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Sample records for proton nmr study

  1. An NMR Protonation Study of Metal Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letkeman, Peter

    1979-01-01

    This experiment is suitable for an integrated laboratory course for senior chemistry majors. It introduces the student to a study of the relative basicity of different proton accepting sites. It serves as an opportunity to learn about nmr techniques and could extend to infrared, as well. (BB)

  2. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    in high-resolution NMR spectra. This technique is selective for protons on the surface organic functional groups due to their motional averaging in solution. In this study, 1H solution NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the interface of the organic functional groups in D2O. The pKa for these functional groups covalently bound to the surface of nanoparticles was determined using an NMR-pH titration method based on the variation in the proton chemical shift for the alkyl group protons closest to the amine group with pH. The adsorption of toxic contaminants (chromate and arsenate anions) on the surface of functionalized silicalite-1 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been studied by 1H solution NMR spectroscopy. With this method, the surface bound contaminants are detected. The analysis of the intensity and position of these peaks allows quantitative assessment of the relative amounts of functional groups with adsorbed metal ions. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy to the electronic environment and structure of the surface functional groups on porous nanomaterials.

  3. Extrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-03-01

    We studied narrow 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 100-355 K and 42-59 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. The Fourier transformed NMR spectra of the proton free-induction signals show the superposition of broad and narrow components, which can be assigned to immobile protons and extrinsic mobile protons, respectively. We found that a narrow spectrum develops on heating above about Tc = 260 K and widens above a Larmor frequency of about νc = 50 MHz for Mg(OH)2. The temperature-induced NMR spectrum and the characteristic frequency νc of 50 MHz are the noteworthy features of the nuclear spin fluctuation spectra of the extrinsic protons.

  4. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  5. NMR studies of proton exchange kinetics in aqueous formaldehyde solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Michal; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil

    2014-05-01

    Aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, formalin, are commonly used for tissue fixation and preservation. Treatment with formalin is known to shorten the tissue transverse relaxation time T2. Part of this shortening is due to the effect of formalin on the water T2. In the present work we show that the shortening of water T2 is a result of proton exchange between water and the major constituent of aqueous solutions of formaldehyde, methylene glycol. We report the observation of the signal of the hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol at 2 ppm to high frequency of the water signal that can be seen at low temperatures and at pH range of 6.0 ± 1.5 and, at conditions where it cannot be observed by the single pulse experiment, it can be detected indirectly through the water signal by the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment. The above finding made it possible to obtain the exchange rate between the hydroxyl protons of the methylene glycol and water in aqueous formaldehyde solutions, either using the dispersion of the spin-lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame (1/T1ρ) or, at the slow exchange regime, from the line width hydroxyl protons of methylene glycol. The exchange rate was ∼104 s-1 at pH 7.4 and 37 °C, the activation energy, 50.2 kJ/mol and its pH dependence at 1.1 °C was fitted to: k (s-1) = 520 + 6.5 × 107[H+] + 3.0 × 109[OH-].

  6. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  7. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, http://doi.org/10.7566/JPSJ.84.113601, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  8. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject (J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 5241-5249). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action.

  9. Membrane lipids protected from oxidation by red wine tannins: a proton NMR study.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Aurélien L; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Buchoux, Sébastien; Grélard, Axelle; Dufourc, Erick J; Géan, Julie

    2014-12-01

    Dietary polyphenols widespread in vegetables and beverages like red wine and tea have been reported to possess antioxidant properties that could have positive effects on human health. In this study, we propose a new in situ and non-invasive method based on proton liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the antioxidant efficiency of red wine tannins on a twice-unsaturated phospholipid, 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLiPC), embedded in a membrane model. Four tannins were studied: (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The lipid degradation kinetics was determined by measuring the loss of the bis-allylic protons during oxidation induced by a radical initiator, 2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH). The antioxidant efficiency, i.e. the ability of tannins to slow down the lipid oxidation rate, was shown to be higher for galloylated tannins, ECG and EGCG. Furthermore, the mixture of four tannins was more efficient than the most effective tannin, EGCG, demonstrating a synergistic effect. To better understand the antioxidant action mechanism of polyphenols on lipid membranes, the tannin location was investigated by NMR and molecular dynamics. A correlation between antioxidant action of tannins and their location at the membrane interface (inserted at the glycerol backbone level) could thus be established.

  10. High-resolution proton NMR studies of intracellular metabolites in yeast using 13C decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Shulman, Robert G.

    The resolution and specificity of 1H NMR in studies of yeast cellular metabolism were increased by feeding a 13C-labeled substrate and observing 1H difference spectra in the presence and absence of 13C decoupling fields. [2- 13C]Acetate was utilized as a respiratory substrate in an aerobic suspension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The broad cellular background proton resonances are removed by the technique, leaving only signals from the protons of the substrate, or its metabolites, that are coupled to 13C. Spectra of the yeast suspension after acetate feeding show the disappearance of label from the acetate pool and the subsequent appearance of 13C in glutamate C 3 and C 4 and in aspartate C 3. These results are in accord with the known fluxes of metabolites. Selective single-frequency 13C decoupling was used to provide assignments for the difference signals. The limitations on single-frequency decoupling coming from finite decoupling fields are investigated. The technique shows a potential for application in a wide variety of systems where the resolution of the 13C spectrum may be combined with the sensitivity for proton detection to observe metabolites that have been previously unobservable.

  11. NMR studies of the protonation states of pyridoxal-5‧-phosphate in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Niether, Christiane; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M.; Toney, Michael D.; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-07-01

    We have measured the 13C NMR spectra of the cofactor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (vitamin B 6, PLP) at 278 K in aqueous solution as a function of pH. By 13C enrichment of PLP in the C-4' and C-5' positions we were able to measure spectra down to pH 1. From the dependence of the 13C chemical shifts on pH, the p Ka values of PLP could be determined. In particular, the heretofore uncharacterized protonation state of PLP, in which the phosphate group as well as the pyridine ring and the phenolic groups are fully protonated, has been analyzed. The corresponding p Ka value of 2.4 indicates that the phosphate group is solely involved in the first deprotonation step. The 15N chemical shifts of the pyridine ring of PLP published previously are in good agreement with the new results. These shifts contain information about the tautomerism of the different protonation states of PLP. The implications of these findings for the biological function of PLP are discussed.

  12. Solubilization Site of Organic Perfume Molecules in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Micelles: New Insights from Proton NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Suratkar; Mahapatra

    2000-05-01

    The site of incorporation of solubilizates in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar systems has been investigated by proton NMR spectroscopy. The solubilizate molecules chosen for the present study are phenol, 4-methylphenol, 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol, anisole, 4-methylanisole, 4-propenylanisole, 1,8-cineole, and limonene. These molecules possess a wide variety of functional groups with different degrees of hydrophilic/hydrophobic character and are thereby solubilized at different micellar locations. Aromatic compounds, especially those having a phenolic-OH group, showed a large upfield shift of SDS methylene protons that are closely linked to the terminal sulfate groups. Additionally, in the case of phenolic compounds, the unresolved signals of the nine straight-chain bulk methylene protons of SDS are split into a broad doublet with uneven intensity. This splitting of methylene protons was found to be dependent on the concentration of the substrate. Based on these observations, probable solubilization sites and orientation of the substrate molecule within the micelles are discussed. Phenolic compounds, being the most hydrophilic among the present set, reside at the hydrophilic/hydrophobic boundary of micelle-water interface and thus influence the resonances of SDS protons the most. Aromatic methoxy and aliphatic compounds, being relatively more hydrophobic in nature, reside inside the micellar core and thereby result in smaller shifts. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  13. Proton NMR study of the organic metal {kappa}-(BETS){sub 2}Mn[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Vyaselev, O. M.; Kushch, N. D.; Yagubskii, E. B.

    2011-11-15

    Magnetic properties of the organic conductor {kappa}-(BETS){sub 2}Mn[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3} above and below the temperature of the metal-insulator transition that occurs at T{sub MI} Almost-Equal-To 25 K are studied by {sup 1}H NMR. The proton spectrum is shown to be determined by the static dipolar fields from Mn{sup 2+} localized moments, while the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation is dominated by fluctuating fields from Mn{sup 2+} electrons. The NMR data, both static (the spectra) and dynamic (the spin-lattice relaxation), indicate the freezing of Mn{sup 2+} moments into a short-range or an incommensurate long-range antiferromagnetic order below T{sub MI}.

  14. Proton NMR study of the organic metal κ-(BETS)2Mn[N(CN)2]3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyaselev, O. M.; Kushch, N. D.; Yagubskii, E. B.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic properties of the organic conductor κ-(BETS)2Mn[N(CN)2]3 above and below the temperature of the metal-insulator transition that occurs at T MI ≈ 25 K are studied by 1H NMR. The proton spectrum is shown to be determined by the static dipolar fields from Mn2+ localized moments, while the 1H spin-lattice relaxation is dominated by fluctuating fields from Mn2+ electrons. The NMR data, both static (the spectra) and dynamic (the spin-lattice relaxation), indicate the freezing of Mn2+ moments into a short-range or an incommensurate long-range antiferromagnetic order below T MI.

  15. Proton NMR study of spin dynamics in the magnetic organic chains M (hfac)3 NITEt (M =Eu3 +,Gd3 + )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, M.; Lascialfari, A.; Caneschi, A.; Ammannato, L.; Gatteschi, D.; Rettori, A.; Pini, M. G.; Cucci, C.; Borsa, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the spin dynamics in the rare-earth-based low-dimensional molecular magnetic chains Eu (hfac) 3NITEt and Gd (hfac) 3NITEt (in short, Eu-Et and Gd-Et). Although both samples are based on the same chemical building block, [(hfac) 3NITEt ] , their magnetic properties change dramatically when the Eu3 + ion, which is nonmagnetic at low temperatures, is substituted by the magnetic Gd3 + ion. The present proton NMR investigation shows that, down to the lowest investigated temperature (T =1.5 K for Gd-Et and T =3 K for Eu-Et), the Eu-Et chain behaves as a one-dimensional Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling (J =-20 K) between s =1 /2 organic radicals, and has a T -independent exchange frequency (ωe=2.6 ×1012 rad/s). In the Gd-Et chain, in contrast, a competition arises between nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic coupling and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic coupling; moreover, two phase transitions have previously been found, in agreement with Villain's conjecture: a first transition, at T0=2.2 K, from a high temperature paramagnetic phase to a chiral spin liquid phase, and a second transition, at TN=1.9 K, to a three-dimensional helical spin solid phase. Contrary to the Eu-Et chain (whose three-dimensional ordering temperature is estimated to insurge at very low, TN≈0.3 K), critical spin dynamics effects have been measured in the Gd-Et chain on approaching TN=1.9 K: namely, a divergence of the proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 , which in turn produces a sudden wipe-out of the NMR signal in a very narrow (Δ T ˜0.04 K) temperature range above TN. Below TN, an inhomogeneous broadening of the NMR line indicates a complete spin freezing. At T0=2.2 K, instead, such critical effects are not observed because NMR measurements probe the two-spin correlation function, while the chiral spin liquid phase transition is associated with a divergence of the four

  16. NMR studies of protonation and hydrogen bond states of internal aldimines of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate acid-base in alanine racemase, aspartate aminotransferase, and poly-L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Dos, Alexandra; Zander, Reinhard; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Compton, Shara; Fogle, Emily; Toney, Michael D; Shenderovich, Ilya; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-12-01

    Using (15)N solid-state NMR, we have studied protonation and H-bonded states of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) linked as an internal aldimine in alanine racemase (AlaR), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), and poly-L-lysine. Protonation of the pyridine nitrogen of PLP and the coupled proton transfer from the phenolic oxygen (enolimine form) to the aldimine nitrogen (ketoenamine form) is often considered to be a prerequisite to the initial step (transimination) of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Indeed, using (15)N NMR and H-bond correlations in AspAT, we observe a strong aspartate-pyridine nitrogen H-bond with H located on nitrogen. After hydration, this hydrogen bond is maintained. By contrast, in the case of solid lyophilized AlaR, we find that the pyridine nitrogen is neither protonated nor hydrogen bonded to the proximal arginine side chain. However, hydration establishes a weak hydrogen bond to pyridine. To clarify how AlaR is activated, we performed (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR experiments on isotopically labeled PLP aldimines formed by lyophilization with poly-L-lysine. In the dry solid, only the enolimine tautomer is observed. However, a fast reversible proton transfer involving the ketoenamine tautomer is observed after treatment with either gaseous water or gaseous dry HCl. Hydrolysis requires the action of both water and HCl. The formation of an external aldimine with aspartic acid at pH 9 also produces the ketoenamine form stabilized by interaction with a second aspartic acid, probably via a H-bond to the phenolic oxygen. We postulate that O-protonation is an effectual mechanism for the activation of PLP, as is N-protonation, and that enzymes that are incapable of N-protonation employ this mechanism. PMID:24147985

  17. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  18. Proton NMR study of the interaction of tin(IV) protoporphyrin IX monomers and dimers with apomyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Deeb, R.S.; Peyton, D.H. )

    1992-01-21

    Events during the reconstitution of apomyoglobin to form the holoprotein were probed by porphyrin-metal substitution. Thus interactions between tin(IV) protoporphyrin IX (SnPP) and equine apomyoglobin (apoEqMb), and between tin(IV) protoporphyrin IX dimers ((SnPP){sub 2}) and apoEqMb, were observed by {sup 1}H NMR and optical absorbance spectroscopic techniques. The chief advantages of using SnPP are that products and intermediates can easily be related to SnPP{center dot}EqMb which has been studied and that at least one step during reconstitution is slowed considerably as compared to heme. Reactions of apoEqMb with SnPP and (SnPP){sub 2} produce different intermediates, although the final product, SnPP{center dot}EqMb, is the same for each. An intermediate observed for reaction of SnPP with apoEqMb at pH 10 is in exchange with free SnPP, with the observed rate constant k{sub off} {approximately} 1 s{sup {minus}1}. meso-Proton resonances were assigned for this intermediate by correlation to SnPP resonances via chemical exchange. The intermediate observed for reaction of (SnPP){sub 2} with apoEqMb at pH 7.5 is heterogeneous. The reaction of either SnPP or (SnPP){sub 2} with apoEqMb at neutral pH produces another species which may be the alternate porphyrin-insertion isomer arising from a 180{degree} rotation about the {alpha},{gamma}-meso axis of the porphyrin. Although optical absorbance spectroscopy of the Soret region shows evidence for each reaction, only in combination with {sup 1}H NMR are the various processes assigned.

  19. Proton NMR studies of the electronic structure of ZrH/sub x/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attalla, A.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Craft, B. D.; Venturini, E. L.; Rhim, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    The proton spin lattice relaxation times and Knight shifts were measured in f.c.c. (delta-phase) and f.c.t. (epsilon-phase) ZrH/sub x/ for 1.5 or = to x or = to 2.0. Both parameters indicate that N(E/sub F/) is very dependent upon hydrogen content with a maximum occurring at ZrH1 83. This behavior is ascribed to modifications in N(E/sub F/) through a fcc/fct distortion in ZrH/sub x/ associated with a Jahn-Teller effect.

  20. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  1. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implicationsmore » for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.« less

  2. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implications for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.

  3. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  4. Proton clouds to measure long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinnige, Tessa; Daniëls, Mark; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2014-03-26

    We show that selective labeling of proteins with protonated amino acids embedded in a perdeuterated matrix, dubbed 'proton clouds', provides general access to long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in proton-detected solid-state NMR, which is important to study protein tertiary structure. Proton-cloud labeling significantly improves spectral resolution by simultaneously reducing proton line width and spectral crowding despite a high local proton density in clouds. The approach is amenable to almost all canonical amino acids. Our method is demonstrated on ubiquitin and the β-barrel membrane protein BamA.

  5. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  6. The Effect of Antitumor Glycosides on Glioma Cells and Tissues as Studied by Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; Campos-Olivas, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the treatment with glycolipid derivatives on the metabolic profile of intact glioma cells and tumor tissues, investigated using proton high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, is reported here. Two compounds were used, a glycoside and its thioglycoside analogue, both showing anti-proliferative activity on glioma C6 cell cultures; however, only the thioglycoside exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. At the drug concentrations showing anti-proliferative activity in cell culture (20 and 40 µM), significant increases in choline containing metabolites were observed in the 1H NMR spectra of the same intact cells. In vivo experiments in nude mice bearing tumors derived from implanted C6 glioma cells, showed that reduction of tumor volume was associated with significant changes in the metabolic profile of the same intact tumor tissues; and were similar to those observed in cell culture. Specifically, the activity of the compounds is mainly associated with an increase in choline and phosphocholine, in both the cell cultures and tumoral tissues. Taurine, a metabolite that has been considered a biomarker of apoptosis, correlated with the reduction of tumor volume. Thus, the results indicate that the mode of action of the glycoside involves, at least in part, alteration of phospholipid metabolism, resulting in cell death. PMID:24194925

  7. Transport Properties of Ibuprofen Encapsulated in Cyclodextrin Nanosponge Hydrogels: A Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The chemical cross-linking of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) led to branched polymers referred to as cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNSEDTA). Two different preparations are described with 1:4 and 1:8 CD-EDTA molar ratios. The corresponding cross-linked polymers were contacted with 0.27 M aqueous solution of ibuprofen sodium salt (IP) leading to homogeneous, colorless, drug loaded hydrogels. The systems were characterized by high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Pulsed field gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the mean square displacement (MSD) of IP inside the polymeric gel at different observation times td. The data were further processed in order to study the time dependence of MSD: MSD = f(td). The proposed methodology is useful to characterize the different diffusion regimes that, in principle, the solute may experience inside the hydrogel, namely normal or anomalous diffusion. The full protocols including the polymer preparation and purification, the obtainment of drug-loaded hydrogels, the NMR sample preparation, the measurement of MSD by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy and the final data processing to achieve the time dependence of MSD are here reported and discussed. The presented experiments represent a paradigmatic case and the data are discussed in terms of innovative approach to the characterization of the transport properties of an encapsulated guest within a polymeric host of potential application for drug delivery. PMID:27585291

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and 13C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Portais, J C; Pianet, I; Allard, M; Merle, M; Raffard, G; Kien, P; Biran, M; Labouesse, J; Caille, J M; Canioni, P

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR [1-13C] glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm3. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the contralateral unaffected side. PMID:1674432

  9. Proton-detected 2D radio frequency driven recoupling solid-state NMR studies on micelle-associated cytochrome-b5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross-peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles.

  10. Lactonization and protonation of gluconic acid: a thermodynamicand kinetic study by potentiometry, nmr and esi-ms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Gibson, P.; Clark, S.B.; Tian, G.; Zanonato, P.; Rao, L.

    2007-01-10

    In acidic aqueous solutions, gluconate protonation is coupled with lactonization of gluconic acid. With the decrease of pC{sub H}, two lactones ({delta}/{gamma}) are sequentially formed. The {delta}-lactone forms more readily than the {gamma}-lactone. In 0.1 M gluconate solutions, if pC{sub H} is above 2.5, only the {delta}-lactone is generated. When pC{sub H} is decreased below 2.0, the formation of the {gamma}-lactone is observable although the {delta}-lactone predominates. At I = 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} and room temperature, the deprotonation constant of the carboxylic group, using the NMR technique, was determined to be log K{sub a} = 3.30 {+-} 0.02; the {delta}-lactonization constant, by the batch potentiometric titrations, was obtained to be log K{sub L} = - (0.54 {+-} 0.04). Using ESI-MS, the rate constants of the {delta}-lactonization and the hydrolysis at pC{sub H} {approx} 5.0 were estimated to be k{sub 1} = 3.2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and k{sup -1} = 1.1 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  11. Dynamic NMR study of the mechanisms of double, triple, and quadruple proton and deuteron transfer in cyclic hydrogen bonded solids of pyrazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Klein, Oliver; Aguilar-Parrilla, Francisco; Lopez, Juan Miguel; Jagerovic, Nadine; Elguero, José; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2004-09-22

    Using dynamic solid state (15)N CPMAS NMR spectroscopy (CP = cross polarization, MAS = magic angle spinning), the kinetics of the degenerate intermolecular double and quadruple proton and deuteron transfers in the cyclic dimer of (15)N labeled polycrystalline 3,5-diphenyl-4-bromopyrazole (DPBrP) and in the cyclic tetramer of (15)N labeled polycrystalline 3,5-diphenylpyrazole (DPP) have been studied in a wide temperature range at different deuterium fractions in the mobile proton sites. Rate constants were measured on a millisecond time scale by line shape analysis of the doubly (15)N labeled compounds, and by magnetization transfer experiments on a second timescale of the singly (15)N labeled compounds in order to minimize the effects of proton-driven (15)N spin diffusion. For DPBrP the multiple kinetic HH/HD/DD isotope effects could be directly obtained. By contrast, four rate constants k(1) to k(4) were obtained for DPP at different deuterium fractions. Whereas k(1) corresponds to the rate constant k(HHHH) of the HHHH isotopolog, an appropriate kinetic reaction model was needed for the kinetic assignment of the other rate constants. Using the model described by Limbach, H. H.; Klein, O.; Lopez Del Amo, J. M.; Elguero, J. Z. Phys. Chem. 2004,218, 17, a concerted quadruple proton-transfer mechanism as well as a stepwise consecutive single transfer mechanism could be excluded. By contrast, using the kinetic assignment k(2) approximately k(3) approximately k(HHHD) approximately k(HDHD) and k(3) approximately k(HDDD) approximately k(DDDD), the results could be explained in terms of a two-step process involving a zwitterionic intermediate. In this mechanism, each reaction step involves the concerted transfer of two hydrons, giving rise to primary kinetic HH/HD/DD isotope effects, whereas the nontransferred hydrons only contribute small secondary effects, which are not resolved experimentally. By contrast, the multiple kinetic isotope effects of the double proton

  12. 1020MHz single-channel proton fast magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Zhang, Rongchun; Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Shinji; Noguchi, Takashi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Goto, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tadashi; Maeda, Hideaki; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Toshio; Iguchi, Seiya; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Tetsuo; Suematsu, Hiroto; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a first successful demonstration of a single channel proton 3D and 2D high-throughput ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR techniques in an ultra-high magnetic field (1020MHz) NMR spectrometer comprised of HTS/LTS magnet. High spectral resolution is well demonstrated.

  13. NMR studies of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has long been used as an invaluable tool for structure and dynamic studies of macromolecules. Here we focus on the application of NMR spectroscopy in characterization of metalloproteins, including structural studies and identification of metal coordination spheres by hetero-/homo-nuclear metal NMR spectroscopy. Paramagnetic NMR as well as (13)C directly detected protonless NMR spectroscopy will also be addressed for application to paramagnetic metalloproteins. Moreover, these techniques offer great potential for studies of other non-metal binding macromolecules.

  14. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  15. Two-photon, /sup 13/C and two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopic studies of retinyl Schiff bases, protonated Schiff bases, and Schiff base salts: evidence for a protonation induced. pi pi. * excited state level ordering reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Birge, R.R.; Murray, L.P.; Zidovetzki, R.; Knapp, H.M.

    1987-04-01

    The ..pi pi..* excited singlet state manifolds of the visual chromophores, all-trans-retinylpyrrolidiniminium perchlorate (ATRSBS) and all-trans-N-retinylidene-n-butylimine:HCl (ATRPSB) are studied by using one-photon and two-photon laser spectroscopy. The goal is a better understanding of how protonation and counterion location affect level ordering in retinyl Schiff bases. Ambient temperature two-photon thermal lensing spectra indicate that ATRSBS has a lowest lying /sup 1/A/sub g/*/sup -/-like state as was observed previously for all-trans-retinal and the Schiff base of all-trans-retinal. In contrast, two-photon spectra of ATRPSB indicate that the protonated Schiff base has a lowest lying /sup 1/B/sub u/*/sup +/-like state. The origin of this level ordering reversal is analyzed by using molecular orbital theory as well as /sup 13/C and two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR. They conclude that the relative level ordering of the low-lying covalent and ionic ..pi pi..* excited states of protonated Schiff bases and Schiff base salts is highly sensitive to counterion location (diffuseness). INDO-PSDCI molecular orbital theory is shown to be a reliable theoretical method of predicting the effect of counterion location on the one-photon and two-photon properties of retinyl protonated Schiff bases and Schiff base salts. This study provides further experimental support for the conclusions of a previous two-photon investigation of the rhodopsin binding site which demonstrated that the protein bound 11-cis-retinyl chromophore is protonated and occupies a neutral binding site.

  16. Experimental estimation of postmortem interval using multivariate analysis of proton NMR metabolomic data.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Keiko; Koike, Kaoru; Uekusa, Kyoko; Nihira, Makoto; Yuta, Kohtaro; Ohno, Youkichi

    2009-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has recently been applied to metabolic studies. In particular, metabolic profiles of tissues or of the whole body can easily be acquired through multivariate analysis of NMR spectra. The present study investigates metabolic changes after death in rat femoral muscles using pattern recognition of proton NMR spectra. Rats were killed by suffocation, cocaine overdose and induced respiratory failure, and then low molecular weight metabolites extracted using perchlorate from excised tissues were measured using proton NMR. All spectral data were processed and assessed by multivariate analysis to obtain metabolic profiles of the tissues. The results of principal component analysis (PCA) score plots soon after death showed that the metabolic profiles of the tissues differed according to the mode of death. The principal component (PC) scores of the data varied hourly and correlated with postmortem interval. The present results showed that NMR-based metabolic profiling could provide useful information with which to estimate postmortem intervals and causes of death.

  17. Effect of solvent on proton location and dynamic behavior in short intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yukie; Masuda, Yuichi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen phthalate anion has a short strong O-H-O hydrogen bond (H-bond). According to previous experimental studies, the H-bond is asymmetric and two tautomers are interconverted in aqueous solutions. In the present study, the effects of polar solvents on the H-bond in a zwitterionic hydrogen phthalate derivative 1 were investigated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analyses of the trajectories for the methanol solution showed that the H-bonding proton tends to be located closer to the carboxylate group that forms fewer intermolecular H-bonds, than to the other carboxylate group and that the intramolecular proton transfer in 1 is triggered by the breakage and/or formation of an intermolecular H-bond. The enol form of dibenzoylmethane (2) also has a short H-bond, and the OH bond is reported to be rather long (>1.1 Å) in the crystal. In the present study, the effects of the solvent on the H-bond in 2 were investigated by molecular orbital (MO) calculations, MD simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for 2 in vacuum indicated that the barrier height for the intramolecular proton transfer is almost the same as the zero-point energy of the vibrational ground state, resulting in broad distribution of the proton density along the H-bond, owing to the nuclear quantum effect. The OH distances were determined in CCl4, acetonitrile, and dimethylsulfoxide solutions from the magnetic dipolar interactions between the 17O and 1H nuclei monitoring the nuclear magnetic relaxation times of 1H. The experimental results indicated that the H-bond geometry of 2 is influenced by the interactions with dimethylsulfoxide, suggesting the formation of a bifurcated H-bond, which was supported by the DFT calculations. The MD simulations for the methanol solution of 2 showed that the asymmetry of the OH distance is correlated with the asymmetry in the electrostatic field of the

  18. A 300 MHz and 600 MHz proton NMR study of a 12 base pair restriction fragment: investigation of structure by relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Early, T A; Kearns, D R; Hillen, W; Wells, R D

    1980-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of a 12 base pair DNA restriction fragment has been measured at 300 and 600 MHz and resonances from over 70 protons are individually resolved. Relaxation rate measurements have been carried out at 300 MHz and compared with the theoretical predictions obtained using an isotropic rigid rotor model with coordinates derived from a Dreiding model of DNA. The model gives results that are in excellent agreement with experiment for most protons when a 7 nsec rotational correlation time is used, although agreement is improved for certain base protons by using a shorter correlation time for the sugar group, or by increasing the sugar-base interproton distances. A comparison of non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation rates for carbon bound protons indicates that there is extensive spin diffusion even in this short DNA fragment. Examination of the spin-spin relaxation rates for the same type of proton on different base pairs reveals little sequence effect on conformation. PMID:6258152

  19. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid–liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid–liquid phases. PMID:27311326

  20. Two-dimensional NMR studies of squash family inhibitors. Sequence-specific proton assignments and secondary structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III

    SciTech Connect

    Krisnamoorthi, R.; Yuxi Gong; Chanlan Sun Lin ); VanderVelde, D. )

    1992-01-28

    The solution structure of reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III*) was investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. CMTI-III*, prepared by reacting CMTI-III with trypsin which cleaved the Arg5-Ile6 peptide bond, had the two fragments held together by a disulfide linkage. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H NMR resonance assignments were made for all the 29 amino acid residues of the protein. The secondary structure of CMTI-III*, as deduced from NOESY cross peaks and identification of slowly exchanging hydrogens, contains two turns, a 3{sub 10}-helix, and a triple-stranded {beta}-sheet. Sequential proton assignments were also made for the virgin inhibitor, CMTI-III, at pH 4.71, 30C. Comparison of backbone hydrogen chemical shifts of CMTI-III and CMTI-III* revealed significant changes for residues located far away from the reactive-site region as well as for those located near it, indicating tertiary structural changes that are transmitted through most of the 29 residues of the inhibitor protein. These chemical shift changes were relatively small compared to changes that occurred upon hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond between Arg 5 and Ile6 in CMTI-III.

  1. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-03-18

    The diffusion properties of H(+) in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface.

  2. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion properties of H+ in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface. PMID:26988733

  3. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion properties of H(+) in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface. PMID:26988733

  4. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  5. Two-dimensional proton J-resolved NMR spectroscopy of neomycin B

    SciTech Connect

    Botto, R.E.; Coxon, B.

    1984-01-01

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of a solution of neomycin B free base (Structure 1) in D/sub 2/O has been assigned completely by two-dimensional, homonuclear J-resolved NMR spectroscopy and spin decoupling at 400 MHz. Proton chemical shifts and proton-proton couplings are reported for all glycoside residues in neomycin B along with their computer simulated spectra. The /sup 4/C/sub 1/ chair conformation has been assigned to the 2,6-diamino-2,6-dideoxy-..beta..-L-idopyranosyl (ring D) portion of the antibiotic (1b) by analysis of the proton coupling constants and chemical shifts. The ..beta..-furanose form of the ribosyl portion (ring C) has been assigned. Vicinal proton couplings for the 2-deoxystreptaminyl group (ring B) are consistent with a chair conformation in which all ring substituents are equatorial, and proton chemical shift assignments are based on protonation studies. A computer simulated composite of the individual calculated spectra is presented for comparison with the experimental spectrum of neomycin B. 30 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  7. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  8. Synthesis and proton NMR spectroscopy of intra-vesicular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Luke Y-J; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under (1)H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall.

  9. Correlation of the antimicrobial activity of salicylaldehydes with broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton. Possible involvement of proton exchange processes in the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Elo, Hannu; Kuure, Matti; Pelttari, Eila

    2015-03-01

    Certain substituted salicylaldehydes are potent antibacterial and antifungal agents and some of them merit consideration as potential chemotherapeutic agents against Candida infections, but their mechanism of action has remained obscure. We report here a distinct correlation between broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton of salicylaldehydes and their activity against several types of bacteria and fungi. When proton NMR spectra of the compounds were determined using hexadeuterodimethylsulfoxide as solvent and the height of the OH proton signal was measured, using the signal of the aldehyde proton as an internal standard, it was discovered that a prerequisite of potent antimicrobial activity is that the proton signal is either unobservable or relatively very low, i.e. that it is extremely broadened. Thus, none of the congeners whose OH proton signal was high were potent antimicrobial agents. Some congeners that gave a very low OH signal were, however, essentially inactive against the microbes, indicating that although drastic broadening of the OH signal appears to be a prerequisite, also other (so far unknown) factors are needed for high antimicrobial activity. Because broadening of the hydroxyl proton signal is related to the speed of the proton exchange process(es) involving that proton, proton exchange may be involved in the mechanism of action of the compounds. Further studies are needed to analyze the relative importance of different factors (such as electronic effects, strength of the internal hydrogen bond, co-planarity of the ring and the formyl group) that determine the rates of those processes. PMID:25621992

  10. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins. PMID:27489348

  11. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins.

  12. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Bellon, V. , 34 - Montpellier )

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  14. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  15. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  16. High resolution proton NMR studies of gangliosides. Structure of two types of GD3 lactones and their reactivity with monoclonal antibody R24.

    PubMed

    Ando, S; Yu, R K; Scarsdale, J N; Kusunoki, S; Prestegard, J H

    1989-02-25

    Ganglioside GD3 was converted at room temperature to two stable lactones, denoted as GD3 lactones I and II. The reaction sequence was presumed to be GD3----GD3 lactone I----GD3 lactone II based on the time course of their production. Lactone I behaved as a monosialoganglioside and lactone II as a neutral species. The two lactones were isolated by DEAE-Sephadex column chromatography. The positions of the inner ester linkages were investigated by two-dimensional J-correlated proton NMR spectroscopy. An ester linkage was most likely formed between the carboxyl group of the external sialic acid residue and C9-OH of the internal sialic acid residue in lactone I. In addition to this ester linkage, a second ester linkage between the carboxyl group of the internal sialic acid and C2-OH of the galactose residue was likely formed in lactone II. The structural changes induced by lactonization were further examined by their reactivity with the monoclonal antibody R24 (Puckel, C. S., Lloyd, K. O., Travassos, L. R., Dippold, W. G., Oettgen, H. F., and Old, L. J. (1982) J. Exp. Med. 155, 1133-1147), which reacted with GD3. R24 was found to bind weakly to GD3 lactone I, but not to GD3 lactone II. The results suggest that the monoclonal antibody requires both sialic acid residues for high affinity binding, and the complete lactonization results in a loss of negative charges and/or a change in the overall conformation of the oligosaccharide moiety which may account for the loss of binding.

  17. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Applications: Proton NMR In Biological Objects Subjected To Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Proton NMR in Biological Objects Submitted to Magic Angle Spinning, In Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, Second Edition (Paul J. Worsfold, Alan Townshend and Colin F. Poole, eds.), Elsevier, Oxford 6:333-342. Published January 1, 2005. Proposal Number 10896.

  19. Proton 2D NMR and distance geometry study of the folding of Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor, a member of the squash inhibitors family

    SciTech Connect

    Heitz, A.; Chiche, L.; Le-Nguyen, D.; Castro, B. )

    1989-03-21

    The solution conformation of synthetic Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor II, a 28-residue peptide with 3 disulfide bridges, has been studied by {sup 1}H 2D NMR measurements. Secondary structure elements were determined: a miniantiparallel {beta}-sheet Met 7-Cys 9 and Gly 25-Cys 27, a {beta}-hairpin 20-28 with {beta}-turn 22-25, and two tight turns Asp 12-Cys 15 and Leu 16-Cys 19. A set of interproton distance restraints deduced from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectra and 13 {phi} backbone torsion angles restraints were used as the basis of three-dimensional structure computations including disulfide bridges arrangement by using distance geometry calculations. Computations for the 15 possible S-S linkage combinations lead to the proposal of the array 2-19, 9-21, 15-27 as the most probably structure for EETI II.

  20. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively. PMID:23561087

  1. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively.

  2. 15N-15N Proton Assisted Recoupling in Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Józef R.; De Paëpe, Gaël; Eddy, Matthew T.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiment for obtaining 15N-15N correlation spectra. The approach yields direct information about the secondary and tertiary structure of proteins, including identification of α-helical stretches and inter-strand connectivity in antiparallel β-sheets, which are of major interest for structural studies of membrane proteins and amyloid fibrils. The method, 15N-15N proton assisted recoupling (PAR), relies on a second order mechanism, third spin assisted recoupling (TSAR), used previously in the context of 15N-13C and 13C-13C polarization transfer schemes. In comparison to 15N-15N proton driven spin diffusion experiments, the PAR technique accelerates polarization transfer between 15N’s by a factor of ~102−103, and is furthermore applicable over the entire range of currently available MAS frequencies (10–70 kHz). PMID:19334788

  3. Analysis of Proton NMR in Hydrogen Bonds in Terms of Lone-Pair and Bond Orbital Contributions.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Kiplangat; Aucar, Gustavo A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-12-01

    NMR spectroscopic parameters of the proton involved in hydrogen bonding are studied theoretically. The set of molecules includes systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds, internal hydrogen bonds but no resonance stabilization, the acetic acid dimer (AAD), a DNA base pair, and the hydrogen succinate anion (HSA). Ethanol and guanine represent reference molecules without hydrogen bonding. The calculations are based on zero-point vibrationally averaged molecular structures in order to include anharmonicity effects in the NMR parameters. An analysis of the calculated NMR shielding and J-coupling is performed in terms of "chemist's orbitals", that is, localized molecular orbitals (LMOs) representing lone-pairs, atomic cores, and bonds. The LMO analysis associates some of the strong de-shielding of the protons in resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds with delocalization involving the π-backbone. Resonance is also shown to be an important factor causing de-shielding of the OH protons for AAD and HSA, but not for the DNA base pair. Nitromalonamide (NMA) and HSA have particularly strong hydrogen bonds exhibiting signs of covalency in the associated J-couplings. The analysis results show how NMR spectroscopic parameters that are characteristic for hydrogen bonded protons are influenced by the geometry and degree of covalency of the hydrogen bond as well as intra- and intermolecular resonance.

  4. Solid state NMR study of bone mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.

    1992-01-01

    In high field (9.4 T) CP MASS (cross polarization magic angle sample spinning) studies, in contrast to the scheme in the literature that infers the presence of minor constituents in spectra, we developed a new scheme to suppress the main part of the spectra to show the minor constituents. In order to perform in vivo solid state NMR studies, a double tuned two port surface coil probe was constructed. This probe is a modified version of the traditional Cross probe, which utilizes two 1/4 wave length 50 ohm transmission line, one with open ended and the other with shorted end, to isolate the high and low frequency circuits. The two resonance frequencies in Cross probe were proton and carbon. Our probe is designed to resonate at the proton and phosphorus frequencies, which are much closer to each other and hence more difficult to be tuned and matched simultaneously. Our approach to solve this problem is that instead of using standard 50 ohm transmission lines, we constructed a low capacity open end coaxial transmission line and low inductance shorted end coaxial transmission line. The Q of the phosphorus channel is high. We developed a short contact time cross polarization technique for non-MASS spectroscopy which reduces the signal of the major component of bone mineral to emphasize the minor component. By applying this technique on intact pork bone samples with our home made surface coil, we observed the wide line component, acid phosphate, for the first time. Hydroxyapatite, brushite and octacalcium are considered in the literature to be the model compounds for bone mineral. Cross polarization dynamics has been studied on hydroxyapatite and brushite, which yielded an NMR value for the distance between proton and phosphorus. One and two dimensional CP MASS spectroscopy of octacalcium phosphate were also studied, which revealed the different cross polarization rates and anisotropic channel shifts of acid phosphate and phosphate ions in octacalcium phosphate.

  5. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  6. Proton NMR studies of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitors: Evidence for pH-dependent conformational change and his25 - try27 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthi, R.; Chanlan Sun Lin; Yuxi Gong ); VanderVelde, D. ); Hahn, K. )

    1992-01-28

    A pH-dependent His25-Tyr27 interaction was demonstrated in the case of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitors (CMTI-I and CMTI-III) by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. pH titration, line widths, peak shapes, deuterium exchange kinetics, and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) were employed to characterize a conformational change involving Tyr27, which was shown to be triggered by deprotonation of His25 around pH 6. A hydrogen bond is proposed to be formed between N{sub {epsilon}} of His25 and OH of Tyr27, as a distance between the atoms, His25 N{epsilon} and Tyr25 OH, of 3.02 {angstrom} is consistent with a model built with NOE-derived distance constraints. The presently characterized relative orientations of His25 and Tyr27 are of functional significance, as these residues make contact with the enzyme in the enzyme-inhibitor complex. Furthermore, trypsin assay and inhibitor-binding studies showed that conformations of trypsin and the squash inhibitor complex. Furthermore, trypsin assay and inhibitor-binding studies showed that conformations of trypsin and the squash inhibitor were functionally relevant only in the pH range 6-8. The pK{sub a} of His25 was determined and found to be influenced by Glu9/Lys substitution and by the hydrolysis of the reactive-site peptide bond between Arg5 and Ile6. As these sites are located far (>10 {angstrom}) from His25, the results point out conformational changes that are propagated to a distant site in the protein molecule.

  7. Proton NMR Spectra: Deceptively Simple and Deceptively Complex Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurst, J. E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes relatively simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that demonstrate unexpected results of the deceptively simple and deceptively complex types. Background information, experimental procedures, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  8. Improvements in localized proton NMR spectroscopy of human brain. Water suppression, short echo times, and 1 ml resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, J.; Michaelis, T.; Merboldt, K. D.; Bruhn, H.; Gyngell, M. L.; Hänicke, W.

    Considerable technical improvements are reported for localized proton NMR spectroscopy using stimulated echoes. When compared to previous results, proton NMR spectra of the human brain are now obtainable (i) with in vivo water suppression factors of ⩾1000, (ii) with only minor T2 losses and negligible distortions due to J modulation at short echo times of 10-20 ms, and (iii) from volumes of interest as small as 1-8 ml within measuring times of 1-10 min. As a consequence, the detection of cerebral metabolites is greatly facilitated. This particularly applies to the assignment of those resonances (e.g., glutamate, taurine, inositols) that suffer from strong spin-spin coupling at the field strengths commonly in use for NMR in man. Studies of regional metabolite differences, tissue heterogeneity, and focal lesions in patients benefit from the increased spatial resolution and a concomitant reduction of partial volume effects. Localized proton NMR spectroscopy was performed on young healthy volunteers. Experiments were carried out on a 2.0 T whole-body MRI/MRS system using the standard headcoil for both imaging and spectroscopy.

  9. Optimum levels of exchangeable protons in perdeuterated proteins for proton detection in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Umit; Lange, Sascha; Trent Franks, W; Linser, Rasmus; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Reif, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the level of exchangeable protons on the observed amide proton linewidth obtained in perdeuterated proteins. Decreasing the amount of D(2)O employed in the crystallization buffer from 90 to 0%, we observe a fourfold increase in linewidth for both (1)H and (15)N resonances. At the same time, we find a gradual increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for (1)H-(15)N correlations in dipolar coupling based experiments for H(2)O concentrations of up to 40%. Beyond 40%, a significant reduction in SNR is observed. Scalar-coupling based (1)H-(15)N correlation experiments yield a nearly constant SNR for samples prepared with < or =30% H(2)O. Samples in which more H(2)O is employed for crystallization show a significantly reduced NMR intensity. Calculation of the SNR by taking into account the reduction in (1)H T (1) in samples containing more protons (SNR per unit time), yields a maximum SNR for samples crystallized using 30 and 40% H(2)O for scalar and dipolar coupling based experiments, respectively. A sensitivity gain of 3.8 is obtained by increasing the H(2)O concentration from 10 to 40% in the CP based experiment, whereas the linewidth only becomes 1.5 times broader. In general, we find that CP is more favorable compared to INEPT based transfer when the number of possible (1)H,(1)H interactions increases. At low levels of deuteration (> or =60% H(2)O in the crystallization buffer), resonances from rigid residues are broadened beyond detection. All experiments are carried out at MAS frequency of 24 kHz employing perdeuterated samples of the chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain.

  10. Influence of the incorporation of fibers in biscuit dough on proton mobility characterized by time domain NMR.

    PubMed

    Serial, M R; Blanco Canalis, M S; Carpinella, M; Valentinuzzi, M C; León, A E; Ribotta, P D; Acosta, R H

    2016-02-01

    The effect of fiber addition on the distribution and mobility of protons in biscuits is studied by using low resolution time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR). The proportion of flour is reduced in order to incorporate inulin and oat fiber. NMR temperature dependent experiments are carried out in order to gain insight on the processes occurring in biscuit baking. Proton populations were identified measuring spin-spin relaxation times (T2). The major change in the relaxation profiles upon incorporation of fibers corresponds to mobile water molecules, which appear to be related to dough spreading behavior and biscuit quality. Biscuit samples baked in a commercial oven were studied by two dimensional spin-lattice/spin-spin (T1-T2) relaxation maps. The T1/T2 ratio is used as an indicator of the population mobility, where changes in the mobility of water in contact with flour components as starch, proteins and pentosans are observed. PMID:26304434

  11. Deuteron and proton NMR study of D2, p-dichlorobenzene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene in bimesogenic liquid crystals with two nematic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnell, E. E.; Ahmed, Z.; Welch, C.; Mehl, G. H.; Dong, R. Y.

    2016-08-01

    The solutes dideuterium, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene and p-dichlorobenzene (pdcb) are co-dissolved in a 61/39 wt% mixture of CBC9CB/5CB, a bimesogenic liquid crystal with two nematic phases. NMR spectra are collected for each solute. The local electric field gradient (FZZ) is obtained from the dideuterium spectrum. A double Maier-Saupe potential (MSMS) is used to rationalize the order parameters of pdcb. The liquid-crystal fields G1 and G2 are taken to be due to size and shape interactions and interactions between the solute molecular quadrupole and the mean FZZ of the medium. The FZZ 's obtained from D2 and G2 (from pdcb) are compared and discussed.

  12. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:22986689

  13. Proton NMR investigation into the basis for the relatively high redox potential of lignin peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Turano, P. ); Ming Tien ); Kirk, T.K. )

    1991-08-15

    Lignin peroxidase shares several structural features with the well-studied horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase but carries a higher redox potential. Here the heme domain of lignin peroxidase and the lignin peroxidase cyanide adduct was examined by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, including nuclear Overhauser effect and two-dimensional measurements, and the findings were compared with those for horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase. Structural information was obtained on the orientation of the heme vinyl and propionate groups and the proximal and distal histidines. The shifts of the {var epsilon}1 proton of the proximal histidine were found to be empirically related to the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} redox potentials.

  14. Proton NMR assignments and regular backbone structure of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.D. ); Purisima, E.O. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); Eastman, M.A.; Scheraga, H.A. )

    1989-07-11

    Proton NMR assignments have been made for 121 of the 124 residues of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). During the first stage of assignment, COSY and relayed COSY data were used to identify 40 amino acid spin systems belonging to alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, and serine residues. Approximately 60 other NH-{alpha}CH-{beta}CH systems were also identified but not assigned to specific amino acid type. NOESY data then were used to connect sequentially neighboring spin systems; approximately 475 of the possible 700 resonances in RNase A were assigned in this way. The authors' assignments agree with those for 20 residues assigned previously. NOESY correlations were used to identify regular backbone structure elements in RNase A, which are very similar to those observed in X-ray crystallographic studies.

  15. Proton NMR studies of bovine and porcine phospholipase A sub 2 : Assignment of aromatic resonances and evidence for a conformational equilibrium in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.; Primrose, W.U.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Dekker, N.; Boelens, R.; Kaptein, R.; Slotboom, A.J. )

    1989-07-11

    Bovine and porcine pancreatic phospholipases A{sub 2}, and porcine isophospholipase A{sub 2}, have been investigated by one- and two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. Resonances have been assigned for 20-26 residues in each enzyme, including all the aromatic residues, by a strategy based on the semiquantitative comparison of proximity relationships deduced from NOE experiments with those seen in the crystal structure. NOE experiments indicate that the loop comprising residues 59-70, which has a different conformation in the crystal structures of the bovine and porcine enzymes, has the same conformation in these two enzymes in solution. Selective changes in the line width of a limited number of resonances as a function of pH, temperature, and calcium concentration provide evidence for a local conformational equilibrium. This equilibrium involves a limited region of the protein structure around residues 25, 41, 106, and 111; it has been identified in the bovine enzyme and porcine isoenzyme but is not apparent in the porcine enzyme.

  16. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) 14N spectra ( I = 1) via spy nuclei S = 1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T11IT11S and T21IT11S at the beginning of the evolution interval t1. The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t1 to ω1 may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S- S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected 14N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the 14N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of L-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for L-alanine the width of the 14N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide 14N in AAG peptide bonds.

  17. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  18. Multiple active site histidine protonation states in Acetobacter aceti N5-carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide mutase detected by REDOR NMR.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jacob; Jiang, Hong; Ransome, Aaron E; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-08-21

    Class I PurE (N5-carboxyaminoimidazole mutase) catalyzes a chemically unique mutase reaction. A working mechanistic hypothesis involves a histidine (His45 in Escherichia coli PurE) functioning as a general acid, but no evidence for multiple protonation states has been obtained. Solution NMR is a peerless tool for this task but has had limited application to enzymes, most of which are larger than its effective molecular size limit. Solid-state NMR is not subject to this limit. REDOR NMR studies of a 151 kDa complex of uniformly 15N-labeled Acetobacter aceti PurE (AaPurE) and the active site ligand [6-13C]citrate probed a single ionization equilibrium associated with the key histidine (AaPurE His59). In the AaPurE complex, the citrate central carboxylate C6 13C peak moves upfield, indicating diminution of negative charge, and broadens, indicating heterogeneity. Histidine 15N chemical shifts indicate His59 exists in approximately equimolar amounts of an Ndelta-unprotonated (pyridine-like) form and an Ndelta-protonated (pyrrole-like) form, each of which is approximately 4 A from citrate C6. The spectroscopic data are consistent with proton transfers involving His59 Ndelta that are invoked in the class I PurE mechanism.

  19. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  20. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  1. Conformational NMR Study of Bistriazolyl Anion Receptors.

    PubMed

    Makuc, Damjan; Merckx, Tamara; Dehaen, Wim; Plavec, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Conformational features of pyridine- and pyrimidine-based bistriazolyl anion receptors dissolved in acetonitrile-d3 were assessed by multidimensional, heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. NOESY correlation signals suggested preorganization of both host molecules in solution in the absence of anions. In addition, only a single set of signals was observed in the 1H NMR spectra, which suggested a symmetrical conformation of anion receptors or their conformational exchange that is fast on the NMR time-scale. Furthermore, the predominant conformations of the pyridine- and pyrimidine-based anion receptors are preserved upon addition of chloride, bromide, and acetate anions. Chemical shift changes observed upon addition of anions showed that the NH (thio)urea and triazole protons are involved in anion-receptor interactions through hydrogen bonding. PMID:27640375

  2. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  3. 1H-NMR measurements of proton mobility in nano-crystalline YSZ.

    PubMed

    Hinterberg, Judith; Adams, Alina; Blümich, Bernhard; Heitjans, Paul; Kim, Sangtae; Munir, Zuhair A; Martin, Manfred

    2013-12-01

    We report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results on water saturated, dense, nano-crystalline YSZ samples (9.5 mol% yttria doped zirconia) which exhibit proton conductivity at temperatures as low as room temperature. (1)H-NMR spectra recorded under static and magic angle spinning conditions show two distinct signals. Their temperature-dependent behavior and their linewidths suggest that one can be attributed to (free) water adsorbed on the surface of the sample and the other one to mobile protons within the sample. This interpretation is supported by comparison with measurements on a single-crystalline sample. For the nano-crystalline samples motional narrowing is observed for the signal originating from protons in the sample interior. For these protons, the analysis of temperature and field dependent spin-lattice relaxation time T1 points towards diffusion in a confined two-dimensional geometry. We attribute this quasi two-dimensional motion to protons that are mobile along internal interfaces or nanopores of nano-crystalline YSZ.

  4. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Barany, M.; Arus, C.

    1986-03-01

    Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.

  5. Diffusion dependence of proton NMR relaxation rates in the presence of ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Michael; Hammel, P. Chris

    2009-03-01

    Ferritin is the predominant iron-storage protein in living organisms. It may serve as an indicator of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Measuring brain ferritin concentration non-invasively via MRI could enable better diagnoses and treatments of such diseases. Quantitative MRI determination of the ferritin concentration requires an understanding of the NMR relaxation mechanisms of hydrogen protons in the presence of ferritin. In aqueous solutions, ferritin enhances the transverse relaxation rate (R2) of the protons. This is thought to occur due to a diffusive mechanism, where protons diffusing near ferritin pass through a region of elevated magnetic field, and a chemical exchange mechanism, where protons bind to the protein for a period of time, experiencing an even higher magnetic field. These two mechanisms exhibit different dependencies on the self-diffusion coefficient of the protons. By adding glycerol to aqueous solutions, we control the self-diffusion of protons. We measure the R2 of protons in ferritin-containing binary mixtures of water and glycerol using CPMG sequences, and compare the experimental results to theoretical predictions of diffusion dependence in order to distinguish the relative importance of the mechanisms.

  6. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  7. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  8. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  9. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  10. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively.

  11. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively. PMID:25241007

  12. Dynamic NMR study of trans-cyclodecene

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, D.M.; Noe, E.A.

    1996-12-18

    The slow-exchange {sup 13}C spectrum of trans-cyclodecene at -154.9{degree}C shows eight peaks of the olefinic carbons, and these are interpreted in terms of five conformations. Three of the conformations are of C{sub 1} symmetry, and two are of C{sub 2} symmetry. Further evidence for the number of conformations and their symmetries came from a proton NMR spectrum of the olefinic hydrogens taken at -154.9{degree}C with decoupling the allylic hydrogens. Populations ranged from 3.0% to 37.6% with the least-populated conformation having a free energy of 0.59 kcal/mol, relative to the most stable conformer. The conformations studied by Saunders and Jimenez-Vazquez using Allinger`s MM3 force field are described, and the calculated strain energies and populations are discussed. Energies for six conformations were also obtained from ab initio calculations at the HF/6-311G{sup *} level. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. CLOUDS, a protocol for deriving a molecular proton density via NMR.

    PubMed

    Grishaev, Alexander; Llinás, Miguel

    2002-05-14

    We demonstrate the feasibility of computing realistic spatial proton distributions for proteins in solution from experimental NMR nuclear Overhauser effect data only and with minimal assignments. The method, CLOUDS, relies on precise and abundant interproton distance restraints calculated via a relaxation matrix analysis of sets of experimental nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy crosspeaks. The MIDGE protocol was adapted for this purpose. A gas of unassigned, unconnected H atoms is condensed into a structured proton distribution (cloud) via a molecular dynamics simulated-annealing scheme in which the internuclear distances and van der Waals repulsive terms are the only active restraints. Proton densities are generated by combining a large number of such clouds, each computed from a different trajectory. After filtering by reference to the cloud closest to the mean, a minimal dispersion proton density (foc) is identified. The latter affords a quasi-continuous hydrogen-only probability distribution that conveys immediate information on the protein surface topology (grooves, protrusions, potential binding site cavities, etc.), directly related to the molecular structure. Feasibility of the method was tested on NMR data measured on two globular protein domains of low regular secondary structure content, the col 2 domain of human matrix metalloproteinase-2 and the kringle 2 domain of human plasminogen, of 60 and 83 amino acid residues, respectively.

  14. NMR studies of borates and borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, P. J.

    1986-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been employed for some 25 years to study the structure of boron-containing compounds.1-3 The earliest works employed the 11B nuclear isotope in a study of glasses containing boron oxide. Many additional NMR studies3-10 of boron-containing glasses have utilized both the 11B and 10B isotopes. Crystalline materials were also studied2,3 at an early date, with particular attention given to borides and boron carbide. After a discussion of the features of NMR spectroscopy particularly pertinent for the study of boron-containing compounds, highlights of the early work and more recent studies will be summarized to indicate the usefulness of 10B and 11B NMR for structural studies.

  15. Ab initio study of {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts for the chromophores of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin. 2. Comprehensive analysis of the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of protonated all-trans-retinylidene Schiff base

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Minoru; Wada, Mitsuhito; Inoue, Yoshio; Tamura, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yoichi

    1996-02-01

    Theoretical analysis was performed for the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of the retinal chromophore in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by means of ab initio NMR shielding calculation, based on the localized orbital/ local origin method. In order to comprehensively investigate the correlation between the {sup 13}C chemical shieldings of the unsaturated carbons and physicochemical perturbations relating to the spectral tuning of bacteriorhodopsin, the following three factors are taken into account in the present calculation: (1) change in strength of the hydrogen bonding between protonated retinylidene Schiff base and its counterion, (2) conformational changes about single bonds of the conjugated chain, and (3) electrostatic interactions between the Schiff base and electric dipoles. On the basis of these calculations, we successfully find a molecular model for which the shielding calculation almost completely reproduces the observed chemical shift data for the chromophore of bR. 47 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Natural-abundance 15N NMR studies of Turkey ovomucoid third domain. Assignment of peptide 15N resonances to the residues at the reactive site region via proton-detected multiple-quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Polo, Gilberto; Krishnamoorthi, R.; Markley, John L.; Live, David H.; Davis, Donald G.; Cowburn, David

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional 1H{ 15N} multiple-quantum (MQ) spectroscopy has been applied to a protein sample at natural abundance: ovomucoid third domain from turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo), a serine proteinase inhibitor of 56 amino acid residues. Peptide amide 1H NMR assignments obtained by two-dimensional 1H{ 1H} NMR methods (R. Krishnamoorthi and J. L. Markley, unpublished data) led to identification of the corresponding 1H{ 15N} MQ coherence cross peaks. From these, 15N NMR chemical shifts were determined for several specific backbone amide groups of amino acid residues located around the reactive site region of the inhibitor. The results suggest that amide 15N chemical shifts, which are readily obtained in this way, may serve as sensitive probes for conformational studies of proteins.

  17. Novel application of NMR relaxometry in studies of diffusion in virgin rape oil.

    PubMed

    Rachocki, A; Tritt-Goc, J

    2014-01-01

    Field cycling (FC) proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) relaxometry was applied to study the dynamics of rape oil molecules. The spin-lattice relaxation data, measured in the frequency range from 0.01 to 30 MHz, were analysed by applying relaxation theory combined with the force-free-hard-sphere (FFHS) diffusion model. In the low frequency range, the relaxation was dominated by the translational diffusion contribution. Therefore, the diffusion coefficient of rape oil was determined from a linear dependence of the (1)H NMR relaxation dispersion drawn as a function of the square root of Larmor frequency. The results are consistent with those obtained from the pulse gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR method. To estimate the density of oil protons, a parameter required to derive the diffusion coefficient from NMR relaxometry, a single point imaging (SPI) NMR experiment was proposed.

  18. Precision high-throughput proton NMR spectroscopy of human urine, serum, and plasma for large-scale metabolic phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Dona, Anthony C; Jiménez, Beatriz; Schäfer, Hartmut; Humpfer, Eberhard; Spraul, Manfred; Lewis, Matthew R; Pearce, Jake T M; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2014-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic phenotyping of urine and blood plasma/serum samples provides important prognostic and diagnostic information and permits monitoring of disease progression in an objective manner. Much effort has been made in recent years to develop NMR instrumentation and technology to allow the acquisition of data in an effective, reproducible, and high-throughput approach that allows the study of general population samples from epidemiological collections for biomarkers of disease risk. The challenge remains to develop highly reproducible methods and standardized protocols that minimize technical or experimental bias, allowing realistic interlaboratory comparisons of subtle biomarker information. Here we present a detailed set of updated protocols that carefully consider major experimental conditions, including sample preparation, spectrometer parameters, NMR pulse sequences, throughput, reproducibility, quality control, and resolution. These results provide an experimental platform that facilitates NMR spectroscopy usage across different large cohorts of biofluid samples, enabling integration of global metabolic profiling that is a prerequisite for personalized healthcare. PMID:25180432

  19. Probing microstructure evolution during the hardening of gypsum by proton NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Jaffel, Hamouda; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Ndobo-Epoy, Jean-Philippe; Morin, Vincent; Guicquero, Jean-Pierre

    2006-04-13

    We report a comprehensive proton NMR relaxation study of the water confined in the evolving porous structure of hardened gypsum prepared with different water-to-plaster ratios (w/p) and increasing additions of crushed gypsum. This study gives some new information on the microstructure, the water distribution, and the hydration kinetics without any drying or perturbing preparation. The bi-exponential transverse magnetization decay reveals the existence of two water populations in slow exchange. However, the different behaviors of these populations during saturation and desaturation experiments show evidence of a fast exchange of each population with the surface. Two modes of organization of the microstructure of this material are identified through an original model of exchange as a function of the water-to-plaster ratio (0.4 < or = w/p < or = 0.6 and 0.7 < or = w/p < or = 1). A clear gap is shown in the exchange rate value above w/p = 0.6 that could be representative of a percolation threshold. Both the method and the theory presented can be applied more widely to other porous media with reactive surface areas. PMID:16599514

  20. Quantification of Water-Soluble Metabolites in Medicinal Mushrooms Using Proton NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Mishchuk, Darya O; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble metabolites in 5 mushrooms were identified and quantified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and software for targeted metabolite detection and quantification. In total, 35 compounds were found in Agaricus brasiliensis, 25 in Taiwanofungus camphoratus, 23 in Ganoderma lucidum (Taiwan) and Lentinus edodes, and 16 in G. lucidum (China). Total amounts of all identified metabolites in A. brasiliensis, T. camphoratus, G. lucidum, G. lucidum (China), and L. edodes were 149,950.51, 12,834.18, 9,549.09, 2,788.41, and 111,726.51 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. These metabolites were categorized into 4 groups: free amino acids and derivatives, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and nucleosides. Carbohydrates were the most abundant metabolites among all 4 groups, with mannitol having the highest concentration among all analyzed metabolites (848-94,104 mg/kg dry weight). Principal components analysis (PCA) showed obvious distinction among the metabolites of the 5 different kinds of mushrooms analyzed in this study. Thus PCA could provide an optional analytical way of identifying and recognizing the compositions of flavor products. Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that NMRbased metabolomics is a powerful tool for differentiating between various medicinal mushrooms. PMID:27649603

  1. MRI and unilateral NMR study of reindeer skin tanning processes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizheng; Del Federico, Eleonora; Ilott, Andrew J; Klokkernes, Torunn; Kehlet, Cindie; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-04-01

    The study of arctic or subarctic indigenous skin clothing material, known for its design and ability to keep the body warm, provides information about the tanning materials and techniques. The study also provides clues about the culture that created it, since tanning processes are often specific to certain indigenous groups. Untreated skin samples and samples treated with willow (Salix sp) bark extract and cod liver oil are compared in this study using both MRI and unilateral NMR techniques. The two types of samples show different proton spatial distributions and different relaxation times, which may also provide information about the tanning technique and aging behavior.

  2. MRI and unilateral NMR study of reindeer skin tanning processes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizheng; Del Federico, Eleonora; Ilott, Andrew J; Klokkernes, Torunn; Kehlet, Cindie; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-04-01

    The study of arctic or subarctic indigenous skin clothing material, known for its design and ability to keep the body warm, provides information about the tanning materials and techniques. The study also provides clues about the culture that created it, since tanning processes are often specific to certain indigenous groups. Untreated skin samples and samples treated with willow (Salix sp) bark extract and cod liver oil are compared in this study using both MRI and unilateral NMR techniques. The two types of samples show different proton spatial distributions and different relaxation times, which may also provide information about the tanning technique and aging behavior. PMID:25719858

  3. HyperBIRD: a sensitivity-enhanced approach to collecting homonuclear-decoupled proton NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Kevin J; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Samples prepared following dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enable the detection of NMR spectra from low-γ nuclei with outstanding sensitivity, yet have limited use for the enhancement of abundant species like (1)H nuclei. Small- and intermediate-sized molecules, however, show strong heteronuclear cross-relaxation effects: spontaneous processes with an inherent isotopic selectivity, whereby only the (13)C-bonded protons receive a polarization enhancement. These effects are here combined with a recently developed method that delivers homonuclear-decoupled (1)H spectra in natural abundance samples based on heteronuclear couplings to these same, (13)C-bonded nuclei. This results in the HyperBIRD methodology; a single-shot combination of these two effects that can simultaneously simplify and resolve complex, congested (1)H NMR spectra with many overlapping spin multiplets, while achieving 50-100 times sensitivity enhancements over conventional thermal counterparts. PMID:25256418

  4. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  5. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  6. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3 - 4 fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8 - 13 fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling. PMID:19857977

  7. High resolution heteronuclear correlation NMR spectroscopy between quadrupolar nuclei and protons in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbourt, A.; Vinogradov, E.; Goobes, G.; Vega, S.

    2004-08-01

    A high resolution two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment is presented that correlates half-integer quadrupolar spins with protons. In this experiment the quadrupolar nuclei evolve during t1 under a split-t1, FAM-enhanced MQMAS pulse scheme. After each t1 period ending at the MQMAS echo position, single quantum magnetization is transferred, via a cross polarization process in the mixing time, from the quadrupolar nuclei to the protons. High-resolution proton signals are then detected in the t2 time domain during wPMLG5* homonuclear decoupling. The experiment has been demonstrated on a powder sample of sodium citrate and 23Na- 1H 2D correlation spectra have been obtained. From the HETCOR spectra and the regular MQMAS spectrum, the three crystallographically inequivalent Na + sites in the asymmetric unit were assigned. This MQMAS- wPMLG HETCOR pulse sequence can be used for spectral editing of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei coupled to protons.

  8. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  9. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min. PMID:25158224

  10. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  11. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  12. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  13. Interaction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae. alpha. -factor with phospholipid vesicles as revealed by proton and phosphorus NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Jelicks, L.A.; Broido, M.S.; Becker, J.M.; Naider, F.R. )

    1989-05-16

    Proton and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR) studies of the interaction between a tridecapeptide pheromone, the {alpha}-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and sonicated lipid vesicles are reported. {sup 31}P NMR studies demonstrate that there is interaction of the peptide with the phosphorus headgroups, and quasielastic light scattering (QLS) studies indicate that lipid vesicles increase in size upon addition of peptide. Previous solution (aqueous and DMSO) studies from this laboratory indicate that {alpha}-factor is highly flexible with only one long-lived identifiable structural feature, a type II {beta}-turn spanning the central portion of the peptide. Two-dimensional (2D) {sup 1}H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) studies demonstrate a marked ordering of the peptide upon interaction with lipid, suggesting a compact N-terminus, in addition to a stabilized {beta}-turn. In contrast to these results in both solution and lipid environment, Wakamatsu et al. proposed a lipid environment conformation, on the basis of one-dimensional transferred NOE studies in D{sub 2}O, which does not include the {beta}-turn.

  14. NMR study of stable radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obynochny, A. A.; Maryasov, A. G.; Shakirov, M. M.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    1993-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the NMR spectrum of methyl-substituted nitroxyl radical of the imidazoline series has been studied. The NMR signal induced by radicals in the gas phase has been observed. A shift of the lines of the NMR spectrum in the gas phase according to the Curie law is observed which allows one to determine the value of the hfi constant of the protons of different racial groups. The hfi constant for methyl-substituted radical within experimental accuracy coincides with those measured by other methods in the liquid phase. In the absorbed phase of the samples under study, a substantial contribution is made by the volumetric susceptibility of the liquid film. The diamagnetic contribution to the magnetic susceptibility of the radical in the liquid state has been measured (in the film of 2 × 10 -6). When the thickness of the adsorbed film is small, the molecular exchange between the liquid and gas phases becomes noticeable, causing a corresponding additional shift of the lines. The gas-kinetic cross section for the radical (120 Å 2) has been estimated from the temperature dependence of the line width in the gas phase.

  15. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered.

  17. On the potential of hyperpolarized water in biomolecular NMR studies

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Talia; Szekely, Or; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    A main obstacle arising when using ex-situ hyperpolarization to increase the sensitivity of biomolecular NMR, is the fast relaxation that macromolecular spins undergo upon being transferred from the polarizer to the spectrometer where their observation takes place. To cope with this limitation the present study explores the use of hyperpolarized water, as a means to enhance the sensitivity of nuclei in biomolecules. Methods to achieve proton polarizations in excess of 5% in water transferred into the NMR spectrometer were devised, as were methods enabling this polarization to last for up to 30 sec. Upon dissolving aminoacids and polypeptides sited at the spectrometer into such hyperpolarized water, a substantial enhancement of certain biomolecular amide and amine proton resonances was observed. This exchange driven 1H enhancement was further passed on to sidechain and to backbone nitrogens, owing to spontaneous one-bond Overhauser processes. 15N signal enhancements >500 over 11.7 T thermal counterparts could thus be imparted, in a kinetic process that enabled multi-scan signal averaging. Besides potential bioanalytical uses, this approach opens interesting possibilities in the monitoring of dynamic biomolecular processes -including solvent accessibility and exchange process. PMID:24417324

  18. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  19. Improving the resolution in proton-detected through-space heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ming; Trébosc, J.; Lafon, O.; Pourpoint, F.; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, J.-P.

    2014-08-01

    Connectivities and proximities between protons and low-gamma nuclei can be probed in solid-state NMR spectroscopy using two-dimensional (2D) proton-detected heteronuclear correlation, through Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (HMQC) pulse sequence. The indirect detection via protons dramatically enhances the sensitivity. However, the spectra are often broadened along the indirect F1 dimension by the decay of heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherences under the strong 1H-1H dipolar couplings. This work presents a systematic comparison of the performances of various decoupling schemes during the indirect t1 evolution period of dipolar-mediated HMQC (D-HMQC) experiment. We demonstrate that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequences during t1, such as symmetry-based schemes, phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) and Decoupling Using Mind-Boggling Optimization (DUMBO), provide better resolution than continuous wave 1H irradiation. We also report that high resolution requires the preservation of 1H isotropic chemical shifts during the decoupling sequences. When observing indirectly broad spectra presenting numerous spinning sidebands, the D-HMQC sequence must be fully rotor-synchronized owing to the rotor-synchronized indirect sampling and dipolar recoupling sequence employed. In this case, we propose a solution to reduce artefact sidebands caused by the modulation of window delays before and after the decoupling application during the t1 period. Moreover, we show that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequence using Smooth Amplitude Modulation (SAM) minimizes the t1-noise. The performances of the various decoupling schemes are assessed via numerical simulations and compared to 2D 1H-{13C} D-HMQC experiments on [U-13C]-L-histidineṡHClṡH2O at various magnetic fields and Magic Angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. Great resolution and sensitivity enhancements resulting from decoupling during t1 period enable the detection of heteronuclear correlation between aliphatic protons and

  20. Mechanism of Efficient Proton Conduction in Diphosphoric Acid Elucidated via First-Principles Simulation and NMR.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Rachel A; Vilčiauskas, Linas; Melchior, Jan-Patrick; Bester, Gabriel; Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-12-31

    Diphosphoric acid (H4P2O7) is the first condensation product of phosphoric acid (H3PO4), the compound with the highest intrinsic proton conductivity in the liquid state. It exists at higher temperature (T > 200 °C) and lower relative humidity (RH ≈ 0.01%) and shows significant ionic conductivity under these conditions. In this work, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of a pure H4P2O7 model system and NMR spectroscopy on nominal H4P2O7 (which contains significant amounts of ortho- and triphosphoric acid in thermodynamic equilibrium) were performed to reveal the nature and underlying mechanisms of the ionic conductivity. The central oxygen of the molecule is found to be excluded from any hydrogen bonding, which has two interesting consequences: (i) compared to H3PO4, the acidity of H4P2O7 is severely increased, and (ii) the condensation reaction only leads to a minor decrease in hydrogen bond network frustration, which is thought to be one of the features enabling high proton conductivity. A topological analysis of diphosphoric acid's hydrogen bond network shows remarkable similarities to that of phosphonic acid (H3PO3). The hydrogen bonding facilitates protonic polarization fluctuations (Zundel polarization) extending over several molecules (Grotthuss chains), the other important ingredient for efficient structural diffusion of protons. At T = 160 °C, this is estimated to make a conductivity contribution of about 0.1 S/cm, which accounts for half of the total ionic conductivity (σ ≈ 0.2 S/cm). The other half is suggested to result from diffusion of charged phosphate species (vehicle mechanism) that are present in high concentration, resembling conduction in ionic liquids. PMID:26633234

  1. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K.

    2015-12-01

    1H -detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong 1H -1H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40 kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic 1H -detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30 kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the 1H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60 kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid- β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current 13C -detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  2. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies.

    PubMed

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2015-12-01

    (1)H-detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong (1)H-(1)H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic (1)H-detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the (1)H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid-β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current (13)C-detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  3. H2O/OH ratio determination in hydrous aluminosilicate glasses by static proton NMR and the effect of chemical shift anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Riemer, T; Schmidt, B; Behrens, H; Dupree, R

    2000-04-01

    Static 1H NMR spectra of hydrous NaAlSi3O8 glasses have been acquired at low temperature (140 K) in order to quantitatively determine OH and H2O concentrations. Since both components overlap in the spectra, an unambiguous determination of the line shapes is required. The structurally bonded hydroxyl groups are well described by a Gaussian line and the water molecules exhibit a Pake doublet-like line shape due to the strong proton-proton dipolar interaction. However, at proton resonance frequencies used in this study (360 MHz), the Pake doublet has an asymmetric line shape due to chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), which is significant and must be included in any simulation in order to reproduce the experimental line shape successfully. The simulations for rigid water molecules dissolved in our hydrous aluminosilicate glasses result in a CSA of 30+/-5 ppm and a dipolar interaction constant of 63.8+/-2.5 kHz (i.e., dipolar coupling constant (DCC) of 42.6+/-1.7 kHz), corresponding to a proton-proton distance of r(ij) = 154+/-2 pm. In contrast to earlier work, water speciation obtained from the simulations of our 1H NMR spectra are in excellent agreement with those obtained from infrared (IR) spectroscopy.

  4. Quantitative analysis of cyclic dimer fatty acid content in the dimerization product by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyun Joo; Kim, Minyoung; Seok, Seunghwan; Kim, Young-Wun; Kim, Do Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In this work, (1)H NMR is utilized for the quantitative analysis of a specific cyclic dimer fatty acid in a dimer acid mixture using the pseudo-standard material of mesitylene on the basis of its structural similarity. Mesitylene and cyclic dimer acid levels were determined using the signal of the proton on the cyclic ring (δ=6.8) referenced to the signal of maleic acid (δ=6.2). The content of the cyclic dimer fatty acid was successfully determined through the standard curve of mesitylene and the reported equation. Using the linearity of the mesitylene curve, the cyclic dimer fatty acid in the oil mixture was quantified. The results suggest that the proposed method can be used to quantify cyclic compounds in mixtures to optimize the dimerization process.

  5. Proton capture resonance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.E. |; Bilpuch, E.G. |; Bybee, C.R. |; Cox, J.M.; Fittje, L.M. |; Labonte, M.A.; Moore, E.F.; Shriner, J.D. |; Shriner, J.F. Jr. |; Vavrina, G.A. |; Wallace, P.M. |

    1997-02-01

    The fluctuation properties of quantum systems now are used as a signature of quantum chaos. The analyses require data of extremely high quality. The {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction is being used to establish a complete level scheme of {sup 30}P to study chaos and isospin breaking in this nuclide. Determination of the angular momentum J, the parity {pi}, and the isospin T from resonance capture data is considered. Special emphasis is placed on the capture angular distributions and on a geometric description of these angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Multinuclear NMR studies of relaxor ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Donghua

    Multinuclear NMR of 93Nb, 45Sc, and 207Pb has been carried out to study the structure, disorder, and dynamics of a series of important solid solutions: perovskite relaxor ferroelectric materials (1-x) Pb(Mg1/3Nb 2/3)O3-x Pb(Sc1/2Nb1/2)O 3 (PMN-PSN). 93Nb NMR investigations of the local structure and cation order/disorder are presented as a function of PSN concentration, x. The superb fidelity and accuracy of 3QMAS allows us to make clear and consistent assignments of spectral intensities to the 28 possible nearest B-site neighbor (nBn) configurations, (NMg, NSc, NNb), where each number ranges from 0 to 6 and their sum is 6. For most of the 28 possible nBn configurations, isotropic chemical shifts and quadrupole product constants have been extracted from the data. The seven configurations with only larger cations, Mg 2+ and Sc3+ (and no Nb5+) are assigned to the seven observed narrow peaks, whose deconvoluted intensities facilitate quantitative evaluation of, and differentiation between, different models of B-site (chemical) disorder. The "completely random" model is ruled out and the "random site" model is shown to be in qualitative agreement with the NMR experiments. To obtain quantitative agreement with observed NMR intensities, the random site model is slightly modified by including unlike-pair interaction energies. To date, 45Sc studies have not been as fruitful as 93Nb NMR because the resolution is lower in the 45Sc spectra. The lower resolution of 45Sc spectra is due to a smaller span of isotropic chemical shift (40 ppm for 45Sc vs. 82 ppm for 93Nb) and to the lack of a fortuitous mechanism that simplifies the 93Nb spectra; for 93Nb the overlap of the isotropic chemical shifts of 6-Sc and 6-Nb configurations results in the alignment of all the 28 configurations along only seven quadrupole distribution axes. Finally we present variable temperature 207Pb static, MAS, and 2D-PASS NMR studies. Strong linear correlations between isotropic and anisotropic chemical

  7. Amide Proton Solvent Protection in Amylin Fibrils Probed by Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2013-01-01

    Amylin is an endocrine hormone that accumulates in amyloid plaques in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes. The amyloid plaques have been implicated in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which synthesize amylin and insulin. To better characterize the secondary structure of amylin in amyloid fibrils we assigned the NMR spectrum of the unfolded state in 95% DMSO and used a quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange technique to look at amide proton solvent protection in the fibrils. In this technique, partially exchanged fibrils are dissolved in 95% DMSO and information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils is determined from DMSO-denatured monomers. Hydrogen exchange lifetimes at pH 7.6 and 37°C vary between ∼5 h for the unstructured N-terminus to 600 h for amide protons in the two β-strands that form inter-molecular hydrogen bonds between amylin monomers along the length of the fibril. Based on the protection data we conclude that residues A8-H18 and I26-Y37 comprise the two β-strands in amylin fibrils. There is variation in protection within the β-strands, particularly for strand β1 where only residues F15-H18 are strongly protected. Differences in protection appear to be due to restrictions on backbone dynamics imposed by the packing of two-layers of C2-symmetry-related β-hairpins in the protofilament structure, with strand β1 positioned on the surface and β2 in the interior. PMID:23457571

  8. NMR Studies of Cartilage Dynamics, Diffusion, Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jurgen; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann Jorn; Arnold, Klaus

    An increasing number of people is suffering from rheumatic diseases, and, therefore, methods of early diagnosis of joint degeneration are urgently required. For their establishment, however, an improved knowledge about the molecular organisation of cartilage would be helpful. Cartilage consists of three main components: Water, collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS) that is (together with further polysaccharides and proteins) a major constituent of the proteoglycans of cartilage. 1H and 13C MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) opened new perspectives for the study of the macromolecular components in cartilage. We have primarily studied the mobilities of CS and collagen in bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage (that differ significantly in their collagen/polysaccharide content) by measuring 13C NMR relaxation times as well as the corresponding 13C CP (cross polarisation) MAS NMR spectra. These data clearly indicate that the mobility of cartilage macromolecules is broadly distributed from almost completely rigid (collagen) to highly mobile (polysaccharides), which lends cartilage its mechanical strength and shock-absorbing properties.

  9. Ultra-high field NMR studies of antibody binding and site-specific phosphorylation of {alpha}-synuclein

    SciTech Connect

    Sasakawa, Hiroaki |; Sakata, Eri; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Masuda, Masami |; Mori, Tetsuya; Kurimoto, Eiji; Iguchi, Takeshi; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kato, Koichi |

    2007-11-23

    Although biological importance of intrinsically disordered proteins is becoming recognized, NMR analyses of this class of proteins remain as tasks with more challenge because of poor chemical shift dispersion. It is expected that ultra-high field NMR spectroscopy offers improved resolution to cope with this difficulty. Here, we report an ultra-high field NMR study of {alpha}-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein identified as the major component of the Lewy bodies. Based on NMR spectral data collected at a 920 MHz proton frequency, we performed epitope mapping of an anti-{alpha}-synuclein monoclonal antibody, and furthermore, characterized conformational effects of phosphorylation at Ser129 of {alpha}-synuclein.

  10. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K.S.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Yu, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S.H.; Weintraub, W.; Rykaczewski, K.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R.C.; Woods, P.J.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; MacDonald, B.D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.F.; Ressler, J.J.; Walters, W.B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-01

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Symmetrization of cationic hydrogen bridges of protonated sponges induced by solvent and counteranion interactions as revealed by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Mariusz; Wehling, Jens P; Kong, Shushu; Tolstoy, Peter M; Shenderovich, Ilya G; López, Concepción; Claramunt, Rosa María; Elguero, José; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-02-01

    The properties of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds of doubly (15)N-labeled protonated sponges of the 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (DMANH(+)) type have been studied as a function of the solvent, counteranion, and temperature using low-temperature NMR spectroscopy. Information about the hydrogen-bond symmetries was obtained by the analysis of the chemical shifts delta(H) and delta(N) and the scalar coupling constants J(N,N), J(N,H), J(H,N) of the (15)NH(15)N hydrogen bonds. Whereas the individual couplings J(N,H) and J(H,N) were averaged by a fast intramolecular proton tautomerism between two forms, it is shown that the sum |J(N,H)+J(H,N)| generally represents a measure of the hydrogen-bond strength in a similar way to delta(H) and J(N,N). The NMR spectroscopic parameters of DMANH(+) and of 4-nitro-DMANH(+) are independent of the anion in the case of CD(3)CN, which indicates ion-pair dissociation in this solvent. By contrast, studies using CD(2)Cl(2), [D(8)]toluene as well as the freon mixture CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl, which is liquid down to 100 K, revealed an influence of temperature and of the counteranions. Whereas a small counteranion such as trifluoroacetate perturbed the hydrogen bond, the large noncoordinating anion tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate B[{C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)](-) (BARF(-)), which exhibits a delocalized charge, made the hydrogen bond more symmetric. Lowering the temperature led to a similar symmetrization, an effect that is discussed in terms of solvent ordering at low temperature and differential solvent order/disorder at high temperatures. By contrast, toluene molecules that are ordered around the cation led to typical high-field shifts of the hydrogen-bonded proton as well as of those bound to carbon, an effect that is absent in the case of neutral NHN chelates. PMID:20024986

  12. NMR methods for studying the structure and dynamics of oncogenic and antihistaminic peptides in biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Sizun, Christina; Aussenac, Fabien; Grelard, Axelle; Dufourc, Erick J

    2004-02-01

    We present several applications of both wide-line and magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR of bicelles in which are embedded fragments of a tyrosine kinase receptor or enkephalins. The magnetically orientable bicelle membranes are shown to be of particular interest for studying the functional properties of lipids and proteins in a state that is very close to their natural environment. Quadrupolar, dipolar and chemical shielding interactions can be used to determine minute alterations of internal membrane dynamics and the orientation of peptides with respect to the membrane plane. MAS of bicelles can in turn lead to high-resolution proton spectra of hydrated membranes. Using deuterium-proton contrast methods one can then obtain pseudo-high-resolution proton spectra of peptides or proteins embedded in deuterated membranes and determine their atomic 3D structure using quasi-conventional liquid-state NMR methods. PMID:14745798

  13. High pressure NMR study of a small protein, gurmarin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Yamada, H; Imoto, T; Akasaka, K

    1998-11-01

    The effect of pressure on the structure of gurmarin, a globular, 35-residue protein from Gymnema sylvestre, was studied in aqueous environment (95% 1H2O/5% 2H2O, pH 2.0) with an on-line variable pressure NMR system operating at 750 MHz. Two-dimensional TOCSY and NOESY spectra were measured as functions of pressure between 1 and 2000 bar at 40 degrees C. Practically all the proton signals of gurmarin underwent some shifts with pressure, showing that the entire protein structure responds to, and is altered by, pressure. Most amide protons showed different degrees of low field shifts with pressure, namely 0-0.2 ppm with an average of 0.051 ppm at 2000 bar, showing that they are involved in hydrogen bonding and that these hydrogen bonds are shortened by pressure by different degrees. The tendency was also confirmed that the chemical shifts of the amide protons exposed to the solvent (water) are more sensitive to pressure than those internally hydrogen bonded with carbonyls. The pressure-induced shifts of the H alpha signals of the residues in the beta-sheet showed a negative correlation with the 'folding' shifts (difference between the shift at 1 bar and that of a random coil), suggesting that the main-chain torsion angles of the beta-sheet are slightly altered by pressure. Significant pressure-induced shifts were also observed for the side-chain protons (but no larger than 10% of the 'folding' shifts), demonstrating that the tertiary structure of gurmarin is also affected by pressure. Finally, the linearity of the pressure-induced shifts suggest that the compressibility of gurmarin is invariant in the pressure range between 1 and 2000 bar. PMID:9862129

  14. NMR and molecular mechanics study of pyrethrins I and II.

    PubMed

    Rugutt, J K; Henry, C W; Franzblau, S G; Warner, I M

    1999-08-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of the organic extract of the Kenyan pyrethrum flowers (Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium Vissiani) resulted in the isolation of two natural pyrethrin esters, pyrethrin I (PI) and pyrethrin II (PII) as the major constituents. These esters elicited inhibition of the multiple drug resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The high-field (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of PI and PII were unequivocally assigned using modern two-dimensional (2D) proton-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) and heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC) experiments. The conformations of both esters were deduced from (1)H-(1)H vicinal coupling constants and confirmed by 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY). Computer molecular modeling (MM) studies revealed that PI and PII molecules adopt a "love-seat" conformation in chloroform (CDCl(3)) solution.

  15. Using NMR to study full intact wine bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekley, A. J.; Bruins, P.; Sisto, M.; Augustine, M. P.

    2003-03-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe and spectrometer capable of investigating full intact wine bottles is described and used to study a series of Cabernet Sauvignons with high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy. Selected examples of full bottle 13C NMR spectra are also provided. The application of this full bottle NMR method to the measurement of acetic acid content, the detection of complex sugars, phenols, and trace elements in wine is discussed.

  16. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Demonstration of a functional relationship between aspartate 93 and Mg2+ by site-directed mutagenesis and proton, phosphorus-31, and magnesium-25 NMR.

    PubMed

    Yan, H G; Tsai, M D

    1991-06-01

    Earlier magnetic resonance studies suggested no direct interaction between Mg2+ ions and adenylate kinase (AK) in the AK.MgATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) complex. However, recent NMR studies concluded that the carboxylate of aspartate 119 accepts a hydrogen bond from a water ligand of the bound Mg2+ ion in the muscle AK.MgATP complex [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. On the other hand, in the 2.6-A crystal structure of the yeast AK.MgAP5A [P1,P5-bis(5'-adenosyl)pentaphosphate] complex, the Mg2+ ion is in proximity to aspartate 93 [Egner, U., Tomasselli, A.G., & Schulz, G.E. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 195, 649-658]. Substitution of Asp-93 with alanine resulted in no change in dissociation constants, 4-fold increases in Km, and a 650-fold decrease in kcat. Notable changes have been observed in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of histidine 36 and a few other aromatic residues. However, the results of detailed analyses of the free enzymes and the AK.MgAP5A complexes by one- and two-dimensional NMR suggested that the changes are due to localized perturbations. Thus it is concluded that Asp-93 stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3.9 kcal/mol. The next question is how. Since proton NMR results indicated that binding of Mg2+ to the AK.AP5A complex induces some changes in the proton NMR signals of WT but not those of D93A, the functional role of Asp-93 should be in binding to Mg2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. A field-cycling NMR relaxometry investigation of proton tunnelling in a partially disordered system of hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brougham, D. F.; Horsewill, A. J.; Trommsdorff, H. P.

    1999-05-01

    Double-proton transfer in the hydrogen bonds of the benzoic acid dimer is described by an asymmetric double-well potential. At low temperature, the hydrogen bond dynamics are dominated by phonon-assisted tunnelling and the correlation time for proton transfer is independent of temperature. We report proton transfer measurements on samples that incorporate a small concentration of thioindigo dye molecules as a substitutional impurity. The potential energy surface, particularly the energy asymmetry of the double-well potential, of dimers within a sphere of influence of the guest molecule is perturbed. These dimers exhibit a distribution of energy asymmetries and correlation times. The system is analogous to disordered systems such as glasses and provides insight into low-frequency excitations that are invoked to explain the molecular dynamics in those systems. Field-cycling NMR relaxometry was used to make a direct measurement of the spectral density of the sample at low temperatures and to identify the contribution made by the proton transfer dynamics of the hydrogen bonds in the vicinity of the guest molecules. The mean proton transfer rate and asymmetry of these dimers have been measured and are compared with the values characteristic of dimers that are remote from impurity centres. The proficiency of field-cycling NMR relaxometry, and the advantages over conventional narrow band spin-lattice relaxation measurements, is discussed.

  18. Proton NMR characterization of isomeric sulfmyoglobins: preparation, interconversion, reactivity patterns, and structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Chatfield, M.J.; La Mar, G.N.; Kauten, R.J.

    1987-11-03

    The preparations of sulfmyoglobin (sulf-Mb) by standard procedures have been found heterogeneous by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Presented here are the results of a comprehensive study of the factors that influence the selection among the three dominant isomeric forms of sperm whale sulf-Mb and their resulting detailed optical and /sup 1/H NMR properties as related to their detectability and structural properties of the heme pocket. A single isomer is formed initially in the deoxy state; further treatment in any desired oxidation/ligation state can yield two other major isomers. Acid catalysis and chromatography facilitate formation of a second isomer, particularly in the high-spin state. At neutral pH, a third isomer is formed by a first-order process. The processes that alter oxidation/ligation state are found to be reversible and are judged to affect only the metal center, but the three isomeric sulf-Mbs are found to exhibit significantly different ligand affinity and chemical stability. The present results allow, for the first time, a rational approach for preparing a given isomeric sulf-Mb in an optimally pure state for subsequent characterization by other techniques. While optical spectroscopy can distinguish the alkaline forms, only /sup 1/H NMR clearly distinguishes all three ferric isomers. The hyperfine shift patterns in the various oxidation/spin states of sulf-Mbs indicate relatively small structural alteration, and the proximal and distal sides of the heme suggest that peripheral electronic effects are responsible for the differentially reduced ligand affinities for the three isomeric sulf-Mbs. The first /sup 1/H NMR spectra of sulfhemoglobins are presented, which indicate a structure similar to that of the initially formed sulf-Mb isomer but also suggest the presence of a similar molecular heterogeneity as found for sulf-Mb, albiet to a smaller extent.

  19. NMR study of magnetism and superparamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shaojie

    The research described in this dissertation is concerned with two different types of magnetic materials. Both types of systems involve competing interactions between transition metal ions. New approaches involving magnetic resonance in the large hyperfine fields at nuclear sites have been developed. The interactions responsible for the properties that have been investigated in the materials studied are geometric frustration in an insulator and ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions in a metal alloy. Further details are given below. The extended kagome frustrated system YBaCo4O7 has 2D kagome and triangular lattices of Co ions stacked along the c-axis. Antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering accompanied by a structural transition has been reported in the literature. From a zero field (ZF) NMR single crystal rotation experiment, we have obtained the Co spin configurations for both the kagome and triangular layers. A 'spin-flop' configuration between the spins on the kagome layer and the spins on the triangular layer is indicated by our results. Our NMR findings are compared with neutron scattering results for this intriguing frustrated AF spin system. The non-stoichiometric oxygenated sister compound YBaCo4O7.1 has application potential for oxygen storage. While, its' magnetic properties are quite different from those of the stoichiometric compound, in spite of their similar structures of alternating kagome and triangular Co layers. Various techniques, including ZF NMR have been used to investigate the spin dynamics and spin configuration in a single crystal of YBaCo4O7.1. A magnetic transition at 80 K is observed, which is interpreted as the freezing out of spins in the triangular layers. At low temperatures (below 50 K), the spin dynamics persists and a fraction of spins in the kagome layers form a viscous spin liquid. Below 10 K, a glass-like spin structure forms and a large distribution of spin correlation times are suggested by nuclear spin lattice relaxation

  20. NMR relaxation studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. Jugeshwar; Clark, W. G.; Gaidos, G.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P.; Thompson, J. D.; Menon, R.; Ramesh, K. P.

    2015-05-01

    NMR relaxation rates (1 /T1 ), magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene are reported in this paper. The magnetic susceptibility data show the contributions from both Pauli and Curie spins, with the size of the Pauli term depending strongly on the doping level. Proton and fluorine NMR relaxation rates have been studied as a function of temperature (3-300 K) and field (for protons at 0.9, 9.0, 16.4, and 23.4 T, and for fluorine at 9.0 T). The temperature dependence of T1 is classified into three regimes: (a) For T <(g μBB /2 kB ) , the relaxation mechanism follows a modified Korringa relation due to electron-electron interactions and disorder. 1H - T1 is due to the electron-nuclear dipolar interaction in addition to the contact term. (b) For the intermediate temperature range (g μBB /2 kB ) study. Fluorine relaxation data have been analyzed and attributed to the P F6 reorientation. The cross relaxation among the 1H and 19F nuclei has been observed in the entire temperature range suggesting the role of magnetic dipolar interaction modulated by the reorientation of the symmetric molecular subgroups. The data analysis shows that the enhancement in the Korringa ratio is greater in a less conducting sample. Intra- and interchain hopping of charge carriers is found to be a dominant relaxation mechanism at low temperature. Frequency dependence of T1-1 on temperature shows that at low temperature [T <(g μBB /2 kB ) ] the system shows three dimensions and changes to quasi one dimension at

  1. Site-specific protonation kinetics of acidic side chains in proteins determined by pH-dependent carboxyl (13)C NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Johan; Weininger, Ulrich; Khan, M Ashhar I; Linse, Sara; Akke, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Proton-transfer dynamics plays a critical role in many biochemical processes, such as proton pumping across membranes and enzyme catalysis. The large majority of enzymes utilize acid-base catalysis and proton-transfer mechanisms, where the rates of proton transfer can be rate limiting for the overall reaction. However, measurement of proton-exchange kinetics for individual side-chain carboxyl groups in proteins has been achieved in only a handful of cases, which typically have involved comparative analysis of mutant proteins in the context of reaction network modeling. Here we describe an approach to determine site-specific protonation and deprotonation rate constants (kon and koff, respectively) of carboxyl side chains, based on (13)C NMR relaxation measurements as a function of pH. We validated the method using an extensively studied model system, the B1 domain of protein G, for which we measured rate constants koff in the range (0.1-3) × 10(6) s(-1) and kon in the range (0.6-300) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which correspond to acid-base equilibrium dissociation constants (Ka) in excellent agreement with previous results determined by chemical shift titrations. Our results further reveal a linear free-energy relationship between log kon and pKa, which provides information on the free-energy landscape of the protonation reaction, showing that the variability among residues in these parameters arises primarily from the extent of charge stabilization of the deprotonated state by the protein environment. We find that side-chain carboxyls with extreme values of koff or kon are involved in hydrogen bonding, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilization of the protonated or deprotonated state.

  2. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  3. NMR study of strontium binding by a micaceous mineral.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Geoffrey M; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, Sridhar; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na(4)Mg(6)Al(4)Si(4)O(20)F(4). Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a (1)H-(87)Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by (87)Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct (87)Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals. PMID:16599480

  4. Toxicometabolomics approach to urinary biomarkers for mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2})-induced nephrotoxicity using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyu-Bong; Um, So Young; Chung, Myeon Woo; Jung, Seung Chul; Oh, Ji Seon; Kim, Seon Hwa; Na, Han Sung; Lee, Byung Mu; Choi, Ki Hwan

    2010-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine and characterize surrogate biomarkers that can predict nephrotoxicity induced by mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) using urinary proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) spectral data. A procedure for {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis using pattern recognition was proposed to evaluate nephrotoxicity induced by HgCl{sub 2} in Sprague-Dawley rats. HgCl{sub 2} at 0.1 or 0.75 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), and urine was collected every 24 h for 6 days. Animals (n = 6 per group) were sacrificed 3 or 6 days post-dosing in order to perform clinical blood chemistry tests and histopathologic examinations. Urinary {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy revealed apparent differential clustering between the control and HgCl{sub 2} treatment groups as evidenced by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS)-discriminant analysis (DA). Time- and dose-dependent separation of HgCl{sub 2}-treated animals from controls was observed by PCA of {sup 1}H NMR spectral data. In HgCl{sub 2}-treated rats, the concentrations of endogenous urinary metabolites of glucose, acetate, alanine, lactate, succinate, and ethanol were significantly increased, whereas the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, allantoin, citrate, formate, taurine, and hippurate were significantly decreased. These endogenous metabolites were selected as putative biomarkers for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity. A dose response was observed in concentrations of lactate, acetate, succinate, and ethanol, where severe disruption of the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, formate, glucose, and taurine was observed at the higher dose (0.75 mg/kg) of HgCl{sub 2}. Correlation of urinary {sup 1}H NMR PLS-DA data with renal histopathologic changes suggests that {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis can be used to predict or screen for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity{sub .}

  5. Solid-State NMR Investigation of the Conformation, Proton Conduction, and Hydration of the Influenza B Virus M2 Transmembrane Proton Channel.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Tietze, Daniel; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Jun; Hong, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Together with the influenza A virus, influenza B virus causes seasonal flu epidemics. The M2 protein of influenza B (BM2) forms a tetrameric proton-conducting channel that is important for the virus lifecycle. BM2 shares little sequence homology with AM2, except for a conserved HxxxW motif in the transmembrane (TM) domain. Unlike AM2, no antiviral drugs have been developed to block the BM2 channel. To elucidate the proton-conduction mechanism of BM2 and to facilitate the development of BM2 inhibitors, we have employed solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation, dynamics, and hydration of the BM2 TM domain in lipid bilayers. BM2 adopts an α-helical conformation in lipid membranes. At physiological temperature and low pH, the proton-selective residue, His19, shows relatively narrow (15)N chemical exchange peaks for the imidazole nitrogens, indicating fast proton shuttling that interconverts cationic and neutral histidines. Importantly, pH-dependent (15)N chemical shifts indicate that His19 retains the neutral population to much lower pH than His37 in AM2, indicating larger acid-dissociation constants or lower pKa's. We attribute these dynamical and equilibrium differences to the presence of a second titratable histidine, His27, which may increase the proton-dissociation rate of His19. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C correlation spectra probing water (1)H polarization transfer to the peptide indicates that the BM2 channel becomes much more hydrated at low pH than at high pH, particularly at Ser12, indicating that the pore-facing serine residues in BM2 mediate proton relay to the proton-selective histidine. PMID:27286559

  6. Longitudinal-relaxation-enhanced NMR experiments for the study of nucleic acids in solution.

    PubMed

    Farjon, Jonathan; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Schanda, Paul; Pardi, Arthur; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2009-06-24

    Atomic-resolution information on the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids is essential for a better understanding of the mechanistic basis of many cellular processes. NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids; however, solution NMR studies are currently limited to relatively small nucleic acids at high concentrations. Thus, technological and methodological improvements that increase the experimental sensitivity and spectral resolution of NMR spectroscopy are required for studies of larger nucleic acids or protein-nucleic acid complexes. Here we introduce a series of imino-proton-detected NMR experiments that yield an over 2-fold increase in sensitivity compared to conventional pulse schemes. These methods can be applied to the detection of base pair interactions, RNA-ligand titration experiments, measurement of residual dipolar (15)N-(1)H couplings, and direct measurements of conformational transitions. These NMR experiments employ longitudinal spin relaxation enhancement techniques that have proven useful in protein NMR spectroscopy. The performance of these new experiments is demonstrated for a 10 kDa TAR-TAR*(GA) RNA kissing complex and a 26 kDa tRNA.

  7. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of 1H and 13C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs.

  8. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  9. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  10. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  11. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  12. Single-file diffusion of confined water inside SWNTs: an NMR study.

    PubMed

    Das, Anindya; Jayanthi, Sundaresan; Deepak, Handiganadu Srinivasa Murthy Vinay; Ramanathan, Krishna Venkatachala; Kumar, Anil; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sood, Ajay K

    2010-03-23

    We report a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of confined water inside approximately 1.4 nm diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We show that the confined water does not freeze even up to 223 K. A pulse field gradient (PFG) NMR method is used to determine the mean squared displacement (MSD) of the water molecules inside the nanotubes at temperatures below 273 K, where the bulk water outside the nanotubes freezes and hence does not contribute to the proton NMR signal. We show that the mean squared displacement varies as the square root of time, predicted for single-file diffusion in a one-dimensional channel. We propose a qualitative understanding of our results based on available molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elastic modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.

  14. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported. PMID:25451865

  15. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  16. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of

  17. NMR Studies of Protein Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. This thesis describes applications of 2D homonuclear NMR techniques to the study of protein structure and dynamics in solution. The sequential assignments for the 3G-residue bovine Pancreatic Polypeptide (bPP) are reported. The secondary and tertiary structure of bPP in solution has been determined from experimental NMR data. bPP has a well defined C-terminal alpha-helix and a rather ordered conformation in the N-terminal region. The two segments are joined by a turn which is poorly defined. Both the N- and the C-terminus are highly disordered. The mean solution structure of bPP is remarkably similar to the crystal structure of avian Pancreatic Polypeptide (aPP). The average conformations of most side-chains from the alpha-helix of bPP in solution are closely similar to those of aPP in the crystalline state. A large number of side-chains of bPP, however, show significant conformational averaging in solution. The 89-residue kringle domain of urokinase from both human and recombinant sources has been investigated. Sequential assignments based primarily on the recombinant sample and the determination of secondary structure are presented. Two helices have been identified; one of these corresponds to that reported for t-PA kringle 2, but does not exist in other kringles with known structures. The second helix is thus far unique to the urokinase kringle. Three antiparallel beta-sheets and three tight turns have also been identified. The tertiary fold of the molecule conforms broadly to that found for other kringles. Three regions in the urokinase kringle exhibit high local mobility; one of these, the Pro56-Pro62 segment, forms part of the proposed binding site. The other two mobile regions are the N- and C-termini which are likely to form the interfaces between the kringle and the other two domains (EGF and protease) in urokinase. The differential dynamic behaviours of the kringle and

  18. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  19. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  20. ⁵¹V NMR Crystallography of Vanadium Chloroperoxidase and Its Directed Evolution P395D/L241V/T343A Mutant: Protonation Environments of the Active Site.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Hou, Guangjin; Renirie, Rokus; Wever, Ron; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-29

    Vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPOs) perform two-electron oxidation of halides using hydrogen peroxide. Their mechanism, including the factors determining the substrate specificity and the pH-dependence of the catalytic rates, is poorly understood. The vanadate cofactor in the active site of VHPOs contains "spectroscopically silent" V(V), which does not change oxidation state during the reaction. We employed an NMR crystallography approach based on (51)V magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory, to gain insights into the structure and coordination environment of the cofactor in the resting state of vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidases (VCPO). The cofactor environments in the wild-type VCPO and its P395D/L241V/T343A mutant exhibiting 5-100-fold improved catalytic activity are examined at various pH values. Optimal sensitivity attained due to the fast MAS probe technologies enabled the assignment of the location and number of protons on the vanadate as a function of pH. The vanadate cofactor changes its protonation from quadruply protonated at pH 6.3 to triply protonated at pH 7.3 to doubly protonated at pH 8.3. In contrast, in the mutant, the vanadate protonation is the same at pH 5.0 and 8.3, and the cofactor is doubly protonated. This methodology to identify the distinct protonation environments of the cofactor, which are also pH-dependent, could help explain the different reactivities of the wild-type and mutant VCPO and their pH-dependence. This study demonstrates that (51)V-based NMR crystallography can be used to derive the detailed coordination environments of vanadium centers in large biological molecules.

  1. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome.

  2. Biochemical and proton NMR characterization of the isolated functional beta-subunit of coupling factor one from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roux-Fromy, M.; Neumann, J.M.; Andre, F.; Berger, G.; Girault, G.; Galmiche, J.M.; Remy, R.

    1987-04-29

    Beta subunits have been dissociated from CF1 of spinach chloroplasts, purified by HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional electrophoresis and fluorescence emission. The solutions of isolated beta subunits are able to hydrolyze MgATP; this ATPase activity is an intrinsic property of the beta molecule. From proton NMR at 300 and 500 MHz, it is shown that the preparations are fully reproducible and that beta subunits remain monomeric with 75% aliphatic protons associated with rigid parts of the molecule. The other 25% give rise to separate resonances and belong to mobile side-chains and/or to flexible regions. The measurement of the transverse relaxation times T2 has permitted a detailed characterization of the molecular dynamics of the isolated beta subunits.

  3. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  4. Studies on metabolic regulation using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H; Badar-Goffer, R; Ben-Yoseph, O; Morris, P; Thatcher, N

    1993-01-01

    The effects of hypoxia and hypoglycaemia on cerebral metabolism and calcium have been studied using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 13C MRS showed that severe hypoxia did not cause any further increase in metabolic flux into lactate seen in mild hypoxia, but there was a further increase in 13C labelling of alanine and glycerol 3-phosphate. These results are discussed in terms of the ability of lactate dehydrogenase to maintain normal levels of NADH in mild hypoxia, but not in severe hypoxia. We conclude that glycerol 3-phosphate and alanine may provide novel means of monitoring severe hypoxia whereas lactate is a reliable indicator only of mild hypoxia. 19F- and 31P NMR spectroscopy showed that neither hypoxia nor hypoglycaemia alone caused any significant change in [Ca2+]i. Combined sequential insults (hypoxia, followed by hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia), or vice versa, produced a 100% increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas immediate exposure to the combined insult (hypoxia plus hypoglycaemia) resulted in a large 5-fold increase in [Ca2+]i, with severe irreversible effects on the energy state. These results are discussed in terms of metabolic adaptation to the single type of insult, which renders the tissue less vulnerable to the combined insult. The effects of this combined insult are far more severe than those caused by glutamate or NMDA, which throws doubt on the current excitoxic hypothesis of cell damage.

  5. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovoi, A.; Mattea, C.; Herrmann, A.; Rössler, E. A.; Stapf, S.; Fatkullin, N.

    2016-06-01

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time.

  6. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Lozovoi, A; Mattea, C; Herrmann, A; Rössler, E A; Stapf, S; Fatkullin, N

    2016-06-28

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time. PMID:27369489

  7. The Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectrum of Methyl 7-Cycloheptatrienylacetate: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurch, G. R., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment designed to give the senior chemistry student an opportunity to apply several synthetic and purification techniques as well as possibilities for the application of NMR spectroscopy. (CS)

  8. Internal dynamics of DNA - a solid state deuterium NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Chang.

    1989-01-01

    In this dissertation, solid state {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the dynamics of the sodium salt oligonucleotide, (d(CGCGAATTCGCG)){sub 2}, which contains the Eco R1 binding site. Deuterium quadrupole echo line shape and spin-lattice relaxation times were obtained as a function of hydration on three different deuterated samples. In the first sample, (d{sub 12}-(d(CG*CG*A*A*TTCG*CG*)){sub 2}), the C8 proton of all purine in the self-complementary dodecamer were exchanged for deuterons. Specifically labeled thymidine (C6 deuterated) was also synthetically incorporated at the seventh position (counting 5{prime} to 3{prime}) in the sequence (d{sub 2}-(d(CGCGAAT*TCGCG)){sub 2}). In the third sample the C2{double prime} position of the furanose ring of adenosine at the fifth and sixth positions in the same sequence (d{sub 4}-(d(CGCGA*A*TTCGCG)){sub 2}) was deuterium labeled. The static quadrupole coupling constant (e{sup 2}qQ/h) and asymmetry parameter ({eta}) were obtained through the analysis of appropriative motional models from the corresponding monomers studies.

  9. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  10. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  11. NMR studies of molecules in liquid crystals and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    NMR experiments to measure proton dipole couplings were performed on a series of n-alkanes (n-hexane through n-decane) dissolved in nematic liquid crystals. Computer modeling of the experimental NMR-spectra was done using several different models for intermolecular interactions in these systems. The model of Photinos et al. was found to be best in describing the intermolecular interactions in these systems and can provide a statistical picture of the conformation and orientation of the alkane molecules in their partially-oriented environment. Order parameters and conformational distributions for the alkanes can be calculated from the modeling. The alkanes are found to have conformational distributions very much like those found in liquid alkanes. Proton NMR spectra of tetrahydrofuran (THF) intercalated in two graphite intercalation compounds were also measured. Computer simulations of these spectra provide a picture of THF in the constrained environment between the graphene layers where the THF is oriented at a particular angle, can translate and rotate freely, but does not appear to pseudorotate.

  12. Proton NMR analysis of octane number for motor gasoline: Part V

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, M.; Nonaka, N.; Amano, H.; Takada, I.; Ishimori, S.; Andoh, H.; Kumamoto, K.

    1992-10-01

    A method to predict the octane number of automobile gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) by proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectrometry was studied. Samples of gasoline whose octane numbers had been identified according to the ASTM standards (commercially available premium gasoline to which MTBE was added at rates of 7 vol % and 14 vol %) were used in this investigation of the effect of MTBE on the octane number. The findings were utilized to introduce a term regarding MTBE into the previously reported linear regression equation for estimating the octane number from the PMR spectrum, and the appropriateness of the linear regression equation was assessed. As a result the MTBE contents in the sample were determined with satisfactory accuracy by using a standard addition method, and a linear regression equation reflecting the effect of MTBE was obtained. These achievements are reported. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Gas-phase NMR studies of alcohols. Intrinsic acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; True, Nancy S.

    1985-05-01

    Gas-phase (≈100 Torr) 1H NMR spectra of eighteen simple aliphatic and unsaturated alcohols, four fluorinated alcohols, and two thiols were obtained at 148.6°C where hydrogen bonding has little effect on chemical shifts. For the methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, t-butanol, i- butanol, neopentanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol and benzyl alcohol, the observed hydroxylic proton chemical shifts correlate with previously obtained relative gas-phase acidities from thermochemical analysis which employed equilibrium constants of proton transfer reactions measured via mass spectroscopic and ion cyclotron resonance techniques. The correlational dependence is 10.3(0.5) kcal/mol ppm with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. These results demonstrate that the trend of increasing acidity with increasing size of the alkyl substituent is also reflected in the neutral forms of the alcohols, indicating that the polarizability of the ionic forms is not the only determining factor in relative gas-phase acidities of alcohols. Although factors affecting the hydroxylic proton chemical shifts of the larger substituted and unsaturated alcohols are more complex, their observed 1H NMR spectra also reflect this trend. For methanol and ethanol observed gas-phase 1H chemical shifts are also compared with recent theoritical calculations. 3JHH coupling constants across CO bonds are ≈ 5.5 Hz, significantly smaller than typical 3JHH coupling across sp 3 hybrid C C bonds.

  14. Basic principles of static proton low-resolution spin diffusion NMR in nanophase-separated materials with mobility contrast.

    PubMed

    Schäler, Kerstin; Roos, Matthias; Micke, Peter; Golitsyn, Yury; Seidlitz, Anne; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Schneider, Horst; Hempel, Günter; Saalwächter, Kay

    2015-11-01

    We review basic principles of low-resolution proton NMR spin diffusion experiments, relying on mobility differences in nm-sized phases of inhomogeneous organic materials such as block-co- or semicrystalline polymers. They are of use for estimates of domain sizes and insights into nanometric dynamic inhomogeneities. Experimental procedures and limitations of mobility-based signal decomposition/filtering prior to spin diffusion are addressed on the example of as yet unpublished data on semicrystalline poly(ϵ-caprolactone), PCL. Specifically, we discuss technical aspects of the quantitative, dead-time free detection of rigid-domain signals by aid of the magic-sandwich echo (MSE), and magic-and-polarization-echo (MAPE) and double-quantum (DQ) magnetization filters to select rigid and mobile components, respectively. Such filters are of general use in reliable fitting approaches for phase composition determinations. Spin diffusion studies at low field using benchtop instruments are challenged by rather short (1)H T1 relaxation times, which calls for simulation-based analyses. Applying these, in combination with domain sizes as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, we have determined spin diffusion coefficients D for PCL (0.34, 0.19 and 0.032nm(2)/ms for crystalline, interphase and amorphous parts, respectively). We further address thermal-history effects related to secondary crystallization. Finally, the state of knowledge concerning the connection between D values determined locally at the atomic level, using (13)C detection and CP- or REDOR-based "(1)H hole burning" procedures, and those obtained by calibration experiments, is summarized. Specifically, the non-trivial dependence of D on the magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequency, with a minimum under static and a local maximum under moderate-MAS conditions, is highlighted.

  15. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  16. NMR contributions to structural dynamics studies of intrinsically disordered proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Konrat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by substantial conformational plasticity. Given their inherent structural flexibility X-ray crystallography is not applicable to study these proteins. In contrast, NMR spectroscopy offers unique opportunities for structural and dynamic studies of IDPs. The past two decades have witnessed significant development of NMR spectroscopy that couples advances in spin physics and chemistry with a broad range of applications. This article will summarize key advances in basic physical-chemistry and NMR methodology, outline their limitations and envision future R&D directions. PMID:24656082

  17. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  18. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  19. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  20. Dihydroflavanonols from Cedrus deodara, A (13)C NMR study.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, P K; Agarwal, S K; Rastogi, R P; Osterdahal, B G

    1981-09-01

    High resolution (13)C NMR study of taxifolin, cedeodarin, cedrin and their methyl ethers allowed unambiguous placement of the Me in 5,7-dihydroxyflavanonol nucleus, besides providing other valuable information on the substitution pattern in the molecule.

  1. Narrow carbonyl resonances in proton-diluted proteins facilitate NMR assignments in the solid-state.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    HNCO/HNCACO type correlation experiments are an alternative for assignment of backbone resonances in extensively deuterated proteins in the solid-state, given the fact that line widths on the order of 14-17 Hz are achieved in the carbonyl dimension without the need of high power decoupling. The achieved resolution demonstrates that MAS solid-state NMR on extensively deuterated proteins is able to compete with solution-state NMR spectroscopy if proteins are investigated with correlation times tau(c) that exceed 25 ns. PMID:20232230

  2. NMR studies on polyphosphide Ce6Ni6P17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report the result of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on Ce6Ni6P17. The observed NMR spectra show a Lorentzian-type and an asymmetric shapes, reflecting the local symmetry around each P site in the cubic unit cell. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to three inequivalent P sites and deduced the temperature dependence of the Knight shift for each site. The Knight shifts increase with decreasing temperature down to 1.5 K, indicating a localized spin system of Ce6Ni6P17. Antiferromagnetic correlation between 4f spins is suggested from the negative sign of the Weiss-temperature.

  3. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  4. Proton NMR analysis of octane number for motor gasoline: Part IV

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, M.; Nonaka, N.; Amano, H.; Takada, I.; Ishimori, S.; Andoh, H.; Kumamoto, K.

    1992-08-01

    Software for predicting the octane number of motor gasoline by proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectrometry has been formulated. At the same time, a method has been studied to predict the composition of gasoline (in terms of the contents of paraffin, olefin, and aromatic compounds). The formulated program was evaluated by using it to predict the octane numbers of 31 samples of marketed summer gasoline (including 16 regular and 15 premium products), whose octane numbers and compositions were identified according to the ASTM standards. Also, the relationship between the PMR spectrum and gasoline composition was subjected to linear regression analysis by using the 31 samples whose octane numbers were calculated, and the appropriateness of the resultant regression equations was assessed. This report concerns the results of the study in which the octane numbers of the 31 samples were satisfactorily predicted by the formulated program and useful linear regression equation were obtained for the prediction of the composition of gasoline. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Minimalist Relativistic Force Field: Prediction of Proton-Proton Coupling Constants in (1)H NMR Spectra Is Perfected with NBO Hybridization Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-05-15

    We previously developed a reliable method for multiparametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. We now report that utilization of NBO hybridization coefficients for carbon atoms in the involved C-H bonds allows for a significant simplification of this parametric scheme, requiring only four general types of SSCCs: geminal, vicinal, 1,3-, and long-range constants. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries. A new DU8 basis set, based on a training set of 475 experimental spin-spin coupling constants, is developed for hydrogen and common non-hydrogen atoms (Li, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl, Se, Br, I) to calculate Fermi contacts. On a test set of 919 SSCCs from a diverse collection of natural products and complex synthetic molecules the method gave excellent accuracy of 0.29 Hz (rmsd) with the maximum unsigned error not exceeding 1 Hz.

  6. Minimalist Relativistic Force Field: Prediction of Proton-Proton Coupling Constants in (1)H NMR Spectra Is Perfected with NBO Hybridization Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-05-15

    We previously developed a reliable method for multiparametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. We now report that utilization of NBO hybridization coefficients for carbon atoms in the involved C-H bonds allows for a significant simplification of this parametric scheme, requiring only four general types of SSCCs: geminal, vicinal, 1,3-, and long-range constants. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries. A new DU8 basis set, based on a training set of 475 experimental spin-spin coupling constants, is developed for hydrogen and common non-hydrogen atoms (Li, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl, Se, Br, I) to calculate Fermi contacts. On a test set of 919 SSCCs from a diverse collection of natural products and complex synthetic molecules the method gave excellent accuracy of 0.29 Hz (rmsd) with the maximum unsigned error not exceeding 1 Hz. PMID:25885091

  7. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  8. Unusual effects in variable temperature powder NMR spectra of the methyl group protons in 9,10-dimethyltriptycene-d₁₂.

    PubMed

    Bernatowicz, P; Ratajczyk, T; Kalicki, P; Szymanski, S

    2014-01-01

    Variable temperature (1)H wide line NMR spectra of polycrystalline 9,10-dimethyltriptycene-d12 deuterated in the aromatic positions were studied. The spectra show different patterns in an unrepeatable dependence on the way of preparation of the powdered samples. Simultaneously, no anomalies were seen in the MAS and CPMAS proton-decoupled room-temperature (13)C spectra as well as in powder X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects observed in the (1)H spectra are tentatively explained in terms of a phenomenological model. For one of the examined samples it afforded a consistent interpretation of the entire series of temperature dependent spectra in terms of structural non uniformity of the solid material studied. Quantum character of the stochastic dynamics of the methyl groups in the investigated compound was confirmed, although these dynamics are close to the classical limit where the familiar random jump model applies. PMID:24656571

  9. Solid-state and unilateral NMR study of deterioration of a Dead Sea Scroll fragment.

    PubMed

    Masic, A; Chierotti, M R; Gobetto, R; Martra, G; Rabin, I; Coluccia, S

    2012-02-01

    Unilateral and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses were performed on a parchment fragment of the Dead Sea Scroll (DSS). The analyzed sample belongs to the collection of non-inscribed and nontreated fragments of known archaeological provenance from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester. Therefore, it can be considered as original DSS material free from any contamination related to the post-discovery period. Considering the paramount significance of the DSS, noninvasive approaches and portable in situ nondestructive methods are of fundamental importance for the determination of composition, structure, and chemical-physical properties of the materials under study. NMR studies reveal low amounts of water content associated with very short proton relaxation times, T(1), indicating a high level of deterioration of collagen molecules within scroll fragments. In addition, (13)C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy shows characteristic peaks of lipids whose presence we attribute to the production technology that did not involve liming. Extraction with chloroform led to the reduction of both lipid and protein signals in the (13)C CPMAS spectrum indicating probable involvement of lipids in parchment degradation processes. NMR absorption and relaxation measurements provide nondestructive, discriminative, and sensitive tools for studying the deterioration effects on the organization and properties of water and collagen within ancient manuscripts.

  10. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  11. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Waudby, Christopher A; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John

    2013-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome-nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity.

  12. NMR studies of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Till

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between biological macromolecules or of macromolecules with low-molecular-weight ligands is a central paradigm in the understanding of function in biological systems. It is also the major goal in pharmaceutical research to find and optimize ligands that modulate the function of biological macromolecules. Both technological advances and new methods in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have led to the development of several tools by which the interaction of proteins or DNA and low molecular weight-ligands can be characterized at an atomic level. Information can be gained quickly and easily with ligand-based techniques. These need only small amounts of nonisotope labeled, and thus readily available target macromolecules. As the focus is on the signals stemming only from the ligand, no further NMR information regarding the target is needed. Techniques based on the observation of isotopically labeled biological macromolecules open the possibility to observe interactions of proteins with low-molecular-weight ligands, DNA or other proteins. With these techniques, the structure of high-molecular-weight complexes can be determined. Here, the resonance signals of the macromolecule must be identified beforehand, which can be time consuming but with the benefit of obtaining more information with respect to the target ligand complex.

  13. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  14. Solid-state proton NMR of paramagnetic metal complexes: DANTE spin echoes for selective excitation in inhomogeneously broadened lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Perez Linde, A. J.; Bauer, Gerald; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-08-01

    The paramagnetic complex bis(oxazolinylphenyl)amine-Fe(III)Cl2 is investigated by means of solid-state proton NMR at 18.8 T (800 MHz) using magic-angle spinning at 65 kHz. Spin echoes that are excited and refocused by combs of rotor-synchronized pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) allow one to characterize different chemical environments that severely overlap in conventional MAS spectra. Such sequences combine two apparently contradictory features: an overall bandwidth exceeding several MHz, and very selective irradiation of a few kHz within inhomogeneously broadened sidebands. The experimental hyperfine interactions correlate well with DFT calculations.

  15. High-Resolution NMR Studies of Human Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Watt, Eric D.; Boettcher, John M.; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    In normal hemostasis, the blood clotting cascade is initiated when factor VIIa (fVIIa, other clotting factors are named similarly) binds to the integral membrane protein, human tissue factor (TF). The TF/fVIIa complex in turn activates fX and fIX, eventually concluding with clot formation. Several X-ray crystal structures of the soluble extracellular domain of TF (sTF) exist; however, these structures are missing electron density in functionally relevant regions of the protein. In this context, NMR can provide complementary structural information as well as dynamic insights into enzyme activity. The resolution and sensitivity for NMR studies are greatly enhanced by the ability to prepare multiple milligrams of protein with various isotopic labeling patterns. Here, we demonstrate high-yield production of several isotopically labeled forms of recombinant sTF, allowing for high-resolution NMR studies both in the solid and solution state. We also report solution NMR spectra at sub-mM concentrations of sTF, ensuring the presence of dispersed monomer, as well as the first solid-state NMR spectra of sTF. Our improved sample preparation and precipitation conditions have enabled the acquisition of multidimensional NMR data sets for TF chemical shift assignment and provide a benchmark for TF structure elucidation. PMID:27657719

  16. Sensitivity of proton NMR relaxation times in a HTPB based polyurethane elastomer to thermo-oxidative aging.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Mowery, Daniel Michael; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2004-09-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry studies were conducted on a hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based polyurethane elastomer thermo-oxidatively aged at 80 C. The {sup 1}H T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1{rho}} relaxation times of samples thermally aged for various periods of time were determined as a function of NMR measurement temperature. The response of each measurement was calculated from a best-fit linear function of the relaxation time vs. aging time. It was found that the T{sub 2,H} and T{sub 1{rho},H} relaxation times exhibited the largest response to thermal degradation, whereas T{sub 1,H} showed minimal change. All of the NMR relaxation measurements on solid samples showed significantly less sensitivity to thermal aging than the T{sub 2,H} relaxation times of solvent-swollen samples.

  17. Predicting the spin state of paramagnetic iron complexes by DFT calculation of proton NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, Andrea; Rastrelli, Federico; Bagno, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    Many transition-metal complexes easily change their spin state S in response to external perturbations (spin crossover). Determining such states and their dynamics can play a central role in the understanding of useful properties such as molecular magnetism or catalytic behavior, but is often far from straightforward. In this work we demonstrate that, at a moderate computational cost, density functional calculations can predict the correct ground spin state of Fe(ii) and Fe(iii) complexes and can then be used to determine the (1)H NMR spectra of all spin states. Since the spectral features are remarkably different according to the spin state, calculated (1)H NMR resonances can be used to infer the correct spin state, along with supporting the structure elucidation of numerous paramagnetic complexes.

  18. Proton irradiation study of GFR candidate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian; Yang, Yong; Dickson, Clayton; Allen, Todd

    2009-06-01

    This work investigated the microstructural response of SiC, ZrC and ZrN irradiated with 2.6 MeV protons at 800 °C to a fluence of 2.75 × 10 19 protons/cm 2, corresponding to 0.71-1.8 displacement per atom (dpa), depending on the material. The change of lattice constant evaluated using HOLZ patterns is not observed. In comparison to Kr ion irradiation at 800 °C to 10 dpa from the previous studies, the proton irradiated ZrC and ZrN at 1.8 dpa show less irradiation damage to the lattice structure. The proton irradiated ZrC exhibits faulted loops which are not observed in the Kr ion irradiated sample. ZrN shows the least microstructural change from proton irradiation. The microstructure of 6H-SiC irradiated to 0.71 dpa consists of black dot defects at high density.

  19. Simulation study of proton transport in ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Philip; Allahyarov, Elshad

    2008-03-01

    Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations were used to study the morphological changes induced in a Nafion-like ionomer by the imposition of a strong electric field. We observe that proton transport through this polymer electrolyte membrane is accompanied by morphological changes that include the formation of structures aligned along the direction of the applied field. The polar head groups of the ionomer side chains assemble into clusters, which then form rod-like formations, and these cylindrical structures then assemble into a hexagonally ordered array aligned with the direction of current flow. For dry ionomers, at current densities in excess of 1 A/cm^2 these rod-like clusters undergo an inner micro-phase separation, in which distinct wire-like lines of sulfonate head groups are accompanied by similar wire-like alignments of bound protons. The clusters appear to be of two types. If there are two, four, or five lines of sulfonates then there is an equal number of lines of protons, but if there are three lines of sulfonates then they are accompanied by four lines of protons. Occasionally these lines of sulfonates and protons form a helical structure. Upon removal of the electric field, the hexagonal array of rod-like structures remains, but the microphase separation disappears below the threshold current of 1 A/cm^2.

  20. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the (15)N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H(2)O/D(2)O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu(II) to enable rapid data acquisition. PMID:18462963

  1. Magnetic field nonuniformities and NMR of protons diffusing in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Bergman, D J; Dunn, K J; LaTorraca, G A

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic field inhomogeneity can arise either because of an externally applied field gradient or because of spatial variations in magnetic susceptibility. The latter are most important when the solid matrix includes paramagnetic substances and when the uniform applied field, and, consequently, also the Larmor precession frequency are very large. Both types of field inhomogeneity add extra phase shifts to the precessing spins. These phase shifts vary with time and position in a complex and random fashion as a result of the diffusive motion of the spins. We have studied these effects by performing detailed calculations for the case of a fluid filled porous medium with a periodic microstructure. Special attention was devoted to the question of whether the statistical distribution of the phase shifts encountered in a Hahn spin echo experiment or in a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) spin-echo train can be approximated as a Gaussian. The mean square phase shift is measured in such experiments as an enhanced relaxation rate of the precessing transverse magnetization. We determine this mean square phase shift for periodic composites from the diffusion eigenstates, which were calculated using a previously developed Fourier expansion method. The enhanced relaxation rate depends on the echo spacing time tau in a way that can be correlated with important length scales of the porous microstructure. Those correlations can be extended also to disordered microstructures, like the ones that are found in natural rocks. We compare these theoretically predicted correlations with CPMG measurements performed on protons in laboratory samples of brine saturated sandstone. PMID:8970094

  2. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  3. Molecular orbital calculation of proton shielding tensors for the interpretation of solid state NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, U.; Rosenberger, H.

    1981-02-01

    We give a short review of the gauge-invariant calculation of shielding constants and susceptibilities from the ground state wvefunction. Since the method is well suited for localizad orbitals, PC ILO bond orbitals are used for the shielding calculation of glycine and its hydrogen bonded dimer (and for testing the theory also CH 4 and C 2H 6). From these values the 1H shielding tensors are constructed in an incrementary way. The calculated data are compared with experimental results and the NH…O hydrogen bond is investigated in detail. The theory gives an anisotropy of a NH…O hydrogen bonded proton of Δσ = 28.3 ppm and a value of a NH proton without hydrogen bond of Δσ = 18.8 ppm and for the CH proton Δσ = 12.5 ppm results. When taking into account the rotation of the NH θ3 groups we find that the qualitative features of the experiment are correctly represented. For the anisotropy Δσ = -6.55 ppm and for the asymmetry η = 0.588 are obtained. The experimental values are -5.63 ppm and 0.805, respectively.

  4. NMR studies of the solution conformation and dynamics of the tyrocidine peptide antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, N.

    1985-01-01

    The tyrocidine B and tyrocidine C /sup 1/H NMR spectra in DMSO-d/sub 6/ were assigned by using 2D /sup 1/H-/sup 1/H correlation spectroscopy and 1D double resonance experiments. Based on the proton chemical shifts, /sup 3/J/sub NH-N..cap alpha../ coupling constants, the chemical shift temperature dependence, and 1D and 2D /sup 1/H-/sup 1/H NOE values, a backbone conformation consisting of an anti-parallel ..beta..-pleated sheet, a type I ..beta..-turn and a type II' ..beta..-turn was suggested for both tyrocidines B and C. Seven out of ten side chains were determined to exist predominantly in one classical Chi/sub 1/ rotamer; while the residues Val/sup 1/ and Leu/sup 3/ had two Chi/sub 1/ rotamers which were significantly populated. Chi/sub 2/ angles were determined for residues Phe/sup 4/, Trp/sup 6/, DPhe/sup 7/ (D Trp/sup 7/) and Asn/sup 8/. The natural abundance /sup 13/C spectra of tyrocidine B and tyrocidine C were assigned by using /sup 1/H-/sup 13/C correlation spectroscopy. A study of the effect of soluble paramagnetic nitroxide compounds on tyrocidine A proton T/sub 1/ values were performed which confirmed the proposed tyrocidine A conformation. It also proved that these nitroxide compounds are very useful in studying proton solvent exposure, and therefore in delineating hydrogen bonding. A proton NMR study of the opioid peptide dynorphin-(1-13) in aqueous solution was reported which was consistent with a non-ordered molecule in the solution.

  5. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  6. Heteronuclear NMR studies of cobalamins. 11. sup 15 N NMR studies of the axial nucleotide and amide side chains of cyanocobalamin and dicyanocobamides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.; Brooks, H.B.; Xiang, Zou ); Victor, M.; Ray, A. ); Timkovich, R. )

    1990-11-28

    Spectroscopic and thermodynamic evidence for the structure of cobalamines and dicyanocobalamin (CN){sub 2}Cbl have been previously reported. The structure indicated the occurrence of the so-called tuck-in species. Further observations and characterization of the tuck-in species of (CN){sub 2}Cbl by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy are presented herein. These results represent the first observation of the {sup 15}N NMR spectrum of benzimidazole nucleotide of cobalamins. The first NMR observation of the amide protons of cobalamins and their connectivity to the amide nitrogens are also reported. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The potential utility of predicted one bond carbon-proton coupling constants in the structure elucidation of small organic molecules by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkata, Chandrasekhar; Forster, Mark J; Howe, Peter W A; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is the most popular technique used for structure elucidation of small organic molecules in solution, but incorrect structures are regularly reported. One-bond proton-carbon J-couplings provide additional information about chemical structure because they are determined by different features of molecular structure than are proton and carbon chemical shifts. However, these couplings are not routinely used to validate proposed structures because few software tools exist to predict them. This study assesses the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for predicting them using 396 published experimental observations from a diverse range of small organic molecules. With the B3LYP functional and the TZVP basis set, Density Functional Theory calculations using the open-source software package NWChem can predict one-bond CH J-couplings with good accuracy for most classes of small organic molecule. The root-mean-square deviation after correction is 1.5 Hz for most sp3 CH pairs and 1.9 Hz for sp2 pairs; larger errors are observed for sp3 pairs with multiple electronegative substituents and for sp pairs. These results suggest that prediction of one-bond CH J-couplings by Density Functional Theory is sufficiently accurate for structure validation. This will be of particular use in strained ring systems and heterocycles which have characteristic couplings and which pose challenges for structure elucidation.

  8. The Potential Utility of Predicted One Bond Carbon-Proton Coupling Constants in the Structure Elucidation of Small Organic Molecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Chandrasekhar; Forster, Mark J.; Howe, Peter W. A.; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is the most popular technique used for structure elucidation of small organic molecules in solution, but incorrect structures are regularly reported. One-bond proton-carbon J-couplings provide additional information about chemical structure because they are determined by different features of molecular structure than are proton and carbon chemical shifts. However, these couplings are not routinely used to validate proposed structures because few software tools exist to predict them. This study assesses the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for predicting them using 396 published experimental observations from a diverse range of small organic molecules. With the B3LYP functional and the TZVP basis set, Density Functional Theory calculations using the open-source software package NWChem can predict one-bond CH J-couplings with good accuracy for most classes of small organic molecule. The root-mean-square deviation after correction is 1.5 Hz for most sp3 CH pairs and 1.9 Hz for sp2 pairs; larger errors are observed for sp3 pairs with multiple electronegative substituents and for sp pairs. These results suggest that prediction of one-bond CH J-couplings by Density Functional Theory is sufficiently accurate for structure validation. This will be of particular use in strained ring systems and heterocycles which have characteristic couplings and which pose challenges for structure elucidation. PMID:25365289

  9. Some specific features of the NMR study of fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Some specific features of studying fluid flows with a NMR spectrometer are considered. The consideration of these features in the NMR spectrometer design makes it possible to determine the relative concentrations of paramagnetic ions and measure the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times ( T 1 and T 2, respectively) in fluid flows with an error no larger than 0.5%. This approach allows one to completely avoid errors in determining the state of a fluid from measured relaxation constants T 1 and T 2, which is especially urgent when working with medical suspensions and biological solutions. The results of an experimental study of fluid flows are presented.

  10. Proton NMR assignment and secondary structural elements of human transforming growth factor. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.C.; Mueller, L.; Jeffs, P.W. )

    1989-01-24

    The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of human transforming growth factor {alpha} (hTGF-{alpha}) has been completely assigned, and secondary structural elements have been identified as a preliminary step in determining the structure of this protein by distance geometry methods. Many of these structural elements closely correspond to those previously found in a truncated human EGF and murine EGF. These include the presence of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet between residues G19 and C34 with a type I {beta}-turn at V25-D28, a type II {beta}-turn at H35-Y38, and another short {beta}-sheet between residues Y38-V39 and H45-A46.

  11. 1H NMR study of the effect of heme insertion on the folding of apomyoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Takemoto, Kenji; Matsuo, Hitomi

    2002-01-01

    NMR signals arising from His EF5 and His GH1 N ɛH protons of sperm whale myoglobin and apomyoglobin have been assigned, and the protein folding has been studied through the analysis of these signals. His EF5 and His GH1 N ɛH protons participate in the internal hydrogen bonds at the B-GH and EF-H interfaces, respectively, and their signals are remarkably sensitive to local structural alterations at these sites. The shifts of these signals in alkaline pH condition were only slightly affected by the removal of heme, indicating that the overall protein folding is essentially retained in apoprotein. The line width of His EF5 proton signal, however, increased largely in the spectra of apomyoglobin and this result suggests a conformational lability of the EF-H interface in the absence of heme. Furthermore, the His EF5 proton signal was found to be influenced by not only the orientation of heme relative to the protein, but also by the type of hemin used to reconstitute apomyoglobin. These results clearly demonstrate the presence of a long-range structural correlation between the heme active site and the EF-H interface.

  12. Low-temperature NMR studies on inosine wobble base pairs.

    PubMed

    Janke, Eline M Basílio; Riechert-Krause, Fanny; Weisz, Klaus

    2011-07-01

    Base pairs formed by the inosine nucleoside (I) play an important role in many physiological processes as well as in various DNA technologies. Relative stabilities and favored base pair geometries of free inosine wobble base pairs in aprotic solvents have been determined through (1)H NMR measurements at room temperature and at very low temperatures in a freonic solvent. As indicated by its significantly deshielded imino proton, the Watson-Crick-type I·C base pair forms a remarkably strong NHN hydrogen bond. For the thermodynamically less stable I·A wobble base pair, two configurations of similar population coexist at 133 K in the slow hydrogen bond exchange regime, namely a Watson-Crick(I)-Watson-Crick(A) geometry and a Watson-Crick(I)-Hoogsteen(A) geometry. I·U base pairs are stabilized by two rather weak hydrogen bonds and are significantly disfavored over inosine self-associates in a low-temperature Freon solution. PMID:21644523

  13. Molecular dynamics of solid cortisol studied by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    Polycrystalline cortisol (hydrocortisone; 11β,17α,21-trihydroxy-4-preg- nene-3,20-dione; C21H30O5) has been investigated by continuous and pulse proton NMR methods between 78 and 400 K at Larmor frequencies of 7, 25 and 60 MHz. A reduced value of second moment was found above 90 K and is ascribed to reorientation of two methyl groups. A single asymmetric minimum was found in the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation times and this also is attributed to reorientation of two methyl groups. The asymmetry suggests an asymmetric distribution of correlation times of the motion. Using the Cole-Davidson distribution, the best computer fit yields the following parameters characterizing the motion: Ea = 11ṡ8 ± 0ṡ1 kJ mol-1, τ0 = 4ṡ6 ± 0ṡ4) x 10-13s, distribution parameter δ = 0ṡ62.

  14. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids.

  15. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids. PMID:27533469

  16. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba2In2O5, Ba2In2O4(OH)2, is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H2O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics2004, 170, 25−32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculations of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1H and 17O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1H–17O double resonance experiments. PMID:26321789

  17. Proton NMR investigation of the heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase that mimics manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-07-13

    The heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase [MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 4, 215-221] that closely mimics manganese peroxidase (MnP) has been characterized by both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All hyperfine-shifted resonances from the heme pocket as well as resonances from catalytically relevant amino acid residues in the congested diamagnetic envelope have been assigned. From the NMR spectral assignment and the line broadening pattern of specific protons in NOESY spectra of MnCcP, the location of the engineered Mn(II) center is firmly identified. Furthermore, we found that the creation of the Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in no detectable structural changes on the distal heme pocket of the protein. However, notable structural changes are observed at the proximal side of the heme cavity. Both CepsilonH shift of the proximal histidine and (15)N shift of the bound C(15)N(-) suggest a weaker heme Fe(III)-N(His) bond in MnCcP compared to WtCcP. Our results indicate that the engineered Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in not only a similar Mn(II)-binding affinity and improved MnP activity, but also weakened the Fe(III)-N(His) bond strength of the template protein CcP so that its bond strength is similar to that of the target protein MnP. The results presented here help elucidate the impact of designing a metal-binding site on both the local and global structure of the enzyme, and provide a structural basis for engineering the next generation of MnCcP that mimics MnP more closely. PMID:10413489

  18. Conformation of the ATP binding peptide in actin revealed by proton NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barden, J.A.

    1987-09-22

    The actin peptide 106-124 exists in a completely conserved region of the sequence and binds strongly to both ATP and tripolyphosphate. Binding particularly affects residues 116 and 118 and generally affects the two segments 115-118 and 121-124. One-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement difference spectroscopy was used to detect molecular interactions between both adjacent and nonadjacent residues. The N-terminal segment 106-112 was found to be largely extended. A sharp bend was detected between Pro-112 and Lys-113. The triphosphate moiety binds to the strongly hydrophilic central segment of the peptide. Evidence was obtained for a reverse turn involving residues 121-124. Amide proton temperature coefficients and coupling constants provide evidence for a type I ..beta..-turn. A model of the ATP binding site is proposed together with its relationship to other parts of the actin structure and to the phalloidin binding site.

  19. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  20. Hydrogen bonds and a hydrogen-bonded chain in mannich bases of 5,5'-dinitro-2,2'-biphenol-FT-IR and 1H NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Bogumil; Urjasz, Hanna; Bartl, Franz; Zundel, Georg

    1997-11-01

    5,5'-Dinitro-3-diethylaminomethyl-2,2'-biphenol ( 1) and 5,5'-dinitro-3,3' bis(diethylaminomethyl)-2,2'-biphenol ( 2) as well as 5,5'-dinitro-2,2'-biphenol ( 3) were synthesized and studied by FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy in acetonitrile or acetonitrile-d 3 solutions, respectively. With compound 1 a hydrogen-bonded system with large proton polarizability is found. In the hydrogen bonds in compound 2 the protons are localized at the N atoms. These hydrogen bonds show no proton polarizability. In the protonated compound 2 a very strong homoconjugated -O⋯H +⋯O - hydrogen bond with large proton polarizability is found, whereas two other protons are localized at the N atoms. The deviation of the results obtained with other derivatives of 2,2'-biphenols are caused by the larger acidity of the nitro groups.

  1. NMR studies of recombinant Coprinus peroxidase and three site-directed mutants. Implications for peroxidase substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Veitch, N C; Tams, J W; Vind, J; Dalbøge, H; Welinder, K G

    1994-06-15

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to characterise and compare wild-type fungal and recombinant Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and three mutants in which Gly156 and/or Asn157 was replaced by Phe. Analysis of one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra of recombinant CIP was undertaken for comparison with the fungal enzyme and in order to establish a meaningful basis for solution studies of CIP mutants. Proton resonance assignments of haem and haem-linked residues obtained for the cyanide-ligated form of recombinant CIP revealed a high degree of spectral similarity with those of lignin and manganese-dependent peroxidases and extend previously reported NMR data for fungal CIP. The three mutants examined by NMR spectroscopy comprised site-specific substitutions made to a region of the structure believed to form part of the peroxidase haem group access channel for substrate and ligand molecules. Proton resonances of the aromatic side-chains of Phe156 and Phe157 were found to have similar spectral characteristics to those of two phenylalanine residues known to be involved in the binding of aromatic donor molecules to the plant peroxidase, horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C. The results are discussed in the context of complementary reactivity studies on the mutants in order to develop a more detailed understanding of aromatic donor molecule binding to fungal and plant peroxidases.

  2. DNP enhanced NMR using a high-power 94 GHz microwave source: a study of the TEMPOL radical in toluene.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, Eugeny V; Newton, Mark E; Pike, Kevin J; Bolton, David R; Kowalczyk, Radoslaw M; Howes, Andrew P; Smith, Mark E; Dupree, Ray

    2010-06-14

    DNP enhanced (1)H NMR at 143 MHz in toluene is investigated using an NMR spectrometer coupled with a modified EPR spectrometer operating at 94 GHz and TEMPOL as the polarisation agent. A 100 W microwave amplifier was incorporated into the output stage of the EPR instrument so that high microwave powers could be delivered to the probe in either CW or pulsed mode. The maximum enhancement for the ring protons increases from approximately -16 for a 5 mM TEMPOL solution to approximately -50 for a 20 mM solution at a microwave power of approximately 480 mW. The temperature dependence of the enhancement, the NMR relaxation rates and the ESR spectrum of TEMPOL were also studied in an effort to obtain information on the dynamics of the system.

  3. A carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of some experimental referee broadened-specification /ERBS/ turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalling, D. K.; Pugmire, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy study of alternative jet fuels are presented. A referee broadened-specification (ERBS) aviation turbine fuel, a mixture of 65 percent traditional kerosene with 35 percent hydrotreated catalytic gas oil (HCGO) containing 12.8 percent hydrogen, and fuels of lower hydrogen content created by blending the latter with a mixture of HCGO and xylene bottoms were studied. The various samples were examined by carbon-13 and proton NMR at high field strength, and the resulting spectra are shown. In the proton spectrum of the 12.8 percent hydrogen fuel, no prominent single species is seen while for the blending stock, many individual lines are apparent. The ERBS fuels were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and the resulting fractions analyzed by NMR. The species found are identified.

  4. The PAW/GIPAW approach for computing NMR parameters: a new dimension added to NMR study of solids.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Thibault

    2011-07-01

    In 2001, Mauri and Pickard introduced the gauge including projected augmented wave (GIPAW) method that enabled for the first time the calculation of all-electron NMR parameters in solids, i.e. accounting for periodic boundary conditions. The GIPAW method roots in the plane wave pseudopotential formalism of the density functional theory (DFT), and avoids the use of the cluster approximation. This method has undoubtedly revitalized the interest in quantum chemical calculations in the solid-state NMR community. It has quickly evolved and improved so that the calculation of the key components of NMR interactions, namely the shielding and electric field gradient tensors, has now become a routine for most of the common nuclei studied in NMR. Availability of reliable implementations in several software packages (CASTEP, Quantum Espresso, PARATEC) make its usage more and more increasingly popular, maybe indispensable in near future for all material NMR studies. The majority of nuclei of the periodic table have already been investigated by GIPAW, and because of its high accuracy it is quickly becoming an essential tool for interpreting and understanding experimental NMR spectra, providing reliable assignments of the observed resonances to crystallographic sites or enabling a priori prediction of NMR data. The continuous increase of computing power makes ever larger (and thus more realistic) systems amenable to first-principles analysis. In the near future perspectives, as the incorporation of dynamical effects and/or disorder are still at their early developments, these areas will certainly be the prime target.

  5. Solvent and H/D isotope effects on the proton transfer pathways in heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylic acid anions observed by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-05-22

    Heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded anions A···H···X(-) of phenols (AH) and carboxylic/inorganic acids (HX) dissolved in CD2Cl2 and CDF3/CDF2Cl have been studied by combined low-temperature UV-vis and (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy (UVNMR). The systems constitute small molecular models of hydrogen-bonded cofactors in proteins such as the photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Thus, the phenols studied include the PYP cofactor 4-hydroxycinnamic acid methyl thioester, and the more acidic 4-nitrophenol and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol which mimic electronically excited cofactor states. It is shown that the (13)C chemical shifts of the phenolic residues of A···H···X(-), referenced to the corresponding values of A···H···A(-), constitute excellent probes for the average proton positions. These shifts correlate with those of the H-bonded protons, as well as with the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts. A combined analysis of UV-vis and NMR data was employed to elucidate the proton transfer pathways in a qualitative way. Dual absorption bands of the phenolic moiety indicate a double-well situation for the shortest OHO hydrogen bonds studied. Surprisingly, when the solvent polarity is low the carboxylates are protonated whereas the proton shifts toward the phenolic oxygens when the polarity is increased. This finding indicates that because of stronger ion-dipole interactions small anions are stabilized at high solvent polarity and large anions exhibiting delocalized charges at low solvent polarities. It also explains the large acidity difference of phenols and carboxylic acids in water, and the observation that this difference is strongly reduced in the interior of proteins when both partners form mutual hydrogen bonds. PMID:23607931

  6. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances a protein by two-dimensional NMR: the case of mouse epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kohda, D; Sawada, T; Inagaki, F

    1991-05-21

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p2H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) 1H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable groups which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups (alpha-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and alpha-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal alpha-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the beta-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. We found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins. PMID:2036358

  7. Nonplanarity and the protonation behavior of porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    SOMMA,MARIA S.; MEDFORTH,CRAIG J.; TH,KEVIN M.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    2000-03-21

    {sup 1}H NMR studies of the protonation of highly nonplanar porphyrins with strong acids reveal the presence of the previously elusive monocation, and show that its stability can be related to the amount of saddle distortion induced by protonation; the amount of saddle distortion for a porphyrin dication is also found to correlate well with the rate of intermolecular proton transfer.

  8. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-09-07

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin.

  9. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  10. 1H and 15N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially 1H-15N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate 15N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS 15N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via 1H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D 1H and 2D 1H-15N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  11. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  12. Nitrogen-15 NMR studies of solid dipeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The first part of this study deals with the systematic determination of the /sup 15/N chemical shift tensor for the series of dipeptides N-acetyl(1-/sup 13/C)-glycyl-(/sup 15/N)-X-amide (GlyX: X = alanine, glycine, tyrosine), (1-/sup 13/C)-glycyl(/sup 15/N)-glycine/center dot/HCL and (1-/sup 13/C)-ananyl-(/sup 15/N)-alanine (AlaAla). The principal values and polar angles relating the chemical shift tensor to the peptide C-N bond are given for all dipeptides studied. The isotropic values for /sup 15/N varied from 105 ppm up to 119.7ppm for all the dipeptides studied and the angle ..beta../sub CN/ relating sigma/sub 33/to the C-N bond varied from 98/degree/ to 106/degree/. GlyAla and AlaAla showed striking differences in asymmetry parameter, .37 vs. .13, and anisotropy, 165 vs. 144, yet the isotropic values for these two are identical. The /sup 13/C chemical shift principal values and polar angles are determined for AlaAla. The second part of the study deals with an experiment to determine unambiguously the orientation of the chemical shift tensor in the molecular frame.

  13. An NMR Study of Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Keith E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as a model for studying enzyme activity with a basic spectrometer is presented. Included are background information, experimental procedures, and a discussion of probable results. Stressed is the value of the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in biochemistry. (CW)

  14. NMR studies and applications of perfluorocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yulin

    Hyperpolarized 3He has been very successful in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs. It provides ways to study the physiological properties of the lungs and lung function. However, the high costs of the polarizing apparatus and the complicated polarizing procedure are preventing this technique from being clinically used routinely. Recent developments have shown that several fluorinated gases have the potential to replace 3He in some of its applications. This thesis presents some preliminary results of human excised lung imaging using C2F6 and C3F8. These two fluorinated gases were able to yield images with good signal-to-noise ratio and reasonable resolutions in a 1.5 T magnet. Using diffusion MRI of these two gases can distinguish emphysematous lungs from healthy ones. An important application of these gases would be to determine local lung surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio in vivo, which requires the unrestricted (free) diffusivity in each pixel to be known. We present data in this thesis which allow free diffusivities to be calculated from the relaxation time T1. Samples of pure C 2F6 and C3F8 at different pressures and in mixtures with oxygen at different concentrations were made. Measurements were done at two different magnetic fields and temperature was regulated to study the temperature dependence over a small range. These two gases were also used in studies of carbon-block filters, where the strong adsorption of the gases to the high surface-area carbon is beneficial. A brief review of our work on mouse lung imaging using hyperpolarized 3He is presented in Appendix A; Appendix B is a study of the longitudinal spin magnetization in the presence of a strong magnetic field gradient; the construction of the pulsed field gradient waveform measurement coils and some experimental results using these coils are contained in Appendix C.

  15. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, L. B.

    1985-04-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by magic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable engine sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. The NMR techniques that will be emphasized are the measurement and analysis of the (17)O NMR properties, (27)Al NMR intensity quantitation, and (27)Al and (29)Si NMR relaxation rates. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of (17)O enriched Na-Y faujasties.

  17. Dynamics of anions and cations in cesium hydrogensulfide (CsHS, CsDS): Neutron and x-ray diffraction, calorimetry and proton NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarmann, F.; Jacobs, H.; Kockelmann, W.; Senker, J.; Muller, P.; Kennedy, C. A.; Marriott, R. A.; Qiu, L.; White, M. A.

    2002-09-01

    Protonated and deuterated samples of the hydrogensulfide of cesium were studied by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction, calorimetry and proton NMR investigations in a wide temperature range. Primarily due to reorientational disorder of the anions, three modifications of the title compounds are known: an ordered low-temperature modification--LTM (tetragonal, I4/m, Z=8), a dynamically disordered middle-temperature modification--MTM (tetragonal, P4/mbm, Z=2), and a high-temperature modification--HTM (cubic, Pm3m, Z=1). The LTM[rightleft arrows]MTM phase transition is continuous. Its order parameter, related to an order/disorder and to a displacive part of the phase transition, coupled bilinearly, follows a critical law. The critical temperature TC=123.2plus-or-minus0.5 K determined by neutron diffraction of CsDS is in good agreement with TC=121plus-or-minus2 K obtained by calorimetric investigations. For the protonated title compound a shift to TC=129plus-or-minus2 K was observed by calorimetric measurements. The entropy change of this transition is (0.24plus-or-minus0.04) R and (0.27plus-or-minus0.04) R for CsHS and CsDS, respectively. The MTM[rightleft arrows]HTM phase transition is clearly of first order. The transition temperatures of CsHS and CsDS are T=207.9plus-or-minus0.3 K and T=213.6plus-or-minus0.3 K with entropy changes of (0.86plus-or-minus0.01) R and (0.81plus-or-minus0.01) R, respectively. Second moments (M2) of the proton NMR absorption signal of MTM and HTM are in reasonable agreement with M2 calculated for the known crystal structures. A minimum in spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) in the MTM could not be assigned by dipolar coupling to a two-site 180deg reorientation of the anions, a model of motion presumed by the knowledge of the crystal structure. The activation enthalpies determined by fits of T1 presuming a thermal activated process are in the order of molecular reorientations (Ea=13.5plus-or-minus0.5 kJ mol-1 for the MTM and Ea=9.3plus

  18. Effects of osmotic manipulation of intracellular hydration of HeLa S-3 cells on their proton NMR relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, D N; Rimmington, J E; Foster, M A

    1990-01-01

    Pellets of HeLa from suspension cultured cells in isotonic medium (300 mosmolar) were introduced into a Bruker CXP100 NMR spectrophotometer at 80 mHz within 5 min of the start of centrifugation. T1 and T2 times were measured within a total elapsed time of 20-25 min at 80 mHz and 37 degrees C, and averaged 1430 msec and 120 msec, respectively. Extrapolation to zero extracellular space gave a corrected T1 of 1370 msec. For cells collected after 10 min in hypotonic medium (down to 30 mosmolar) increased proton density correlated well with increased cell water content, but relaxation times did not rise in proportion to that predicted for the entry of "bulk" water (T1 of 4700 msec), except when swelling approached lysis point. Cells partially dehydrated by 10 min in hypertonic medium of up to 1500 mosmolar have also been analyzed, but once again the shortening of T1 was not proportional to the loss of "free" (bulk phase) water. At the upper limit of hypertonic treatment, lacunae or vacuoles of a watery nature separated within the cytomatrix, preventing maximum dehydration. The relationship of cell water to T1 is complex over the whole range of tonicity that HeLa S-3 cells tolerate. The data indicate, however, that hypotonically induced water probably has an average T1 time considerably lower than bulk phase water. In contrast, raising the total extracellular volume with medium had precisely the predicted effect on T1 time, further strengthening the case that water taken up by cell acquires a shorter T1 time. Cells adapting to hypotonic conditions oscillated in size and water content over 2-3 hr before returning to near their initial volume. Under these circumstances, T1 oscillated in the same way but with a reduced amplitude, consistent with the above findings.

  19. Effect of magnetic field and iron content on NMR proton relaxation of liver, spleen and brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Hocq, Aline; Luhmer, Michel; Saussez, Sven; Louryan, Stéphane; Gillis, Pierre; Gossuin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Iron accumulation is observed in liver and spleen during hemochromatosis and important neurodegenerative diseases involve iron overload in brain. Storage of iron is ensured by ferritin, which contains a magnetic core. It causes a darkening on T2 -weighted MR images. This work aims at improving the understanding of the NMR relaxation of iron-loaded human tissues, which is necessary to develop protocols of iron content measurements by MRI. Relaxation times measurements on brain, liver and spleen samples were realized at different magnetic fields. Iron content was determined by atomic emission spectroscopy. For all samples, the longitudinal relaxation rate (1/T1 ) of tissue protons decreases with the magnetic field up to 1 T, independently of iron content, while their transverse relaxation rate (1/T2 ) strongly increases with the field, either linearly or quadratically, or a combination thereof. The extent of the inter-echo time dependence of 1/T2 also varies according to the sample. A combination of theoretical models is necessary to describe the relaxation of iron-containing tissues. This can be due to the presence, inside tissues, of ferritin clusters of different sizes and densities. When considering all samples, a correlation (r(2)  = 0.6) between 1/T1 and iron concentration is observed at 7.0 T. In contrast the correlation between 1/T2 and iron content is poor, even at high field (r(2)  = 0.14 at 7.0 T). Our results show that MRI methods based on T1 or T2 measurements will easily detect an iron overloading at high magnetic field, but will not provide an accurate quantification of tissue iron content at low iron concentrations. PMID:24954138

  20. Protonation States of the Tryptophan Synthase Internal Aldimine Active Site from Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Direct Observation of the Protonated Schiff Base Linkage to Pyridoxal-5′-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acid–base chemistry that drives catalysis in pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes has been the subject of intense interest and investigation since the initial identification of PLP’s role as a coenzyme in this extensive class of enzymes. It was first proposed over 50 years ago that the initial step in the catalytic cycle is facilitated by a protonated Schiff base form of the holoenzyme in which the linking lysine ε-imine nitrogen, which covalently binds the coenzyme, is protonated. Here we provide the first 15N NMR chemical shift measurements of such a Schiff base linkage in the resting holoenzyme form, the internal aldimine state of tryptophan synthase. Double-resonance experiments confirm the assignment of the Schiff base nitrogen, and additional 13C, 15N, and 31P chemical shift measurements of sites on the PLP coenzyme allow a detailed model of coenzyme protonation states to be established. PMID:25148001

  1. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, R. |

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework {sup 27}Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na{sup +} cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  2. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  3. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    17O NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations was employed to understand the local structure and dynamics of the phosphate ions and protons in the paraelectric phase of the proton conductor CsH2PO4. For the room-temperature structure, the results confirm that one proton (H1) is localized in an asymmetric H-bond (between O1 donor and O2 acceptor oxygen atoms), whereas the H2 proton undergoes rapid exchange between two sites in a hydrogen bond with a symmetric double potential well at a rate ≥107 Hz. Variable-temperature 17O NMR spectra recorded from 22 to 214 °C were interpreted by considering different models for the rotation of the phosphate anions. At least two distinct rate constants for rotations about four pseudo C3 axes of the phosphate ion were required in order to achieve good agreement with the experimental data. An activation energy of 0.21 ± 0.06 eV was observed for rotation about the P–O1 axis, with a higher activation energy of 0.50 ± 0.07 eV being obtained for rotation about the P–O2, P–O3d, and P–O3a axes, with the superscripts denoting, respectively, dynamic donor and acceptor oxygen atoms of the H-bond. The higher activation energy of the second process is most likely associated with the cost of breaking an O1–H1 bond. The activation energy of this process is slightly lower than that obtained from the 1H exchange process (0.70 ± 0.07 eV) (Kim, G.; Blanc, F.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Grey, C. P. J. Phys. Chem. C2013, 117, 6504−6515) associated with the translational motion of the protons. The relationship between proton jumps and phosphate rotation was analyzed in detail by considering uncorrelated motion, motion of individual PO4 ions and the four connected/H-bonded protons, and concerted motions of adjacent phosphate units, mediated by proton hops. We conclude that, while phosphate rotations aid proton motion, not all phosphate rotations result in proton jumps. PMID:25732257

  4. Tacrine derivatives-acetylcholinesterase interaction: 1H NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Maurizio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Piccioni, Fabiana; Porcelli, Fernando; Borioni, Anna; Rodomonte, Andrea; Del Giudice, Maria Rosaria

    2007-06-01

    Two acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors structurally related to Tacrine, 6-methoxytacrine (1a) and 9-heptylamino-6-methoxytacrine (1b), and their interaction with Electrophorus Electricus AChE were investigated. The complete assignment of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of 1a and 1b was performed by mono-dimensional and homo- and hetero-correlated two-dimensional NMR experiments. This study was undertaken to elucidate the interaction modes between AChE and 1a and 1b in solution, using NMR. The interaction between the two inhibitors and AChE was studied by the analysis of the motional parameters non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation times, thereby allowing the motional state of 1a and 1b, both free and bound with AChE, to be defined. The relaxation data pointed out the ligands molecular moiety most involved in the binding with AChE. The relevant ligand/enzyme interaction constants were also evaluated for both compounds and resulted to be 859 and 5412M(-1) for 1a and1b, respectively.

  5. Effect of gel firmness at cutting time, pH, and temperature on rennet coagulation and syneresis: an in situ 1H NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christian Lyndgaard; Rinnan, Asmund; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Janhøj, Thomas; Micklander, Elisabeth; Andersen, Ulf; van den Berg, Frans

    2010-01-13

    The objective of this study was to monitor rennet-induced milk gel formation and mechanically induced gel syneresis in situ by low-field NMR. pH, temperature, and gel firmness at cutting time were varied in a factorial design. The new curve-fitting method Doubleslicing revealed that during coagulation two proton populations with distinct transverse relaxation times (T2,1=181, T2,2=465 ms) were present in fractions (f1=98.9%, f2=1.1%). Mechanical cutting of the gel in the NMR tube induced macrosyneresis, which led to the appearance of an additional proton population (T2,3=1500-2200 ms) identified as whey. On the basis of NMR quantification of whey water the syneresis rate was calculated and found to be significantly dependent on pH and temperature.

  6. Study of elastic proton-proton scattering with the STAR detector at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Rafal

    2015-09-01

    The STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is equipped with system of dedicated Silicon Strip Detectors housed inside Roman Pot vessels, allowing to detect protons scattered at small angles. Data from polarized proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass system (c.m.s.) energy √s = 200 GeV collected with special settings of RHIC magnet lattice (β * = 22 m) allow to study proton-proton elastic scattering at very low values of squared four-momentum transfer (Mandelstam t), 0:003 <= -t <= 0:035 GeV2=c2. Results of analysis of systematic effects and large statistics of collected data sample reveal possibility of measurement of the Nuclear Slope Parameter with precision not yet achieved at this c.m.s. energy.

  7. An advanced phantom study assessing the feasibility of neuronal current imaging by ultra-low-field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körber, Rainer; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Höfner, Nora; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Kim, Kiwoong; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/MRI, a common scheme is to magnetize the sample by a polarizing field of up to hundreds of mT, after which the NMR signal, precessing in a field on the order of several μT, is detected with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In our ULF-NMR system, we polarize with up to 50 mT and deploy a single-stage DC-SQUID current sensor with an integrated input coil which is connected to a wire-wound Nb gradiometer. We developed this system (white noise 0.50 fT/√{Hz}) for assessing the feasibility of imaging neuronal currents by detecting their effect on the ULF-NMR signal. Magnetoencephalography investigations of evoked brain activity showed neuronal dipole moments below 50 nAm. With our instrumentation, we have studied two different approaches for neuronal current imaging. In the so-called DC effect, long-lived neuronal activity shifts the Larmor frequency of the surrounding protons. An alternative strategy is to exploit fast neuronal activity as a tipping pulse. This so-called AC effect requires the proton Larmor frequency to match the frequency of the neuronal activity, which ranges from near-DC to ∼kHz. We emulated neuronal activity by means of a single dipolar source in a physical phantom, consisting of a hollow sphere filled with an aqueous solution of CuSO4 and NaCl. In these phantom studies, with physiologically relevant dipole depths, we determined resolution limits for our set-up for the AC and the DC effect of ∼10 μAm and ∼50 nAm, respectively. Hence, the DC effect appears to be detectable in vivo by current ULF-NMR technology.

  8. An advanced phantom study assessing the feasibility of neuronal current imaging by ultra-low-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Körber, Rainer; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Höfner, Nora; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Kim, Kiwoong; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/MRI, a common scheme is to magnetize the sample by a polarizing field of up to hundreds of mT, after which the NMR signal, precessing in a field on the order of several μT, is detected with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In our ULF-NMR system, we polarize with up to 50mT and deploy a single-stage DC-SQUID current sensor with an integrated input coil which is connected to a wire-wound Nb gradiometer. We developed this system (white noise 0.50fT/√Hz) for assessing the feasibility of imaging neuronal currents by detecting their effect on the ULF-NMR signal. Magnetoencephalography investigations of evoked brain activity showed neuronal dipole moments below 50nAm. With our instrumentation, we have studied two different approaches for neuronal current imaging. In the so-called DC effect, long-lived neuronal activity shifts the Larmor frequency of the surrounding protons. An alternative strategy is to exploit fast neuronal activity as a tipping pulse. This so-called AC effect requires the proton Larmor frequency to match the frequency of the neuronal activity, which ranges from near-DC to ∼kHz. We emulated neuronal activity by means of a single dipolar source in a physical phantom, consisting of a hollow sphere filled with an aqueous solution of CuSO4 and NaCl. In these phantom studies, with physiologically relevant dipole depths, we determined resolution limits for our set-up for the AC and the DC effect of ∼10μAm and ∼50nAm, respectively. Hence, the DC effect appears to be detectable in vivo by current ULF-NMR technology.

  9. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  10. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  11. NMR Studies of Molecular Orientation and Dynamics in Spider silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michal, Carl; Eles, Philip

    2004-05-01

    Spider dragline silk has a unique combination of strength and extensibility that has been difficult to achieve in synthetic polymer fibres and has inspired industrial efforts to produce genetically engineered analogues. In light of these efforts elsewhere, we describe solid-state NMR experiments that elucidate the molecular structure and dynamics of this remarkable material. These experiments include the use of a 2-D exchange NMR experiment known as DECODER in which the sample is reoriented through a discrete angle during the mixing time. This experiment allows a reconstruction of the orientation distribution of the protein backbone. Our data is well described by a two-component distribution where the protein backbones of both components are preferentially aligned along the silk fibre. This experiment is also sensitive to molecular motion on a wide range of time-scales, and is employed to study changes in the silk as a function of fibre extension and hydration. Hydrated silk undergoes a remarkable phenomena known as supercontraction where fibres shrink by up to 50% in length while swelling in diameter. DECODER NMR of fully and partially supercontracted silk reveals that supercontraction occurs through a process of local phase transitions where water disrupts inter- and intra-chain hydrogen bonds.

  12. Lipid-ethanol interaction studied by NMR on bicelles.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Bernd W; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2005-04-21

    The interaction of ethanol with phospholipids was studied in bicelles at a physiologically relevant ethanol concentration of 20 mM and a lipid content of 14 wt % by high-resolution NMR. Transient association of ethanol with magnetically aligned bicelles imparts a small degree of anisotropy to the solute. This anisotropy allows detection of residual (1)H-(1)H and (1)H-(13)C dipolar couplings, which are superimposed on scalar couplings. Residual (2)H NMR quadrupole splittings of isotope-labeled ethanol were measured as well. The analysis of residual tensorial interactions yielded information on the orientation and motions of ethanol in the membrane-bound state. The fraction of phosphatidylcholine-bound ethanol was determined independently by gas chromatography and NMR. About 4% of ethanol is bound to phosphatidylcholine at a bicelle concentration of 14 wt % at 40 degrees C. Free and bound ethanol are in rapid exchange. The lifetime of ethanol association with phosphatidylcholine membranes is of the order of a few nanoseconds.

  13. Spatially selective heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy for bio-molecular NMR studies

    PubMed Central

    Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Parish, David M.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Xiao, Rong; Szyperski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Spatially selective heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (SS HMQC) NMR spectroscopy was devised for solution studies of proteins. Due to ‘time-staggered’ acquisition of free induction decays (FIDs) in different slices, SS HMQC allows one to employ long delays for longitudinal nuclear spin relaxation at high repetition rates for the acquisition of the FIDs. To also achieve high intrinsic sensitivity, SS HMQC was implemented by combing a single spatially selective 1H excitation pulse with non-selective 1H 180° pulses. High-quality spectra could be obtained within 66 seconds for a 7.6 kDa uniformly 13C,15N-labeled protein, and within 45 and 90 seconds for, respectively, two uniformly 2H,13C,15N-labeled but isoleucine, leucine and valine methyl group protonated proteins with molecular weights of 7.5 and 43 kDa. PMID:24789578

  14. A Kinetic Study of DDGS Hemicellulose Acid Hydrolysis and NMR Characterization of DDGS Hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanchi; Liu, Shijie

    2015-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) extraction was used as a pretreatment method to separate the hemicellulose fraction from dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS) into liquid phase. Acid hydrolysis using 3.264 % w/w sulfuric acid at 130 °C was performed to convert polysaccharides in LHW extract to monosaccharides. The structure characterization of DDGS in anomeric carbon region based on proton NMR and heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) during acid hydrolysis was studied in this work. It reveals that the sugar units in DDGS hemicelluloses are constructed with (1-4)-β-D-xylopyranose and α-L-arabinofuranosyl residues. A kinetic model is included to explain the changing concentration of monomer, oligomer, and sugar units. The model was further tested based on the changing concentration of five carbon sugar units during hydrolysis. PMID:26198022

  15. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Organic phosphorus incorporated in calcite during laboratory precipitation experiments and in natural cave deposits was investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For calcite precipitated in the presence of organic phosphoesters of varying size and functionality, solid-state 31P{1H} CP/MAS NMR shows that the phosphoesters were incorporated intact into the solid. Systematic changes in the 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphate group were observed between the solid phosphoester and that incorporated in the solid precipitate, yielding 31P NMR chemical shifts of the coprecipitates in the range of +1.8 to -2.2 ppm. These chemical shifts are distinct from that of similarly prepared calcite coprecipitated with inorganic phosphate, 3.5 ppm. Only minor changes were noted in the phosphoester 31P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) which suggests no significant change in the local structure of the phosphate group, which is dominated by C-O-P bonding. Close spatial proximity of the organic phosphate group to calcite structural components was revealed by 31P/13C rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments for coprecipitates prepared with 13C-labeled carbonate. All coprecipitates showed significant 31P dephasing effects upon 13C-irradiation, signaling atomic-scale proximity to carbonate carbon. The dephasing rate for smaller organophosphate molecules is similar to that observed for inorganic phosphate, whereas much slower dephasing was observed for larger molecules having long and/or bulky side-chains. This result suggests that small organic molecules can be tightly enclosed within the calcite structure, whereas significant structural disruption required to accommodate the larger organic molecules leads to longer phosphate-carbonate distances. Comparison of 31P NMR spectroscopic data from the synthetic coprecipitates with those from calcite moonmilk speleothems indicates that phosphorus occurs mainly as inorganic orthophosphate in the natural deposits, although small

  16. NMR Studies of 3He Films on Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of NMR studies of the dynamics of 3He adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride. These studies can identify the phase transitions of the 2D films as a function of temperature. A thermally activated temperature dependence is observed for 2.6 < T < 8 K compared to a linear temperature dependence for 0.7 < T < 2.6 K. This linear dependence is consistent with that expected for thermal diffusion in a fluid for coverages of 0.4 - 0.6 of a monolayer.

  17. Conformations of a model cyclic hexapeptide, CYIQNC: (1)H-NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashok Kumar; Ojha, Rajendra Prasad

    2015-09-01

    Solution conformation of the cyclic hexapeptide sequence, [cyclo-S-Cys-Tyr-Ile-Gln-Asn-Cys-S] (CYIQNC) - a disulfide-linked fragment of a neurohypophyseal peptide hormone oxytocin (OT) - has been investigated by high-field one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopic methods and compared with the results obtained from computer simulation studies. (1)H-NMR results based on temperature dependence of amide proton chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effect indicate that peptide in solution populates different conformations, characterized by two fused β-turns. The segment Ile(3)-Gln(4)-Asn(5)-Cys(6) yields a preferred type-III β-turn at residues 4, 5 (HB, 3HN → 6CO), while the segment Cys(6), Cys(1)-Tyr(2)-Ile(3) exhibits inherently weaker, flexible β-turn either of type I/II'/III/half-turn at residues 1, 2 (HB, 6HN → 3CO). The computer simulation studies using a mixed protocol of distance geometry-simulated annealing followed by constrained minimization, restrained molecular dynamics, and energy minimization showed the possibility of existence of additional conformations with the hydrogen bonds, (a) 5HN → 3CO and (b) 2HN → 6CO. These results, therefore, indicate that the additional conformations obtained from both NMR and simulation studies can also be possible to the peptide. These additional conformations might have very small population in the solution and did not show their signatures in these conditions. These findings will be helpful in designing more analogs with modifications in the cyclic moiety of OT.

  18. Conformations of a model cyclic hexapeptide, CYIQNC: (1)H-NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashok Kumar; Ojha, Rajendra Prasad

    2015-09-01

    Solution conformation of the cyclic hexapeptide sequence, [cyclo-S-Cys-Tyr-Ile-Gln-Asn-Cys-S] (CYIQNC) - a disulfide-linked fragment of a neurohypophyseal peptide hormone oxytocin (OT) - has been investigated by high-field one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopic methods and compared with the results obtained from computer simulation studies. (1)H-NMR results based on temperature dependence of amide proton chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effect indicate that peptide in solution populates different conformations, characterized by two fused β-turns. The segment Ile(3)-Gln(4)-Asn(5)-Cys(6) yields a preferred type-III β-turn at residues 4, 5 (HB, 3HN → 6CO), while the segment Cys(6), Cys(1)-Tyr(2)-Ile(3) exhibits inherently weaker, flexible β-turn either of type I/II'/III/half-turn at residues 1, 2 (HB, 6HN → 3CO). The computer simulation studies using a mixed protocol of distance geometry-simulated annealing followed by constrained minimization, restrained molecular dynamics, and energy minimization showed the possibility of existence of additional conformations with the hydrogen bonds, (a) 5HN → 3CO and (b) 2HN → 6CO. These results, therefore, indicate that the additional conformations obtained from both NMR and simulation studies can also be possible to the peptide. These additional conformations might have very small population in the solution and did not show their signatures in these conditions. These findings will be helpful in designing more analogs with modifications in the cyclic moiety of OT. PMID:25375824

  19. Resolving Nitrogen-15 and Proton Chemical Shifts for Mobile Segments of Elastin with Two-dimensional NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ohgo, Kosuke; Niemczura, Walter P.; Seacat, Brian C.; Wise, Steven G.; Weiss, Anthony S.; Kumashiro, Kristin K.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments are applied to uniformly 15N-enriched synthetic elastin, a recombinant human tropoelastin that has been cross-linked to form an elastic hydrogel. Hydrated elastin is characterized by large segments that undergo “liquid-like” motions that limit the efficiency of cross-polarization. The refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer experiment is used to target these extensive, mobile regions of this protein. Numerous peaks are detected in the backbone amide region of the protein, and their chemical shifts indicate the completely unstructured, “random coil” model for elastin is unlikely. Instead, more evidence is gathered that supports a characteristic ensemble of conformations in this rubber-like protein. PMID:22474297

  20. Identification of heparin samples that contain impurities or contaminants by chemometric pattern recognition analysis of proton NMR spectral data.

    PubMed

    Zang, Qingda; Keire, David A; Buhse, Lucinda F; Wood, Richard D; Mital, Dinesh P; Haque, Syed; Srinivasan, Shankar; Moore, Christine M V; Nasr, Moheb; Al-Hakim, Ali; Trehy, Michael L; Welsh, William J

    2011-08-01

    Chemometric analysis of a set of one-dimensional (1D) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data for heparin sodium active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) samples was employed to distinguish USP-grade heparin samples from those containing oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) contaminant and/or unacceptable levels of dermatan sulfate (DS) impurity. Three chemometric pattern recognition approaches were implemented: classification and regression tree (CART), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM). Heparin sodium samples from various manufacturers were analyzed in 2008 and 2009 by 1D (1)H NMR, strong anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and percent galactosamine in total hexosamine tests. Based on these data, the samples were divided into three groups: Heparin, DS ≤ 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; DS, DS > 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; and OSCS, OSCS > 0% with any content of DS. Three data sets corresponding to different chemical shift regions (1.95-2.20, 3.10-5.70, and 1.95-5.70 ppm) were evaluated. While all three chemometric approaches were able to effectively model the data in the 1.95-2.20 ppm region, SVM was found to substantially outperform CART and ANN for data in the 3.10-5.70 ppm region in terms of classification success rate. A 100% prediction rate was frequently achieved for discrimination between heparin and OSCS samples. The majority of classification errors between heparin and DS involved cases where the DS content was close to the 1.0% DS borderline between the two classes. When these borderline samples were removed, nearly perfect classification results were attained. Satisfactory results were achieved when the resulting models were challenged by test samples containing blends of heparin APIs spiked with non-, partially, or fully oversulfated chondroitin sulfate A, heparan sulfate, or DS at the 1.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% (w/w) levels. This study demonstrated that the combination of 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy with

  1. A study by (1)H NMR on the influence of some factors affecting lipid in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Nieva-Echevarría, Bárbara; Goicoechea, Encarnación; Manzanos, María J; Guillén, María D

    2016-11-15

    This article focuses on the impact of several experimental factors, including gastric acidification, intestinal transit time, presence of gastric lipase, sample/digestive fluids ratio, concentration and nature of the enzymes in intestinal juice, and bile concentration, on the extent of in vitro lipolysis when using a static model that simulates human digestion processes in mouth, stomach and small intestine. The study was carried out by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR). This technique provides a complete molecular picture of lipolysis, evidencing for the first time, whether preferential hydrolysis of certain glycerides over others occurs. A lipolysis degree similar to that reported in vivo was reached by varying certain variables within a physiological range; among them, bile concentration was found to be crucial. The holistic view of this (1)H NMR study provides information of paramount importance to design sound in vitro digestion models to determine the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of lipophilic compounds. PMID:27283602

  2. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  3. Dynamic 1H NMR Studies of Schiff Base Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köylü, M. Z.; Ekinci, A.; Böyükata, M.; Temel, H.

    2016-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 and the spin-spin relaxation time T 2 of two Schiff base derivatives, N,N'-ethylenebis(salicylidene)-1,2-diaminoethane (H2L1) and N,N'-ethylenebis (salicylidene)-1,3-diaminopropane (H2L2), in DMSO-d6 solvent were studied as a function of temperature in the range of 20-50°C using a Bruker Avance 400.132 MHz 1H NMR spectrometer. Based on the activation energy ( E a) and correlation time (τc), we believe that the Schiff base derivatives perform a molecular tumbling motion.

  4. Solid-State NMR Studies of Chemically Lithiated CFx

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, N. D.; Johnson, V. S.; Ben-Ari, R.; Gan, H.; Lehnes, J. M.; Guo, R.; Lu, W.; Muffoletto, B. C.; Reddy, T.; Stallworth, P. E.; Greenbaum, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    Three types of fluorinated carbon, all in their original form and upon sequential chemical lithiations via n-butyllithium, were investigated by 13C and 19F solid-state NMR methods. The three starting CFx materials [where x = 1 (nominally)] were fiber based, graphite based, and petroleum coke based. The aim of the current study was to identify, at the atomic/molecular structural level, factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among the different kinds of CFx. Differences were noted in the covalent F character among the starting compounds and in the details of LiF production among the lithiated samples. PMID:20676233

  5. Solid-State NMR Studies of Chemically Lithiated CF.

    PubMed

    Leifer, N D; Johnson, V S; Ben-Ari, R; Gan, H; Lehnes, J M; Guo, R; Lu, W; Muffoletto, B C; Reddy, T; Stallworth, P E; Greenbaum, S G

    2010-01-01

    Three types of fluorinated carbon, all in their original form and upon sequential chemical lithiations via n-butyllithium, were investigated by (13)C and (19)F solid-state NMR methods. The three starting CF(x) materials [where x = 1 (nominally)] were fiber based, graphite based, and petroleum coke based. The aim of the current study was to identify, at the atomic/molecular structural level, factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among the different kinds of CF(x). Differences were noted in the covalent F character among the starting compounds and in the details of LiF production among the lithiated samples.

  6. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  7. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing results obtained on the Argonne coals. We have extended our fitting procedure to include carbons of all types in the analysis.

  8. Detection of aldehydes and their conjugated hydroperoxydiene precursors in thermally-stressed culinary oils and fats: investigations using high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Haywood, R M; Claxson, A W; Hawkes, G E; Richardson, D P; Naughton, D P; Coumbarides, G; Hawkes, J; Lynch, E J; Grootveld, M C

    1995-05-01

    High field (400 and 600 MHz) proton NMR spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the thermally-induced autoxidation of glycerol-bound polyunsaturated fatty acids present in intact culinary frying oils and fats. Heating of these materials at 180 degrees C for periods of 30, 60 and 90 min. generated a variety of peroxidation products, notably aldehydes (alkanals, trans-2-alkenals and alka-2,4-dienals) and their conjugated hydroperoxydiene precursors. Since such aldehydes appear to be absorbed into the systemic circulation from the gut in vivo, the toxicological significance of their production during standard frying practices is discussed.

  9. Solid-state NMR and density functional theory studies of ionization states of thiamin.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Balakrishnan, Anand; Dmitrenko, Olga; Godert, Amy; Begley, Tadhg P; Jordan, Frank; Polenova, Tatyana

    2011-02-01

    Thiamin diphosphate (ThDP) is a key coenzyme in sugar metabolism. The 4'-aminopyrimidine ring of ThDP cycles through several ionization and tautomeric states during enzyme catalysis, but it is not fully understood which states are adopted during the individual steps of the catalytic cycle. Thiamin has been synthesized with labels selectively inserted into the C2 and C6' positions, as well as into the amino group, creating [C2, C6'-(13)C(2)] thiamin and [N4'-(15)N] thiamin. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been employed to record the (13)C and (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors for C2, C6', and N4' atoms. Our results indicate that the isotropic chemical shifts as well as the principal components of the (13)C and (15)N CSA tensors are very sensitive to the protonation states in these compounds and, therefore, permit differentiating between the two ionization states, 4-aminopyrimidine and 4-aminopyrimidinium. Using density functional theory (DFT), we have calculated the magnetic shielding anisotropy tensors of C2, C6', and N4' and found excellent agreement between the computed and the experimental tensors. Our findings indicate that MAS NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with DFT calculations is a sensitive probe of ionization states in the thiamin cofactor. The results of this study will serve as a guide for characterization of ionization and tautomeric states of thiamin in complexes with thiamin-dependent enzymes.

  10. Studies of magnetism using nuclear orientation and related NMR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, James F.

    2001-09-01

    Nuclear Orientation and related NMR techniques have been used to study three magnetic insulators: Mn(COOCH3)2·4H2O, MnCl2·4H2O and CoCl2·6H 2O. Continuous wave NMR thermally detected by Nuclear Orientation has been used to investigate the magnetic properties and spin dynamics of the quasi-2-dimensional ferromagnet 54Mn-Mn(COOCH3)2·4H 2O. The system exhibits a frequency pulling effect due to the indirect Suhl-Nakamura interaction between nuclear spins and the electronic spin excitation spectrum is related to the coupling strength of the nuclear spins. The temperature dependence of the frequency pulling effect was measured for the two crystalline sublattices Mn1 and Mn2 in low magnetic field. The spectra show a structure not predicted theoretically. The current theory is valid only for I = 1/2 with uniaxial crystalline anisotropy fields. The theory of frequency pulling has been extended here to the case of I ≥ 1/2 and non-uniaxial crystalline anisotropy fields and the resonant frequencies and linewidths have been calculated as a function of temperature. The new theory and data agree well in terms of the magnitude and temperature dependence of the frequency pulling. Discrepancies are likely due to simplifying assumptions when calculating the electronic magnon spectrum. Classical and quantum numerical simulations confirm qualitatively the predictions of the model. The first Low Temperature Nuclear Orientation experiments on isotopes implanted into insulators is reported. Radioactive 56Mn ions have been implanted into insulating, antiferromagnetic crystals of MnCl 2·4H2O and CoCl2·6H2O. In MnCl2·4H2O, comparison of the gamma-ray anisotropy of the 56Mn nuclei with that of 54Mn, doped into the sample during growth, showed that both the 56Mn and 54Mn spins felt a very similar hyperfine field. The site occupancy factor in a simple, two site model was deduced to be 0.96+0.04-0.07 . In CoCl2·6H2O, the average hyperfine field for the implanted 56Mn was significantly

  11. Intracellular pH and inorganic phosphate content of heart in vivo: A sup 31 P-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, L.A.; Swain, J.A.; Portman, M.A.; Balaban, R.S. )

    1988-07-01

    Studies were performed to determine the contribution of red blood cells to the {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the canine heart in vivo and the feasibility of measuring myocardial intracellular phosphate and pH. This was accomplished by replacing whole blood with a perfluorochemical perfusion emulsion blood substitute, Oxypherol, and noting the difference in the {sup 31}P-NMR spectrum of the heart. NMR data were collected with a NMR transmitter-receiver coil on the surface of the distal portion of the left ventricle. These studies demonstrated that a small contribution from 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and phosphodiesters in the blood could be detected. The magnitude and shift of these blood-borne signals permitted the relative quantification of intracellular inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) content as well as intracellular pH. Under resting conditions, the intracellular ATP/P{sub i} was 7.0 {plus minus} 0.08. This corresponds to a free intracellular P{sub 1} content of {approx} 0.8 {mu}mol./g wet wt. The intracellular pH was 7.10 {plus minus} 0.01. Acute respiratory alkalosis and acidosis, with the arterial pH ranging from {approximately}7.0 to 7.7, resulted in only small changes in the intracellular pH. These latter results demonstrate an effective myocardial intracellular proton-buffering mechanism in vivo.

  12. NMR studies of copper speciation in the bovine rumen environment.

    PubMed

    Reid, R S; Attaelmannan, M A

    1998-02-01

    Dietary copper supplements containing complexed copper have been asserted to be more bioavailable than 'inorganic' supplements. Since bioavailability is intimately related to the particular metal ion species that exist in any given environment, studies of solution speciation can be used to examine this assertion. In a previous study, our computer modeling of copper speciation in bovine saliva indicated that when a lysine-complexed copper supplement is used, the complex will not persist. In the present study, these conclusions are supplemented and extended using 1H NMR experiments. Lysine and the copper(II)-lysine system are characterized, and chemical shifts of the individual species obtained. Chemical shift values for the copper(II)-lysine-bovine saliva system can then be predicted. Results show good agreement with experimental values. The scope of the computer modeling is then expanded to include the major low molar mass ligands present in the rumen. Implications of the results are discussed. The validity of this rumen model is further evaluated by NMR investigations on biological samples. The study provides further evidence that complexes such as copper(II)-lysine would disintegrate in the gastrointestinal tract, and are unlikely to be absorbed intact.

  13. Methodology for solid state NMR off-resonance study of molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Jurga, Kazimierz; Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta; Baranowski, Mikołaj

    2015-10-01

    Methodology for the study of dynamics in heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame was described in the previous paper [1]. Now the methodology for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the rotating frame is presented. The solid state NMR off-resonance experiments were carried out on a homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz for protons. This spectrometer includes a specially designed probe which contains two independently tuned and electrically isolated coils installed in the coaxial position on the dewar. A unique probe design allows working at three slightly differing frequencies off and on resonance for protons and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz for fluorine nuclei with complete absence of their electrical interference. The probe allows simultaneously creating rf magnetic fields at off-resonance frequencies within the range of 30.2-30.6 MHz and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz. Presented heteronuclear cross-relaxation off-resonance experiments in the rotating frame provide information about molecular dynamics.

  14. Proton NMR for detection, identification and quantification of adulterants in 160 herbal food supplements marketed for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Rabab; Assemat, Gaëtan; Martins, Nathalie; Balayssac, Stéphane; Gilard, Véronique; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2016-05-30

    One hundred and sixty food supplements (FS) marketed for weight loss and mainly purchased on the Internet were analyzed. All the FS were claimed as 100% natural containing only natural compounds, plant extracts and/or vitamins and the presence of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was never mentioned. (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used for detecting the presence of adulterants and for their identification and quantification. Mass spectrometry was used as a complementary method for supporting their identification. Among the 164 samples considered because capsules from 5 different blisters of the same FS were analyzed, 56% were tainted with six API. Forty three contained sibutramine as single adulterant (26%), 9 phenolphthalein (6%) and 23 a mixture of these API (14%) that were both withdrawn from the market several years ago because of toxicity concerns. Sildenafil was found in 12 samples, either as a single adulterant (n=5) or in combination with sibutramine (n=3), phenolphthalein (n=3) and both sibutramine and phenolphthalein (n=1). Fluoxetine was present in 4 formulations, alone (n=3) or in combination with sibutramine and orlistat (n=1). At last, lorcaserine was detected in one FS. The content of sibutramine per dosage unit was comprised between 0.1 and 22 mg and that of phenolphthalein between 0.05 and 56 mg. The study also highlights poor manufacturing practices as evidenced for instance by the variability of API in capsules from different blisters of the same box. This paper demonstrates the need for more effective quality control of weight loss FS and the efficiency of (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the detection of tainted FS. PMID:26928212

  15. Proton NMR for detection, identification and quantification of adulterants in 160 herbal food supplements marketed for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Rabab; Assemat, Gaëtan; Martins, Nathalie; Balayssac, Stéphane; Gilard, Véronique; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2016-05-30

    One hundred and sixty food supplements (FS) marketed for weight loss and mainly purchased on the Internet were analyzed. All the FS were claimed as 100% natural containing only natural compounds, plant extracts and/or vitamins and the presence of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was never mentioned. (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used for detecting the presence of adulterants and for their identification and quantification. Mass spectrometry was used as a complementary method for supporting their identification. Among the 164 samples considered because capsules from 5 different blisters of the same FS were analyzed, 56% were tainted with six API. Forty three contained sibutramine as single adulterant (26%), 9 phenolphthalein (6%) and 23 a mixture of these API (14%) that were both withdrawn from the market several years ago because of toxicity concerns. Sildenafil was found in 12 samples, either as a single adulterant (n=5) or in combination with sibutramine (n=3), phenolphthalein (n=3) and both sibutramine and phenolphthalein (n=1). Fluoxetine was present in 4 formulations, alone (n=3) or in combination with sibutramine and orlistat (n=1). At last, lorcaserine was detected in one FS. The content of sibutramine per dosage unit was comprised between 0.1 and 22 mg and that of phenolphthalein between 0.05 and 56 mg. The study also highlights poor manufacturing practices as evidenced for instance by the variability of API in capsules from different blisters of the same box. This paper demonstrates the need for more effective quality control of weight loss FS and the efficiency of (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the detection of tainted FS.

  16. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  17. NMR Relaxation in Systems with Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Temperature Study

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Hejasee, Rola H.; Qadri, Shahnaz; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To measure and model NMR relaxation enhancement due to the presence of Gd substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles at different temperatures. Materials and Methods Relaxation rates were measured at 1.5 T using FSE sequences in samples of agarose gel doped with uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 nanoparticles over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. Physical characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles synthesized using chemical co-precipitation included scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometry. Results Relaxivity (in s−1 mM−1 Fe) for the uncoated and coated particles, respectively, increased as follows: from 2.5 to 3.2 and 0.4 to 0.7 for T1, while for T2 it increased from 162.3 to 253.7 and 59.7 to 82.2 over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. T2 data was fitted to the echo limited motional regime using one fitting parameter that reflects the degree of agglomeration of particles into a cluster. This parameter was found to increase linearly with temperature and was larger for the PEG coated particles than the uncoated ones. Conclusion The increase of 1/T2 with temperature is modeled successfully using echo limited motional regime where both diffusion of the protons and nanoparticle cluster size increase with temperature. Both transverse and longitudinal relaxation efficiencies are reduced by PEG coating at all temperatures. If prediction of relaxation rates under different particle concentrations and operating temperatures is possible then the use of MNP in temperature monitoring and hyperthermia applications may be achieved. PMID:23720101

  18. Effect of solvent on an NMR chemical shift difference between glycyl geminal α-protons as a probe of β-turn formation of short peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonan, Kenji; Ikawa, Shun-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of short peptides with a glycyl (Gly) or N-methylglycyl (sarcosyl, Sar) residue were measured in various mixed solvents with a wide range of dielectric constants: 78.3-2.3. From analyses of the octet and quartet signals of the geminal α-protons of Gly and Sar residues, respectively, we have estimated chemical shift differences between the two α-protons, Δ δα/α'. It is found that the Δ δα/α' values increase with decreasing solvent polarity and the increasing rates depend significantly on amino acid sequences. By referring to infrared spectra and chemical shift of the terminal NH protons, δNH, of the peptides, the Δ δα/α' values were found to be a good probe of β-turn formation. From solvent-dependent change of Δ δα/α', we estimated the free energies for the β-turn formation and compared the results with those estimated from δNH. Using the resulting free energies, we have discussed effects of solvent on the β-turn formation.

  19. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity.

  20. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity. PMID:27423927

  1. Solution NMR studies of supramolecular complexes of [60]- and [70]fullerenes with mono O-substituted calix[6]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sumanta; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Nayak, Sandip K.; Banerjee, Manas

    2005-11-01

    Supramolecular complexation of [60]- and [70]fullerenes with 37-allyl-38,39,40,41,42-pentahydroxy-5,11,17,23,29,35-hexa(4- tert butyl)calix[6]arene ( I) has been studied in CCl 4 medium by NMR spectrometric method. All of the complexes are found to be stable with 1:1 stoichiometry. Formation constants ( K) of the above supramolecular complexes have been determined from systematic variation of NMR chemical shifts of specific protons of I in the presence of [60]- and [70]fullerenes. Trends in the K value suggest that [70]fullerene binds more strongly with I relative to [60]fullerene. Both PM3 and ab initio calculations reveal that the intermolecular interaction in the [70]fullerene/ I complex proceeds through quite deep energy minima.

  2. Hydrogen cluster/network in tobermorite as studied by multiple-quantum spin counting {sup 1}H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Mogami, Yuuki; Yamazaki, Satoru; Matsuno, Shinya; Matsui, Kunio; Noda, Yasuto; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-15

    Proton multiple-quantum (MQ) spin-counting experiment has been employed to study arrangement of hydrogen atoms in 9 Å/11 Å natural/synthetic tobermorites. Even though all tobermorite samples give similar characterless, broad static-powder {sup 1}H NMR spectra, their MQ spin-counting spectra are markedly different; higher quanta in 11 Å tobermorite do not grow with the MQ excitation time, while those in 9 Å one do. A statistical analysis of the MQ results recently proposed [26] is applied to show that hydrogens align in 9 Å tobermorite one dimensionally, while in 11 Å tobermorite they exist as a cluster of 5–8 hydrogen atoms.

  3. NMR Studies of Quantum Tunneling in Monolayers of Helium Three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Charles; Stachowiak, Piotr; Sullivan, Neil

    2002-03-01

    The results of NMR studies of the nuclear spin-spin relaxation are reported for commensurate monolayers of helium three adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride. The measurements were made using pulsed NMR techniques for low temperatures, 0.01 < T < 5.0 K, and for moderately high magnetic fields (up to 6 T). The relaxation rate is independent of temperature at low temperatures, 0.12 < T < 0.85 K, and this behavior is interpreted in terms of particle-particle exchange motions of the adsorbed helium atoms. The effective exchange rates were observed to change significantly on replacing a fraction of the helium atoms with relatively immobile neon atoms. This is understood if there is a significant 3-particle exchange in addition to 2-particle exchange. The analyses of the experimental results indicate that the 3-spin exchange term in the exchange Hamiltonian is of opposite sign to that of the 2-spin exchange and also has a larger amplitude. At high temperatures, 0.8 < T < 5.0 K, an exponential temperature dependence of the rate is observed that is attributed to the thermal activation of vacancies.

  4. NMR studies of multiple conformations in complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with analogues of pyrimethamine

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, B.; Tendler, S.J.B.; Feeney, J.; Carr, M.D. ); Arnold, J.R.P.; Thomas, J.A.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Griffin, R.J.; Stevens, M.F.G. )

    1990-10-01

    {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F NMR signals from bound ligands have been assigned in one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra of complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase with various pyrimethamine analogues. The signals were identified mainly by correlating signals from bound and free ligands by using 2D exchange experiments. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues with symmetrically substituted phenyl rings give rise to {sup 1}H signals from four nonequivalent aromatic protons, clearly indicating the presence of hindered rotation about the pyrimidine-phenyl bond. Analogues containing asymmetrically substituted aromatic rings exist as mixtures of two rotational isomers (an enantiomeric pair) because of this hindered rotation and the NMR spectra revealed that both isomers (forms A and B) bind to the enzyme with comparable, though unequal, binding energies. In this case two complete sets of bound proton signals were observed. The relative orientations of the two forms have been determined from NOE through-space connections between protons on the ligand and protein. Ternary complexes with NADP{sup {plus}} were also examined.

  5. 150 MeV proton medical cyclotron design study.

    PubMed

    Burleigh, R J; Clark, D J; Flood, W S

    1975-01-01

    A brief design study has been done for a 150 MeV proton sector cyclotron. The object was to minimize cost but maintain good reliability and easy maintenance. The use of the proton beam would be for therapy, radiography and isotope production.

  6. Manipulating the proton transfer process in molecular complexes: synthesis and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Panja, Sumit Kumar; Dwivedi, Nidhi; Saha, Satyen

    2016-08-01

    The proton transfer process in carefully designed molecular complexes has been investigated directly in the solid and solution phase. SCXRD studies have been employed to investigate the N-H-O bonding interaction sites of the molecular complexes, with additional experimental support from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies, to gain information on the relative position of hydrogen in between the N and O centers. Further, the proton transfer process in solution is studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy through monitoring the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) process in these molecular complexes, which is primarily governed by the number of electron withdrawing groups (nitro groups) on proton donor moieties (NP, DNP and TNP). It is found that the magnitude of the ICT process depends on the extent of proton transfer, which on the other hand depends on the relative stabilities of the constituent species (phenolate species). A correlation is observed between an increase in the number of nitro groups and an increase in the melting point of the molecular complexes, indicating the enhancement of ionic character due to the proton transfer process. The aliphatic H-bonding is identified and monitored using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, which reveals that the identity of molecular complexes in solution interestingly depends on the extent of proton transfer, in addition to the nature of the solvents. The aliphatic C-H-O H-bonding interaction between the oxygen atom of the nitro group and the alkyl hydrogen in piperidinium was also found to play a significant role in strengthening the primary interaction involving a hydrogen transfer process. The conductivity of the molecular complexes increases with an increase in the number of nitro groups, indicating the enhancement in ionic character of the molecular complexes. PMID:27424765

  7. Proton radioactivity studies at the FMA

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, H. ||; Davids, C.N.; Woods, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    A double sided silicon strip (DSSD) setup is installed at the Argonne National Laboratory recoil separator FMA. Ground state proton emitters {sup 146,147}Tm, {sup 160}Re, {sup 156}Ta, {sup 150,151}Lu were produced in a series of test experiments. Improved T{sub 1/2} values were obtained for {sup 147}Tm, {sup 160}Re, and {sup 156}Ta. Improved alpha T{sub 1/2} value of (13.2 {plus_minus} 1.1) ms was obtained for {sup 161}Re. In a search of new proton radioactivities a (5 {plus_minus} 2)% proton decay branch with E{sub p} = (1345 {plus_minus} 13) keV for {sup 161}Re was found.

  8. NMR at cryogenic temperatures: A {sup 13}C NMR study of ferrocene

    SciTech Connect

    Orendt, A.M.; Facelli, J.C.; Jiang, Y.J.; Grant, D.M.

    1998-09-24

    A new cryogenic apparatus is described that can be used to obtain NMR spectra at temperatures down to 8--10 K. The static solid {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of ferrocene is recorded at that temperature. Spectra recorded at higher temperatures show that ferrocene is still freely rotating about its 5-fold symmetry axis on the {sup 13}C NMR time scale at 45--50 K. A comparison of the principal values of the {sup 13}C chemical-shift tensor obtained from the room- and low-temperature spectra of ferrocene indicates that the lowest frequency chemical shift principal component, {delta}{sub 33}, is tilted off this symmetry axis by approximately 12{degree}. Quantum chemical calculations of the chemical-shift tensor, completed on structures of ferrocene from the literature as well as on optimized structures with the cyclopentadienyl rings locked in both the staggered and eclipsed arrangements, predict the angle between the {delta}{sub 33} direction and the rotation axis to be between 11 and 15{degree}, depending upon the geometry used in the calculation. The calculations also predict the sign of the angular perturbation, information not obtained from the experiment. An explanation of this angular change in the {delta}{sub 33} direction is provided by the composition of the molecular orbitals.

  9. Composite-180° pulse-based symmetry sequences to recouple proton chemical shift anisotropy tensors under ultrafast MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Malon, Michal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the measurement of proton ((1)H) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors to obtain deeper insights into H-bonding interactions which find numerous applications in chemical and biological systems. However, the presence of strong (1)H/(1)H dipolar interaction makes it difficult to determine small size (1)H CSAs from the homogeneously broadened NMR spectra. Previously reported pulse sequences for (1)H CSA recoupling are prone to the effects of radio frequency field (B1) inhomogeneity. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study using both numerical and experimental approaches to evaluate γ-encoded radio frequency (RF) pulse sequences based on R-symmetries that recouple (1)H CSA in the indirect dimension of a 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. The spectral resolution and sensitivity can be significantly improved in both frequency dimensions of the 2D (1)H/(1)H correlation spectrum without decoupling (1)H/(1)H dipolar couplings but by using ultrafast MAS rates up to 70 kHz. We successfully demonstrate that with a reasonable RF field requirement (<200 kHz) a set of symmetry-based recoupling sequences, with a series of phase-alternating 270°0-90°180 composite-180° pulses, are more robust in combating B1 inhomogeneity effects. In addition, our results show that the new pulse sequences render remarkable (1)H CSA recoupling efficiency and undistorted CSA lineshapes. Experimental results on citric acid and malonic acid comparing the efficiencies of these newly developed pulse sequences with that of previously reported CSA recoupling pulse sequences are also reported under ultrafast MAS conditions. PMID:25497846

  10. NMR Studies on the Aqueous Phase Photochemical Degradation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2008-04-06

    Aqueous phase photochemical degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is an important pathway in several environments, including washout lagoon soils, impact craters from partially detonated munitions that fill with rain or groundwater, and shallow marine environments containing unexploded munitions that have corroded. Knowledge of the degradation products is necessary for compliance issues on military firing ranges and formerly used defense sites. Previous laboratory studies have indicated that UV irradiation of aqueous TNT solutions results in a multicomponent product mixture, including polymerization compounds, that has been only partially resolved by mass spectrometric analyses. This study illustrates how a combination of solid and liquid state 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopy, including two dimensional analyses, provides complementary information on the total product mixture from aqueous photolysis of TNT, and the effect of reaction conditions. Among the degradation products detected were amine, amide, azoxy, azo, and carboxylic acid compounds.

  11. Amphiphile diffusion in model membrane systems studied by pulsed NMR.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, G; Wennerström, H

    1977-01-01

    The translational diffusion of the amphiphilic molecules in a number of lyotropic liquid crystalline phases has been measured with the pulsed NMR pulsed magnetic field gradient method. The amphiphiles studied were soaps, monoglycerids and lecithins. Measurements were performed both for oriented lamellar and for cubic phases. The order of magnitude of the diffusion coefficients was found to be the same as in neat liquids of analogous compounds. It was also found that the difussion coefficient depend markedly on the amphiphile end group in a way that parallels the area per polar head group as determined in X-ray studies. When corrections for geometrical factors has been made the diffusion rate is approximately equal in cubic and lamellar phases containing the same amphiphile.

  12. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  13. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ward, Meaghan E; Ritz, Emily; Ahmed, Mumdooh A M; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  14. Study of aqueous humour by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkadlecová, Marcela; Havlíček, Jaroslav; Volka, Karel; Souček, Petr; Karel, Ivan

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the composition of the samples of human aqueous humour including the protein content. Using 1H NMR spectroscopy many compounds (proteins, glucose, lactate, citrate and other metabolites) can be identified and their concentrations evaluated using the internal standard. While the concentrations of non-proteins in aqueous humour were relatively stable, the amount of proteins differed much more. In most of the spectra, the signals of proteins were hardly distinguishable from the baseline. For some samples a significantly higher protein content (more than 1 mg/ml) was found. The total protein concentration expressed in albumin equivalents can be determined by comparing the spectra measured by S2PUL (standard measurement) and CPMG (protein suppression) pulse sequentions. For comparison, the spectra of rabbit and bovine aqueous humour are also given.

  15. Proton NMR sequential resonance assignments, secondary structure, and global fold in solution of the major (trans-Pro43) form of bovine calbindin D sub 9k

    SciTech Connect

    Koerdel, J.; Forsen, S.; Chazin, W.J. )

    1989-08-22

    A wide range of two-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR experiments have been used to completely assign the 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of recombinant Ca{sup 2+}-saturated bovine calbindin D{sub 9k}. In solution, calbindin D{sub 9k} exists as an equilibrium mixture of isoforms with trans (75%) and cis (25%) isomers of the peptide bond at Pro43 which results in two sets of {sup 1}H NMR signals from approximately half of the amino acids. The complete {sup 1}H NMR assignments for the major, trans-pro43 isoform are presented here. By use of an integrated strategy for spin system identification, 62 of the 76 spin systems could be assigned to the appropriate residue type. Sequence-specific assignments were then obtained by the standard method. Secondary structure elements were identified on the basis of networks of sequential and medium-range nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} spin coupling constants, and the location of slowly exchanging amide protons. Four helical segments and a short {beta}-sheet between the two calcium binding loops are found. These elements of secondary structure and a few additional long-range NOEs provide the global fold. Good agreement is found between the solution and crystal structures of the minor A form of bovine calbindin D{sub 9k} and between the solution structures of the minor A form of bovine calbindin D{sub 9k} and intact porcine calbindin D{sub 9k}.

  16. Assignment of selected hyperfine proton NMR resonances in the met forms of Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and comparisons with sperm whale metmyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.; Pandey, R.K.; Leung, H.K.; Smith, K.M.

    1988-04-19

    This work indicates a high degree of purity for our preparations of all three of the primary Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and details assignments of the heme methyl and vinyl protons in the hyperfine shift region of the ferric (aquo.) protein forms. The assignments were carried out by reconstituting the apoproteins of each component with selectively deuteriated hemes. The results indicate that even though the individual component preparations consist of essentially a single protein, the proton NMR spectra indicate spectroscopic heterogeneity. Evidence is presented for identification and classification of major and minor protein forms that are present in solutions of each component. Finally, in contrast to previous results, a detailed analysis of the proton hyperfine shift patterns of the major and minor forms of each component, in comparison to the major and minor forms of metmyoglobin, leads to the conclusions that the corresponding forms of the proteins from each species have strikingly similar heme-globin contacts and display nearly identical heme electronic structures and coordination numbers.

  17. Ultra-broadband NMR probe: numerical and experimental study of transmission line NMR probe.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Shinji

    2003-06-01

    We have reinvestigated a transmission line NMR probe first published by Lowe and co-workers in 1970s [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 45 (1974) 631; 48 (1977) 268] numerically and experimentally. The probe is expected to be ultra-broadband, thus might enable new types of solid-state NMR experiments. The NMR probe consists of a coil and capacitors which are connected to the coil at regular intervals. The circuit is the same as a cascaded LC low-pass filter, except there are nonzero mutual inductances between different coil sections. We evaluated the mutual inductances by Neumann's formula and calculated the electrical characteristics of the probe as a function of a carrier frequency. We found that they were almost the same as those of a cascaded LC low-pass filter, when the inductance L of a section was estimated from the inductance of the whole coil divided by the number of the sections, and if C was set to the capacitance in a section. For example, the characteristic impedance of a transmission line coil is given by Z=(L/C)(1/2). We also calculated the magnitude and the distribution of RF magnetic field inside the probe. The magnitude of RF field decreases when the carrier frequency is increased because the phase delay between neighboring sections is proportional to the carrier frequency. For cylindrical coils, the RF field is proportional to (pinu/2nu(d))(1/2)exp(-nu/nu(d)), where the decay frequency nu(d) is determined by the dimensions of the coil. The observed carrier frequency thus must be much smaller than the decay frequency. This condition restricts the size of transmission line coils. We made a cylindrical coil for a 1H NMR probe operating below 400 MHz. It had a diameter 2.3mm and a pitch 1.2mm. Five capacitors of 6pF were connected at every three turns. The RF field strength was 40 and 60 kHz at the input RF power 100 W by a calculation and by experiments, respectively. The calculations showed that the RF field inhomogeneity along the coil axis was caused by a

  18. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  19. Studies related to primitive chemistry. A proton and nitrogen-14 nuclear magnetic resonance amino acid and nucleic acid constituents and a and their possible relation to prebiotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.; Cohen, E. A.; Shiller, A. M.; Chan, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies were made to determine the applicability of this technique for the study of interactions between monomeric and polymeric amino acids with monomeric nucleic acid bases and nucleotides. Proton NMR results for aqueous solutions (D2O) demonstrated interactions between the bases cytosine and adenine and acidic and aromatic amino acids. Solutions of 5'-AMP admixed with amino acids exhibited more complex behavior but stacking between aromatic rings and destacking at high amino acids concentration was evident. The multisite nature of 5'-AMP was pointed out. Chemical shift changes for adenine and 5'-AMP with three water soluble polypeptides demonstrated that significant interactions exist. It was found that the linewidth-pH profile of each amino acid is unique. It is concluded that NMR techniques can give significant and quantitative data on the association of amino acid and nucleic acid constituents.

  20. Environmentally friendly flame retardants. A detailed solid-state NMR study of melamine orthophosphate.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Andreas; Litvinov, Victor M; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2007-12-01

    We used solid-state NMR spectroscopy to gain detailed information about the proton positions, proximities and the hydrogen-bonding network in the environmentally friendly flame retardant melamine orthophosphate (MP). High-resolution proton one- and two-dimensional solid-state NMR spectra were obtained at high external magnetic field in combination with fast magic angle spinning of the sample. Furthermore, we recorded homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of types (15)N–(15)N, (1)H–(13)C, (1)H–(15)N and (1)H–(31)P. In addition, we determined the geometry of the NH and NH(2) groups in MP by (15)N–(1)H heteronuclear recoupling experiments.We were able to completely assign the different isotropic chemical shifts in MP. Furthermore, we could identify the protonation of the melamine and orthophosphate moieties. The experimental results are discussed in connection with the structural model obtained by powder X-ray diffraction together with a combined molecular modeling-Rietveld refinement approach (De Ridder et al. Helv. Chim. Acta 2004; 87: 1894). We show that the geometry of the NH2 groups can only be successfully estimated by solid-state NMR. PMID:18157843

  1. An NMR relaxometry and gravimetric study of gelatin-free aqueous polyacrylamide dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Steven; Schreiner, L. John

    2006-09-01

    In conformal radiation therapy, a high dose of radiation is given to a target volume to increase the probability of cure, and care is taken to minimize the dose to surrounding healthy tissue. The techniques used to achieve this are very complicated and the precise verification of the resulting three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution is required. Polyacrylamide gelatin (PAG) dosimeters with magnetic resonance imaging and optical computed tomography scanning provide the required 3D dosimetry with high spatial resolution. Many basic studies have characterized these chemical dosimeters that polymerize under irradiation. However, the investigation of the fundamental properties of the radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters is complicated by the presence of the background gelatin matrix. In this work, a gelatin-free model system for the study of the basic radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters has been developed. Experiments were performed on gelatin-free dosimeters, named aqueous polyacrylamide (APA) dosimeters, containing equal amounts of acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide. The APA dosimeters were prepared with four different total monomer concentrations (2, 4, 6 and 8% by weight). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin and spin-lattice proton relaxation measurements at 20 MHz, and gravimetric analyses performed on all four dosimeters, show a continuous degree of polymerization over the dose range of 0-25 Gy. The developed NMR model explains the relationship observed between the relaxation data and the amount of crosslinked polymer formed at each dose. This model can be extended with gelatin relaxation data to provide a fundamental understanding of radiation-induced polymerization in the conventional PAG dosimeters.

  2. An NMR relaxometry and gravimetric study of gelatin-free aqueous polyacrylamide dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Babic, Steven; Schreiner, L John

    2006-09-01

    In conformal radiation therapy, a high dose of radiation is given to a target volume to increase the probability of cure, and care is taken to minimize the dose to surrounding healthy tissue. The techniques used to achieve this are very complicated and the precise verification of the resulting three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution is required. Polyacrylamide gelatin (PAG) dosimeters with magnetic resonance imaging and optical computed tomography scanning provide the required 3D dosimetry with high spatial resolution. Many basic studies have characterized these chemical dosimeters that polymerize under irradiation. However, the investigation of the fundamental properties of the radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters is complicated by the presence of the background gelatin matrix. In this work, a gelatin-free model system for the study of the basic radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters has been developed. Experiments were performed on gelatin-free dosimeters, named aqueous polyacrylamide (APA) dosimeters, containing equal amounts of acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide. The APA dosimeters were prepared with four different total monomer concentrations (2, 4, 6 and 8% by weight). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin and spin-lattice proton relaxation measurements at 20 MHz, and gravimetric analyses performed on all four dosimeters, show a continuous degree of polymerization over the dose range of 0-25 Gy. The developed NMR model explains the relationship observed between the relaxation data and the amount of crosslinked polymer formed at each dose. This model can be extended with gelatin relaxation data to provide a fundamental understanding of radiation-induced polymerization in the conventional PAG dosimeters. PMID:16912375

  3. Study of Proton Transfer in E. Coli Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2013-06-01

    Photolyase is a flavoprotein which utilizes blue-light energy to repair UV-light damaged DNA. The catalytic cofactor of photolyase, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), has five redox states. Conversions between these redox states involve intraprotein electron transfer and proton transfer, which play important role in protein function. Here we systematically studied proton transfer in E. coli photolyase in vitro by site-directed mutagenesis and steady-state UV-vis spectroscopy, and proposed the proton channel in photolyase. We found that in the mutant N378C/E363L, proton channel was completely eliminated when DNA substrate was bound to the protein. Proton is suggested to be transported from protein surface to FAD by two pathways: the proton relay pathway through E363 and surface water to N378 and then to FAD; and the proton diffusion pathway through the substrate binding pocket. In addition, reaction kinetics of conversions between the redox states was then solved and redox potentials of the redox states were determined. These results described a complete picture of FAD redox changes, which are fundamental to the functions of all flavoenzymes.

  4. DNA three-way junction with a dinuclear iron(II) supramolecular helicate at the center: a NMR structural study.

    PubMed

    Cerasino, Leonardo; Hannon, Michael J; Sletten, Einar

    2007-08-01

    A tetracationic supramolecular helicate, [Fe2L3]4+ (L = C25H20N4), with a triple-helical architecture is found to induce the formation of a three-way junction (3WJ) of deoxyribonucleotides with the helicate located in the center of the junction. NMR spectroscopic studies of the interaction between the M enantiomer of the helicate and two different oligonucleotides, [5'-d(TATGGTACCATA)]2 and [5'-d(CGTACG)]2, show that, in each case, the 2-fold symmetry of the helicate is lifted, while the 3-fold symmetry around the helicate axis is retained. The 1:3 helicate/DNA stoichiometry estimated from 1D NMR spectra supports a molecular model of a three-way junction composed of three strands. Three separate double-helical arms of the three-way junction are chemically identical giving rise to one set of proton resonances. The NOE contacts between the helicate and DNA unambiguously show that the helicate is fitted into the center of the three-way junction experiencing a hydrophobic 3-fold symmetric environment. Close stacking interactions between the ligand phenyl groups and the nucleotide bases are demonstrated through unusually large downfield shifts (1-2 ppm) of the phenyl protons. The unprecedented 3WJ arrangement observed in solution has also been found to exist in the crystal structure of the helicate adduct of [d(CGTACG)2] (Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2006, 45, 1227).

  5. Structure of 3-aminopyridine betaine hydrochloride studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, I.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.

    2010-08-01

    The structure of 3-aminopyridine betaine hydrochloride (1-carboxymethyl-3-aminopyridinium chloride), 3-NH 2PBH·Cl, has been studied by X-ray diffraction, B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculations, FTIR and NMR spectra. The compound crystallized in monoclinic, space group P2 1/c in the crystal, the Cl - anion is connected with protonated betaine via the hydrogen bond O-H⋯Cl of 2.946(3) Å. Both protons of the NH 2 group are engaged in hydrogen bonds with the neighboring molecules: N(2)-H(2B)⋯O(2) of 2.905(6) Å and N(2)-H(2B)⋯Cl(1) of 3.324(3) Å. The Cl - ion interacts electrostatically with three neighboring molecules. The probable assignments of the anharmonic experimental solid state vibrational frequencies of the investigated compound, based on the calculated frequencies in vacuum at the same level of theory for optimized structure, have been made. Correlations between the experimental 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts ( δexp) and the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) calculated magnetic isotropic shielding ( σcal) in DMSO and D 2O, δexp = a + b · σcalc, are reported.

  6. Dynamic NMR of low-sensitivity fast-relaxing nuclei: (17)O NMR and DFT study of acetoxysilanes.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Mameli, Giulia; Mocci, Francesca; Luhmer, Michel; Cerioni, Giovanni

    2012-02-01

    (17)O NMR is not routinely used for structure characterization, and kinetic studies of fluxional organic compounds are seldom undertaken because poor sensitivity and fast quadrupole relaxation are frequently regarded as intractable issues. This work shows how, nowadays, quantitative (17)O dynamic NMR studies on small organic molecules are feasible without enrichment being needed. It reports on acetoxysilanes, a class of fluxional compounds whose structure and dynamics were to be clarified. Natural abundance (17)O NMR spectra were recorded over a wide range of temperatures using standard instrumentation. The analysis relies on simple linewidth measurements and directly provides the activation parameters. The activation enthalpy is found to decrease with increasing number of acetoxy groups bound to silicon. Density functional theory calculations properly predict this trend and show that a single oxygen atom of the acetoxy group is bound to silicon, excluding chelation as binding mode, and that the dynamic process involves the shift of the silicon atom between the two oxygen atoms of the acetoxy group.

  7. 1D and 2D NMR studies of isobornyl acrylate - Methyl methacrylate copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Deepika; Hooda, Sunita; Brar, A. S.; Shankar, Ravi

    2011-10-01

    Isobornyl acrylate - methyl methacrylate (B/M) copolymers of different compositions were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using methyl-2-bromopropionate as an initiator and PMDETA copper complex as catalyst under nitrogen atmosphere at 70 °C. 1H NMR spectrum was used to determine the compositions of copolymer. The copolymer compositions were then used to determine the reactivity ratios of monomers. Reactivity ratios of co-monomers in B/M copolymer, determined from linear Kelen-Tudos method (KT) and non linear Error-in-Variable Method (EVM), are rB = 0.41 ± 0.11, rM = 1.11 ± 0.33 and rB = 0.52, rM = 1.31 respectively. The complete resonance assignments of 1H and 13C{ 1H} NMR spectra were carried out with the help of Distortion less Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT), two-dimensional Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC). 2D HSQC assignments were further confirmed by 2D Total Correlation Spectroscopy (TOCSY). The carbonyl carbon of B and M units and methyl carbon of M unit were assigned up to triad compositional and configurational sequences whereas β-methylene carbons were assigned up to tetrad compositional and configurational sequences. Similarly the methine carbon of B unit was assigned up to pentad level. 1,3 and 1,4 bond order couplings of carbonyl carbon and quaternary carbon resonances with methine, methylene and methyl protons were studied in detail using 2D Hetero Nuclear Multiple Bond Correlation (HMBC) spectra.

  8. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study.

    PubMed

    Mair, R W; Rosen, M S; Wang, R; Cory, D G; Walsworth, R L

    2002-12-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. PMID:12807139

  9. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Wang, R.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. c2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. 1H NMR and Rheological Studies of the Calcium Induced Gelation Process in Aqueous Low Methoxyl Pectin Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobies, M.; Kuśmia, S.; Jurga, S.

    2006-07-01

    The 1H NMR relaxometry in combination with water proton spin-spin relaxation time measurements and rheometry have been applied to study the ionic gelation of 1% w/w aqueous low methoxyl pectin solution induced by divalent Ca2+ cations from a calcium chloride solution. The model-free approach to the analysis of 1H NMR relaxometry data has been used to separate the information on the static (β) and dynamic (<τ_c>) behaviour of the systems tested. The 1H NMR results confirm that the average mobility of both water and the pectin molecules is largely dependent on the concentration of the cross-linking agent. The character of this dependency (β,<τc> and T2 vs. CaCl2 concentration) is consistent with the two-stage gelation process of low methoxyl pectin, in which the formation of strongly linked dimer associations (in the range of 0-2.5 mM CaCl2) is followed by the appearance of weak inter-dimer aggregations (for CaCl2≥ 3.5 mM). The presence of the weak gel structure for the sample with 3.5 mM CaCl2 has been confirmed by rheological measurements. Apart from that, the T1 and T2 relaxation times have been found to be highly sensitive to the syneresis phenomenon, which can be useful to monitor the low methoxyl pectin gel network stability.

  11. Advanced solids NMR studies of coal structure and chemistry. Progress report, September 1, 1995--February 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methine groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. We will also develop NMR methods for probing coal macropore structure using hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe as a probe, and study the molecular dynamics of what appear to be mobile, CH{sub 2} rich, long chain hydrocarbons. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples.

  12. Fundamental studies of supported bimetallic catalysts by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Savargaonkar, N.

    1996-10-17

    Various hydrogenation reactions on transition metals are important commercially whereas certain hydrogenolysis reactions are useful from fundamental point of view. Understanding the hydrogen mobility and kinetics of adsorption-desorption of hydrogen is important in understanding the mechanisms of such reactions involving hydrogen. The kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption was studied by means of selective excitation NMR on silica supported Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption was found to be lower on silica supported Pt catalysts as compared to Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. It was found that the rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Pt-Rh catalyst were similar to those on Rh catalyst and much higher as compared to Pt catalyst. The Ru-Ag bimetallic system is much simpler to study than the Pt-Rh system and serves as a model system to characterize more complicated systems such as the K/Ru system. Ag was found to decrease the amounts of adsorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen-to-ruthenium stoichiometry. Ag reduced the populations of states with low and intermediate binding energies of hydrogen on silica supported Ru catalyst. The rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption were also lower on silica supported Ru-Ag catalyst as compared to Ru catalyst. This report contains introductory information, the literature review, general conclusions, and four appendices. An additional four chapters and one appendix have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. Imino proton NMR guides the reprogramming of A•T specific minor groove binders for mixed base pair recognition

    PubMed Central

    Harika, Narinder K.; Paul, Ananya; Stroeva, Ekaterina; Chai, Yun; Boykin, David W.; Germann, Markus W.; Wilson, W. David

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific binding to DNA is crucial for targeting transcription factor-DNA complexes to modulate gene expression. The heterocyclic diamidine, DB2277, specifically recognizes a single G•C base pair in the minor groove of mixed base pair sequences of the type AAAGTTT. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence of major and minor species of the bound compound. To understand the principles that determine the binding affinity and orientation in mixed sequences of DNA, over thirty DNA hairpin substrates were examined by NMR and thermal melting. The NMR exchange dynamics between major and minor species shows that the exchange is much faster than compound dissociation determined from biosensor–surface plasmon resonance. Extensive modifications of DNA sequences resulted in a unique DNA sequence with binding site AAGATA that binds DB2277 in a single orientation. A molecular docking result agrees with the model representing rapid flipping of DB2277 between major and minor species. Imino spectral analysis of a 15N-labeled central G clearly shows the crucial role of the exocyclic amino group of G in sequence-specific recognition. Our results suggest that this approach can be expanded to additional modules for recognition of more sequence-specific DNA complexes. This approach provides substantial information about the sequence-specific, highly efficient, dynamic nature of minor groove binding agents. PMID:27131382

  14. NMR Spectroscopy to Study MAP Kinase Binding to MAP Kinase Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy and other solution methods are increasingly being used to obtain novel insights into the mechanisms by which MAPK regulatory proteins bind and direct the activity of MAPKs. Here, we describe how interactions between the MAPK p38α and its regulatory proteins are studied using NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). PMID:27514807

  15. NMR studies of structure and dynamics of liquid molecules confined in extended nanospaces.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Takehiko; Mizutani, Wataru; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2009-08-01

    We fabricated an NMR cell equipped with 10-100 nm scale spaces on a glass substrate (called extended nanospaces), and investigated molecular structure and dynamics of water confined in the extended nanospaces by (1)H NMR chemical shift (delta(H)) and (1)H and (2)H NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate ((1)H- and (2)H-1/T(1)), (1)H NMR spin-spin relaxation rate ((1)H-1/T(2)), and (1)H NMR rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation rate ((1)H-1/T(1rho)) measurements of H(2)O and (2)H(2)O. The delta(H) and (1)H- and (2)H-1/T(1) results showed that size-confinement produces slower translational motions and higher proton mobility of water, but does not affect the hydrogen-bonding structure and rotational motions. Such unique phenomena appeared in the space size of 40 to 800 nm. However, the (1)H-1/T(1) value at 40 nm was still different from that in 4 nm porous nanomaterial, because translational and rotational motions were inhibited for H(2)O molecules in the nanomaterial. By examining temperature- and deuterium-dependence of the (1)H-1/T(1) values, the molecular translational motions of the confined water were found to be controlled by protonic diffusion invoking a proton hopping pathway between adjacent water rather than hydrodynamic translational diffusion. Furthermore, we clarified that proton exchange between adjacent water molecules in extended nanospaces could be enhanced by the chemical exchange of protons between water and SiOH groups on glass surfaces, ( identical with SiO(-)...H(+)...H(2)O) + H(2)O --> triple bond SiO(-) + (H(3)O(+) + H(2)O) --> triple bond SiO(-) + (H(2)O + H(3)O(+)), based on (1)H-1/T(2) measurements. An enhancement of proton exchange rate of water due to the reduction of space sizes was verified from the results of (1)H-1/T(1rho) values, and the rate of water in the 100 nm sized spaces is larger by a factor of more than ten from that of bulk water. Such size-confinement effects were distinctly observed for hydrogen-bond solvents with strong proton

  16. Measurement of longitudinal relaxation times in crowded 1H NMR spectra using one- and two-dimensional maximum quantum (MAXY) NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maili; Ye, Chaohui; Farrant, R. Duncan; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Lindon, John C.

    Methods for measuring longitudinal relaxation times of protons in heavily overlapped 1H NMR spectra are introduced and exemplified using a solution of cholesteryl acetate. The methods are based on 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional maximum quantum NMR spectroscopy (MAXY), which makes possible the selective detection of CH, CH2 and CH31H NMR resonances. A modification of the BIRD pulse sequence to achieve selective inversion of protons bonded to either 12C or 13C is given. The approach should find application in studies of molecular dynamics where isotopic enrichment is not possible and the level of available sample dictates the use of 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Comprehensive multiphase NMR: a promising technology to study plants in their native state.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Heather L; Soong, Ronald; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Botana, Adolfo; Fortier-Mcgill, Blythe; Maas, Werner E; Fey, Michael; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J; Campbell, Malcolm M; Simpson, Andre

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is arguably one the most powerful tools to study the interactions and molecular structure within plants. Traditionally, however, NMR has developed as two separate fields, one dealing with liquids and the other dealing with solids. Plants in their native state contain components that are soluble, swollen, and true solids. Here, a new form of NMR spectroscopy, developed in 2012, termed comprehensive multiphase (CMP)-NMR is applied for plant analysis. The technology composes all aspects of solution, gel, and solid-state NMR into a single NMR probe such that all components in all phases in native unaltered samples can be studied and differentiated in situ. The technology is evaluated using wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the cellulose-deficient mutant ectopic lignification1 (eli1) as examples. Using CMP-NMR to study intact samples eliminated the bias introduced by extraction methods and enabled the acquisition of a more complete structural and metabolic profile; thus, CMP-NMR revealed molecular differences between wild type (WT) and eli1 that could be overlooked by conventional methods. Methanol, fatty acids and/or lipids, glutamine, phenylalanine, starch, and nucleic acids were more abundant in eli1 than in WT. Pentaglycine was present in A. thaliana seedlings and more abundant in eli1 than in WT. PMID:25855560

  18. Multicomponent complex formation between vinpocetine, cyclodextrins, tartaric acid and water-soluble polymers monitored by NMR and solubility studies.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Laura; Carvalho, Rui A; Ferreira, Domingos C; Veiga, Francisco J B

    2005-01-01

    This work deals with multicomponent complex formation of vinpocetine (VP) with beta-cyclodextrin (betaCD), sulfobutyl ether beta-cyclodextrin (SBEbetaCD) and tartaric acid (TA), in the presence or absence of water-soluble polymers, in aqueous solution. Complexation was monitored by phase-solubility and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) studies. TA demonstrated a synergistic effect on VP solubility, and in the complexation efficiency of betaCD and SBEbetaCD. Additionally, water-soluble polymers increased even more the complexation efficiency of the CDs that was reflected by a 2.1-2.5 increase on K(C) values for VP-CD-TA-polymer multicomponent complexes. SBEbetaCD was more effective in VP solubilization, as K(C) values of VP-SBEbetaCD-TA multicomponent complexes were notably higher than in corresponding betaCD complexes. The large chemical shift displacements from protons located in the interior of the hydrophobic CD cavities (i.e., H-3 and H-5) coupled with significant chemical shift displacements of VP aromatic protons suggested that this moiety was included in the cavity of both betaCD and SBEbetaCD. Two-dimensional rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) experiments were carried out in order to obtain information about the multicomponent complex geometry in solution. Inspection of ROESY spectra allowed the establishment of spatial proximities between all aromatic protons of VP and the internal protons of the CDs, confirming that the aromatic moiety of VP is included in CD cavities being deeply inserted in SBEbetaCD multicomponent complexes, since additional interactions with the sulfobutyl side chains were evidenced.

  19. 1H-NMR comparative study of the active site in shark (Galeorhinus japonicus), horse, and sperm whale deoxy myoglobins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Iwafune, K; Chûjô, R; Inoue, Y; Imai, K; Suzuki, T

    1992-09-01

    1H-NMR spectra of deoxy myoglobins (Mbs) from shark (Galeorhinus japonicus), horse, and sperm whale have been studied to gain insights into their active site structure. It has been demonstrated for the first time that nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) can be observed between heme peripheral side-chain proton resonances of these paramagnetic complexes. Val-E11 methyl and His-F8 C delta H proton resonances of these Mbs were also assigned from the characteristic shift and line width. The hyperfine shift of the former resonance was used to calculate the magnetic anisotropy of the protein. The shift analysis of the latter resonance, together with the previously assigned His-F8 N delta H proton resonance, revealed that the strain on the Fe-N epsilon bond is in the order horse Mb approximately whale Mb < shark Mb and that the hydrogen bond strength of the His-F8 N delta H proton to the main-chain carbonyl oxygen in the preceding turn of the F helix is in the order shark Mb < horse Mb < whale Mb. Weaker Feporphyrin interaction in shark Mb was manifested in a smaller shift of the heme methyl proton resonance and appears to result from distortion of the coordination geometry in this Mb. Larger strain on the Fe-N epsilon bond in shark Mb should be to some extent attributed to its lowered O2 affinity (P50 = 1.1 mmHg at 20 degrees C), compared to whale and horse Mbs.

  20. Transversity studies with protons and light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopetta, Sergio

    2011-12-01

    A general formalism to evaluate time-reversal odd transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (T-odd TMDS) is reviewed and applied to the calculation of the leading-twist quantities, i.e., the Sivers and the Boer-Mulders functions. Two different models of the proton structure, namely a non relativistic constituent quark model and the MIT bag model, have been used. The results obtained in both frameworks fulfill the Burkardt sum rule to a large extent. The calculation of nuclear effects in the extraction of neutron single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off transversely polarized 3He is also illustrated. In the kinematics of JLab, it is found that the nuclear effects described by an Impulse Approximation approach are under theoretical control.

  1. Study of aging of silicone rubber biomaterials with NMR.

    PubMed

    Pfleiderer, B; Xu, P; Ackerman, J L; Garrido, L

    1995-09-01

    Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (29Si, 13C, 1H) is used to characterize the aging process of silicone rubber-based biomaterials in a rat model. 1H NMR relaxation measurements (spin-lattice, T1, and spin-spin, T2, relaxation times) were performed to better understand the molecular dynamics of polysiloxane chains in implants. After 1 year of implantation in animals, changes in the 1H T2 relaxation times and the NMR spectra were observed in polydimethylsiloxane, Silastic sheets and chin implants, while these measurements remain unchanged in finger joints. Very small amounts of fat were detected in all types of silicone rubber implants at the end of the implantation period. This work shows that free silicone migrates from the implants to adjacent tissues and distant sites, such as spleen or liver, and is chemically modified.

  2. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples. PMID:27374054

  3. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples.

  4. Potentiometric and NMR complexation studies of phenylboronic acid PBA and its aminophosphonate analog with selected catecholamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Tomasz; Młynarz, Piotr; Dobosz, Agnieszka; Rydzewska, Agata; Prokopowicz, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Boronic acids are a class of intensively explored compounds, which according to their specific properties have been intensively explored in last decades. Among them phenylboronic acids and their derivatives are most frequently examined as receptors for diverse carbohydrates. In turn, there is a large gap in basic research concerning complexation of catecholamines by these compounds. Therefore, we decided to undertake studies on interaction of chosen catecholamines, namely: noradrenaline (norephinephrine), dopamine, L-DOPA, DOPA-P (phosphonic analog of L-DOPA) and catechol, with simple phenyl boronic acid PBA by means of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, the binding properties of recently synthesized phenylboronic receptor 1 bearing aminophosphonate function in meta-position were investigated and showed promising ability to bind catecholamines. The protonation and stability constants of PBA and receptor 1 complexes were examined by potentiometry. The obtained results demonstrated that PBA binds the catecholamines with the following affinity order: noradrenaline ⩾ dopamine ≈ L-DOPA > catechol > DOPA-P, while its modified analog 1 reveals slightly different preferences: dopamine > noradrenaline > catechol > L-DOPA > DOPA-P.

  5. 1H and 2H NMR studies of water in work-free wheat flour doughs.

    PubMed

    d'Avignon, D A; Hung, C C; Pagel, M T; Hart, B; Bretthorst, G L; Ackerman, J J

    1991-01-01

    Proton and deuterium NMR relaxation methods were used to characterize water compartmentalization and hydration in work-free wheat flour doughs. Transverse (spin-spin) relaxation measurements define three motionally unique water compartments in the work-free dough preparations. The apparent occupancy fraction and relative mobility of each water domain are found to be functions of moisture content, temperature, and flour type. Additionally, the number of relaxation-resolved water compartments and their characteristic relaxation rate constants are found to depend critically on both moisture content and the interpulse-delay employed for the multi-pulse relaxation experiments. Under controlled experimental conditions, dynamics between the three water compartments can be observed to be consistent with the onset of flour hydration. The most notable observation during the initial period of hydration is a loss of "free" or "loosely bound" water to environments characterized by less mobility. Freezing studies show that hard wheat doughs have slightly less amorphous, non-freezable water than do soft wheat flour doughs prepared under similar conditions. PMID:1746346

  6. Solid state 1H NMR studies of cell wall materials of potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huiru; Belton, Peter S.; Ng, Annie; Waldron, Keith W.; Ryden, Peter

    1999-04-01

    Cell wall materials from potatoes ( Solanum tuberosum) prepared by two different methods have been studied using NMR proton relaxation times. Spin lattice relaxation in both the rotating and laboratory frames as well as transverse relaxation have been measured over a range of temperatures and hydration levels. It was observed that the sample prepared using a DMSO extraction showed anomalous behaviour of spin lattice relaxation in the laboratory frame probably due to residual solvent in the sample. Spin lattice relaxation in the laboratory frame is the result of hydroxymethyl rotation and another unidentified high frequency motion. In the rotating frame relaxation is adequately explained by hydroxymethyl rotation alone. In neither experiment is methyl group rotation observed, calculation suggests that this is due to the low density of methyl groups in the sample. Non-freezing water in potato cell walls, α-cellulose and pectin was found about 0.2, 0.04 and 0.18 g per gram dry matter, indicating preferable hydration of pectin compared to cellulose. The effects of hydration are most noticeable in the measurements that reflect low frequency motions, particularly transverse relaxation, where both second moments and the relative intensity of signals arising from immobile material are reduced by hydration.

  7. Study of the New Pulse NMR System for the Jefferson Lab Helium-3 Polarized Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    At Jefferson Lab, a polarized Helium-3 target is used to study the neutron. The Helium-3 target is undergoing an upgrade to improve its polarization. Measuring it involved a new technique known as pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The focus of this project was to find noise in the Pulse NMR signal and to compute the calibration constant to make the polarization easier to deduce. Pulse NMR calibration tests were performed by doing AFP NMR measurements followed by Pulse NMR measurements while varying certain conditions. These included the convection heater, the operation of the oven, and the operation of the laser. Data analysis was done by fitting the pulse NMR signal from the oscilloscope and utilizing the Fourier Transform. Noise was analyzed in the fitting and the Fourier Transform. The calibration constants were affected by the convection heater. The values deviated between the pumping and target chambers of the cell when there was no convection but the values were closer when convection was induced. As far as the noise, it was found to be significant. These results will enable the calculation of the polarization with pulse NMR. In addition, the signal analysis provided insight into the influence of background noise on the pulse NMR measurement. This research was done though the SULI program of the Department of Energy.

  8. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  9. NMR Studies of Biomass and its Reaction Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass refers to biological material derived from living or recently living organisms, such as wood, agricultural products and wastes, and alcohol fuels. An increasingly popular R&D approach is to convert biomass into industrial polymers or chemicals. NMR is an excellent technique for the character...

  10. 129Xe NMR studies of biochar made from biobased materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar is created by pyrolysis of biobased materials under controlled oxidative environments. The product is charcoal-like and can be used as filtration medium, sequestrant for metallic ions, soil conditioner, and other applications. In our work we have found 129Xe NMR to be an excellent technique...

  11. Solid-state NMR studies for DC 745: April--May 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T.; Labouriau, A.

    2000-12-01

    Powles et al. reported in 1961 that pdydimethyl siloxane melts exhibit a transverse decay of nuclear spin magnetization (T{sub 2}) that is nonexponential. This observation was interpreted in terms of the proton NMR signal from the melt having characteristics of a broad line. Since then, similar findings were obtained for other polymer melts too. Accordingly to Powles et al. this peculiar proton line shape was the result of an intramolecular direct dipole-dipole interaction between a pair of protons. They also suggested that this dipolar interaction was weak because the dipolar interaction was motionally averaged since the orientation-dependent local dipolar field is modulated by molecular dynamics. In sum, the consequences and the origins of nuclear spin correlations in viscous polymer melts were recognized almost 4 decades ago. In the 1970s, Cohen-Addad suggested that these weak proton dipolar interactions could be used to characterize polymer melts and networks. In this work, we have used some of these ideas to probe the effects of thermal treatments on the proton spin-spin relaxation times for DC745.

  12. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  13. Comparative proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amantadine complexes formed in aqueous solutions with three major cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Lis-Cieplak, Agnieszka; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-01-01

    Host-guest complexes of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD, respectively) with amantadine (1-aminoadamantane, AMA; an antiviral agent) were characterized in aqueous solutions using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Host-guest molecular interactions were manifested by changes in the chemical shifts of AMA protons. NMR Job's plots showed that the stoichiometry of all the studied complexes was 1:1. Two-dimensional T-ROESY experiments demonstrated that the complexes were formed by different degrees of incorporation of the adamantyl group of AMA into the CD cavity. The mode of AMA binding was proposed. The AMA molecule came into the α-CD cavity (the smallest size) or β-CD cavity (the intermediate size) through its wide entrance to become shallowly or deeply accommodated, respectively. In the complex of AMA with γ-CD (the largest cavity size), the adamantyl group was also quite deeply inserted into the CD cavity, but it arrived there through the narrow cavity entrance. It was found that the adamantyl group of AMA was best accommodated by the β-CD cavity. The binding constants Kaa of the studied complexes (in M(-1) ), determined from DOSY NMR, were fairly high; their values in an ascending order were: α-CD (183) < γ-CD (306) ≪ β-CD (5150).

  14. 200 MeV proton radiography studies with a hand phantom using a prototype proton CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V; Feng, V; Hurley, F; Johnson, R P; Leary, C; Macafee, S; Plumb, A; Rykalin, V; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schubert, K; Schulte, R; Schultze, B; Steinberg, D; Witt, M; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2014-04-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton computed tomography (CT) scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality.

  15. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V.; Feng, V.; Hurley, F.; Johnson, R.P.; Leary, C.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Rykalin, V.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Schubert, K.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, B.; Steinberg, D.; Witt, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton CT scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  16. Quantum-chemical simulation of 1H NMR spectra. 2. Comparison of DFT-based procedures for computing proton-proton coupling constants in organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bally, Thomas; Rablen, Paul R

    2011-06-17

    The performance of 250 different computational protocols (combinations of density functionals, basis sets and methods) was assessed on a set of 165 well-established experimental (1)H-(1)H nuclear coupling constants (J(H-H)) from 65 molecules spanning a wide range of "chemical space". Thereby we found that, if one uses core-augmented basis sets and allows for linear scaling of the raw results, calculations of only the Fermi contact term yield more accurate predictions than calculations where all four terms that contribute to J(H-H) are evaluated. It turns out that B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)u+1s is the best (and, in addition, one of the most economical) of all tested methods, yielding predictions of J(H-H) with a root-mean-square deviation from experiment of less than 0.5 Hz for our test set. Another method that does similarly well, without the need for additional 1s basis functions, is B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, which is, however, ca. 8 times more "expensive" in terms of CPU time. A selection of the better methods was tested on a probe set comprising 61 J(H-H) values from 37 molecules. In this set we also included five molecules where conformational averaging is required. The rms deviations were better than or equal to those with the training set, which indicates that the method we recommend is generally applicable for organic molecules. We give instructions on how to carry out calculations of (1)H chemical shifts and J(H-H) most economically and provide scripts to extract the relevant information from the outputs of calculations with the Gaussian program in clearly arranged form, e.g., to feed them into programs for simulating entire (1)H NMR spectra.

  17. Interaction of lafutidine in binding to human serum albumin in gastric ulcer therapy: STD-NMR, WaterLOGSY-NMR, NMR relaxation times, Tr-NOESY, molecule docking, and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongqin; Huang, Yanmei; He, Jiawei; Li, Shanshan; Tang, Bin; Li, Hui

    2016-09-15

    In this study, lafutidine (LAF) was used as a model compound to investigate the binding mechanism between antiulcer drugs and human serum albumin (HSA) through various techniques, including STD-NMR, WaterLOGSY-NMR, (1)H NMR relaxation times, tr-NOESY, molecule docking calculation, FT-IR spectroscopy, and CD spectroscopy. The analyses of STD-NMR, which derived relative STD (%) intensities, and WaterLOGSY-NMR, determined that LAF bound to HSA. In particular, the pyridyl group of LAF was in close contact with HSA binding pocket, whereas furyl group had a secondary binding. Competitive STD-NMR and WaterLOGSY-NMR experiments, with warifarin and ibuprofen as site-selective probes, indicated that LAF preferentially bound to site II in the hydrophobic subdomains IIIA of HSA. The bound conformation of LAF at the HSA binding site was further elucidated by transferred NOE effect (tr-NOESY) experiment. Relaxation experiments provided quantitative information about the relationship between the affinity and structure of LAF. The molecule docking simulations conducted with AutoDock and the restraints derived from STD results led to three-dimensional models that were consistent with the NMR spectroscopic data. The presence of hydrophobic forces and hydrogen interactions was also determined. Additionally, FT-IR and CD spectroscopies showed that LAF induced secondary structure changes of HSA.

  18. Magic-angle-spinning NMR of the drug resistant S31N M2 proton transporter from influenza A.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Eddy, Matthew T; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G

    2012-05-01

    We report chemical shift assignments of the drug-resistant S31N mutant of M2(18-60) determined using 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectra acquired with a (15)N-(13)C ZF-TEDOR transfer followed by (13)C-(13)C mixing by RFDR. The MAS spectra reveal two sets of resonances, indicating that the tetramer assembles as a dimer of dimers, similar to the wild-type channel. Helicies from the two sets of chemical shifts are shown to be in close proximity at residue H37, and the assignments reveal a difference in the helix torsion angles, as predicted by TALOS+, for the key resistance residue N31. In contrast to wild-type M2(18-60), chemical shift changes are minimal upon addition of the inhibitor rimantadine, suggesting that the drug does not bind to S31N M2.

  19. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  20. Rotational energy barrier of 2-(2',6'-dihydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole: a case study by NMR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weihua; Twum, Eric B; Li, Linlin; Wright, Brian D; Rinaldi, Peter L; Pang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    2-(2'-Hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) derivatives represent an important class of luminescent materials, as they can undergo excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The material's ESIPT properties are dependent on the ratio of two different rotamers, whose interconversion is poorly understood. By using HBO derivative 4, the rotational energy barrier of 2- (2',6'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole is determined to be 10.5 kcal/mol by variable-temperature NMR. Although a HBO derivative typically exhibits two rotamers with O···H-O (e.g., 1a) and N···H-O bonding (e.g., 1b), correlation of NMR with fluorescence data reveals that the rotamer with N···H-O bonding is predominant in the solution.

  1. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase from baker's yeast: I. Kinetic analysis, chemical modification, and proton NMR spectroscopy of the enzyme substrate complex. II. Amino acid analysis and NMR spectroscopy of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of the effect of pH on the reversible reaction catalyzed by orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) from Baker's yeast revealed that different amino acid residues may enable the enzyme-catalyzed reactions to proceed in the forward and reverse directions, respectively. For the forward reaction, there appear to be at least two critical amino acid residues (pK's 4.6 and 7.1) which must be in a deprotonated state to reach a maximum activity near pH 8 which is maintained through pH 9.5. For the reverse reaction, maximum activity is reached near pH 7 (pK's at 5.4) and then the activity decreases at higher pH (pK's at 7.9 and possibly above 9). A theoretical proton NMR spectrum was generated for OPRTase, based on its amino acid composition. The spectrum thus produced has a similar number of major peaks to that of the actual spectrum taken at 300 MHz. Spectra collected at various pH values between 8 and 5, were consistent with the maintenance of the gross conformational structure of the enzyme over that pH range.

  2. NMR studies on binary and ternary Pd(II) complexes formed by the growth-modulating tripeptide glycylhistidyllysine and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Laussac, J P; Pasdeloup, M; Hadjiliadis, N

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism of transport of Pt(II) and Pd(II) into tissues through blood and that of their elimination in kidney is incompletely known so far. In this respect, the binding of palladium by the tripeptide glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine (GHL), a constituent of the human plasma, as a binary complex, and by the nucleotides 5'-IMP and 5'-GMP, as ternary complexes, has been studied by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. These studies have been conducted in aqueous media and at different ligand/metal ratios. At acidic pH, resonances were observed for binary and ternary kinetically stable complexes, and binding sites in these complexes were identified by the effect of binding on chemical shifts of protons and carbon resonances. From these data, stoichiometries and structures of these complexes were proposed. PMID:2821192

  3. Studies of electron and proton isochoric heating for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Beg, F; Clarke, R; Clarke, D; Chen, M; Chung, H; Chen, S; Freeman, R; Green, J; Gu, P; Gregori, G; Highbarger, K; Habara, H; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Heathcote, R; Hill, J; King, J; Kodama, R; Koch, J; Lancaster, K; Langdon, B; Murphy, C; Norreys, P; Neely, D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nakamura, H; Patel, N; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Snavley, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Foord, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Storm, M; Tanaka, K; Tempo, M; Toley, M; Town, R; Wilks, S; VanWoerkom, L; Weber, R; Yabuuchi, T; Zhang, B

    2006-10-02

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) proposal to use this technique to initiate burn in a fusion capsule. Experiments designed to investigate electron isochoric heating have measured heating in two limiting cases of interest to fast ignition, small planar foils and hollow cones. Data from Cu K{alpha} fluorescence, crystal x-ray spectroscopy of Cu K shell emission, and XUV imaging at 68eV and 256 eV are used to test PIC and Hybrid PIC modeling of the interaction. Isochoric heating by focused proton beams generated at the concave inside surface of a hemi-shell and from a sub hemi-shell inside a cone have been studied with the same diagnostic methods plus imaging of proton induced K{alpha}. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled. Conclusions from the proton and electron heating experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed.

  4. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique. PMID:16332107

  5. Affect intensity and negative mood regulation (NMR) expectancies: a preliminary Indian study.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Seema; Tripathi, Ravikesh

    2012-06-01

    Individuals differ in the intensity with which they typically experience affect as well as in their beliefs regarding their ability to alleviate negative mood states. These variables have been implicated in a range of clinical problems. Most studies utilize a single index of affect intensity. The differential correlates of positive and negative affect intensity, their association with negative mood regulation expectancy and their role as predictors of psychological outcomes have been insufficiently explored. This study aimed at exploring the relationship of affect intensity variables with negative mood regulation (NMR) expectancy, their association with age and gender and examining the role of affect intensity and NMR expectancy as predictors of stress and well being in a community sample of Indian adults. The sample consisted of 206 participants aged between 20 and 60 years. Higher age was associated with higher NMR expectancy but lower positive affect intensity. Positive and negative affect intensity showed differential patterns of association with NMR expectancy. Higher negative affect intensity was associated with lower NMR expectancy whereas higher positive affect intensity was associated with higher NMR expectancy. Affect intensity and NMR expectancy variables jointly predicted 30-39% of variance in perceived stress and well being. Implications for further research are discussed.

  6. NMR studies of selective population inversion and spin clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.S.

    1986-02-01

    This work describes the development and application of selective excitation techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Composite pulses and multiple-quantum methods are used to accomplish various goals, such as broadband and narrowband excitation in liquids, and collective excitation of groups of spins in solids. These methods are applied to a variety of problems, including non-invasive spatial localization, spin cluster size characterization in disordered solids and solid state NMR imaging.

  7. Studies of electrolyte penetration in carbon anodes by NMR techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, G.

    1998-12-09

    A toroid cavity nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detector capable of recording radial concentration profiles, diffusion constants, and displacements of charge carriers was employed to investigate the lithium ion distribution in an electrochemical cell containing a carbonaceous material synthesized from pyrene and pillared clays as inorganic templates. A carbon rod was used in a control experiment to assign the Li{sup +} spectrum and to calibrate the one dimensional radial images.

  8. An in-depth analysis of the biological functional studies based on the NMR M2 channel structure of influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Ribo; Du Qishi Wang Chenghua; Chou, K.-C.

    2008-12-26

    The long-sought three-dimensional structure of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus was successfully determined recently by the high-resolution NMR [J.R. Schnell, J.J. Chou, Structure and mechanism of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus, Nature 451 (2008) 591-595]. Such a milestone work has provided a solid structural basis for studying drug-resistance problems. However, the action mechanism revealed from the NMR structure is completely different from the traditional view and hence prone to be misinterpreted as 'conflicting' with some previous biological functional studies. To clarify this kind of confusion, an in-depth analysis was performed for these functional studies, particularly for the mutations D44N, D44A and N44D on position 44, and the mutations on positions 27-38. The analyzed results have provided not only compelling evidences to further validate the NMR structure but also very useful clues for dealing with the drug-resistance problems and developing new effective drugs against H5N1 avian influenza virus, an impending threat to human beings.

  9. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified into primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and of gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance with wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C

  10. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio

  11. Comments on Injector Proton Beam Study in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    During the entire period of injector proton study in run 2014, it seems that the beam transverse emittance out of Booster is larger than that in run 2013. The emittance measured at the BtA transfer line and also the transmission from Booster late to AGS late are presented for this argument. In addition to this problem, it seems that the multiturn Booster injection, which defines the transverse emittance, needs more attention. Moreover, for high intensity operations, the space charge effect may be already relevant in RHIC polarized proton runs. With the RHIC proton intensity improvement in the next several years, higher Booster input intensity is needed, therefore, the space charge effect at the Booster injection and early ramp may become a new limiting factor.

  12. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  13. NMR study of ferroelastic phase transition of tetramethylammonium tetrabromocobaltate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Sun Ha

    2016-09-01

    Static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were carried out on 1H, 13C, and 14N nuclei in order to understand the structural changes of the N(CH3)4 groups in [N(CH3)4]2CoBr4 near the ferroelastic phase transition temperature TC. The two chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 groups were distinguished using 13C cross-polarization/(CP)MAS and 14N static NMR. The changes in chemical shifts, line intensities, and the spin-lattice relaxation time near TC can be correlated with the changing structural geometry, which underlies the phase transition. The 14N NMR spectra indicated a crystal symmetry change at TC, which is related to the ferroelastic domain with different orientations of the N(CH3)4 groups. The ferroelastic domain walls were confirmed by optical polarizing microscopy, and the wall orientations were described by the Sapriel theory. The transition to the ferroelastic phase was found to be related to the orientational ordering of the N(CH3)4 groups.

  14. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets.

  15. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies: spatial and temporal resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    We are developing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy, spectroscopy and combined NMR/optical techniques to the study of biofilms. Objectives include: time and depth-resolved metabolite concentrations with isotropic spatial resolution on the order of 10 microns, metabolic pathways and flux rates, mass transport and ultimately their correlation with gene expression by optical microscopy in biofilms. These methods are being developed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model system, but are equally applicable to other biofilm systems of interest. Thus, spatially resolved NMR of biofilms is expected to contribute significantly to the understanding of adherent cell metabolism.

  16. Solid-state NMR studies of theophylline co-crystals with dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Pindelska, Edyta; Sokal, Agnieszka; Szeleszczuk, Lukasz; Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-11-01

    In this work, three polycrystalline materials containing co-crystals of theophylline with malonic, maleic, and glutaric acids were studied using (13)C, (15)N and (1)H solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The NMR assignments were supported by gauge including projector augmented waves (GIPAW) calculations of chemical shielding, performed using X-ray determined geometry. The experimental (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR results and the calculated isotropic chemical shifts were in excellent agreement. A rapid and convenient method for theophylline co-crystals crystal structure analysis has been proposed for co-crystals, which are potentially new APIs.

  17. Progress of the Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS).

    PubMed

    Bryant, P J

    1999-06-01

    The Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) was set up following an agreement between Professor M. Regler of the Med-AUSTRON (Austria) and Professor U. Amaldi of the TERA Foundation (Italy) to join their efforts in the design of a medical synchrotron that could later be adapted to individual national needs. CERN agreed to host this study inside its PS Division and to contribute one full-time member to the study team. The study group has worked in collaboration with GSI (Germany) and was more recently joined by Onkologie 2000 (Czech Republic). Work started in January 1996 and is expected to finish during 1998. The agreed aim of the study was to investigate and design a generic facility that would allow the direct clinical comparison of protons and carbon ions for cancer treatment. The accelerator was to be designed primarily for high-precision active beam scanning with both protons and ions, but was also to be capable of delivering proton beams with passive spreading. PMID:10394382

  18. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastián C.

    2006-03-01

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon® seat, and Kalrez® O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  19. Method study of parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Feng; Gao, Jie; Xiao, Ming; Wang, Dou; Wang, Yi-Wei; Bai, Sha; Bian, Tian-Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we show a systematic method of appropriate parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider by using an analytical expression for the beam-beam tune shift limit, starting from a given design goal and technical limitations. A suitable parameter space has been explored. Based on the parameter scan, sets of appropriate parameters designed for a 50 km and 100 km circular proton-proton collider are proposed. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175192)

  20. Investigations of acetaminophen binding to bovine serum albumin in the presence of fatty acid: Fluorescence and 1H NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojko, B.; Sułkowska, A.; Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-04-01

    The binding of acetaminophen to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by the quenching fluorescence method and the proton nuclear magnetic resonance technique ( 1H NMR). For fluorescence measurements 1-anilino-9-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) hydrophobic probe was used to verify subdomain IIIA as acetaminophen's likely binding site. Three binding sites of acetaminophen in subdomain IIA of bovine serum albumin were found. Quenching constants calculated by the Stern-Volmer modified method were used to estimate the influence of myristic acid (MYR) on the drug binding to the albumin. The influence of [fatty acid]/[albumin] molar ratios on the affinity of the protein towards acetaminophen was described. Changes of chemical shifts and relaxation times of the drug indicated that the presence of MYR inhibits interaction in the AA-albumin complex. It is suggested that the elevated level of fatty acids does not significantly influence the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen.

  1. Chemical shift and electric field gradient tensors for the amide and carboxyl hydrogens in the model peptide N-acetyl-D,L-valine. Single-crystal deuterium NMR study.

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, R. E., II; Bernhard, T.; Haeberlen, U.; Rendell, J.; Opella, S.; Chemical Engineering

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is well established as a method for describing molecular structure with resolution on the atomic scale. Many of the NMR observables result from anisotropic interactions between the nuclear spin and its environment. These observables can be described by second-rank tensors. For example, the eigenvalues of the traceless symmetric part of the hydrogen chemical shift (CS) tensor provide information about the strength of inter- or intramolecular hydrogen bonding. On the other hand, the eigenvectors of the deuterium electric field gradient (EFG) tensor give deuteron/proton bond directions with an accuracy rivalled only by neutron diffraction. In this paper the authors report structural information of this type for the amide and carboxyl hydrogen sites in a single crystal of the model peptide N-acetyl-D,L-valine (NAV). They use deuterium NMR to infer both the EFG and CS tensors at the amide and carboxyl hydrogen sites in NAV. Advantages of this technique over multiple-pulse proton NMR are that it works in the presence of {sup 14}N spins which are very hard to decouple from protons and that additional information in form of the EFG tensors can be derived. The change in the CS and EFG tensors upon exchange of a deuteron for a proton (the isotope effect) is anticipated to be very small; the effect on the CS tensors is certainly smaller than the experimental errors. NAV has served as a model peptide before in a variety of NMR studies, including those concerned with developing solid-state NMR spectroscopy as a method for determining the structure of proteins. NMR experiments on peptide or protein samples which are oriented in at least one dimension can provide important information about the three-dimensional structure of the peptide or the protein. In order to interpret the NMR data in terms of the structure of the polypeptide, the relationship of the CS and EFG tensors to the local symmetry elements of an amino acide, e.g., the peptide plane, is

  2. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.; Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-04-01

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  3. Monoterpene Unknowns Identified Using IR, [to the first power]H-NMR, [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR, DEPT, COSY, and HETCOR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.

    2005-01-01

    A study identifies a compound from a set of monoterpenes using infrared (IR) and one-dimensional (1D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. After identifying the unknown, each carbon and proton signal can be interpreted and assigned to the structure using the information in the two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, correlation spectroscopy…

  4. In vitro determination by 1H-NMR studies that bile with shorter nucleation times contain cholesterol-enriched vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, S S; Parkes, H G; Ellul, J P; Murphy, G M

    1995-06-01

    Although biliary vesicles are considered to be the primary source of cholesterol found in cholesterol gallstones, difficulties in quantitatively separating the different cholesterol transport modes in bile still remain. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR) offers an alternative approach. Investigations were carried out on both model biles and human gallbladder bile samples: (i) to follow the effect of increasing sodium glycocholate concentrations on the 1H-NMR spectra of arachidonic acid rich-phospholipid, and cholesterol-lecithin vesicles, (ii) to compare the concentrations of total phospholipids in bile determined enzymatically with those obtained by integration of the phospholipid choline head group resonance peak, and (iii) to examine the relationship between biliary cholesterol nucleation time (NT) and the areas of the biliary lipid 1H-NMR peaks. It was found that the molecular motions of vesicle phospholipid, as determined by 1H-NMR, were restricted by saturation with cholesterol. In bile from patients with cholesterol gallstones, the reduced NMR fluidity of the phospholipid choline-head group indicated that the proportion of cholesterol-phospholipid vesicles containing more than 50% cholesterol, on a molar basis, was increased. The ratios of the N+(CH3)3 and = CH proton resonance peaks showed no overlap between samples with cholesterol gallstones and shorter NT and those with either no gallstones or pigment stones and longer NT. 1H-NMR spectroscopy indicates in a non-invasive manner those biles which are prone to cholesterol crystal formation.

  5. Multiple-quantum NMR studies of spin clusters in liquid crystals and zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-07-01

    This work will describe the use of MQ NMR to study spin clusters in anisotropic materials. A technique known as multiple-quantum spin counting was used to determine average spin cluster sizes liquid crystalline materials and in faujacitic zeolites containing aromatic hydrocarbons. The first half of the thesis will describe MQ NMR and the MQ spin counting technique, and the second half of the thesis will describe the actual experiments and their results.

  6. Dipolar-dephasing 13C NMR studies of decomposed wood and coalified xylem tissue: Evidence for chemical structural changes associated with defunctionalization of lignin structural units during coalification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    A series of decomposed and coalified gymnosperm woods was examined by conventional solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and by dipolar-dephasing NMR techniques. The results of these NMR studies for a histologically related series of samples provide clues as to the nature of codification reactions that lead to the defunctionalization of lignin-derived aromatic structures. These reactions sequentially involve the following: (1) loss of methoxyl carbons from guaiacyl structural units with replacement by hydroxyls and increased condensation; (2) loss of hydroxyls or aryl ethers with replacement by hydrogen as rank increases from lignin to high-volatile bituminous coal; (3) loss of alkyl groups with continued replacement by hydrogen. The dipolar-dephasing data show that the early stages of coalification in samples examined (lignin to lignite) involve a decreasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings and suggest that condensation is significant during coalification at this early stage. An increasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings is observed as the rank of the sample increases from lignite to anthracite.

  7. 51V-NMR study of the Kagome staircase compound Co3V2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogloblichev, V.; Kumagai, K.; Yakubovsky, A.; Mikhalev, K.; Furukawa, Y.; Verkhovskii, S.; Gerashenko, A.; Barilo, S.; Bychkov, G.; Shiryaev, S.; Korolev, A.

    2009-03-01

    Kagome staircase compound Co3V2O8 (S = 3/2) has a structure very similar to multiferroic compound Ni3V2Og (S = 1), but their magnetic phase diagrams differ noticeably. We present the results of the first NMR study in Co3V2O8 single crystal. From 51V-NMR spectra, the components of electric field gradient (EFG) tensor and of magnetic shifts tensor, Ki, are obtained. The temperature dependences of NMR shifts 51Ki for each main crystal axis direction are well described by a spin contributions in the paramagnetic phase. In ferromagnetic phase the zero field 51V-NMR spectrum is observed in the temperature range of 1.5-6.3 K.

  8. Water in barnacle muscle. III. NMR studies of fresh fibers and membrane-damaged fibers equilibrated with selected solutes.

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, E E; Clark, M E; Hinke, J A; Chapman, N R

    1981-01-01

    Water in barnacle muscle has been studied using NMR techniques. Fresh fibers are compared with membrane-damaged fibers treated with solutes that greatly alter fixed charge and total water content. Both water (97%) and solute (3%) protons are visible in continuous wave spectra of oriented fresh fibers. No local field inhomogeneities were detected, nor are cell solutes significantly bound. In pulse experiments, all cell water is visible and exhibits a single exponential decay. In fresh fibers, T2 approximately or equal to 40 ms; faster decaying signals are assigned to immobile and mobile protons on macromolecules. T1 and T1p are frequency dependent. Using equations derived for a two-compartment model with fast exchange, we calculate the following: tau b, the correlation time for anisotropic rotational motion of bound water; Sb, its order parameter; tau ex, the correlation time for exchange between bound and free fractions; f, the fraction of water bound; and Hr, the grams of water bound per gram of macromolecule. Whereas f varies inversely with total water content, the other parameters are virtually constant, with values: tau b approximately or equal to 1.3 X 10(-8) S; tau ex approximately or equal to 8 X 10(-6) s; Sb approximately or equal to 0.06; and Hr approximately or equal to 0.1g H2O/g macromolecule. Thus, the NMR relaxation detectable properties of water bound to macromolecules are unaffected by solutes that greatly alter the macromolecular surface charge. PMID:7272435

  9. Positional isotope exchange studies on enzyme using NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopically enriched compounds, /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and /sup 18/O bridge-labeled pyrophosphate, synthesized previously in this laboratory, were used to investigate and measure the exchange vs. turnover of substrates and products from their central complexes in four selected enzyme systems. Using hi-field /sup 31/P NMR, we were able to differentiate between /sup 18/O labeled in the bridge vs. the non-bridge positions by virtue of the isotope shift upon the phosphorus nuclei. The bridge to non-bridge scrambling of the label was quantitated and the exchange vs. turnover ratios under a variety of conditions was determined. Using the substrate inhibitor carboxycreatinine, PIX experiments with /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and creatine kinase were conducted. It was shown that carboxycreatinine and creatine kinase promoted exchange of the /sup 18/O label as determined by NMR. We have concluded that carboxycreatinine is either a substrate that catalyzes very slow turnover or it catalyzes exchange by a dissociative (SN/sub 1//sub P/) type of mechanism

  10. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite – Gelatine Mesocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite—gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO43− groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals. PMID:26515127

  11. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite - Gelatine Mesocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-10-01

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite—gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO43- groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals.

  12. /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer and /sup 13/C NMR kinetic studies of glycolytic regulation during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell-Burk, S.L.; den Hollander, J.A.; Alger, J.R.; Shulman, R.G.

    1987-11-17

    /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer techniques have been employed in glucose-gown derepressed yeast to determine unidirectional fluxes in the upper part of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. The experiments were performed during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis by saturating the ATP/sub ..gamma../ resonances and monitoring changes in the phosphomonoester signals from glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. These experiments were supplemented with /sup 13/C NMR measurements of glucose utilization rates and /sup 13/C NMR label distribution studies. Combined with data obtained previously from radioisotope measurement, these /sup 31/P and /sup 13/C NMR kinetic studies allowed estimation of the net glycolytic flow in addition to relative flows through phosphofructokinase (PFK) and Fru-1,6-P/sub 2/ase during anaerobic and aerobic glycolysis. The /sup 31/P NMR saturation-transfer results are consistent with previous results obtained from measurements of metabolite levels, radioisotope data, and /sup 13/C NMR studies, providing additional support for in vivo measurement of the flows during glycolysis.

  13. Thermal decomposition of t-butylamine borane studied by in situ solid state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Feigerle, J.; Smyrl, N. R.; Morrell, J. S.; Stowe, A. C.

    2010-03-18

    of the amine borane fuel more feasible [22]. In the present study, tert-butylamine borane is investigated by heteronuclear in situ solid state NMR to understand hydrogen release from a hydrocarbon containing amine borane. tbutylamine borane has similar physical properties to amine borane with a melting point of 96 C. A single proton has been replaced with a t-butylamine group resulting in a weakening of the dihydrogen bonding framework. t-butylamine borane has a theoretical gravimetric hydrogen density of 15.1%; however, isobutane can also be evolved rather than hydrogen. If decomposition yields one mole isobutane and two moles hydrogen, 4.5 wt% H2 gas will be evolved. More importantly for the present work, the resulting spent fuel should be comprised of both (BNH)n and (CBNH)n polyimidoboranes.

  14. ¹H-NMR study of the impact of high pressure and thermal processing on cell membrane integrity of onions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Maria E; Barrett, Diane M; McCarthy, Michael J; Vergeldt, Frank J; Gerkema, Edo; Matser, Ariette M; Van As, Henk

    2010-09-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) relaxometry was used to study the effects of high pressure and thermal processing on membrane permeability and cell compartmentalization, important components of plant tissue texture. High pressure treated onions were subjected to pressure levels from 20 to 200 MPa at 5 min hold time at initial temperatures of 5 and 20 °C. Thermally treated onions were exposed for 30 min at temperatures from 40 to 90 °C. Loss of membrane integrity was clearly shown by changes in transverse relaxation time (T(2)) of water at temperatures of 60 °C and above. Destabilization effects on membranes exposed to high pressure were observed at 200 MPa as indicated by T(2) measurements and cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM). T(2) relaxation successfully discriminated different degrees of membrane damage based on the T(2) shift of the vacuolar component. Analyses of the average water self-diffusion coefficient indicated less restricted diffusion after membrane rupture occurred in cases of severe thermal treatments. Milder processing treatments yielded lower average diffusion coefficients than the controls. ¹H-NMR proved to be an effective method for quantification of cell membrane damage in onions and allowed for the comparison of different food processes based on their impact on tissue integrity.

  15. Urea's effect on the ribonuclease A catalytic efficiency: a kinetic, 1H NMR and molecular orbital study.

    PubMed

    Almarza, Jorge; Rincón, Luis; Bahsas, Alí; Pinto, María Angela; Brito, Francisco

    2013-02-01

    Understanding of protein-urea interactions is one of the greatest challenges to modern structural protein chemistry. Based in enzyme kinetics experiments and (1)H NMR spectroscopic analysis we proposed that urea, at low concentrations, directly interacts with the protonated histidines of the active center of RNase A, following a simple model of competitive inhibition. These results were supported by theoretical analysis based on the frontier molecular orbital theory and suggest that urea might establish a favorable interaction with the cationic amino acids. Our experimental evidence and theoretical analysis indicate that the initials steps of the molecular mechanism of Urea-RNase A interaction passes through the establishment of a three center four electron adduct. Also, our results would explain the observed disruption of the (1)H NMR signals corresponding to H12 and H119 (involved in catalysis) of the RNase A studied in the presence of urea. Our interaction model of urea-amino acids (cationic) can be extended to explain the inactivation of other enzymes with cationic amino acids at the active site.

  16. Structure of dimethylphenyl betaine hydrochloride studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculation, NMR and FTIR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, M.; Katrusiak, A.; Dega-Szafran, Z.; Kowalczyk, I.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of dimethylphenyl betaine hydrochloride (1) has been studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations, NMR and FTIR spectra. The crystals are monoclinic, space group P21/c. In the crystal, the Cl- anion is connected with protonated betaine through the O-H⋯Cl- hydrogen bond of 2.943(2) Å. The structures in the gas phase (2) and water solution (3) have been optimized by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) approach and the geometrical results have been compared with the X-ray data of 1. The FTIR spectrum of the solid compound is consistent with the X-ray results. The probable assignments of the anharmonic experimental vibrational frequencies of the investigated chloride (1) based on the calculated harmonic frequencies in water solution (3) are proposed. The correlations between the experimental 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts (δexp) of 1 in D2O and the magnetic isotropic shielding constants (σcalc) calculated by the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) approach, using the screening solvation model (COSMO), δexp = a + b σcalc, for optimized molecule 3 in water solution are linear and correctly reproduce the experimental chemical shifts.

  17. A solid-state NMR study of phase structure, molecular interactions, and mobility in blends of citric acid and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Schantz, S; Hoppu, P; Juppo, A M

    2009-05-01

    Citric acid anhydrate (CAA) and paracetamol (PARA), prepared as crystalline physical mixtures and as amorphous blends, were studied using (13)C solid-state cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR. Amorphous blends showed significant line broadening from the conformational distribution as compared to the crystalline samples. Also, chemical shift variations were observed between crystalline and amorphous blends, which were attributed to differences in intermolecular interactions. Averaging of proton rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1rho)) probed via different (13)C sites in the amorphous blends confirmed molecular level mixing. For some, initially amorphous, sample compositions the onset of crystallization was evident directly from spectra and from the significantly longer T(1rho) relaxations. Thus, crystallization caused phase separation with properties of the two phases resembling those of pure CAA and PARA, respectively. (13)C spectra of amorphous 50/50 (w/w, %) CAA/PARA recorded from above the glass transition temperature broadened as the temperature increased to a maximum at T approximately T(g) + 33 K. This was the result of a dynamic interference between the line narrowing techniques being applied and the time scale of molecular reorientation in the miscible melt. The derived average correlation time was found to correspond well with previous results from melt rheology. We conclude that the underlying reasons for physical instability (i.e., crystallization from the miscible melt, including molecular interactions and dynamics) of this class of amorphous binary mixtures can be effectively evaluated using NMR spectroscopy.

  18. A Case Study in Proton Pencil-Beam Scanning Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Kooy, Hanne M.; Clasie, Benjamin M.; Lu, H.-M.; Madden, Thomas M.; Bentefour, Hassan; Depauw, Nicolas M.S.; Adams, Judy A.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Demaret, Denis; Delaney, Thomas F.; Flanz, Jacob B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: We completed an implementation of pencil-beam scanning (PBS), a technology whereby a focused beam of protons, of variable intensity and energy, is scanned over a plane perpendicular to the beam axis and in depth. The aim of radiotherapy is to improve the target to healthy tissue dose differential. We illustrate how PBS achieves this aim in a patient with a bulky tumor. Methods and Materials: Our first deployment of PBS uses 'broad' pencil-beams ranging from 20 to 35 mm (full-width-half-maximum) over the range interval from 32 to 7 g/cm{sup 2}. Such beam-brushes offer a unique opportunity for treating bulky tumors. We present a case study of a large (4,295 cc clinical target volume) retroperitoneal sarcoma treated to 50.4 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) (presurgery) using a course of photons and protons to the clinical target volume and a course of protons to the gross target volume. Results: We describe our system and present the dosimetry for all courses and provide an interdosimetric comparison. Discussion: The use of PBS for bulky targets reduces the complexity of treatment planning and delivery compared with collimated proton fields. In addition, PBS obviates, especially for cases as presented here, the significant cost incurred in the construction of field-specific hardware. PBS offers improved dose distributions, reduced treatment time, and reduced cost of treatment.

  19. Dynamic studies of proton diffusion in mesoscopic heterogeneous matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, M.; Nachliel, E.; Kiryati, S.

    1992-01-01

    The thin water layer, as found in chloroplast or mitochondria, is confined between low dielectric amphypathic surfaces a few nm apart. The physical properties of this mesoscopic space, and how its dimensions affect the rate of chemical reactions proceeding in it, is the subject for this study. The method selected for this purpose is time resolved fluorometry which can monitor the reversible dissociation of a proton from excited molecule of pyranine (8 hydroxy pyrene 1,3,6 tri sulfonate) trapped in thin water layers of a multilamellar vesicle made of neutral or slightly charged phospholipids. The results were analyzed by a computer program of N. Agmon (Pines, E., D. Huppert, and N. Agmon. 1988. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 88:5620-5630) that simulates the diffusion of a proton, subjected to electrostatic attraction, in a thin water layer enclosed between low affinity, proton binding surfaces. The analysis determines the diffusion coefficient of the proton, the effective dielectric constant of the water and the water accessibility of the phosphomoieties of the lipids. These parameters were measured for various lipids [egg-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol + DPPC (1:1) and egg PC plus phosphatidyl serine (9:1)] and under varying osmotic pressure which reduces the width of the water layer down to ∼10 ∼ across. We found that: (a) The effective dielectric constant of the aqueous layer, depending on the lipid composition, is ∼40. (b) The diffusion coefficient of the proton in the thin layer (30-10 ∼ across) is that measured in bulk water D = 9.3 10-5 cm2/s, indicating that the water retains its normal liquid state even on contact with the membrane. (c) The reactivity of the phosphomoiety, quantitated by rate of its reaction with proton, diminishes under lateral pressure which reduces the surface area per lipid. We find no evidence for abnormal dynamics of proton transfer at the lipid water interface which, by any mechanism

  20. Multinuclear MAS NMR studies of sodalitic framework materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.M.; Mead, P.J.; Dann, S.E.; Weller, M.T.

    2000-02-24

    A wide range of sodalite framework materials, M{sub 8}[TT{prime}O{sub 4}]{sub 6}X{sub 2} where T = Al, Ga, Si, T{prime} = Be, Al, Si, Ge, have been characterized using {sup 27}Al, {sup 29}Si, and {sup 71}Ga magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy. Structural parameters, such as functions of the framework T{single{underscore}bond}O{single{underscore}bond}T{prime} angle, correlate linearly with the determined chemical shift values and provide relationships, as a function of T{prime}, which will facilitate characterization of more complex zeolitic compounds containing such species. The effects of changing a particular neighboring framework cation on the resonance position is controlled by variations in both framework bond angles/distances and electrostatic effects; these contributions are resolved.

  1. NMR Study of Collective Motions and Bending Rigidity in Multilamellar System of Lipid and Surfactant Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struppe, J.; Noack, F.; Klose, G.

    1997-10-01

    The frequency dependence of the longitudinal proton spin relaxation time T1 was measured by field-cycling and standard NMR techniques at different temperatures in the liquid crystalline lamellar phases of bilayer systems, composed of lipids, nonionic surfactants, and lipid-surfactant mixtures. We show by our data analysis, comparing various motional models such as layer undulations (LUs) and relaxation by translational diffusion mediated reorientations (TR), that collective layer undulations with their typical T1~ν behaviour determine the low frequency T1 dispersion in both unoriented and glass plate-oriented bilayer systems. The angular dependence of the T1 dispersion for the oriented bilayer system supports these findings and provides a more critical analysis of the two dimensional self-diffusion than in unoriented samples. The evaluated fitting parameters of the LU model allows, together with the measured second moment of the proton NMR signal for the lipid, calculation of the bending rigidity ϰc for these bilayers at different levels of hydration. The obtained values of ϰc turn out to be too large compared with the literature. However, using recent LU models (B. Halle) which include the obvious couplings between neighbouring bilayers at low Larmor frequencies, the corrected ϰc of the fully hydrated membrane systems are comparable to those obtained from the standard videooptical experiments. Therefore proton spin relaxation measure-ments at low Larmor frequencies with the field-cycling technique are a suitable means to determine the bending rigidity ϰc of model membrane systems at low hydrations and of systems containing surfactants.

  2. An NMR and ab initio quantum chemical study of acid-base equilibria for conformationally constrained acidic alpha-amino acids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P A; Jaroszewski, J W; Norrby, P O; Liljefors, T

    2001-03-01

    The protonation states of a series of piperidinedicarboxylic acids (PDAs), which are conformationally constrained acidic alpha-amino acids, have been studied by (13)C NMR titration in water. The resulting data have been correlated with theoretical results obtained by HF/6-31+G calculations using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for the description of water. The PDAs are highly ionizable and contain one or two possible internal hydrogen bonds. In the present study, we show that the PCM model is able to reproduce the relative stabilities of the different protonation states of the PDAs. Furthermore, our results show that prediction of relative pK(a) values for two different types of ionizable functional groups covering a pK(a) range from 1.6 to 12.1 is possible with a high degree of accuracy.

  3. Conformational studies by 1H-NMR in a nematic solvent: methyl isonicotinate. methyl nicotinate and methyl picolinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Hajime; Inoue, Kaori; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Konaka, Shigehiro

    1999-02-01

    The structures of methyl isonicotinate (MI), methyl nicotinate (MN) and methyl picolinate (MP), i.e., 4-, 3-, and 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid methyl esters, were studied by 1H-NMR at 296 K using nematic liquid-crystal solvent ZLI 1167. Conformational analysis was performed according to the model of Emsley, Luckhurst and Stockley to take account of the correlation between rotation and internal rotation. Only the conformer with a planar skeleton was detected for MI but s- trans and s- cis conformers were found for MN and MP. The relative abundance of the s- trans form was determined to be 64(2) and 68(2)% for MN and MP, respectively, which are in agreement with those determined by gas-phase electron diffraction. The positions of the ring protons of MI in ZLI 1167 agree with those in the gas phase within experimental errors. In the case of MN and MP, however, observed direct coupling constants between the ring protons are in poor agreement with those calculated from the gas-phase structures due to the deformation of the pyridine rings in ZLI 1167.

  4. NMR relaxation study of crosslinked cis-1,4-polybutadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Munie, G.C.; Jonas, J.; Rowland, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    Proton relaxation measurements have been used to investigate the effects of crosslinking on the segmental motion in cis-1,4-polybutadiene samples. The temperature dependence of proton spin-lattice relaxation time T/sub 1/ and spin-spin relaxation time T/sub 2/ at 60 and 24.3 MHz is reported in cis-1,4-polybutadiene (PB) samples with different crosslink density including uncrosslinked PB and samples with 140, 40, and 14 repeat units between crosslinks. In addition, spin-lattice relaxation times in rotating coordinate frame, T/sub 1p/, have also been determined. The relaxation data are interpreted in terms of the effects of crosslinks on segmental chain motions. Because of their sensitivity to low-frequency motion, T/sub 2/ data are of major interest. At temperatures well above the T/sub 1/ minimum the small T/sub 2/ temperature dependence resembles solidlike behavior reflecting the nonzero averaging of dipolar interactions due to anisotropic motion of the chain segments between crosslinks. The magnitude of T/sub 2/ at 60/sup 0/C is found to be proportional to the average mass between crosslinks.

  5. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-08-26

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs.

  6. NMR and EPR Studies of Chloroiron(III) Tetraphenylchlorin and Its Complexes with Imidazoles and Pyridines of Widely Differing Basicities

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Sheng; Shokhireva, Tatjana Kh.; Lichtenberger, Dennis L.; Walker, F. Ann

    2008-01-01

    The NMR and EPR spectra of two bis-imidazole and three bis-pyridine complexes of tetraphenylchlorinatoiron(III), [(TPC)Fe(L)2]+ (L = Im-d4, 2-MeHIm, 4-Me2NPy, Py and 4-CNPy) have been investigated. The full resonance assignments of the [(TPC)Fe(L)2]+ complexes of this study have been made from COSY and NOESY experiments and ADF calculations. Unlike the [(OEC)Fe(L)2]+ complexes reported previously (Cai, S.; Lichtenberger, D. L.; Walker, F. A. Inorg. Chem. 2005, 44, 1890-1903), the NMR data for the [(TPC)Fe(L)2]+ complexes of this study indicate that the ground state is S = ½ for each bis-ligand complex, whereas a higher spin state was present at NMR temperatures for the Py and 4-CNPy complexes of (OEC)Fe(III). The pyrrole-8,17 and pyrroline-H of all [TPCFe(L)2]+ show large magnitude chemical shifts (hence indicating large spin density on the adjacent carbons that are part of the π system), while pyrrole-12,13-CH2 and -7,18-CH2 protons show much smaller chemical shifts, as predicted by the spin densities obtained from ADF calculations. The magnitude of the chemical shifts decreases with decreasing donor ability of the substituted pyridine ligands, with the non-hindered imidazole ligand having slightly larger magnitude chemical shifts than the most basic pyridine, even though its basicity is significantly lower (4-Me2NPyH+ pKa = 9.7, H2Im+ pKa = 6.65 (adjusted for the statistical factor of 2 protons)). The temperature dependence of the chemical shifts of all but the 4-Me2NPy bis-ligand complexes studied over the temperature range of the NMR investigations shows that most of them have mixed (dxy)2(dxz,dyz)3/(dxzdyz)4(dxy)1 electron configurations that cannot be resolved by temperature-dependent fitting of the proton chemical shifts, with a S = 3/2 excited state in each case that in most cases lies at more than kT at room temperature above the ground state. The observed pattern of chemical shifts of the 4-CNPy complex and analysis of the temperature dependence

  7. Two dimensional and zero field NMR studies of coal structure. Progress report, September 1-December 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1986-08-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the last quarter. During the last three months we have concentrated on further developing zero field NMR methods so that they can be applied to coal structure problems. Considerations of the short proton relaxation times for the protons in coals have lead us to redesign the basic zero field NMR setup. Two new implementations are being constructed to allow us to lengthen the proton T/sub 1/'s by using cryogenic temperatures and by excluding molecular oxygen from the samples. In one design being investigated a double action piston is used to permit temperatures as low as 77K. The second design uses a field cycling magnet and will eventually accomodate temperatures as low as 4K. The latter design will also allow us to combine the zerofield experiment with magic angle spinning /sup 13/C spectroscopy in the future. We have also recently added a low temperature MAS capability to our laboratory. Preliminary data on model systems are quite encouraging and indicate that 77K operation should be routine. With this system sealed 5mm NMR tubes can be spun at rates of up to 2200Hz allowing us to evacuate our samples. This feature and the use of low temperatures should allow us to significantly lengthen proton T/sub 1p/'s to obtain better sensitivity and quantitation in coal CP/MAS spectra.

  8. Relativistic mean-field study on proton skins and proton halos in exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhongzhou; Mittig, W.; Sarazin, F.

    1999-06-01

    We investigate the ground state properties of proton-rich nuclei in the framework of the relativistic mean-field model. Calculations show that the experimental proton halo in the nuclei 26,27,28P can be reproduced by the model. The proton halos can appear in proton-rich nuclei because the total nuclear potential is attractive up to the radial distance r ≈ 5.5 fm. But the size of proton halos is finite due to the limitation of the Coulomb potential barrier. The mean-square radius of a halo proton is not very sensitive to the separation energy of the last proton in some very proton-rich nuclei due to the effect of the Coulomb barrier. This behavior is different from the case of a neutron halo where the mean-square radius of a halo neutron is inversely proportional to the separation energy of the last halo neutron. We have also analysed the differences of the relativistic mean-field potentials of 25Al and 26P and found that the isovector potential from the p meson has an important effect on the differences.

  9. How proton pulse characteristics influence protoacoustic determination of proton-beam range: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin C; Seghal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    The unique dose deposition of proton beams generates a distinctive thermoacoustic (protoacoustic) signal, which can be used to calculate the proton range. To identify the expected protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and arrival time for different proton pulse characteristics encountered at hospital-based proton sources, the protoacoustic pressure emissions generated by 150 MeV, pencil-beam proton pulses were simulated in a homogeneous water medium. Proton pulses with Gaussian widths ranging up to 200 μs were considered. The protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and time-of-flight (TOF) range accuracy were assessed. For TOF calculations, the acoustic pulse arrival time was determined based on multiple features of the wave. Based on the simulations, Gaussian proton pulses can be categorized as Dirac-delta-function-like (FWHM < 4 μs) and longer. For the δ-function-like irradiation, the protoacoustic spectrum peaks at 44.5 kHz and the systematic error in determining the Bragg peak range is <2.6 mm. For longer proton pulses, the spectrum shifts to lower frequencies, and the range calculation systematic error increases (⩽ 23 mm for FWHM of 56 μs). By mapping the protoacoustic peak arrival time to range with simulations, the residual error can be reduced. Using a proton pulse with FWHM = 2 μs results in a maximum signal-to-noise ratio per total dose. Simulations predict that a 300 nA, 150 MeV, FWHM = 4 μs Gaussian proton pulse (8.0 × 10(6) protons, 3.1 cGy dose at the Bragg peak) will generate a 146 mPa pressure wave at 5 cm beyond the Bragg peak. There is an angle dependent systematic error in the protoacoustic TOF range calculations. Placing detectors along the proton beam axis and beyond the Bragg peak minimizes this error. For clinical proton beams, protoacoustic detectors should be sensitive to <400 kHz (for -20 dB). Hospital-based synchrocyclotrons and cyclotrons are promising sources of proton pulses for generating clinically measurable protoacoustic

  10. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  11. Study on Solar Energetic proton (SEP) Prediction using Regression Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, KiChang; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young Yun; Kwon, Yongki; Wi, Gwan-sik

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Solar Energetic Proton (SEP) can cause significant effects on electric devices in satellite such as displacement damage and single event effect. It can be dangerous to flight crew/passenger flying high altitude with polar route, and therefore, it is essential that it should be predicted in advance to mitigate radiation exposure risk. However, SEP has been hard to predict, because it is not well-connected solar activities such as solar flare, coronal mass ejection (CME). In this study, we analyzed the variation pattern of proton event from 2000 to 2015, and suggested optimum Gaussian function which can well describe the maximum value of previous event, after then, we finally adopted the regression technique to predict SEP value repetitively. This paper shows that the maximum value and duration of ongoing SEP events can be well predicted, but this model typically has large errors in case of predicting starting point and occurrence of SEP events.

  12. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  13. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  14. The quantitative spectrum of inositol phosphate metabolites in avian erythrocytes, analysed by proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. with direct isomer detection.

    PubMed Central

    Radenberg, T; Scholz, P; Bergmann, G; Mayr, G W

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of inositol phosphate isomers present in avian erythrocytes was investigated in qualitative and quantitative terms. Inositol phosphates were isolated in micromolar quantities from turkey blood by anion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and subjected to proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. analysis. We employed a h.p.l.c. technique with a novel, recently described complexometric post-column detection system, called 'metal-dye detection' [Mayr (1988) Biochem. J. 254, 585-591], which enabled us to identify non-radioactively labelled inositol phosphate isomers and to determine their masses. The results indicate that avian erythrocytes contain the same inositol phosphate isomers as mammalian cells. Denoted by the 'lowest-locant rule' [NC-IUB Recommendations (1988) Biochem. J. 258, 1-2] irrespective of true enantiomerism, these are Ins(1,4)P2, Ins(1,6)P2, Ins(1,3,4)P3, Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, Ins(1,3,4,6)P4, Ins(1,4,5,6)P4, Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5, and InsP6. Furthermore, we identified two inositol trisphosphate isomers hitherto not described for mammalian cells, namely Ins(1,5,6)P3 and Ins(2,4,5)P3. The possible position of these two isomers in inositol phosphate metabolism and implications resulting from absolute abundances of inositol phosphates are discussed. PMID:2604720

  15. Cyclometalated complexes of ruthenium. 3. Spectral, electrochemical, and two-dimensional proton NMR of (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(cyclometalating ligand))/sup +/

    SciTech Connect

    Reveco, P.; Cherry, W.R.; Medley, J.; Garber, A.; Gale, R.J.; Selbin, J.

    1986-05-21

    Cyclometalated complexes of ruthenium(II), (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(L))/sup +/, where L = 2-(3-nitrophenyl)pyridine, phenylpyridine, benzo(h)quinoline, azobenzene, and p-(dimethylamino)azobenzene, have been prepared and characterized by two-dimensional proton NMR (HDCOSY) spectra and by cyclic voltammetry. Excited-state behavior of the complexes of the first three listed ligands has been investigated by absorption and emission spectroscopy and the photochemical stability of these species monitored. A substantial decrease is found in oxidation potential (the oxidations are metal-centered, with the electron coming from a t/sub 2/ orbital) in going from a dication (e.g. (Ru(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/) containing bidentate nitrogen donors only to our monocation containing a cyclometalated anion. This decrease undoubtedly results from both the ion charge decrease and the replacement of a sigma-donor/..pi..-acceptor nitrogen by a much stronger sigma-donor carbanion. The one-electron reduction of (Ru(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/ results in (Ru(bpy)/sub 2/(bpy/sup -/))/sup +/. Absorption bands of our new species found in the visible region (450-550 nm) are assigned as metal-to-ligand transitions (MLCT), the lower energy one associated with the bpy ligand and the higher energy one associated with the carbon-bonded anion. All three complexes emit in a glass at 77 K. Temperature dependence of the emission intensities and lifetimes is discussed as is evidence for photoanation or very rapid nonradiative decay for different species.

  16. Synthesis and 1H and 13C NMR spectral study of some r(2),c(4)-bis(isopropylcarbonyl)-c(5)-hydroxy-t(5)-methyl-t(3)-substituted phenyl, cyclohexanones and their oximes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachander, R.; Sameera, S. A.; Mohan, R. T. Sabapathy

    2016-07-01

    All the synthesized compounds have been characterized by 1H, 13C, 2D NMR and mass spectral studies. The spectral data suggest that compounds 2, 3, 5 and 6 exist in chair conformation with axial orientation of the hydroxyl group and equatorial orientations of all the other substituent. Long-range coupling is observed between OH proton to H-6a proton should be in a W arrangement. Compounds 1 and 4 diamagnetic anisotropic effect of the furyl group is not pronounced and absence of long-rang coupling between OH proton to H-6a proton. The oximation effects were discussed to all synthesized compounds using 1H and 13C chemical shifts.

  17. NMR study of chloride ion interactions with thylakoid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Baianu, I. C.; Critchley, C.; Govindjee; Gutowsky, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    The role of Cl- in photosynthetic O2 evolution has been investigated by observing the 35Cl NMR linewidth under a variety of conditions in aqueous suspensions of chloroplasts, primarily for the halophytes Avicennia germinans, Avicennia marina, and Aster tripolium but also for spinach. The line broadening shows there is weak, ionic binding of Cl- to thylakoids, the bound Cl- exchanging rapidly (>>104 sec-1) with free Cl- in solution. The binding is necessary for O2 evolution to occur. Michaelis-Menten constants obtained from the Cl- dependence of the O2 evolution rate are ≈15-70 mM for the halophytes compared with 0.6 mM for spinach (0.5 mM with Br-). There appear to be two types of Cl- binding sites in halophytes, of which the stronger is the activator, at lower [Cl-], of O2 evolution. The 35Cl line broadening includes a nonspecific interaction, which becomes apparent at high Cl- concentrations (≥0.5 M). PMID:16593474

  18. NMR studies of molecular structure in fruit cuticle polyesters.

    PubMed

    Fang, X; Qiu, F; Yan, B; Wang, H; Mort, A J; Stark, R E

    2001-07-01

    The cuticle of higher plants functions primarily as a protective barrier for the leaves and fruits, controlling microbial attack as well as the diffusion of water and chemicals from the outside environment. Its major chemical constituents are waxes (for waterproofing) and cutin (a structural support polymer). However, the insolubility of cutin has hampered investigations of its covalent structure and domain architecture, which are viewed as essential for the design of crop protection strategies and the development of improved synthetic waterproofing materials. Recently developed strategies designed to meet these investigative challenges include partial depolymerization using enzymatic or chemical reagents and spectroscopic examination of the intact polyesters in a solvent-swelled form. The soluble oligomers from degradative treatments of lime fruit cutin are composed primarily of the expected 10,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic and 16-hydroxy-10-oxo-hexadecanoic acids; low-temperature HF treatments also reveal sugar units that are covalently attached to the hydroxyfatty acids. Parallel investigations of solvent-swollen cutin using 2D NMR spectroscopy assisted by magic-angle spinning yield well-resolved spectra that permit detailed comparisons to be made among chemical moieties present in the intact biopolymer, the soluble degradation products, and the unreacted solid residue. PMID:11423150

  19. NMR studies in chemistry. I. Organometallic tin and geramanium compounds. II. The sorbitol pathway in intact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized in the study of two very different chemical problems. The bonding and structure of various cyclopropyl derivatives of tin and germanium has been investigated by means of Sn-119, Ge-73, C-13, and H-1 NMR spectroscopy. Intact rabbit lenses have also been studied using NMR spectroscopy with regard to diabetic cataract formation. C-13 and P-31 NMR spectroscopies have been utilized in the study of the sorbitol pathway and aldose reductase inhibition.

  20. (1) H NMR analysis of O-methyl-inositol isomers: a joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Mauro V; Couri, Mara Rubia C; De Assis, João Vitor; Anconi, Cleber P A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; De Almeida, Wagner B

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (1) H NMR chemical shifts for l-quebrachitol isomers were performed using the B3LYP functional employing the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(2d,p) basis sets. The effect of the solvent on the B3LYP-calculated NMR spectrum was accounted for using the polarizable continuum model. Comparison is made with experimental (1) H NMR spectroscopic data, which shed light on the average uncertainty present in DFT calculations of chemical shifts and showed that the best match between experimental and theoretical B3LYP (1) H NMR profiles is a good strategy to assign the molecular structure present in the sample handled in the experimental measurements. Among four plausible O-methyl-inositol isomers, the l-quebrachitol 2a structure was unambiguously assigned based only on the comparative analysis of experimental and theoretical (1) H NMR chemical shift data. The B3LYP infrared (IR) spectrum was also calculated for the four isomers and compared with the experimental data, with analysis of the theoretical IR profiles corroborating assignment of the 2a structure. Therefore, it is confirmed in this study that a combined experimental/DFT spectroscopic investigation is a powerful tool in structural/conformational analysis studies. PMID:22865668

  1. A Solid-State NMR Study of Selenium Substitution into Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Kuras, Marzena; Oledzka, Ewa; Sobczak, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The substitution of selenium oxyanions in the hydroxyapatite structure was examined using multinuclear solid-state resonance spectroscopy (ssNMR). The study was supported by powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) and wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF). Samples of pure hydroxyapatite (HA300) and selenate (HA300-1.2SeO4) or selenite (HA300-1.2SeO3) substituted hydroxyapatites were synthesized using the standard wet method and heated at 300 °C to remove loosely bonded water. PXRD data showed that all samples are single-phase, nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite. The incorporation of selenite and selenate ions affected the lattice constants. In selenium-containing samples the concentration of Se was very similar and amounted to 9.55% and 9.64%, for HA300-1.2SeO4 and HA300-1.2SeO3, respectively. PXRD and ssNMR data showed that the selenite doping significantly decreases the crystallite size and crystallinity degree. 31P and 1H NMR experiments demonstrated the developed surface hydrated layer in all samples, especially in HA300-1.2SeO3. 1H NMR studies showed the dehydroxylation of HA during the selenium oxyanions substitution and the existence of hydrogen bonding in structural hydroxyl group channels. 1H→77Se cross polarization NMR experiments indicated that selenites and selenates are located in the crystal lattice and on the crystal surface. PMID:25997001

  2. (1) H NMR analysis of O-methyl-inositol isomers: a joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Mauro V; Couri, Mara Rubia C; De Assis, João Vitor; Anconi, Cleber P A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; De Almeida, Wagner B

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of (1) H NMR chemical shifts for l-quebrachitol isomers were performed using the B3LYP functional employing the 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311 + G(2d,p) basis sets. The effect of the solvent on the B3LYP-calculated NMR spectrum was accounted for using the polarizable continuum model. Comparison is made with experimental (1) H NMR spectroscopic data, which shed light on the average uncertainty present in DFT calculations of chemical shifts and showed that the best match between experimental and theoretical B3LYP (1) H NMR profiles is a good strategy to assign the molecular structure present in the sample handled in the experimental measurements. Among four plausible O-methyl-inositol isomers, the l-quebrachitol 2a structure was unambiguously assigned based only on the comparative analysis of experimental and theoretical (1) H NMR chemical shift data. The B3LYP infrared (IR) spectrum was also calculated for the four isomers and compared with the experimental data, with analysis of the theoretical IR profiles corroborating assignment of the 2a structure. Therefore, it is confirmed in this study that a combined experimental/DFT spectroscopic investigation is a powerful tool in structural/conformational analysis studies.

  3. The Study of Solar Energetic Protons Associated with EUV Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhye; Innes, Davina; Bucik, Radoslav; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kahler, Stephen W.

    2014-06-01

    We studied the relationship between solar energetic protons (SEPs) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave properties between 2010 August and 2013 May observed by STEREO, SOHO and SDO. We determined the onset times, peak times and peak fluxes of the SEPs in SOHO ERNE and STEREO LET proton channel (6 - 10 MeV). Full Sun heliographic images created by combining STB 195Å, SDO 193Å, and STA 195Å were used for the analysis of the EUV waves. EUV wave arrival times at the spacecraft connecting points and their speed on the low corona were determined by space-time plots. It is noted that there is a significant correlation between the EUV wave arrival times and SEP onset times (r=0.73) but no SEP peak times. SEP peak fluxes increase with EUV wave speed (r=0.69) and the power law spectral index become harder with the EUV wave speed. This suggests that energetic protons are strongly associated with EUV waves, which is considered as the signature of CME shock in the low corona.

  4. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  5. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Kawachi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-07-01

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  6. Practical applications of hydrostatic pressure to refold proteins from inclusion bodies for NMR structural studies.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Kenji; Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Saio, Tomohide; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Torikai, Shinnosuke; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the hydrostatic pressure refolding method was reported as a practical tool for solubilizing and refolding proteins from inclusion bodies; however, there have been only a few applications for protein structural studies. Here, we report the successful applications of the hydrostatic pressure refolding method to refold proteins, including the MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger, the p62 PB1 domain, the GCN2 RWD domain, and the mTOR FRB domain. Moreover, the absence of aggregation and the correct folding of solubilized protein samples were evaluated with size exclusion chromatography and NMR experiments. The analyses of NMR spectra for MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger and GCN2 RWD further led to the determination of tertiary structures, which are consistent with those from soluble fractions. Overall, our results indicate that the hydrostatic pressure method is effective for preparing samples for NMR structural studies.

  7. Expression and Purification of Src-family Kinases for Solution NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Piserchio, Andrea; Cowburn, David; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2012-01-01

    Summary NMR analyses of the structure, dynamics and interactions of the Src family kinases (SFKs) have been hindered by the limited ability to obtain sufficient amounts of properly folded, soluble protein from bacterial expression systems, to allow these studies to be performed in an economically viable manner. In this chapter we detail our attempts to overcome these difficulties using the catalytic domain (SrcCD) of c-Src, the prototypical SFK, as an illustrative example. We describe in detail two general methods to express and purify SrcCD from E. coli expression systems in both fully active wild-type and kinase-deficient mutant forms, allowing the efficient and cost-effective labeling by NMR-active isotopes for solution NMR studies. PMID:22167671

  8. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices.

    PubMed

    Herbers, C R; Sauer, D; Vogel, M

    2012-03-28

    We use (2)H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids. PMID:22462878

  9. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbers, C. R.; Sauer, D.; Vogel, M.

    2012-03-01

    We use 2H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids.

  10. Synthesis and Protonation Studies of Molybdenum(0) Bis(dinitrogen) Complexes Supported by Diphosphine Ligands Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Labios, Liezel AN; Weiss, Charles J.; Egbert, Jonathan D.; Lense, Sheri J.; Bullock, R. Morris; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Mock, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    A series of molybdenum bis(dinitrogen) complexes of the formula trans-Mo(N2)2(PEtNRPEt)2 (PEtNRPEt = Et2PCH2N(R)CH2Et2; R = phenyl (1), 2,6-difluorobenzyl (2), 3,5-difluorobenzyl (3), CH2CH2NMe2 (4), CH2-o-Py (5)) have been synthesized and characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. Protonation studies with stoichiometric amounts of triflic acid (HOTf) were performed and the the protonated products were characterized by NMR and in situ IR spectroscopic methods. Protonolysis experiments with excess triflic acid were conducted to test for the formation of ammonia from reduction of the dinitrogen ligands. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. S.L. was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  11. Influence of the colloidal structure of dairy gels on milk fat fusion behavior: quantification of the liquid fat content by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR).

    PubMed

    Bouteille, Romain; Perez, Jeanne; Khifer, Farid; Jouan-Rimbaud-Bouveresse, Delphine; Lecanu, Bruno; This, Hervé

    2013-04-01

    Dairy gels (DG), such as yoghurts, contain both solid and liquid fats at the time of consumption, as their temperature rises to anything between 10 and 24 °C after being introduced into the mouth at 4 °C. The mass ratio between solid and liquid fats, which depends on the temperature, impacts the organoleptic properties of DG. As the ordinary methods for determining this ratio can only be applied to samples consisting mainly in fat materials, a fat extraction step needs to be added into the analytical process when applied to DG, which prevents the study of the potential impact of their colloidal structure on milk fat fusion behavior. In situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR) was investigated as a method for direct measurements in DG: at temperatures between 20.0 and 70.0 °C, the liquid fat content and the composition of triacylglycerols of the liquid phase (in terms of alkyl chains length) were determined. Spectra of isolated milk fat also enable the quantification of the double bonds of triacylglycerols. Statistical tests showed no significant difference between isolated milk fat and milk fat inside a DG in terms of melting behavior: the fat globule membrane does not seem to have a significant influence on the fat melting behavior.

  12. Influence of the colloidal structure of dairy gels on milk fat fusion behavior: quantification of the liquid fat content by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR).

    PubMed

    Bouteille, Romain; Perez, Jeanne; Khifer, Farid; Jouan-Rimbaud-Bouveresse, Delphine; Lecanu, Bruno; This, Hervé

    2013-04-01

    Dairy gels (DG), such as yoghurts, contain both solid and liquid fats at the time of consumption, as their temperature rises to anything between 10 and 24 °C after being introduced into the mouth at 4 °C. The mass ratio between solid and liquid fats, which depends on the temperature, impacts the organoleptic properties of DG. As the ordinary methods for determining this ratio can only be applied to samples consisting mainly in fat materials, a fat extraction step needs to be added into the analytical process when applied to DG, which prevents the study of the potential impact of their colloidal structure on milk fat fusion behavior. In situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (isq (1) H NMR) was investigated as a method for direct measurements in DG: at temperatures between 20.0 and 70.0 °C, the liquid fat content and the composition of triacylglycerols of the liquid phase (in terms of alkyl chains length) were determined. Spectra of isolated milk fat also enable the quantification of the double bonds of triacylglycerols. Statistical tests showed no significant difference between isolated milk fat and milk fat inside a DG in terms of melting behavior: the fat globule membrane does not seem to have a significant influence on the fat melting behavior. PMID:23464867

  13. NMR studies on the chemical alteration of soil organic matter precursors during controlled charring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    Beside the production of volatiles, vegetation fire transforms various amounts of labile organic components into recalcitrant dark colored and highly aromatic structures. They are incorporated into soils and are assumed to represent an important sink within the global carbon cycle. In order to elucidate the real importance of PyOM as a C-sink, a good understanding of its chemistry is crucial. Although several 'Black Carbon' (BC) models are reported, a commonly accepted view of the chemistry involved in its formation is still missing. Its biogeochemical recalcitrance is commonly associated with a highly condensed aromatic structure. However, recent studies indicated that this view may be oversimplified for PyOM derived from vegetation fire. In order to bring some more light on the structural properties of PyOM produced during vegetation fire, charred plant residues and model chars derived from typical plant macromolecules (casein, cellulose, lignin and condensed tannins) were subjected to controlled charring under oxic conditions (350°C and 450°C) and then characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Subsequently, the chemical features of the PyOM were related to its chemical recalcitrance as determined by chemical oxidation with acid potassium dichromate. Charring cellulose (350°C, 8 min) yielded in a low C-recovery (11%). Treating casein in the same way resulted in a survival of 62% of its C and 46% of its N. Comparable high C-recoveries are reported for lignin. After charring Lolium perenne, 34% of its N and C were recovered. NMR-spectroscopic studies revealed that for this sample most of the charred N and C occurred in pyrrole-type structures. Our studies further indicate that the aromatic skeleton of char accumulating after a vegetation fire must contain remains of the lignin backbone and considerable contributions of furans and anhydrosugars from thermally altered cellulose. Enhancing the temperature during the

  14. NMR-BASED METABOLOMIC STUDIES OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION IN SMALL FISH MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics is now being widely used to obtain complementary information to genomic and proteomic studies. Among the various approaches used in metabolomics, NMR spectroscopy is particularly powerful, in part because it is relatively non-selective, and is amenable to the study o...

  15. Magic-angle spinning NMR studies of molecular organization in multibilayers formed by 1-octadecanoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine.

    PubMed Central

    Halladay, H N; Stark, R E; Ali, S; Bittman, R

    1990-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been employed to study 50%-by-weight aqueous dispersions of 1-octadecanoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C[18]:C[10]PC) and 1-octadecanoyl-2-d19-decanoyl-PC (C[18]:C[10]PC-d19), mixed-chain phospholipids which can form interdigitated multibilayers. The 1H NMR linewidth for methyl protons of the choline headgroup has been used to monitor the liquid crystalline-to-gel (LC-to-G) phase transition and confirm variations between freezing and melting temperatures. Both 1H and 13C spin-lattice relaxation times indicate unusual restrictions on segmental reorientation at megahertz frequencies for C(18):C(10)PC as compared with symmetric-chain species in the LC state; nevertheless each chemical moiety of the mixed-chain phospholipid exhibits motional behavior that may be classified as liquidlike. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy (NOESY) on C(18):C(10)PC and C(18):C(10)PC-d19 reveals cross-peaks between the omega-methyl protons of the C18 chain and the N-methyl protons of the phosphocholine headgroup, and several experimental and theoretical considerations argue against an interpretation based on spin diffusion. Using NMR relaxation times and NOESY connectivities along with a computational formalism for four-spin systems (Keepers, J. W., and T. L. James. 1984. J. Magn. Reson. 57:404-426), an estimate of 3.5 A is obtained for the average distance between the omega-methyl protons of the C18 chain and the N-methyl protons of the phosphocholine headgroup. This finding is consistent with a degree of interdigitation similar to that proposed for organized assemblies of gel-state phosphatidylcholine molecules with widely disparate acyl-chain lengths (Hui, S. W., and C.-H. Huang. 1986. Biochemistry. 25:1330-1335); however, acyl-chain bendback or other intermolecular interactions may also contribute to the NOESY results. For multibilayers of C(18):C(10)PC in the gel phase, 13C chemical

  16. TC and H NMR studies of PQQ and selected derivatives. [Pyrroloquinoline quinone

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    The ortho-quinone structure of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is famous for its reactivity with nucleophilic species of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen(Duine et. al. 1987). In fact, the crystal structure of PQQ was solved in the form of the C-5 acetone adduct(Salisbury et. al 1979). The propensity of the ortho-quinone to accept nucleophiles is the chemical basis of the function of PQQ at enzyme active sites. The present study focuses on the NMR of PQQ and various derivatives formed with oxygen and nitrogen nucleophiles. Our goals are to assign the H, TC, and VN NMR spectra and to rigorously confirm the structures of the adducts. Once the NMR data of the relevant adducts are well defined, we will use TC and VN labeled substrates to probe the active sites of PQQ containing enzymes. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  18. NMR and Infrared Study of Thermal Oxidation of cis-1, 4-Polybutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gemmer, Robert V.; Golub, Morton A.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the microstructural changes occuring in CB during thermal, uncatalyzed oxidation was carried out. Although the oxidation of CB is accompanied by extensive crosslinking with attendant insolubilization, it was found possible to follow the oxidation of solid CB directly with C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The predominant products appearing in the C-13 NMR spectra of oxidized CB are epoxides. The presence of lesser amounts of alcohols, peroxides, and carbonyl structures was adduced from complementary infrared and NMR spectra of soluble extracts obtained from the oxidized, crosslinked CB. This distribution of functional groups contrasts with that previously reported for the autooxidation of 1,4-polyisoprene. The difference was rationalized in terms of the relative stabilities of intermediate radical species involved in the autoxidation of CB and 1,4-polyisoprene.

  19. NMR and dielectric studies of hydrated collagen and elastin: Evidence for a delocalized secondary relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusceac, Sorin A.; Rosenstihl, Markus; Vogel, Michael; Gainaru, Catalin; Fillmer, Ariane; Böhmer, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Using a combination of dielectric spectroscopy and solid-state deuteron NMR, the hydration water dynamics of connective tissue proteins is studied at sub-ambient temperatures. In this range, the water dynamics follows an Arrhenius law. A scaling analysis of dielectric losses, 'two-phase' NMR spectra, and spin-lattice relaxation times consistently yield evidence for a Gaussian distribution of energy barriers. With the dielectric data as input, random-walk simulations of a large-angle, quasi-isotropic water reorientation provide an approximate description of stimulated-echo data on hydrated elastin. This secondary process takes place in an essentially rigid energy landscape, but in contrast to typical {\\beta}-relaxations it is quasi-isotropic and delocalized. The delocalization is inferred from previous NMR diffusometry experiments. To emphasize the distinction from conventional {\\beta}-processes, for aqueous systems such a matrix-decoupled relaxation was termed a {\

  20. Organic solute changes with acidification in Lake Skjervatjern as shown by 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; Hayes, T.

    1994-01-01

    1H-NMR spectroscopy has been found to be a useful tool to establish possible real differences and trends between all natural organic solute fractions (fulvic acids, humic acids, and XAD-4 acids) after acid-rain additions to the Lake Skjervatjern watershed. The proton NMR technique used in this study determined the spectral distribution of nonexchangeable protons among four peaks (aliphatic protons; aliphatic protons on carbon ?? or attached to electronegative groups; protons on carbons attached to O or N heteroatoms; and aromatic protons). Differences of 10% or more in the respective peak areas were considered to represent a real difference. After one year of acidification, fulvic acids decreased 13% (relative) in Peak 3 protons on carbon attached to N and O heteratoms and exhibited a decrease in aromatic protons between 27% and 31%. Humic acids also exhibited an 11% relative decrease in aromatic protons as a result of acidification. After one year of acidification, real changes were shown in three of the four proton assignments in XAD-4 acids. Peak 1 aliphatic protons increased by 14% (relative), Peak 3 protons on carbons attached to O and N heteroatoms decreased by 13% (relative), and aromatic protons (Peak 4) decreased by 35% (relative). Upon acidification, there was a trend in all solutes for aromatic protons to decrease and aliphatic protons to increase. The natural variation in organic solutes as shown in the Control Side B of the lake from 1990 to 1991 is perhaps a small limitation to the same data interpretations of acid rain changes at the Lake Skjervatjern site, but the proton NMR technique shows great promise as an independent scientific tool to detect and support other chemical techniques in establishing organic solute changes with different treatments (i.e., additions of acid rain).

  1. Solid-state NMR studies of biomineralization peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Roehrich, Adrienne; Drobny, Gary

    2013-09-17

    unanswered. This is largely due to a lack of methods capable of providing high-resolution structural information for proteins adsorbed to material surfaces under physiologically relevant conditions. In this Account, we highlight recent work that is providing insight into the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of a salivary protein model system, as well as the structure and interactions of a peptide that catalyzes the formation of biosilica composites. To develop a better understanding of the structure and interactions of proteins in biomaterials, we have used solid-state NMR techniques to determine the molecular structure and dynamics of proteins and peptides adsorbed onto inorganic crystal surfaces and embedded within biomineral composites. This work adds to the understanding of the structure and crystal recognition mechanisms of an acidic human salivary phosphoprotein, statherin.

  2. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, K C; Witztum, A; Sehgal, C M; Avery, S

    2014-11-01

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ~1 mm.

  3. Electron Capture Dissociation Studies of the Fragmentation Patterns of Doubly Protonated and Mixed Protonated-Sodiated Peptoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Bogdan; Zhao, Xiaoning; Robinson, David B.; Ren, Jianhua

    2014-07-01

    The fragmentation patterns of a group of doubly protonated ([P + 2H]2+) and mixed protonated-sodiated ([P + H + Na]2+) peptide-mimicking oligomers, known as peptoids, have been studied using electron capturing dissociation (ECD) tandem mass spectrometry techniques. For all the peptoids studied, the primary backbone fragmentation occurred at the N-Cα bonds. The N-terminal fragment ions, the C-ions (protonated) and the C'-ions (sodiated) were observed universally for all the peptoids regardless of the types of charge carrier. The C-terminal ions varied depending on the type of charge carrier. The doubly protonated peptoids with at least one basic residue located at a position other than the N-terminus fragmented by producing the Z•-series of ions. In addition, most doubly protonated peptoids also produced the Y-series of ions with notable abundances. The mixed protonated-sodiated peptoids fragmented by yielding the Z•'-series of ions in addition to the C'-series. Chelation between the sodium cation and the amide groups of the peptoid chain might be an important factor that could stabilize both the N-terminal and the C-terminal fragment ions. Regardless of the types of the charge carrier, one notable fragmentation for all the peptoids was the elimination of a benzylic radical from the odd-electron positive ions of the protonated peptoids ([P + 2H]•+) and the sodiated peptoids ([P + H + Na]•+). The study showed potential utility of using the ECD technique for sequencing of peptoid libraries generated by combinatorial chemistry.

  4. Variable temperature NMR studies on the conformations of tonalensin in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Alfredo; Maldonado, Emma; Díaz, Eduardo; Reynolds, William F.

    1998-05-01

    NMR studies on tonalensin 1, a diterpene containing a ten membered ring, made evident the presence of three conformational isomers in solution. At room temperature compound 1 exists as a mixture of the conformers 1A and 1B in a ratio 1:1 in a CDC1 3 solution and 1.5:1 in a Me 2CO-d 6/DMSO-d 6 solution. At lower temperatures a third conformer, 1C, was detected. It was responsible for the line broadening observed for 1A. Temperature dependent 2D NMR experiments have been employed to elucidate the automerization of compound 1.

  5. Direct Comparison of (19)F qNMR and (1)H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin; He, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR ((1)H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR ((19)F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both (19)F and (1)H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that (19)F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to (1)H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from (19)F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. (19)F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  6. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  7. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes.

  8. NMR studies of differences in the conformations and dynamics of ligand complexes formed with mutant dihydrofolate reductases

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, B.; Andrews, J.; Ostler, G.; Tendler, S.J.B.; Feeney, J.; Roberts, G.C.K.; Davies, R.W.; Cheung, H.T.A. )

    1989-02-07

    Two mutants of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase, Trp 21 {yields} Leu and Asp 26 {yields} Glu, have been prepared by using site-directed mutagenesis methods, and their ligand binding and structural properties have been compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 31}P NMR studies have been carried out to characterize the structural changes in the complexes of the mutant and wild-type enzymes. Replacement of the conserved Trp 21 by a Leu residue causes a decrease in activity of the enzyme and reduces the NADPH binding constant by a factor of 400. The binding of substrates and substrate analogues is only slightly affected. {sup 1}H NMR studies of the Trp 21 {yields} Leu enzyme complexes have confirmed the original resonance assignments for Trp 21. In complexes formed with methotrexate and the mutant enzyme, the results indicate some small changes in conformation occurring as much as 14 {angstrom} away from the site of substitution. For the enzyme-NADPH complexes, the chemical shifts of nuclei in the bound coenzyme indicate that the nicotinamide ring binds differently in complexes with the mutant and the wild-type enzyme. There are complexes where the wild-type enzyme has been shown to exist in solution as a mixture of conformations, and studies on the corresponding complexes with the Trp 21 {yields} Leu mutant indicate that the delicately poised equilibria can be perturbed. Some conformational adjustments are required to allow the carboxylate of Glu 26 to bind effectively to the N1 proton of inhibitors such as methotrexate and trimethoprim.

  9. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  10. An NMR study of the coexistence of nematic and "induced" smectic phases in mixtures of nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, P.; Wasser, H. R.; Gowda, G. A. Nagana; Suryaprakash, N.; Khetrapal, C. L.

    1989-07-01

    Deuteron NMR studies of mixtures of nematic liquid crystals such as N-( p-ethoxybenzylidene)- p-n-butylaniline and trans-4-pentyl-4-(4-cyanophenyl)cyclohexane and the molecules dissolved therein show the coexistence of up to three different spectra at certain concentrations and temperatures. This is attributed to the coexistence of nematic and "induced" smectic phases.

  11. Genetic analysis of 16 NMR-lipoprotein fractions in humans, the GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy lipoprotein measurements of more than 1,000 subjects of GOLDN study, at fasting and at 3.5 and 6 h after a postprandial fat (PPL) challenge at visits 2 and 4, before and after a 3 weeks Fenofibrate (FF) treatment, were included in 6 time-independ...

  12. Synthetic, Infrared And Nmr (1H And 13C) Spectral Studies Of N-(Substituted Phenyl)-Methanesulphonamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalakshmi, K. L.; Gowda, B. Thimme

    2004-08-01

    Twenty two N-(substituted phenyl)-methanesulphonamides of the general formula, CH3SO2NHR, where R = 4-XC6H4(X = H, CH3, F, Cl, Br or NO2), i-XC6H4(X=CH3, Cl orNO2 and i=2 or 3) and i, j-X2C6H3(i, j-X2 = 2,3-(CH3)2, 2,4-(CH3)2, 2,5-(CH3)2, 2,6-(CH3)2, 3,5-(CH3)2, 2,3-Cl2, 2,4- Cl2, 2,5-Cl2, 2,6-Cl2 or 3,4-Cl2) were prepared, characterized and their infrared spectra in the solid state and the NMR (1H and 13C) spectra in solution studied. The N-H stretching vibrations absorb in the range, 3298 - 3232 cm-1. Asymmetric and symmetric SO2 stretching vibrations appear as strong absorptions in the ranges, 1331 - 1317 cm-1 and 1157 - 1139 cm-1, respectively. The sulphonamides exhibit S-N stretching vibrations in the range, 926 - 833 cm-1. The effect of substitution in the phenyl ring in terms of electron withdrawing and electron donating groups is non-systematic. The 1H and 13C chemical shifts of N-(substituted phenyl)-methanesulphonamides are assigned to various protons and carbons of the compounds. Further, incremental shifts of the ring protons and carbons due to CH3SO2- and CH3SO2NH- groups in the N-(phenyl)-methanesulphonamide are computed and used to calculate the 1H and 13C chemical shifts of various protons and carbons of N-(substituted phenyl)-methanesulphonamides, by adding substituent contributions to the corresponding aromatic proton or carbon chemical shifts of either aniline, substituted anilines, benzene or substituted benzenes, in different ways, as per the principle of substituent addition. The computed values by different procedures agree well with each other and with the experimental chemical shifts. The correlation of these incremental shifts with the Hammett substituent parameters is poor.

  13. NMR and rotational angles in solution conformation of polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystrov, V. F.

    1985-01-01

    Professor San-Ichiro Mizushima and Professor Yonezo Morino's classical contributions provided unique means and firm basis for understanding of conformational states and internal rotation in polypeptide molecules. Now the NMR spectroscopy is the best choice to study molecular conformation, mechanism of action and structure-functional relationships of peptide and proteins in solution under conditions approaching those of their physiological environments. Crucial details of spatial structure and interactions of these molecules in solution are revealed by using proton-proton and carbon-proton vicinal coupling constants, proton nuclear Overhauser effect and spectral perturbation techniques. The results of NMR conformational analysis are presented for valinomycin "bracelet", gramicidin A double helices, honey-bee neurotoxin apamin, scorpion insectotoxins and snake neurotoxins of long and short types.

  14. Saturation transfer difference NMR studies on substrates and inhibitors of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, Martin Rothacker, Boris; Ilg, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments on Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH, EC1.2.1.24) suggest that only the aldehyde forms and not the gem-diol forms of the specific substrate succinic semialdehyde (SSA), of selected aldehyde substrates, and of the inhibitor 3-tolualdehyde bind to these enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis of the active site cysteine311 to alanine in D. melanogaster SSADH leads to an inactive product binding both SSA aldehyde and gem-diol. Thus, the residue cysteine311 is crucial for their discrimination. STD experiments on SSADH and NAD{sup +}/NADP{sup +} indicate differential affinity in agreement with the respective cosubstrate properties. Epitope mapping by STD points to a strong interaction of the NAD{sup +}/NADP{sup +} adenine H2 proton with SSADH. Adenine H8, nicotinamide H2, H4, and H6 also show STD signals. Saturation transfer to the ribose moieties is limited to the anomeric protons of E. coli SSADH suggesting that the NAD{sup +}/NADP{sup +} adenine and nicotinamide, but not the ribose moieties are important for the binding of the coenzymes.

  15. Carbon-13 NMR of glycogen: Hydration response studied by using solids methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, C.L.; Bryant, R.G. )

    1989-06-13

    The carbon-13 NMR spectra of glycogen are reported by using the methods of magic-angle sample spinning and high-power proton decoupling to provide a dynamic report on the glucose monomer behavior as a function of hydration. Although the glycogen behaves as a typical polymer in the dry state, addition of water makes a significant difference in the spectral appearance. Water addition decreases the carbon spin-lattice relaxation times by 2 orders of magnitude over the range from 7% to 70% water by weight. The proton-carbon dipole-dipole coupling, which broadens the carbon spectrum and permits cross-polarization spectroscopy, is lost with increasing hydration over this range. By 60% water by weight, scalar decoupling methods are sufficient to achieve a reasonably high-resolution spectrum. Further, at this concentration, the carbon spin-lattice relaxation times are near their minimum values at a resonance frequency of 50.3 MHz, making acquisition of carbon spectra relatively insensitive to intensity distortions associated with saturation effects. Though motional averaging places the spectrum in the solution phase limit, the static spectrum shows a residual broader component that would not necessarily be detected readily by using high-resolution liquid-state experiments.

  16. Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Li Tianfang; Liang Zhengrong; Singanallur, Jayalakshmi V.; Satogata, Todd J.; Williams, David C.; Schulte, Reinhard W.

    2006-03-15

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) has been explored in the past decades because of its unique imaging characteristics, low radiation dose, and its possible use for treatment planning and on-line target localization in proton therapy. However, reconstruction of pCT images is challenging because the proton path within the object to be imaged is statistically affected by multiple Coulomb scattering. In this paper, we employ GEANT4-based Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional pCT reconstruction of an elliptical phantom to investigate the possible use of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) with three different path-estimation methods for pCT reconstruction. The first method assumes a straight-line path (SLP) connecting the proton entry and exit positions, the second method adapts the most-likely path (MLP) theoretically determined for a uniform medium, and the third method employs a cubic spline path (CSP). The ART reconstructions showed progressive improvement of spatial resolution when going from the SLP [2 line pairs (lp) cm{sup -1}] to the curved CSP and MLP path estimates (5 lp cm{sup -1}). The MLP-based ART algorithm had the fastest convergence and smallest residual error of all three estimates. This work demonstrates the advantage of tracking curved proton paths in conjunction with the ART algorithm and curved path estimates.

  17. A Method for Solution NMR Structural Studies of Large Integral Membrane Proteins: Reverse Micelle Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Kielec, Joseph M.; Valentine, Kathleen G.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2009-01-01

    The structural study of membrane proteins perhaps represents one of the greatest challenges of the post-genomic era. While membrane proteins comprise over 50% of current and potential drug targets, their structural characterization lags far behind that of soluble proteins. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) offers great potential not only with respect to structural characterization of integral membrane proteins but may also provide the ability to study the details of small ligand interactions. However, the size limitations of solution NMR have restricted comprehensive structural characterization of membrane protein NMR structures to the relatively small β-barrel proteins or helical proteins of relatively simple topology. In an effort to escape the barriers presented by slow molecular reorientation of large integral membrane proteins solubilized by detergent micelles in water, we have adapted the reverse micelle encapsulation strategy originally developed for the study of large soluble proteins by solution NMR methods. Here we review a novel approach to the solubilization of large integral membrane proteins in reverse micelle surfactants dissolved in low viscosity alkane solvents. The procedure is illustrated with a 54 kDa construct of the homotetrameric KcsA potassium channel. PMID:19665988

  18. Resolution and measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings of a noncrystalline protein immobilized in a biological supramolecular assembly by proton-detected MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Ho; Yang, Chen; Opella, Stanley J.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional 15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift and three-dimensional 1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift MAS solid-state NMR correlation spectra of the filamentous bacteriophage Pf1 major coat protein show single-site resolution in noncrystalline, intact-phage preparations. The high sensitivity and resolution result from 1H detection at 600 MHz under 50 kHz magic angle spinning using ∼0.5 mg of perdeuterated and uniformly 15N-labeled protein in which the exchangeable amide sites are partially or completely back-exchanged (reprotonated). Notably, the heteronuclear 1H-15N dipolar coupling frequency dimension is shown to select among 15N resonances, which will be useful in structural studies of larger proteins where the resonances exhibit a high degree of overlap in multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra.

  19. Development of a low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopic technique for the study of matrix mobility in fresh and freeze-thawed hen egg yolk.

    PubMed

    Au, Carmen; Wang, Tong; Acevedo, Nuria C

    2016-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted in developing a low resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopic technique to study matrix mobility in fresh and freeze-thawed gelled yolk. The Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence was used to measure spin-spin relaxation times of proton pools representing major yolk constituents. A component identification test distinguished 3-4 pools. The least mobile pool was assigned to proteins, protein-lipid and protein-water interactions, and the most mobile to unbound water. The remaining pools were assigned to lipids, lipid-protein and lipid-water interactions. A stability test indicated that yolk had varied matrix mobility within the same sample across five days of refrigeration storage. A reproducibility test demonstrated high repeatability of fresh yolk measurements, but significant differences (p<0.05) were found within gelled yolk samples. This research determined that (1)H NMR spectroscopy, a non-destructive technique, can identify yolk components and detect changes in the matrix.

  20. Perspective study of exotics and flavour baryons in antiproton-proton annihilation and proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanov, Mikhail; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Abstract. The spectroscopy of exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. Together with charmonium, these provide a good tool for testing theories of the strong interactions including both perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, lattice QCD, potential and other phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of exotics spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimentally observed states with masses above the DD̅ threshold region are considered. Experimental results from different collaborations (BES, BaBar, Belle, LHCb) are analyzed with special attention given to recently discovered hidden charm states. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-lying charmonium states and others as tetraquarks with hidden charm. It has been shown that charged/neutral tetraquarks must have their neutral/charge partners with mass values differ by at most a few MeV/c2, hypotheses that tend to coincide with those proposed by Maiani and Polosa. However, measurements of different decay modes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using ahigh quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c and proton-proton collisions with momentum up to 26 GeV/c. DD

  1. Interaction of phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin in rheumatoid therapy: 1H NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-09-01

    The monitoring of drug concentration in blood serum is necessary in multi-drug therapy. Mechanism of drug binding with serum albumin (SA) is one of the most important factors which determine drug concentration and its transport to the destination tissues. In rheumatoid diseases drugs which can induce various adverse effects are commonly used in combination therapy. Such proceeding may result in the enhancement of those side effects due to drug interaction. Interaction of phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin and competition between them in gout has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) technique. The aim of the study was to determine the low affinity binding sites, the strength and kind of interaction between serum albumin and drugs used in combination therapy. The study of competition between phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin points to the change of their affinity to serum albumin in the ternary systems. This should be taken into account in multi-drug therapy. This work is a subsequent part of the spectroscopic study on Phe-COL-SA interactions [A. Sułkowska, et al., J. Mol. Struct. 881 (2008) 97-106].

  2. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins.

    PubMed

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie; Hamelin, Olivier; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d10. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  3. Potentiometric and ³¹P NMR studies on inositol phosphates and their interaction with iron(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Sala, Martin; Makuc, Damjan; Kolar, Jana; Plavec, Janez; Pihlar, Boris

    2011-03-01

    Potentiometric, conductometric and ³¹P NMR titrations have been applied to study interactions between myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytic acid), (±)-myo-inositol 1,2,3,5-tetrakisphosphate and (±)-myo-inositol 1,2,3-trisphosphate with iron(III) ions. Potentiometric and conductometric titrations of myo-inositol phosphates show that addition of iron increases acidity and consumption of hydroxide titrant. By increasing the Fe(III)/InsP(6) ratio (from 0.5 to 4) 3 mol of protons are released per 2 mol of iron(III). At first, phytates coordinate iron octahedrally between P2 and P1,3. The second coordination site represents P5 and neighbouring P4,6 phosphate groups. Complexation is accompanied with the deprotonation of P1,3 and P4,6 phosphate oxygens. At higher concentration of iron(III) intermolecular P-O-Fe-O-P bonds trigger formation of a polymeric network and precipitation of the amorphous Fe(III)-InsP(6) aggregates. (31)P NMR titration data complement the above results and display the largest chemical shift changes at pD values between 5 and 10 in agreement with strong interactions between iron and myo-inositol phosphates. The differences in T(1) relaxation times of phosphorous atoms have shown that phosphate groups at positions 1, 2 and 3 are complexated with iron(III). The interactions between iron(III) ions and inositol phosphates depend significantly on the metal to ligand ratio and an attempt to coordinate more than two irons per InsP(6) molecule results in an unstable heterogeneous system.

  4. X-ray and DFT studies of the structure, vibrational and NMR spectra of 2-amino-pyridine betaine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, M.; Kowalczyk, I.; Koput, J.; Katrusiak, A.

    2005-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen bonding, inter- and intramolecular electrostatic interactions on the conformation of 2-amino-pyridine betaine hydrochloride (1-carboxymethyl-2-amino-pyridinium chloride), 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(c), in the crystal and its isolated molecules has been studied by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies, and by DFT calculations. In the crystal, the Cl - anion is connected with protonated betaine via hydrogen bond, O-H⋯Cl -= 2.975(2) Å, two N(12)-H⋯Cl - hydrogen bonds and two N(1) H⋯Cl - intermolecular electrostatic interactions. Two minima are located in the potential energy surface at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level, 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(t) and 2-NH 2PB⋯HCl(c), with the latter being 20,7 kcal/mol higher in energy. The optimized bond lengths and angles of 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(t) at B3LYP level of theory are in good agreement with X-ray data, except for the conformation of the COOH group, which is cis ( syn) in the crystal and trans ( anti) in the single molecule. The probable assignments for the anharmonic experimental solid state vibrational spectra of 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(c) and 2-ND 2PBD⋯Cl(c) based on the calculated B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) harmonic frequencies have been made. 1H and 13C NMR screening constants for both single molecules have been calculated in the GIAO/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) approach. Linear correlation between the calculated and experimental 1H chemical shifts holds only for cis conformer. The lack of such a correlation for trans conformer indicates that it is absent in D 2O solution.

  5. Achievement of a 920-MHz High Resolution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Tadashi; Goto, Atsushi; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Hasegawa, Ken-ichi; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ito, Satoshi; Hamada, Mamoru; Hayashi, Seiji

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a 920-MHz NMR system and performed the proton NMR measurement of H 2O and ethylbenzene using the superconducting magnet operating at 21.6 T (920 MHz for proton), which is the highest field produced by a superconducting NMR magnet in the persistent mode. From the NMR measurements, it is verified that both homogeneity and stability of the magnet have a specification sufficient for a high resolution NMR.

  6. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  7. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  8. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  9. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C A; Rigo, Vagner A; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos; Miranda, Caetano R

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca(2+). Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO3 (101¯4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for (43)Ca, (13)C, and (17)O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated. PMID:25429955

  10. Development of an in Situ NMR Photoreactor To Study Environmental Photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bliumkin, Liora; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Soong, Ronald; Adamo, Antonio; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Zhao, Ran; Reiner, Eric; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Photochemistry is a key environmental process directly linked to the fate, source, and toxicity of pollutants in the environment. This study explores two approaches for integrating light sources with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy: sample irradiation using a "sunlight simulator" outside the magnet versus direct irradiation of the sample inside the magnet. To assess their applicability, the in situ NMR photoreactors were applied to a series of environmental systems: an atmospheric pollutant (p-nitrophenol), crude oil extracts, and groundwater. The study successfully illustrates that environmentally relevant aqueous photochemical processes can be monitored in situ and in real time using NMR spectroscopy. A range of intermediates and degradation products were identified and matched to the literature. Preliminary measurements of half-lives were also obtained from kinetic curves. The sunlight simulator was shown to be the most suitable model to explore environmental photolytic processes in situ. Other light sources with more intense UV output hold potential for evaluating UV as a remediation alternative in areas such as wastewater treatment plants or oil spills. Finally, the ability to analyze the photolytic fate of trace chemicals at natural abundance in groundwater, using a cryogenic probe, demonstrates the viability of NMR spectroscopy as a powerful and complementary technique for environmental applications in general.

  11. Development of an in Situ NMR Photoreactor To Study Environmental Photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bliumkin, Liora; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Soong, Ronald; Adamo, Antonio; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Zhao, Ran; Reiner, Eric; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Photochemistry is a key environmental process directly linked to the fate, source, and toxicity of pollutants in the environment. This study explores two approaches for integrating light sources with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy: sample irradiation using a "sunlight simulator" outside the magnet versus direct irradiation of the sample inside the magnet. To assess their applicability, the in situ NMR photoreactors were applied to a series of environmental systems: an atmospheric pollutant (p-nitrophenol), crude oil extracts, and groundwater. The study successfully illustrates that environmentally relevant aqueous photochemical processes can be monitored in situ and in real time using NMR spectroscopy. A range of intermediates and degradation products were identified and matched to the literature. Preliminary measurements of half-lives were also obtained from kinetic curves. The sunlight simulator was shown to be the most suitable model to explore environmental photolytic processes in situ. Other light sources with more intense UV output hold potential for evaluating UV as a remediation alternative in areas such as wastewater treatment plants or oil spills. Finally, the ability to analyze the photolytic fate of trace chemicals at natural abundance in groundwater, using a cryogenic probe, demonstrates the viability of NMR spectroscopy as a powerful and complementary technique for environmental applications in general. PMID:27172272

  12. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  13. Characterization of D-glucaric acid using NMR, x-ray crystal structure, and MM3 molecular modeling analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-glucaric acid was characterized in solution by comparing NMR spectra from the isotopically unlabeled molecule with those from D-glucaric acid labeled with deuterium or carbon-13 atoms. The NMR studies provided unequivocal assignments for all carbon atoms and non-hydroxyl protons of the molecule. ...

  14. Multinuclear NMR study of the structure of the Fv fragment of anti-dansyl mouse IgG2a antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hideo; Odaka, Asano; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Kato, Koichi; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji ); Kawaminami, Shunro )

    1991-07-02

    A multinuclear NMR study is reported of Fv, which is a minimum antigen-binding unit of immunoglobulin. Fv has been prepared by clostripain digestion of a mouse anti-dansyl IgG2a monoclonal antibody that lacks the entire C{sub H}1 domain. A variety of Fv analogues labeled with {sup 2}H in the aromatic rings and with {sup 13}C and/or {sup 15}N in the peptide bonds have been prepared and used for multinuclear NMR analyses of Fv spectra of Fv sensitively reflect the antigen binding and can be used along with {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C spectral data for the structural analyses of antigen-antibody interactions. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange of the amide protons has been folowed in the absence and presence of DNS-Lys by using the {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N shift correlation spectra. Use of the {beta}-shift observed for the carbonyl carbon resonances has also been helpful in following the hydrogen-deuterium exchange. On the basis of the NMR data obtained, the static and dynamic structure of the Fv fragment in the absence and presence of DNS-Lys has been discussed.

  15. In situ study of the magnetoelectrolysis phenomenon during copper electrodeposition using time domain NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Bruna Ferreira; Nunes, Luiza Maria Silva; Lobo, Carlos Manuel Silva; Cabeça, Luís Fernando; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Although the effect of magnetic field (B) on electrochemical reactions (magnetoelectrolysis phenomenon) has been long known, it has not been considered in electrochemical reactions analyzed in situ by magnetic resonance methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which are intrinsically performed in the presence of B. In this report, the effect of B on the copper electrodeposition reaction, measured by a low-field (0.23 T) NMR spectrometer, was demonstrated. As expected, an enhancement in the reaction rate in comparison to the ex situ electrodeposition reaction was observed. Such enhancement was not dependent on electrodes/magnetic field orientations. Parallel and perpendicular orientations showed similar electrodeposition rates, which is explained by the cyclotron flows generated by distortions in electric and magnetic field lines near the electrode and the electrode edge. Therefore, NMR spectroscopy is not a passive analytical method, as assumed in preceding in situ spectroelectrochemical studies. Although the magnetoelectrolysis phenomenon demonstrated in this report used a paramagnetic ion, it can also be observed for diamagnetic species, since the magnetoelectrolysis phenomenon is independent of the nature of the species. Consequently, similar convection effects may occur in other electrochemical nuclear magnetic resonance (EC-NMR) experiments, such as the electrochemical reaction of organic molecules, as well as in electrocatalysis/fuel cells, lithium-ion batteries, and experiments that use electrochemical electron paramagnetic resonance (EC-EPR) and electrochemical magnetic resonance imaging (EC-MRI).

  16. Li NMR study of heavy-fermion LiV2O4 containing magnetic defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zong, X.; Das, S.; Borsa, F.; Vannette, M.; Prozorov, R.; Schmalian, J.; Johnston, D.

    2008-04-21

    We present a systematic study of the variations of the {sup 7}Li NMR properties versus magnetic defect concentration up to 0.83 mol% within the spinel structure of polycrystalline powder samples and a collection of small single crystals of LiV2O4 in the temperature range from 0.5 to 4.2 K. We also report static magnetization measurements and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements at 14 MHz on the samples at low temperatures. Both the NMR spectrum and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate are inhomogeneous in the presence of the magnetic defects. The NMR data for the powders are well explained by assuming that (i) there is a random distribution of magnetic point defects, (ii) the same heavy Fermi liquid is present in the samples containing the magnetic defects as in magnetically pure LiV2O4, and (iii) the influences of the magnetic defects and of the Fermi liquid on the magnetization and NMR properties are separable. In the single crystals, somewhat different behaviors are observed. Remarkably, the magnetic defects in the powder samples show evidence of spin freezing below T {approx} 1.0 K, whereas in the single crystals with similar magnetic defect concentration no spin freezing was found down to 0.5 K. Thus different types of magnetic defects and/or interactions between them appear to arise in the powders versus the crystals, possibly due to the substantially different synthesis conditions of the powders and crystals.

  17. In situ study of the magnetoelectrolysis phenomenon during copper electrodeposition using time domain NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Bruna Ferreira; Nunes, Luiza Maria Silva; Lobo, Carlos Manuel Silva; Cabeça, Luís Fernando; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Although the effect of magnetic field (B) on electrochemical reactions (magnetoelectrolysis phenomenon) has been long known, it has not been considered in electrochemical reactions analyzed in situ by magnetic resonance methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which are intrinsically performed in the presence of B. In this report, the effect of B on the copper electrodeposition reaction, measured by a low-field (0.23 T) NMR spectrometer, was demonstrated. As expected, an enhancement in the reaction rate in comparison to the ex situ electrodeposition reaction was observed. Such enhancement was not dependent on electrodes/magnetic field orientations. Parallel and perpendicular orientations showed similar electrodeposition rates, which is explained by the cyclotron flows generated by distortions in electric and magnetic field lines near the electrode and the electrode edge. Therefore, NMR spectroscopy is not a passive analytical method, as assumed in preceding in situ spectroelectrochemical studies. Although the magnetoelectrolysis phenomenon demonstrated in this report used a paramagnetic ion, it can also be observed for diamagnetic species, since the magnetoelectrolysis phenomenon is independent of the nature of the species. Consequently, similar convection effects may occur in other electrochemical nuclear magnetic resonance (EC-NMR) experiments, such as the electrochemical reaction of organic molecules, as well as in electrocatalysis/fuel cells, lithium-ion batteries, and experiments that use electrochemical electron paramagnetic resonance (EC-EPR) and electrochemical magnetic resonance imaging (EC-MRI). PMID:25162751

  18. Comparative study of inversion methods of three-dimensional NMR and sensitivity to fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Wang, Peng; Mao, Keyu

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (3D NMR) logging can simultaneously measure transverse relaxation time (T2), longitudinal relaxation time (T1), and diffusion coefficient (D). These parameters can be used to distinguish fluids in the porous reservoirs. For 3D NMR logging, the relaxation mechanism and mathematical model, Fredholm equation, are introduced, and the inversion methods including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD), and Global Inversion (GI) methods are studied in detail, respectively. During one simulation test, multi-echo CPMG sequence activation is designed firstly, echo trains of the ideal fluid models are synthesized, then an inversion algorithm is carried on these synthetic echo trains, and finally T2-T1-D map is built. Futhermore, SVD, BRD, and GI methods are respectively applied into a same fluid model, and the computing speed and inversion accuracy are compared and analyzed. When the optimal inversion method and matrix dimention are applied, the inversion results are in good aggreement with the supposed fluid model, which indicates that the inversion method of 3D NMR is applieable for fluid typing of oil and gas reservoirs. Additionally, the forward modeling and inversion tests are made in oil-water and gas-water models, respectively, the sensitivity to the fluids in different magnetic field gradients is also examined in detail. The effect of magnetic gradient on fluid typing in 3D NMR logging is stuied and the optimal manetic gradient is choosen.

  19. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies establish that heparanase is a retaining glycosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer C.; Laloo, Andrew Elohim; Singh, Sanjesh; Ferro, Vito

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of fondaparinux were fully assigned by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. •Hydrolysis of fondaparinux by heparanase was monitored by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. •Heparanase is established to be a retaining glycosidase. -- Abstract: Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans in basement membranes and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Heparanase is implicated in several diverse pathological processes associated with ECM degradation such as metastasis, inflammation and angiogenesis and is thus an important target for anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drug discovery. Heparanase has been classed as belonging to the clan A glycoside hydrolase family 79 based on sequence analysis, secondary structure predictions and mutagenic analysis, and thus it has been inferred that it is a retaining glycosidase. However, there has been no direct experimental evidence to support this conclusion. Herein we describe {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies of the hydrolysis of the pentasaccharide substrate fondaparinux by heparanase, and provide conclusive evidence that heparanase hydrolyses its substrate with retention of configuration and is thus established as a retaining glycosidase. Knowledge of the mechanism of hydrolysis may have implications for future design of inhibitors for this important drug target.

  20. Layered structure of room-temperature ionic liquids in microemulsions by multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Falcone, R Dario; Baruah, Bharat; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Rithner, Christopher D; Correa, N Mariano; Silber, Juana J; Crans, Debbie C; Levinger, Nancy E

    2011-06-01

    Microemulsions form in mixtures of polar, nonpolar, and amphiphilic molecules. Typical microemulsions employ water as the polar phase. However, microemulsions can form with a polar phase other than water, which hold promise to diversify the range of properties, and hence utility, of microemulsions. Here microemulsions formed by using a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as the polar phase were created and characterized by using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. (1)H, (11)B, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy was applied to explore differences between microemulsions formed by using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF(4)]) as the polar phase with a cationic surfactant, benzylhexadecyldimethylammonium chloride (BHDC), and a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100 (TX-100). NMR spectroscopy showed distinct differences in the behavior of the RTIL as the charge of the surfactant head group varies in the different microemulsion environments. Minor changes in the chemical shifts were observed for [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) in the presence of TX-100 suggesting that the surfactant and the ionic liquid are separated in the microemulsion. The large changes in spectroscopic parameters observed are consistent with microstructure formation with layering of [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) and migration of Cl(-) within the BHDC microemulsions. Comparisons with NMR results for related ionic compounds in organic and aqueous environments as well as literature studies assisted the development of a simple organizational model for these microstructures. PMID:21547960

  1. Ammonia fixation by humic substances: A nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 NMR study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The process of ammonia fixation has been studied in three well characterized and structurally diverse fulvic and humic acid samples. The Suwannee River fulvic acid, and the IHSS peat and leonardite humic acids, were reacted with 15N-labelled ammonium hydroxide, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N NMR spectrometry. Elemental analyses and liquid phase 13C NMR spectra also were recorded on the samples before and after reaction with ammonium hydroxide. The largest increase in percent nitrogen occurred with the Suwannee River fulvic acid, which had a nitrogen content of 0.88% before fixation and 3.17% after fixation. The 15N NMR spectra revealed that ammonia reacted similarly with all three samples, indicating that the functional groups which react with ammonia exist in structural configurations common to all three samples. The majority of nitrogcn incorporated into the samples appears to be in the form of indole and pyrrole nitrogen, followed by pyridine, pyrazine, amide and aminohydroquinone nitrogen. Chemical changes in the individual samples upon fixation could not be discerned from the 13C NMR spectra.

  2. Proton-transport mechanisms in cytochrome c oxidase revealed by studies of kinetic isotope effects

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ann-Louise; Chakrabarty, Suman; Siöberg, Catrine Berthold; Högbom, Martin; Warshel, Arieh; Brzezinski, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) is a membrane-bound enzyme, which catalyzes the reduction of di-oxygen to water and uses a major part of the free energy released in this reaction to pump protons across the membrane. In the Rhodobacter sphaeroides aa3 CytcO all protons that are pumped across the membrane, as well as one half of the protons that are used for O2 reduction, are transferred through one specific intraprotein proton pathway, which holds a highly conserved Glu286 residue. Key questions that need to be addressed in order to understand the function of CytcO at a molecular level are related to the timing of proton transfers from Glu286 to a “pump site” and the catalytic site, respectively. Here, we have investigated the temperature dependencies of the H/D kinetic-isotope effects of intramolecular proton-transfer reactions in the wild-type CytcO as well as in two structural CytcO variants, one in which proton uptake from solution is delayed and one in which proton pumping is uncoupled from O2 reduction. These processes were studied for two specific reaction steps linked to transmembrane proton pumping, one that involves only proton transfer (peroxy–ferryl, P→F, transition) and one in which the same sequence of proton transfers is also linked to electron transfer to the catalytic site (ferryl–oxidized, F→O, transition). An analysis of these reactions in the framework of theory indicates that that the simpler, P→F reaction is rate-limited by proton transfer from Glu286 to the catalytic site. When the same proton-transfer events are also linked to electron transfer to the catalytic site (F→O), the proton-transfer reactions are gated by a protein structural change, which presumably ensures that the proton-pumping stoichiometry is maintained also in the presence of a transmembrane electrochemical gradient. PMID:21463601

  3. NMR study of the magnetization of superfluid helium-3-boron and NMR of superfluid helium-3 in aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haard, Thomas Michael

    Pulsed NMR measurements of superfluid 3He confined in 98.2% porosity silica aerogel are reported. The aerogel suppressed the superfluid transition temperature TC and the order parameter magnitude from their bulk values in qualitative agreement with impurity scattering models. Magnetization measurements showed that the superfluid is an equal spin pairing state (ESP). The superfluid exhibited positive NMR frequency shifts with similar temperature dependence to those of the bulk A-phase, only smaller. TC was independent of the magnetic field for H < 1.8 kOe to within the experimental error. At 2.18 kOe an increased suppression of TC and the order parameter was observed. Two layers of solid 3He were adsorbed to the aerogel strands. When these were replaced with solid 4He a non-ESP superfluid state was observed. An experimental cell for measuring the heat capacity of 3He in aerogel was designed and fabricated. It was tested without aerogel by measuring the heat capacity of liquid 3He over a range of temperatures from 1 to 25 mK and at pressures of 7.0, 14.0, and 28.0 bar. The measurements in both the normal and superfluid phases were consistent with the data of Greywall. The discrepancy between static and dynamic measurements of the magnetization of superfluid 3He-B was characterized over a region of the phase diagram by comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data and recent SQUID data from other researchers. At the B- to A-phase transition, TAB, the discrepancy was absent at low pressure, but increased to 20% at 26.6 bar and 1.2 kOe. The NMR data were consistent with the weak-coupling-plus (wcp) theory at TAB for most pressures and fields. The Ginzburg-Landau strong-coupling parameter gz/( gz)wcp was determined from NMR results to equal 1.00 +/- 0.03 for all pressures. Combinations of the Ginzburg-Landau beta-parameters are reported that are consistent with this observation.

  4. Proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected CBCT image: Feasibility study for adaptive proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yang-Kyun; Sharp, Gregory C.; Phillips, Justin; Winey, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: CBCT projection images were acquired from anthropomorphic phantoms and a prostate patient using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. Two previously introduced techniques were used to correct the scattered x-rays in the raw projection images: uniform scatter correction (CBCTus) and a priori CT-based scatter correction (CBCTap). CBCT images were reconstructed using a standard FDK algorithm and GPU-based reconstruction toolkit. Soft tissue ROI-based HU shifting was used to improve HU accuracy of the uncorrected CBCT images and CBCTus, while no HU change was applied to the CBCTap. The degree of equivalence of the corrected CBCT images with respect to the reference CT image (CTref) was evaluated by using angular profiles of water equivalent path length (WEPL) and passively scattered proton treatment plans. The CBCTap was further evaluated in more realistic scenarios such as rectal filling and weight loss to assess the effect of mismatched prior information on the corrected images. Results: The uncorrected CBCT and CBCTus images demonstrated substantial WEPL discrepancies (7.3 ± 5.3 mm and 11.1 ± 6.6 mm, respectively) with respect to the CTref, while the CBCTap images showed substantially reduced WEPL errors (2.4 ± 2.0 mm). Similarly, the CBCTap-based treatment plans demonstrated a high pass rate (96.0% ± 2.5% in 2 mm/2% criteria) in a 3D gamma analysis. Conclusions: A priori CT-based scatter correction technique was shown to be promising for adaptive proton therapy, as it achieved equivalent proton dose distributions and water equivalent path lengths compared to those of a reference CT in a selection of anthropomorphic phantoms. PMID:26233175

  5. Delineation of conformational preferences in human salivary statherin by 1H, 31P NMR and CD studies: sequential assignment and structure-function correlations.

    PubMed

    Naganagowda, G A; Gururaja, T L; Levine, M J

    1998-08-01

    Membrane-induced solution structure of human salivary statherin, a 43 amino acid residue acidic phosphoprotein, has been investigated by two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance (2D 1H NMR) spectroscopy. NMR assignments and structural analysis of this phosphoprotein was accomplished by analyzing the pattern of sequential and medium range NOEs, alphaCH chemical shift perturbations and deuterium exchange measurements of the amide proton resonances. The NMR data revealed three distinct structural motifs in the molecule: (1) an alpha-helical structure at the N-terminal domain comprising Asp1-Tyr16, (2) a polyproline type II (PPII) conformation predominantly occurring at the middle proline-rich domain spanning Gly19-Gln35, and (3) a 3(10)-helical structure at the C-terminal Pro36-Phe43 sequence. Presence of a few weak dalphaN(i,i+2) NOEs suggests that N-terminus also possesses minor population of 3(10)-helical conformation. Of the three secondary structural elements, helical structure formed by the N-terminal residues, Asp1-Ile11 appears to be more rigid as observed by the relatively very slow exchange of amide hydrogens of Glu5-Ile11. 31P NMR experiments clearly indicated that N-terminal domain of statherin exists mainly in disordered state in water whereas, upon addition of structure stabilizing co-solvent, 2,2,2-trifluorethanol (TFE), it showed a strong propensity for helical conformation. Calcium ion interaction studies suggested that the disordered N-terminal region encompassing the two vicinal phosphoserines is essential for the binding of calcium ions in vivo. Results from the circular dichroism (CD) experiments were found to be consistent with and complimentary to the NMR data and provided an evidence that non-aqueous environment such as TFE, could induce the protein to fold into helical conformation. The findings that the statherin possesses blended solvent sensitive secondary structural elements and the requirement of non-structured N-terminal region

  6. Solid state NMR study of SEI formation in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dachun

    Recently, rechargeable lithium ion batteries, which offer high energy density and long cycle life, are in great demand as power sources for our mobile electronic society. The formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the surface of electrodes in lithium ion batteries plays an essential role in their performance. This thesis presents solid state NMR and MAS NMR results on the SEI, which contribute to our understanding of SEI formation on both cathodes and anodes. This thesis is organized as following: Chapter 1 surveys the history of batteries and the challenges to further development of the lithium ion battery. Fundamental aspects and SEI formation mechanisms are also included in Chapter l. Chapter 2 deals with the principles and experimental techniques of solid state NMR. Chapter 3 presents studies of SEI formation on anode and cathode in lithium ion batteries using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and NMR. The results provide EIS and NMR evidence that cells containing electrolytes with high EC content display less irreversible capacity after high temperature storage. The irreversible capacity is attributed to SEI growth on electrode surfaces. NMR results on cathodes, on the other hand, imply that the presence of Ni in the cathode may reduce cell performance due to the oxidation of Ni 3+ to Ni4+. Our simulations show that a lower EC/DMC ratio is associated with a smaller SEI intensity for the cathode and higher intensity for the anode. Chapter 4 discusses the effect of temperature on SEI formation on anodes and cathodes. NMR measurements show that MCMB graphite based anodes exhibit high stability no chemical shift is evident over a wide temperature range. On cathodes, however, NMR does reveal changes in SEI intensity as a function of temperature. These changes are believed to be the result of decomposition of the SEI. Evidently, then, changes in the performance of the cell as a factor of temperature are, at least in part, due to changes in

  7. Structural Transformation and Physical Properties of a Hydrogel-Forming Peptide Studied by NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Dynamic Rheometer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongzhou; Herrera, Alvaro I.; Luo, Zhiping; Prakash, Om; Sun, Xiuzhi S.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based hydrogels are attractive biological materials. Study of their self-assembly pathways from their monomer structures is important not only for undertaking the rational design of peptide-based materials, but also for understanding their biological functions and the mechanism of many human diseases relative to protein aggregation. In this work, we have monitored the conformation, morphological, and mechanical properties of a hydrogel-forming peptide during hydrogelation in different dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)/H2O solutions. The peptide shows nanofiber morphologies in DMSO/H2O solution with a ratio lower than 4:1. Increased water percentage in the solution enhanced the hydrogelation rate and gel strength. One-dimensional and two-dimensional proton NMR and electron microscopy studies performed on the peptide in DMSO/H2O solution with different ratios indicate that the peptide monomer tends to adopt a more helical structure during the hydrogelation as the DMSO/H2O ratio is reduced. Interestingly, at the same DMSO/H2O ratio, adding Ca2+ not only promotes peptide hydrogelation and gel strength, but also leads to special shear-thinning and recovery properties of the hydrogel. Without changing the peptide conformation, Ca2+ binds to the charged Asp residues and induces the change of interfiber interactions that play an important role in hydrogel properties. PMID:23009847

  8. In-situ NMR study of molecular and ionic processes inside carbon nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhixiang

    Interactions of simple ions with water and interfaces play critical roles in many electrochemical and biological processes. They are especially significant in nanoconfined regions and have a profound impact in many applications, for instance nanofluidics and supercapacitors. This dissertation employs a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study their influence on the ionic processes inside carbon nanopores. To characterize the carbon micropore structure, a convenient NMR method is established by taking a 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) spectrum of the adsorbed water. A density functional theory (DFT) computation of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) yields a quantitative relationship between the NICS values and the micropore sizes. The carbon micropore size and distribution are derived from the chemical shift and the spectrum lineshape. For aqueous electrolytes inside uncharged carbon nanopores, the measurement of ion concentrations reveals a substantial electroneutrality breakdown. The specific ion effects and ion-ion correlations are shown to play crucial roles in determining the degree of electroneutrality breakdown. The importance of those interactions is further revealed by the asymmetric and nonlinear responses of ion concentrations to the charging of the confining carbon walls. Such information is obtained with a carbon supercapacitor built into the NMR probe. The NMR observations are validated by a numerical calculation of the ion distribution in the nanopores using the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation, demonstrating that the nonelectrostatic interfacial interactions can indeed dominate the electrostatic interactions and lead to the breakdown of electroneutrality inside nanoconfined regions. Interfacial ion hydration is an essential part of the specific ion effects. Using in-situ 23Na and 19F NMR on carbon supercapacitors with different carbon pore sizes, I provide a molecular-scale understanding of the permeation and

  9. Bulk magnetization and 1H NMR spectra of magnetically heterogeneous model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E M; Bud' ko, S L

    2011-04-28

    Bulk magnetization and ¹H static and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two magnetically heterogeneous model systems based on laponite (LAP) layered silicate or polystyrene (PS) with low and high proton concentration, respectively, and ferrimagnetic Fe₂O₃ nano- or micro-particles have been studied. In LAP+Fe₂O₃, a major contribution to the NMR signal broadening is due to the dipolar coupling between the magnetic moments of protons and magnetic particles. In PS+Fe₂O₃, due to the higher proton concentration in polystyrene and stronger proton–proton dipolar coupling, an additional broadening is observed, i.e. ¹H MAS NMR spectra of magnetically heterogeneous systems are sensitive to both proton–magnetic particles and proton–proton dipolar couplings. An increase of the volume magnetization by ~1 emu/cm³ affects the ¹H NMR signal width in a way that is similar to an increase of the proton concentration by ~2×10²²/cm³. ¹H MAS NMR spectra, along with bulk magnetization measurements, allow the accurate determination of the hydrogen concentration in magnetically heterogeneous systems.

  10. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing: Sequential assignment of resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Krishna, N.R. )

    1989-02-21

    The authors report the sequential assignment of resonances to specific residues in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the variant-3 neurotoxin from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing (range southwestern U.S.A.). A combination of two-dimensional NMR experiments such as 2D-COSY, 2D-NOESY, and single- and double-RELAY coherence transfer spectroscopy has been employed on samples of the protein dissolved in D{sub 2}O and in H{sub 2}O for assignment purposes. These studies provide a basis for the determination of the solution-phase conformation of this protein and for undertaking detailed structure-function studies of these neurotoxins that modulate the flow of sodium current by binding to the sodium channels of excitable membranes.

  11. Preliminary 1H NMR study on archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Maccotta, Antonella; Fantazzini, Paola; Garavaglia, Carla; Donato, Ines D; Perzia, Patrizia; Brai, Maria; Morreale, Filippa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Relaxation (MRR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are powerful tools to obtain detailed information on the pore space structure that one is unlikely to obtain in other ways. These techniques are particularly suitable for Cultural Heritage materials, because they use water 1H nuclei as a probe. Interaction with water is one of the main causes of deterioration of materials. Porous structure in wood, for example, favours the penetration of water, which can carry polluting substances and promote mould growth. A particular case is waterlogged wood from underwater discoveries and moist sites; in fact, these finds are very fragile because of chemical, physical and biological decay from the long contact with the water. When wood artefacts are brought to the surface and directly dried in air, there is the collapse of the cellular structures, and wood loses its original form and dimensions and cannot be used for study and museum exhibits. In this work we have undertaken the study of some wood finds coming from Ercolano's harbour by MRR and MRI under different conditions, and we have obtained a characterization of pore space in wood and images of the spatial distribution of the confined water in the wood. PMID:16485652

  12. Preliminary 1H NMR study on archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Maccotta, Antonella; Fantazzini, Paola; Garavaglia, Carla; Donato, Ines D; Perzia, Patrizia; Brai, Maria; Morreale, Filippa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Relaxation (MRR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are powerful tools to obtain detailed information on the pore space structure that one is unlikely to obtain in other ways. These techniques are particularly suitable for Cultural Heritage materials, because they use water 1H nuclei as a probe. Interaction with water is one of the main causes of deterioration of materials. Porous structure in wood, for example, favours the penetration of water, which can carry polluting substances and promote mould growth. A particular case is waterlogged wood from underwater discoveries and moist sites; in fact, these finds are very fragile because of chemical, physical and biological decay from the long contact with the water. When wood artefacts are brought to the surface and directly dried in air, there is the collapse of the cellular structures, and wood loses its original form and dimensions and cannot be used for study and museum exhibits. In this work we have undertaken the study of some wood finds coming from Ercolano's harbour by MRR and MRI under different conditions, and we have obtained a characterization of pore space in wood and images of the spatial distribution of the confined water in the wood.

  13. Macroparticle simulation studies of a proton beam haloexperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Colestock, P.L.; Gilpatrick, D.; Smith, H.V.; Wangler,T.P.; Schulze, M.E.

    2002-09-12

    We report macroparticle simulations for comparison withmeasured results from a proton beam-halo experiment in a 52-quadrupoleperiodic-focusing channel. An important issue is that the inputphase-space distribution is not experimentally known. Three differentinitial distributions with different shapes predict different beamprofiles in the transport system. Simulations have been fairly successfulin reproducing the core of the measured matched-beam profiles and thetrend of emittance growth as a function of mismatch factor, butunderestimate the growth rate of halo and emittance for mismatched beams.In this study, we find that knowledge of the Courant-Snyder parametersand emittances of the input beam is not sufficient for reliableprediction of the halo. Input distributions iwth greater population inthe tails produce larger rates of emittance growth, a result that isqualitatively consistent with the particle-core model of halo formationin mismatched beams.

  14. NMR-Based Metabonomic Studies on Stomach Heat and Cold Syndromes and Intervention Effects of the Corresponding Formulas

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhongjie; Han, Bin; Gong, Mengjuan; Wang, Shumei; Liang, Shengwang

    2014-01-01

    Zuojin Wan (ZJW) and Lizhong Wan (LZW) have been widely used in the treatment of Stomach heat and cold syndrome (SH and SC), respectively. In this study, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomic approach was developed to profile SH and SC-related metabolic perturbations in rat serum and to investigate the intervention effects of ZJW and LZW on the corresponding SH and SC. Compared to the conventional macroscopic and histopathological examinations, the metabonomic approach could enable discrimination between SH and SC based on serum metabolic profiles. Meanwhile, 17 and 15 potential biomarkers associated with SH and SC, respectively, which were mainly involved in gastric dysfunction and mucosal lesions, gut microbiotal activity, transmethylation, glucose and lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism, were identified. Furthermore, taking the potential biomarkers as drug targets, it was revealed that administration of ZJW and LZW could exclusively reverse the pathological process of SH and SC, respectively, through partially regulating the disturbed metabolic pathways. This work showed biological basis related to SH and SC at metabolic level and offered a new paradigm for better understanding and explanation of “Fang Zheng Dui Ying” principle in traditional Chinese medicine from a systemic view. PMID:24701240

  15. The role of water in protein's behavior: The two dynamical crossovers studied by NMR and FTIR techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Dugo, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The role the solvent plays in determining the biological activity of proteins is of primary importance. Water is the solvent of life and proteins need at least a water monolayer covering their surface in order to become biologically active. We study how the properties of water and the effect of its coupling with the hydrophilic moieties of proteins govern the regime of protein activity. In particular we follow, by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, the thermal evolution of the amide vibrational modes of hydrated lysozyme in the temperature interval 180 K < T < 350 K. In such a way we are able to observe the thermal limit of biological activity characterizing hydrated lysozyme. Finally we focus on the region of lysozyme thermal denaturation by following the evolution of the proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra for 298 K < T < 366 K with the High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning probe. Our data suggest that the hydrogen bond coupling between hydration water and protein hydrophilic groups is crucial in triggering the main mechanisms that define the enzymatic activity of proteins. PMID:25750698

  16. The role of water in protein's behavior: The two dynamical crossovers studied by NMR and FTIR techniques.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The role the solvent plays in determining the biological activity of proteins is of primary importance. Water is the solvent of life and proteins need at least a water monolayer covering their surface in order to become biologically active. We study how the properties of water and the effect of its coupling with the hydrophilic moieties of proteins govern the regime of protein activity. In particular we follow, by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, the thermal evolution of the amide vibrational modes of hydrated lysozyme in the temperature interval 180 K < T < 350 K. In such a way we are able to observe the thermal limit of biological activity characterizing hydrated lysozyme. Finally we focus on the region of lysozyme thermal denaturation by following the evolution of the proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra for 298 K < T < 366 K with the High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning probe. Our data suggest that the hydrogen bond coupling between hydration water and protein hydrophilic groups is crucial in triggering the main mechanisms that define the enzymatic activity of proteins.

  17. 1H NMR study of the hetero-association of flavin-mononucleotide with mutagenic dyes: ethidium bromide and proflavine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Mukhina, Yu. V.; Davies, D. B.

    The hetero-association of the vitamin B2 derivative, flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), with a mutagenic dye, ethidium bromide (EB) or proflavine (PF), has been studied by 1D and 2D 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The variations of proton chemical shifts of both the vitamin and dye as a function of concentration and temperature were analysed in terms of the structural and thermodynamical properties of the FMN-EB and FMN-PF complexes in solution. The structures of the complexes were also investigated by observed intermolecular ROE contacts and molecular mechanics calculations. The results show that the 1 : 1 hetero-association complexes in solution are more stable than the self-association complexes, which is consistent with formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bond in the hetero-complexes of FMN-EB and FMN-PF. Hence it is possible that the toxicity of aromatic molecules such as EB and PF may be reduced in vitro by the presence of FMN, partly because of the known antimutagenic action of FMN and partly because it has been shown in this work that there is an effective intermolecular association between the mutagens and the vitamin.

  18. NMR Studies of the original magnetic properties of the cuprates: influence of impurities and defects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloul, Henri

    1998-03-01

    The cuprates display original magnetic properties, both in their insulating and metallic phases. In underdoped metallic systems, a pseudo gap in the density of magnetic q=3D0 excitations is observed from local susceptibility measurements, as well as from specific heat and transport properties. A pseudo spin-gap in the AF excitations at the AF wave vector is detected both by NMR and inelastic neutron scattering. From the NMR measurements it can be concluded that these magnetic anomalies are quite similar in single layer(J. Bobroff, H.. Alloul, P. Mendels, V. Viallet, J. F. Marucco and D. Colson, Phys. Rev. Letters 78, 3757 (1997).), bilayer and trilayer underdoped cuprates. The modifications of magnetic properties induced by substitutions or defects in the planes, which do not modify appreciably the charge transfer have been studied. The spatial dependence of the spin susceptibility \\chi ' (r) of the pure material can be directly probed through the study of the modifications of the NMR spectra of various nuclei (^89Y, ^17O, ^63Cu) induced by such localised magnetic impurities. Large qualitative differences between the underdoped and slightly overdoped YBCO are evidenced from ^17O NMR line broadening in Ni substituted YBCO. This allows us to propose a quite powerful method for studying the q and T dependence of the static magnetic susceptibility (J. Bobroff et al, Phys. Rev. Letters 78, 3757 (1997).). The impurity magnetic state also directly reflects the occurence of electronic correlations in the metallic state. The case of Zn will be examined in some detail. ^89Y NMR has revealed that the substitution of this 3d^10 non magnetic atom on a Cu site induces a Curie like contribution to the local susceptibility on the near neighbour coppers ( A. V. Mahajan, H. Alloul, G. Collin and J. F. Marucco, Physical Review Letters 72, 3100 (1994).). The effective induced moment decreases with hole doping and becomes rather weak, but is still present for optimal doping

  19. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Hamed; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-03-01

    Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M+ ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of "internal proton affinity" (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule.

  20. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Korn, C.; Goren, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T/sub 1/ in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH/sub 1.588/, ZrH/sub 1.629/, ZrH/sub 1.684/, ZrH/sub 1.736/, ZrH/sub 1.815/, ZrH/sub 1.910/, and ZrH/sub 1.960/. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with E/sub a/ = 13.4 +- 0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A = (1/2)(2-x)(45 +- 10) x 10/sup 12/ Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for approx.3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  1. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, C.; Goren, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T1 in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH1.588, ZrH1.629, ZrH1.684, ZrH1.736, ZrH1.815, ZrH1.910, and ZrH1.960. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with Ea=13.4+/-0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A=(1/2)(2-x)(45+/-10)×1012 Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for ~3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  2. Structural studies of pravastatin and simvastatin and their complexes with SDS micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullin, I. Z.; Galiullina, L. F.; Klochkova, E. A.; Latfullin, I. A.; Aganov, A. V.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational features of pravastatin and simvastatin molecules in solution and in their complexes with sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles (SDS) were studied by 2D NOESY NMR spectroscopy. On the basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance experiments it was established that pravastatin and simvastatin can form molecular complex with SDS micelles which were considered as the model of cell membrane. In addition, interatomic distances for studied compounds were calculated based on 2D NOESY NMR experiments. It was shown that pravastatin interacts only with a surface of model membrane. However, in contrast to pravastatin, simvastatin penetrates into the inner part of SDS micelles. Observed distinctions in the mechanisms of interaction of pravastatin and simvastatin with models of cell membranes could explain the differences in their pharmacological properties.

  3. Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions Studied by NMR: From Molecular Recognition to Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alonso, María del Carmen; Díaz, Dolores; Berbis, Manuel Álvaro; Marcelo, Filipa; Cañada, Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Diseases that result from infection are, in general, a consequence of specific interactions between a pathogenic organism and the cells. The study of host-pathogen interactions has provided insights for the design of drugs with therapeutic properties. One area that has proved to be promising for such studies is the constituted by carbohydrates which participate in biological processes of paramount importance. On the one hand, carbohydrates have shown to be information carriers with similar, if not higher, importance than traditionally considered carriers as amino acids and nucleic acids. On the other hand, the knowledge on molecular recognition of sugars by lectins and other carbohydrate-binding proteins has been employed for the development of new biomedical strategies. Biophysical techniques such as X-Ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy lead currently the investigation on this field. In this review, a description of traditional and novel NMR methodologies employed in the study of sugar-protein interactions is briefly presented in combination with a palette of NMR-based studies related to biologically and/or pharmaceutically relevant applications. PMID:23305367

  4. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.

    2012-11-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a 2nd major cause of liver disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of pathologies starting from fat accumulation (steatosis) in early reversible stage to inflammation with or without fibrosis and cirrhosis in later irreversible stages. Previously, we reported significant steatosis in the livers of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup −}) vs. hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol daily for 2 months [Bhopale et al., 2006, Alcohol 39, 179–188]. However, ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 4% ethanol also showed a significant mortality. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was conducted to understand the mechanism and identify lipid(s) involved in the development of ethanol-induced fatty liver. ADH{sup −} and ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 1, 2 or 3.5% ethanol daily for 2 months and fatty infiltration in the livers were evaluated by histology and by measuring dry weights of extracted lipids. Lipid metabolomic changes in extracted lipids were determined by proton ({sup 1}H) and {sup 31}phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR data was analyzed by hierarchical clustering (HC) and principle component analysis (PCA) for pattern recognition. Extensive vacuolization by histology and significantly increased dry weights of total lipids found only in the livers of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls suggest a dose-dependent formation of fatty liver in ADH{sup −} deer mouse model. Analysis of NMR data of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls shows increases for total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), triacylglycerides and unsaturation, and decreases for free cholesterol, phospholipids and allylic and diallylic protons. Certain classes of neutral lipids (cholesterol esters, fatty acyl chain (-COCH{sub 2}-) and FAMEs) were

  5. Reduction of andrographolide and its stereostructure by NMR and X-ray study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deepika; Chaudhuri, Prabir K

    2013-04-01

    Andrographolide (1) on asymmetric reduction with nickel boride in situ led to the identification of a product as 12,13 R-dihydroandrographolide (3) in de (>96%). The structure and stereochemistry of compound 3 were established by NMR study and confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. β-Substituent of γ-butyrolactone in andrographolide exerted diastereomeric selectivity in reduction. Neoandrographolide (2) under similar condition yielded 5. PMID:22559743

  6. Study of aging in oil paintings by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spyros, Apostolos; Anglos, Demetrios

    2004-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is proposed as an efficient analytical tool in the study of painted artworks. The binding medium from two original oil paintings, dated from the early 20th and the late 17th century, was studied via high-resolution 1D and 2D NMR, establishing the advanced state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the oil paint. Studies of the solvent-extractable component from model samples of various drying oils, raw oil paints, and aged oil paints allowed the definition of several markers based on the integral ratios of various chemical species present in the 1H and 13C NMR spectra. These markers are sensitive to hydrolytic and oxidative processes that reflect the extent of aging in oil paintings. The rapidity, simplicity, and nondestructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology represents a great advantage, since the usually minute sample quantities available from original artwork can be subsequently analyzed further by other analytical techniques, if necessary. PMID:15373425

  7. Proton nuclear Overhauser effect study of the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Dugad, L B; Goff, H M

    1992-07-13

    Proton nuclear Overhauser effect and paramagnetic relaxation measurements have been used to define more extensively the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, CMP (previously known as Coprinus cinereus peroxidase), as the ferric low-spin cyanide ligated complex. The results are compared with other well-characterized peroxidase enzymes. The NMR spectrum of CMPCN shows changes in the paramagnetically shifted resonances as a function of time, suggesting a significant heme disorder for CMP. The presence of proximal and distal histidine amino acid residues are common to the heme environments of both CMPCN and HRPCN. However, the upfield distal arginine signals of HRPCN are not evident in the 1H-NMR spectra of CMPCN.

  8. Dynamics of the hydrogen and phosphate ions in proton conducting gel/D3PO4 electrolytes: A 2H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, K. R.; Zukowska, G. Z.; Stevens, J. R.

    2003-07-01

    The synthesis and characterization of protonic conducting polymeric gels is motivated by their possible application in various electrochemical devices. Nonaqueous proton-conducting gel electrolytes are being developed for use in various sensors and electrochromic devices operating at ambient temperatures. The electrolyte must have a relatively high conductivity and chemical and physical stability. One method of producing nonaqueous conducting polymeric gel electrolytes is to entrap organic solutions of a strong acid such as H3PO4 in a polymer matrix. Results are reported on the system consisting of phosphoric acid dissolved in N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) within a gel network formed with poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA). Using selective deuteration, the diffusion coefficients for both the deuteron and phosphorus from the phosphoric acid and the DMF are measured by field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Combining the diffusion with conductivity measurements in the Nernst-Einstein equation leads to a better understanding of the number of charge carriers in the mixture and the temperature dependence of this number. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation is used as a tool to probe the ion dynamics in these materials. In addition to NMR measurements, the samples have been characterized by electrical conductivity, differential scanning calorimetry, and viscosity measurements. The results show that the Grotthus mechanism involving the hopping of the proton from one molecular site to another, as well as the vehicular mechanism due to the motion of the D2PO4- and D4PO4+ ions are most responsible for the motion of the proton in these electrolytes. The variety of protonation sites in the PGMA/DMF/H3PO4 system is much more diverse that in the previously studied PMMA/PC/D3PO4 system. In the PGMA/DMF/H3PO4 system there are sites on the polymer, DMF and H3PO4.

  9. Pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic) acid and 2-aminopyridine as building blocks of a novel proton transfer compound: Solution and X-ray crystal structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, A.; Moosavi, S. M.; Kordestani, D.; Maddah, B.; Shamsipur, M.; Aghabozorg, H.; Ramezanipour, F.; Kickelbick, G.

    2007-02-01

    The synthesis of a novel proton transfer compound (2-apyH)(pdtcH), L, derived from pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic) acid, (pdtcH 2), is reported. This compound was prepared from the reaction between pdtcH 2, and 2-aminopyridine, (2-apy), in water as solvent. The characterization was performed using 1H and 13C solution NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystal structure analysis reveals that intra- and intermolecular proton transfer from the diacid pdtcH 2 to the base 2-apy results in the formation of a supramolecular network, which is self-assembled via non-covalent interactions. The monocationic (2-apyH) + and monoanionic (pdtcH) - building blocks are connected through H-bonding, π-π interactions and ion-pairing simultaneously as shown in the X-ray crystal structure. The monoanionic fragments are located almost parallel to each other and the cationic species have also situations nearly parallel to each other, positioning almost perpendicular to anions. The aqueous solution studies were accomplished by spectrophotometric and potentiometric pH titrations. The most abundant proton transfer species present at pH < 6 is (2-apyH)(pdtcH), in support of association between (2-apyH) + and (pdtcH) - in L, being similar to that observed by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure analysis.

  10. Solid-state 29Si MAS NMR studies of diatoms: structural characterization of biosilica deposits.

    PubMed

    Bertermann, R; Kröger, N; Tacke, R

    2003-03-01

    Four different diatom species (Chaetoceros debilis, Chaetoceros didymum, Cylindrotheca fusiformis, Nitzschia angularis) were studied by solid-state (29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. To determine the Q(2):Q(3):Q(4) ratios in the biosilica deposits of the diatoms, quantitative (29)Si MAS NMR experiments were performed. This analysis did not reveal any differences regarding the molecular architecture of the silica (i.e. the degree of condensation of the SiOH units (2 identical with SiOH --> identical with Si-O-Si identical with + H(2)O)) from the different diatom species. However, complete cells showed significantly smaller Q(4):Q(3) ratios (1.8-1.9) than extracted cell walls (2.5-2.8), indicating the existence of intracellular pools of less condensed silica.

  11. NMR study of the ternary carbides M2 AlC (M=Ti,V,Cr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, C. S.; Lin, J. Y.; Xie, B. X.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed a systematic study of the layered ternary carbides Ti2AlC , V2AlC , and Cr2AlC using Al27 NMR spectroscopy. The quadrupole splittings, Knight shifts, as well as spin-lattice relaxation times on each material have been identified. The sign of the isotropic Knight shift varies from positive for Ti2AlC and V2AlC to negative for Cr2AlC , attributed to the enhancement of hybridization with increasing valence electron count in the transition metal. Universally long relaxation times are found for these alloys. Results provide a measure of Al-s Fermi-level density of states Ns(EF) for Ti2AlC and V2AlC . In addition, the evidence that Ns(EF) correlates with the transition metal d -electron count has been explored in the present NMR investigation.

  12. Chiral Magnetism in an Itinerant Helical Magnet, MnSi - An Extended 29Si NMR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Motoya, Kiyoichiro; Majumder, Mayukh; Witt, Sebastian; Krellner, Cornelius; Baenitz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The microscopic magnetism in the helical, conical and ferromagnetically polarized phases in an itinerant helical magnet, MnSi, has been studied by an extended 29Si NMR at zero field and under external magnetic fields. The temperature dependence of the staggered moment, MQ(T), determined by the 29Si NMR frequency, ν(T), and the nuclear relaxation rate, 1/T1(T), at zero field is in general accord with the SCR theory for weak itinerant ferromagnetic metals and its extension to helical magnets. The external field dependence of resonance frequency, ν(H), follows a vector sum of the contributions from the atomic hyperfine and macroscopic fields with a field induced moment characteristic to itinerant magnets. A discontinuous jump of the resonance frequency at the critical field, Hc, between the conical and the polarized phases has also been found, which suggests a first order like change of the electronic states at Hc.

  13. Comparative evaluation of NMR and nuclear medicine in disc space infection: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.; Feiglin, D.; Piraino, D.; O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Weinstein, M.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Six patients with proven disc space infection underwent bone scanning with 975MB/sub q/ HDP together with NMR imaging on a 0.6T superconducting magnet to obtain weighted T1 30mSec (TE .3 Sec TR) and T2 (120mSec TE 3 Sec TR) images within a 48 hr. period. All patients had plain radiographic evaluation of the areas involved. Three pts. had Ga-67 Citrate scans using 222MBq activity following the bone scan and 1 patient had CT images of the involved area. All 6 bone scans showed increased bony uptake in at least the adjacent vertebral end plates but did not show any abnormal uptake in the region of the disc. Bony activity distribution was non-specific and could have been consistent with either degenerative or osteomyelitic change. Gallium imaging in one case supported the latter diagnosis but did not indicate presence of disc space involvement. Two other cases showed bony involvement to the extent of the bone scan; one showing minimal uptake due to antibiotic therapy. Plain radiographs were suggestive of disc space infection in all cases. NMR in all cases revealed marked disc space and adjacent bone involvement to the extent shown on bone scans. T1 and T2 weighted images appeared highly specific for either infection or degenerative change and were unaffected by antibiotic therapy. NMR appears to be more sensitive in evaluation of disc space infection than radionuclide studies. NMR is also able to provide significant anatomic information involving thecal sac and neural structures. Nuclear medicine studies appear equally sensitive though less specific in the evaluation of bone involvement except perhaps where antibiotic therapy has been used.

  14. NMR Studies of Polymer-Nanoparticle Interfaces in Biological and Synthetic Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides unique capabilities for studying buried interfaces in organic-inorganic (specifically phosphate-based) nanocomposites, in terms of local composition as well as distances between, and mobility of, structural units near the interface. The organic-inorganic interface is crucial for the mechanical coupling between the polymer and the inorganic nanoparticles. We have studied the organic-inorganic nanocomposite in bone and characterized the interface between the organic matrix (the triple-helical fibrous polypeptide collagen) and the inorganic, reinforcing bioapatite (a calcium phosphate) that accounts for 45 vol% of the material and is present as ˜3-nm thick nanocrystals. By solid-state ^13C^31P NMR, we can obtain selective spectra of the collagen residues at the interface; ionic and hydroxyproline C-OH groups of significant mobility are dominant. ^1H-^31P and ^1H-^13C NMR prove that water with isotropic mobility, which accounts for about 7% of the total volume, forms a monomolecular interfacial layer between apatite and collagen. Its rotational correlation time is about five orders of magnitude longer than that of liquid water. We propose that this water layer can be considered as ``viscous glue'' that holds the components of the nanocomposite together. It would avoid stress concentration and, by virtue of its flexible H-bonding, reduce the requirement of matched lock-and-key binding sites for collagen sidegroups on the apatite surface. In nanocomposites of phosphate glass with polyamides, ^1H-^13C NMR reveals a reduced crystallinity of the polyamide near the inorganic particles.[4pt] Coauthors: Yan-Yan Hu, Aditya Rawal (Ames Laboratory), Joshua Otaigbe (University of Southern Mississippi)

  15. Interaction of antiaggregant molecule ajoene with membranes. An ESR and 1H, 2H, 31P-NMR study.

    PubMed

    Debouzy, J C; Neumann, J M; Hervé, M; Daveloose, D; Viret, J; Apitz-Castro, R

    1989-01-01

    The structure of ajoene, a molecule extracted from garlic, has been studied by 1H-NMR and its interaction with model membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31-P-NMR and ESR experiments. This study clearly shows that the ajoene molecule is located deep in the layer and is close to the interlayer medium. Moreover while NMR experiments show that the membrane structure is only slightly affected by the presence of ajoene, ESR experiments reveal significant modifications in phospholipid dynamics. This interaction, observed before with the phenothiazine derivative, promazine, results in an increase of the membrane fluidity in its hydrophobic part and could be related to clinical properties of ajoene.

  16. The spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H, 13C NMR) and theoretical studies of cinnamic acid and alkali metal cinnamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowska, Monika; Świsłocka, Renata; Lewandowski, Włodzimierz

    2007-05-01

    The effect of alkali metals (Li → Na → K → Rb → Cs) on the electronic structure of cinnamic acid (phenylacrylic acid) was studied. In this research many miscellaneous analytical methods, which complement one another, were used: infrared (FT-IR), Raman (FT-Raman), nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H, 13C NMR) and quantum mechanical calculations. The spectroscopic studies lead to conclusions concerning the distribution of the electronic charge in molecule, the delocalization energy of π-electrons and the reactivity of metal complexes. The change of metal along with the series: Li → Na → K → Rb → Cs caused: (1) the change of electronic charge distribution in cinnamate anion what is seen via the occurrence of the systematic shifts of several bands in the experimental and theoretical IR and Raman spectra of cinnamates, (2) systematic chemical shifts for protons 1H and 13C nuclei.

  17. Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(I) complexes of cinnamic acid: FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H and 13C NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowska, M.; Świsłocka, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2011-05-01

    The effect of zinc, cadmium(II) and mercury(I) ions on the electronic structure of cinnamic acid (phenylacrylic acid) was studied. In this research many miscellaneous analytical methods, which complement one another, were used: infrared (FT-IR), Raman (FT-Raman), nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H, 13C NMR) and quantum mechanical calculations. The spectroscopic studies provide some knowledge on the distribution of the electronic charge in molecule, the delocalization energy of π-electrons and the reactivity of metal complexes. In the series of Zn(II) → Cd(II) → Hg(I) cinnamates: (1) systematic shifts of several bands in the experimental and theoretical IR and Raman spectra and (2) regular chemical shifts for protons 1H and 13C nuclei were observed.

  18. Proteolysis process in fermented sausage model systems as studied by NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    García García, Ana Belén; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Cambero Rodríguez, María Isabel; Cruz Díaz, Karen Paola; Bertram, Hanne Christine

    2015-03-25

    Proton NMR relaxation analyses were performed in sausage model systems (SMS) at different manufacturing times (0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days) to evaluate changes in water distribution and mobility. Three different water populations were identified, T2b (5-10 ms), T21 (30-70 ms), and T22 (100-300 ms), and the progress of ripening could be followed as a shift toward shorter relaxation times. In addition, the combined effect of adding commercial proteases (Pronase E and aspartyl proteinase) on protein breakdown and structural integrity of sausage models (SMS+P) was investigated, resulting in the formation of a more fluid and less organized meat matrix that led to changes in water populations T2b2 and T22 compared with SMS. A very different protein degradation pattern between SMS and SMS+P was observed by means of SDS-PAGE and fluorescamine assay, supporting that some degree of protein aggregation is needed for the presence of the T22 population in fermented sausages.

  19. Two-satellite study of proton drift on quiet days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, A.; Kremser, G.; Fennell, J. F.

    1981-07-01

    The drift shells of protons in a model magnetic field were calculated. The radial gradient of the protons is combined with calculated drift shells to predict the flux levels at several local times for different pitch angles and energies. The field model is a three term Mead model, which is fit to the observed B-values at synchronous orbit. The predicted local time dependent fluxes match the observed fluxes, and correctly predict the pitch angle dependencies.

  20. Novel electrolytes for use in new and improved batteries: An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Marc B.

    This thesis focuses on the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study materials for use as electrolytes in batteries. The details of four projects are described in this thesis as well as a brief theoretical background of NMR. Structural and dynamics properties were determined using several NMR techniques such as static, MAS, PFG diffusion, and relaxation to understand microscopic and macroscopic properties of the materials described within. Nuclei investigate were 1H, 2H, 7Li, 13C, 19F, 23Na, and 27Al. The first project focuses on an exciting new material to be used as a solid electrolyte membrane. T. The second project focuses on the dynamics of ionic liquid-solvent mixtures and their comparison to molecular dynamics computer simulations. The third project involves a solvent-free film containing NaTFSI salt mixed in to PEO for use in sodium-ion batteries. This final project focuses on a composite electrolyte consisting of a ceramic and solid: LiI:PEO:LiAlO2.