of ester glucuronides and show the application with respect to the isomers of synthetic (2-fluorobenzoyl)-d-glucopyranuronic acid. Individual isomers were separated from an equilibrium mixture containing the β-1-O-acyl, α- and β-2-O-acyl, α- and β-3-O-acyl, and α- and β-4-O-acyl isomers at pH 7.4 in 20 mM phosphate buffer. The interconverting isomers were separated using reversed-phase HPLC and pumped directly into a dedicated on-line NMR flow probe in a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer. The flow was stopped with each isomer in the NMR flow probe, and sequential NMR spectra were collected at 25 °C, allowing direct measurement of the production of positional isomers from each selectively isolated glucuronide isomer. All of the positional isomers and anomers were characterized, and relative quantities determined, and a kinetic model describing the rearrangement reactions was constructed. The acyl migration reaction kinetics were simulated using a theoretical approach using nine first-order rate constants determined for the acyl migration reactions and six first-order rate constants describing the mutarotation each of the 2-, 3-, and 4-positional isomers. The rate constants (in h(-)(1)) for the rearrangement reactions of the 2-fluorobenzoyl glucuronide isomers were as follows:  β-1-O-acyl, 0.29 ± 0.01; α-2-O-acyl, 0.11 ± 0.01; β-2-O-acyl, 0.07 ± 0.01; α-3-O-acyl, 0.10 ± 0.01; β-3-O-acyl, 0.09 ± 0.01; α-4-O-acyl, 0.09 ± 0.01; and β-4-O-acyl, 0.06 ± 0.01. The α- and β-anomerization rates were estimated on the basis of the kinetics model; the anomerization rates of the 4-O-acyl isomers were additionally determined experimentally using directly coupled HPLC-NMR. The

  12. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified into primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and of gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance with wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C

  13. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio

  14. Development and Characterization of NMR Measurements for Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Zachary; Whitney, Heather

    2012-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are systems of water, gelatin, and monomers which form polymers upon irradiation. The gelatin matrix retains dose distribution in 3D form, facilitating truly integrated measurements of complex dose plans for radiation therapy. Polymer gels have two proton pools coupled by exchange: free solvent protons and bound polymerized macromolecular protons. Measuring magnetization transfer (MT) and relaxation affords useful insights into particle rigidity and chemical exchange effects on relaxation in polymer gels. Polymer gel dose response has been previously quantified with several techniques, most often in terms of MRI parameters, usually at field strengths of 1.5 T and below. The research described here investigates the dose response of a revised MAGIC gel dosimeter via both high-field imaging and simpler nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This includes both transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates (R2 and R1) and quantitative MT parameters. We investigated estimating polymer molecular weight for a given applied dose using the Rouse model and R2 data from the imaging study. Finally, we began development of NMR methods for studying dose response, requiring adaption of NMR experiments to accommodate for radiation damping.

  15. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of J-coupled resonances in human brain at 3 and 4 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Bustillo, Juan; Chen, Hongji; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Gasparovic, Charles; Zuo, Chun; Magnotta, Vincent; Mueller, Bryon; Mullins, Paul; Renshaw, Perry; Ugurbil, Kamil; Lim, Kelvin O; Alger, Jeffry R

    2007-08-01

    In this multicenter study, 2D spatial mapping of J-coupled resonances at 3T and 4T was performed using short-TE (15 ms) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI). Water-suppressed (WS) data were acquired in 8.5 min with 1-cm(3) spatial resolution from a supraventricular axial slice. Optimized outer volume suppression (OVS) enabled mapping in close proximity to peripheral scalp regions. Constrained spectral fitting in reference to a non-WS (NWS) scan was performed with LCModel using correction for relaxation attenuation and partial-volume effects. The concentrations of total choline (tCho), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamate + glutamine (Glu+Gln), myo-inositol (Ins), NAA, NAA+NAAG, and two macromolecular resonances at 0.9 and 2.0 ppm were mapped with mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) between 6% and 18% and approximately 150-cm(3) sensitive volumes. Aspartate, GABA, glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and macromolecules (MMs) at 1.2 ppm were also mapped, although with larger mean CRLBs between 30% and 44%. The CRLBs at 4T were 19% lower on average as compared to 3T, consistent with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral resolution. Metabolite concentrations were in the ranges reported in previous studies. Glu concentration was significantly higher in gray matter (GM) compared to white matter (WM), as anticipated. The short acquisition time makes this methodology suitable for clinical studies.

  16. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of J-coupled resonances in human brain at 3 and 4 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Bustillo, Juan; Chen, Hongji; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Gasparovic, Charles; Zuo, Chun; Magnotta, Vincent; Mueller, Bryon; Mullins, Paul; Renshaw, Perry; Ugurbil, Kamil; Lim, Kelvin O; Alger, Jeffry R

    2007-08-01

    In this multicenter study, 2D spatial mapping of J-coupled resonances at 3T and 4T was performed using short-TE (15 ms) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI). Water-suppressed (WS) data were acquired in 8.5 min with 1-cm(3) spatial resolution from a supraventricular axial slice. Optimized outer volume suppression (OVS) enabled mapping in close proximity to peripheral scalp regions. Constrained spectral fitting in reference to a non-WS (NWS) scan was performed with LCModel using correction for relaxation attenuation and partial-volume effects. The concentrations of total choline (tCho), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamate + glutamine (Glu+Gln), myo-inositol (Ins), NAA, NAA+NAAG, and two macromolecular resonances at 0.9 and 2.0 ppm were mapped with mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) between 6% and 18% and approximately 150-cm(3) sensitive volumes. Aspartate, GABA, glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and macromolecules (MMs) at 1.2 ppm were also mapped, although with larger mean CRLBs between 30% and 44%. The CRLBs at 4T were 19% lower on average as compared to 3T, consistent with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral resolution. Metabolite concentrations were in the ranges reported in previous studies. Glu concentration was significantly higher in gray matter (GM) compared to white matter (WM), as anticipated. The short acquisition time makes this methodology suitable for clinical studies. PMID:17610279

  17. Coupled modeling of water transport and air-droplet interaction in the electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Pianese, Cesare; Guezennec, Yann G.

    In this work, an accurate and computationally fast model for liquid water transport within a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) electrode is developed by lumping the space-dependence of the relevant variables. Capillarity is considered as the main transport mechanism within the gas diffusion layer (GDL). The novelty of the model lies in the coupled simulation of the water transport at the interface between gas diffusion layer and gas flow channel (GFC). This is achieved with a phenomenological description of the process that allows its simulation with relative simplicity. Moreover, a detailed two-dimensional visualization of such interface is achieved via geometric simulation of water droplets formation, growth, coalescence and detachment on the surface of the GDL. The model is useful for optimization analysis oriented to both PEMFC design and balance of plant. Furthermore, the accomplishment of reduced computational time and good accuracy makes the model suitable for control strategy implementation to ensure PEM fuel cells operation within optimal electrode water content.

  18. What determines the sign of the Fermi-contact contribution to the NMR spin spin coupling constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bene, Janet E.; Elguero, José

    2003-11-01

    The Dirac vector model for the sign of the spin-spin coupling constant ( J) between a pair of atoms states that one-bond coupling constants are positive, two-bond negative, three-bond positive, etc. However, this rule is often violated. In an attempt to understand the sign of J, we propose a new model, the Nuclear magnetic resonance triplet wavefunction model (NMRTWM) which is based on the phases of excited triplet state wavefunctions, and the response of magnetic nuclei to these phases. The model demonstrates that, (1) the excited states which contribute to the coupling constant do so in a regular manner; (2) the sign of an individual contribution is determined by the nodal character of the excited-state wavefunction and the response of the nuclei to the phases of this function; and (3) the sign of the total coupling constant is the result of competing positive and negative contributions from various states. NMRTWM provides a fundamental explanation for both the successes and failures of the Dirac vector model, and can be used to gain insight into some puzzling results for the orientation dependence of F-F coupling between two HF molecules.

  19. Ab initio study of {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts for the chromophores of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin. 2. Comprehensive analysis of the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of protonated all-trans-retinylidene Schiff base

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Minoru; Wada, Mitsuhito; Inoue, Yoshio; Tamura, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yoichi

    1996-02-01

    Theoretical analysis was performed for the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of the retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by means of ab initio NMR shielding calculation, based on the localized orbital/ local origin method. In order to comprehensively investigate the correlation between the {sup 13}C chemical shieldings of the unsaturated carbons and physicochemical perturbations relating to the spectral tuning of bacteriorhodopsin, the following three factors are taken into account in the present calculation: (1) change in strength of the hydrogen bonding between protonated retinylidene Schiff base and its counterion, (2) conformational changes about single bonds of the conjugated chain, and (3) electrostatic interactions between the Schiff base and electric dipoles. On the basis of these calculations, we successfully find a molecular model for which the shielding calculation almost completely reproduces the observed chemical shift data for the chromophore of bR. 47 refs., 13 figs.

  20. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets.

  1. Roles of multiple-proton transfer pathways and proton-coupled electron transfer in the reactivity of the bis-FeIV state of MauG.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongxin; Williamson, Heather R; Davidson, Victor L

    2015-09-01

    The high-valent state of the diheme enzyme MauG exhibits charge-resonance (CR) stabilization in which the major species is a bis-Fe(IV) state with one heme present as Fe(IV)=O and the other as Fe(IV) with axial heme ligands provided by His and Tyr side chains. In the absence of its substrate, the high-valent state is relatively stable and returns to the diferric state over several minutes. It is shown that this process occurs in two phases. The first phase is redistribution of the resonance species that support the CR. The second phase is the loss of CR and reduction to the diferric state. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the rates of the two phases exhibited different temperature dependencies and activation energies of 8.9 and 19.6 kcal/mol. The two phases exhibited kinetic solvent isotope effects of 2.5 and 2.3. Proton inventory plots of each reaction phase exhibited extreme curvature that could not be fit to models for one- or multiple-proton transfers in the transition state. Each did fit well to a model for two alternative pathways for proton transfer, each involving multiple protons. In each case the experimentally determined fractionation factors were consistent with one of the pathways involving tunneling. The percent of the reaction that involved the tunneling pathway differed for the two reaction phases. Using the crystal structure of MauG it was possible to propose proton-transfer pathways consistent with the experimental data using water molecules and amino acid side chains in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme.

  2. Proton-coupled organic cation antiporter-mediated uptake of apomorphine enantiomers in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3.

    PubMed

    Okura, Takashi; Higuchi, Kei; Kitamura, Atsushi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    R(-)-Apomorphine is a dopamine agonist used for rescue management of motor function impairment associated with levodopa therapy in Parkinson's disease patients. The aim of this study was to examine the role of proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in uptake of R(-)-apomorphine and its S-enantiomer in human brain, using human endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 as a model. Uptake of R(-)- or S(+)-apomorphine into hCMEC/D3 cells was measured under various conditions to evaluate its time-, concentration-, energy- and ion-dependency. Inhibition by selected organic cations was also examined. Uptakes of both R(-)- and S(+)-apomorphine increased with time. The initial uptake velocities of R(-)- and S(+)-apomorphine were concentration-dependent, with similar Km and Vmax values. The cell-to-medium (C/M) ratio of R(-)-apomorphine was significantly reduced by pretreatment with sodium azide, but was not affected by replacement of extracellular sodium ion with N-methylglucamine or potassium. Intracellular alkalization markedly reduced the uptake, while intracellular acidification increased it, suggesting that the uptake is driven by an oppositely directed proton gradient. The C/M ratio was significantly decreased by amantadine, verapamil, pyrilamine and diphenhydramine (substrates or inhibitors of proton-coupled organic cation antiporter), while tetraethylammonium (substrate of organic cation transporters (OCTs)) and carnitine (substrate of carnitine/organic cation transporter 2; (OCTN2)) had no effect. R(-)-Apomorphine uptake was competitively inhibited by diphenhydramine. Our results indicate that R(-)-apomorphine transport in human blood-brain barrier (BBB) model cells is similar to S(+)-apomorphine uptake. The transport was dependent on an oppositely directed proton gradient, but was sodium- or membrane potential-independent. The transport characteristics were consistent with involvement of the previously reported proton-coupled organic cation antiporter.

  3. Surface modification of Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles by silane coupling agent: Synthesis and application in proton exchange composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Salarizadeh, Parisa; Javanbakht, Mehran; Pourmahdian, Saeed; Bagheri, Ahmad; Beydaghi, Hossein; Enhessari, Morteza

    2016-06-15

    Modifying surfaces of nanoparticles with silane coupling agent provides a simple method to alter their surface properties and improve their dispersibility in organic solvents and polymer matrix. Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles (IT) were modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as novel reinforcing filler for proton exchange membranes. The main operating parameters such as reaction time (R.T), APTES/IT and triethylamine (TEA)/IT ratios have been optimized for maximum grafting efficiency. The optimum conditions for R.T, APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were 6h, 4 and 0.3 respectively. It was observed that the APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were the most significant parameters affecting the grafting percentage. Modified nanoparticles were characterized using FT-IR, TGA, SEM, TEM and XRD techniques. Effects of modified nanoparticles in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) were evaluated. The resulting nanocomposite membranes exhibited higher proton conductivity in comparison with pristine SPPEK and SPPEK/IT membranes. This increase is attributed to connectivity of the water channels which creates more direct pathways for proton transport. Composite membrane with 3% AIT (6.46% grafting amount) showed 0.024 S cm(-1) proton conductivity at 25 °C and 149 mW cm(-2) power density (at 0.5V) at 80 °C which were about 243% and 51%, respectively higher than that of pure SPPEK.

  4. Anisotropic nuclear spin interactions for the morphology analysis of proteins in solution by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tate, Shin-Ichi

    2008-01-01

    Determining the relative orientation of domains within a protein is an important problem in structural biology, which has been difficult to address by either X-ray crystallography or NMR. The structure of a multidomain protein in a crystal lattice can be altered by crystal packing forces, resulting in different domain arrangements from those in solution. On the other hand, conventional NMR primarily provides short-range structural information, including proton-proton distances derived from nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) and torsion angles through vicinal spin couplings. Thus, NMR cannot always determine the precise interdomain arrangements due to the sparsely observed spin interactions between domains. However, the weak alignment of proteins in solution has enabled a new NMR technique to determine the domain arrangement based on the different structural information, which defines the orientation of a structural unit in protein against the magnetic field. This technique relies on the anisotropic nuclear spin interactions that only occur for a molecule in a weakly aligned state. In this review, the basics of the new NMR approach are described with focusing on its application to domain orientation analysis. We also describe our recently established NMR approach using the same spin interactions, which expands the domain arrangement analysis to higher-molecular weight proteins over 100 kDa.

  5. Nitric oxide is reduced to HNO by proton-coupled nucleophilic attack by ascorbate, tyrosine, and other alcohols. A new route to HNO in biological media?

    PubMed

    Suarez, Sebastián A; Neuman, Nicolás I; Muñoz, Martina; Álvarez, Lucía; Bikiel, Damián E; Brondino, Carlos D; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Miljkovic, Jan Lj; Filipovic, Milos R; Martí, Marcelo A; Doctorovich, Fabio

    2015-04-15

    The role of NO in biology is well established. However, an increasing body of evidence suggests that azanone (HNO), could also be involved in biological processes, some of which are attributed to NO. In this context, one of the most important and yet unanswered questions is whether and how HNO is produced in vivo. A possible route concerns the chemical or enzymatic reduction of NO. In the present work, we have taken advantage of a selective HNO sensing method, to show that NO is reduced to HNO by biologically relevant alcohols with moderate reducing capacity, such as ascorbate or tyrosine. The proposed mechanism involves a nucleophilic attack to NO by the alcohol, coupled to a proton transfer (PCNA: proton-coupled nucleophilic attack) and a subsequent decomposition of the so-produced radical to yield HNO and an alkoxyl radical.

  6. Measurements of heavy-atom isotope effects using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Kamiński, Rafał; Ciepielowski, Grzegorz; Jankowski, Stefan; Paneth, Piotr

    2011-10-01

    A novel method for measuring heavy-atom KIEs for magnetically active isotopes using (1)H NMR is presented. It takes advantage of the resonance split of the protons coupled with the heavy atom in the (1)H spectrum. The method is validated by the example of the (13)C-KIE on the hydroamination of styrene with aniline, catalyzed by phosphine-ligated palladium triflates.

  7. Unveiling Inherent Degeneracies in Determining Population-Weighted Ensembles of Interdomain Orientational Distributions Using NMR Residual Dipolar Couplings: Application to RNA Helix Junction Helix Motifs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2015-07-30

    A growing number of studies employ time-averaged experimental data to determine dynamic ensembles of biomolecules. While it is well-known that different ensembles can satisfy experimental data to within error, the extent and nature of these degeneracies, and their impact on the accuracy of the ensemble determination remains poorly understood. Here, we use simulations and a recently introduced metric for assessing ensemble similarity to explore degeneracies in determining ensembles using NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) with specific application to A-form helices in RNA. Various target ensembles were constructed representing different domain-domain orientational distributions that are confined to a topologically restricted (<10%) conformational space. Five independent sets of ensemble averaged RDCs were then computed for each target ensemble and a "sample and select" scheme used to identify degenerate ensembles that satisfy RDCs to within experimental uncertainty. We find that ensembles with different ensemble sizes and that can differ significantly from the target ensemble (by as much as ∑Ω ∼ 0.4 where ∑Ω varies between 0 and 1 for maximum and minimum ensemble similarity, respectively) can satisfy the ensemble averaged RDCs. These deviations increase with the number of unique conformers and breadth of the target distribution, and result in significant uncertainty in determining conformational entropy (as large as 5 kcal/mol at T = 298 K). Nevertheless, the RDC-degenerate ensembles are biased toward populated regions of the target ensemble, and capture other essential features of the distribution, including the shape. Our results identify ensemble size as a major source of uncertainty in determining ensembles and suggest that NMR interactions such as RDCs and spin relaxation, on their own, do not carry the necessary information needed to determine conformational entropy at a useful level of precision. The framework introduced here provides a general

  8. Modulating RNA Alignment Using Directional Dynamic Kinks: Application in Determining an Atomic-Resolution Ensemble for a Hairpin using NMR Residual Dipolar Couplings.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Loïc; Giambaşu, George M; Nikolova, Evgenia N; Petzold, Katja; Bhattacharya, Akash; Case, David A; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2015-10-14

    Approaches that combine experimental data and computational molecular dynamics (MD) to determine atomic resolution ensembles of biomolecules require the measurement of abundant experimental data. NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) carry rich dynamics information, however, difficulties in modulating overall alignment of nucleic acids have limited the ability to fully extract this information. We present a strategy for modulating RNA alignment that is based on introducing variable dynamic kinks in terminal helices. With this strategy, we measured seven sets of RDCs in a cUUCGg apical loop and used this rich data set to test the accuracy of an 0.8 μs MD simulation computed using the Amber ff10 force field as well as to determine an atomic resolution ensemble. The MD-generated ensemble quantitatively reproduces the measured RDCs, but selection of a sub-ensemble was required to satisfy the RDCs within error. The largest discrepancies between the RDC-selected and MD-generated ensembles are observed for the most flexible loop residues and backbone angles connecting the loop to the helix, with the RDC-selected ensemble resulting in more uniform dynamics. Comparison of the RDC-selected ensemble with NMR spin relaxation data suggests that the dynamics occurs on the ps-ns time scales as verified by measurements of R(1ρ) relaxation-dispersion data. The RDC-satisfying ensemble samples many conformations adopted by the hairpin in crystal structures indicating that intrinsic plasticity may play important roles in conformational adaptation. The approach presented here can be applied to test nucleic acid force fields and to characterize dynamics in diverse RNA motifs at atomic resolution.

  9. Interactions between CusF and CusB identified by NMR spectroscopy and chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mealman, Tiffany D; Bagai, Ireena; Singh, Pragya; Goodlett, David R; Rensing, Christopher; Zhou, Hongjun; Wysocki, Vicki H; McEvoy, Megan M

    2011-04-01

    The Escherichia coli periplasmic proteins CusF and CusB, as part of the CusCFBA efflux system, aid in the resistance of elevated levels of copper and silver by direct metal transfer between the metallochaperone CusF and the membrane fusion protein CusB before metal extrusion from the periplasm to the extracellular space. Although previous in vitro experiments have demonstrated highly specific interactions between CusF and CusB that are crucial for metal transfer to occur, the structural details of the interaction have not been determined. Here, the interactions between CusF and CusB are mapped through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and chemical cross-linking coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry to better understand how recognition and metal transfer occur between these proteins. The NMR (1)H-(15)N correlation spectra reveal that CusB interacts with the metal-binding face of CusF. In vitro chemical cross-linking with a 7.7 Å homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linker, BS(2)G, was used to capture the CusF/CusB interaction site, and mass spectral data acquired on an LTQ-Orbitrap confirm the following two cross-links: CusF K31 to CusB K29 and CusF K58 to CusB K32, thus revealing that the N-terminal region of CusB interacts with the metal-binding face of CusF. The proteins transiently interact in a metal-dependent fashion, and contacts between CusF and CusB are localized to regions near their respective metal-binding sites. PMID:21323389

  10. Interactions between CusF and CusB identified by NMR spectroscopy and chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mealman, Tiffany D.; Bagai, Ireena; Singh, Pragya; Goodlett, David R.; Rensing, Christopher; Zhou, Hongjun; Wysocki, Vicki H.; McEvoy, Megan M.

    2011-01-01

    The E. coli periplasmic proteins CusF and CusB, as part of the CusCFBA efflux system, aid in the resistance of elevated levels of copper and silver by direct metal transfer between the metallochaperone CusF and the membrane fusion protein CusB, before metal extrusion from the periplasm to the extracellular space. Although previous in vitro experiments have demonstrated highly specific interactions between CusF and CusB that are crucial for metal transfer to occur, the structural details of the interaction have not been determined. Here, the interactions between CusF and CusB are mapped through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and chemical cross-linking coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry to better understand how recognition and metal transfer occur between these proteins. The NMR 1H-15N correlation spectra reveal that CusB interacts with the metal-binding face of CusF. In vitro chemical cross-linking with a 7.7 Å homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linker, BS2G, was used to capture the CusF/CusB interaction site and mass spectral data acquired on an LTQ-Orbitrap confirm the following two cross-links: CusF K31 to CusB K29 and CusF K58 to CusB K32; thus, revealing that the N-terminal region of CusB interacts with the metal-binding face of CusF. The proteins transiently interact in a metal-dependent fashion and contacts between CusF and CusB are localized to regions near their respective metal binding sites. PMID:21323389

  11. A simple, quantitative approach to the coupling of photophosphorylation to electron flow in terms of proton fluxes.

    PubMed

    McCarty, R E; Portis, A R

    1976-11-16

    A simple relationship between observed phosphorylation efficiencies (P/e ratios) and internal proton concentration in spinach chloroplast thylakoids has been derived. P/e ratios, varked by either changing the light intensity or by adding the energy transfer inhibitor, 4'-deoxyphlorizin, were found to change with internal proton concentration in accordance with this relationship. A quantitative prediction of the effect of uncouplers on the P/e ratio can probably also be made. By extrapolation of plots of observed P/e ratios against internal proton concentration divided by the overall rate of electron flow, a maximum intrinsic P/e of about 0.66 is obtained. Assuming that two protons appear inside thylakoids per electron transferred, a P/e ratio of 0.66 suggests that three internal protons are consumed for each ATP formed. Internal protons may be considered to be substrates for the phosphorylation reaction. Hill plots of phosphorylation rate vs. internal proton concentration also indicate that three protons are consumed for each ATP synthesized. Thus, the H+ concentration gradient behaves quantitatively, as well as qualitatively, as if it is the connecting link between electron flow and phosphorylation in illuminated thylakoids.

  12. Gas-phase NMR studies of alcohols. Intrinsic acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; True, Nancy S.

    1985-05-01

    Gas-phase (≈100 Torr) 1H NMR spectra of eighteen simple aliphatic and unsaturated alcohols, four fluorinated alcohols, and two thiols were obtained at 148.6°C where hydrogen bonding has little effect on chemical shifts. For the methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, t-butanol, i- butanol, neopentanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and benzyl alcohol, the observed hydroxylic proton chemical shifts correlate with previously obtained relative gas-phase acidities from thermochemical analysis which employed equilibrium constants of proton transfer reactions measured via mass spectroscopic and ion cyclotron resonance techniques. The correlational dependence is 10.3(0.5) kcal/mol ppm with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. These results demonstrate that the trend of increasing acidity with increasing size of the alkyl substituent is also reflected in the neutral forms of the alcohols, indicating that the polarizability of the ionic forms is not the only determining factor in relative gas-phase acidities of alcohols. Although factors affecting the hydroxylic proton chemical shifts of the larger substituted and unsaturated alcohols are more complex, their observed 1H NMR spectra also reflect this trend. For methanol and ethanol observed gas-phase 1H chemical shifts are also compared with recent theoritical calculations. 3JHH coupling constants across CO bonds are ≈ 5.5 Hz, significantly smaller than typical 3JHH coupling across sp 3 hybrid C C bonds.

  13. Expression cloning and functional characterization of the kidney cortex high-affinity proton-coupled peptide transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Boll, M; Herget, M; Wagener, M; Weber, W M; Markovich, D; Biber, J; Clauss, W; Murer, H; Daniel, H

    1996-01-01

    The presence of a proton-coupled electrogenic high-affinity peptide transporter in the apical membrane of tubular cells has been demonstrated by microperfusion studies and by use of brush border membrane vesicles. The transporter mediates tubular uptake of filtered di- and tripeptides and aminocephalosporin antibiotics. We have used expression cloning in Xenopus laevis oocytes for identification and characterization of the renal high-affinity peptide transporter. Injection of poly(A)+ RNA isolated from rabbit kidney cortex into oocytes resulted in expression of a pH-dependent transport activity for the aminocephalosporin antibiotic cefadroxil. After size fractionation of poly(A)+ RNA the transport activity was identified in the 3.0- to 5.0-kb fractions, which were used for construction of a cDNA library. The library was screened for expression of cefadroxil transport after injection of complementary RNA synthesized in vitro from different pools of clones. A single clone (rPepT2) was isolated that stimulated cefadroxil uptake into oocytes approximately 70-fold at a pH of 6.0. Kinetic analysis of cefadroxil uptake expressed by the transporter's complementary RNA showed a single saturable high-affinity transport system shared by dipeptides, tripeptides, and selected amino-beta-lactam antibiotics. Electrophysiological studies established that the transport activity is electrogenic and affected by membrane potential. Sequencing of the cDNA predicts a protein of 729 amino acids with 12 membrane-spanning domains. Although there is a significant amino acid sequence identity (47%) to the recently cloned peptide transporters from rabbit and human small intestine, the renal transporter shows distinct structural and functional differences. Images Fig. 7 PMID:8552623

  14. Monoterpene separation by coupling proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry with fastGC.

    PubMed

    Materić, Dušan; Lanza, Matteo; Sulzer, Philipp; Herbig, Jens; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Mason, Nigel; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a well-established technique for real-time analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Although it is extremely sensitive (with sensitivities of up to 4500 cps/ppbv, limits of detection <1 pptv and the response times of approximately 100 ms), the selectivity of PTR-MS is still somewhat limited, as isomers cannot be separated. Recently, selectivity-enhancing measures, such as manipulation of drift tube parameters (reduced electric field strength) and using primary ions other than H3O(+), such as NO(+) and O2 (+), have been introduced. However, monoterpenes, which belong to the most important plant VOCs, still cannot be distinguished so more traditional technologies, such as gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), have to be utilised. GC-MS is very time consuming (up to 1 h) and cannot be used for real-time analysis. Here, we introduce a sensitive, near-to-real-time method for plant monoterpene research-PTR-MS coupled with fastGC. We successfully separated and identified six of the most abundant monoterpenes in plant studies (α- and β-pinenes, limonene, 3-carene, camphene and myrcene) in less than 80 s, using both standards and conifer branch enclosures (Norway spruce, Scots pine and black pine). Five monoterpenes usually present in Norway spruce samples with a high abundance were separated even when the compound concentrations were diluted to 20 ppbv. Thus, fastGC-PTR-ToF-MS was shown to be an adequate one-instrument solution for plant monoterpene research. PMID:26253230

  15. Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT) family expression in human nasal epithelium and their drug transport potential.

    PubMed

    Agu, Remigius; Cowley, Elizabeth; Shao, Di; Macdonald, Christopher; Kirkpatrick, David; Renton, Ken; Massoud, Emad

    2011-06-01

    The molecular and functional expression of peptide transporters (PEPT1 and PEPT2, PHT1, PHT2) in human nasal epithelium was investigated. Quantitative/reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qPCR/RT-PCR), Western blotting and indirect immuno-histochemistry were used to investigate the functional gene and protein expression for the transporters. Uptake and transport studies were performed using metabolically stable peptides [β-alanyl-L-lysyl-Nε-7-amino-4-methyl-coumarin-3-acetic acid (β-Ala-Lys-AMCA) and β-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine)]. The effects of concentration, temperature, polarity, competing peptides, and inhibitors on peptide uptake and transport were investigated. PCR products corresponding to PEPT1 (150 bp), PEPT2 (127 bp), PHT1 (110 bp) and PHT2 (198 bp) were detected. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting confirmed the functional expression of PEPT1 and PEPT2 genes. The uptake of β-Ala-Lys-AMCA was concentration-dependent and saturable (Vmax =4.1 ( 0.07 μmol/min/mg protein, Km = 0.6 ( 0.07 μM). The optimal pH for intracellular accumulation of β-Ala-Lys-AMCA was 6.5. Whereas dipeptides and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) significantly inhibited peptide uptake and transport, L-Phe had no effect on peptide transport. The permeation of β-alanyl-L-histidine was concentration-, direction-, and temperature-dependent. The uptake, permeation, qPCR/RT-PCR and protein expression data showed that the human nasal epithelium functionally expresses proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters.

  16. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  17. Separation and complete analyses of the overlapped and unresolved 1H NMR spectra of enantiomers by spin selected correlation experiments.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Uday Ramesh; Baishya, Bikash; Suryaprakash, N

    2008-06-26

    NMR spectroscopic discrimination of optical enantiomers is most often carried out using (2)H and (13)C spectra of chiral molecules aligned in a chiral liquid crystalline solvent. The use of proton NMR for such a purpose is severely hindered due to the spectral complexity and the significant loss of resolution arising from numerous short- and long-distance couplings and the indistinguishable overlap of spectra from both R and S enantiomers. The determination of all the spectral parameters by the analyses of such intricate NMR spectra poses challenges, such as, unraveling of the resonances for each enantiomer, spectral resolution, and simplification of the multiplet pattern. The present study exploits the spin state selection achieved by the two-dimensional (1)H NMR correlation of selectively excited isolated coupled spins (Soft-COSY) of the molecules to overcome these problems. The experiment provides the relative signs and magnitudes of all of the proton-proton couplings, which are otherwise not possible to determine from the broad and featureless one-dimensional (1)H spectra. The utilization of the method for quantification of enantiomeric excess has been demonstrated. The studies on different chiral molecules, each having a chiral center, whose spectral complexity increases with the increasing number of interacting spins, and the advantages and limitations of the method over SERF and DQ-SERF experiments have been reported in this work.

  18. Evidence for strong-coupling s-wave superconductivity in MgB2: (11)B NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Kotegawa, H; Ishida, K; Kitaoka, Y; Muranaka, T; Akimitsu, J

    2001-09-17

    We have investigated a gap structure in a newly discovered superconductor, MgB2, through measurement of the (11)B nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, (11)(1/T(1)). (11)(1/T(1)) is proportional to the temperature (T) in the normal state, and decreases exponentially in the superconducting (SC) state, revealing a tiny coherence peak just below T(c). The T dependence of 1/T(1) in the SC state can be accounted for by an s-wave SC model with a large gap size of 2Delta/k(B)T(c) approximately 5 which suggests it is in a strong-coupling regime.

  19. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  20. Mechanism of dilute-spin-exchange in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-03-28

    In the stationary, aligned samples used in oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR, {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings are not attenuated as they are in magic angle spinning solid-state NMR; consequently, they are available for participation in dipolar coupling-based spin-exchange processes. Here we describe analytically the pathways of {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N spin-exchange mediated by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings. The mixed-order proton-relay mechanism can be differentiated from the third spin assisted recoupling mechanism by setting the {sup 1}H to an off-resonance frequency so that it is at the “magic angle” during the spin-exchange interval in the experiment, since the “magic angle” irradiation nearly quenches the former but only slightly attenuates the latter. Experimental spectra from a single crystal of N-acetyl leucine confirm that this proton-relay mechanism plays the dominant role in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N dilute-spin-exchange in OS solid-state NMR in crystalline samples. Remarkably, the “forbidden” spin-exchange condition under “magic angle” irradiation results in {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N cross-peaks intensities that are comparable to those observed with on-resonance irradiation in applications to proteins. The mechanism of the proton relay in dilute-spin-exchange is crucial for the design of polarization transfer experiments.

  1. A Novel High-Resolution and Sensitivity-Enhanced Three-Dimensional Solid-State NMR Experiment Under Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Although magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR is a powerful technique to obtain atomic-resolution insights into the structure and dynamics of a variety of chemical and biological solids, poor sensitivity has severely limited its applications. In this study, we demonstrate an approach that suitably combines proton-detection, ultrafast-MAS and multiple frequency dimensions to overcome this limitation. With the utilization of proton-proton dipolar recoupling and double quantum (DQ) coherence excitation/reconversion radio-frequency pulses, very high-resolution proton-based 3D NMR spectra that correlate single-quantum (SQ), DQ and SQ coherences of biological solids have been obtained successfully for the first time. The proposed technique requires a very small amount of sample and does not need multiple radio-frequency (RF) channels. It also reveals information about the proximity between a spin and a certain other dipolar-coupled pair of spins in addition to regular SQ/DQ and SQ/SQ correlations. Although (1)H spectral resolution is still limited for densely proton-coupled systems, the 3D technique is valuable to study dilute proton systems, such as zeolites, small molecules, or deuterated samples. We also believe that this new methodology will aid in the design of a plethora of multidimensional NMR techniques and enable high-throughput investigation of an exciting class of solids at atomic-level resolution. PMID:26138791

  2. Deuteron and proton NMR study of D2, p-dichlorobenzene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene in bimesogenic liquid crystals with two nematic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnell, E. E.; Ahmed, Z.; Welch, C.; Mehl, G. H.; Dong, R. Y.

    2016-08-01

    The solutes dideuterium, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene and p-dichlorobenzene (pdcb) are co-dissolved in a 61/39 wt% mixture of CBC9CB/5CB, a bimesogenic liquid crystal with two nematic phases. NMR spectra are collected for each solute. The local electric field gradient (FZZ) is obtained from the dideuterium spectrum. A double Maier-Saupe potential (MSMS) is used to rationalize the order parameters of pdcb. The liquid-crystal fields G1 and G2 are taken to be due to size and shape interactions and interactions between the solute molecular quadrupole and the mean FZZ of the medium. The FZZ 's obtained from D2 and G2 (from pdcb) are compared and discussed.

  3. Proton 2D NMR and distance geometry study of the folding of Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor, a member of the squash inhibitors family

    SciTech Connect

    Heitz, A.; Chiche, L.; Le-Nguyen, D.; Castro, B. )

    1989-03-21

    The solution conformation of synthetic Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor II, a 28-residue peptide with 3 disulfide bridges, has been studied by {sup 1}H 2D NMR measurements. Secondary structure elements were determined: a miniantiparallel {beta}-sheet Met 7-Cys 9 and Gly 25-Cys 27, a {beta}-hairpin 20-28 with {beta}-turn 22-25, and two tight turns Asp 12-Cys 15 and Leu 16-Cys 19. A set of interproton distance restraints deduced from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectra and 13 {phi} backbone torsion angles restraints were used as the basis of three-dimensional structure computations including disulfide bridges arrangement by using distance geometry calculations. Computations for the 15 possible S-S linkage combinations lead to the proposal of the array 2-19, 9-21, 15-27 as the most probably structure for EETI II.

  4. Revealing the specific solute-solvent interactions via the measurements of the NMR spin-spin coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahkhatuni, Astghik A.; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G.; Minasyan, Nune S.; Panosyan, Henry A.; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B.

    2015-03-01

    The solvent induced changes of one-bond spin-spin coupling constants (SSCCs) are investigated for a set of substituted methanes in solvents with various ε dielectric constants. Solute-solvent systems with varying types of ε-dependences for the solute SSCCs are outlined. Aliphatic hydrocarbon solvents and their halogen-substituted derivatives comprise the subset, where the SSCC is linearly dependent on the solvent reaction field, f(ε) = 2(ε - 1)/(2ε + 1), hence indicating the absence of specific solute-solvent interactions. In such solvents, SSCCs depend only on bulk dielectric properties of the medium, and, the magnitudes of the solvent sensitivities of SSCCs are fully determined by the initial values of "pure" SSCCs that correspond to the isolated solute molecules. The solvents involved in the second subset have a relatively chaotic distribution of the SSCC/f(ε) relationship, with possible groupings by their chemical nature. There, the conventional linear SSCC/f(ε) dependence is perturbed by additional interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, specific association processes, lone electron pairs, and conjugation.

  5. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  6. Isolating Friedelin from Cork and Reducing It to Friedelinol and Epifriedelinol. A Project Involving NMR Spectrometry and Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Joseph W.; McNeill, Kristin I.; Moore, Janet L.

    2001-04-01

    In this four-week project, the pentacyclic triterpene friedelin is isolated from laboratory cork. The ground cork is refluxed in ethyl acetate, from which crude friedelin crystallizes. The crude product is analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and purified by flash chromatography. The resulting pure friedelin is reduced to friedelinol and epifriedelinol using different reduction conditions. Each product is analyzed by 1H NMR spectrometry and identified by comparing the CHOH signal with the corresponding signal in the model compounds, menthol and neomenthol. Finally, from computer-generated 3-D molecular models of each alcohol, key dihedral angles are measured and used to calculate three proton-proton coupling constants (J values) involving the CHOH proton. These values are compared to the actual J values determined by NMR spectrometry.

  7. The Proton-Sensing G-Protein Coupled Receptor GPR4 Promotes Angiogenesis in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohong; Zhong, Qi; Huang, Junwei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Wei; Yang, Zheng; Ding, Shuo; Chen, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is an aggressive disease with poor survival and is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Gastroesophageal reflux is a common event in SCCHN patients. GPR4 is a proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which can be activated by acidosis. The objective of this study was to explore the role of GPR4 in acid exposure and tumor angiogenesis in SCCHN. In this study, we confirmed that overexpressing GPR4 in SCCHN cells could increase the expression and secretion of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA at pH 5.9. This effect could be inhibited by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of p38 increased in GPR4 infected cells at pH 5.9, which could be inhibited by SB203580. In tube formation assay, HMEC-1 cells were incubated with conditioned medium (CM, pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) derived from control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells. Tube length was significantly increased in HMEC-1 cells incubated with CM from GPR4 infected cells compared with control cells at pH5.9, which indicated the pro-angiogenic effect of GPR4 in acidic pH. The neutralizing antibodies of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA could inhibit tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In vivo, the effect of GPR4 on angiogenesis was investigated with the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells were seeded onto the upper CAM surface (n = 5 in each group) and 5 μL DMEM/F12 (pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) was added to the surface of the cell every 24 h. Four days later, the upper CAM were harvested and the ratio of the vascular area to the CAM area was quantified using Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. GPR4 infected cells could recruit more vascular than control cells at pH5.9. In conclusion, we suggested that GPR4 induces angiogenesis via GPR4-induced p38-mediated IL6, IL8 and VEGFA secretion at acidic extracellular pH in SCCHN. PMID:27078157

  8. The Proton-Sensing G-Protein Coupled Receptor GPR4 Promotes Angiogenesis in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhibin; Xu, Hongbo; Chen, Xiaohong; Zhong, Qi; Huang, Junwei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Wei; Yang, Zheng; Ding, Shuo; Chen, Ping; Huang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is an aggressive disease with poor survival and is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Gastroesophageal reflux is a common event in SCCHN patients. GPR4 is a proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which can be activated by acidosis. The objective of this study was to explore the role of GPR4 in acid exposure and tumor angiogenesis in SCCHN. In this study, we confirmed that overexpressing GPR4 in SCCHN cells could increase the expression and secretion of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA at pH 5.9. This effect could be inhibited by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of p38 increased in GPR4 infected cells at pH 5.9, which could be inhibited by SB203580. In tube formation assay, HMEC-1 cells were incubated with conditioned medium (CM, pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) derived from control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells. Tube length was significantly increased in HMEC-1 cells incubated with CM from GPR4 infected cells compared with control cells at pH5.9, which indicated the pro-angiogenic effect of GPR4 in acidic pH. The neutralizing antibodies of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA could inhibit tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In vivo, the effect of GPR4 on angiogenesis was investigated with the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells were seeded onto the upper CAM surface (n = 5 in each group) and 5 μL DMEM/F12 (pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) was added to the surface of the cell every 24 h. Four days later, the upper CAM were harvested and the ratio of the vascular area to the CAM area was quantified using Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. GPR4 infected cells could recruit more vascular than control cells at pH5.9. In conclusion, we suggested that GPR4 induces angiogenesis via GPR4-induced p38-mediated IL6, IL8 and VEGFA secretion at acidic extracellular pH in SCCHN. PMID:27078157

  9. Change of translational-rotational coupling in liquids revealed by field-cycling {sup 1}H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, R.; Schneider, E.; Rössler, E. A.

    2015-01-21

    Applying the field-cycling nuclear magnetic resonance technique, the frequency dependence of the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate, R{sub 1}(ω)=T{sub 1}{sup −1}(ω), is measured for propylene glycol (PG) which is increasingly diluted with deuterated chloroform. A frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz and a broad temperature interval from 220 to about 100 K are covered. The results are compared to those of experiments, where glycerol and o-terphenyl are diluted with their deuterated counter-part. Reflecting intra- as well as intermolecular relaxation, the dispersion curves R{sub 1}(ω,x) (x denotes mole fraction PG) allow to extract the rotational time constant τ{sub rot}(T, x) and the self-diffusion coefficient D(T, x) in a single experiment. The Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relation is tested in terms of the quantity D(T, x) τ{sub rot}(T, x) which provides a measure of an effective hydrodynamic radius or equivalently of the spectral separation of the translational and the rotational relaxation contribution. In contrast to o-terphenyl, glycerol and PG show a spectral separation much larger than suggested by the SED relation. In the case of PG/chloroform mixtures, not only an acceleration of the PG dynamics is observed with increasing dilution but also the spectral separation of rotational and translational relaxation contributions continuously decreases. Finally, following a behavior similar to that of o-terphenyl already at about x = 0.6; i.e., while D(T, x) τ{sub rot}(T, x) in the mixture is essentially temperature independent, it strongly increases with x signaling thus a change of translational-rotational coupling. This directly reflects the dissolution of the hydrogen-bond network and thus a change of solution structure.

  10. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, L. B.

    1985-04-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by magic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable engine sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. The NMR techniques that will be emphasized are the measurement and analysis of the (17)O NMR properties, (27)Al NMR intensity quantitation, and (27)Al and (29)Si NMR relaxation rates. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of (17)O enriched Na-Y faujasties.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of phosphorus(v) pesticides. Part I. Chemical shifts of protons as a means of identification of pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babad, H.; Herbert, W.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1968-01-01

    Correlations of structural and proton chemical-hift data for 40 commercial phosphorus(V) pesticides are reported. Correlations of structure with the phosphorus coupling constants are discussed, and general trends are noted which aid in the use of NMR as a tool for identification and analysis of phosphorus(V) compounds. ?? 1968.

  12. Asymmetric protonation of EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Emma A.; Robinson, Anne E.; Liu, Yongjia

    2015-01-01

    The small multidrug resistance transporter EmrE is a homodimer that uses energy provided by the proton motive force to drive the efflux of drug substrates. The pKa values of its “active-site” residues—glutamate 14 (Glu14) from each subunit—must be poised around physiological pH values to efficiently couple proton import to drug export in vivo. To assess the protonation of EmrE, pH titrations were conducted with 1H-15N TROSY-HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Analysis of these spectra indicates that the Glu14 residues have asymmetric pKa values of 7.0 ± 0.1 and 8.2 ± 0.3 at 45°C and 6.8 ± 0.1 and 8.5 ± 0.2 at 25°C. These pKa values are substantially increased compared with typical pKa values for solvent-exposed glutamates but are within the range of published Glu14 pKa values inferred from the pH dependence of substrate binding and transport assays. The active-site mutant, E14D-EmrE, has pKa values below the physiological pH range, consistent with its impaired transport activity. The NMR spectra demonstrate that the protonation states of the active-site Glu14 residues determine both the global structure and the rate of conformational exchange between inward- and outward-facing EmrE. Thus, the pKa values of the asymmetric active-site Glu14 residues are key for proper coupling of proton import to multidrug efflux. However, the results raise new questions regarding the coupling mechanism because they show that EmrE exists in a mixture of protonation states near neutral pH and can interconvert between inward- and outward-facing forms in multiple different protonation states. PMID:26573622

  13. Faster and cleaner real-time pure shift NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauhart, Johannes; Glanzer, Simon; Sakhaii, Peyman; Bermel, Wolfgang; Zangger, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Real-time pure shift experiments provide highly resolved proton NMR spectra which do not require any special processing. Although being more sensitive than their pseudo 2D counterparts, their signal intensities per unit time are still far below regular NMR spectra. In addition, scalar coupling evolution during the individual data chunks produces decoupling sidebands. Here we show that faster and cleaner real-time pure shift spectra can be obtained through the implementation of two parameter alterations. Variation of the FID chunk lengths between individual transients significantly suppresses decoupling sidebands for any kind of real-time pure shift spectra and thus allows for example the analysis of minor components in compound mixtures. Shifting the excitation frequency between individual scans of real-time slice-selective pure shift spectra increases their sensitivity obtainable in unit time by allowing faster repetitions of acquisitions.

  14. Product operator descriptions of the 2D DEPT J-resolved NMR experiment for weakly coupled ISn (I=\\frac{1}{2}, S=\\frac{3}{2}; n=1, 2, 3) spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokatlı, Ahmet; Bahçeli, Semiha

    2010-02-01

    There are a variety of multi-pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments for spectral assignment of complex molecules in a solution. The two-dimensional (2D) distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) J-resolved NMR experiment is a 13C-detected, spectral editing polarization transfer technique. The product operator theory is widely used for an analytical description of the multi-pulse NMR experiment for weakly coupled spin systems. In this study, analytical descriptions of the 2D DEPT J-resolved NMR experiment for weakly coupled ISn (I=\\textstyle{\\frac{1}{2}}, S=\\textstyle{\\frac{3}{2}} ; n=1, 2, 3) spin systems using the product operator theory have been introduced for the first time. The calculated intensities and positions of the observable signals are simulated for molecules containing [13C (I=\\textstyle{\\frac{1}{2}}) , 81Br (S=\\textstyle{\\frac{3}{2}})] nuclei by using a MAPLE program on a computer. Finally, we present a theoretical discussion and experimental suggestions.

  15. Major Groove Width Variations in RNA Structures Determined by NMR and Impact of 13C residual chemical shift anisotropy and 1H-13C residual dipolar coupling on refinement

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, Blanton S; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Barton, Shawn; Kinde, Benyam; Starck, Patrice; Singh, Rashmi; Bax, Ad

    2010-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid structure determination by NMR spectroscopy relies primarily on local structural restraints provided by 1H-1H NOEs and J-couplings. When employed loosely, these restraints are broadly compatible with A- and B-like helical geometries and give rise to calculated structures that are highly sensitive to the force fields employed during refinement. A survey of recently reported NMR structures reveals significant variations in helical parameters, particularly the major groove width. Although helical parameters observed in high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of isolated A-form RNA helices are sensitive to crystal packing effects, variations among the published X-ray structures are significantly smaller than those observed in NMR structures. Here we show that restraints derived from aromatic 1H-13C residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and residual chemical shift anisotropies (RCSAs) can overcome NMR restraint and force field deficiencies and afford structures with helical properties similar to those observed in high-resolution X-ray structures. PMID:20549304

  16. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (101¯0) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    SciTech Connect

    Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Kharche, Neerav; Batista, Victor S.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Tully, John C.; Muckerman, James T.

    2015-03-12

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (101¯0) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation of free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of –Ga-OH to –Ga-O˙⁻ requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface –NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than –OH sites. However, proton transfer from –OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (101¯0)–water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface –OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.

  17. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (101¯0) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    DOE PAGES

    Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Kharche, Neerav; Batista, Victor S.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Tully, John C.; Muckerman, James T.

    2015-03-12

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (101¯0) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation ofmore » free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of –Ga-OH to –Ga-O˙⁻ requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface –NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than –OH sites. However, proton transfer from –OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (101¯0)–water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface –OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.« less

  18. Optically transmitted and inductively coupled electric reference to access in vivo concentrations for quantitative proton-decoupled ¹³C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Pavan, Matteo; Heinzer-Schweizer, Susanne; Boesiger, Peter; Henning, Anke

    2012-01-01

    This report describes our efforts on quantification of tissue metabolite concentrations in mM by nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the Electric Reference To access In vivo Concentrations (ERETIC) method. Previous work showed that a calibrated synthetic magnetic resonance spectroscopy-like signal transmitted through an optical fiber and inductively coupled into a transmit/receive coil represents a reliable reference standard for in vivo (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy quantification on a clinical platform. In this work, we introduce a related implementation that enables simultaneous proton decoupling and ERETIC-based metabolite quantification and hence extends the applicability of the ERETIC method to nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled in vivo (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, ERETIC signal stability under the influence of simultaneous proton decoupling is investigated. The proposed quantification method was cross-validated against internal and external reference standards on human skeletal muscle. The ERETIC signal intensity stability was 100.65 ± 4.18% over 3 months including measurements with and without proton decoupling. Glycogen and unsaturated fatty acid concentrations measured with the ERETIC method were in excellent agreement with internal creatine and external phantom reference methods, showing a difference of 1.85 ± 1.21% for glycogen and 1.84 ± 1.00% for unsaturated fatty acid between ERETIC and creatine-based quantification, whereas the deviations between external reference and creatine-based quantification are 6.95 ± 9.52% and 3.19 ± 2.60%, respectively.

  19. NMR studies of molecules in liquid crystals and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    NMR experiments to measure proton dipole couplings were performed on a series of n-alkanes (n-hexane through n-decane) dissolved in nematic liquid crystals. Computer modeling of the experimental NMR-spectra was done using several different models for intermolecular interactions in these systems. The model of Photinos et al. was found to be best in describing the intermolecular interactions in these systems and can provide a statistical picture of the conformation and orientation of the alkane molecules in their partially-oriented environment. Order parameters and conformational distributions for the alkanes can be calculated from the modeling. The alkanes are found to have conformational distributions very much like those found in liquid alkanes. Proton NMR spectra of tetrahydrofuran (THF) intercalated in two graphite intercalation compounds were also measured. Computer simulations of these spectra provide a picture of THF in the constrained environment between the graphene layers where the THF is oriented at a particular angle, can translate and rotate freely, but does not appear to pseudorotate.

  20. Communication: Molecular dynamics and 1H NMR of n-hexane in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Adrian C. J.; Burnell, E. Elliott; Meerts, W. Leo; de Lange, Cornelis A.; Dong, Ronald Y.; Muccioli, Luca; Pizzirusso, Antonio; Zannoni, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    The NMR spectrum of n-hexane orientationally ordered in the nematic liquid crystal ZLI-1132 is analysed using covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES). The spectrum contains over 150 000 transitions, with many sharp features appearing above a broad, underlying background signal that results from the plethora of overlapping transitions from the n-hexane as well as from the liquid crystal. The CMA-ES requires initial search ranges for NMR spectral parameters, notably the direct dipolar couplings. Several sets of such ranges were utilized, including three from MD simulations and others from the modified chord model that is specifically designed to predict hydrocarbon-chain dipolar couplings. In the end, only inaccurate dipolar couplings from an earlier study utilizing proton-proton double quantum 2D-NMR techniques on partially deuterated n-hexane provided the necessary estimates. The precise set of dipolar couplings obtained can now be used to investigate conformational averaging of n-hexane in a nematic environment.

  1. Communication: Molecular dynamics and {sup 1}H NMR of n-hexane in liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adrian C. J.; Burnell, E. Elliott; Meerts, W. Leo; Lange, Cornelis A. de; Dong, Ronald Y.; Muccioli, Luca Pizzirusso, Antonio Zannoni, Claudio

    2015-07-07

    The NMR spectrum of n-hexane orientationally ordered in the nematic liquid crystal ZLI-1132 is analysed using covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES). The spectrum contains over 150 000 transitions, with many sharp features appearing above a broad, underlying background signal that results from the plethora of overlapping transitions from the n-hexane as well as from the liquid crystal. The CMA-ES requires initial search ranges for NMR spectral parameters, notably the direct dipolar couplings. Several sets of such ranges were utilized, including three from MD simulations and others from the modified chord model that is specifically designed to predict hydrocarbon-chain dipolar couplings. In the end, only inaccurate dipolar couplings from an earlier study utilizing proton-proton double quantum 2D-NMR techniques on partially deuterated n-hexane provided the necessary estimates. The precise set of dipolar couplings obtained can now be used to investigate conformational averaging of n-hexane in a nematic environment.

  2. Proton NMR studies of bovine and porcine phospholipase A sub 2 : Assignment of aromatic resonances and evidence for a conformational equilibrium in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.; Primrose, W.U.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Dekker, N.; Boelens, R.; Kaptein, R.; Slotboom, A.J. )

    1989-07-11

    Bovine and porcine pancreatic phospholipases A{sub 2}, and porcine isophospholipase A{sub 2}, have been investigated by one- and two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. Resonances have been assigned for 20-26 residues in each enzyme, including all the aromatic residues, by a strategy based on the semiquantitative comparison of proximity relationships deduced from NOE experiments with those seen in the crystal structure. NOE experiments indicate that the loop comprising residues 59-70, which has a different conformation in the crystal structures of the bovine and porcine enzymes, has the same conformation in these two enzymes in solution. Selective changes in the line width of a limited number of resonances as a function of pH, temperature, and calcium concentration provide evidence for a local conformational equilibrium. This equilibrium involves a limited region of the protein structure around residues 25, 41, 106, and 111; it has been identified in the bovine enzyme and porcine isoenzyme but is not apparent in the porcine enzyme.

  3. Combination of 1H NMR and chemometrics to discriminate manuka honey from other floral honey types from Oceania.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Marc; Rogers, Karyne M; Jamin, Eric; Thomas, Freddy; Guyader, Sophie; Lees, Michèle; Rutledge, Douglas N

    2017-02-15

    Manuka honey is a product produced essentially in New Zealand, and has been widely recognised for its antibacterial properties and specific taste. In this study, 264 honeys from New Zealand and Australia were analysed using proton NMR spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics. Known manuka markers, methylglyoxal and dihydroxyacetone, have been characterised and quantified, together with a new NMR marker, identified as being leptosperin. Manuka honey profiling using 1H NMR is shown to be a possible alternative to chromatography with the added advantage that it can measure methylglyoxal (MGO), dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and leptosperin simultaneously. By combining the information from these three markers, we established a model to estimate the proportion of manuka in a given honey. Markers of other botanical origins were also identified, which makes 1H NMR a convenient and efficient tool, complementary to pollen analysis, to control the botanical origin of Oceania honeys.

  4. Combination of 1H NMR and chemometrics to discriminate manuka honey from other floral honey types from Oceania.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Marc; Rogers, Karyne M; Jamin, Eric; Thomas, Freddy; Guyader, Sophie; Lees, Michèle; Rutledge, Douglas N

    2017-02-15

    Manuka honey is a product produced essentially in New Zealand, and has been widely recognised for its antibacterial properties and specific taste. In this study, 264 honeys from New Zealand and Australia were analysed using proton NMR spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics. Known manuka markers, methylglyoxal and dihydroxyacetone, have been characterised and quantified, together with a new NMR marker, identified as being leptosperin. Manuka honey profiling using 1H NMR is shown to be a possible alternative to chromatography with the added advantage that it can measure methylglyoxal (MGO), dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and leptosperin simultaneously. By combining the information from these three markers, we established a model to estimate the proportion of manuka in a given honey. Markers of other botanical origins were also identified, which makes 1H NMR a convenient and efficient tool, complementary to pollen analysis, to control the botanical origin of Oceania honeys. PMID:27664696

  5. Solvent signal as an NMR concentration reference.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huaping; Raftery, Daniel

    2008-12-15

    We propose that the NMR solvent signal be utilized as a universal concentration reference because most solvents can be observed by NMR and solvent concentrations can be readily calculated or determined independently. In particular, a highly protonated solvent such as water can serve as a primary concentration standard for its stability, availability, and ease of observation. The potential problems of radiation damping associated with a strong NMR signal can be alleviated by small pulse angle excitation. The solvent signal then can be detected by the NMR receiver with the same efficiency as a dilute analyte. We demonstrated that the analyte's proton concentration can be accurately determined from 4 microM to more than 100 M, referenced by solvent (water) protons of concentrations more than 10 M. The proposed method is robust and indifferent to probe tuning and does not require any additional concentration standard.

  6. Elucidating collision induced dissociation products and reaction mechanisms of protonated uracil by coupling chemical dynamics simulations with tandem mass spectrometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Molina, Estefanía Rossich; Ortiz, Daniel; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Spezia, Riccardo

    2015-12-01

    In this study we have coupled mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) direct chemical dynamics simulations with electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry experiments in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the fragmentation mechanisms occurring during the collision induced dissociation of gaseous protonated uracil. Using this approach, we were able to successfully characterize the fragmentation pathways corresponding to ammonia loss (m/z 96), water loss (m/z 95) and cyanic or isocyanic acid loss (m/z 70). Furthermore, we also performed experiments with isotopic labeling completing the fragmentation picture. Remarkably, fragmentation mechanisms obtained from chemical dynamics simulations are consistent with those deduced from isotopic labeling.

  7. Influence of the colloidal structure of dairy gels on milk fat fusion behavior: quantification of the liquid fat content by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR).

    PubMed

    Bouteille, Romain; Perez, Jeanne; Khifer, Farid; Jouan-Rimbaud-Bouveresse, Delphine; Lecanu, Bruno; This, Hervé

    2013-04-01

    Dairy gels (DG), such as yoghurts, contain both solid and liquid fats at the time of consumption, as their temperature rises to anything between 10 and 24 °C after being introduced into the mouth at 4 °C. The mass ratio between solid and liquid fats, which depends on the temperature, impacts the organoleptic properties of DG. As the ordinary methods for determining this ratio can only be applied to samples consisting mainly in fat materials, a fat extraction step needs to be added into the analytical process when applied to DG, which prevents the study of the potential impact of their colloidal structure on milk fat fusion behavior. In situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR) was investigated as a method for direct measurements in DG: at temperatures between 20.0 and 70.0 °C, the liquid fat content and the composition of triacylglycerols of the liquid phase (in terms of alkyl chains length) were determined. Spectra of isolated milk fat also enable the quantification of the double bonds of triacylglycerols. Statistical tests showed no significant difference between isolated milk fat and milk fat inside a DG in terms of melting behavior: the fat globule membrane does not seem to have a significant influence on the fat melting behavior.

  8. Influence of the colloidal structure of dairy gels on milk fat fusion behavior: quantification of the liquid fat content by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR).

    PubMed

    Bouteille, Romain; Perez, Jeanne; Khifer, Farid; Jouan-Rimbaud-Bouveresse, Delphine; Lecanu, Bruno; This, Hervé

    2013-04-01

    Dairy gels (DG), such as yoghurts, contain both solid and liquid fats at the time of consumption, as their temperature rises to anything between 10 and 24 °C after being introduced into the mouth at 4 °C. The mass ratio between solid and liquid fats, which depends on the temperature, impacts the organoleptic properties of DG. As the ordinary methods for determining this ratio can only be applied to samples consisting mainly in fat materials, a fat extraction step needs to be added into the analytical process when applied to DG, which prevents the study of the potential impact of their colloidal structure on milk fat fusion behavior. In situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR) was investigated as a method for direct measurements in DG: at temperatures between 20.0 and 70.0 °C, the liquid fat content and the composition of triacylglycerols of the liquid phase (in ter