Science.gov

Sample records for proton nmr study

  1. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    in high-resolution NMR spectra. This technique is selective for protons on the surface organic functional groups due to their motional averaging in solution. In this study, 1H solution NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the interface of the organic functional groups in D2O. The pKa for these functional groups covalently bound to the surface of nanoparticles was determined using an NMR-pH titration method based on the variation in the proton chemical shift for the alkyl group protons closest to the amine group with pH. The adsorption of toxic contaminants (chromate and arsenate anions) on the surface of functionalized silicalite-1 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been studied by 1H solution NMR spectroscopy. With this method, the surface bound contaminants are detected. The analysis of the intensity and position of these peaks allows quantitative assessment of the relative amounts of functional groups with adsorbed metal ions. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy to the electronic environment and structure of the surface functional groups on porous nanomaterials.

  2. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  3. Proton-NMR study on chemisorption of ethylene on platinum powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashi Shibanuma; Toshiji Matsui

    1985-05-01

    The high-temperature phase of ethylene on surfaces of Pt powder has been studied by proton-NMR in order to decide whether the surface species is the ethylidyne species (CH 3C) proposed by Kesmodel et al. or the multiple-bonded species (CH 2CH) proposed by Demuth. The observed NMR spectrum is not attributable to CH 3-groups on the surfaes, but can be interpreted as the superposition of two signals, one originating from CH 2-groups and the other from CH-groups. In other words, the results suggest that the surface species is the multiple-bonded species.

  4. Proton-NMR study on chemisorption of ethylene on platinum powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibanuma, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiji

    The high-temperature phase of ethylene on surfaces of Pt powder has been studied by proton-NMR in order to decide whether the surface species is the ethylidyne species (CH 3-C≡) proposed by Kesmodel et al. or the multiple-bonded species (-CH 2-CH=) proposed by Demuth. The observed NMR spectrum is not attributable to CH 3-groups on the surfaces, but can be interpreted as the superposition of two signals, one originating from CH 2-groups and the other from CH-groups. In other words, the results suggest that the surface species is the multiple-bonded species.

  5. Water exchange in plant tissue studied by proton NMR in the presence of paramagnetic centers.

    PubMed

    Bacić, G; Ratković, S

    1984-04-01

    The proton NMR relaxation of water in maize roots in the presence of paramagnetic centers, Mn2+, Mn- EDTA2 -, and dextran-magnetite was measured. It was shown that the NMR method of Conlon and Outhred (1972, Biochem. Biophys. Acta. 288:354-361) can be applied to a heterogenous multicellular system, and the water exchange time between cortical cells and the extracellular space can be calculated. The water exchange is presumably controlled by the intracellular unstirred layers. The Mn- EDTA2 - complex is a suitable paramagnetic compound for complex tissue, while the application of dextran-magnetite is probably restricted to studies of water exchange in cell suspensions. The water free space of the root and viscosity of the cells cytoplasm was estimated with the use of Mn- EDTA2 -. The convenience of proton NMR for studying the multiphase uptake of paramagnetic ions by plant root as well as their transport to leaves is demonstrated. A simple and rapid NMR technique (spin-echo recovery) for continuous measurement of the uptake process is presented.

  6. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, http://doi.org/10.7566/JPSJ.84.113601, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  7. NMR and IR spectroscopic study of proton exchange between o-nitrophenol and methanol in CCl/sub 4/

    SciTech Connect

    Bureiko, S.F.; Golubev, N.S.; Lange, I.Y.

    1982-08-01

    The kinetics of proton exchange in solution between o-nitrophenol and methanol have been studied by dynamic NMR and IR spectroscopy, and a method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the rate constants for H-H, H-D, and D-H exchange from /sup 1/H NMR spectra.

  8. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject (J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, 119, 5241-5249). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action.

  9. Characterization of filter extractables by proton NMR spectroscopy: studies on intact filters with process buffers.

    PubMed

    Kao, Y H; Bender, J; Hagewiesche, A; Wong, P; Huang, Y; Vanderlaan, M

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize potential extractables from sterilizing grade filters. The focus of this report is the 0.22 micron Durapore (hydrophilic modified PVDF) filter which is used throughout our recovery processes. The objectives of this study are (1) to identify potential filter extractables from the hydrophilic PVDF filters; (2) to show that NMR spectroscopy may be used to detect filter extractables in the presence of product and excipients; and (3) to establish levels of filter extractables obtained by extraction with a variety of buffers. The data show that the primary source of filter extractables is the hydrophilic modification of the PVDF membrane surface. Extractables from the modified hydrophilic PVDF filter include propylene glycol (PG) and soluble oligomers of the hydroxypropyl acrylate and cross-linker. Propylene glycol, arising from the hydrolysis of the hydroxypropyl acrylate, appears to be the primary extractable in buffers above pH 11. Since the 1H-NMR method can easily detect the methyl proton signals of PG, an NMR assay was developed to detect PG in the presence of buffer excipients and final product. Propylene glycol can be used as a marker for the extractables from Durapore hydrophilic PVDF filters. Although numerous buffers were used to generate extractables from the PVDF filter, significant extractables (PG and soluble oligomers) were found only in high pH extraction buffers. As a result of this finding, only a limited number of new buffers or new PVDF filters will require testing for future validation studies. Process validation studies have shown that neither PG nor soluble oligomers are at levels that impact the quality or safety of the product.

  10. Proton NMR studies of PECVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and HWCVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberg, Julie Lynn

    This dissertation discusses a new understanding of the internal structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Recent research in our group has included nuclear spin echo double resonance (SEDOR) measurements on device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic films. Using the SEDOR pulse sequence with and without the perturbing 29Si pulse, we obtain Fourier transform spectra for film at 80K that allows us to distinguish between molecular hydrogen and hydrogen bonded to silicon. Using such an approach, we have demonstrated that high quality a-Si:H films produced by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) from SiH 4 contains about ten atomic percent hydrogen, nearly 40% of which is molecular hydrogen, individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of tetragonal sites (T-sites). The main objective of this dissertation is to examine the difference between a-Si:H made by PECVD techniques and a-Si:H made by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) techniques. Proton NMR and 1H- 29Si SEDOR NMR are used to examine the hydrogen structure of HWCVD a-Si:H films prepared at the University of Utrecht and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Past NMR studies have shown that high quality PECVD a-Si:H films have geometries in which 40% of the contained hydrogen is present as H2 molecules individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of T-sites. A much smaller H2 fraction sometimes is physisorbed on internal surfaces. In this dissertation, similar NMR methods are used to perform structural studies of the two HWCVD aSi:H samples. The 3kHz resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole-burn behavior similar to that found for PECVD a-Si:H films as does the 24kHz FWHM line from clustered hydrogen bonded to silicon. Radio frequency hole-burning is a tool to distinguish between inhomogenous and homogeneous broadening. In the hole-burn experiments, the 3kHz FWHM resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole

  11. The local order of supercooled water in solution with LiCl studied by NMR proton chemical shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, C.; Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Cicero, N.; Dugo, G.; Mallamace, F.

    2016-05-01

    We study by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the local order of water molecules in solution with lithium chloride at eutectic concentration. In particular, by measuring the proton chemical shift as a function of the temperature in the interval 203{ K}NMR peak allows the investigation of the mutual difference between the chemical shift of water solvating lithium and chlorine individually. The thermal behavior of this quantity confirms previous results about the role of the temperature in the solvation mechanisms down to about 225K. This temperature coincides with that of the so-called Widom line for water supporting the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  12. 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam: assignment of heme resonances and substrate dependance of one cysteinate beta proton.

    PubMed

    Mouro, C; Bondon, A; Simonneaux, G; Jung, C

    1997-09-08

    The 1H-NMR study of diamagnetic cytochrome P450cam FeII-CO has been performed for the first time. Chemical shifts of the cysteinate fifth ligand protons and of several heme protons have been assigned through 1- and 2-dimensional spectra at 500 MHz. A substrate dependance has been observed for the resonance of the cysteinate proton detected in the high-field region.

  13. Interactions of hydrogen with alkali promoted Ru/SiO2 catalysts: A proton NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Uner, Denis Ozbay

    1994-05-10

    Role of H spillover to the silica support was studied using chemisorption; a strongly bound component of spilled over H was found in the silica support which interfered with accurate measurements of active metal sites via volumetric strong H chemisorption. The volumetric chemisorption technique was modified so that measurement times were reduced from 12--36 h to 1 h. The active Ru surface was characterized means of changes in proton spin counts and NMR Knight shifts vs alkali loading. Na, K blocked the active surface of Ru metal, but Cs was pushed off by H chemisorption. The alkali promoters restricted H mobility on both metal surface and at the metal support interfaces; this is consistent with effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. 1H NMR was used to study the effect of the active metal and promoter on support hydroxyl groups. The OH group density in the silica support decreased with metal and/or promoter loading, but not on a one-to-one basis; the exchange efficiency of the hydroxyls decreased with atomic size of the alkali metal. An additional downfield proton resonance was detected which was assigned to the alkali hydroxide species in the support.

  14. Proton NMR study of spin dynamics in the magnetic organic chains M (hfac)3 NITEt (M =Eu3 +,Gd3 + )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, M.; Lascialfari, A.; Caneschi, A.; Ammannato, L.; Gatteschi, D.; Rettori, A.; Pini, M. G.; Cucci, C.; Borsa, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the spin dynamics in the rare-earth-based low-dimensional molecular magnetic chains Eu (hfac) 3NITEt and Gd (hfac) 3NITEt (in short, Eu-Et and Gd-Et). Although both samples are based on the same chemical building block, [(hfac) 3NITEt ] , their magnetic properties change dramatically when the Eu3 + ion, which is nonmagnetic at low temperatures, is substituted by the magnetic Gd3 + ion. The present proton NMR investigation shows that, down to the lowest investigated temperature (T =1.5 K for Gd-Et and T =3 K for Eu-Et), the Eu-Et chain behaves as a one-dimensional Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling (J =-20 K) between s =1 /2 organic radicals, and has a T -independent exchange frequency (ωe=2.6 ×1012 rad/s). In the Gd-Et chain, in contrast, a competition arises between nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic coupling and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic coupling; moreover, two phase transitions have previously been found, in agreement with Villain's conjecture: a first transition, at T0=2.2 K, from a high temperature paramagnetic phase to a chiral spin liquid phase, and a second transition, at TN=1.9 K, to a three-dimensional helical spin solid phase. Contrary to the Eu-Et chain (whose three-dimensional ordering temperature is estimated to insurge at very low, TN≈0.3 K), critical spin dynamics effects have been measured in the Gd-Et chain on approaching TN=1.9 K: namely, a divergence of the proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 , which in turn produces a sudden wipe-out of the NMR signal in a very narrow (Δ T ˜0.04 K) temperature range above TN. Below TN, an inhomogeneous broadening of the NMR line indicates a complete spin freezing. At T0=2.2 K, instead, such critical effects are not observed because NMR measurements probe the two-spin correlation function, while the chiral spin liquid phase transition is associated with a divergence of the four

  15. Proton NMR spectral study of UV treated live Escherichia coli Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokopud, Michael

    The lethal effects of ultraviolet radiation on microorganisms have been known and utilized for many years. In sufficiently high photon fluences, light and in particular, UV light, is an effective and subtle means of killing or at least immobilizing most, if not all cells and micro-organisms. Because of their small size, light can penetrate the enclosing protective walls and enter the inner volumes where it can break organic bonds in components that are vital to cell function. Despite the fact that a very low dose of UV light (1-9 mJ/cm2) has been shown to inactivate many micro-organisms, there remains a dearth of biological information about light induced effects in molecules and their interactions within living microbial systems. The use of 1H NMR as a spectroscopic tool was chosen to undertake an examination of the possible effects resulting from exposing E. coli to lethal fluencies of UV radiation. Once sample preparation, treatment, and NMR mounting methods were optimized, the high sensitivity and high resolution capabilities of the method produced reproducible results for a series of experiments. These results reveal significant changes in the ratio of the 1H NMR spectra of the treated to untreated E.coli samples when the treated sample was exposed to a lethal fluence of 275nm light. Photons at the 275nm wavelength, used in this study, have enough energy to break all of the principle bonds in an organic molecule. The difference spectrum between treated to untreated samples appears to be fitted well using specific component spectra from these groups of compounds. Increases in NMR peak amplitudes are observed and appear to be correlated with the spectral locations of several amino acids, membrane components and several sugars/saccharides. Increases in peak intensities of 4-8% were observed in the 0.8-1.1 ppm chemical shift region, characteristic of lipid and amino acid groups. A 3.5-4% increase was observed in the 2 ppm and 3.4-4 ppm region characteristic of

  16. Isotope-edited proton NMR study on the structure of a pepsin/inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Erickson, J.W.; Abad-Zapatero, C.

    1988-11-01

    A general approach is illustrated for providing detailed structural information on large enzyme/inhibitor complexes using NMR spectroscopy. The method involves the use of isotopically labeled ligands to simplify two-dimensional NOE spectra of large molecular complexes by isotope-editing techniques. With this approach, the backbone and side-chain conformations (at the P/sub 2/ and P/sub 3/ sites) of a tightly bound inhibitor of porcine pepsin have bene determined. In addition, structural information on the active site of pepsin has been obtained. Due to the sequence homology between porcine pepsin and human renin, this structural information may prove useful for modeling renin/inhibitor complexes with the ultimate goal of designing more effective renin inhibitors. Moreover, this general approach can be applied to study other biological systems of interest such as other enzyme/inhibitor complexes, ligands bound to soluble receptors, and enzyme/substrate interactions.

  17. Hydrogen bond geometries and proton tautomerism of homoconjugated anions of carboxylic acids studied via H/D isotope effects on 13C NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Koeppe, Benjamin; Golubev, Nikolai S; Denisov, Gleb S; Smirnov, Sergei N; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    Ten formally symmetric anionic OHO hydrogen bonded complexes, modeling Asp/Glu amino acid side chain interactions in nonaqueous environment (CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl solution, 200-110 K) have been studied by (1)H, (2)H, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, i.e. intermolecularly H-bonded homoconjugated anions of acetic, chloroacetic, dichloroacetic, trifluoroacetic, trimethylacetic, and isobutyric acids, and intramolecularly H-bonded hydrogen succinate, hydrogen rac-dimethylsuccinate, hydrogen maleate, and hydrogen phthalate. In particular, primary H/D isotope effects on the hydrogen bond proton signals as well as secondary H/D isotope effects on the (13)C signals of the carboxylic groups are reported and analyzed. We demonstrate that in most of the studied systems there is a degenerate proton tautomerism between O-H···O(-) and O(-)···H-O structures which is fast in the NMR time scale. The stronger is the proton donating ability of the acid, the shorter and more symmetric are the H-bonds in each tautomer of the homoconjugate. For the maleate and phthalate anions exhibiting intramolecular hydrogen bonds, evidence for symmetric single well potentials is obtained. We propose a correlation between H/D isotope effects on carboxylic carbon chemical shifts and the proton transfer coordinate, q(1) = ½(r(OH) - r(HO)), which allows us to estimate the desired OHO hydrogen bond geometries from the observed (13)C NMR parameters, taking into account the degenerate proton tautomerism.

  18. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  19. A proton NMR relaxation study of water dynamics in bovine serum albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Belotti, Monica; Martinelli, Andrea; Gianferri, Raffaella; Brosio, Elvino

    2010-01-14

    Water dynamics and compartmentation in glutaraldehyde cross-linked bovine serum albumin nanoparticles have been investigated by an integrated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) protocol based on water relaxation times and self-diffusion coefficients measurements. Multi-exponentially of water relaxation curves has been accounted for according to a diffusive and chemical exchange model (see B. P. Hills, S. F. Takacs and P. S. Belton, Mol. Phys., 1989, 67(4), 903, and Mol. Phys., 1989, 67(4), 913; E. Brosio, M. Belotti and R. Gianferri, in Food Science and Technology: New Research, ed. L. V. Greco and M. N. Bruno, Nova Science Publishers, Hauppauge (NY), 2008) that made it possible to single out water molecules in the molecular spaces in the interior of albumin nanoparticles, in the meso-cavities formed by packed nanoparticles and in the meniscus on top of the nanoparticles suspension. A quantitative rationalization of T(2) values of water different components allowed morphological information to be acquired as for the size of water filled compartments, while self-diffusion coefficient measurements of water excess or fluxed packed nanoparticles suspensions are describers of transport properties of soft biomaterials. The paper reports an NMR approach that can be seen as a general and relevant method to characterize excess-water-swollen soft biomaterials.

  20. Proton NMR studies of the electronic structure of ZrH/sub x/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attalla, A.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Craft, B. D.; Venturini, E. L.; Rhim, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    The proton spin lattice relaxation times and Knight shifts were measured in f.c.c. (delta-phase) and f.c.t. (epsilon-phase) ZrH/sub x/ for 1.5 or = to x or = to 2.0. Both parameters indicate that N(E/sub F/) is very dependent upon hydrogen content with a maximum occurring at ZrH1 83. This behavior is ascribed to modifications in N(E/sub F/) through a fcc/fct distortion in ZrH/sub x/ associated with a Jahn-Teller effect.

  1. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  2. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; ...

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implicationsmore » for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.« less

  3. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implications for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.

  4. Proton NMR Study of Room Temperature Aging in Isotactic Polypropylene and Ethylene/Octene Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhart, David; Snyder, Chad; Alamo, Rufina

    2003-03-01

    The Bloch-decay proton spectra of 2 isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) and 2 ethylene/octene (EO) copolymers have been monitored as a function of room-temperature aging time, t_age, from 10 min to 4 d. Conditions for initiating aging were air-quench from the melt for EO and 6 min annealing near 90 ^oC for iPP. We focused on elucidating the nature of aging, both morphologically and via concepts like secondary crystallization. To this end, some multiple-pulse experiments were also conducted. Aging always reduced the population of the most mobile species. It was linear in log(t_age)and the (minimum) amount of motionally transformed material was only a few percent. In iPP, aging was dominated by secondary crystallization rather than a general densification of the amorphous region. Aging-induced crystallization in EO is less well defined. The iPP samples had significant contrast in defect content, mass dispersion, and amorphous content; however, the contrast in aging amounts was only modest. No definitive morphological placement of the aging structures formed could be deduced; but possibilites consistent with the data will be discussed.

  5. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  6. Proton clouds to measure long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Sinnige, Tessa; Daniëls, Mark; Baldus, Marc; Weingarth, Markus

    2014-03-26

    We show that selective labeling of proteins with protonated amino acids embedded in a perdeuterated matrix, dubbed 'proton clouds', provides general access to long-range contacts between nonexchangeable side chain protons in proton-detected solid-state NMR, which is important to study protein tertiary structure. Proton-cloud labeling significantly improves spectral resolution by simultaneously reducing proton line width and spectral crowding despite a high local proton density in clouds. The approach is amenable to almost all canonical amino acids. Our method is demonstrated on ubiquitin and the β-barrel membrane protein BamA.

  7. Proton-coupled 15N NMR spectra of neutral and protonated ethenoadenosine and ethenocytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Sierzputowska-Gracz, H; Wiewiórowski, M; Kozerski, L; von Philipsborn, W

    1984-01-01

    The 15N chemical shifts and 15N, 1H spin coupling constants were determined in the title compounds using the INEPT pulse sequence and assigned with the aid of selective proton decoupling. The delta/15N/ and J/N, H/ values are discussed in terms of involvement of the imidazole ring created by ethenobridging in the electronic structure of the whole molecule. Both spectral parameters indicate that the diligant nitrogen in this ring is the primary site of protonation in these modified nucleosides. It is concluded that 15N NMR of nucleoside bases can be largely a complementary method to 1H and 13C NMR studies and, in addition, can serve as a direct probe for studies of nitrogen environment in oligomeric fragments of nucleic acids even at moderately strong magnetic fields due to the higher spectral dispersion compared with 1H and 13C NMR spectra. PMID:6473107

  8. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  9. The Effect of Antitumor Glycosides on Glioma Cells and Tissues as Studied by Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; Campos-Olivas, Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the treatment with glycolipid derivatives on the metabolic profile of intact glioma cells and tumor tissues, investigated using proton high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, is reported here. Two compounds were used, a glycoside and its thioglycoside analogue, both showing anti-proliferative activity on glioma C6 cell cultures; however, only the thioglycoside exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. At the drug concentrations showing anti-proliferative activity in cell culture (20 and 40 µM), significant increases in choline containing metabolites were observed in the 1H NMR spectra of the same intact cells. In vivo experiments in nude mice bearing tumors derived from implanted C6 glioma cells, showed that reduction of tumor volume was associated with significant changes in the metabolic profile of the same intact tumor tissues; and were similar to those observed in cell culture. Specifically, the activity of the compounds is mainly associated with an increase in choline and phosphocholine, in both the cell cultures and tumoral tissues. Taurine, a metabolite that has been considered a biomarker of apoptosis, correlated with the reduction of tumor volume. Thus, the results indicate that the mode of action of the glycoside involves, at least in part, alteration of phospholipid metabolism, resulting in cell death. PMID:24194925

  10. Polar solvent fluctuations drive proton transfer in hydrogen bonded complexes of carboxylic acid with pyridines: NMR, IR and ab initio MD study.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, B; Pylaeva, S A; Allolio, C; Sebastiani, D; Nibbering, E T J; Denisov, G S; Limbach, H-H; Tolstoy, P M

    2017-01-04

    We study a series of intermolecular hydrogen-bonded 1 : 1 complexes formed by chloroacetic acid with 19 substituted pyridines and one aliphatic amine dissolved in CD2Cl2 at low temperature by (1)H and (13)C NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The hydrogen bond geometries in these complexes vary from molecular (O-HN) to zwitterionic (O(-)H-N(+)) ones, while NMR spectra show the formation of short strong hydrogen bonds in intermediate cases. Analysis of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching and asymmetric CO2(-) stretching bands in FTIR spectra reveal the presence of proton tautomerism. On the basis of these data, we construct the overall proton transfer pathway. In addition to that, we also study by use of ab initio molecular dynamics the complex formed by chloroacetic acid with 2-methylpyridine, surrounded by 71 CD2Cl2 molecules, revealing a dual-maximum distribution of hydrogen bond geometries in solution. The analysis of the calculated trajectory shows that the proton jumps between molecular and zwitterionic forms are indeed driven by dipole-dipole solvent-solute interactions, but the primary cause of the jumps is the formation/breaking of weak CHO bonds from solvent molecules to oxygen atoms of the carboxylate group.

  11. Lactonization and protonation of gluconic acid: a thermodynamicand kinetic study by potentiometry, nmr and esi-ms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Gibson, P.; Clark, S.B.; Tian, G.; Zanonato, P.; Rao, L.

    2007-01-10

    In acidic aqueous solutions, gluconate protonation is coupled with lactonization of gluconic acid. With the decrease of pC{sub H}, two lactones ({delta}/{gamma}) are sequentially formed. The {delta}-lactone forms more readily than the {gamma}-lactone. In 0.1 M gluconate solutions, if pC{sub H} is above 2.5, only the {delta}-lactone is generated. When pC{sub H} is decreased below 2.0, the formation of the {gamma}-lactone is observable although the {delta}-lactone predominates. At I = 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} and room temperature, the deprotonation constant of the carboxylic group, using the NMR technique, was determined to be log K{sub a} = 3.30 {+-} 0.02; the {delta}-lactonization constant, by the batch potentiometric titrations, was obtained to be log K{sub L} = - (0.54 {+-} 0.04). Using ESI-MS, the rate constants of the {delta}-lactonization and the hydrolysis at pC{sub H} {approx} 5.0 were estimated to be k{sub 1} = 3.2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and k{sup -1} = 1.1 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  12. NMR and DFT study on media effects on proton transfer in hydrogen bonding: concept of molecular probe with an application to ionic and super-polar liquids.

    PubMed

    Balevicius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Aidas, Kestutis

    2009-10-14

    Media effects of ionic and super-polar liquids on the state of H-bonding were studied by NMR and DFT methods. The proton sharing (positioning) in the H-bond was monitored following the chemical shifts of picolinic acid N-oxide (PANO) used as the molecular probe. The relationships between PANO 1H and 13C chemical shifts and proton position in the O-H...O bridge were calibrated using traditional organic solvents and other H-bond complexes of pyridine N-oxide with acids to increase the H-bond strength. A reliable parameter for H-bond monitoring was proposed. The state of the H-bond in ionic liquid media is largely governed by the dielectric properties of the bulk media. A drastic fall-out of PANO/[BuMePyr][TfO] from the general dielectric scheme built using solvents with increasing dielectric constant (from chloroform to water and culminating with formamide) was observed. On a molecular level this effect indicates that the ionic liquid [BuMePyr][TfO] can act on H-bonded systems as a stimulant of proton transfer. In 'super-polar' media (formamide) the intramolecular H-bond system converts into an intermolecular one forming a neutral H-bond complex of PANO with the formamide molecule.

  13. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  14. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    PubMed Central

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John-Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) uses a Zn-bound OH−/H2O mechanism to catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2. This catalysis also involves a separate proton transfer step, mediated by an ordered solvent network coordinated by hydrophilic residues. One of these residues, Tyr7, was previously shown to be deprotonated in the neutron crystal structure at pH 10. This observation indicated that Tyr7 has a perturbed pKa compared with free tyrosine. To further probe the pKa of this residue, NMR spectroscopic measurements of [13C]Tyr-labeled holo HCA II (with active-site Zn present) were preformed to titrate all Tyr residues between pH 5.4–11.0. In addition, neutron studies of apo HCA II (with Zn removed from the active site) at pH 7.5 and holo HCA II at pH 6 were conducted. This detailed interrogation of tyrosines in HCA II by NMR and neutron crystallography revealed a significantly lowered pKa of Tyr7 and how pH and Tyr proximity to Zn affect hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:25902526

  15. Effect of solvent on proton location and dynamic behavior in short intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yukie; Masuda, Yuichi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen phthalate anion has a short strong O-H-O hydrogen bond (H-bond). According to previous experimental studies, the H-bond is asymmetric and two tautomers are interconverted in aqueous solutions. In the present study, the effects of polar solvents on the H-bond in a zwitterionic hydrogen phthalate derivative 1 were investigated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analyses of the trajectories for the methanol solution showed that the H-bonding proton tends to be located closer to the carboxylate group that forms fewer intermolecular H-bonds, than to the other carboxylate group and that the intramolecular proton transfer in 1 is triggered by the breakage and/or formation of an intermolecular H-bond. The enol form of dibenzoylmethane (2) also has a short H-bond, and the OH bond is reported to be rather long (>1.1 Å) in the crystal. In the present study, the effects of the solvent on the H-bond in 2 were investigated by molecular orbital (MO) calculations, MD simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for 2 in vacuum indicated that the barrier height for the intramolecular proton transfer is almost the same as the zero-point energy of the vibrational ground state, resulting in broad distribution of the proton density along the H-bond, owing to the nuclear quantum effect. The OH distances were determined in CCl4, acetonitrile, and dimethylsulfoxide solutions from the magnetic dipolar interactions between the 17O and 1H nuclei monitoring the nuclear magnetic relaxation times of 1H. The experimental results indicated that the H-bond geometry of 2 is influenced by the interactions with dimethylsulfoxide, suggesting the formation of a bifurcated H-bond, which was supported by the DFT calculations. The MD simulations for the methanol solution of 2 showed that the asymmetry of the OH distance is correlated with the asymmetry in the electrostatic field of the

  16. A proton NMR study of the effect of a new intravasal injectable male contraceptive RISUG on seminal plasma metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sharma, U; Chaudhury, K; Jagannathan, N R; Guha, S K

    2001-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to quantify citrate, glucose, lactate, glycerophosphorylcholine and choline in seminal plasma from subjects injected with a new male contraceptive RISUG, a copolymer of styrene maleic anhydride dissolved in dimethyl sulphoxide, and in seminal plasma from normal ejaculates. No significant difference in the concentration of citrate was observed between the groups, indicating that the prostate is not affected by the contraceptive. The concentrations of glucose, lactate, glycerophosphorylcholine and choline were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in subjects injected with RISUG compared with controls. In addition, metabolite ratios such as choline:citrate, citrate:lactate, choline:lactate and glycerophosphorylcholine:choline were calculated. Citrate:lactate and glycerophosphorylcholine:choline ratios were significantly lower in RISUG-injected subjects than in controls (P < 0.01), thereby indicating the occurrence of partial obstructive azoospermia. The most important finding of the present study was that the intervention of RISUG in the vas deferens even for a period as long as 8 years is absolutely safe and does not lead to prostatic diseases.

  17. Effect of a new injectable male contraceptive on the seminal plasma amino acids studied by proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Koel; Sharma, Uma; Jagannathan, N R; Guha, Sujoy K

    2002-09-01

    Effect of RISUG, a newly developed male contraceptive, on various amino acids of seminal plasma ejaculates was studied by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 400 MHz. Levels of amino acids were compared with the seminal plasma of obstructive azoospermia and controls. Glutamic acid, glutamine, and arginine were found to be high in concentration in human seminal plasma. The concentration of aromatic amino acids such as tyrosine, histidine, and phenylalanine in RISUG-injected subjects showed no significant difference compared to controls (p > 0.1); however, there was a statistically significant decrease in the concentration of these amino acids in obstructive azoospermia. The concentration of some prominent amino acids that showed overlapping resonances, such as isoleucine+leucine+valine (p < 0.01), alanine+isoleucine+lysine (p < 0.01), arginine+lysine+leucine (p < 0.01), and glutamic acid+glutamine (p < 0.01), showed a statistically significant decrease in RISUG-injected subjects compared to controls. Overlap of these amino acid resonances were noticed even at 600 MHz. In general, the total amino acids concentration in RISUG-injected subjects was found to be higher than in azoospermic subjects, confirming the occurrence of 'partial' obstructive azoospermia in subjects injected with this contraceptive.

  18. NMR spectroscopy of hydroxyl protons in aqueous solutions of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, E; Otting, G; Wüthrich, K

    1992-09-01

    Hydroxyl groups of serine and threonine, and to some extent also tyrosine are usually located on or near the surface of proteins. NMR observations of the hydroxyl protons is therefore of interest to support investigations of the protein surface in solution, and knowledge of the hydroxyl NMR lines is indispensable as a reference for studies of protein hydration in solution. In this paper, solvent suppression schemes recently developed for observation of hydration water resonances were used to observe hydroxyl protons of serine, threonine and tyrosine in aqueous solutions of small model peptides and the protein basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). The chemical shifts of the hydroxyl protons of serine and threonine were found to be between 5.4 and 6.2 ppm, with random-coil shifts at 4 degrees C of 5.92 ppm and 5.88 ppm, respectively, and those of tyrosine between 9.6 and 10.1 ppm, with a random-coil shift of 9.78 ppm. Since these spectral regions are virtually free of other polypeptide 1H NMR signals, cross peaks with the hydroxyl protons are usually well separated even in homonuclear two-dimensional 1H NMR spectra. To illustrate the practical use of hydroxyl proton NMR in polypeptides, the conformations of the side-chain hydroxyl groups in BPTI were characterized by measurements of nuclear Overhauser effects and scalar coupling constants involving the hydroxyl protons. In addition, hydroxyl proton exchange rates were measured as a function of pH, where simple first-order rate processes were observed for both acid- and base-catalysed exchange of all but one of the hydroxyl-bearing residues in BPTI. For the conformations of the individual Ser, Thr and Tyr side chains characterized in the solution structure with the use of hydroxyl proton NMR, both exact coincidence and significant differences relative to the corresponding BPTI crystal structure data were observed.

  19. Mixed micelles of polyethylene glycol (23) lauryl ether with ionic surfactants studied by proton 1D and 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Chang; Zhao, Sui; Mao, Shi-Zhen; Yuan, Han-Zhen; Yu, Jia-Yong; Shen, Lian-Fang; Du, You-Ru

    2002-05-01

    (1)H NMR chemical shift, spin-lattice relaxation time, spin-spin relaxation time, self-diffusion coefficient, and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (2D NOESY) measurements have been used to study the nonionic-ionic surfactant mixed micelles. Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were used as the ionic surfactants and polyethylene glycol (23) lauryl ether (Brij-35) as the nonionic surfactant. The two systems are both with varying molar ratios of CTAB/Brij-35 (C/B) and SDS/Brij-35 (S/B) ranging from 0.5 to 2, respectively, at a constant concentration of 6 mM for Brij-35 in aqueous solutions. Results give information about the relative arrangement of the surfactant molecules in the mixed micelles. In the former system, the trimethyl groups attached to the polar heads of the CTAB molecules are located between the first oxy-ethylene groups next to the hydrophobic chains of Brij-35 molecules. These oxy-ethylene groups gradually move outward from the hydrophobic core of the mixed micelle with an increase in C/B in the mixed solution. In contrast to the case of the CTAB/Triton X-100 system, the long flexible hydrophilic poly oxy-ethylene chains, which are in the exterior part of the mixed micelles, remain coiled, but looser, surrounding the hydrophobic core. There is almost no variation in conformation of the hydrophilic chains of Brij-35 molecules in the mixed micelles of the SDS/Brij-35 system as the S/B increases. The hydrophobic chains of both CTAB and SDS are co-aggregated with Brij-35, respectively, in their mixed micellar cores.

  20. Mechanism of binding of the radiosensitizers metronidazole and misonidazole (RO-07-0582) to bovine and human serum albumin: a proton NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkowska, A.; Lubas, B.; Wilczok, T.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution proton NMR spectra of the radiosensitizer metronidazole and its derivative misonidazole (RO-07-0582) were measured in D/sub 2/O at resonance frequency 60 MHz and interpreted in the aliphatic and aromatic regions. The linewidths of the NMR peaks attributed to individual fragments of nitroimidazole molecules were then analyzed in the presence of bovine and human serum albumin. With increasing concentration of serum albumin, a selectively larger broadening of the lines attributable to the protons of the aliphatic moieties than of those of the imidazole rings was observed for both compounds. This broadening for misonidazole strongly depends on the ionic strength of the solution. The results indicate a specific immobilization of the molecules of both radiosensitizers during their interaction with serum albumin and the involvement of the aliphatic chains of misonidazole and metronidazole as the primary binding sites.

  1. 1H-19F spin-lattice relaxation spectroscopy: proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bond studied by field-cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Noble, D L; Aibout, A; Horsewill, A J

    2009-12-01

    Proton tunnelling in the hydrogen bonds of two fluorine substituted benzoic acid dimers has been investigated using field-cycling NMR relaxometry. The close proximity of the (19)F nuclei to the hydrogen bond protons introduces heteronuclear (19)F-(1)H dipolar interactions into the spin-lattice relaxation processes. This renders the (1)H magnetisation-recovery biexponential and introduces multiple spectral density components into the relaxation matrix characterised by frequencies that are sums and differences of the (19)F and (1)H Larmor frequencies. Using field-cycling NMR pulse sequences that measure the spin-lattice relaxation and cross-relaxation rates we demonstrate how some of these multiple spectral density components can be separately resolved. This leads to an accurate determination of the correlation times that characterise the proton tunnelling motion. A broad spectrum of relaxation behaviour is illustrated and explored in the chosen samples and the investigation is used to explore the theory and practise of field-cycling NMR relaxometry in cases where heteronuclear interactions are significant.

  2. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the past reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have been reinvestigating the prospects of using zero field NMR types of techniques for two dimensional NMR structural analysis of complex organic solids such as coals. Currently MAS spin rates are not sufficiently high to permit zero field in high field NMR for protons in typical organic solids, however they are compatible with {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C dipolar couplings. In collaboration with Dr. Robert Tycko of AT T Bell Laboratories, inventor of the zero field in high field NMR method, the authors have performed the first zero field in high field {sup 13}C NMR experiments. These results are described. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Kinetic isotope effects and tunneling in cyclic double and triple proton transfer between acetic acid and methanol in tetrahydrofuran studied by dynamic /sup 1/H and /sup 2/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritzen, D.; Limbach, H.H.

    1984-02-22

    Previous studies of proton exchange and hydrogen bonding between acetic acid (A) and methanol (B) in tetrahydrofuran-d/sub 8/ have been extended to the study of the primary kinetic H/D isotope effects of the exchange. For this purpose a new combination of dynamic /sup 1/H and /sup 2/H NMR spectroscopy has been used to perform an ''NMR proton inventory''. The following rate law was obtained at deuterium fractions D=0 and D=1 of the exchangeable protonic sites: NU=k/sup LL/ C/sub A/C/sub B/+k/sub LLL/C/sub A//sup 2/C/sub B/ (L=H,D). This was attributed to a superposition of cyclic double and triple proton exchange involving one and two molecules of acetic acid and one molecule of methanol. Additional experiments were carried out at intermediate deuterium fractions. Thus, the kinetic HH/HD/DD and HHH/HHD/DDD isotope effects of the exchange as a function of the temperature was measured successfully. This has been achieved for the first time for well-defined intermolecular multiple-proton-transfer reactions. The possibility of determining the number of protons transferred in a chemical reaction by performing an NMR proton inventory is discussed. The rule of the geometric mean (RGM) is fulfilled for the kinetic isotope effects of the LLL process, which are almost independent of temperature within the margin of error. By contrast, the RGM is not fullfilled for the LL process, and the kinetic isotope effects depend strongly on the temperature. The energies of activation and frequency factors fit Bell's criteria of tunneling. The kinetic results are in good agreement with predictions of transition-state theory but can be explained by an intermolecular tunneling model. The results are proof that acetic acid and methanol form cyclic hydrogen-bonded 1:1 and 2:1 complexes which have very low concentration in tetrahydrofuran.

  4. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-06-17

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid-liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid-liquid phases.

  5. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid–liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid–liquid phases. PMID:27311326

  6. NMR analysis, protonation equilibria and decomposition kinetics of tolperisone.

    PubMed

    Orgován, Gábor; Tihanyi, Károly; Noszál, Béla

    2009-12-05

    The rate constants of spontaneous and hydroxide-catalyzed decomposition and the tautomer-specific protonation constants of tolperisone, a classical muscle relaxant were determined. A solution NMR method without any separation techniques was elaborated to quantitate the progress of decomposition. All the rate and equilibrium constants were determined at four different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The molecular mechanism of decomposition is proposed.

  7. Positional Enrichment by Proton Analysis (PEPA): A One-Dimensional (1) H-NMR Approach for (13) C Stable Isotope Tracer Studies in Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Vinaixa, Maria; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Aivio, Suvi; Capellades, Jordi; Gómez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau; Stracker, Travis H; Yanes, Oscar

    2017-03-20

    A novel metabolomics approach for NMR-based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of (13) C-satellite peaks using 1D-(1) H-NMR spectra. In comparison with (13) C-NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of (13) C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high-throughput of (1) H-NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D-NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts.

  8. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-09-30

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40/sup 0/C for a tightly bound /sup 15/N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads.

  9. Site selectivity in the protonation of a phosphinito bridged Pt(I)-Pt(I) complex: a combined NMR and density-functional theory mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Mario; Polini, Flavia; Gallo, Vito; Mastrorilli, Piero; Calmuschi-Cula, Beatrice; Englert, Ulli; Re, Nazzareno; Repo, Timo; Räisänen, Minna

    2008-11-03

    The protonation of the dinuclear phosphinito bridged complex [(PHCy2)Pt(mu-PCy2){kappa(2)P,O-mu-P(O)Cy2}Pt(PHCy2)] (Pt-Pt) (1) by Brønsted acids affords hydrido bridged Pt-Pt species the structure of which depends on the nature and on the amount of the acid used. The addition of 1 equiv of HX (X = Cl, Br, I) gives products of formal protonation of the Pt-Pt bond of formula syn-[(PHCy2)(X)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2){kappaP-P(O)Cy2}] (Pt-Pt) (5, X = Cl; 6, X = Br; 8, X = I), containing a Pt-X bond and a dangling kappa P-P(O)Cy2 ligand. Uptake of a second equivalent of HX results in the protonation of the P(O)Cy2 ligand with formation of the complexes [(PHCy2)(X)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2){kappaP-P(OH)Cy2}]X (Pt-Pt) (3, X = Cl; 4, X = Br; 9, X = I). Each step of protonation is reversible, thus reactions of 3, 4, with NaOH give, first, the corresponding neutral complexes 5, 6, and then the parent compound 1. While the complexes 3 and 4 are indefinitely stable, the iodine analogue 9 transforms into anti-[(PHCy2)(I)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2)(I)] (Pt-Pt) (7) deriving from substitution of an iodo group for the P(OH)Cy2 ligand. Complexes 3 and 4 are isomorphous crystallizing in the triclinic space group P1 and show an intramolecular hydrogen bond and an interaction between the halide counteranion and the POH hydrogen. The occurrence of such an interaction also in solution was ascertained for 3 by (35)Cl NMR. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy (including (31)P-(1)H HOESY) and density-functional theory calculations indicate that the mechanism of the reaction starts with a prior protonation of the oxygen with formation of an intermediate (12) endowed with a six membered Pt(1)-X...H-O-P-Pt(2) ring that evolves into thermodynamically stable products featuring the hydride ligand bridging the Pt atoms. Energy profiles calculated for the various steps of the reaction between 1 and HCl showed very low barriers for the proton transfer and the subsequent rearrangement to 12, while a barrier

  10. Positional Enrichment by Proton Analysis (PEPA): A One‐Dimensional 1H‐NMR Approach for 13C Stable Isotope Tracer Studies in Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Aivio, Suvi; Capellades, Jordi; Gómez, Josep; Canyellas, Nicolau; Stracker, Travis H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A novel metabolomics approach for NMR‐based stable isotope tracer studies called PEPA is presented, and its performance validated using human cancer cells. PEPA detects the position of carbon label in isotopically enriched metabolites and quantifies fractional enrichment by indirect determination of 13C‐satellite peaks using 1D‐1H‐NMR spectra. In comparison with 13C‐NMR, TOCSY and HSQC, PEPA improves sensitivity, accelerates the elucidation of 13C positions in labeled metabolites and the quantification of the percentage of stable isotope enrichment. Altogether, PEPA provides a novel framework for extending the high‐throughput of 1H‐NMR metabolic profiling to stable isotope tracing in metabolomics, facilitating and complementing the information derived from 2D‐NMR experiments and expanding the range of isotopically enriched metabolites detected in cellular extracts. PMID:28220994

  11. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  12. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by 15N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons.

    PubMed

    Live, D H; Cowburn, D; Breslow, E

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, 15N labeling being used to identify specific backbone 15N and 1H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence of hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neurophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of 15N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  14. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  15. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins.

  16. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of 1H-1H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins. PMID:27489348

  17. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Bellon, V. , 34 - Montpellier )

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  19. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  20. Thin-film solid-state proton NMR measurements using a synthetic mica substrate: Polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderHart, David L.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; Lavery, Kristopher A.; Dennis, Cindi L.; Rao, Ashwin B.; Lin, Eric K.

    2009-11-01

    Solid-state proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are performed successfully on polymer blend thin films through the use of synthetic mica as a substrate. When used as a substrate, synthetic fluorophlogopite mica with its proton-free, diamagnetic character, allows for adequate measurement sensitivity while minimally perturbing the proton thin-film spectra, especially relative to more commonly available natural micas. Specifically, we use multiple-pulse techniques in the presence of magic-angle spinning to measure the degree of mixing in two different polymer blend thin films, polystyrene/poly(xylylene ether) and poly(1-methyladamantyl methacrylate) (PMAdMA)/triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate (TPS-PFBS), spin-coated onto mica substrates. Our earlier studies had focused on bulk systems where NMR signals are stronger, but may not be representative of thin films of the same systems that are relevant to many applications such as photoresist formulations in the electronics industry. The superiority of synthetic over natural paramagnetic mica is demonstrated by the maintenance of resolution and spinning sideband intensities (relative to bulk samples) for the synthetic mica samples. In contrast, degraded resolution and large spinning sidebands are shown to typify spectra of the natural mica samples. This approach can be applied to many other proton measurements of solid thin films, thereby greatly extending the types of systems to be investigated. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported for all micas used.

  1. Thin-film solid-state proton NMR measurements using a synthetic mica substrate: polymer blends.

    PubMed

    VanderHart, David L; Prabhu, Vivek M; Lavery, Kristopher A; Dennis, Cindi L; Rao, Ashwin B; Lin, Eric K

    2009-11-01

    Solid-state proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements are performed successfully on polymer blend thin films through the use of synthetic mica as a substrate. When used as a substrate, synthetic fluorophlogopite mica with its proton-free, diamagnetic character, allows for adequate measurement sensitivity while minimally perturbing the proton thin-film spectra, especially relative to more commonly available natural micas. Specifically, we use multiple-pulse techniques in the presence of magic-angle spinning to measure the degree of mixing in two different polymer blend thin films, polystyrene/poly(xylylene ether) and poly(1-methyladamantyl methacrylate) (PMAdMA)/triphenylsulfonium perfluorobutanesulfonate (TPS-PFBS), spin-coated onto mica substrates. Our earlier studies had focused on bulk systems where NMR signals are stronger, but may not be representative of thin films of the same systems that are relevant to many applications such as photoresist formulations in the electronics industry. The superiority of synthetic over natural paramagnetic mica is demonstrated by the maintenance of resolution and spinning sideband intensities (relative to bulk samples) for the synthetic mica samples. In contrast, degraded resolution and large spinning sidebands are shown to typify spectra of the natural mica samples. This approach can be applied to many other proton measurements of solid thin films, thereby greatly extending the types of systems to be investigated. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are also reported for all micas used.

  2. Diffusion of small molecules in a chitosan/water gel determined by proton localized NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    García-Aparicio, Carlos; Quijada-Garrido, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio

    2012-02-15

    Proton localized NMR spectroscopy (MRS) has been applied to study the diffusion of three small molecules, caffeine, theophylline and caprolactam, in chitosan gels with different concentration of water. This technique allows the non-destructive monitorization of diffusant concentration as a function of time and location. Concentration profiles were compared with theoretical curves based on solutions of Fick's diffusion equation for the best fitting, with the appropriate boundary conditions. The measured concentration profiles show a good agreement with the Fickian law. Values of the diffusion coefficients D ranging from 6.1×10(-6) to 3.4×10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) depending on chitosan concentration and type of diffusant molecule were determined. In addition, measurements of diffusion coefficients at equilibrium conditions with proton pulsed field gradient NMR methods supported the observed Fickian behavior and showed values of D in excellent agreement with those determined by proton MRS. All these facts demonstrate that proton MRS is an appropriate method for investigating diffusion process in complex systems, such as polymer gels.

  3. NMR Spectroscopic Assignment of Backbone and Side-Chain Protons in Fully Protonated Proteins: Microcrystals, Sedimented Assemblies, and Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Jan; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Cala, Diane; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Schubeis, Tobias; Akopjana, Inara; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Tars, Kaspars; Pica, Andrea; Leone, Serena; Picone, Delia; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Dixon, Nicholas E; Martinez, Denis; Berbon, Mélanie; El Mammeri, Nadia; Noubhani, Abdelmajid; Saupe, Sven; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-12-12

    We demonstrate sensitive detection of alpha protons of fully protonated proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy with 100-111 kHz magic-angle spinning (MAS). The excellent resolution in the Cα-Hα plane is demonstrated for 5 proteins, including microcrystals, a sedimented complex, a capsid and amyloid fibrils. A set of 3D spectra based on a Cα-Hα detection block was developed and applied for the sequence-specific backbone and aliphatic side-chain resonance assignment using only 500 μg of sample. These developments accelerate structural studies of biomolecular assemblies available in submilligram quantities without the need of protein deuteration.

  4. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-05

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication.

  5. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  6. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Applications: Proton NMR In Biological Objects Subjected To Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Proton NMR in Biological Objects Submitted to Magic Angle Spinning, In Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, Second Edition (Paul J. Worsfold, Alan Townshend and Colin F. Poole, eds.), Elsevier, Oxford 6:333-342. Published January 1, 2005. Proposal Number 10896.

  8. Low resolution 1H NMR assignment of proton populations in pound cake and its polymeric ingredients.

    PubMed

    Luyts, A; Wilderjans, E; Waterschoot, J; Van Haesendonck, I; Brijs, K; Courtin, C M; Hills, B; Delcour, J A

    2013-08-15

    Based on a model system approach, five different proton populations were distinguished in pound cake crumb using one dimensional low resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In free induction decay (FID) measurements, proton populations were assigned to (i) non-exchanging CH protons of crystalline starch, proteins and crystalline fat and (ii) non-exchanging CH protons of amorphous starch and gluten, which are in little contact with water. In Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) measurements, three proton populations were distinguished. The CPMG population with the lowest mobility and the FID population with the highest mobility represent the same proton population. The two CPMG proton populations with the highest mobility were assigned to exchanging protons (i.e., protons of water, starch, gluten, egg proteins and sugar) and protons of lipids (i.e., protons of egg yolk lipids and amorphous lipid fraction of margarine) respectively. Based on their spin-lattice relaxation times (T1), two dimensional (1)H NMR spectroscopy further resolved the two proton populations with the highest mobility into three and two proton populations, respectively.

  9. Critical hydrogen bonds and protonation states of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate revealed by NMR.

    PubMed

    Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Chan-Huot, Monique; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Shenderovich, Ilya G; Denisov, Gleb S; Toney, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    In this contribution we review recent NMR studies of protonation and hydrogen bond states of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and PLP model Schiff bases in different environments, starting from aqueous solution, the organic solid state to polar organic solution and finally to enzyme environments. We have established hydrogen bond correlations that allow one to estimate hydrogen bond geometries from (15)N chemical shifts. It is shown that protonation of the pyridine ring of PLP in aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) is achieved by (i) an intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond with an aspartate residue, assisted by the imidazole group of a histidine side chain and (ii) a local polarity as found for related model systems in a polar organic solvent exhibiting a dielectric constant of about 30. Model studies indicate that protonation of the pyridine ring of PLP leads to a dominance of the ketoenamine form, where the intramolecular OHN hydrogen bond of PLP exhibits a zwitterionic state. Thus, the PLP moiety in AspAT carries a net positive charge considered as a pre-requisite to initiate the enzyme reaction. However, it is shown that the ketoenamine form dominates in the absence of ring protonation when PLP is solvated by polar groups such as water. Finally, the differences between acid-base interactions in aqueous solution and in the interior of proteins are discussed. This article is part of a special issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phosphate Enzymology.

  10. Proton NMR Spectra: Deceptively Simple and Deceptively Complex Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurst, J. E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes relatively simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that demonstrate unexpected results of the deceptively simple and deceptively complex types. Background information, experimental procedures, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  11. Optimum levels of exchangeable protons in perdeuterated proteins for proton detection in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akbey, Umit; Lange, Sascha; Trent Franks, W; Linser, Rasmus; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Reif, Bernd; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the level of exchangeable protons on the observed amide proton linewidth obtained in perdeuterated proteins. Decreasing the amount of D(2)O employed in the crystallization buffer from 90 to 0%, we observe a fourfold increase in linewidth for both (1)H and (15)N resonances. At the same time, we find a gradual increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for (1)H-(15)N correlations in dipolar coupling based experiments for H(2)O concentrations of up to 40%. Beyond 40%, a significant reduction in SNR is observed. Scalar-coupling based (1)H-(15)N correlation experiments yield a nearly constant SNR for samples prepared with < or =30% H(2)O. Samples in which more H(2)O is employed for crystallization show a significantly reduced NMR intensity. Calculation of the SNR by taking into account the reduction in (1)H T (1) in samples containing more protons (SNR per unit time), yields a maximum SNR for samples crystallized using 30 and 40% H(2)O for scalar and dipolar coupling based experiments, respectively. A sensitivity gain of 3.8 is obtained by increasing the H(2)O concentration from 10 to 40% in the CP based experiment, whereas the linewidth only becomes 1.5 times broader. In general, we find that CP is more favorable compared to INEPT based transfer when the number of possible (1)H,(1)H interactions increases. At low levels of deuteration (> or =60% H(2)O in the crystallization buffer), resonances from rigid residues are broadened beyond detection. All experiments are carried out at MAS frequency of 24 kHz employing perdeuterated samples of the chicken alpha-spectrin SH3 domain.

  12. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities.

  13. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  14. Channel orientation anisotropy in perfluorosulfonic acid/SiO 2 composite proton exchange membranes: Water self-diffusion study using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipoi, Carmen; Demco, Dan E.; Zhu, Xiaomin; Vinokur, Rostislav; Conradi, Oliver; Fechete, Radu; Möller, Martin

    2011-09-01

    A diffusion-exchange model with the assumption of two water pools was applied to describe the water transport in perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA)/SiO 2 nanocomposites. The water diffusivity in-plane and through-plane in solution cast films was measured by NMR revealing higher in-plane mobility. Both diffusion coefficients reached maxima at ˜3%-wt. concentration in SiO 2. The anisotropy of the PFSA channels orientation reflected in the diffusivity anisotropy decreased with the increase in the nanofiller content. Water exchange rates reached a maximum at low concentration of silica. Gaussian displacement distribution for water diffusion was detected in PFSA membrane at 40 °C independent of the direction of gradient for small concentration in silica.

  15. NMR spectra and translational diffusion of protons in crystals with hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timokhin, V. M.; Garmash, V. M.; Tarasov, V. P.

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of proton transport in hydrogen-bond crystals at low temperatures is currently one of important problems in the semiconductor physics. With the use of the NMR spectra of wide-band-gap hydrogen-bond crystals grown in H2O and D2O solutions, we have succeeded in finding a direct proof of the presence of protons in the mobile phase, determined their activation energy in good agreement with the spectra of thermally stimulated depolarization currents and with the infrared spectra, and, as a result, clarified the mechanism of proton transport and tunneling.

  16. Empirical NMR Chemical Shift Correlations for Methyl and Methylene Protons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrich, Edwin C.; Runkle, Katherine Gates

    1984-01-01

    Presents an internally consistent set of 63 substituent constants developed for use with the Schoolery Relationship to predict the chemical shifts of methylene protons of acyclic compounds. Chemical shift data used in deriving the constants were taken mainly from primary sources of HNMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectra. (JN)

  17. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR.

    PubMed

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) (14)N spectra (I=1) via spy nuclei S=1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T(11)(I)T(11)(S) and T(21)(I)T(11)(S) at the beginning of the evolution interval t(1). The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t(1) to omega(1) may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S-S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected (14)N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the (14)N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of l-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for l-alanine the width of the (14)N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide (14)N in AAG peptide bonds.

  18. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  19. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focused on variable temperature spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 5 figs.

  20. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focussed on spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study of the proton-irradiated KTiOPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2013-08-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study the effects of proton irradiation on KTiOPO4 (KTP) in view of the previously studied paramagnetic impurity doping effects. High-resolution 31P NMR measurements showed significant increase in the isotropic chemical shifts of the two inequivalent phosphorus sites in the proton-irradiated KTP system, indicating decrease in the electron density around the phosphorous nuclei. The 31P NMR linewidths of the KTP system manifested anomalies associated with the superionic transition and with the polaron formation, which became much weaker after proton irradiation. Besides, the activation energy of the charge carriers increased significantly after proton irradiation.

  2. TU-EF-BRA-01: NMR and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbarst, A.

    2015-06-15

    applications of MRI exploit its capability to detect and image distinct movements of fluids: MR angiography (MRA), which rivals CT angiography but often requires no contrast medium, monitors the bulk flow of blood; functional MRI ( f MRI), distinguishes the perfusion of oxygenated blood from that of de-oxygenated, and lights up parts of the brain that are activated by a stimulus, rather like PET; and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indicates the diffusion of free water along tracts of axons, thereby bringing nerve trunks into view. There are variants on all of these themes, and on others as well. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), for example, can perform non-invasive ‘virtual biopsies’ that allow identification of certain cancers and other lesions. And an MRI-guided needle biopsy can sample brain tissue from a region only millimeters in dimensions. MRI, however, involves deeper and more complex aspects of physics, technology, and biology than do most other imaging modalities, and it is widely considered to be correspondingly more difficult to learn. We could probably cover all of this rather comprehensively if we had 50 hours available rather than 2 ̶ but, to paraphrase a former Secretary of Defense, you tell your story in the time you have allotted. The four presenters and another physicist, Kevin King from GE, have combined their efforts to co-author a single slide show that describes essentials of MRI as simply as possible. It is obviously far from thorough, but hopefully it will succeed in explaining some of the basics in a simplified but still valid fashion; in providing a taste of the numerous capabilities and complexities of the modality; and in whetting your appetite to learn more. Part I. NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient (Wolbarst), begins with an introductory case study that illustrates a half dozen ways in which MRI provides valuable clinical information. It then explores the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon, which underlies MRI. NMR

  3. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  4. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have concentrated on a theoretical treatment of pairs of tightly coupled spin {1/2} nuclei under magic angle spinning conditions. The average Hamiltonian theory developed here is required for a quantitative understanding of two dimensional NMR experiments of such spin pairs in solids. These experiments in turn provide a means of determining connectivities between resonances in solid state NMR spectra. Development of these techniques will allow us to establish connectivities between functional components in coals. The complete description of these spin dynamics has turned out to be complex, and is necessary to provide a foundation upon which such experiments may be quantitatively interpreted in complex mixtures such as coals. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concern how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors have concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the magic angle spinning (MAS) rate. In order to be able to use fields the order of 7.0 T or higher, CP efficiency must be maintained at MAS rates of over 10 kHz. The standard sequences have severe limitations at these rates which lead to intensity distortions in {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra. Thus in order to be able to take advantage of the increases in sensitivity and resolution that accompany high field operation, improvements in the NMR methods are required. The new sequences the authors are developing will be especially important for quantitative analysis of coal structure by {sup 13}C solid state NMR at high field strengths. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Barany, M.; Arus, C.

    1986-03-01

    Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.

  7. Diffusion dependence of proton NMR relaxation rates in the presence of ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Michael; Hammel, P. Chris

    2009-03-01

    Ferritin is the predominant iron-storage protein in living organisms. It may serve as an indicator of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Measuring brain ferritin concentration non-invasively via MRI could enable better diagnoses and treatments of such diseases. Quantitative MRI determination of the ferritin concentration requires an understanding of the NMR relaxation mechanisms of hydrogen protons in the presence of ferritin. In aqueous solutions, ferritin enhances the transverse relaxation rate (R2) of the protons. This is thought to occur due to a diffusive mechanism, where protons diffusing near ferritin pass through a region of elevated magnetic field, and a chemical exchange mechanism, where protons bind to the protein for a period of time, experiencing an even higher magnetic field. These two mechanisms exhibit different dependencies on the self-diffusion coefficient of the protons. By adding glycerol to aqueous solutions, we control the self-diffusion of protons. We measure the R2 of protons in ferritin-containing binary mixtures of water and glycerol using CPMG sequences, and compare the experimental results to theoretical predictions of diffusion dependence in order to distinguish the relative importance of the mechanisms.

  8. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  9. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  10. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  11. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  12. Intermolecular triple proton and deuteron transfer in crystalline 3,5-dimethylpyrazole studied by NMR, NQR, and x-ray methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrle, B.; Aguilar-Parrilla, F.; Limbach, H.H. ); de la Concepcion Foces-Foces, M.; Cano, F.H. ); Elguero, J. ); Baldy, A.; Pierrot, M. ); Khurshid, M.M.T.; Larcombe-McDouall, J.B.; Smith, J.A.S. )

    1989-09-13

    A combination of {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N magnetic resonance, {sup 14}N quadrupole double resonance, and x-ray studies of solid 3,5-dimethylpyrazole between 270 and 350 K has shown that the NH...N hydrogen bond units present in the crystal are dynamically disordered, so that each nitrogen atom is on average attached to half a hydrogen atom. The molecules form discrete hydrogen-bonded cyclic trimers, in which the hydrogen atoms move in a double minimum potential energy surface which is symmetrical, to within experimental error. The experimental evidence in this temperature range is consistent with disorder by means of correlated triple hydrogen jumps with an activation energy of 45 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. There is a large kinetic hydrogen (HHH)/deuterium (DDD) isotope effort of >20 at 299 K and equal to 8 at 347 K.

  13. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively.

  14. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coal models. Along the same lines the author are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors has concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch. It has been found that the usual theories of CP are incorrect, and that the CP process is very heterogeneous in nature. This has significant implications on methods typically used in quantifying {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra of coals. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Differential protonation and dynamic structure of doxylamine succinate in solution using 1H and 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, B S; Nagana Gowda, G A; Ramesha, A R; Khetrapal, C L

    2004-07-01

    A protonation and dynamic structural study of doxylamine succinate, a 1:1 salt of succinic acid with dimethyl-[2-(1-phenyl-1-pyridin-2-yl-ethoxy)ethyl]amine, in solution using one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR experiments at variable temperature and concentration is presented. The two acidic protons of the salt doxylamine succinate are in 'intermediate' exchange at room temperature, as evidenced by the appearance of a broad signal. This signal evolves into two distinct signals below about -30 degrees C. A two-dimensional 1H-1H double quantum filtered correlation experiment carried out at -55 degrees C shows protonation of one of the acidic protons to the dimethylamine nitrogen. A two-dimensional rotating frame 1H-1H NOE experiment at the same temperature reveals that the other proton remains with the succinate moiety. Comparison of the 1H and 13C chemical shifts and the 13C T1 relaxation times of the salt with those of the free base further substantiate the findings.

  16. Proton and fluorine NMR imaging for the assessment of myocardial perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, B.S.D.

    1985-01-01

    A high field, small bore NMR spectrometer was converted to an imaging system for the detection of fluorine and protons in phantoms and small biological samples. The modified spectrometer system was used to image various phantoms for the assessment of imaging performance. After assessment of the imaging system performance, a water soluble fluorinated compound of relatively low toxicity was investigated for use as an imaging agent for the detection of myocardial perfusion. New Zealand white rabbits were used as the model. Hearts were rapidly extracted and hung via the aorta to a perfusion apparatus which was capable of prolonging heart function throughout the course of the experiment. Perfusion with a standard nutrient solution was followed either by perfusion with a solution to which the fluorinated compound had been added or by ligation of the left coronary artery with subsequent perfusion with the fluorinated compound in perfusate solution. The hearts were then sectioned and imaged. The ligation of the left coronary artery produced a region of impaired perfusion in the left ventricular wall and parts of the septum. The regions of reduced perfusion appeared in the F-19 NMR images as areas of reduced intensity. Proton images of the tissue sections were also obtained for comparison. It was found that infarcted regions may be best visualized by combining the fluorine and proton images. Infarct damage was verified by Gentian violet stain. Relaxation times of fluorine and protons were measured both in perfused tissue and in various concentration solutions.

  17. Proton-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Bone with Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Kumar Pandey, Manoj; Gong, Bo; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    While obtaining high-resolution structural details from bone is highly important to better understand its mechanical strength and the effects of aging and disease on bone ultrastructure, it has been a major challenge to do so with existing biophysical techniques. Though solid-state NMR spectroscopy has the potential to reveal the structural details of bone, it suffers from poor spectral resolution and sensitivity. Nonetheless, recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR technology have made it possible to spin solid samples up to 110 kHz frequency. With such remarkable capabilities, 1H-detected NMR experiments that have traditionally been challenging on rigid solids can now be implemented. Here, we report the first application of multidimensional 1H-detected NMR measurements on bone under ultrafast MAS conditions to provide atomistic-level elucidation of the complex heterogeneous structure of bone. Our investigations demonstrate that two-dimensional 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectra for bone are obtainable using fp-RFDR (finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling) pulse sequence under ultrafast MAS. Our results infer that water exhibits distinct 1H-1H dipolar coupling networks with the backbone and side-chain regions in collagen. These results show the promising potential of proton-detected ultrafast MAS NMR for monitoring structural and dynamic changes caused by mechanical loading and disease in bone.

  18. Probing microstructure evolution during the hardening of gypsum by proton NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Jaffel, Hamouda; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Ndobo-Epoy, Jean-Philippe; Morin, Vincent; Guicquero, Jean-Pierre

    2006-04-13

    We report a comprehensive proton NMR relaxation study of the water confined in the evolving porous structure of hardened gypsum prepared with different water-to-plaster ratios (w/p) and increasing additions of crushed gypsum. This study gives some new information on the microstructure, the water distribution, and the hydration kinetics without any drying or perturbing preparation. The bi-exponential transverse magnetization decay reveals the existence of two water populations in slow exchange. However, the different behaviors of these populations during saturation and desaturation experiments show evidence of a fast exchange of each population with the surface. Two modes of organization of the microstructure of this material are identified through an original model of exchange as a function of the water-to-plaster ratio (0.4 < or = w/p < or = 0.6 and 0.7 < or = w/p < or = 1). A clear gap is shown in the exchange rate value above w/p = 0.6 that could be representative of a percolation threshold. Both the method and the theory presented can be applied more widely to other porous media with reactive surface areas.

  19. Quantification of Water-Soluble Metabolites in Medicinal Mushrooms Using Proton NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Mishchuk, Darya O; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble metabolites in 5 mushrooms were identified and quantified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and software for targeted metabolite detection and quantification. In total, 35 compounds were found in Agaricus brasiliensis, 25 in Taiwanofungus camphoratus, 23 in Ganoderma lucidum (Taiwan) and Lentinus edodes, and 16 in G. lucidum (China). Total amounts of all identified metabolites in A. brasiliensis, T. camphoratus, G. lucidum, G. lucidum (China), and L. edodes were 149,950.51, 12,834.18, 9,549.09, 2,788.41, and 111,726.51 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. These metabolites were categorized into 4 groups: free amino acids and derivatives, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and nucleosides. Carbohydrates were the most abundant metabolites among all 4 groups, with mannitol having the highest concentration among all analyzed metabolites (848-94,104 mg/kg dry weight). Principal components analysis (PCA) showed obvious distinction among the metabolites of the 5 different kinds of mushrooms analyzed in this study. Thus PCA could provide an optional analytical way of identifying and recognizing the compositions of flavor products. Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that NMRbased metabolomics is a powerful tool for differentiating between various medicinal mushrooms.

  20. Characterization of the protonic distribution and environment in amorphous silicon-hydrogen alloys using proton NMR and ESR

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, F.R.; Lowry, M.E.; Garcia, M.L.S.; Barnes, R.G.; Torgeson, D.E.

    1981-06-01

    We present magnetic resonance data from a series of a-Si(H) samples deposited under varied hydrogen partial pressures. This parameter has been shown to be directly related to the sample-wide average proton density. The other sputtering parameters were maintained such that no dihydride bonding (as determined by the 890 cm/sup -1/ir bending mode) is present. Measurements presented are the NMR absorption spectrum (from the Fourier transform of the free induction decay), relaxation time T/sub 1/, and ESR absorption. The NMR absorption spectrum identifies two distinct forms of H incorporation. One is a tightly clustered form, such as H bonded on the inner surface of a microvoid of maximum dimension 5A, while the other is a randomly distributed phase with local H density of 3.5 x 10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/. The distributed phase H density is independent of the sample-wide average, indicating a fixed composition phase which occupies a larger percentage of the sample as H pressure is increased during deposition. This phase appears to extend to a maximum of 88% of the sample. The protonic spin-lattice relaxation time (T/sub 1/) measures the coupling of the spin system to its enviroment, ''the lattice''. For the series of samples, we find that T/sub 1/ first increases from 2.8 s to 44.8 s with increasing H content and then decreases to 8.1 s as H density is further increased. In an effort to understand this unusual relaxation behavior, we have made temperature dependant T/sub 1/ and ESR measurements. Utilizing these results, the protonic relaxation mechanism is discussed in terms ''disorder mode'' and electronic state models.

  1. Natural-abundance 15N NMR studies of Turkey ovomucoid third domain. Assignment of peptide 15N resonances to the residues at the reactive site region via proton-detected multiple-quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Polo, Gilberto; Krishnamoorthi, R.; Markley, John L.; Live, David H.; Davis, Donald G.; Cowburn, David

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional 1H{ 15N} multiple-quantum (MQ) spectroscopy has been applied to a protein sample at natural abundance: ovomucoid third domain from turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo), a serine proteinase inhibitor of 56 amino acid residues. Peptide amide 1H NMR assignments obtained by two-dimensional 1H{ 1H} NMR methods (R. Krishnamoorthi and J. L. Markley, unpublished data) led to identification of the corresponding 1H{ 15N} MQ coherence cross peaks. From these, 15N NMR chemical shifts were determined for several specific backbone amide groups of amino acid residues located around the reactive site region of the inhibitor. The results suggest that amide 15N chemical shifts, which are readily obtained in this way, may serve as sensitive probes for conformational studies of proteins.

  2. J-edited pure shift NMR for the facile measurement of (n)J(HH) for specific protons.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N

    2015-04-07

    We report a novel 1D J-edited pure shift NMR experiment (J-PSHIFT) that was constructed from a pseudo 2D experiment for the direct measurement of proton-proton scalar couplings. The experiment gives homonuclear broad-band (1)H-decoupled (1)H NMR spectra, which provide a single peak for chemically distinct protons, and only retain the homonuclear-scalar-coupled doublet pattern at the chemical-shift positions of the protons in the coupled network of a specific proton. This permits the direct and unambiguous measurement of the magnitudes of the couplings. The incorporation of a 1D selective correlation spectroscopy (COSY)/ total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) block in lieu of the initial selective pulse, results in the exclusive detection of the correlated spectrum of a specific proton.

  3. Beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate crystal: structure, 13C NMR and vibrational properties, protonation character.

    PubMed

    Godzisz, D; Ilczyszyn, M; Ilczyszyn, M M

    2003-03-01

    The crystal structure of beta-alanine-oxalic acid (1:1) hemihydrate complex has been reinvestigated by X-ray diffraction method at 293 K. Formation of monoclinic crystal system belonging to C2/c space group and consisting of semi-oxalate chains, diprotonated beta-alanine dimers and water molecules bonded to both these units is confirmed. New results are obtained for distances in the carboxylic groups and hydrogen bonds. These structural observations are used for protonation degree monitoring on the carboxylic oxygen atoms. They are in accordance with our vibrational study. The 13C NMR spectra provide insights into the solid structure of this complex, character of its hydrogen bonds and the beta-alanine protonation.

  4. MRI and unilateral NMR study of reindeer skin tanning processes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizheng; Del Federico, Eleonora; Ilott, Andrew J; Klokkernes, Torunn; Kehlet, Cindie; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-04-07

    The study of arctic or subarctic indigenous skin clothing material, known for its design and ability to keep the body warm, provides information about the tanning materials and techniques. The study also provides clues about the culture that created it, since tanning processes are often specific to certain indigenous groups. Untreated skin samples and samples treated with willow (Salix sp) bark extract and cod liver oil are compared in this study using both MRI and unilateral NMR techniques. The two types of samples show different proton spatial distributions and different relaxation times, which may also provide information about the tanning technique and aging behavior.

  5. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  6. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  7. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), (1)H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong (1)H-(1)H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow (1)H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) (1)H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about (1)H-(1)H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical

  8. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Cherry, Brian R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3 - 4 fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8 - 13 fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling. PMID:19857977

  9. Proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy in rigid solids with ultra-fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Holland, Gregory P; Cherry, Brian R; Jenkins, Janelle E; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we show the potential for utilizing proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR in rigid solids under ultra-fast magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The indirect detection of carbon-13 from coupled neighboring hydrogen nuclei provides a sensitivity enhancement of 3- to 4-fold in crystalline amino acids over direct-detected versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity enhancement is shown to be significantly larger for disordered solids that display inhomogeneously broadened carbon-13 spectra. Latrodectus hesperus (Black Widow) dragline silk is given as an example where the sample is mass-limited and the sensitivity enhancement for the proton-detected experiment is 8- to 13-fold. The ultra-fast MAS proton-detected HSQC solid-state NMR technique has the added advantage that no proton homonuclear decoupling is applied during the experiment. Further, well-resolved, indirectly observed carbon-13 spectra can be obtained in some cases without heteronuclear proton decoupling.

  10. Fast proton exchange in histidine: measurement of rate constants through indirect detection by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Akansha Ashvani; Duma, Luminita; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe

    2014-05-19

    Owing to its imidazole side chain, histidine participates in various processes such as enzyme catalysis, pH regulation, metal binding, and phosphorylation. The determination of exchange rates of labile protons for such a system is important for understanding its functions. However, these rates are too fast to be measured directly in an aqueous solution by using NMR spectroscopy. We have obtained the exchange rates of the NH3(+) amino protons and the labile NH(ε2) and NH(δ1) protons of the imidazole ring by indirect detection through nitrogen-15 as a function of temperature (272 Kprotons H(i) and the three one-bond scalar coupling constants (1)J(N,H(i)) could also be determined accurately.

  11. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  12. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-05

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  13. Multinuclear NMR studies of gaseous and liquid sevoflurane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macięga, E.; Makulski, W.; Jackowski, K.; Blicharska, B.

    2006-03-01

    For the first time, a small amount of sevoflurane ((CF 3) 2CHOCH 2F) in carbon dioxide and xenon as the gaseous solvents has been studied using 19F and 1H NMR spectra. Density-dependent 19F and 1H nuclear magnetic shielding was observed when the pressure of each solvent was increased. After extrapolation of the results to the zero-density limit it was possible to determine the appropriate shielding constants free from intermolecular interactions, σ0(F) and σ0(H). Similar procedure has also been applied for the investigation of fluorine-proton spin-spin couplings and the 2J 0(FH) and 3J 0(FH) constants of an isolated (CF 3) 2CHOCH 2F molecule were also obtained. Additionally, high-resolution 1H, 13C, 17O and 19F NMR spectra of pure liquid sevoflurane were also recorded and all the 1H- 13C, 1H- 19F and 19F- 13C spin-spin coupling constants and NMR chemical shifts were measured. It is shown that the experimental NMR parameters are suitable for comparison with the results of recent quantum-chemical calculations.

  14. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  15. Charge transport studies of proton and ion conducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versek, Craig Wm

    The development of a high-throughput impedance spectroscopy instrumentation platform for conductivity characterization of ion transport materials is outlined. Collaborative studies using this system are summarized. Charge conduction mechanisms and conductivity data for small molecule proton conducting liquids, pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and select mixtures of these compounds are documented. Furthermore, proton diffusivity measurements using a Pulse Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) technique for imidazole and 1,2,3-triazole binary mixtures are compared. Studies of azole functionalized discotic and linear mesogens with conductivity, structural, and thermal characterizations are detailed.

  16. Orientation-dependent proton double-quantum NMR build-up function for soft materials with anisotropic mobility.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Anna; Tschierske, Carsten; Saalwächter, Kay

    In recent years, the analysis of proton double-quantum NMR build-up curves has become an important tool to quantify anisotropic mobility in different kinds of soft materials such as polymer networks or liquid crystals. In the former case, such data provides a measure of orientation-dependent residual (time-averaged) dipolar couplings arising from anisotropic segmental motions, informing about the length and the state of local stretching of the network chains. Previous studies of macroscopically ordered, i.e. stretched, networks were subject to the limitation that a detailed build-up curve analysis on the basis of a universal "Abragam-like" (A-l) build-up function valid for a proton multi-spin system was only possible for an isotropic orientation-averaged response. This situation is here remedied by introducing a generic orientation-dependent build-up function for an anisotropically mobile protonated molecular segment. We discuss an application to the modeling of data for a stretched network measured at different orientations with respect to the magnetic field, and present a validation by fitting data of different liquid-crystal molecules oriented in the magnetic field.

  17. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  18. New insight into hydration and aging mechanisms of paper by the line shape analysis of proton NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Missori, M.; Corsaro, C.

    2016-05-01

    The action of water within biological systems is strictly linked either with their physical chemical properties and with their functions. Cellulose is one of the most studied biopolymers due to its biological importance and its wide use in manufactured products. Among them, paper is mainly constituted by an almost equimolar ratio of cellulose and water. Therefore the study of the behavior of water within pristine and aged paper samples can help to shed light on the degradation mechanisms that irremediably act over time and spoil paper. In this work we present Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on modern paper samples made of pure cellulose not aged and artificially aged as well as on ancient paper samples made in 1413 in Perpignan (France). The line shape parameters of the proton NMR spectra were studied as a function of the hydration content. Results indicate that water in aged samples is progressively involved in the hydration of the byproducts of cellulose degradation. This enhances the degradation process itself through the progressive consumption of the cellulose amorphous regions.

  19. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  20. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

  1. Solid state NMR studies of materials for energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambukara Kodiweera Arachchilage, Chandana K.

    Presented in this dissertation are NMR investigations of the dynamical and structural properties of materials for energy conversion and storage devices. 1H and 2H NMR was used to study water and methanol transportation in sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) based membranes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). These results are presented in chapter 3. The amount of liquid in the membrane and ion exchange capacity (IEC) are two main factors that govern the dynamics in these membranes. Water and methanol diffusion coefficients also are comparable. Chapters 4 and 5 are concerned with 31P and 1H NMR in phosphoric acid doped PBI membranes (para-PBI and 2OH-PBI) as well as PBI membranes containing ionic liquids (H3PO4/PMIH2PO4/PBI). These membranes are designed for higher-temperature fuel cell operation. In general, stronger short and long range interactions were observed in the 2OH-PBI matrix, yielding reduced proton transport compared to that of para-PBI. In the case of H3PO4/PMIH2PO 4/PBI, both conductivity and diffusion are higher for the sample with molar ratio 2/4/1. Finally, chapter 6 is devoted to the 31P NMR MAS study of phosphorus-containing structural groups on the surfaces of micro/mesoporous activated carbons. Two spectral features were observed and the narrow feature identifies surface phosphates while the broad component identifies heterogeneous subsurface phosphorus environments including phosphate and more complex structure multiple P-C, P-N and P=N bonds.

  2. NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Lewis E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in solution NMR spectroscopy have significantly extended the spectrum of problems that can now be addressed with this technology. In particular, studies of proteins with molecular weights on the order of 100 kDa are now possible at a level of detail that was previously reserved for much smaller systems. An example of the sort of information that is now accessible is provided in a study of malate synthase G, a 723 residue enzyme that has been a focal point of research efforts in my laboratory. Details of the labeling schemes that have been employed and optimal experiments for extraction of structural and dynamics information on this protein are described. NMR studies of protein dynamics, in principle, give insight into the relation between motion and function. A description of deuterium-based spin relaxation methods for the investigation of side chain dynamics is provided. Examples where millisecond (ms) time scale dynamics play an important role and where relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy has been particularly informative, including applications involving the membrane enzyme PagP and mutants of the Fyn SH3 domain that fold on a ms time scale, are presented.

  3. Ultra-high field NMR studies of antibody binding and site-specific phosphorylation of {alpha}-synuclein

    SciTech Connect

    Sasakawa, Hiroaki |; Sakata, Eri; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Masuda, Masami |; Mori, Tetsuya; Kurimoto, Eiji; Iguchi, Takeshi; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kato, Koichi |

    2007-11-23

    Although biological importance of intrinsically disordered proteins is becoming recognized, NMR analyses of this class of proteins remain as tasks with more challenge because of poor chemical shift dispersion. It is expected that ultra-high field NMR spectroscopy offers improved resolution to cope with this difficulty. Here, we report an ultra-high field NMR study of {alpha}-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein identified as the major component of the Lewy bodies. Based on NMR spectral data collected at a 920 MHz proton frequency, we performed epitope mapping of an anti-{alpha}-synuclein monoclonal antibody, and furthermore, characterized conformational effects of phosphorylation at Ser129 of {alpha}-synuclein.

  4. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Demonstration of a functional relationship between aspartate 93 and Mg2+ by site-directed mutagenesis and proton, phosphorus-31, and magnesium-25 NMR.

    PubMed

    Yan, H G; Tsai, M D

    1991-06-04

    Earlier magnetic resonance studies suggested no direct interaction between Mg2+ ions and adenylate kinase (AK) in the AK.MgATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) complex. However, recent NMR studies concluded that the carboxylate of aspartate 119 accepts a hydrogen bond from a water ligand of the bound Mg2+ ion in the muscle AK.MgATP complex [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. On the other hand, in the 2.6-A crystal structure of the yeast AK.MgAP5A [P1,P5-bis(5'-adenosyl)pentaphosphate] complex, the Mg2+ ion is in proximity to aspartate 93 [Egner, U., Tomasselli, A.G., & Schulz, G.E. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 195, 649-658]. Substitution of Asp-93 with alanine resulted in no change in dissociation constants, 4-fold increases in Km, and a 650-fold decrease in kcat. Notable changes have been observed in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of histidine 36 and a few other aromatic residues. However, the results of detailed analyses of the free enzymes and the AK.MgAP5A complexes by one- and two-dimensional NMR suggested that the changes are due to localized perturbations. Thus it is concluded that Asp-93 stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3.9 kcal/mol. The next question is how. Since proton NMR results indicated that binding of Mg2+ to the AK.AP5A complex induces some changes in the proton NMR signals of WT but not those of D93A, the functional role of Asp-93 should be in binding to Mg2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. The proton driver design study

    SciTech Connect

    Editors: W. Chou, C.M. Ankenbrandt and E.I. Malamud

    2001-03-08

    In a 1997 summer study, a team led by Steve Holmes formulated a development plan for the Fermilab proton source and described the results in TM-2021. Subsequently, at the end of 1998, a task group was formed to prepare a detailed design of a high intensity facility called the Proton Driver to replace the Fermilab Booster. In the past two years the design effort has attracted more than fifty participants, mostly from the Beams Division. Physicists and engineers from the Technical Division and FESS as well as other institutions, including the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), Stanford University, University of Hawaii, CERN in Switzerland, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in England and the IHEP in Russia also contributed heavily. The results of that effort are summarized in this document describing the design of a 16 GeV synchrotron, two new beam transport lines (a 400 MeV injection line and a 12/16 GeV extraction line), and related improvements to the present negative ion source and the 400 MeV Linac. A construction cost estimate is presented in Appendix A.

  6. Assignments of proton populations in dough and bread using NMR relaxometry of starch, gluten, and flour model systems.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Geertrui M; Lagrain, Bert; Deleu, Lomme J; Fierens, Ellen; Hills, Brian P; Delcour, Jan A

    2012-05-30

    Starch-water, gluten-water, and flour-water model systems as well as straight-dough bread were investigated with (1)H NMR relaxometry using free induction decay and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. Depending on the degree of interaction between polymers and water, different proton populations could be distinguished. The starch protons in the starch-water model gain mobility owing to amylopectin crystal melting, granule swelling, and amylose leaching, whereas water protons lose mobility due to increased interaction with starch polymers. Heating of the gluten-water sample induces no pronounced changes in proton distributions. Heating changes the proton distributions of the flour-water and starch-water models in a similar way, implying that the changes are primarily attributable to starch gelatinization. Proton distributions of the heated flour-water model system and those of fresh bread crumb are very similar. This allows identifying the different proton populations in bread on the basis of the results from the model systems.

  7. NMR spin locking of proton magnetization under a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Tian, Changlin; Cross, Timothy A

    2002-01-01

    The spin dynamics of NMR spin locking of proton magnetization under a frequency-switched Lee-Goldburg (FSLG) pulse sequence is investigated for a better understanding of the line-narrowing mechanism in PISEMA experiments. For the sample of oriented 15N(1,3,5,7)-labeled gramicidin A in hydrated DMPC bilayers, it is found that the spin-lattice relaxation time T(1rho)(H) in the tilted rotating frame is about five times shorter when the 1H magnetization is spin locked at the magic angle by the FSLG sequence compared to the simple Lee-Goldburg sequence. It is believed that the rapid phase alternation of the effective fields during the FSLG cycles results in averaging of the spin lock field so that the spin lock becomes less efficient. A FSLG supercycle has been suggested here to slow the phase alternation. It has been demonstrated experimentally that a modified PISEMA pulse sequence with such supercycles gives rise to about 30% line narrowing in the dipolar dimension in the PISEMA spectra compared to a standard PISEMA pulse sequence.

  8. Site-specific protonation kinetics of acidic side chains in proteins determined by pH-dependent carboxyl (13)C NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Johan; Weininger, Ulrich; Khan, M Ashhar I; Linse, Sara; Akke, Mikael

    2015-03-04

    Proton-transfer dynamics plays a critical role in many biochemical processes, such as proton pumping across membranes and enzyme catalysis. The large majority of enzymes utilize acid-base catalysis and proton-transfer mechanisms, where the rates of proton transfer can be rate limiting for the overall reaction. However, measurement of proton-exchange kinetics for individual side-chain carboxyl groups in proteins has been achieved in only a handful of cases, which typically have involved comparative analysis of mutant proteins in the context of reaction network modeling. Here we describe an approach to determine site-specific protonation and deprotonation rate constants (kon and koff, respectively) of carboxyl side chains, based on (13)C NMR relaxation measurements as a function of pH. We validated the method using an extensively studied model system, the B1 domain of protein G, for which we measured rate constants koff in the range (0.1-3) × 10(6) s(-1) and kon in the range (0.6-300) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which correspond to acid-base equilibrium dissociation constants (Ka) in excellent agreement with previous results determined by chemical shift titrations. Our results further reveal a linear free-energy relationship between log kon and pKa, which provides information on the free-energy landscape of the protonation reaction, showing that the variability among residues in these parameters arises primarily from the extent of charge stabilization of the deprotonated state by the protein environment. We find that side-chain carboxyls with extreme values of koff or kon are involved in hydrogen bonding, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilization of the protonated or deprotonated state.

  9. Proton NMR characterization of isomeric sulfmyoglobins: preparation, interconversion, reactivity patterns, and structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Chatfield, M.J.; La Mar, G.N.; Kauten, R.J.

    1987-11-03

    The preparations of sulfmyoglobin (sulf-Mb) by standard procedures have been found heterogeneous by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Presented here are the results of a comprehensive study of the factors that influence the selection among the three dominant isomeric forms of sperm whale sulf-Mb and their resulting detailed optical and /sup 1/H NMR properties as related to their detectability and structural properties of the heme pocket. A single isomer is formed initially in the deoxy state; further treatment in any desired oxidation/ligation state can yield two other major isomers. Acid catalysis and chromatography facilitate formation of a second isomer, particularly in the high-spin state. At neutral pH, a third isomer is formed by a first-order process. The processes that alter oxidation/ligation state are found to be reversible and are judged to affect only the metal center, but the three isomeric sulf-Mbs are found to exhibit significantly different ligand affinity and chemical stability. The present results allow, for the first time, a rational approach for preparing a given isomeric sulf-Mb in an optimally pure state for subsequent characterization by other techniques. While optical spectroscopy can distinguish the alkaline forms, only /sup 1/H NMR clearly distinguishes all three ferric isomers. The hyperfine shift patterns in the various oxidation/spin states of sulf-Mbs indicate relatively small structural alteration, and the proximal and distal sides of the heme suggest that peripheral electronic effects are responsible for the differentially reduced ligand affinities for the three isomeric sulf-Mbs. The first /sup 1/H NMR spectra of sulfhemoglobins are presented, which indicate a structure similar to that of the initially formed sulf-Mb isomer but also suggest the presence of a similar molecular heterogeneity as found for sulf-Mb, albiet to a smaller extent.

  10. Entangled Polymer Melt Dynamics Studied By Low-Field NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaca Chavez, Fabian; Huebsch, Patrick; Zirbs, Ronald; Binder, Wolfgang; Saalwaechter, Kay

    2009-03-01

    Proton Multiple-Quantum (MQ) NMR is a powerful technique to investigate polymer dynamics due to its sensitivity to molecular motions on very different timescales. Entangled melts exhibit dynamic processes that cover a wide range of timescales, starting from fast ps-scale segmental reorientation up to diffusive and cooperative motions on the ms-s-scale. In this work, we apply MQ NMR to linear poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) and poly(isobutylene) of different molecular weight above the glass transition over suitable ranges of temperature, in order to establish the dynamic regimes predicted by the tube model, and, for the first time, to extract actual time scale information. This directly complements many neutron scattering studies, which are restricted to the sub-μs-timescale. Measurements on PIB-grafted silica particles with different molecular weights and different chain densities on the surface of the particle are also shown. The data is analyzed by establishing scaling laws which can be directly associated with different dynamic regimes predicted by the tube/reptation model. Full analytical analyses based on a correlation function which explicitly includes segmental, Rouse, and reptation dynamics are discussed.

  11. Flexible and rigid structures in HIV-1 p17 matrix protein monitored by relaxation and amide proton exchange with NMR.

    PubMed

    Ohori, Yuka; Okazaki, Honoka; Watanabe, Satoru; Tochio, Naoya; Arai, Munehito; Kigawa, Takanori; Nishimura, Chiaki

    2014-03-01

    The HIV-1 p17 matrix protein is a multifunctional protein that interacts with other molecules including proteins and membranes. The dynamic structure between its folded and partially unfolded states can be critical for the recognition of interacting molecules. One of the most important roles of the p17 matrix protein is its localization to the plasma membrane with the Gag polyprotein. The myristyl group attached to the N-terminus on the p17 matrix protein functions as an anchor for binding to the plasma membrane. Biochemical studies revealed that two regions are important for its function: D14-L31 and V84-V88. Here, the dynamic structures of the p17 matrix protein were studied using NMR for relaxation and amide proton exchange experiments at the physiological pH of 7.0. The results revealed that the α12-loop, which includes the 14-31 region, was relatively flexible, and that helix 4, including the 84-88 region, was the most protected helix in this protein. However, the residues in the α34-loop near helix 4 had a low order parameter and high exchange rate of amide protons, indicating high flexibility. This region is probably flexible because this loop functions as a hinge for optimizing the interactions between helices 3 and 4. The C-terminal long region of K113-Y132 adopted a disordered structure. Furthermore, the C-terminal helix 5 appeared to be slightly destabilized due to the flexible C-terminal tail based on the order parameters. Thus, the dynamic structure of the p17 matrix protein may be related to its multiple functions.

  12. 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectral studies of some Schiff bases derived from 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole.

    PubMed

    Issa, Y M; Hassib, H B; Abdelaal, H E

    2009-11-01

    Heterocyclic Schiff bases derived from 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole and different substituted aromatic aldehydes are prepared and subjected to (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and mass spectral analyses. (1)H NMR spectra in DMSO exhibit a sharp singlet within the 9.35-8.90ppm region which corresponds to the azomethine proton. The position of this signal is largely dependent on the nature of the substituents on the benzal moiety. It is observed that the shape, position and the integration value of the signal of the aromatic proton of the triazole ring ((5)C) are clearly affected by the rate of exchange, relaxation time, concentration of solution as well as the solvent used. (13)C NMR is taken as substantial support for the results reached from (1)H NMR studies. The mass spectral results are taken as a tool to confirm the structure of the investigated compounds. The base peak (100%), mostly the M-1 peak, indicates the facile loss of hydrogen radical. The fragmentation pattern of the unsubstituted Schiff base is taken as the general scheme. Differences in the other schemes result from the effect of the electronegativity of the substituents attached to the aromatic ring.

  13. NMR study of strontium binding by a micaceous mineral.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Geoffrey M; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, Sridhar; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na(4)Mg(6)Al(4)Si(4)O(20)F(4). Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 degrees C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a (1)H-(87)Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by (87)Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct (87)Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  14. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  15. Reaction pathways of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylate complexes explored by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Tolstoy, Peter M; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2011-05-25

    Combined low-temperature NMR/UV-vis spectroscopy (UVNMR), where optical and NMR spectra are measured in the NMR spectrometer under the same conditions, has been set up and applied to the study of H-bonded anions A··H··X(-) (AH = 1-(13)C-2-chloro-4-nitrophenol, X(-) = 15 carboxylic acid anions, 5 phenolates, Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), and BF(4)(-)). In this series, H is shifted from A to X, modeling the proton-transfer pathway. The (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and the H/D isotope effects on the latter provide information about averaged H-bond geometries. At the same time, red shifts of the π-π* UV-vis absorption bands are observed which correlate with the averaged H-bond geometries. However, on the UV-vis time scale, different tautomeric states and solvent configurations are in slow exchange. The combined data sets indicate that the proton transfer starts with a H-bond compression and a displacement of the proton toward the H-bond center, involving single-well configurations A-H···X(-). In the strong H-bond regime, coexisting tautomers A··H···X(-) and A(-)···H··X are observed by UV. Their geometries and statistical weights change continuously when the basicity of X(-) is increased. Finally, again a series of single-well structures of the type A(-)···H-X is observed. Interestingly, the UV-vis absorption bands are broadened inhomogeneously because of a distribution of H-bond geometries arising from different solvent configurations.

  16. Microslot NMR probe for metabolomics studies.

    PubMed

    Krojanski, Hans Georg; Lambert, Jörg; Gerikalan, Yilmaz; Suter, Dieter; Hergenröder, Roland

    2008-11-15

    A NMR microprobe based on microstrip technology suitable for investigations of volume-limited samples in the low nanoliter range was designed. NMR spectra of sample quantities in the 100 pmol range can be obtained with this probe in a few seconds. The planar geometry of the probe is easily adaptable to the size and geometry requirements of the samples.

  17. NMR study of n-dodecane adsorbed on graphite.

    PubMed

    Alba, M D; Castro, M A; Clarke, S M; Perdigón, A C

    2003-05-01

    In this brief contribution we demonstrate that 1H and 2H NMR spectroscopy can be an effective method of investigating adsorption from liquids at the solid-liquid interface. The method is illustrated here with the adsorption of a simple alkane adsorbed on graphite, in particular the system n-dodecane and graphite at coverages of 1 and 5 monolayers. Static single-pulse proton nuclear magnetic resonance and static quadrupolar echo deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were recorded for both coverages. The experimental NMR results presented here show features clearly consistent with earlier calorimetric and neutron scattering work and demonstrate the formation of solid adsorbed layers that coexist with the bulk adsorbate with both isotopes. This ability to probe both deuterated and protonated materials simultaneously illustrates that this experimental approach can be readily extended to investigate the adsorption behaviour of multicomponent mixtures.

  18. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of 1H and 13C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs.

  19. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2016-01-15

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs.

  20. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of 1H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951-6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the 1H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  1. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  2. N-H...F hydrogen bonds in fluorinated benzanilides: NMR and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha Reddy, G N; Vasantha Kumar, M V; Guru Row, T N; Suryaprakash, N

    2010-10-28

    Using (19)F and (1)H-NMR (with (14)N decoupling) spectroscopic techniques together with density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations, we have investigated weak molecular interactions in isomeric fluorinated benzanilides. Simultaneous presence of through space nuclear spin-spin couplings ((1h)J(N-HF)) of diverse strengths and feeble structural fluctuations are detected as a function of site specific substitution of fluorine atoms within the basic identical molecular framework. The transfer of hydrogen bonding interaction energies through space is established by perturbing their strengths and monitoring the effect on NMR parameters. Multiple quantum (MQ) excitation, up to the highest possible MQ orders of coupled protons, is utilized as a tool for accurate (1)H assignments. Results of NMR studies and DFT calculations are compared with the relevant structural parameters taken from single crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  3. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  4. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  5. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of

  6. Rapid Proton-Detected NMR Assignment for Proteins with Fast Magic Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using a set of six 1H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5–30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide 2H/1H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary 13C/15N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR. PMID:25102442

  7. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-03

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR.

  8. Detection of Phosphomonoester Signals in Proton-Decoupled 31P NMR Spectra of the Myocardium of Patients with Myocardial Hypertrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wulf-Ingo; Sieverding, Ludger; Breuer, Johannes; Schmidt, Oliver; Widmaier, Stefan; Bunse, Michael; van Erckelens, Franz; Apitz, Jürgen; Dietze, Guenther J.; Lutz, Otto

    1998-07-01

    Proton-decoupled31P NMR spectroscopy at 1.5 T of the anterior left ventricular myocardium was used to monitor myocardial phosphate metabolism in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM,n= 14) and aortic stenosis (AS,n= 12). In addition to the well-known phosphorus signals a phosphomonoester (PME) signal was detected at about 6.9 ppm in 7 HCM and 2 AS patients. This signal was not observed in the spectra of normal controls (n= 11). We suggest that in spectra of patients with myocardial hypertrophy the presence of a PME signal reflects alterations in myocardial glucose metabolism.

  9. Biochemical and proton NMR characterization of the isolated functional beta-subunit of coupling factor one from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roux-Fromy, M.; Neumann, J.M.; Andre, F.; Berger, G.; Girault, G.; Galmiche, J.M.; Remy, R.

    1987-04-29

    Beta subunits have been dissociated from CF1 of spinach chloroplasts, purified by HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional electrophoresis and fluorescence emission. The solutions of isolated beta subunits are able to hydrolyze MgATP; this ATPase activity is an intrinsic property of the beta molecule. From proton NMR at 300 and 500 MHz, it is shown that the preparations are fully reproducible and that beta subunits remain monomeric with 75% aliphatic protons associated with rigid parts of the molecule. The other 25% give rise to separate resonances and belong to mobile side-chains and/or to flexible regions. The measurement of the transverse relaxation times T2 has permitted a detailed characterization of the molecular dynamics of the isolated beta subunits.

  10. Beta-alanine-hydrochloride (2:1) crystal: structure, 13C NMR and vibrational properties, protonation character.

    PubMed

    Godzisz, D; Ilczyszyn, M; Ciunik, Z

    2003-01-15

    The crystal structure of beta-alanine-hydrochloride (2:1) complex (2A-HCl) has been determined by X-ray diffraction method at 298 and 100 K as monoclinic, space group C2/c, Z=4. The crystal comprises chloride anions and protonated beta-alanine dimers: two beta-alanine zwitterions are joined by strong, symmetric (Ci) hydrogen bond with the O...O distance of 2.473 A at room temperature. Powder FT-IR and FT-Raman as well as solid state 13C NMR spectra provide insights into the solid structure of this complex, character of its hydrogen bonds and the beta-alanine protonation.

  11. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  12. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  13. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported.

  14. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome.

  15. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elastic modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.

  16. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  17. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  18. Contemporary NMR Studies of Protein Electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Hass, Mathias A S; Mulder, Frans A A

    2015-01-01

    Electrostatics play an important role in many aspects of protein chemistry. However, the accurate determination of side chain proton affinity in proteins by experiment and theory remains challenging. In recent years the field of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has advanced the way that protonation states are measured, allowing researchers to examine electrostatic interactions at an unprecedented level of detail and accuracy. Experiments are now in place that follow pH-dependent (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts as spatially close as possible to the sites of protonation, allowing all titratable amino acid side chains to be probed sequence specifically. The strong and telling response of carefully selected reporter nuclei allows individual titration events to be monitored. At the same time, improved frameworks allow researchers to model multiple coupled protonation equilibria and to identify the underlying pH-dependent contributions to the chemical shifts.

  19. Proton–proton Overhauser NMR spectroscopy with polypeptide chains in large structures

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Reto; Wider, Gerhard; Fiaux, Jocelyne; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Horwich, Arthur L.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    The use of 1H–1H nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) for structural studies of uniformly deuterated polypeptide chains in large structures is investigated by model calculations and NMR experiments. Detailed analysis of the evolution of the magnetization during 1H–1H NOE experiments under slow-motion conditions shows that the maximal 1H–1H NOE transfer is independent of the overall rotational correlation time, even in the presence of chemical exchange with the bulk water, provided that the mixing time is adjusted for the size of the structure studied. 1H–1H NOE buildup measurements were performed for the 472-kDa complex of the 72-kDa cochaperonin GroES with a 400-kDa single-ring variant of the chaperonin GroEL (SR1). These experiments demonstrate that multidimensional NOESY experiments with cross-correlated relaxation-enhanced polarization transfer and transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy elements can be applied to structures of molecular masses up to several hundred kilodaltabs, which opens new possibilities for studying functional interactions in large maromolecular assemblies in solution. PMID:17032756

  20. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, September 13, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  1. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  2. Hepatitis B virus direct repeat sequence: imino proton exchange rates and distance and torsion angle restraints from NMR.

    PubMed

    Bishop, K D; Blocker, F J; Egan, W; James, T L

    1994-01-18

    Structural features of a trisdecamer duplex, [d(GGCAGAGGTGAAA).d(TTTCACCTCTGCC)], in solution are being investigated by proton one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy. This DNA sequence is comprised of the 11-base-pair direct repeat sequence found in the hepatitis B viral genome with an additional base pair from the genome included on each end to minimize end effects on the 11-bp sequence of interest. The direct repeat sequence occurs twice in the viral genome; both are essential for initiation of DNA synthesis. The critical nature of this sequence suggests it may be a target to control replication of the virus. Elucidation of the structure of the direct repeat sequence could prove to be beneficial in targeting efforts. Structural determination via restrained molecular dynamics requires experimentally derived distance restraints. The ability to determine solution structures of biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy is limited by the quality and quantity of distance and torsion angle restraints that can be extracted from the NMR data. Techniques used to establish these restraints are constantly evolving and improving. Modifications in procedure are applied to the trisdecamer duplex to yield improvements in the determination of sugar conformations from COSY data and a substantial increase in the number of distance restraints typically garnered from 2D NOE intensity data. This increase in the number of distance restraints normally obtained from 2D NOE intensities was accomplished by utilizing a new version of the iterative complete relaxation matrix program MARDIGRAS with intensities extracted from a 2D NOE data set acquired in 90% H2O. The exchange rate of the imino and amino protons with the solvent water protons can now be included in the relaxation matrix calculations, thereby providing more accurate distances when utilizing the 2D NOE cross-peaks involving at least one exchangeable proton. In this lab, analysis of two-quantum-filtered correlation

  3. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  4. Dynamics of Antibody Domains Studied by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Bang K.; Walsh, Joseph D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ishima, Rieko

    2012-01-01

    Information on local dynamics of antibodies is important to evaluate stability, to rationally design variants, and to clarify conformational disorders at the epitope binding sites. Such information may also be useful for improved understanding of antigen recognition. NMR can be used for characterization of local protein dynamics at the atomic level through relaxation measurements. Due to the complexity of the NMR spectra, an extensive use of this method is limited to small protein molecules, for example, antibody domains and some scFv. Here, we describe a protocol that was used to study the dynamics of an antibody domain in solution using NMR. We describe protein preparation for NMR studies, NMR sample optimization, signal assignments, and dynamics experiments. PMID:19252840

  5. NMR studies of the conformational interconversion of butaclamol in solution.

    PubMed

    Casarotto, M G; Craik, D J; Lloyd, E J

    1991-07-01

    1H NMR experiments at 300 MHz have been carried out to determine the identity and study the interconversion of two conformations of butaclamol in solution. The hydrochloride salt in DMSO exists as an equilibrium mixture of two conformations, which differ in their stereochemistry about the ring junction that contains the single nitrogen atom in butaclamol. The trans form has a relative population of 80% and the cis I form 20%. In CDCl3 only the trans form is observed, while in CDCl3-DMSO mixtures, both forms are detected in a ratio (trans:cis I) that decreases as the percentage of CDCl3 decreases. For the free base in either CD2Cl2 or DMSO, only a single set of resonances is observed at room temperature, but as temperature is lowered, peaks from methine protons H4a and H13b near the ring junction broaden and (for samples in CD2Cl2) eventually split into two resonances corresponding to the cis and trans forms. It is suggested that nitrogen inversion is the dynamic process responsible for the interconversion of the two forms. Line shape analysis as a function of temperature yielded an energy barrier of 9.6 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol for the interconversion, in good agreement with values obtained from saturation transfer experiments. In the hydrochloride salt, the barrier in DMSO was somewhat higher, i.e., 17.3 +/- 0.9 kcal/mol, as determined by saturation transfer and variable-temperature measurements.

  6. 500-MHz proton NMR evidence for two solution structures of the common arm base-paired segment of wheat germ 5S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiejun; Marshall, A.G. )

    1990-02-20

    The base-pair protons of the common arm duplex fragment of wheat germ (Triticum aestivum) ribosomal 5S RNA have been identified and assigned by means of 500-MHz proton NMR spectroscopy. The two previously reported extra base pairs within the fragment are now explained by the presence of two distinct solution structures of the common arm fragment (and its corresponding base-paired segment in intact 5S rRNA). The present conclusions are supported by one- and two-dimensional proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements in H{sub 2}O and by temperature variation and Mg{sup 2+} titration of the downfield {sup 1}H NMR spectrum. The difference between the two conformers is most likely due to difference in helical tightness. Some additional amino proton resonances have also been assigned.

  7. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  8. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  9. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  10. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  11. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  12. Long-lived states to monitor protein unfolding by proton NMR.

    PubMed

    Bornet, Aurélien; Ahuja, Puneet; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Fernandes, Laetitia; Hadji, Sonia; Lee, Shirley Y; Haririnia, Aydin; Fushman, David; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Vasos, Paul R

    2011-10-24

    The relaxation of long-lived states (LLS) corresponds to the slow return to statistical thermal equilibrium between symmetric and antisymmetric proton spin states. This process is remarkably sensitive to the presence of external spins and can be used to obtain information about partial unfolding of proteins. We detected the appearance of a destabilized conformer of ubiquitin when urea is added to the protein in its native state. This conformer shows increased mobility in the C-terminus, which significantly extends the lifetimes of proton LLS magnetisation in Ser-65. These changes could not be detected by conventional measurements of T(1) and T(2) relaxation times of protons, and would hardly be sensed by carbon-13 or nitrogen-15 relaxation measurements. Conformers with similar dynamic and structural features, as revealed by LLS relaxation times, could be observed, in the absence of urea, in two ubiquitin mutants, L67S and L69S.

  13. NMR studies on polyphosphide Ce6Ni6P17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report the result of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on Ce6Ni6P17. The observed NMR spectra show a Lorentzian-type and an asymmetric shapes, reflecting the local symmetry around each P site in the cubic unit cell. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to three inequivalent P sites and deduced the temperature dependence of the Knight shift for each site. The Knight shifts increase with decreasing temperature down to 1.5 K, indicating a localized spin system of Ce6Ni6P17. Antiferromagnetic correlation between 4f spins is suggested from the negative sign of the Weiss-temperature.

  14. Proton irradiation study of GFR candidate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian; Yang, Yong; Dickson, Clayton; Allen, Todd

    2009-06-01

    This work investigated the microstructural response of SiC, ZrC and ZrN irradiated with 2.6 MeV protons at 800 °C to a fluence of 2.75 × 10 19 protons/cm 2, corresponding to 0.71-1.8 displacement per atom (dpa), depending on the material. The change of lattice constant evaluated using HOLZ patterns is not observed. In comparison to Kr ion irradiation at 800 °C to 10 dpa from the previous studies, the proton irradiated ZrC and ZrN at 1.8 dpa show less irradiation damage to the lattice structure. The proton irradiated ZrC exhibits faulted loops which are not observed in the Kr ion irradiated sample. ZrN shows the least microstructural change from proton irradiation. The microstructure of 6H-SiC irradiated to 0.71 dpa consists of black dot defects at high density.

  15. Simulation study of proton transport in ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Philip; Allahyarov, Elshad

    2008-03-01

    Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations were used to study the morphological changes induced in a Nafion-like ionomer by the imposition of a strong electric field. We observe that proton transport through this polymer electrolyte membrane is accompanied by morphological changes that include the formation of structures aligned along the direction of the applied field. The polar head groups of the ionomer side chains assemble into clusters, which then form rod-like formations, and these cylindrical structures then assemble into a hexagonally ordered array aligned with the direction of current flow. For dry ionomers, at current densities in excess of 1 A/cm^2 these rod-like clusters undergo an inner micro-phase separation, in which distinct wire-like lines of sulfonate head groups are accompanied by similar wire-like alignments of bound protons. The clusters appear to be of two types. If there are two, four, or five lines of sulfonates then there is an equal number of lines of protons, but if there are three lines of sulfonates then they are accompanied by four lines of protons. Occasionally these lines of sulfonates and protons form a helical structure. Upon removal of the electric field, the hexagonal array of rod-like structures remains, but the microphase separation disappears below the threshold current of 1 A/cm^2.

  16. Solid-state proton NMR of paramagnetic metal complexes: DANTE spin echoes for selective excitation in inhomogeneously broadened lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Perez Linde, A. J.; Bauer, Gerald; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-08-01

    The paramagnetic complex bis(oxazolinylphenyl)amine-Fe(III)Cl2 is investigated by means of solid-state proton NMR at 18.8 T (800 MHz) using magic-angle spinning at 65 kHz. Spin echoes that are excited and refocused by combs of rotor-synchronized pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) allow one to characterize different chemical environments that severely overlap in conventional MAS spectra. Such sequences combine two apparently contradictory features: an overall bandwidth exceeding several MHz, and very selective irradiation of a few kHz within inhomogeneously broadened sidebands. The experimental hyperfine interactions correlate well with DFT calculations.

  17. NMR and computational studies of chiral discrimination by amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate).

    PubMed

    Ye, Yun K; Bai, Shi; Vyas, Shyam; Wirth, Mary J

    2007-02-08

    Proton NMR and simulations were combined to study the origin of chiral selectivity by a polysaccharide used in a commercial chromatographic stationary phase: amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate). This material has unusually high enantioselectivity for p-O-tert-butyltyrosine allyl ester, which is activated by the presence of an acid. Proton NMR spectra agreed with the HPLC in showing that the l-enantiomer interacts much more strongly with the polysaccharide and that acidity switches on the selectivity. 2D NOESY spectra revealed which protons of each enantiomer and the polysaccharide were in proximity, and these spectra revealed folding of the l-enantiomer. Computations generated energy-minimized structures for the polysaccharide-enantiomer complexes, independently predicting folding of the l-enantiomer. Molecular dynamics simulations 2 ns in duration, repeated for three different energy-minimized structures, generated pair distribution functions that are in excellent agreement with the 2D NOESY spectra. The modeling studies revealed why acidity switches on chiral selectivity and minimally affects the chromatographic retention time of the unfavored d-enantiomer. The results comprise the first case of a chiral separation by a commercial polysaccharide stationary phase being explained using a combination of 2D NOESY and simulations, providing excellent agreement between experiment and computation and lending detailed molecular insight into enantioselectivity for this system.

  18. A LEAN approach toward automated analysis and data processing of polymers using proton NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Brouwer, Hans; Stegeman, Gerrit

    2011-02-01

    To maximize utilization of expensive laboratory instruments and to make most effective use of skilled human resources, the entire chain of data processing, calculation, and reporting that is needed to transform raw NMR data into meaningful results was automated. The LEAN process improvement tools were used to identify non-value-added steps in the existing process. These steps were eliminated using an in-house developed software package, which allowed us to meet the key requirement of improving quality and reliability compared with the existing process while freeing up valuable human resources and increasing productivity. Reliability and quality were improved by the consistent data treatment as performed by the software and the uniform administration of results. Automating a single NMR spectrophotometer led to a reduction in operator time of 35%, doubling of the annual sample throughput from 1400 to 2800, and reducing the turn around time from 6 days to less than 2.

  19. High-resolution proton-detected NMR of proteins at very fast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Loren B.; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Pintacuda, Guido

    2015-04-01

    When combined with high-frequency (currently ∼60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS), proton detection boosts sensitivity and increases coherence lifetimes, resulting in narrow 1H lines. Herein, we review methods for efficient proton detected techniques and applications in highly deuterated proteins, with an emphasis on 100% selected 1H site concentration for the purpose of sensitivity. We discuss the factors affecting resolution and sensitivity that have resulted in higher and higher frequency MAS. Next we describe the various methods that have been used for backbone and side-chain assignment with proton detection, highlighting the efficient use of scalar-based 13C-13C transfers. Additionally, we show new spectra making use of these schemes for side-chain assignment of methyl 13C-1H resonances. The rapid acquisition of resolved 2D spectra with proton detection allows efficient measurement of relaxation parameters used as a measure of dynamic processes. Under rapid MAS, relaxation times can be measured in a site-specific manner in medium-sized proteins, enabling the investigation of molecular motions at high resolution. Additionally, we discuss methods for measurement of structural parameters, including measurement of internuclear 1H-1H contacts and the use of paramagnetic effects in the determination of global structure.

  20. High-resolution proton-detected NMR of proteins at very fast MAS.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Pintacuda, Guido

    2015-04-01

    When combined with high-frequency (currently ∼60 kHz) magic-angle spinning (MAS), proton detection boosts sensitivity and increases coherence lifetimes, resulting in narrow ((1))H lines. Herein, we review methods for efficient proton detected techniques and applications in highly deuterated proteins, with an emphasis on 100% selected ((1))H site concentration for the purpose of sensitivity. We discuss the factors affecting resolution and sensitivity that have resulted in higher and higher frequency MAS. Next we describe the various methods that have been used for backbone and side-chain assignment with proton detection, highlighting the efficient use of scalar-based ((13))C-((13))C transfers. Additionally, we show new spectra making use of these schemes for side-chain assignment of methyl ((13))C-((1))H resonances. The rapid acquisition of resolved 2D spectra with proton detection allows efficient measurement of relaxation parameters used as a measure of dynamic processes. Under rapid MAS, relaxation times can be measured in a site-specific manner in medium-sized proteins, enabling the investigation of molecular motions at high resolution. Additionally, we discuss methods for measurement of structural parameters, including measurement of internuclear ((1))H-((1))H contacts and the use of paramagnetic effects in the determination of global structure.

  1. Spectroscopic studies near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, K.S. ); Moltz, D.M.; Nitschke, J.M.; Wilmarth, P.A. ); Robertson, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated nuclei close to the proton drip line by using heavy-ion fusion reactions to produce extremely neutron-deficient nuclides. Their nuclear decay properties were studied by using on-line isotope separators at Oak Ridge (UNISOR) and Berkeley (OASIS), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory velocity filter, and a fast helium-gas-jet transport system at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. Many isotopes, isomers, and {beta}-delayed-proton and {alpha}-particle emitters were discovered. This contribution summarizes three topics that are part of our overall program: decay rates of even-even {alpha}-particle emitters, mass excesses of {sup 181}Pb, {sup 182}Pb, and {sup 183}Pb, and {beta}-delayed proton emitters near N = 82. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Improving resolution in proton solid-state NMR by removing nitrogen-14 residual dipolar broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robin S.; Elena, Bénédicte; Emsley, Lyndon

    2008-06-01

    Residual dipolar coupling between quadrupolar and other nuclei under MAS has not usually been thought to be important in high field NMR spectroscopy. We show that coupling to 14N broadens 1H lineshapes significantly even at 11.7 T, and that we can decouple 14N from 1H during 1H homonuclear decoupling to successfully improve 1H resolution. The method used for decoupling is the application of evenly spaced pulses to the quadrupolar nucleus.

  3. Sensitivity of proton NMR relaxation times in a HTPB based polyurethane elastomer to thermo-oxidative aging.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Mowery, Daniel Michael; Celina, Mathias Christopher

    2004-09-01

    Solid-state {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry studies were conducted on a hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based polyurethane elastomer thermo-oxidatively aged at 80 C. The {sup 1}H T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1{rho}} relaxation times of samples thermally aged for various periods of time were determined as a function of NMR measurement temperature. The response of each measurement was calculated from a best-fit linear function of the relaxation time vs. aging time. It was found that the T{sub 2,H} and T{sub 1{rho},H} relaxation times exhibited the largest response to thermal degradation, whereas T{sub 1,H} showed minimal change. All of the NMR relaxation measurements on solid samples showed significantly less sensitivity to thermal aging than the T{sub 2,H} relaxation times of solvent-swollen samples.

  4. Investigating the Dissolution Performance of Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Proton NMR.

    PubMed

    Tres, Francesco; Coombes, Steven R; Phillips, Andrew R; Hughes, Leslie P; Wren, Stephen A C; Aylott, Jonathan W; Burley, Jonathan C

    2015-09-10

    We have investigated the dissolution performance of amorphous solid dispersions of poorly water-soluble bicalutamide in a Kollidon VA64 polymeric matrix as a function of the drug loading (5% vs. 30% bicalutamide). A combined suite of state-of-the-art analytical techniques were employed to obtain a clear picture of the drug release, including an integrated magnetic resonance imaging UV-Vis flow cell system and 1H-NMR. Off-line 1H-NMR was used for the first time to simultaneously measure the dissolution profiles and rates of both the drug and the polymer from a solid dispersion. MRI and 1H-NMR data showed that the 5% drug loading compact erodes linearly, and that bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64 are released at approximately the same rate from the molecular dispersion. For the 30% extrudate, data indicated a slower water ingress into the compact which corresponds to a slower dissolution rate of both bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64.

  5. Solid-state and unilateral NMR study of deterioration of a Dead Sea Scroll fragment.

    PubMed

    Masic, A; Chierotti, M R; Gobetto, R; Martra, G; Rabin, I; Coluccia, S

    2012-02-01

    Unilateral and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses were performed on a parchment fragment of the Dead Sea Scroll (DSS). The analyzed sample belongs to the collection of non-inscribed and nontreated fragments of known archaeological provenance from the John Rylands University Library in Manchester. Therefore, it can be considered as original DSS material free from any contamination related to the post-discovery period. Considering the paramount significance of the DSS, noninvasive approaches and portable in situ nondestructive methods are of fundamental importance for the determination of composition, structure, and chemical-physical properties of the materials under study. NMR studies reveal low amounts of water content associated with very short proton relaxation times, T(1), indicating a high level of deterioration of collagen molecules within scroll fragments. In addition, (13)C cross-polarization magic-angle-spinning (CPMAS) NMR spectroscopy shows characteristic peaks of lipids whose presence we attribute to the production technology that did not involve liming. Extraction with chloroform led to the reduction of both lipid and protein signals in the (13)C CPMAS spectrum indicating probable involvement of lipids in parchment degradation processes. NMR absorption and relaxation measurements provide nondestructive, discriminative, and sensitive tools for studying the deterioration effects on the organization and properties of water and collagen within ancient manuscripts.

  6. Diamond Deposition and Defect Chemistry Studied via Solid State NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    same integrated NMR signal, regardless of its chemical environment, provided complete spin-lattice relaxation occurs between averages 3 . Gem -quality...occurs between averages, and broadening from years, a large research effort has been devoted to the study paramagnetic centers is insignificant. Gem ...information on the distribution and motion mond’s durability very attractive. However, while gem - of hydrogen can be obtained from the solid-state NMR

  7. Isolation and 2D NMR Studies of Alkaloids from Comptonella sessilifoliola1.

    PubMed

    Pusset, J; Lopez, J L; Pais, M; Neirabeyeh, M A; Veillon, J M

    1991-04-01

    Six known furanoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated from the wood and trunk bark of COMPTONELLA SESSILIFOLIOLA (Guillaumin) Hartley (Rutaceae). 2D NMR experiments gave the assignment of all the signals for both (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. Pteleine and kokusaginine were used as models. The two-dimensional carbon-proton correlation experiments, performed for the first time on furanoquinoline alkaloids, led us to correct (13)C-NMR assignments previously described in the literature.

  8. High-Resolution NMR Studies of Human Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Watt, Eric D.; Boettcher, John M.; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    In normal hemostasis, the blood clotting cascade is initiated when factor VIIa (fVIIa, other clotting factors are named similarly) binds to the integral membrane protein, human tissue factor (TF). The TF/fVIIa complex in turn activates fX and fIX, eventually concluding with clot formation. Several X-ray crystal structures of the soluble extracellular domain of TF (sTF) exist; however, these structures are missing electron density in functionally relevant regions of the protein. In this context, NMR can provide complementary structural information as well as dynamic insights into enzyme activity. The resolution and sensitivity for NMR studies are greatly enhanced by the ability to prepare multiple milligrams of protein with various isotopic labeling patterns. Here, we demonstrate high-yield production of several isotopically labeled forms of recombinant sTF, allowing for high-resolution NMR studies both in the solid and solution state. We also report solution NMR spectra at sub-mM concentrations of sTF, ensuring the presence of dispersed monomer, as well as the first solid-state NMR spectra of sTF. Our improved sample preparation and precipitation conditions have enabled the acquisition of multidimensional NMR data sets for TF chemical shift assignment and provide a benchmark for TF structure elucidation. PMID:27657719

  9. /sup 13/C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, S.L.; Andrews, P.R.; Craik, D.J.; Gale, D.J.

    1986-02-01

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring /sup 13/C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants.

  10. 1H and 19 F NMR Study of Cation and Anion Motions in Guanidinium Hexafluorozirconate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottel, M.; Kozak, A.; Pająk, Z.

    1996-09-01

    Proton and fluorine NMR second moments and spin-lattice relaxation times of polycrystalline guanidinium hexafluorozirconate and its deuterated analogue were studied in laboratory (60 MHz) and rotating (H1 = 20 G) frames over a wide range of temperature. An analysis of the experimental results enabled us to reveal a dynamical inequivalence of two crystallographically independent cations and an unexpected high mobility of nonspherical anion dimers. A comparison of the ions dynamics in 2:1 complex studied with the guanidinium 1:1 and 3:1 complexes has shown a significant contribution of the hydrogen bonds to the potential barriers hindering the anion reorientations. At low temperatures a proton motion in the hydrogen bond and at 400 K a solid-solid phase transition have been discerned.

  11. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  12. Proton Dynamics in the Anti-ferroelectric CsH3(SeO3)2 by using 1H NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moohee; Ndiaye, B.; Kang, K.; Kim, H.; Sim, J.; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-03-01

    1H NMR techniques have been employed on the anti-ferroelectric CsH3(SeO3)2 to measure spectrum, shift, T1 and T2 from 300 K down to 80 K at 4.85 T. The 1H NMR spectrum at 300 K shows a composite structure; one dominant broad peak and two small narrow peaks. From the temperature dependences of both intensity and T1 for each peak, we identify that the narrow peaks come from rapidly moving protons whereas the broad peaks originate from rigid protons. The spectra below 200 K show several peaks associated with six nonequivalent proton sites and also the T1 decays show a non-exponential curve coming from many proton sites. T1 is very long even at 300 K and becomes even longer at low temperature. By analyzing T1 decays with T1S and T1L, we confirm that 1/T1(T) show an activated behavior; the short component originates from proton dynamics with activation energy of ~ 140 K and the long component is associated with that of ~ 100 K. Further analysis suggests that some protons show an abrupt change in both shift and T1L across Tc and may be responsible for the phase transition.

  13. NMR relaxation of protein and water protons in diamagnetic hemoglobin solutions.

    PubMed

    Eisenstadt, M

    1985-07-02

    We have measured T1 and T2 of protein and water protons in hemoglobin solutions using broad-line pulse techniques; selective excitation and detection methods enabled the intrinsic protein and water relaxation rates, as well as the spin-transfer rate between them, to be obtained at 5, 10, and 20 MHz. Water and protein T1 data were also obtained at 100 and 200 MHz for hemoglobin in H2O/D2O mixtures by using commercial Fourier-transform instruments. The T1 data conform to a simple model of two well-mixed spin systems with single intrinsic relaxation times and an average spin-transfer rate, with each phase recovering from a radio-frequency excitation with a biexponential time dependence. At low frequencies, protein T1 and T2 agree reasonably with a model of dipolar relaxation of an array of fixed protons tumbling in solution, explicitly calculating methyl and methylene relaxation and using a continuum approximation for the others. Differing values in H2O and D2O are mainly ascribed to solvent viscosity. For water-proton relaxation, T1, T2, and spin transfer were measured for H2O and HDO, which enabled a separation of inter-and intramolecular contributions to relaxation. Despite such detail, few firm conclusions could be reached about hydration water. But it seems clear that few long-lived hydration sites are needed to explain T1 and T2, and the spin-transfer value mandates fewer than five sites with a lifetime longer than 10(-8) s.

  14. Heteronuclear NMR studies of cobalamins. 11. sup 15 N NMR studies of the axial nucleotide and amide side chains of cyanocobalamin and dicyanocobamides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.; Brooks, H.B.; Xiang, Zou ); Victor, M.; Ray, A. ); Timkovich, R. )

    1990-11-28

    Spectroscopic and thermodynamic evidence for the structure of cobalamines and dicyanocobalamin (CN){sub 2}Cbl have been previously reported. The structure indicated the occurrence of the so-called tuck-in species. Further observations and characterization of the tuck-in species of (CN){sub 2}Cbl by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy are presented herein. These results represent the first observation of the {sup 15}N NMR spectrum of benzimidazole nucleotide of cobalamins. The first NMR observation of the amide protons of cobalamins and their connectivity to the amide nitrogens are also reported. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Studying the Proton Spin Puzzle with PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherity, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The proton spin puzzle remains one of the biggest mysteries in fundamental particle physics today. This talk will explore how the PHENIX Collaboration's forward W-boson program uses RHIC, the world's only polarized proton-proton collider, to probe the spin structure of the proton.

  16. Study of cultured fibroblasts in vivo using NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Karczmar, G.S.

    1984-08-01

    The goal was to study the compartmentation of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates in intact Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts (CEFs) using /sup 31/P NMR at 109 MHz. A technique for maintaining functional cells at high densities in an NMR magnet is described. Signals were detected from cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), ATP, NAD, NADH, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine. The effect of external glucose on cytoplasmic pools of phosphates was studied. When cells were perfused with glucose-free medium the rate of glycolysis decreased, the amplitudes of the ATP resonances decreased, and the P/sub i/ intensity increased. The quantity of NMR-detectable P/sub i/ produced was significantly greater than the quantity of NMR-detectable ATP which was lost. Experiments with /sup 32/P labeled P/sub i/ showed that as the concentration of glucose in the medium was increase, the amount of phosphate sequestered in the cells increased. We conclude that there is a pool of P/sub i/ which is not detected by high resolution NMR and that the size of this pool increases as the rate of glycolysis increase. Longtitudinal relaxation times of intracellular phosphates in normal, transformed, and primary CEFs were measured. The results demonstrate that relaxation times of phosphates are sensitive to structural and metabolic changes which occur when cells are grown in culture. 59 references. 31 figures.

  17. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba2In2O5, Ba2In2O4(OH)2, is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H2O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics2004, 170, 25−32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculations of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1H and 17O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1H–17O double resonance experiments. PMID:26321789

  18. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    PubMed Central

    Sobolev, Anatoly P.; Capitani, Donatella; Giannino, Donato; Nicolodi, Chiara; Testone, Giulio; Santoro, Flavio; Frugis, Giovanna; Iannelli, Maria A.; Mattoo, Autar K.; Brosio, Elvino; Gianferri, Raffaella; D’Amico, Irene; Mannina, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    The 1H-NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foods is discussed. Transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the ArabidopsisKNAT1 gene is presented as a case study. Twenty-two water-soluble metabolites (amino acids, organic acids, sugars) present in leaves of conventional and GM lettuce were monitored by NMR and quantified at two developmental stages. The NMR spectra did not reveal any difference in metabolite composition between the GM lettuce and the wild type counterpart. Statistical analyses of metabolite variables highlighted metabolism variation as a function of leaf development as well as the transgene. A main effect of the transgene was in altering sugar metabolism. PMID:22253988

  19. Molecular dynamics of solid cortisol studied by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    Polycrystalline cortisol (hydrocortisone; 11β,17α,21-trihydroxy-4-preg- nene-3,20-dione; C21H30O5) has been investigated by continuous and pulse proton NMR methods between 78 and 400 K at Larmor frequencies of 7, 25 and 60 MHz. A reduced value of second moment was found above 90 K and is ascribed to reorientation of two methyl groups. A single asymmetric minimum was found in the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation times and this also is attributed to reorientation of two methyl groups. The asymmetry suggests an asymmetric distribution of correlation times of the motion. Using the Cole-Davidson distribution, the best computer fit yields the following parameters characterizing the motion: Ea = 11ṡ8 ± 0ṡ1 kJ mol-1, τ0 = 4ṡ6 ± 0ṡ4) x 10-13s, distribution parameter δ = 0ṡ62.

  20. Review of NMR studies of nanoscale molecular magnets composed of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic triangles

    DOE PAGES

    Furukawa, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies performed on three nanoscale molecular magnets with different novel configurations of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic (AFM) triangles: (1) the isolated single AFM triangle K6[V15As6O42(H2O)]·8H2O (in short V15), (2) the spin ball [Mo72Fe30O252(Mo2O7(H2O))2(Mo2O8H2(H2O)) (CH3COO)12(H2O)91]·150H2O (in short Fe30 spin ball), and (3) the twisted triangular spin tube [(CuCl2tachH)3Cl]Cl2 (in short Cu3 spin tube). In V15t, from 51V NMR spectra, the local spin configurations were directly determined in both the nonfrustrated total spin ST = 3/2 state at higher magnetic fields (H ge; 2.7 T) and the two nearly degenerate ST =more » 1/2 ground states at lower magnetic fields (H ≤ 2.7 T). The dynamical magnetic properties of V15 were investigated by proton spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) measurements. In the ST = 3/2 state, 1/T1 shows thermally activated behaviour as a function of temperature. On the other hand, the temperature independent behaviour of 1/T1 at very low temperatures is observed in the frustrated ST = 1/2 ground state. Possible origins for the peculiar behaviour of 1/T1 will be discussed in terms of magnetic fluctuations due to spin frustrations. In Fe30, static and dynamical properties of Fe3+ (s = 5/2) have been investigated by proton NMR spectra and 1/T1 measurements. From the temperature dependence of 1/T1, the fluctuation frequency of the Fe3+ spins is found to decrease with decreasing temperature, indicating spin freezing at low temperatures. The spin freezing is also evidenced by the observation of a sudden broadening of 1H NMR spectra below 0.6 K. Finally, 1H NMR data in Cu3 will be described. An observation of magnetic broadening of 1H NMR spectra at low temperatures below 1 K directly revealed a gapless ground state. The 1/T1 measurements revealed a usual slow spin dynamics in the Cu3 spin tube.« less

  1. Theoretical and experimental IR, Raman and NMR spectra in studying the electronic structure of 2-nitrobenzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, R.; Samsonowicz, M.; Regulska, E.; Lewandowski, W.

    2007-05-01

    The influence of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium on the electronic system of the 2-nitrobenzoic acid (2-NBA) was studied. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by HF, B3PW91, B3LYP methods using 6-311++G ∗∗ basis set. The theoretical IR and NMR spectra were obtained. The vibrational (FT-IR, FT-Raman) and NMR ( 1H and 13C) spectra for 2-nitrobenzoic acid salts of alkali metals were also recorded. The assignment of vibrational spectra was done. Characteristic shifts of band wavenumbers and changes in band intensities along the metal series were observed. Good correlation between the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands in the IR and Raman spectra for 2-nitrobenzoates (2-NB) and ionic potential, electronegativity, atomic mass and affinity of metals were found. The chemical shifts of protons and carbons ( 1H, 13C NMR) in the series of studied alkali metal 2-nitrobenzoates were observed too. The calculated parameters were compared to experimental characteristic of studied compounds.

  2. Metabolic changes during cellular senescence investigated by proton NMR-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gey, Claudia; Seeger, Karsten

    2013-03-01

    Cellular senescence is of growing interest due to its role in tumour suppression and its contribution to organismic ageing. This cellular state can be reached by replicative loss of telomeres or certain stresses in cell culture and is characterized by the termination of cell division; however, the cells remain metabolically active. To identify metabolites that are characteristic for senescent cells, extracts of human embryonic lung fibroblast (WI-38 cell line) have been investigated with NMR spectroscopy. Three different types of senescence have been characterized: replicative senescence, DNA damage-induced senescence (etoposide treatment) and oncogene-induced senescence (hyperactive RAF kinase). The metabolite pattern allows (I) discrimination of senescent and control cells and (II) discrimination of the three senescence types. Senescent cells show an increased ratio of glycerophosphocholine to phosphocholine independent from the type of senescence. The increase in glycerophosphocholine implicates a key role of phospholipid metabolism in cellular senescence. The observed changes in the choline metabolism are diametrically opposite to the well-known changes in choline metabolism of tumour cells. As tumours responding to chemotherapeutic agents show a "glycerophosphocholine-to-phosphocholine switch" i.e. an increase in glycerophosphocholine, our metabolic data suggests that these malignant cells enter a senescent state emphasizing the role of senescence in tumour suppression.

  3. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegun, A. K.; Takatsu, J.; Nakaji, T.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Koffeman, E. N.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2016-12-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images, should be minimized from 3-5% or higher to less than 1%, to make the treatment plan with proton beams more accurate, and thereby better treatment for the patient. With Geant4 we simulated a proton radiography detection system with two position-sensitive and residual energy detectors. A complex phantom filled with various materials (including tissue surrogates), was placed between the position sensitive detectors. The phantom was irradiated with 150 MeV protons and the energy loss radiograph and scattering angles were studied. Protons passing through different materials in the phantom lose energy, which was used to create a radiography image of the phantom. The multiple Coulomb scattering of a proton traversing different materials causes blurring of the image. To improve image quality and material identification in the phantom, we selected protons with small scattering angles. A good quality proton radiography image, in which various materials can be recognized accurately, and in combination with xCT can lead to more accurate relative stopping powers predictions.

  4. Dynamical properties of confined supercooled water: an NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Broccio, Matteo; Corsaro, Carmelo; Faraone, Antonio; Liu, Li; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    We report a set of dynamical data of confined water measured in a very deeply supercooled regime (290-190 K). Water is contained in silica matrices (MCM-41-S) which consist of 1D cylindrical pores with diameters d = 14,18 and 24 Å. When confined in these tubular pores, water does not crystallize, and can be supercooled well below 200 K. We use the NMR technique to obtain the characteristic proton relaxation time-constants (the spin-lattice relaxation time-constant T1 and the spin-spin relaxation time-constant T2) and a direct measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient in the whole temperature range. We give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover (FSC) at TL = 225 K from the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient. A combination of the NMR self-diffusion coefficient with the average translational relaxation time, as measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, shows a well defined decoupling of transport coefficients, i.e. the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, on approaching the crossover temperature TL.

  5. NMR study of a membrane protein in detergent-free aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zoonens, Manuela; Catoire, Laurent J; Giusti, Fabrice; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2005-06-21

    One of the major obstacles to membrane protein (MP) structural studies is the destabilizing effect of detergents. Amphipols (APols) are short amphipathic polymers that can substitute for detergents to keep MPs water-soluble under mild conditions. In the present work, we have explored the feasibility of studying the structure of APol-complexed MPs by NMR. As a test MP, we chose the 171-residue transmembrane domain of outer MP A from Escherichia coli (tOmpA), whose x-ray and NMR structures in detergent are known. 2H,15N-labeled tOmpA was produced as inclusion bodies, refolded in detergent solution, trapped with APol A8-35, and the detergent removed by adsorption onto polystyrene beads. The resolution of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy-heteronuclear single-quantum correlation spectra of tOmpA/A8-35 complexes was found to be close to that of the best spectra obtained in detergent solutions. The dispersion of chemical shifts indicated that the protein had regained its native fold and retained it during the exchange of surfactants. MP-APol interactions were mapped by substituting hydrogenated for deuterated A8-35. The resulting dipolar broadening of amide proton linewidths was found to be limited to the beta-barrel region of tOmpA, indicating that A8-35 binds specifically to the hydrophobic transmembrane surface of the protein. The potential of this approach to MP studies by solution NMR is discussed.

  6. A structural study of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) and its cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative using NMR spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Hamzah, Rosniza; Bakar, Mohamad Abu; Khairuddean, Melati; Mohammed, Issam Ahmed; Adnan, Rohana

    2012-09-12

    A structural study of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) and its cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative was carried out using NMR spectroscopy techniques. The overlapping (1)H-NMR signals of ENR-50 at δ 1.56, 1.68-1.70, 2.06, 2.15-2.17 ppm were successfully assigned. In this work, the <(13)C-NMR chemical shift assignments of ENR-50 were consistent to the previously reported work. A cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative of ENR-50 was synthesized from the reaction of purified ENR-50 with carbon disulfide (CS(2)), in the presence of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as catalyst at reflux temperature. The cyclic dithiocarbonate formation involved the epoxide ring opening of the ENR-50. This was followed by insertion of the C-S moiety of CS(2) at the oxygen attached to the quaternary carbon and methine carbon of epoxidized isoprene unit, respectively. The bands due to the C=S and C-O were clearly observed in the FTIR spectrum while the (1)H-NMR spectrum of the derivative revealed the peak attributed to the methylene protons had split. The (13)C-NMR spectrum of the derivative further indicates two new carbon peaks arising from the >C=S and quaternary carbon of cyclic dithiocarbonate. All other (1)H- and (13)C-NMR chemical shifts of the derivative remain unchanged with respect to the ENR-50.

  7. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  8. (1)JCH NMR Profile: Identification of Key Structural Features and Functionalities by Visual Observation and Direct Measurement of One-Bond Proton-Carbon Coupling Constants.

    PubMed

    Marcó, Núria; Souza, Alexandre A; Nolis, Pau; Cobas, Carlos; Gil, Roberto R; Parella, Teodor

    2017-02-17

    A user-friendly NMR interface for the visual and accurate determination of experimental one-bond proton-carbon coupling constants ((1)JCH) in small molecules is presented. This intuitive (1)JCH profile correlates directly to δ((1)H), and (1)JCH facilitates the rapid identification and assignment of (1)H signals belonging to key structural elements and functional groups. Illustrative examples are provided for some target molecules, including terminal alkynes, strained rings, electronegative substituents, or lone-pair-bearing heteronuclei.

  9. Novel Dodecaarylporphyrins: Synthesis and Variable Temperature NMR Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cancilla, Mark; Lebrilla, Carlito; Ma, Jian-Guo; Medforth, Craig J.; Muzzi, Cinzia M.; Shelnutt, John A.; Smith, Kevin M.; Voss, Lisa

    1999-05-05

    An investigation of the synthesis of novel dodecaarylporphyrins using the Suzuki coupling reaction of arylboronic acids with octabromotetraarylporphyrins is reported. Studies of the dynamic properties of these new porphyrins using variable temperature (VT) 1H NMR spectroscopy and molecular mechanics provide interesting insights into their dynamic properties, including the first determination of {beta} aryl rotation in a porphyrin system.

  10. A carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of some experimental referee broadened-specification /ERBS/ turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalling, D. K.; Pugmire, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy study of alternative jet fuels are presented. A referee broadened-specification (ERBS) aviation turbine fuel, a mixture of 65 percent traditional kerosene with 35 percent hydrotreated catalytic gas oil (HCGO) containing 12.8 percent hydrogen, and fuels of lower hydrogen content created by blending the latter with a mixture of HCGO and xylene bottoms were studied. The various samples were examined by carbon-13 and proton NMR at high field strength, and the resulting spectra are shown. In the proton spectrum of the 12.8 percent hydrogen fuel, no prominent single species is seen while for the blending stock, many individual lines are apparent. The ERBS fuels were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and the resulting fractions analyzed by NMR. The species found are identified.

  11. Equilibrium forms of vitisin B pigments in an aqueous system studied by NMR and visible spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joana; Mateus, Nuno; Silva, Artur M S; de Freitas, Victor

    2009-08-13

    The main species in the acid-base equilibria of two pyranoanthocyanins (vitisins B), pyranomalvidin-3-glucoside I and pyranomalvidin-3-O-coumaroylglucoside II, and the respective pK(a) were determined using NMR, visible spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry techniques. The three equilibria involve protonation of the pyranoflavylium cation of vitisin B (pK(a1)) and two deprotonations (pK(a2) and pK(a3)). For pigment I, the values obtained through the titration curves of the chemical shift of some protons versus pH were (pK(a1) < 0.68; pK(a2) = 4.40 +/- 0.08; pK(a3) = 7.45 +/- 0.09) very close to the values obtained by visible spectroscopy (pK(a1) < 0.63; pK(a2) = 4.43 +/- 0.02; pK(a3) = 7.34 +/- 0.03). For pigment II, it was only possible to calculate the pK(a) by visible spectroscopy (pK(a1) < 0.75; pK(a2) = 4.66 +/- 0.10; pK(a3) = 6.76 +/- 0.10). NMR studies have shown that pigment I does not undergo hydration, and the hypothesis of the occurrence of hemiacetal forms in equilibrium was discarded.

  12. Solvent and H/D isotope effects on the proton transfer pathways in heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded phenol-carboxylic acid anions observed by combined UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, Benjamin; Guo, Jing; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-05-22

    Heteroconjugated hydrogen-bonded anions A···H···X(-) of phenols (AH) and carboxylic/inorganic acids (HX) dissolved in CD2Cl2 and CDF3/CDF2Cl have been studied by combined low-temperature UV-vis and (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy (UVNMR). The systems constitute small molecular models of hydrogen-bonded cofactors in proteins such as the photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Thus, the phenols studied include the PYP cofactor 4-hydroxycinnamic acid methyl thioester, and the more acidic 4-nitrophenol and 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol which mimic electronically excited cofactor states. It is shown that the (13)C chemical shifts of the phenolic residues of A···H···X(-), referenced to the corresponding values of A···H···A(-), constitute excellent probes for the average proton positions. These shifts correlate with those of the H-bonded protons, as well as with the H/D isotope effects on the (13)C chemical shifts. A combined analysis of UV-vis and NMR data was employed to elucidate the proton transfer pathways in a qualitative way. Dual absorption bands of the phenolic moiety indicate a double-well situation for the shortest OHO hydrogen bonds studied. Surprisingly, when the solvent polarity is low the carboxylates are protonated whereas the proton shifts toward the phenolic oxygens when the polarity is increased. This finding indicates that because of stronger ion-dipole interactions small anions are stabilized at high solvent polarity and large anions exhibiting delocalized charges at low solvent polarities. It also explains the large acidity difference of phenols and carboxylic acids in water, and the observation that this difference is strongly reduced in the interior of proteins when both partners form mutual hydrogen bonds.

  13. Studies of Transition Metal Complexes Using Dynamic NMR Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coston, Timothy Peter John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This Thesis is primarily concerned with the quantitative study of fluxional processes in, predominantly platinum(IV) complexes, with the ligands 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(methylthio)ethane (MeS)_2CHCH(SMe)_2 , and 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(methylthio)ethene (MeS) _2C=C(SMe)_2. Quantitative information relating to the energetics of these processes has been obtained by a combination of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques. Chapter One provides an introduction to the background of fluxional processes in transition metal complexes together with data concerning the energetics of the processes that have already been studied by NMR techniques. Chapter Two provides a thorough grounding in NMR techniques, in particular those concerned with the quantitative measurement of rates involved in chemical exchange processes. A description of the use of 2D EXSY NMR spectroscopy in obtaining rate data is given. The properties of the magnetic isotope of platinum are given in Chapter Three. A general survey is also given of some additional compounds that have already been studied by platinum-195 spectroscopy. Chapter Four is concerned with the quantitative study of low temperature (<293 K) fluxionality (sulphur inversion) in the complexes (PtXMe_3 (MeS)_2CHCH(SMe) _2) (X = Cl, Br, I). These complexes were studied by dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance and the information regarding the rates of sulphur inversion was obtained by complete band-shape analysis. Chapter Five is concerned with high temperature (>333 K) fluxionality, of the previous complexes, as studied by a combination of one- and two -dimensional NMR techniques. Aside from obtaining thermodynamic parameters for all the processes, a new novel mechanism is proposed. Chapter Six is primarily concerned with the NMR investigation of the new dinuclear complexes ((PtXMe _3)_2(MeS) _2CHCH(SMe)_2) (X = Cl, Br, I). The solution properties have been established and thermo-dynamic parameters

  14. 1H and 15N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially 1H-15N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate 15N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS 15N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via 1H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D 1H and 2D 1H-15N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  15. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-01

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame 1H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  16. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  17. Study of cultured fibroblasts in vivo using NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Karczmar, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to study the compartmentation of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates in intact Chicken Embryo Fibroblasts (CEFs) using /sup 31/P NMR at 109 MHz. Because glycolysis is regulated differently in normal and virally transformed CEFs, NMR experiments were performed on both types of cells. A technique for maintaining functional cells at high densities in an NMR magnet is described. Signals were detected from cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), ATP, NAD, NADH, phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine. The effect of external glucose on cytoplasmic pools of phosphates was studied. However, experiments with /sup 32/P labelled P/sub i/ showed that as the concentration of glucose in the medium was increased, the amount of phosphate sequestered in the cells increased. They conclude that there is a pool of P/sub i/ which is not detected by high resolution of NMR and that the size of this pool increases as the rate of glycolysis increases. These effects were found only in cultured cells; the data for transformed and normal cells were similar. Longitudinal relaxation times of intracellular phosphates in normal, transformed, and primary CEFs were measured.

  18. a Study of Molecular Dynamics in Water-Cellulose Systems Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waana, Charles Musannyana

    This thesis presents the application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to the study of the water dynamics in water-cellulose systems. Both H_2O and D_2O were used in polycrystalline Sigmacell 50 cellulose and in cellulose acetate films. Both the spectral lineshapes and various spin relaxation times were studied as functions of temperature and moisture content of the samples. ^1H and ^2 H NMR spectra of rm H_2O and rm D_2O absorbed in cellulose acetate films were observed while changing the angle between the plane of the film and the static magnetic field. ^1H-NMR spectra show dipolar splittings that vary depending on the angle. The splitting has a maximum when the surface of the film is perpendicular to the magnetic field. From the angular dependence of the dipolar splittings, it is deduced that the motionally averaged axis of the dipole moments is perpendicular to the film surface. ^2H NMR spectra show quadrupolar splittings which indicate that the motionally averaged axis of the electric quadrupole interaction is oriented perpendicular to the film. A number of NMR parameters were determined as a function of moisture content at 20^circ C for water adsorbed on Sigmacell 50 cellulose. The NMR parameters indicate that the cellulose swells as the water is added. Ninety-two percent of the cellulose is in crystalline domains and undergoes very little swelling indicating that it is largely inaccessible to water, whereas the remaining 8% is in paracrystalline or amorphous domains which are accessible to water and undergo considerable swelling. A three state model is applied for the protons in these samples, consisting of cellulose protons, water in intimate contact with these cellulose portons, and water which is not in intimate contact. Exchange and/or cross relaxation occurs between the three different proton groups. All the data are consistent with this model. An NMR relaxation study of water dynamics in hydrated Sigmacell 50 cellulose and cellulose acetate films has

  19. Solid State NMR Studies of Energy Conversion and Storage Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankuru Hennadige, Sohan Roshel De Silva

    NMR (Nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is utilized to study energy conversion and storage materials. Different types of NMR techniques including Magic Angle Spinning, Cross-polarization and relaxation measurement experiments were employed. Four different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, three types of CFx battery materials were investigated. Electrochemical studies have demonstrated different electrochemical performances by one type, delivering superior performance over the other two. 13C and 19F MAS NMR techniques are employed to identify the atomic/molecular structural factors that might account for differences in electrochemical performance among different types. Next as the second project, layered polymer dielectrics were investigated by NMR. Previous studies have shown that thin film capacitors are improved by using alternate layers of two polymers with complementary properties: one with a high breakdown strength and one with high dielectric constant as opposed to monolithic layers. 13C to 1H cross-polarization techniques were used to investigate any inter-layer properties that may cause the increase in the dielectric strength. The third project was to study two types of thermoelectric materials. These samples were made of heavily doped phosphorous and boron in silicon by two different methods: ball-milled and annealed. These samples were investigated by NMR to determine the degree of disorder and obtain insight into the doping efficiency. The last ongoing project is on a lithium-ion battery system. The nature of passivating layers or the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on the electrodes surface is important because of the direct correlation between the SEI and the battery life time/durability. Multinuclear (7Li, 19F, 31P) techniques are employed to identify the composition of the SEI formation of both positive and negative electrodes.

  20. Study of correlations in molecular motion by multiple quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.H.

    1981-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a very useful tool for characterizing molecular configurations through the measurement of transition frequencies and dipolar couplings. The measurement of spectral lineshapes, spin-lattice relaxation times, and transverse relaxation times also provide us with valuable information about correlations in molecular motion. The new technique of multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance has numerous advantages over the conventional single quantum NMR techniques in obtaining information about static and dynamic interactions of coupled spin systems. In the first two chapters, the theoretical background of spin Hamiltonians and the density matrix formalism of multiple quantum NMR is discussed. The creation and detection of multiple quantum coherence by multiple pulse sequence are discussed. Prototype multiple quantum spectra of oriented benzene are presented. Redfield relaxation theory and the application of multiple quantum NMR to the study of correlations in fluctuations are presented. A specific example of an oriented methyl group relaxed by paramagnetic impurities is studied in detail. The study of possible correlated motion between two coupled methyl groups by multiple quantum NMR is presented. For a six spin system it is shown that the four-quantum spectrum is sensitive to two-body correlations, and serves a ready test of correlated motion. The study of the spin-lattice dynamics of orienting or tunneling methyl groups (CH/sub 3/ and CD/sub 3/) at low temperatures is presented. The anisotropic spin-lattice relaxation of deuterated hexamethylbenzene, caused by the sixfold reorientation of the molecules, is investigated, and the NMR spectrometers and other experimental details are discussed.

  1. Evidence for DAPI intercalation in CG sites of DNA oligomer [d(CGACGTCG)]2: a 1H NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, E; D'Ambrosio, E; Ravagnan, G; Paci, M

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and the DNA oligomer [d(CGACGTCG)]2 has been investigated by proton one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in solution. Compared with the minor groove binding of the drug to [d(GCGATCGC)]2, previously studied by NMR spectroscopy, the interaction of DAPI with [d(CGACGTCG)]2 appears markedly different and gives results typical of a binding mechanism by intercalation. C:G imino proton signals of the [d(CGACGTCG)]2 oligomer as well as DAPI resonances appear strongly upfield shifted and sequential dipolar connectivities between cytosine and guanine residues show a clear decrease upon binding. Moreover, protons lying in both the minor and major grooves of the DNA double helix appear involved in the interaction, as evidenced principally by intermolecular drug-DNA NOEs. In particular, the results indicate the existence of two stereochemically non-equivalent intercalation binding sites located in the central and terminal adjacent C:G base pairs of the palindromic DNA sequence. Different lifetimes of the complexes were also observed for the two sites of binding. Moreover, due to the fast exchange on the NMR timescale between free and bound species, different interactions in dynamic equilibrium with the observed intercalative bindings were not excluded. PMID:7753623

  2. Some perspectives on the interpretation of proton NMR spin diffusion data in terms of polymer morphologies.

    PubMed

    VanderHart, D L; McFadden, G B

    1996-08-01

    Proton spin diffusion data yield morphological information over dimensions covering approximately the 2-50 nm range. In this article, the interpretation of such data for polymers is emphasized, recognizing that the mathematical framework for much of this interpretation already exists in the literature. Practical issues are considered, for example, a useful scaling of plotted data is suggested, key attributes of the data are identified and ambiguities in the mapping of data into morphological models are spelled out. Discussion is limited to two-phase systems, where it is assumed that, by employing multiple-pulse methods polarization gradients can be generated, whose spunal sharpness is limited solety by the morphological definition of the interfaces. Interpretation of data in terms of morphology and stoichiometry is emphasized, where stoichiometric issues pertain only to chemically heterogeneous systems. Extraction of stoichiometric information from spin diffusion data is not commonly attempted; the discussion included herein allows for the possibility that the composition of phases may be chemically mixed. Methods for generating gradients are discussed only briefly. A standardized spin diffusion plot is proposed and the initial slope of this plot is tocussed on for providing information about morphology and stoichiometry. Ambiguities of interpretation considered include the dimensionality of the deduced morphology and, for systems with chemical heterogeneity the uniqueness of the compositional characterization of each phase. In addition, funite difference methods are used to simulate entire spin diffusion curves for idealized lamellar and hexagonal rod/matrix morphologies. Comparisons of these curves show that distinguishing 1-D and 2-D morphologies on the basis of experimental data is unlikely to be successful over the range of stoichiometrics where such morphologies are expected. Several examples of spin diffusion data are presented. Brief treatments of the

  3. The PAW/GIPAW approach for computing NMR parameters: a new dimension added to NMR study of solids.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Thibault

    2011-07-01

    In 2001, Mauri and Pickard introduced the gauge including projected augmented wave (GIPAW) method that enabled for the first time the calculation of all-electron NMR parameters in solids, i.e. accounting for periodic boundary conditions. The GIPAW method roots in the plane wave pseudopotential formalism of the density functional theory (DFT), and avoids the use of the cluster approximation. This method has undoubtedly revitalized the interest in quantum chemical calculations in the solid-state NMR community. It has quickly evolved and improved so that the calculation of the key components of NMR interactions, namely the shielding and electric field gradient tensors, has now become a routine for most of the common nuclei studied in NMR. Availability of reliable implementations in several software packages (CASTEP, Quantum Espresso, PARATEC) make its usage more and more increasingly popular, maybe indispensable in near future for all material NMR studies. The majority of nuclei of the periodic table have already been investigated by GIPAW, and because of its high accuracy it is quickly becoming an essential tool for interpreting and understanding experimental NMR spectra, providing reliable assignments of the observed resonances to crystallographic sites or enabling a priori prediction of NMR data. The continuous increase of computing power makes ever larger (and thus more realistic) systems amenable to first-principles analysis. In the near future perspectives, as the incorporation of dynamical effects and/or disorder are still at their early developments, these areas will certainly be the prime target.

  4. Study of the negative magneto-resistance of single proton-implanted lithium-doped ZnO microwires.

    PubMed

    Lorite, I; Zandalazini, C; Esquinazi, P; Spemann, D; Friedländer, S; Pöppl, A; Michalsky, T; Grundmann, M; Vogt, J; Meijer, J; Heluani, S P; Ohldag, H; Adeagbo, W A; Nayak, S K; Hergert, W; Ernst, A; Hoffmann, M

    2015-07-01

    The magneto-transport properties of single proton-implanted ZnO and of Li(7%)-doped ZnO microwires have been studied. The as-grown microwires were highly insulating and not magnetic. After proton implantation the Li(7%) doped ZnO microwires showed a non-monotonous behavior of the negative magneto-resistance (MR) at temperature above 150 K. This is in contrast to the monotonous NMR observed below 50 K for proton-implanted ZnO. The observed difference in the transport properties of the wires is related to the amount of stable Zn vacancies created at the near surface region by the proton implantation and Li doping. The magnetic field dependence of the resistance might be explained by the formation of a magnetic/non-magnetic heterostructure in the wire after proton implantation.

  5. NMR-based approach to the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals: radiochemical purity, specific activity, and radioactive concentration values by proton and tritium NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schenk, David J; Dormer, Peter G; Hesk, David; Pollack, Scott R; Lavey, Carolee Flader

    2015-06-15

    Compounds containing tritium are widely used across the drug discovery and development landscape. These materials are widely utilized because they can be efficiently synthesized and produced at high specific activity. Results from internally calibrated (3)H and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggests that at least in some cases, this calibrated approach could supplement or potentially replace radio-high-performance liquid chromatography for radiochemical purity, dilution and scintillation counting for the measurement of radioactivity per volume, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis for the determination of specific activity. In summary, the NMR-derived values agreed with those from the standard approaches to within 1% to 9% for solution count and specific activity. Additionally, the NMR-derived values for radiochemical purity deviated by less than 5%. A benefit of this method is that these values may be calculated at the same time that (3)H NMR analysis provides the location and distribution of tritium atoms within the molecule. Presented and discussed here is the application of this method, advantages and disadvantages of the approach, and a rationale for utilizing internally calibrated (1)H and (3)H NMR spectroscopy for specific activity, radioactive concentration, and radiochemical purity whenever acquiring (3)H NMR for tritium location.

  6. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Protonation of ninhydrin and indan-1,2,3-trione revisited: A combined theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salnikov, George E.; Genaev, Alexander M.; Shernyukov, Andrey V.; Shubin, Vyacheslav G.

    2017-04-01

    The literature data on protonation of indan-1,2,3-trione and ninhydrin (indantrione hydrate) in acidic media are inconsistent, formation of dications at pH 3 and very low extent of protonation in superacid CF3SO3H were claimed. Our combined theoretical (DFT, MP2, CCSD) and experimental (NMR) study has shown that indantrione undergoes single protonation in CF3SO3H resulting in monocation formation. In more strong superacid FSO3H-SbF5 dication is formed, but, contrary to the literary data, trication is not formed even in this superacid. Significant dependence of 13C NMR chemical shifts of indantrione on media acidity allows using this compound as a convenient indicator of acidity in a broad range, from H0 -3 to -25.

  8. An NMR Study of Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Keith E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as a model for studying enzyme activity with a basic spectrometer is presented. Included are background information, experimental procedures, and a discussion of probable results. Stressed is the value of the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in biochemistry. (CW)

  9. NMR studies and applications of perfluorocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yulin

    Hyperpolarized 3He has been very successful in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs. It provides ways to study the physiological properties of the lungs and lung function. However, the high costs of the polarizing apparatus and the complicated polarizing procedure are preventing this technique from being clinically used routinely. Recent developments have shown that several fluorinated gases have the potential to replace 3He in some of its applications. This thesis presents some preliminary results of human excised lung imaging using C2F6 and C3F8. These two fluorinated gases were able to yield images with good signal-to-noise ratio and reasonable resolutions in a 1.5 T magnet. Using diffusion MRI of these two gases can distinguish emphysematous lungs from healthy ones. An important application of these gases would be to determine local lung surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio in vivo, which requires the unrestricted (free) diffusivity in each pixel to be known. We present data in this thesis which allow free diffusivities to be calculated from the relaxation time T1. Samples of pure C 2F6 and C3F8 at different pressures and in mixtures with oxygen at different concentrations were made. Measurements were done at two different magnetic fields and temperature was regulated to study the temperature dependence over a small range. These two gases were also used in studies of carbon-block filters, where the strong adsorption of the gases to the high surface-area carbon is beneficial. A brief review of our work on mouse lung imaging using hyperpolarized 3He is presented in Appendix A; Appendix B is a study of the longitudinal spin magnetization in the presence of a strong magnetic field gradient; the construction of the pulsed field gradient waveform measurement coils and some experimental results using these coils are contained in Appendix C.

  10. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    17O NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations was employed to understand the local structure and dynamics of the phosphate ions and protons in the paraelectric phase of the proton conductor CsH2PO4. For the room-temperature structure, the results confirm that one proton (H1) is localized in an asymmetric H-bond (between O1 donor and O2 acceptor oxygen atoms), whereas the H2 proton undergoes rapid exchange between two sites in a hydrogen bond with a symmetric double potential well at a rate ≥107 Hz. Variable-temperature 17O NMR spectra recorded from 22 to 214 °C were interpreted by considering different models for the rotation of the phosphate anions. At least two distinct rate constants for rotations about four pseudo C3 axes of the phosphate ion were required in order to achieve good agreement with the experimental data. An activation energy of 0.21 ± 0.06 eV was observed for rotation about the P–O1 axis, with a higher activation energy of 0.50 ± 0.07 eV being obtained for rotation about the P–O2, P–O3d, and P–O3a axes, with the superscripts denoting, respectively, dynamic donor and acceptor oxygen atoms of the H-bond. The higher activation energy of the second process is most likely associated with the cost of breaking an O1–H1 bond. The activation energy of this process is slightly lower than that obtained from the 1H exchange process (0.70 ± 0.07 eV) (Kim, G.; Blanc, F.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Grey, C. P. J. Phys. Chem. C2013, 117, 6504−6515) associated with the translational motion of the protons. The relationship between proton jumps and phosphate rotation was analyzed in detail by considering uncorrelated motion, motion of individual PO4 ions and the four connected/H-bonded protons, and concerted motions of adjacent phosphate units, mediated by proton hops. We conclude that, while phosphate rotations aid proton motion, not all phosphate rotations result in proton jumps. PMID:25732257

  11. Pulsed NMR study of the curing process of epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Hiroki; Tanaka, Chikako; Yaginuma, Michiko; Shinohara, Emi; Asano, Atsushi; Kurotsu, Takuzo

    2008-07-01

    To analyze a curing process of epoxy resin in terms of molecular motion, we adapted a pulsed NMR method. Three kinds of (1)H spin-spin relaxation times (T(2L) (long), T(2S) (short) and T(2M) (intermediate)) were estimated from observed solid echo train signals as the curing process proceeded. A short T(2S) value below 20 micros suggests the existence of a motion-restricted chain, that is, cured elements of resin, and its fraction, P(S), sigmoidally increased with the curing time. On the other hand, the fraction of T(2L), P(L), decreased with the reaction time reciprocally against P(S), suggesting the disappearance of highly mobile molecules raised from pre-cured resin. The spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), was also measured to check another aspect of molecular motion in the process. T(1) of the mixed epoxy resin and curing agent gradually increased just after mixing both of them. This corresponds to an increment of a less-mobile fraction, of which the correction time is more than 10(-6) s, and also means that the occurrence of a network structure whose mobility is strongly restricted by chemically bonded bridges between the epoxy resin and curing agent. The time courses of these parameters coincided with those of IR peaks pertinent to the curing reaction. Therefore, pulsed NMR is a useful tool to monitor the hardening process of epoxy resin in real time non-distractively in terms of the molecular motion of protons.

  12. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  13. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, Raz

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. 27Al and 23Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework 27Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na+ cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  14. An advanced phantom study assessing the feasibility of neuronal current imaging by ultra-low-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Körber, Rainer; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Höfner, Nora; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Kim, Kiwoong; Burghoff, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In ultra-low-field (ULF) NMR/MRI, a common scheme is to magnetize the sample by a polarizing field of up to hundreds of mT, after which the NMR signal, precessing in a field on the order of several μT, is detected with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In our ULF-NMR system, we polarize with up to 50mT and deploy a single-stage DC-SQUID current sensor with an integrated input coil which is connected to a wire-wound Nb gradiometer. We developed this system (white noise 0.50fT/√Hz) for assessing the feasibility of imaging neuronal currents by detecting their effect on the ULF-NMR signal. Magnetoencephalography investigations of evoked brain activity showed neuronal dipole moments below 50nAm. With our instrumentation, we have studied two different approaches for neuronal current imaging. In the so-called DC effect, long-lived neuronal activity shifts the Larmor frequency of the surrounding protons. An alternative strategy is to exploit fast neuronal activity as a tipping pulse. This so-called AC effect requires the proton Larmor frequency to match the frequency of the neuronal activity, which ranges from near-DC to ∼kHz. We emulated neuronal activity by means of a single dipolar source in a physical phantom, consisting of a hollow sphere filled with an aqueous solution of CuSO4 and NaCl. In these phantom studies, with physiologically relevant dipole depths, we determined resolution limits for our set-up for the AC and the DC effect of ∼10μAm and ∼50nAm, respectively. Hence, the DC effect appears to be detectable in vivo by current ULF-NMR technology.

  15. NMR Structural Studies of Antimicrobial Peptides: LPcin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji-Ho; Kim, Ji-Sun; Choi, Sung-Sub; Kim, Yongae

    2016-01-01

    Lactophoricin (LPcin), a component of proteose peptone (113–135) isolated from bovine milk, is a cationic amphipathic antimicrobial peptide consisting of 23 amino acids. We designed a series of N- or C-terminal truncated variants, mutated analogs, and truncated mutated analogs using peptide-engineering techniques. Then, we selected three LPcin analogs of LPcin-C8 (LPcin-YK1), LPcin-T2WT6W (LPcin-YK2), and LPcin-T2WT6W-C8 (LPcin-YK3), which may have better antimicrobial activities than LPcin, and successfully expressed them in E. coli with high yield. We elucidated the 3D structures and topologies of the three LPcin analogs in membrane environments by conducting NMR structural studies. We investigated the purity of the LPcin analogs and the α-helical secondary structures by performing 1H-15N 2D HSQC and HMQC-NOESY liquid-state NMR spectroscopy using protein-containing micelle samples. We measured the 3D structures and tilt angles in membranes by conducting 15N 1D and 2D 1H-15N SAMMY type solid-state NMR spectroscopy with an 800 MHz in-house-built 1H-15N double-resonance solid-state NMR probe with a strip-shield coil, using protein-containing large bicelle samples aligned and confirmed by molecular-dynamics simulations. The three LPcin analogs were found to be curved α-helical structures, with tilt angles of 55–75° for normal membrane bilayers, and their enhanced activities may be correlated with these topologies. PMID:26789765

  16. NMR Studies of Molecular Orientation and Dynamics in Spider silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michal, Carl; Eles, Philip

    2004-05-01

    Spider dragline silk has a unique combination of strength and extensibility that has been difficult to achieve in synthetic polymer fibres and has inspired industrial efforts to produce genetically engineered analogues. In light of these efforts elsewhere, we describe solid-state NMR experiments that elucidate the molecular structure and dynamics of this remarkable material. These experiments include the use of a 2-D exchange NMR experiment known as DECODER in which the sample is reoriented through a discrete angle during the mixing time. This experiment allows a reconstruction of the orientation distribution of the protein backbone. Our data is well described by a two-component distribution where the protein backbones of both components are preferentially aligned along the silk fibre. This experiment is also sensitive to molecular motion on a wide range of time-scales, and is employed to study changes in the silk as a function of fibre extension and hydration. Hydrated silk undergoes a remarkable phenomena known as supercontraction where fibres shrink by up to 50% in length while swelling in diameter. DECODER NMR of fully and partially supercontracted silk reveals that supercontraction occurs through a process of local phase transitions where water disrupts inter- and intra-chain hydrogen bonds.

  17. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  18. Advanced solids NMR studies of coal structure and chemistry. Progress report, March 1 - September 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1996-12-31

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utili- zation of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NNM methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methine groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. We will also develop NMR methods for probing coal macropore structure using hyperpolarized {sup 29}Xe as a probe, and study the molecular dynamics of what appear to be mobile, CH{sub 2} rich, long chain hydrocarbons. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples.

  19. Dosimetry of {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir gamma-irradiated agarose gels by proton relaxation time measurement and NMR imaging, in a 0-100 Gy dose range

    SciTech Connect

    Chalansonnet, A.; Briguet, A.; Bonnat, J.L.

    1997-05-01

    Localized irradiation of the skin and subcutaneous tissues with large single doses of gamma rays can induce immediate effects characterized by erythema, desquamation, and necrosis. Correlations between the evolution of the lesions and dosimetry studies have to be established by biophysical methods. NMR studies of the effects of an irradiated Fricke solution might be a means of controlling the delivered irradiation doses. After exposition to ionizing radiations, ferrous ions are transformed into ferric ions. Both are paramagnetic ions, and proton spin-lattice relaxation is accelerated depending on the oxidation reaction. In this study, solution of ammonium ferrous sulfate in an acid environment was incorporated into a gelling substance made with agarose, so that T{sub 1} weighted image contrast could be used to detect ferric ion formation. Experiments with {sup 192}Ir and {sup 90}Co gamma rays with doses in the 0 to 100 Gy range were conducted with Fe{sup 2+} concentrations of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mM in a gelling substance containing 4% agarose. A relationship was established between the amount of Fe{sup 3+} created and the spin-lattice proton relaxation rate, which led to a straightforward dose-effect relation. The use of such high doses allowed us to reproduce realistic conditions of accidental overexposure. A linear relationship was obtained between the doses absorbed and the NMR parameters measured (T{sub 1} and relative image intensity). 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Organic phosphorus incorporated in calcite during laboratory precipitation experiments and in natural cave deposits was investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For calcite precipitated in the presence of organic phosphoesters of varying size and functionality, solid-state 31P{1H} CP/MAS NMR shows that the phosphoesters were incorporated intact into the solid. Systematic changes in the 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphate group were observed between the solid phosphoester and that incorporated in the solid precipitate, yielding 31P NMR chemical shifts of the coprecipitates in the range of +1.8 to -2.2 ppm. These chemical shifts are distinct from that of similarly prepared calcite coprecipitated with inorganic phosphate, 3.5 ppm. Only minor changes were noted in the phosphoester 31P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) which suggests no significant change in the local structure of the phosphate group, which is dominated by C-O-P bonding. Close spatial proximity of the organic phosphate group to calcite structural components was revealed by 31P/13C rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments for coprecipitates prepared with 13C-labeled carbonate. All coprecipitates showed significant 31P dephasing effects upon 13C-irradiation, signaling atomic-scale proximity to carbonate carbon. The dephasing rate for smaller organophosphate molecules is similar to that observed for inorganic phosphate, whereas much slower dephasing was observed for larger molecules having long and/or bulky side-chains. This result suggests that small organic molecules can be tightly enclosed within the calcite structure, whereas significant structural disruption required to accommodate the larger organic molecules leads to longer phosphate-carbonate distances. Comparison of 31P NMR spectroscopic data from the synthetic coprecipitates with those from calcite moonmilk speleothems indicates that phosphorus occurs mainly as inorganic orthophosphate in the natural deposits, although small

  1. NMR study of a membrane protein in detergent-free aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Zoonens, Manuela; Catoire, Laurent J.; Giusti, Fabrice; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2005-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to membrane protein (MP) structural studies is the destabilizing effect of detergents. Amphipols (APols) are short amphipathic polymers that can substitute for detergents to keep MPs water-soluble under mild conditions. In the present work, we have explored the feasibility of studying the structure of APol-complexed MPs by NMR. As a test MP, we chose the 171-residue transmembrane domain of outer MP A from Escherichia coli (tOmpA), whose x-ray and NMR structures in detergent are known. 2H,15N-labeled tOmpA was produced as inclusion bodies, refolded in detergent solution, trapped with APol A8-35, and the detergent removed by adsorption onto polystyrene beads. The resolution of transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy–heteronuclear single-quantum correlation spectra of tOmpA/A8-35 complexes was found to be close to that of the best spectra obtained in detergent solutions. The dispersion of chemical shifts indicated that the protein had regained its native fold and retained it during the exchange of surfactants. MP–APol interactions were mapped by substituting hydrogenated for deuterated A8-35. The resulting dipolar broadening of amide proton linewidths was found to be limited to the β-barrel region of tOmpA, indicating that A8-35 binds specifically to the hydrophobic transmembrane surface of the protein. The potential of this approach to MP studies by solution NMR is discussed. PMID:15956183

  2. (1)H-NMR-based metabolomic studies of bisphenol A in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Changshin; Yoon, Dahye; Cho, Junghee; Kim, Siwon; Lee, Heonho; Choi, Hyeonsoo; Kim, Suhkmann

    2017-04-03

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the response of zebrafish (Danio rerio) to increasing concentrations of bisphenol A (4,4'-(propane-2,2-diyl)diphenol, BPA). Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was applied to detect aberrant metabolomic profiles after 72 h of BPA exposure at all levels tested (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg/L). The OPLS-DA score plots showed that BPA exposure caused significant alterations in the metabolome. The metabolomic changes in response to BPA exposure generally exhibited nonlinear patterns, with the exception of reduced levels of several metabolites, including glutamine, inosine, lactate, and succinate. As the level of BPA exposure increased, individual metabolite patterns indicated that the zebrafish metabolome was subjected to severe oxidative stress. Interestingly, ATP levels increased significantly at all levels of BPA exposure. In the present study, we demonstrated the applicability of (1)H-NMR-based metabolomics to identify the discrete nature of metabolic changes.

  3. Proton Transport in Nanocrysttaline Bioceramic Materals:. AN Investigative Study of Synthetic Bone with that of Natural Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Hrudananda; Rambabu, B.; Saunders, Ramsey

    2006-06-01

    Hydroxy apatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is a ceramic material. This has been used for biological applications such as bone and teeth enamel. In this paper various preparation methods including sonochemical followed by microwave sintering technique has been used to prepare the material. The material was characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM and its electrical transport (proton) is measured by impedance spectroscopy. The conductivity measured is 0.091×10-6 to 19.20×10-6 Scm-1 at 25 - 850°C range of temperature at 100 kHz applied frequency. Conductivity found to increase with increasing applied frequency at a given temperature of measurement. The prevalence of protons in the lattice has been confirmed by proton NMR studies. The results of the experimental observations on proton migration in the apatite lattice for electrical conduction are discussed.

  4. Perspective Study of Charmonium and Exotics in Antiproton-Proton Annihilation and Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanov, Mikhail; Olsen, Stephen; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    The spectroscopy of exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. Together with charmonium, these provide a good tool for testing theories of the strong interactions including both perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, lattice QCD, potential and other phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of exotics spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimentally observed states with masses above the Dbar{D} threshold region are considered. Experimental results from different collaborations (BES, BaBar, Belle, LHCb) are analyzed with special attention given to recently discovered hidden charm states. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-lying charmonium states and others as tetraquarks with hidden charm. It has been shown that charged/neutral tetraquarks must have their neutral/charge partners with mass values differ by at most a few MeV/c2, hypotheses that tend to coincide with those proposed by Maiani and Polosa. However, measurements of different decay modes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using a high quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c and proton-proton collisions with momentum up to 26 GeV/c.

  5. Proton NMR for detection, identification and quantification of adulterants in 160 herbal food supplements marketed for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Rabab; Assemat, Gaëtan; Martins, Nathalie; Balayssac, Stéphane; Gilard, Véronique; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam

    2016-05-30

    One hundred and sixty food supplements (FS) marketed for weight loss and mainly purchased on the Internet were analyzed. All the FS were claimed as 100% natural containing only natural compounds, plant extracts and/or vitamins and the presence of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was never mentioned. (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used for detecting the presence of adulterants and for their identification and quantification. Mass spectrometry was used as a complementary method for supporting their identification. Among the 164 samples considered because capsules from 5 different blisters of the same FS were analyzed, 56% were tainted with six API. Forty three contained sibutramine as single adulterant (26%), 9 phenolphthalein (6%) and 23 a mixture of these API (14%) that were both withdrawn from the market several years ago because of toxicity concerns. Sildenafil was found in 12 samples, either as a single adulterant (n=5) or in combination with sibutramine (n=3), phenolphthalein (n=3) and both sibutramine and phenolphthalein (n=1). Fluoxetine was present in 4 formulations, alone (n=3) or in combination with sibutramine and orlistat (n=1). At last, lorcaserine was detected in one FS. The content of sibutramine per dosage unit was comprised between 0.1 and 22 mg and that of phenolphthalein between 0.05 and 56 mg. The study also highlights poor manufacturing practices as evidenced for instance by the variability of API in capsules from different blisters of the same box. This paper demonstrates the need for more effective quality control of weight loss FS and the efficiency of (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the detection of tainted FS.

  6. A Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Method for the Site-Specific Measurement of Proton Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Biological and Organic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Gupta, Rupal; Polenova, Tatyana; Vega, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Proton chemical shifts are a rich probe of structure and hydrogen bonding environments in organic and biological molecules. Until recently, measurements of 1H chemical shift tensors have been restricted to either solid systems with sparse proton sites or were based on the indirect determination of anisotropic tensor components from cross-relaxation and liquid-crystal experiments. We have introduced an MAS approach that permits site-resolved determination of CSA tensors of protons forming chemical bonds with labeled spin-1/2 nuclei in fully protonated solids with multiple sites, including organic molecules and proteins. This approach, originally introduced for the measurements of chemical shift tensors of amide protons, is based on three RN-symmetry based experiments, from which the principal components of the 1H CS tensor can be reliably extracted by simultaneous triple fit of the data. In this article, we expand our approach to a much more challenging system involving aliphatic and aromatic protons. We start with a review of the prior work on experimental-NMR and computational-quantum-chemical approaches for the measurements of 1H chemical shift tensors and for relating these to the electronic structures. We then present our experimental results on U-13C,15N-labeled histdine demonstrating that 1H chemical shift tensors can be reliably determined for the 1H15N and 1H13C spin pairs in cationic and neutral forms of histidine. Finally, we demonstrate that the experimental 1H(C) and 1H(N) chemical shift tensors are in agreement with Density Functional Theory calculations, therefore establishing the usefulness of our method for characterization of structure and hydrogen bonding environment in organic and biological solids. PMID:25484446

  7. Solvent dynamical behavior in an organogel phase as studied by NMR relaxation and diffusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Yemloul, Mehdi; Steiner, Emilie; Robert, Anthony; Bouguet-Bonnet, Sabine; Allix, Florent; Jamart-Grégoire, Brigitte; Canet, Daniel

    2011-03-24

    An organogelation process depends on the gelator-solvent pair. This study deals with the solvent dynamics once the gelation process is completed. The first approach used is relaxometry, i.e., the measurement of toluene proton longitudinal relaxation time T(1) as a function of the proton NMR resonance frequency (here in the 5 kHz to 400 MHz range). Pure toluene exhibits an unexpected T(1) variation, which has been identified as paramagnetic relaxation resulting from an interaction of toluene with dissolved oxygen. In the gel phase, this contribution is retrieved with, in addition, a strong decay at low frequencies assigned to toluene molecules within the gel fibers. Comparison of dispersion curves of pure toluene and toluene in the gel phase leads to an estimate of the proportion of toluene embedded within the organogel (found around 40%). The second approach is based on carbon-13 T(1) and nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, the combination of these two parameters providing direct information about the reorientation of C-H bonds. It appears clearly that reorientation of toluene is the same in pure liquid and in the gel phase. The only noticeable changes in carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation times are due to the so-called chemical shift anisotropy (csa) mechanism and reflect slight modifications of the toluene electronic distribution in the gel phase. NMR diffusion measurements by the pulse gradient spin-echo (PGSE) method allow us to determine the diffusion coefficient of toluene inside the organogel. It is roughly two-thirds of the one in pure toluene, thus indicating that self-diffusion is the only dynamical parameter to be slightly affected when the solvent is inside the gel structure. The whole set of experimental observations leads to the conclusion that, once the gel is formed, the solvent becomes essentially passive, although an important fraction is located within the gel structure.

  8. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  9. NMR spectroscopy study of local correlations in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance we study the dynamics of the hydrogen bond (HB) sub-domains in bulk and emulsified water across a wide temperature range that includes the supercooled regime. We measure the proton spin-lattice T1 and spin-spin T2 relaxation times to understand the hydrophilic interactions that determine the properties of water. We use (i) the Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound approach that focuses on a single characteristic correlation time τc, and (ii) the Powles and Hubbard approach that measures the proton rotational time τθ. We find that when the temperature is low both relaxation times are strongly correlated when the HB lifetime is long, and that when the temperature is high a decrease in the HB lifetime destroys the water clusters and decouples the dynamic modes of the system.

  10. 35Cl NQR and 1H NMR Studies of Molecular Motions in Guanidinium Salt of Chloroacetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdanowska-Fnjczek, Maria; Grottel, Małgorzata; Jakubas, Ryszard

    1998-07-01

    Multinuclear NQR and NMR techniques have been applied in order to study the molecular dynamics in [C(NH2)3](ClH2CCOO). The 35Cl NQR frequency was measured over a wide range of temperature. The experimental results were described by using the theories of Bayer and Brown which take into account the torsional oscillations of the CClH2 -group of the anion. A study of the proton NMR second moment as well as relaxation times T1, and T1p performed in a wide temperature range revealed an onset of the guanidinium cation reorientation around its two-fold symmetry axis. Activation parameters for this motion were determined.

  11. A study by (1)H NMR on the influence of some factors affecting lipid in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Nieva-Echevarría, Bárbara; Goicoechea, Encarnación; Manzanos, María J; Guillén, María D

    2016-11-15

    This article focuses on the impact of several experimental factors, including gastric acidification, intestinal transit time, presence of gastric lipase, sample/digestive fluids ratio, concentration and nature of the enzymes in intestinal juice, and bile concentration, on the extent of in vitro lipolysis when using a static model that simulates human digestion processes in mouth, stomach and small intestine. The study was carried out by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR). This technique provides a complete molecular picture of lipolysis, evidencing for the first time, whether preferential hydrolysis of certain glycerides over others occurs. A lipolysis degree similar to that reported in vivo was reached by varying certain variables within a physiological range; among them, bile concentration was found to be crucial. The holistic view of this (1)H NMR study provides information of paramount importance to design sound in vitro digestion models to determine the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of lipophilic compounds.

  12. Feasibility study of proton-based quality assurance of proton range compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Jeong, C.; Min, B. J.; Kwak, J.; Lee, J.; Cho, S.; Shin, D.; Lim, Y. K.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. B.

    2013-06-01

    All patient specific range compensators (RCs) are customized for achieving distal dose conformity of target volume in passively scattered proton therapy. Compensators are milled precisely using a computerized machine. In proton therapy, precision of the compensator is critical and quality assurance (QA) is required to protect normal tissues and organs from radiation damage. This study aims to evaluate the precision of proton-based quality assurance of range compensator. First, the geometry information of two compensators was extracted from the DICOM Radiotherapy (RT) plan. Next, RCs were irradiated on the EBT film individually by proton beam which is modulated to have a photon-like percent depth dose (PDD). Step phantoms were also irradiated on the EBT film to generate calibration curve which indicates relationship between optical density of irradiated film and perpendicular depth of compensator. Comparisons were made using the mean absolute difference (MAD) between coordinate information from DICOM RT and converted depth information from the EBT film. MAD over the whole region was 1.7, and 2.0 mm. However, MAD over the relatively flat regions on each compensator selected for comparison was within 1 mm. These results shows that proton-based quality assurance of range compensator is feasible and it is expected to achieve MAD over the whole region less than 1 mm with further correction about scattering effect of proton imaging.

  13. Methodology for solid state NMR off-resonance study of molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Jurga, Kazimierz; Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta; Baranowski, Mikołaj

    2015-10-01

    Methodology for the study of dynamics in heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame was described in the previous paper [1]. Now the methodology for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the rotating frame is presented. The solid state NMR off-resonance experiments were carried out on a homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz for protons. This spectrometer includes a specially designed probe which contains two independently tuned and electrically isolated coils installed in the coaxial position on the dewar. A unique probe design allows working at three slightly differing frequencies off and on resonance for protons and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz for fluorine nuclei with complete absence of their electrical interference. The probe allows simultaneously creating rf magnetic fields at off-resonance frequencies within the range of 30.2-30.6 MHz and at the frequency of 28.411 MHz. Presented heteronuclear cross-relaxation off-resonance experiments in the rotating frame provide information about molecular dynamics.

  14. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  15. Proton Exchange in a Paramagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Agent from Experimental Studies and ab Initio Metadynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Rodolphe; Bonnet, Célia S; Retailleau, Pascal; Durand, Philippe; Tóth, Éva

    2017-03-27

    The proton-exchange process between water and a carbamate has been studied experimentally and theoretically in a lanthanide-based paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer agent endowed with potential multimodality detection capabilities (optical imaging, or T1 MRI for the Gd(III) analogue). In addition to an in-depth structural analysis by a combined approach (using X-ray crystallography, NMR, and molecular dynamics), our ab initio simulation in aqueous solution sheds light on the reaction mechanism for this proton exchange, which involves structural Grotthuss diffusion.

  16. Proton Conductivity Studies on Biopolymer Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harun, N. I.; Sabri, N. S.; Rosli, N. H. A.; Taib, M. F. M.; Saaid, S. I. Y.; Kudin, T. I. T.; Ali, A. M. M.; Yahya, M. Z. A.

    2010-07-07

    Proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of methyl cellulose (MC) and different wt.% of ammonium nitrate (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}) were prepared by solution cast technique. Impedance spectroscopy was carried out to study electrical characteristics of bulk materials. The ionic conductivity of the prepared samples was calculated using the bulk resistance (R{sub b}) obtained from impedance spectroscopy plot. The highest ionic conductivity obtained was 1.17x10{sup -4} Scm{sup -1} for the sample with composition ratio of MC(50): NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(50). To enhance the ionic conductivity, propylene carbonate (PC) and ethylene carbonate (EC) plasticizers were introduced. It was found that the ionic conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes increased with the increase in plasticizers concentration. The ionic conductivities of solid polymer electrolytes based on MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-PC was enhanced up to 4.91x10{sup -3} Scm{sup -1} while for the MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-EC system, the highest conductivity was 1.74x10{sup -2} Scm{sup -1}. The addition of more plasticizer however decreases in mechanical stability of the membranes.

  17. NMR studies of electrostatic potential distribution around biologically important molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Likhtenshtein, G I; Adin, I; Novoselsky, A; Shames, A; Vaisbuch, I; Glaser, R

    1999-01-01

    A new experimental approach has been developed to study the distribution of local electrostatic potential around specific protons in biologically important molecules. The approach is the development of a method denoted as "spin label/spin probe," which was proposed by one of us (. Mol. Biol. 6:498-507). The proposed method is based upon the quantitative measurement of the contribution of differently charged nitroxide probes to the spin lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) of protons in the molecule of interest, followed by calculation of local electrostatic potential using the classical Debye equation. In parallel, the theoretical calculation of potential distribution with the use of the MacSpartan Plus 1.0 program has been performed. Application of the method to solutions of simple organic molecules (aliphatic and aromatic alcohols, aliphatic carboxylates (propionate anion), and protonated ethyl amine and imidazole) allowed us to estimate the effective potential around the molecules under investigation. These were found to be in good agreement with theoretically expected values. This technique was then applied to zwitterionic amino acids bearing neutral and charged side chains (glycine, lysine, histidine, and aspartic acid). The reliability of the general approach is proved by the data presented in this paper. Application of this new methodology can afford insight into the biochemical significance of electrostatic effects in biological systems. PMID:10388770

  18. Review of NMR studies of nanoscale molecular magnets composed of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic triangles

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies performed on three nanoscale molecular magnets with different novel configurations of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnetic (AFM) triangles: (1) the isolated single AFM triangle K6[V15As6O42(H2O)]·8H2O (in short V15), (2) the spin ball [Mo72Fe30O252(Mo2O7(H2O))2(Mo2O8H2(H2O)) (CH3COO)12(H2O)91]·150H2O (in short Fe30 spin ball), and (3) the twisted triangular spin tube [(CuCl2tachH)3Cl]Cl2 (in short Cu3 spin tube). In V15t, from 51V NMR spectra, the local spin configurations were directly determined in both the nonfrustrated total spin ST = 3/2 state at higher magnetic fields (H ge; 2.7 T) and the two nearly degenerate ST = 1/2 ground states at lower magnetic fields (H ≤ 2.7 T). The dynamical magnetic properties of V15 were investigated by proton spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) measurements. In the ST = 3/2 state, 1/T1 shows thermally activated behaviour as a function of temperature. On the other hand, the temperature independent behaviour of 1/T1 at very low temperatures is observed in the frustrated ST = 1/2 ground state. Possible origins for the peculiar behaviour of 1/T1 will be discussed in terms of magnetic fluctuations due to spin frustrations. In Fe30, static and dynamical properties of Fe3+ (s = 5/2) have been investigated by proton NMR spectra and 1/T1 measurements. From the temperature dependence of 1/T1, the fluctuation frequency of the Fe3+ spins is found to decrease with decreasing temperature, indicating spin freezing at low temperatures. The

  19. Unraveling the molecular recognition of amino acid derivatives by a pseudopeptidic macrocycle: ESI-MS, NMR, fluorescence, and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Ignacio; Burguete, M Isabel; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V; Vigara, Laura

    2009-08-21

    The binding between a pseudopeptidic macrocyclic naphthalenophane and different N-protected amino acid derivatives has been thoroughly studied by ESI-MS, NMR, fluorescence, and molecular modeling. Careful NMR titration experiments led to the characterization of the intermolecular noncovalent interactions, reflecting a slight side chain and l-stereoselectivity of the host-guest complexes. The data suggest the formation of an intimate ionic pair after the proton transfer from the carboxylic substrate to the amino macrocycle. Additional intermolecular interactions like H-bonding and pi-pi contacts are also important. This receptor shows a stronger interaction with substrates bearing aromatic rings, either in the side chain or in the N-protecting group. Besides, for N-Z-Phe-OH, a moderate enantioselectivity has been observed. Mass spectrometry suggests the formation of supramolecular complexes with stoichiometries higher than 1:1. The dual nature of the fluorescence emission of the macrocyclic receptor allowed determining binding constants and pertinent thermodynamic parameters. On the basis of the experimental data (NMR titrations, intermolecular ROESY, VT-NMR) and with the help of molecular modeling, a reasonable structure for the supramolecular complexes can be proposed, in which the interactions with the naphthyl ring of the receptor play a fundamental role in the strength and selectivity of the molecular recognition event.

  20. Experimental NMR spin-lattice relaxometry study in the liquid crystalline nematic phase of propylcyano-phenylcyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Acosta, R H; Pusiol, D J

    2001-01-01

    The NMR spin-lattice proton relaxation dispersion T1(nu(L)) of the liquid crystal propylcyano-phenylcyclohexane is studied over several decades of Larmor frequencies and at different temperatures in the nematic mesophase. The results show that the order fluctuation of the local nematic director contribution to T1(nu(L)) undergoes a transition between two power regimes: from T1(nu(L)) protional to nu(1/2)L to nu(alpha)L (alpha approximately 1/3) on going from low to high Larmor frequencies.

  1. Hydrogen cluster/network in tobermorite as studied by multiple-quantum spin counting {sup 1}H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Mogami, Yuuki; Yamazaki, Satoru; Matsuno, Shinya; Matsui, Kunio; Noda, Yasuto; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-15

    Proton multiple-quantum (MQ) spin-counting experiment has been employed to study arrangement of hydrogen atoms in 9 Å/11 Å natural/synthetic tobermorites. Even though all tobermorite samples give similar characterless, broad static-powder {sup 1}H NMR spectra, their MQ spin-counting spectra are markedly different; higher quanta in 11 Å tobermorite do not grow with the MQ excitation time, while those in 9 Å one do. A statistical analysis of the MQ results recently proposed [26] is applied to show that hydrogens align in 9 Å tobermorite one dimensionally, while in 11 Å tobermorite they exist as a cluster of 5–8 hydrogen atoms.

  2. (1)H, (13)C NMR and X-ray crystallographic studies of highly polyhalogenated derivatives of costunolide lactone.

    PubMed

    Corona, D; Díaz, E; Nava, J L; Guzmán, A; Barrios, H; Fuentes, A; Hernandez-Plata, S A; Allard, J; Jankowski, C K

    2005-11-01

    The costunolide lactone, a sesquiterpene compound isolated from Zaluzania triiloba species, reacted with several dihalocarbene sources produced by trihaloform-NaOH under successive phase transfer reactions yielding mono-, bis- and tris-dihalocyclopropane adducts. The structures, as well as the configurational assignments of the different derivatives, were established by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and assisted by X-ray crystallographic and molecular modelling studies. The specific shielding of protons in the neighbourhood of different halogens on the cyclopropane moieties was correlated to the pseudocontact interactions.

  3. Tricritical point in ferroelastic ammonium titanyl fluoride: NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kavun, V.Ya.; Kozlova, S.G.; Laptash, N.M; Tkachenko, I.A.; Gabuda, S.P

    2010-09-15

    Ionic mobility and phase transitions in ammonium titanyl pentafluoride (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} were studied using the {sup 19}F and {sup 1}H NMR data. The high-temperature phase (I) is characterized by spherically symmetric (isotropic) reorientation of [TiOF{sub 5}]{sup 3-} anions and by uniaxial reorientation of these anions in the ferroelastic phase II. A previously unknown second-order phase transition to the low-temperature modification (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}(III) was found at 205 K. The transition is accompanied by hindering of uniaxial rotations of [TiOF{sub 5}]{sup 3-} anions and by noticeable change of {sup 19}F magnetic shielding tensor associated with the influence of pseudo-Jahn-Teller effect. A pressure-induced tricritical point with coordinates p{sub TCR{approx}}2 kbar and T{sub TCR{approx}}170 K is estimated on the base of {sup 19}F NMR chemical shift data, and previously studied p-T diagram of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}. - Graphical abstract: p-T phase diagram of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}.

  4. NMR Study of Organic Counterion Binding to Perfluorinated Micellar Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossev, Dobrin; Matsumoto, Mustuo; Nakahara, Masaru

    2008-03-01

    In this study we have applied our previously developed NMR method to study the adsorption of tetramethylammonium (TMA^+) and tetraethylammonium (TEA^+) counterions to micelles formed by perfluorooctylsulfonate (FOS^-) surfactant in water at 30 C. These two counterions induce formation of threadlike surfactant structures that result in well pronounced viscoelastic properties of the solution. To selectively probe the degree of counterion binding we have used ^1H and ^19F NMR chemical shifts and self-diffusion coefficients that are sensitive to the Stern and diffuse double layers, respectively. The competitive adsorption of TMA^+ and TEA^+ was examined as a function of the TMA^+/TEA^+ ratio at a constant FOS^- concentration of 100 mM. The two counterions were found to form Stern layer around the FOS^- micelles with comparable packing; about one counterion per two micellized FOS molecules. When mixed at intermediate proportions, however, the TEA^+ counterion shows preferential binding; the concentration of TEA^+ in the Stern layer is found to be twice higher than that of TMA^+ at equal total respective concentrations in the solution. These results are discussed in terms of counterion size and hydrophobicity and presented in parallel with those that involved the smaller and more hydrophilic lithium counterion.

  5. Phenol-formaldehyde resins: A quantitative NMR study of molecular structure and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottenbourgs, Benjamin Tony

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins have been the subject of this work. 13C liquid-state and solid-state NMR has been used to investigate the molecular structure of mainly novolak and partially of resole resins. 1H wideline in combination with 13C solid-state NMR relaxometry has been applied to study the curing and the molecular dynamics of phenolic resins. It was the intention to provide an insight in the relationship between resin composition, resin structure and subsequent resin properties (by means of the molecular dynamics). An improved 13C liquid-state NMR quantification technique of novolaks in THF-CDCl3 solutions is demonstrated. Full quantitative 13C liquid-state spectra of phenol-formaldehyde resins with high signal- to-noise ratio were obtained by using chromium acetylacetonate under optimized spectral conditions within a few hours spectrometer time. Attached proton test (APT) spectra enabled proper peak assignments in the region with significant overlap. For several novolaks, prepared under different catalytic conditions, the degree of polymerization, degree of branching, number average molecular weight, isomeric distribution, and the number of unreacted ortho and para phenol ring positions was determined with a reduced margin of error, by analyzing and integrating the 13C spectra. The power of 13C solid-state NMR in the analysis of cured PF resins is shown. Particular importance was ascribed to the question of the quantifiability of the experiments when it was desired to measure the degree of conversion by means of a 13C CP/MAS contact time study. The network structure present, and thus also the mechanical properties, is critically dependent upon the final degree of conversion obtained after curing. The degree of conversion, which depended on the cure conditions (cure temperature, cure pressure and cure time), was limited by vitrification as was demonstrated by DSC experiments. Changes in the spin-lattice relaxation time T 1H were observed, providing

  6. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Ward, Meaghan E; Ritz, Emily; Ahmed, Mumdooh A M; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of nickel-iron hybrid hemoglobins (Hb)

    SciTech Connect

    Shibayama, N.; Inubushi, T.; Ikeda-Saito, M.; Yonetani, T.

    1986-05-01

    Ni-Fe hybrid Hbs, ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 3/..beta..(Fe)/sup 2/ and ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/, have been studied by proton NMR. ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/, ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/..beta..(Fe)/sub 2/, and ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/ show exchangeable proton resonances at +14 and +11 ppm, T-state markers. Upon binding of CO to ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/, these T-state markers disappear with a concomitant appearance of a R-state marker at +10.8 ppm at pH 6.5 to 8.5. On the other hand, the complementary hybrid, ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/..beta..(Fe-CO)/sub 2/, shows the two T-state markers at low pHs. Upon raising pH, the amplitude of the T-state markers is decreased and accompanied by an appearance of the R-state marker. Electronic absorption spectra and hyperfine-shifted proton resonances at different pHs indicate that these ligand-induced structural changes are accompanied by the changes in the coordination and spin states of Ni-PP in ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/-subunits. In the deoxy T-state, the ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/-subunits are dominantly in a tetra-coordinated (S = 0) state, whereas, in the R-state, the penta-coordinated (S = 1) state is markedly increased in the ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/-subunits. Thus, hyperfine-shifted proximal His NH proton resonances of the ..cap alpha..(Ni)/sub 2/-subunits are observable only in the R-state. The Ni-PP in the ..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/-subunits, however, always takes a penta-coordinated (S = 1) state regardless of the medium conditions and the state of ligation in the partner ..cap alpha..(Fe)/sub 2/-subunits. Thus, hyperfine-shifted proximal His NH proton resonances of the ..beta..(Ni)/sub 2/-subunits are always observable.

  8. NMR chemical shift study of the interaction of selected peptides with liposomal and micellar models of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Van Koninckxloo, Aurore; Henoumont, Céline; Laurent, Sophie; Muller, Robert N; Vander Elst, Luce

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between two peptides previously selected by phage display to target apoptotic cells and phospholipidic models of these cells (liposomes or micelles made of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and/or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (DPPS, phosphatidylserine analog) was studied by the simple analysis of the changes induced on the proton NMR chemical shifts of the peptides. Our approach which does not need healthy and/or apoptotic cells for assessing the affinity of different peptides is fast and efficient and requires small amounts of peptide to determine the association constant, the interacting protons, and the number of interaction sites. The micellar model gave more reliable results than the liposomal one. The preferential interaction of the peptide with DPPS was evidenced by the change of the chemical shifts of specific amino acids of the peptides. Our micellar model is thus well suited to mimic apoptotic cells.

  9. Effects of nucleotide binding to LmrA: A combined MAS-NMR and solution NMR study.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Mönkemeyer, Leonie; Velamakanni, Saroj; van Veen, Hendrik W; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    ABC transporters are fascinating examples of fine-tuned molecular machines that use the energy from ATP hydrolysis to translocate a multitude of substrates across biological membranes. While structural details have emerged on many members of this large protein superfamily, a number of functional details are still under debate. High resolution structures yield valuable insights into protein function, but it is the combination of structural, functional and dynamic insights that facilitates a complete understanding of the workings of their complex molecular mechanisms. NMR is a technique well-suited to investigate proteins in atomic resolution while taking their dynamic properties into account. It thus nicely complements other structural techniques, such as X-ray crystallography, that have contributed high-resolution data to the architectural understanding of ABC transporters. Here, we describe the heterologous expression of LmrA, an ABC exporter from Lactococcus lactis, in Escherichia coli. This allows for more flexible isotope labeling for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and the easy study of LmrA's multidrug resistance phenotype. We use a combination of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) on the reconstituted transporter and solution NMR on its isolated nucleotide binding domain to investigate consequences of nucleotide binding to LmrA. We find that nucleotide binding affects the protein globally, but that NMR is also able to pinpoint local dynamic effects to specific residues, such as the Walker A motif's conserved lysine residue.

  10. Studies of a Proton Bunch Phase Monitor for Range Verification in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, T.; Golnik, C.; Enghardt, W.; Petzoldt, J.; Kormoll, T.; Pausch, G.; Straessner, A.; Roemer, K.; Dreyer, A.; Hueso-Gonzalez, F.; Enghardt, W.

    2015-07-01

    A primary subject of the present research in particle therapy is to ensure the precise irradiation of the target volume. The prompt gamma timing (PGT) method provides one possibility for in vivo range verification during the irradiation of patients. Prompt gamma rays with high energies are emitted promptly due to nuclear reactions of protons with tissue. The arrival time of these gammas to the detector reflects the stopping process of the primary protons in tissue and is directly correlated to the range. Due to the time resolution of the detector and the proton bunch time spread, as well as drifts of the bunch phase with respect to the accelerator frequency, timing spectra are smeared out and compromise the accuracy of range information intended for future clinical applications. Nevertheless, counteracting this limitation and recovering range information from the PGT measured spectra, corrections using a bunch phase monitor can be performed. A first prototype of bunch phase monitor was tested at GSI Darmstadt, where measurements of the energy correlation profile of the ion bunches were performed. At the ELBE accelerator at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), set up to provide bremsstrahlung photons in very short pulses, a constant fraction algorithm for the incoming digital signals was evaluated, which is used for optimizing the time resolution. Studies of scattering experiments with different thin targets and detector positions are accomplished at Onco Ray Dresden, where a clinical proton beam is available. These experiments allow a basic characterization of the proton bunch structure and the detection yield. (authors)

  11. Studies of a proton phase beam monitor for range verification in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, T.; Golnik, C.; Enghardt, W.; Petzoldt, J.; Kormoll, T.; Pausch, G.; Straessner, A.; Roemer, K.; Dreyer, A.; Hueso-Gonzalez, F.; Enghardt, W.

    2015-07-01

    A primary subject of the present research in particle therapy is to ensure the precise irradiation of the target volume. The prompt gamma timing (PGT) method provides one possibility for in vivo range verification during the irradiation of patients. Prompt gamma rays with high energies are emitted promptly due to nuclear reactions of protons with tissue. The arrival time of these gammas to the detector reflects the stopping process of the primary protons in tissue and are directly correlated to the range. Due to the time resolution of the detector and the proton bunch time spread, as well as drifts of the bunch phase with respect to the accelerator frequency, timing spectra are smeared out and compromise the accuracy of range information intended for future clinical applications. Nevertheless, counteracting this limitation and recovering range information from the PGT measured spectra, corrections using a phase beam monitor can be performed. A first prototype of phase beam monitor was tested at GSI Darmstadt, where measurements of the energy profile of the ion bunches were performed. At the ELBE accelerator Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), set up to provide bremsstrahlung photons in very short pulses, a constant fraction algorithm for the incoming digital signals was evaluated, which is used for optimizing the time resolution. Studies of scattering experiments with different thin targets and detector positions are accomplished at Oncoray Dresden, where a clinical proton beam is available. These experiments allow a basic characterization of the proton bunch structure and the detection yield. (authors)

  12. Assignment of selected hyperfine proton NMR resonances in the met forms of Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and comparisons with sperm whale metmyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.; Pandey, R.K.; Leung, H.K.; Smith, K.M.

    1988-04-19

    This work indicates a high degree of purity for our preparations of all three of the primary Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and details assignments of the heme methyl and vinyl protons in the hyperfine shift region of the ferric (aquo.) protein forms. The assignments were carried out by reconstituting the apoproteins of each component with selectively deuteriated hemes. The results indicate that even though the individual component preparations consist of essentially a single protein, the proton NMR spectra indicate spectroscopic heterogeneity. Evidence is presented for identification and classification of major and minor protein forms that are present in solutions of each component. Finally, in contrast to previous results, a detailed analysis of the proton hyperfine shift patterns of the major and minor forms of each component, in comparison to the major and minor forms of metmyoglobin, leads to the conclusions that the corresponding forms of the proteins from each species have strikingly similar heme-globin contacts and display nearly identical heme electronic structures and coordination numbers.

  13. NMR structural studies of PECVD amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Thomas Sidley, Jr.

    The properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) amorphous semiconductor films vary depending upon preparation conditions and doping. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films (a-Si:H) have some properties that make these films desirable for use in solar cells and photoreceptor devices. Maximizing electronic and structural properties of such films is key to their success. Nuclear magnetic resonance, and in particular deuterium magnetic resonance (DMR) for a-Si:H,D films, is a useful means to study the morphology of such samples. The location and motions of hydrogen and the chemically equivalent deuterium within an amorphous semiconductor film can be observed with NMR. The information from the NMR studies can be correlated with electronic properties studies to determine whether a given sample would make a successful photovoltaic device. This thesis focuses on three aspects of study: comparison of two samples that differ in the bias applied to the substrate upon which the amorphous films were grown; derivation of relaxation parameters for covalently bonded deuterium; development of a new pulse sequence "incremental spin echo double resonance (SEDOR)" to study the number of unlike spins that contribute to the local field of a given nuclei. Four significant conclusions can be drawn. First, the electronic quality as measured by the photoresponse product etamutau correlates with the broad Gaussian DMR spectral feature which arises from molecular hydrogen in sites that restrict motion. Second, the relaxation of nuclear magnetization under extreme inhomogeneous broadening can be modeled very well as the relaxation without spin diffusion to faster relaxing species within a sample. Third, incremental SEDOR has either a quantum mechanical or classical behavior depending upon the length of the pulse spacing in comparison to the spin-spin relaxation time. Fourth, the local field at the hydrogen of an HD pair within an a-Si:H,D sample is determined on average by

  14. In vivo localized proton spectroscopic studies of human gastrocnemius muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, P.A.; Jackson, E.F.; Hazle, J.D.; Fotedar, L.K.; Kulkarni, M.V.; Flamig, D.P.

    1988-10-01

    In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of gastrocnemius muscle were performed in six normal volunteers. Both spatially resolved spectroscopy (SPARS) and stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequences were used for volume localization. A number of water suppression sequences have been combined with these localization schemes. Among the various techniques investigated in these studies, STEAM with an inversion pulse (T1-discriminated spectrum) seems to have the best potential for in vivo localized high-resolution proton spectroscopy studies of human muscle.

  15. NMR Studies on the Aqueous Phase Photochemical Degradation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2008-04-06

    Aqueous phase photochemical degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is an important pathway in several environments, including washout lagoon soils, impact craters from partially detonated munitions that fill with rain or groundwater, and shallow marine environments containing unexploded munitions that have corroded. Knowledge of the degradation products is necessary for compliance issues on military firing ranges and formerly used defense sites. Previous laboratory studies have indicated that UV irradiation of aqueous TNT solutions results in a multicomponent product mixture, including polymerization compounds, that has been only partially resolved by mass spectrometric analyses. This study illustrates how a combination of solid and liquid state 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopy, including two dimensional analyses, provides complementary information on the total product mixture from aqueous photolysis of TNT, and the effect of reaction conditions. Among the degradation products detected were amine, amide, azoxy, azo, and carboxylic acid compounds.

  16. Unilateral NMR study of a XVI century wall painted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti, N.; Capitani, D.; Rossi, E.; Cozzolino, S.; Segre, A. L.

    2007-06-01

    Wall paintings in the XVI century Serra Chapel in the "Chiesa di Nostra Signora del Sacro Cuore" Rome, have been studied using unilateral NMR. In order to map the distribution of moisture content in the wall painted, a large number of Hahn echo measurements, covering large areas of the wall painting were performed. Because the intensity of the Hahn echo is proportional to the amount of moisture in the area under study, the experimental data were transformed into 2D gradient colour maps which allowed an easy visualization of the moisture content of the wall. The state of conservation of the wall painting was monitored using T2 measurements specially with regards to outcropping salt.

  17. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  18. Synthesis and NMR studies of (13)C-labeled vitamin D metabolites.

    PubMed

    Okamura, William H; Zhu, Gui-Dong; Hill, David K; Thomas, Richard J; Ringe, Kerstin; Borchardt, Daniel B; Norman, Anthony W; Mueller, Leonard J

    2002-03-08

    Isotope-labeled drug molecules may be useful for probing by NMR spectroscopy the conformation of ligand associated with biological hosts such as membranes and proteins. Triple-labeled [7,9,19-(13)C(3)]-vitamin D(3) (56), its 25-hydroxylated and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxylated metabolites (58 and 68, respectively), and other labeled materials have been synthesized via coupling of [9-(13)C]-Grundmann's ketone 39 or its protected 25-hydroxy derivative 43 with labeled A ring enyne fragments 25 or 26. The labeled CD-ring fragment 39 was prepared by a sequence involving Grignard addition of [(13)C]-methylmagnesium iodide to Grundmann's enone 28, oxidative cleavage, functional group modifications leading to seco-iodide 38, and finally a kinetic enolate S(N)2 cycloalkylation. The C-7,19 double labeling of the A-ring enyne was achieved by the Corey-Fuchs/Wittig processes on keto aldehyde 11. By employing these labeled fragments in the Wilson-Mazur route, the C-7,9,19 triple-(13)C-labeled metabolites 56, 58, and 68 as well as other (13)C-labeled metabolites have been prepared. In an initial NMR investigation of one of the labeled metabolites prepared in this study, namely [7,9,19-(13)C(3)]-25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (58), the three (13)C-labeled carbons of the otherwise water insoluble steroid could be clearly detected by (13)C NMR analysis at 0.1 mM in a mixture of CD(3)OD/D(2)O (60/40) or in aqueous dimethylcyclodextrin solution and at 2 mM in 20 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) aqueous micellar solution. In the SDS micellar solution, a double half-filter NOESY experiment revealed that the distance between the H(19Z) and H(7) protons is significantly shorter than that of the corresponding distance calculated from the solid state (X-ray) structure of the free ligand. The NMR data in micelles reveals that 58 exists essentially completely in the alpha-conformer with the 3 beta-hydroxyl equatorially oriented, just as in the solid state. The shortened distance (H(19Z))-H(7)) in micellar

  19. Ion transport in porous media studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Pel, L; Huinink, H P; Kopinga, K; Rijniers, L A; Kaasschieter, E F

    2001-01-01

    Moisture and salt transport in masonry can give rise to damages. Therefore a detailed knowledge of the moisture and salt transport is essential for understanding the durability of masonry. A special NMR apparatus has been made allowing quasi-simultaneous measurements of both moisture and Na profiles in porous building materials. Using this apparatus both the absorption of a 4 M NaCl solution in a calcium silicate brick and the drying of a 3 M NaCl capillary saturated fired-clay brick have been studied. It was found that during the absorption process the Na ions clearly stay behind, which this is caused by adsorption of these ions to the pore surface. For the drying it was found that at the beginning of the drying process the ions accumulate near the surface. As the drying rate decreases, diffusion becomes dominant and the ion profile levels off again.

  20. ¹H NMR and hyperpolarized ¹³C NMR assays of pyruvate-lactate: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hill, Deborah K; Jamin, Yann; Orton, Matthew R; Tardif, Nicolas; Parkes, Harold G; Robinson, Simon P; Leach, Martin O; Chung, Yuen-Li; Eykyn, Thomas R

    2013-10-01

    Pyruvate-lactate exchange is mediated by the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and is central to the altered energy metabolism in cancer cells. The measurement of exchange kinetics using hyperpolarized (13) C NMR has provided a biomarker of response to novel therapeutics. However, the observable signal is restricted to the exchanging hyperpolarized (13) C pools and the endogenous pools of (12) C-labelled metabolites are invisible in these measurements. In this study, we investigated an alternative in vitro (1) H NMR assay, using [3-(13) C]pyruvate, and compared the measured kinetics with a hyperpolarized (13) C NMR assay, using [1-(13) C]pyruvate, under the same conditions in human colorectal carcinoma SW1222 cells. The apparent forward reaction rate constants (kPL ) derived from the two assays showed no significant difference, and both assays had similar reproducibility (kPL  = 0.506 ± 0.054 and kPL  = 0.441 ± 0.090 nmol/s/10(6) cells; mean ± standard deviation; n = 3); (1) H, (13) C assays, respectively). The apparent backward reaction rate constant (kLP ) could only be measured with good reproducibility using the (1) H NMR assay (kLP  = 0.376 ± 0.091 nmol/s/10(6) cells; mean ± standard deviation; n = 3). The (1) H NMR assay has adequate sensitivity to measure real-time pyruvate-lactate exchange kinetics in vitro, offering a complementary and accessible assay of apparent LDH activity.

  1. Ultra-broadband NMR probe: numerical and experimental study of transmission line NMR probe.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Shinji

    2003-06-01

    We have reinvestigated a transmission line NMR probe first published by Lowe and co-workers in 1970s [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 45 (1974) 631; 48 (1977) 268] numerically and experimentally. The probe is expected to be ultra-broadband, thus might enable new types of solid-state NMR experiments. The NMR probe consists of a coil and capacitors which are connected to the coil at regular intervals. The circuit is the same as a cascaded LC low-pass filter, except there are nonzero mutual inductances between different coil sections. We evaluated the mutual inductances by Neumann's formula and calculated the electrical characteristics of the probe as a function of a carrier frequency. We found that they were almost the same as those of a cascaded LC low-pass filter, when the inductance L of a section was estimated from the inductance of the whole coil divided by the number of the sections, and if C was set to the capacitance in a section. For example, the characteristic impedance of a transmission line coil is given by Z=(L/C)(1/2). We also calculated the magnitude and the distribution of RF magnetic field inside the probe. The magnitude of RF field decreases when the carrier frequency is increased because the phase delay between neighboring sections is proportional to the carrier frequency. For cylindrical coils, the RF field is proportional to (pinu/2nu(d))(1/2)exp(-nu/nu(d)), where the decay frequency nu(d) is determined by the dimensions of the coil. The observed carrier frequency thus must be much smaller than the decay frequency. This condition restricts the size of transmission line coils. We made a cylindrical coil for a 1H NMR probe operating below 400 MHz. It had a diameter 2.3mm and a pitch 1.2mm. Five capacitors of 6pF were connected at every three turns. The RF field strength was 40 and 60 kHz at the input RF power 100 W by a calculation and by experiments, respectively. The calculations showed that the RF field inhomogeneity along the coil axis was caused by a

  2. Study of Proton Transfer in E. Coli Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2013-06-01

    Photolyase is a flavoprotein which utilizes blue-light energy to repair UV-light damaged DNA. The catalytic cofactor of photolyase, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), has five redox states. Conversions between these redox states involve intraprotein electron transfer and proton transfer, which play important role in protein function. Here we systematically studied proton transfer in E. coli photolyase in vitro by site-directed mutagenesis and steady-state UV-vis spectroscopy, and proposed the proton channel in photolyase. We found that in the mutant N378C/E363L, proton channel was completely eliminated when DNA substrate was bound to the protein. Proton is suggested to be transported from protein surface to FAD by two pathways: the proton relay pathway through E363 and surface water to N378 and then to FAD; and the proton diffusion pathway through the substrate binding pocket. In addition, reaction kinetics of conversions between the redox states was then solved and redox potentials of the redox states were determined. These results described a complete picture of FAD redox changes, which are fundamental to the functions of all flavoenzymes.

  3. Studies related to primitive chemistry. A proton and nitrogen-14 nuclear magnetic resonance amino acid and nucleic acid constituents and a and their possible relation to prebiotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.; Cohen, E. A.; Shiller, A. M.; Chan, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies were made to determine the applicability of this technique for the study of interactions between monomeric and polymeric amino acids with monomeric nucleic acid bases and nucleotides. Proton NMR results for aqueous solutions (D2O) demonstrated interactions between the bases cytosine and adenine and acidic and aromatic amino acids. Solutions of 5'-AMP admixed with amino acids exhibited more complex behavior but stacking between aromatic rings and destacking at high amino acids concentration was evident. The multisite nature of 5'-AMP was pointed out. Chemical shift changes for adenine and 5'-AMP with three water soluble polypeptides demonstrated that significant interactions exist. It was found that the linewidth-pH profile of each amino acid is unique. It is concluded that NMR techniques can give significant and quantitative data on the association of amino acid and nucleic acid constituents.

  4. Low-temperature IR and NMR studies of the interaction of group 8 metal dihydrides with alcohols.

    PubMed

    Gutsul, Evgenii I; Belkova, Natalia V; Sverdlov, Maria S; Epstein, Lina M; Shubina, Elena S; Bakhmutov, Vladimir I; Gribanova, Tatiana N; Minyaev, Ruslan M; Bianchini, Claudio; Peruzzini, Maurizio; Zanobini, Fabrizio

    2003-05-23

    The reactions of the octahedral dihydrido complexes [MH(2)(PP(3))] [M=Fe, Ru, Os; PP(3)=P(CH(2)CH(2)PPh(2))(3)] with a variety of weak ROH acids have been studied by IR and NMR methods in either CH(2)Cl(2) or THF in the temperature range from 190 to 290 K. This study has allowed the determination of the spectral and thermodynamic properties associated with the formation of dihydrogen bonds (DHB) between the terminal hydrides and the OH group. Both the DHB enthalpy values and the hydride basicity factors (E(j)) have been found to increase in the order Fe < Ru < Os. The proton transfer process, leading to the DHB complexes, and eventually to eta(2)-H(2) products, has been found to depend on the acidic strength of the alcohol as well as the nature of the solvent. Low temperature IR and NMR techniques have been used to trace the complete energy profile of the proton transfer process involving the osmium complex [OsH(2)(PP(3))] with trifluoroethanol.

  5. [NMR study of complex formation of aromatic ligands with heptadeoxynucleotide 5'-d(GCGAAGC) forming stable hairpin structure in aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Veselkov, A N; Eaton, R J; Semanin, A V; Pakhomov, V I; Dymant, L N; Karavaev, L; Davies, D V

    2002-01-01

    Complex formation of hairpin-producing heptadeoxynucleotide 5'-d(GCGAAGC) with aromatic molecules: acridine dye proflavine and anthracycline antibiotic daunomycin was studied by one-dimensional 1H NMR and two-dimensional correlation 1H-1H (2M-TOCSY, 2M-NOESY), 1H-31P (2M-HMBC) NMR spectroscopy (500 and 600 MHz) in aqueous solution. Concentration and temperature dependences for the chemical shifts of ligand protons were measured, molecular models of equilibrium in solution were developed, and equilibrium thermodynamic parameters for the formation of intercalation complexes were calculated. Spatial structures of dye and antibiotic complexes with the heptamer hairpin were constructed on the basis of 2M-NOE data and the calculated values of limiting chemical shifts of ligand protons.

  6. SLOW-MAS NMR METHODS TO STUDY METABOLIC PROCESSES IN VIVO AND IN VITRO

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Bertram, Hanne Christine; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-09-25

    In vitro and in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy is widely used to measure metabolic profiles in cells, tissues, animals, and humans and to use them, e.g., for diagnosis and therapy response evaluations. However, the spectra often suffer from poor resolution due to variations in the isotropic bulk magnetic susceptibility present in biological objects, resulting in a broadening of the NMR lines. In principle this broadening can be averaged to zero by the technique of magic angle spinning (MAS), where the sample is rotated about an axis making an angle of 54o44’ relative to the external magnetic field. However, a problem is that in a standard MAS experiment spinning speeds of a kHz or more are required in order to avoid the occurrence of spinning sidebands (SSBs) in the spectra, which renders analysis of the spectra difficult again. At these spinning speeds the large centrifugal forces cause severe structural damage in larger biological objects, so that this method cannot be used to study metabolic processes in intact samples. In solid state NMR several methods have been developed where slow MAS is combined with special radio frequency pulse sequences to eliminate spinning side bands or separate them from the isotropic spectrum so that a SSB-free high-resolution isotropic spectrum is obtained. It has been shown recently that two methods, phase-adjusted spinning sidebands (PASS) and phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT), can successfully be modified for applications in biological materials (1, 2). With PASS MAS speeds as low as 40 Hz can be employed, allowing non or minimally invasive in vitro studies of excised tissues and organs. This method was used, amongst other things, to study post mortem changes in the proton metabolite spectra in excised rabbit muscle tissue (3). With PHORMAT the NMR sensitivity is reduced and longer measuring times are required, but with this methodology the MAS speed can be reduced to ~1 Hz. This makes PHORMAT amenable for in vivo

  7. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  8. An NMR relaxometry and gravimetric study of gelatin-free aqueous polyacrylamide dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Steven; Schreiner, L. John

    2006-09-01

    In conformal radiation therapy, a high dose of radiation is given to a target volume to increase the probability of cure, and care is taken to minimize the dose to surrounding healthy tissue. The techniques used to achieve this are very complicated and the precise verification of the resulting three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution is required. Polyacrylamide gelatin (PAG) dosimeters with magnetic resonance imaging and optical computed tomography scanning provide the required 3D dosimetry with high spatial resolution. Many basic studies have characterized these chemical dosimeters that polymerize under irradiation. However, the investigation of the fundamental properties of the radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters is complicated by the presence of the background gelatin matrix. In this work, a gelatin-free model system for the study of the basic radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters has been developed. Experiments were performed on gelatin-free dosimeters, named aqueous polyacrylamide (APA) dosimeters, containing equal amounts of acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide. The APA dosimeters were prepared with four different total monomer concentrations (2, 4, 6 and 8% by weight). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin and spin-lattice proton relaxation measurements at 20 MHz, and gravimetric analyses performed on all four dosimeters, show a continuous degree of polymerization over the dose range of 0-25 Gy. The developed NMR model explains the relationship observed between the relaxation data and the amount of crosslinked polymer formed at each dose. This model can be extended with gelatin relaxation data to provide a fundamental understanding of radiation-induced polymerization in the conventional PAG dosimeters.

  9. Imino proton NMR guides the reprogramming of A•T specific minor groove binders for mixed base pair recognition

    PubMed Central

    Harika, Narinder K.; Paul, Ananya; Stroeva, Ekaterina; Chai, Yun; Boykin, David W.; Germann, Markus W.; Wilson, W. David

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific binding to DNA is crucial for targeting transcription factor-DNA complexes to modulate gene expression. The heterocyclic diamidine, DB2277, specifically recognizes a single G•C base pair in the minor groove of mixed base pair sequences of the type AAAGTTT. NMR spectroscopy reveals the presence of major and minor species of the bound compound. To understand the principles that determine the binding affinity and orientation in mixed sequences of DNA, over thirty DNA hairpin substrates were examined by NMR and thermal melting. The NMR exchange dynamics between major and minor species shows that the exchange is much faster than compound dissociation determined from biosensor–surface plasmon resonance. Extensive modifications of DNA sequences resulted in a unique DNA sequence with binding site AAGATA that binds DB2277 in a single orientation. A molecular docking result agrees with the model representing rapid flipping of DB2277 between major and minor species. Imino spectral analysis of a 15N-labeled central G clearly shows the crucial role of the exocyclic amino group of G in sequence-specific recognition. Our results suggest that this approach can be expanded to additional modules for recognition of more sequence-specific DNA complexes. This approach provides substantial information about the sequence-specific, highly efficient, dynamic nature of minor groove binding agents. PMID:27131382

  10. 1D and 2D NMR studies of isobornyl acrylate - Methyl methacrylate copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Deepika; Hooda, Sunita; Brar, A. S.; Shankar, Ravi

    2011-10-01

    Isobornyl acrylate - methyl methacrylate (B/M) copolymers of different compositions were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using methyl-2-bromopropionate as an initiator and PMDETA copper complex as catalyst under nitrogen atmosphere at 70 °C. 1H NMR spectrum was used to determine the compositions of copolymer. The copolymer compositions were then used to determine the reactivity ratios of monomers. Reactivity ratios of co-monomers in B/M copolymer, determined from linear Kelen-Tudos method (KT) and non linear Error-in-Variable Method (EVM), are rB = 0.41 ± 0.11, rM = 1.11 ± 0.33 and rB = 0.52, rM = 1.31 respectively. The complete resonance assignments of 1H and 13C{ 1H} NMR spectra were carried out with the help of Distortion less Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT), two-dimensional Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC). 2D HSQC assignments were further confirmed by 2D Total Correlation Spectroscopy (TOCSY). The carbonyl carbon of B and M units and methyl carbon of M unit were assigned up to triad compositional and configurational sequences whereas β-methylene carbons were assigned up to tetrad compositional and configurational sequences. Similarly the methine carbon of B unit was assigned up to pentad level. 1,3 and 1,4 bond order couplings of carbonyl carbon and quaternary carbon resonances with methine, methylene and methyl protons were studied in detail using 2D Hetero Nuclear Multiple Bond Correlation (HMBC) spectra.

  11. NMR studies of G:A mismatches in oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplexes modelled after ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Katahira, M; Sato, H; Mishima, K; Uesugi, S; Fujii, S

    1993-01-01

    The structures of two oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplexes, the base sequences of which were modelled after both a hammerhead ribozyme and a small metalloribozyme, were studied by NMR. Both duplexes contain adjacent G:A mismatches; one has a PyGAPu:PyGAPu sequence and the other a PyGAPy:PuGAPu sequence. It is concluded on the basis of many characteristic NOEs that in both duplexes G:A base pairs are formed in the unique 'sheared' form, where an amino proton instead of an imino proton of G is involved in the hydrogen bonding, and G and A bases are arranged 'side by side' instead of 'head to head'. A photo-CIDNP experiment, which gives unique and independent information on the solvent accessibility of nucleotide bases, also supports G:A base pairing rather than a bulged-out structure of G and A residues. This is the first demonstration that not only the PyGAPu:PyGAPu sequence but also the PyGAPy:PuGAPu sequence can form the unique sheared G:A base pairs. Taking the previous studies on G:A mismatches into account, the idea is suggested that a PyGA:GAPu sequence is a minimum and essential element for the formation of the sheared G:A base pairs. The sheared G:A base pairs in the PyGAPu:PyGAPu sequence are suggested to be more stable than those in the PyGAPy:PuGAPu sequence. This is explained rationally by the idea proposed above. PMID:8265358

  12. Proton transfer studies in CGC+ assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żabicki, Michał; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Fischer, Sighart F.

    2009-12-01

    We have designed and analyzed a molecular model of a generic triple helix DNA base structure - the cytosine-guanine-cytosine (CGC+) assembly. The complex has been investigated for the ability of a concerted proton transfer from cytosine to guanine. Ab initio calculations have been preformed using Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) method with 6-31G ∗+ basis set. In order to determine possible reaction paths, the potential map has been constructed pointing the most stable configuration for the process to occur. Based on this observation, we have estimated a transmission coefficient for the transfer and found no support for a concerted motion. The effect of fluctuations of the barrier height on the kinetics is also discussed.

  13. Diffusion NMR methods applied to xenon gas for materials study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Wang, R.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We report initial NMR studies of (i) xenon gas diffusion in model heterogeneous porous media and (ii) continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas. Both areas utilize the pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) techniques in the gas phase, with the aim of obtaining more sophisticated information than just translational self-diffusion coefficients--a brief overview of this area is provided in the Introduction. The heterogeneous or multiple-length scale model porous media consisted of random packs of mixed glass beads of two different sizes. We focus on observing the approach of the time-dependent gas diffusion coefficient, D(t) (an indicator of mean squared displacement), to the long-time asymptote, with the aim of understanding the long-length scale structural information that may be derived from a heterogeneous porous system. We find that D(t) of imbibed xenon gas at short diffusion times is similar for the mixed bead pack and a pack of the smaller sized beads alone, hence reflecting the pore surface area to volume ratio of the smaller bead sample. The approach of D(t) to the long-time limit follows that of a pack of the larger sized beads alone, although the limiting D(t) for the mixed bead pack is lower, reflecting the lower porosity of the sample compared to that of a pack of mono-sized glass beads. The Pade approximation is used to interpolate D(t) data between the short- and long-time limits. Initial studies of continuous flow laser-polarized xenon gas demonstrate velocity-sensitive imaging of much higher flows than can generally be obtained with liquids (20-200 mm s-1). Gas velocity imaging is, however, found to be limited to a resolution of about 1 mm s-1 owing to the high diffusivity of gases compared with liquids. We also present the first gas-phase NMR scattering, or diffusive-diffraction, data, namely flow-enhanced structural features in the echo attenuation data from laser-polarized xenon flowing through a 2 mm glass bead pack. c2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. In-Cell Solid-State NMR: An Emerging Technique for the Study of Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Warnet, Xavier L.; Arnold, Alexandre A.; Marcotte, Isabelle; Warschawski, Dror E.

    2015-01-01

    Biological molecular processes are often studied in model systems, which simplifies their inherent complexity but may cause investigators to lose sight of the effects of the molecular environment. Information obtained in this way must therefore be validated by experiments in the cell. NMR has been used to study biological cells since the early days of its development. The first NMR structural studies of a protein inside a cell (by solution-state NMR) and of a membrane protein (by solid-state NMR) were published in 2001 and 2011, respectively. More recently, dynamic nuclear polarization, which has been used to enhance the signal in solid-state NMR, has also been applied to the study of frozen cells. Much progress has been made in the past 5 years, and in this review we take stock of this new technique, which is particularly appropriate for the study of biological membranes. PMID:26682804

  15. Fundamental studies of supported bimetallic catalysts by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Savargaonkar, Nilesh

    1996-10-17

    Various hydrogenation reactions on transition metals are important commercially whereas certain hydrogenolysis reactions are useful from fundamental point of view. Understanding the hydrogen mobility and kinetics of adsorption-desorption of hydrogen is important in understanding the mechanisms of such reactions involving hydrogen. The kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption was studied by means of selective excitation NMR on silica supported Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption was found to be lower on silica supported Pt catalysts as compared to Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. It was found that the rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Pt-Rh catalyst were similar to those on Rh catalyst and much higher as compared to Pt catalyst. The Ru-Ag bimetallic system is much simpler to study than the Pt-Rh system and serves as a model system to characterize more complicated systems such as the K/Ru system. Ag was found to decrease the amounts of adsorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen-to-ruthenium stoichiometry. Ag reduced the populations of states with low and intermediate binding energies of hydrogen on silica supported Ru catalyst. The rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption were also lower on silica supported Ru-Ag catalyst as compared to Ru catalyst. This report contains introductory information, the literature review, general conclusions, and four appendices. An additional four chapters and one appendix have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Studies of Molecular Dynamics by Solid State Deuterium NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baiyi

    The rotational dynamics of molecules in a number of solid systems were followed by variable temperature deuterium (^2H), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy via changes in the spectral lineshapes and spin-lattice relaxation times (T _1). First the pure solid trimethylamine-borane adduct, (CH_3)_3NBH_3, was studied. For a methyl deuterated sample, T _1 measurements yielded two T_1 minima, 6.9 ms and 4.3 ms corresponding to the slowing of methyl and trimethyl rotation, respectively, with decreasing temperature. Activation energies for methyl and trimethyl rotation, obtained from fitting the T _1 curve as a function of temperature, were 32.8 and 15.0 kJ/mol, respectively; simulations of the spectral lineshapes gave 26.6 and 18.9 kT/mol, respectively. Fitting of the ^2H T_1 curve for the borane deuterated sample gave a BH _3 rotation activation energy of 14.1 kT/mol and a ^2H quadrupolar coupling constant, chi, of 101 kHz. The activation energy for BH_3 rotation obtained from the spectral lineshape simulations gave 12.6 kT/mol. A series of deuterated organic chalcogen cations: (CH_3)_3S^+, (CH_3)_3Se^+ and (CH_3)_3Te^+, were ion exchanged into the cavities of sodium Mordenite LZ-M5 and the dynamics of these guests within the hydrated zeolite were followed by ^2H NMR. All three undergo isotropic motion above about -80 to -90^circC. Below this temperature two superimposed ^2H powder spectra appear; the broad lineshape is consistent with only methyl rotation in a hindered, coordinated site, and the other narrow lineshape is due to both methyl and trimethyl rotation in a less hindered, uncoordinated site. As the temperature is lowered the population of the lower energy coordinated site increases. Relative peak areas yield adsorption enthalpies of 6.7, 7.8 and 10.0 kJ/mol for (CH_3)_3S^+, (CH_3)_3Se^+ and (CH_3)_3Te^+, respectively. The series of methyl deuterated ammonium and phosphonium cations: (CH_3)NH_3^+ , (CH_3)_2NH^+ , (CH_3)_3NH^+ and (CH_3)_4P^+ , were

  17. 1H-NMR comparative study of the active site in shark (Galeorhinus japonicus), horse, and sperm whale deoxy myoglobins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Iwafune, K; Chûjô, R; Inoue, Y; Imai, K; Suzuki, T

    1992-09-01

    1H-NMR spectra of deoxy myoglobins (Mbs) from shark (Galeorhinus japonicus), horse, and sperm whale have been studied to gain insights into their active site structure. It has been demonstrated for the first time that nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) can be observed between heme peripheral side-chain proton resonances of these paramagnetic complexes. Val-E11 methyl and His-F8 C delta H proton resonances of these Mbs were also assigned from the characteristic shift and line width. The hyperfine shift of the former resonance was used to calculate the magnetic anisotropy of the protein. The shift analysis of the latter resonance, together with the previously assigned His-F8 N delta H proton resonance, revealed that the strain on the Fe-N epsilon bond is in the order horse Mb approximately whale Mb < shark Mb and that the hydrogen bond strength of the His-F8 N delta H proton to the main-chain carbonyl oxygen in the preceding turn of the F helix is in the order shark Mb < horse Mb < whale Mb. Weaker Feporphyrin interaction in shark Mb was manifested in a smaller shift of the heme methyl proton resonance and appears to result from distortion of the coordination geometry in this Mb. Larger strain on the Fe-N epsilon bond in shark Mb should be to some extent attributed to its lowered O2 affinity (P50 = 1.1 mmHg at 20 degrees C), compared to whale and horse Mbs.

  18. NMR study of small molecule adsorption in MOF-74-Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, M. G.; Canepa, Pieremanuele; Thonhauser, T.

    2013-04-01

    We calculate the carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding for CO2 and the hydrogen shieldings for both H2 and H2O inside the metal organic framework MOF-74-Mg. Our ab initio calculations are at the density functional theory level using the van der Waals including density functional vdW-DF. The shieldings are obtained while placing the small molecules throughout the structure, including the calculated adsorption site for various loading scenarios. We then explore relationships between loading, rotational and positional characteristics, and the NMR shieldings for each adsorbate. Our NMR calculations show a change in the shielding depending on adsorbate, position, and loading in a range that is experimentally observable. We further provide a simple model for the energy and the NMR shieldings throughout the cavity of the MOF. By providing this mapping of shielding to position and loading for these adsorbates, we argue that NMR probes could be used to provide additional information about the position at which these small molecules bind within the MOF, as well as the loading of the adsorbed molecule.

  19. A Deuterium NMR Study of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingemans, Theo J.; Madsen, Louis A.; Samulski, Edward T.

    2002-10-01

    We have synthesized two deuterated boomerang-shaped liquid crystals based on 2,5-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (ODBP). Deuterium was introduced in the rigid 2,5-diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole core and in the aromatic ring of the terminal 4-dodecyloxyphenyl moiety using standard acid catalyzed deuterium exchange conditions. Both compounds, (4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl-d4) di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate: ODBP-d4-Ph-O-C12) and (4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl) di-4-dodecyloxy-benzoate-d4; ODBP-Ph-d4-O-C12) were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance, optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The optical textures and thermal behavior of both compounds were found to be identical to the non-deuterated analog 4,4(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl) di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate (ODBP-Ph-O-C12) which we reported earlier. These compounds exhibit behavior indicative of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase, which we hope to confirm using deuterium NMR spectroscopy in the next phase of this study.

  20. Vibrational and NMR probe studies of S Az-1 montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.T.; Erickson, C.; Earl, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports a study of the interactions of exchangeable metal cations with mineral surfaces using a combined spectroscopic/macroscopic approach. Objectives were to examine the use of water molecules and metal cations as molecular probes of smectite water interactions. The {nu}{sub 2} mode of water is used as a diagnostic vibrational band. An FTIR-gravimetric cell is used to examine the FTIR spectra of water on homoionic smectites. The {sup 23}Na NMR resonance is used to probe metal-water interactions on the surface. Results show that there are strong changes in both position and absorption coefficient of the H-O-H bending mode of water sorbed on SAz-1 montmorillonite as a function of water content. These changes are attributed to strong electrostatic forces and mobility changes that occur when the water in the interlammelar space is associated with the metal ion. The clay surface is viewed as having at least two distinct sites to which a hydrated Na{sup +} can bind. 32 refs, 5 figs. (DLC)

  1. Vibrational and NMR probe studies of S Az-1 montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.T.; Erickson, C. . Dept. of Soil Science); Earl, W.L. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the interactions of exchangeable metal cations with mineral surfaces using a combined spectroscopic/macroscopic approach. Objectives were to examine the use of water molecules and metal cations as molecular probes of smectite water interactions. The {nu}{sub 2} mode of water is used as a diagnostic vibrational band. An FTIR-gravimetric cell is used to examine the FTIR spectra of water on homoionic smectites. The {sup 23}Na NMR resonance is used to probe metal-water interactions on the surface. Results show that there are strong changes in both position and absorption coefficient of the H-O-H bending mode of water sorbed on SAz-1 montmorillonite as a function of water content. These changes are attributed to strong electrostatic forces and mobility changes that occur when the water in the interlammelar space is associated with the metal ion. The clay surface is viewed as having at least two distinct sites to which a hydrated Na{sup +} can bind. 32 refs, 5 figs. (DLC)

  2. Progress in Fast Ignition Studies with Electrons and Protons

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Chen, H.; Hey, D.; Key, M. H.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; King, J. A.; Ma, T.; Wei, M. S.; Chen, C. D.; Chowdhury, E.; Link, A.

    2009-09-10

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) concept for initiating burn in a fusion capsule. In order to investigate critical aspects needed for a FI point design, experiments were performed to study 1) laser-to-electrons or protons conversion issues and 2) laser-cone interactions including prepulse effects. A large suite of diagnostics was utilized to study these important parameters. Using cone--wire surrogate targets it is found that pre-pulse levels on medium scale lasers such as Titan at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory produce long scale length plasmas that strongly effect coupling of the laser to FI relevant electrons inside cones. The cone wall thickness also affects coupling to the wire. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled as a function of target thickness, material. Conclusions from the proton and electron source experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed. In conclusion, a program of study will be presented based on understanding the fundamental physics of the electron or proton source relevant to FI.

  3. NMR study of black-phase in SmS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Haga, Y.

    2015-03-01

    We report the result of the 33S nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement on the nonmagnetic semiconductor SmS at ambient pressure. For this measurement, the 33S isotope enriched powder sample of SmS was prepared to increase the 33S NMR intensity. We have attempted 33S NMR measurement on SmS and successfully observed the signal of it. With decreasing temperature, the spectrum measured at the constant magnetic field shifted to lower frequency and became weakly temperature dependent below 50 K. The presence of the energy gap was microscopically established by the rapid decrease in the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1. The activation energy was deduced to be 625 K from an Arrhenius plot of T1.

  4. NMR studies of osmoregulation in methanogenic archaebacteria. [NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    Methanogens are strict anaerobic archaebacteria whose metabolism centers around the reduction of CO[sub 2] to CH[sub 4]. Their environments are often extreme (high temperatures, high salt, few nutrients, etc.) and they may have evolved unique ways to handle these stresses. It is proposed that methanogenic archaebacteria respond to osmotic stress by accumulating a series of organic solutes. In two strains of marine methanogens, Methanogenium cariaci and Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, four key organic solutes are observed: L-[alpha]-glutamate, [beta]-glutamate, N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine, and glycine betaine. The first three of these are synthesized de novo; glycine betaine is transported into the Mg. cariaci cells from the medium. In the absence of betaine, Mg. cariaci synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine as the dominant osmolyte. Mc. thermolithotrophicus also synthesizes N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine but only at salt concentrations greater than 1 M. In Mc. thermolithotrophicus intracellular potassium ion concentrations, determined by [sup 39]K NMR spectroscopy, are balanced by the total concentration of anionic amino acid species, [alpha]-glutamate and [beta]-glutamate. Turnover of the organic solutes has been monitored using [sup 13]C-pulse/[sup 12]C-chase, and [sup 15]N-pulse/[sup 14]N-chase experiments. The [beta]-amino acids exhibit slower turnover rates compared to L-[alpha]-glutamate or aspartate, consistent with their role as compatible solutes. Biosynthetic information for the [beta]-amino acids was provided by [sup 13]C-label incorporation and steady state labeling experiments. [beta]-glutamate shows a lag in [sup 13]C uptake from [sup 13]CO[sub 2], indicative of its biosynthesis from a precursor not in equilibrium with the soluble L-[alpha]-glutamate pool, probably a macromolecule. A novel biosynthetic pathway is proposed for N[sup e]-acetyl-[beta]-lysine from the diaminopimelate pathway.

  5. Al NMR study of molten aluminum oxide compounds and mixtures, measured at ultra high temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwowarczyk, J.; Marzke, R. F.; Wolf, G. H.; Petuskey, W. T.; Takulapalli, B.

    2002-10-01

    The technique of ultra high-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has provided insight into the chemical structure and properties of molten aluminum-bearing refractory ceramics, at temperatures in excess of 2000 ^oC. Through application of standard NMR measurements we have studied molten aluminum-bearing ceramics via ^27Al NMR. We have measured spin-lattice (T_1) and spin-spin (T_2) relaxation times, have studied Al-O-P chemical bonding within molten aluminua-monazite (Al_2O3 + LaPO_4) samples and have begun to measure Al diffusivity as a function of temperature and composition. To overcome the limitations of standard NMR heating systems a specially designed NMR probe was developed. Application of levitation technology and a laser heating system permit controlled, containerless heating of samples over a wide range of temperatures. Supported by NSF DMR 0116361, DMR 9818133 and by Research Corp. RA 0276

  6. Ultrasound Treatment of Polyisoprene Rubber, Studied by NMR Relaxation and Diffusion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Meerwall, E.; Sun, X. M.; Joshi, T.; Isayev, A. I.

    2006-10-01

    In support of rubber recycling, we have studied the effect of intense ultrasound on unfilled cis-polyisoprene (PI) melts and networks using proton NMR T2 relaxation and pulsed-gradient diffusion. At 70.5 deg.C the echo decays show two components, due to entangled sol and crosslinked network; and unentangled sol, dangling ends, and oligomers. Component T2 values, hence intermolecular mobilities, increase with sonication, with modest changes in relative amplitudes. The high melt molecular weight(M) without a low-M tail precluded diffusion measurements. We then examined PI melts degraded by ultrasound with and without subsequent vulcanization. Here the T2 decays are consistent with three components. Sonication shifts and broadens the M-distribution but produces no network. Curing generates at least 94% network, lowers all mobilities, and decreases the proportions of unentangled sol and of oligomers. The diffusion spectrum is bimodal, arising from intermediate fractions and oligomeric species. Both diffusion rates and all T2 values increase slightly with ultrasound amplitude. We compare these results with our earlier work in natural rubber.

  7. Ultrasound Treatment of Butyl Gum and Rubber, Studied by NMR Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Meerwall, E. D.; Feng, Wenlai; Isayev, A. I.

    2004-10-01

    We have examined the effects of intense ultrasound on butyl gum and unfilled vulcanizates using proton transverse NMR relaxation, sol extraction, GPC analysis, and glass transition measurements. At 100 deg.C the spin echo decays exhibit three components, due to entangled molecules and network, unentangled sol plus dangling chain ends, and oligomer remnants; two components suffice to describe most vulcanizates. Compared to other rubbers we have studied, all component spin relaxation times are shorter and less sensitive to ultrasound, and the fraction of the short-T2 component is significantly higher. In the gums sonication produces chain scission but no significant crosslinking. In sol extracted from sonicated rubber, the T2 component amplitudes correlate well with the trimodal molecular-weight distribution. In spite of the low glass transition temperatures (near -60 deg.C) even the longest T2 up to 120 deg.C was too short to permit pulsed-gradient diffusion measurements. The low extractable sol fraction at standard ultrasound settings confirms the conclusion that in butyl rubber sonication is less effective for network destruction than in other rubbers.

  8. Potentiometric and NMR complexation studies of phenylboronic acid PBA and its aminophosphonate analog with selected catecholamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Tomasz; Młynarz, Piotr; Dobosz, Agnieszka; Rydzewska, Agata; Prokopowicz, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Boronic acids are a class of intensively explored compounds, which according to their specific properties have been intensively explored in last decades. Among them phenylboronic acids and their derivatives are most frequently examined as receptors for diverse carbohydrates. In turn, there is a large gap in basic research concerning complexation of catecholamines by these compounds. Therefore, we decided to undertake studies on interaction of chosen catecholamines, namely: noradrenaline (norephinephrine), dopamine, L-DOPA, DOPA-P (phosphonic analog of L-DOPA) and catechol, with simple phenyl boronic acid PBA by means of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, the binding properties of recently synthesized phenylboronic receptor 1 bearing aminophosphonate function in meta-position were investigated and showed promising ability to bind catecholamines. The protonation and stability constants of PBA and receptor 1 complexes were examined by potentiometry. The obtained results demonstrated that PBA binds the catecholamines with the following affinity order: noradrenaline ⩾ dopamine ≈ L-DOPA > catechol > DOPA-P, while its modified analog 1 reveals slightly different preferences: dopamine > noradrenaline > catechol > L-DOPA > DOPA-P.

  9. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators.

    PubMed

    Nonappa; Kolehmainen, E

    2016-07-13

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples.

  10. Solid state NMR studies of gels derived from low molecular mass gelators

    PubMed Central

    Kolehmainen, E.

    2016-01-01

    Since its invention more than six decades ago, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has evolved as an inevitable part of chemical as well as structural analysis of small molecules, polymers, biomaterials and hybrid materials. In the solution state, due to the increased viscosity of complex viscoelastic fluids such as gels, liquid crystals and other soft materials, the rate of molecular tumbling is reduced, which in turn affects the chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar and quadrupolar interactions. As a consequence the solution state NMR spectra show broad lines, and therefore, extracting detailed structural information is a challenging task. In this context, solid state (SS) NMR has the ability to distinguish between a minute amount of polymorphic forms, conformational changes, and the number of non-equivalent molecules in an asymmetric unit of a crystal lattice, and to provide both qualitative as well as quantitative analytical data with a short-range order. Therefore, SS NMR has continued to evolve as an indispensable tool for structural analysis and gave birth to a new field called NMR crystallography. Solid state cross polarization (CP) and high resolution (HR) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has been used to study weak interactions in polymer gels. However, the application of SS NMR spectroscopy to study gels derived from low molecular weight gelators has been limited until recently. In this review, we will focus on the importance of solid state NMR spectroscopy in understanding and elucidating the structure of supramolecular gels derived from low molecular weight gelators with selected examples. PMID:27374054

  11. Comparative proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amantadine complexes formed in aqueous solutions with three major cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Lis-Cieplak, Agnieszka; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-01-01

    Host-guest complexes of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD, respectively) with amantadine (1-aminoadamantane, AMA; an antiviral agent) were characterized in aqueous solutions using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Host-guest molecular interactions were manifested by changes in the chemical shifts of AMA protons. NMR Job's plots showed that the stoichiometry of all the studied complexes was 1:1. Two-dimensional T-ROESY experiments demonstrated that the complexes were formed by different degrees of incorporation of the adamantyl group of AMA into the CD cavity. The mode of AMA binding was proposed. The AMA molecule came into the α-CD cavity (the smallest size) or β-CD cavity (the intermediate size) through its wide entrance to become shallowly or deeply accommodated, respectively. In the complex of AMA with γ-CD (the largest cavity size), the adamantyl group was also quite deeply inserted into the CD cavity, but it arrived there through the narrow cavity entrance. It was found that the adamantyl group of AMA was best accommodated by the β-CD cavity. The binding constants Kaa of the studied complexes (in M(-1) ), determined from DOSY NMR, were fairly high; their values in an ascending order were: α-CD (183) < γ-CD (306) ≪ β-CD (5150).

  12. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  13. Proton Transfer Reactions Studied Using the VANDLE Neutron Detector Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornsberry, C. R.; Burcher, S.; Gryzwacz, R.; Jones, K. L.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Smith, K.; Vostinar, M.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blankstein, D.; Deboer, J.; Hall, M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Reingold, C.; Tan, W.; Cizewski, J. A.; Lepailleur, A.; Walter, D.; Febbraro, M.; Pain, S. D.; Marley, S. T.

    2016-09-01

    Proton transfer reactions, such as (d,n), are powerful tools for the study of single particle proton states of exotic nuclei. Measuring the outgoing neutron allows for the extraction of spectroscopic information from the recoil nucleus. With the development of new radioactive ion beam facilities, such as FRIB in the U.S., comes the need for new tools for the study of reactions involving radioactive nuclei. Neutron detectors, such as VANDLE, are sensitive to gamma rays in addition to neutrons. This results in high background rates for measurements with high external trigger rates. The use of discriminating recoil particle detectors, such as phoswich detectors, allow for the selection of a clean recoil tag by separating the recoil nucleus of interest from unreacted RIB components. Developments of low energy proton transfer measurements in inverse kinematics and recent (d,n) results will be presented. This work supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  14. Proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H isotropic/anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR at 70kHz MAS.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors offer a wealth of information for structural and dynamics studies of a variety of chemical and biological systems. In particular, CSA of amide protons can provide piercing insights into hydrogen-bonding interactions that vary with the backbone conformation of a protein and dynamics. However, the narrow span of amide proton resonances makes it very difficult to measure (1)H CSAs of proteins even by using the recently proposed 2D (1)H/(1)H anisotropic/isotropic chemical shift (CSA/CS) correlation technique. Such difficulties due to overlapping proton resonances can in general be overcome by utilizing the broad span of isotropic chemical shifts of low-gamma nuclei like (15)N. In this context, we demonstrate a proton-detected 3D (15)N/(1)H/(1)H CS/CSA/CS correlation experiment at fast MAS frequency (70kHz) to measure (1)H CSA values of unresolved amide protons of N-acetyl-(15)N-l-valyl-(15)N-l-leucine (NAVL).

  15. Protonated Forms of Monoclinic Zirconia: A Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, Yves A.; Gemmen, Randall S.

    2010-05-06

    In various materials applications of zirconia, protonated forms of monoclinic zirconia may be formed, motivating their study within the framework of density-functional theory. Using the HCTH/120 exchange-correlation functional, the equations of state of yttria and of the three low-pressure zirconia polymorphs are computed, to verify our approach. Next, the favored charge state of a hydrogen atom in monoclinic zirconia is shown to be positive for all Fermilevel energies in the band gap, by the computation of defect formation energies.This result is consistent with a single previous theoretical prediction at midgap as well as muonium spectroscopy experiments. For the formally positively (+1e) charged system of a proton in monoclinic zirconia (with a homogeneous neutralizing background charge densityimplicitly included), modeled using up to a 3 x 3 x 3 arrangement of unit cells, different stable and metastable structures are identified. They are similar to those structures previously proposed for the neutral system of hydrogen-doedmonoclinic zirconia, at a similar level of theory. As predicted using the HCTH/120 functional, the lowest energy structure of the proton bonded to one of the two available oxygen atom types, O1, is favored by 0.39 eV compared to that of the proton bonded to O2. The rate of proton transfer between O1 ions is slower than that for hydrogen-dopedmonoclinic zirconia, whose transition-state structures may be lowered in energy by the extra electron.

  16. Studies of electron and proton isochoric heating for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Beg, F; Clarke, R; Clarke, D; Chen, M; Chung, H; Chen, S; Freeman, R; Green, J; Gu, P; Gregori, G; Highbarger, K; Habara, H; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Heathcote, R; Hill, J; King, J; Kodama, R; Koch, J; Lancaster, K; Langdon, B; Murphy, C; Norreys, P; Neely, D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nakamura, H; Patel, N; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Snavley, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Foord, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Storm, M; Tanaka, K; Tempo, M; Toley, M; Town, R; Wilks, S; VanWoerkom, L; Weber, R; Yabuuchi, T; Zhang, B

    2006-10-02

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) proposal to use this technique to initiate burn in a fusion capsule. Experiments designed to investigate electron isochoric heating have measured heating in two limiting cases of interest to fast ignition, small planar foils and hollow cones. Data from Cu K{alpha} fluorescence, crystal x-ray spectroscopy of Cu K shell emission, and XUV imaging at 68eV and 256 eV are used to test PIC and Hybrid PIC modeling of the interaction. Isochoric heating by focused proton beams generated at the concave inside surface of a hemi-shell and from a sub hemi-shell inside a cone have been studied with the same diagnostic methods plus imaging of proton induced K{alpha}. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled. Conclusions from the proton and electron heating experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed.

  17. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of a zinc diffusion facilitator protein in native nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Bersch, Beate; Dörr, Jonas M.; Hessel, Audrey; Killian, J. Antoinette; Schanda, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The structure, dynamics and function of membrane proteins are intimately linked to the properties of the membrane environment in which the proteins are embedded. For structural and biophysical characterization, membrane proteins generally need to be extracted from the membrane, and reconstituted in a suitable membrane-mimicking environment. Ensuring functional and structural integrity in these environments is often a major concern. The styrene/maleic acid co-polymer has recently been shown to be able to extract lipid/membrane protein patches directly from native membranes, forming nanosize discoidal proteolipid particles, also referred to as native nanodiscs. Here we show, for the first time, that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from an integral membrane protein in native nanodiscs, as exemplified with the 2 x 34 kDa-large bacterial cation diffusion facilitator CzcD from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. PMID:28128538

  18. Deciphering the Conformational Choreography of Zinc Coordination Complexes with Standard and Novel Proton NMR Techniques Combined with DFT Methods.

    PubMed

    Pucheta, Jose Enrique Herbert; Prim, Damien; Gillet, Jean Michel; Farjon, Jonathan

    2016-04-04

    The presence of water has been shown to deeply impact the stability and geometry of Zn complexes in solution. Evidence for tetra- and penta-coordinated species in a pyridylmethylamine-Zn(II) model complex is presented. Novel (1) H NMR tools such as T1 -filtered selective exchange spectroscopy and pure shifted gradient-encoded selective refocusing as well as classical 2D ((1) H-(1) H) exchange spectroscopy, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy and T1 ((1) H) measurements, in combination with density functional theory methods allow the full conformational dynamics of a pyridylmethylamine-Zn(II) complex to be revealed. Four conformers and two families of complexes depending on the hydration states are elucidated.

  19. NMR-based simulation studies of Pf1 coat protein in explicit membranes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Jo, Sunhwan; Marassi, Francesca M; Im, Wonpil

    2013-08-06

    As time- and ensemble-averaged measures, NMR observables contain information about both protein structure and dynamics. This work represents a computational study to extract such information for membrane proteins from orientation-dependent NMR observables: solid-state NMR chemical shift anisotropy and dipolar coupling, and solution NMR residual dipolar coupling. We have performed NMR-restrained molecular dynamics simulations to refine the structure of the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in explicit lipid bilayers using the recently measured chemical shift anisotropy, dipolar coupling, and residual dipolar coupling data. From the simulations, we have characterized detailed protein-lipid interactions and explored the dynamics. All simulations are stable and the NMR restraints are well satisfied. The C-terminal transmembrane (TM) domain of Pf1 finds its optimal position in the membrane quickly (within 6 ns), illustrating efficient solvation of TM domains in explicit bilayer environments. Such rapid convergence also leads to well-converged interaction patterns between the TM helix and the membrane, which clearly show the interactions of interfacial membrane-anchoring residues with the lipids. For the N-terminal periplasmic helix of Pf1, we identify a stable, albeit dynamic, helix orientation parallel to the membrane surface that satisfies the amphiphatic nature of the helix in an explicit lipid bilayer. Such detailed information cannot be obtained solely from NMR observables. Therefore, the present simulations illustrate the usefulness of NMR-restrained MD refinement of membrane protein structure in explicit membranes.

  20. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  1. 129Xe NMR studies of biochar made from biobased materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar is created by pyrolysis of biobased materials under controlled oxidative environments. The product is charcoal-like and can be used as filtration medium, sequestrant for metallic ions, soil conditioner, and other applications. In our work we have found 129Xe NMR to be an excellent technique...

  2. Selectively labeling the heterologous protein in Escherichia coli for NMR studies: a strategy to speed up NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almeida, F C; Amorim, G C; Moreau, V H; Sousa, V O; Creazola, A T; Américo, T A; Pais, A P; Leite, A; Netto, L E; Giordano, R J; Valente, A P

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The (1)H/(15)N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective (15)N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good (1)H/(15)N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The (15)N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the (1)H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  3. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  4. Comments on Injector Proton Beam Study in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    During the entire period of injector proton study in run 2014, it seems that the beam transverse emittance out of Booster is larger than that in run 2013. The emittance measured at the BtA transfer line and also the transmission from Booster late to AGS late are presented for this argument. In addition to this problem, it seems that the multiturn Booster injection, which defines the transverse emittance, needs more attention. Moreover, for high intensity operations, the space charge effect may be already relevant in RHIC polarized proton runs. With the RHIC proton intensity improvement in the next several years, higher Booster input intensity is needed, therefore, the space charge effect at the Booster injection and early ramp may become a new limiting factor.

  5. NMR studies of coupled low- and high-barrier hydrogen bonds in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate model systems in polar solution.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Shasad; Denisov, Gleb S; Toney, Michael D; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2007-05-16

    The 1H and 15N NMR spectra of several 15N-labeled pyridoxal-5'-phosphate model systems have been measured at low temperature in various aprotic and protic solvents of different polarity, i.e., dichloromethane-d2, acetonitrile-d3, tetrahydrofuran-d8, freon mixture CDF3/CDClF2, and methanol. In particular, the 15N-labeled 5'-triisopropyl-silyl ether of N-(pyridoxylidene)-tolylamine (1a), N-(pyridoxylidene)-methylamine (2a), and the Schiff base with 15N-2-methylaspartic acid (3a) and their complexes with proton donors such as triphenylmethanol, phenol, and carboxylic acids of increasing strength were studied. With the use of hydrogen bond correlation techniques, the 1H/15N chemical shift and scalar coupling data could be associated with the geometries of the intermolecular O1H1N1 (pyridine nitrogen) and the intramolecular O2H2N2 (Schiff base) hydrogen bonds. Whereas O1H1N1 is characterized by a series of asymmetric low-barrier hydrogen bonds, the proton in O2H2N2 faces a barrier for proton transfer of medium height. When the substituent on the Schiff base nitrogen is an aromatic ring, the shift of the proton in O1H1N1 from oxygen to nitrogen has little effect on the position of the proton in the O2H2N2 hydrogen bond. By contrast, when the substituent on the Schiff base nitrogen is a methyl group, a proton shift from O to N in O1H1N1 drives the tautomeric equilibrium in O2H2N2 from the neutral O2-H2...N2 to the zwitterionic O2-...H2-N(2+) form. This coupling is lost in aqueous solution where the intramolecular O2H2N2 hydrogen bond is broken by solute-solvent interactions. However, in methanol, which mimics hydrogen bonds to the Schiff base in the enzyme active site, the coupling is preserved. Therefore, the reactivity of Schiff base intermediates in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate enzymes can likely be tuned to the requirements of the reaction being catalyzed by differential protonation of the pyridine nitrogen.

  6. Protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes studied using 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Davis, Mark F; Gennett, Thomas; Dillon, Anne C; Jones, Kim M; Heben, Michael J

    2005-12-14

    The reversible protonation of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in sulfuric acid and Nafion was investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Raman spectroscopies. Magic-angle spinning (MAS) was used to obtain high-resolution 13C and 1H-13C cross polarization (CP) NMR spectra. The 13C NMR chemical shifts are reported for bulk SWNTs, H2SO4-treated SWNTs, SWNT-Nafion polymer composites, SWNT-AQ55 polymer composites, and SWNTs in contact with water. Protonation occurs without irreversible oxidation of the nanotube substrate via a charge-transfer process. This is the first report of a chemically induced change in a SWNT 13C resonance brought about by a reversible interaction with an acidic proton, providing additional evidence that carbon nanotubes behave as weak bases. Cross polarization was found to be a powerful technique for providing an additional contrast mechanism for studying nanotubes in contact with other chemical species. The CP studies confirmed polarization transfer from nearby protons to nanotube carbon atoms. The CP technique was also applied to investigate water adsorbed on carbon nanotube surfaces. Finally, the degree of bundling of the SWNTs in Nafion films was probed with the 1H-13C CP-MAS technique.

  7. Multidimensional HRMAS NMR: a platform for in vivo studies using intact bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei

    2006-07-01

    In vivo analysis in whole cell bacteria, especially the native tertiary structures of the bacterial cell wall, remains an unconquered frontier. The current understanding of bacterial cell wall structures has been based on destructive analysis of individual components. These in vitro results may not faithfully reflect the native structural and conformational information. Multidimensional High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR (HRMAS NMR) has evolved to be a powerful technique in a variety of in vivo studies, including live bacterial cells. Existing studies of HRMAS NMR in bacteria, technical consideration of its successful application, and current limitations in studying true human pathogens are briefly reviewed in this report.

  8. Crystal structure and proton conductivity of BaSn0.6Sc0.4O3-δ : insights from neutron powder diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kinyanjui, Francis G; Norberg, Stefan T; Knee, Christopher S; Ahmed, Istaq; Hull, Stephen; Buannic, Lucienne; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Grey, Clare P; Eriksson, Sten G

    2016-04-14

    The solid-state synthesis and structural characterisation of perovskite BaSn1-x Sc x O3-δ (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) and its corresponding hydrated ceramics are reported. Powder and neutron X-ray diffractions reveal the presence of cubic perovskites (space group Pm3m) with an increasing cell parameter as a function of scandium concentration along with some indication of phase segregation. (119)Sn and (45)Sc solid-state NMR spectroscopy data highlight the existence of oxygen vacancies in the dry materials, and their filling upon hydrothermal treatment with D2O. It also indicates that the Sn(4+) and Sc(3+) local distribution at the B-site of the perovskite is inhomogeneous and suggests that the oxygen vacancies are located in the scandium dopant coordination shell at low concentrations (x ≤ 0.2) and in the tin coordination shell at high concentrations (x ≥ 0.3). (17)O NMR spectra on (17)O enriched BaSn1-x Sc x O3-δ materials show the existence of Sn-O-Sn, Sn-O-Sc and Sc-O-Sc bridging oxygen environments. A further room temperature neutron powder diffraction study on deuterated BaSn0.6Sc0.4O3-δ refines the deuteron position at the 24k crystallographic site (x, y, 0) with x = 0.579(3) and y = 0.217(3) which leads to an O-D bond distance of 0.96(1) Å and suggests tilting of the proton towards the next nearest oxygen. Proton conduction was found to dominate in wet argon below 700 °C with total conductivity values in the range 1.8 × 10(-4) to 1.1 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) between 300 and 600 °C. Electron holes govern the conduction process in dry oxidizing conditions, whilst in wet oxygen they compete with protonic defects leading to a wide mixed conduction region in the 200 to 600 °C temperature region, and a suppression of the conductivity at higher temperature.

  9. NMR study of the motion of oxygens in some oxysalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, K.

    1984-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the proton spin-lattice relaxation times T1 and T1ϱ were measured in some partially deuterated ammonium compounds; ammonium perchlorate and ammonium dichromate. The extremely large minimum values of T1ϱ (2 ˜ 3 sec) were found to be independent of the concentration of deuterons. These minima of T1ϱ were attributed to the random modulation of the dipolar interaction between the protons and 17O (0.037%) of low abundance. The activation energy Ea of the reorientation of ClO 4 and CrO 3 were determined to be 6.2 and 10.7 kcal mol -1, respectively.

  10. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio

  11. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified into primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and of gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance with wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C

  12. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets.

  13. Assessment of meat quality by NMR--an investigation of pork products originating from different breeds.

    PubMed

    Straadt, Ida K; Aaslyng, Margit D; Bertram, Hanne C

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, meat obtained from uncommon and novel pig crossings between the rare Iberian and Mangalitza pigs and the more frequent Duroc and Landrace/Yorkshire pigs was characterized by time-domain proton NMR relaxometry and high-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy to elucidate the potential of NMR to assess the meat quality of new-introduced pig breeds. Multivariate data analysis of proton NMR T(2) relaxation curves obtained on fresh meat samples revealed differences in the T(2) relaxation pattern of the different breeds included in the study. Comparison of NMR T(2) relaxation data with gravimetric determination of water-holding capacity (WHC) indicated that this should be ascribed to differences in the WHC of the different meats, and that NMR T(2) relaxation in accordance with previous studies provides unique information about WHC, which may be ascribed to the fact that NMR T(2) relaxation reflects information about intrinsic meat structure. High-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy of freeze exudate and meat extracts also revealed differences in the metabolite profile of the meat between the different breeds studied. The effects of breed on the amount of lactate in the freeze exudate were observed, which could be linked to WHC of the meat. In conclusion, the different NMR techniques applied could provide complementary information about biophysical and biochemical factors of importance for meat quality assessment.

  14. An in-depth analysis of the biological functional studies based on the NMR M2 channel structure of influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Ribo; Du Qishi Wang Chenghua; Chou, K.-C.

    2008-12-26

    The long-sought three-dimensional structure of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus was successfully determined recently by the high-resolution NMR [J.R. Schnell, J.J. Chou, Structure and mechanism of the M2 proton channel of influenza A virus, Nature 451 (2008) 591-595]. Such a milestone work has provided a solid structural basis for studying drug-resistance problems. However, the action mechanism revealed from the NMR structure is completely different from the traditional view and hence prone to be misinterpreted as 'conflicting' with some previous biological functional studies. To clarify this kind of confusion, an in-depth analysis was performed for these functional studies, particularly for the mutations D44N, D44A and N44D on position 44, and the mutations on positions 27-38. The analyzed results have provided not only compelling evidences to further validate the NMR structure but also very useful clues for dealing with the drug-resistance problems and developing new effective drugs against H5N1 avian influenza virus, an impending threat to human beings.

  15. 125Te NMR study of IrTe 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Kiyoshi; Magishi, Ko-ichi; Shinonome, Yasuaki; Saito, Takahito; Koyama, Kuniyuki; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nagata, Shoichi

    2002-03-01

    We have measured 125Te NMR of IrTe2 in order to elucidate the origin of the anomalous behaviors in electrical and magnetic properties around 270 K. In high-temperature region, the NMR spectrum exhibits a sharp line. On the other hand, in low-temperature region, the spectrum shifts to higher magnetic field and splits into three lines. Also, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, is proportional to the temperature in both temperature sides; Korringa-like behavior which is characteristic of a metallic state. From the T dependences of the spectrum and 1/T1 around 270 K, it is suggested that these anomalous behaviors may not be due to the charge density wave formation but be caused by a kind of lattice distortion at low temperature.

  16. NMR study of mesomorphic solutions of cellulose derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dayan, S.; Fried, F.; Gilli, J.M.; Sixou, P.

    1983-01-01

    Highly concentrated solutions of hydroxypropylcellulose and cellulose acetate give mesomorphic phases in a precise range of temperatures and concentrations. The existence of an orientational anisotropy in such solutions induces typical parameters of the high-resolution NMR spectra (chemical shift, splitting) that are similar to those of liquid crystal spectra. In the present work, the high-resolution NMR spectra of nuclei belonging to the solute molecules (D/sub 2/O and trifluoroacetic acid) were recorded as a function of various physical parameters such as temperature, concentration, and temporal change of the solutions. The specific variation of the orientational degree of order for each mesophase is described. In the case of the cellulose acetate/trifluoroacetic acid solution, an order parameter is calculated and a model for the orientational organization of the solution is described. 34 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  17. Hydrogen bonding. Part 17. IR and NMR study of the lower hydrates of choline chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Kenneth M.; Avci, Günsel F.

    1984-09-01

    Choline chloride forms two lower hydrates — a dihydrate and a monohydrate — with quite unusual properties. The dihydrate is a highly structured liquid salt; the IR spectrum is similar to that of a crystalline framework clathrate hydrate, and there are separate 1H-NMR signals for the cation hydroxyl and water protons. The dihydrate is a crystalline solid at reduced pressure. The crystalline monohydrate only exists at reduced pressure; at atmospheric pressure it disproportionates to liquid dihydrate and anhydrous choline chloride. The anhydrous choline chloride thus formed is a previously unreported crystal modification of choline chloride.

  18. 1H NMR spectral studies on the polymerization mechanism of indole and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingkun; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Weiqiang; Nie, Guangming; Pu, Shouzhi; Zhang, Shusheng

    2006-03-01

    The existence of N sbnd H bond according to the hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) spectra of polyindole and its derivatives, such as poly(5-bromoindole), poly(5-cyanoindole), poly(5-nitroindole), poly(5-methylindole), proved polymerization of high-quality polyindoles, which were electrosynthesized from middle strong Lewis acid boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BFEE) and its mixed electrolytes with additional diethyl ether, occurred at 2,3-position. The elongation of the conjugation length made the chemical shift of all the protons of polyindoles to lower field in comparison with those of monomers.

  19. Solid-State NMR Structure Determination from Diagonal-Compensated, Sparsely Nonuniform-Sampled 4D Proton–Proton Restraints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report acquisition of diagonal-compensated protein structural restraints from four-dimensional solid-state NMR spectra on extensively deuterated and 1H back-exchanged proteins. To achieve this, we use homonuclear 1H–1H correlations with diagonal suppression and nonuniform sampling (NUS). Suppression of the diagonal allows the accurate identification of cross-peaks which are otherwise obscured by the strong autocorrelation or whose intensity is biased due to partial overlap with the diagonal. The approach results in unambiguous spectral interpretation and relatively few but reliable restraints for structure calculation. In addition, the diagonal suppression produces a spectrum with low dynamic range for which ultrasparse NUS data sets can be readily reconstructed, allowing straightforward application of NUS with only 2% sampling density with the advantage of more heavily sampling time-domain regions of high signal intensity. The method is demonstrated here for two proteins, α-spectrin SH3 microcrystals and hydrophobin functional amyloids. For the case of SH3, suppression of the diagonal results in facilitated identification of unambiguous restraints and improvement of the quality of the calculated structural ensemble compared to nondiagonal-suppressed 4D spectra. For the only partly assigned hydrophobin rodlets, the structure is yet unknown. Applied to this protein of biological significance with large inhomogeneous broadening, the method allows identification of unambiguous crosspeaks that are otherwise obscured by the diagonal. PMID:24988008

  20. NMR studies of selective population inversion and spin clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.S.

    1986-02-01

    This work describes the development and application of selective excitation techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Composite pulses and multiple-quantum methods are used to accomplish various goals, such as broadband and narrowband excitation in liquids, and collective excitation of groups of spins in solids. These methods are applied to a variety of problems, including non-invasive spatial localization, spin cluster size characterization in disordered solids and solid state NMR imaging.

  1. Solid State NMR Studies of the Aluminum Hydride Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Graetz, Jason; Reilly, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Several solid state NMR techniques including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and multiple-quantum (MQ) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various AlH3 samples. MAS-NMR spectra for the 1H and 27Al nuclei have been obtained on a variety of AlH3 samples that include the (beta)- and (gamma)- phases as well as the most stable (alpha)-phase. While the dominant components in these NMR spectra correspond to the aluminum hydride phases, other species were found that include Al metal, molecular hydrogen (H2), as well as peaks that can be assigned to Al-O species in different configurations. The occurrence and concentration of these extraneous components are dependent upon the initial AlH3 phase composition and preparation procedures. Both the (beta)-AlH3 and (gamma)-AlH3 phases were found to generate substantial amounts of Al metal when the materials were stored at room temperature while the (alpha)-phase materials do not exhibit these changes.

  2. Further NMR-spectroscopic studies of interaction of phospholipid liposomes with methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) in dental adhesives.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, S; Komoda, Y

    1993-06-01

    To determine how MDP interacts with liposomes, the chemical shifts of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/MDP and dilauroylphosphatidylethanolamine (DLEA)/cholesterol (CS)/MDP liposomes were studied by NMR spectroscopy using a D2O buffer solution at pH 7.0 as a model for biological membranes. Proton chemical shifts of MDP enhanced shielding in DPPC liposomes together with an increase in the mobility of DPPC. However, MDP signals were not observed in DLEA/CS liposomes due to saturation. It is known that an ionized chemical does not lead to increased permeability of cell membranes composed of a lipid bilayer. However, MDP, which is ionized at pH 7.0, had a large interaction with the liposome systems. This appeared to arise from hydrophobic interaction between deca methylene groups of MDP and acyl chains of phospholipid.

  3. NMR methods for in-situ biofilm metabolism studies: spatial and temporal resolved measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Majors, Paul D.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Wind, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    We are developing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy, spectroscopy and combined NMR/optical techniques to the study of biofilms. Objectives include: time and depth-resolved metabolite concentrations with isotropic spatial resolution on the order of 10 microns, metabolic pathways and flux rates, mass transport and ultimately their correlation with gene expression by optical microscopy in biofilms. These methods are being developed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model system, but are equally applicable to other biofilm systems of interest. Thus, spatially resolved NMR of biofilms is expected to contribute significantly to the understanding of adherent cell metabolism.

  4. Conformational studies by 1H and 13C NMR of lisinopril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yohko; Ishi, Tomoko

    1993-10-01

    Lisinopril, N-N-[( s-1-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]- L-lysyl- L-proline) (MK-521), is an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme and a new drug for the treatment of hypertension. 1H and 13C NMR studies have shown that the s-cis equilibrium about the amide bond is strongly dependent on the configuration of the chiral centres. Vicinal coupling constants of stereochemical significance were obtained in deuterated solvent using NMR techniques. Comparison with values calculated for lisinopril using potential energy calculations and NMR show that lisinopril exists in preferred optimum conformation in solution.

  5. Monoterpene Unknowns Identified Using IR, [to the first power]H-NMR, [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR, DEPT, COSY, and HETCOR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.

    2005-01-01

    A study identifies a compound from a set of monoterpenes using infrared (IR) and one-dimensional (1D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. After identifying the unknown, each carbon and proton signal can be interpreted and assigned to the structure using the information in the two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectra, correlation spectroscopy…

  6. Local structure and molecular motions in imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal as studied by 2H and 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, M.; Chizuwa, M.; Umiyama, T.; Kumagai, Y.; Miyatou, T.; Ohashi, R.; Ida, T.; Tansho, M.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-04-01

    The local structure and molecular motion of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal were investigated using solid-state 2H and 13C NMR. The imidazolium ion undergoes isotropic rotation, which is correlated with a defect in the crystal, as observed by 2H NMR broadline spectra above 263 K. A 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in the regular site was observed from 2H NMR quadrupole Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra. The Grotthuss mechanism was accompanied by a 180∘ flip of the imidazolium ion in regular sites. Moreover, the proton transfer associated with the imidazolium ion of the defective crystal is important for proton conductivity of the imidazolium hydrogen malonate crystal.

  7. From precursors to non-oxide ceramics: Pyrolytic mechanisms studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmund, W.M.; Aldinger, F.; Feike, M.; Spiess, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    The pyrolysis of a poly ethylsilazane was studied using a CO{sub 2}-laser beam heated solid state MAS-NMR probe head. Chemical structures of the intermediate stages could be identified. The analogy of the pyrolysis evolution for the following two different methods could be shown: (A) in an inert gas furnace conventionally prepared and (B) laser irradiated in the NMR probe head under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. Samples prepared by method A were studied by {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR and samples prepared by method B were studied with an appropriate cross polarization time by {sup 29}Si CP-MAS-NMR. Both experiments showed the same mechanisms for the pyrolysis as the polymer is transformed into a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/C ceramic.

  8. Benchmark Theoretical and Experimental Study on (15)N NMR Shifts of Oxidatively Damaged Guanine.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Šála, Michal; Klepetářová, Blanka; Šebera, Jakub; Fukal, Jiří; Holečková, Veronika; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Nencka, Radim; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2016-02-11

    The (15)N NMR shifts of 9-ethyl-8-oxoguanine (OG) were calculated and measured in liquid DMSO and in crystal. The OG molecule is a model for oxidatively damaged 2'-deoxyguanosine that occurs owing to oxidative stress in cell. The DNA lesion is repaired with human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) base-excision repair enzyme, however, the exact mechanism of excision of damaged nucleobase with hOGG1 is currently unknown. This benchmark study on (15)N NMR shifts of OG aims their accurate structural interpretation and calibration of the calculation protocol utilizable in future studies on mechanism of hOGG1 enzyme. The effects of NMR reference, DFT functional, basis set, solvent, structure, and dynamics on calculated (15)N NMR shifts were first evaluated for OG in crystal to calibrate the best performing calculation method. The effect of large-amplitude motions on (15)N NMR shifts of OG in liquid was calculated employing molecular dynamics. The B3LYP method with Iglo-III basis used for B3LYP optimized geometry with 6-311++G(d,p) basis and including effects of solvent and molecular dynamic was the calculation protocol used for calculation of (15)N NMR shifts of OG. The NMR shift of N9 nitrogen of OG was particularly studied because the atom is involved in an N-glycosidic bond that is cleaved with hOGG1. The change of N9 NMR shift owing to oxidation of 9-ethylguanine (G) measured in liquid was -27.1 ppm. The calculated N9 NMR shift of OG deviated from experiment in crystal and in liquid by 0.45 and 0.65 ppm, respectively. The calculated change of N9 NMR shift owing to notable N9-pyramidalization of OG in one previously found polymorph was 20.53 ppm. We therefore assume that the pyramidal geometry of N9 nitrogen that could occur for damaged DNA within hOGG1 catalytic site might be detectable with (15)N NMR spectroscopy. The calculation protocol can be used for accurate structural interpretation of (15)N NMR shifts of oxidatively damaged guanine DNA residue.

  9. A Case Study in Proton Pencil-Beam Scanning Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Kooy, Hanne M.; Clasie, Benjamin M.; Lu, H.-M.; Madden, Thomas M.; Bentefour, Hassan; Depauw, Nicolas M.S.; Adams, Judy A.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Demaret, Denis; Delaney, Thomas F.; Flanz, Jacob B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: We completed an implementation of pencil-beam scanning (PBS), a technology whereby a focused beam of protons, of variable intensity and energy, is scanned over a plane perpendicular to the beam axis and in depth. The aim of radiotherapy is to improve the target to healthy tissue dose differential. We illustrate how PBS achieves this aim in a patient with a bulky tumor. Methods and Materials: Our first deployment of PBS uses 'broad' pencil-beams ranging from 20 to 35 mm (full-width-half-maximum) over the range interval from 32 to 7 g/cm{sup 2}. Such beam-brushes offer a unique opportunity for treating bulky tumors. We present a case study of a large (4,295 cc clinical target volume) retroperitoneal sarcoma treated to 50.4 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) (presurgery) using a course of photons and protons to the clinical target volume and a course of protons to the gross target volume. Results: We describe our system and present the dosimetry for all courses and provide an interdosimetric comparison. Discussion: The use of PBS for bulky targets reduces the complexity of treatment planning and delivery compared with collimated proton fields. In addition, PBS obviates, especially for cases as presented here, the significant cost incurred in the construction of field-specific hardware. PBS offers improved dose distributions, reduced treatment time, and reduced cost of treatment.

  10. Laboratory Studies to Assess the Potential for Detection of Light Non-aqueous Phase Liquid in Contaminated Soils with Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryar, T. R.; Knight, R. J.; Nielsen, T. P.

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the conditions necessary for the detection of LNAPL (Light Non-aqueous Phase Liquid) in contaminated soils using NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) measurements. The study used toluene as the LNAPL and well characterized kaolinite and sand samples as the porous media; proton NMR measurements were made on partially saturated sand, clay and sand-clay mixtures. Proton NMR has the advantage over other surface geophysical techniques that it only responds to H atoms. However, since water is ubiquitous in the near surface, one of our main concerns was whether the signal from water would interfere with the detection of organic contaminants. We established that water and toluene were not resolved for sand or sand-clay mixtures with paramagnetic iron impurities less than or equal to 1.5 mg/g. However, for a sand-clay mixture for which the iron concentration was 1.9 mg/g, the two fluids were clearly resolved by laboratory NMR. These levels of paramagnetic materials are common in soils, especially those with some clay content. Provided that the soil has sufficient paramagnetic content for contaminant signal to be distinguishable from that of water, we found that the detection limit improves with signal to noise ratio (S/N) of the NMR data. For detection of LNAPL in the presence of water, NMR was capable of detecting as little as 20 mg toluene/g water, under ideal conditions in the laboratory. When we reduced signal quality to S/N = 80, the detection limit was only 140 mg toluene/g water. We also showed with synthetic data that the currently available surface loop NMR instrument (capable of S/N ~5) would be incapable of distinguishing organic contaminant at any concentration from water. The instrument would have to be improved to S/N = 20 to reliably detect even 1g LNAPL/g water.

  11. NMR studies on the binding of antitumor drug nogalamycin to DNA hexamer d(CGTACG).

    PubMed

    Robinson, H; Liaw, Y C; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Wang, A H

    1990-08-25

    The interactions between a novel antitumor drug nogalamycin with the self-complementary DNA hexamer d(CGTACG) have been studied by 500 MHz two dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. When two nogalamycins are mixed with the DNA hexamer duplex in a 2:1 ratio, a symmetrical complex is formed. All non-exchangeable proton resonances (except H5' & H5") of this complex have been assigned using 2D-COSY and 2D-NOESY methods at pH 7.0. The observed NOE cross peaks are fully consistent with the 1.3 A resolution x-ray crystal structure (Liaw et al., Biochemistry 28, 9913-9918, 1989) in which the elongated aglycone chromophore is intercalated between the CpG steps at both ends of the helix. The aglycone chromophore spans across the GC Watson-Crick base pairs with its nogalose lying in the minor groove and the aminoglucose lying in the major groove of the distorted B-DNA double helix. The binding conformation suggests that specific hydrogen bonds exist in the complex between the drug and guanine-cytosine bases in both grooves of the helix. When only one drug per DNA duplex is present in solution, there are three molecular species (free DNA, 1:1 complex and 2:1 complex) in slow exchange on the NMR time scale. This equilibrium is temperature dependent. At high temperature the free DNA hexamer duplex and the 1:1 complex are completely destabilized such that at 65 degrees C only free single-stranded DNA and the 2:1 complex co-exist. At 35 degrees C the equilibrium between free DNA and the 1:1 complex is relatively fast, while that between the 1:1 complex and the 2:1 complex is slow. This may be rationalized by the fact that the binding of nogalamycin to DNA requires that the base pairs in DNA open up transiently to allow the bulky sugars to go through. A separate study of the 2:1 complex at low pH showed that the terminal GC base pair is destabilized.

  12. Studies Of Proton Emitting Nuclei At Legnaro National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soramel, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Bonetti, R.; Gernetti, M.; Stroe, L.; Mazzocco, M.; Signorini, C.; Ivasçu, M.; Petrache, C. M.

    2003-09-01

    Since few years at the Legnaro National Laboratories we have recently started a program to study exotic decays at the proton drip-line with particular attention to proton radioactivity in the rare earth region. In fact pemitting nuclei with 54 < Z < 64 are expected to be quite deformed in their ground state and their study is an important input for the theoretical models that describe this kind of decay. Our studies have brought, as first result, the discovery of the decay by pemission of 117La where to p-decaying levels have been found. Our experimental program continued with the study of the decay of 126Pm. For this nucleus we can only conclude that our low statistics data show no evidence of p emission.

  13. Recent progress in solid-state NMR studies of drugs confined within drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Skorupska, Ewa; Jeziorna, Agata; Kazmierski, Slawomir; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR (SS NMR) spectroscopy in structural studies of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) embedded in different drug carriers is detailed. This article is divided into sections. The first part reports short characterization of the nanoparticles and microparticles that can be used as drug delivery systems (DDSs). The second part shows the applicability of SS NMR to study non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In this section, problems related to API-DDS interactions, morphology, local molecular dynamics, nature of inter- or intramolecular connections, and pore filling are reviewed for different drug carriers (e.g. mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), cyclodextrins, polymeric matrices and others). The third and fourth sections detail the recent applications of SS NMR for searching for antibiotics and anticancer drugs confined in zeolites, MSNs, amorphous calcium phosphate and other carriers.

  14. Dipolar-dephasing 13C NMR studies of decomposed wood and coalified xylem tissue: Evidence for chemical structural changes associated with defunctionalization of lignin structural units during coalification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    A series of decomposed and coalified gymnosperm woods was examined by conventional solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and by dipolar-dephasing NMR techniques. The results of these NMR studies for a histologically related series of samples provide clues as to the nature of codification reactions that lead to the defunctionalization of lignin-derived aromatic structures. These reactions sequentially involve the following: (1) loss of methoxyl carbons from guaiacyl structural units with replacement by hydroxyls and increased condensation; (2) loss of hydroxyls or aryl ethers with replacement by hydrogen as rank increases from lignin to high-volatile bituminous coal; (3) loss of alkyl groups with continued replacement by hydrogen. The dipolar-dephasing data show that the early stages of coalification in samples examined (lignin to lignite) involve a decreasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings and suggest that condensation is significant during coalification at this early stage. An increasing degree of protonation on aromatic rings is observed as the rank of the sample increases from lignite to anthracite.

  15. Hydrogen motion in proton sponge cations: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Horbatenko, Yevhen; Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2011-04-18

    This work presents a study of intramolecular NHN hydrogen bonds in cations of the following proton sponges: 2,7-bis(trimethylsilyl)-1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (1), 1,6-diazabicyclo[4.4.4.]tetradecane (2), 1,9-bis(dimethylamino)dibenzoselenophene (3), 1,9-bis(dimethylamino)dibenzothiophene (4), 4,5-bis(dimethylamino)fluorene (5), quino[7,8-h]quinoline (6) 1,2-bis(dimethylamino)benzene (7), and 1,12-bis(dimethylamino)benzo[c]phenantrene (8). Three different patterns were found for proton motion: systems with a single-well potential (cations 1-2), systems with a double-well potential and low proton transfer barrier, ΔEe (cations 3-5), and those with a double-well potential and a high barrier (cations 6-8). Tests of several density functionals indicate that the PBEPBE functional reproduces the potential-energy surface (PES) obtained at the MP2 level well, whereas the B3LYP, MPWB1K, and MPW1B95 functionals overestimate the barrier. Three-dimensional PESs were constructed and the vibrational Schrödinger equation was solved for selected cases of cation 1 (with a single-well potential), cation 4 (with a ΔEe value of 0.1 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level), and cations 6 (ΔEe = 2.4 kcal mol(-1)) and 7 (ΔEe=3.4 kcal mol(-1)). The PES is highly anharmonic in all of these cases. The analysis of the three-dimensional ground-state vibrational wave function shows that the proton is delocalized in cations 1 and 4, but is rather localized around the energy minima for cation 7. Cation 6 is an intermediate case, with two weakly pronounced maxima and substantial tunneling. This allows for classification of proton sponge cations into those with localized and those with delocalized proton behavior, with the borderline between them at ΔEe values of about 1.5 kcal mol(-1). The excited vibrational states of proton sponge cations with a low barrier can be described within the framework of a simple particle-in-a-box model. Each cation can be assigned an effective box width.

  16. NMR studies on the flexibility of nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Lecroisey, A; Veron, M; Delepierre, M; Janin, J

    1997-06-01

    Human NDP kinase B, product of the nm23-H2 gene, binds DNA. It has been suggested that a helix hairpin on the protein surface, part of the nucleotide substrate binding site, could accommodate DNA binding by swinging away. The presence of flexible regions was therefore investigated by 1H NMR dynamic filtering. Although TOCSY peaks could be assigned to five residues at the N terminus of Dictyostelium NDP kinase, no flexible region was detected in the human enzyme. These data favor the idea that the protein offers different binding sites to mono- and polynucleotides.

  17. NMR Studies of Spin Decoherence in Phosphorus-doped Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Dementyev, A. E.; Liu, M.; Barrett, S. E.

    2002-03-01

    Understanding nuclear spin dynamics in Si:P is an important step(B.E. Kane, quant-ph/0003031.) towards the realization of semiconductor spin-based qubits(B.E. Kane, Nature 393, 133 (1998).). We present measurements of NMR spectra and relaxation times for both ^29Si and ^31P, in fields up to 15.3 Tesla. Our progress towards Optically Pumped Nuclear Magnetic Resonance(A.E. Dementyev, P.Khandelwal, N.N. Kuzma, S.E. Barrett, L.N. Pfeiffer, K.W.West, Solid State Commun. 119, 217 (2001).) (OPNMR) of Si:P will be described.

  18. NMR study of seven coumarins from mammea siamensis.

    PubMed

    Prachyawarakorn, V; Mahidol, C; Ruchirawat, S

    2000-01-01

    Seven known mammea coumarins, mammea A/AA cyclo D ( 1 ), mammea A/AD cyclo D ( 2 ), mammea A/AB cyclo D ( 3 ), mammea A/AC cyclo F ( 4 ), mam-mea A/AB cyclo F ( 5 ), mammea A/AA cyclo F ( 6 ), mammea B/AC cyclo F ( 7 ), were isolated for the first time from the hexane extract of Mammea siamensis . A detailed analysis of both 1D and 2D NMR spectral data of these compounds was made.

  19. An NMR probe for the study of aerobic suspensions of cells and organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Balaban, R.S.; Gadian, D.G.; Radda, G.K.; Wong, G.G.

    1981-09-15

    The construction of an NMR probe and cell chamber with good mixing, pH buffering, and oxygenation characteristics, which can be used for relatively dilute cell and organelle suspension is described. The /sup 31/P NMR spectra of acceptable signal-to-noise ratios are obtained from approximately 200 mg (protein) of tissues, and kinetic studies of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are demonstrated. Representative spectra from rabbit kidney cortical tubules and rabbit kidney cortical mitochondria are presented.

  20. 119 Sn NMR studies on the heavy fermion compound CeSn3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, John; Kim, Andrew; Klavins, Peter; Curro, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    CeSn3 does not exhibit long-range order at low temperatures, thus it provides an interesting baseline for NMR studies of the Knight shift. We report the synthesis and characterization of single crystals of CeSn3, as well as 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements from 4.5K to room temperature. Our data reveal a broad peak in the knight shift (K) at Tmax ~ 135K, and a knight shift anomaly at T* ~ 85K.

  1. Multiple-quantum NMR studies of spin clusters in liquid crystals and zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-07-01

    This work will describe the use of MQ NMR to study spin clusters in anisotropic materials. A technique known as multiple-quantum spin counting was used to determine average spin cluster sizes liquid crystalline materials and in faujacitic zeolites containing aromatic hydrocarbons. The first half of the thesis will describe MQ NMR and the MQ spin counting technique, and the second half of the thesis will describe the actual experiments and their results.

  2. Water in barnacle muscle. III. NMR studies of fresh fibers and membrane-damaged fibers equilibrated with selected solutes.

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, E E; Clark, M E; Hinke, J A; Chapman, N R

    1981-01-01

    Water in barnacle muscle has been studied using NMR techniques. Fresh fibers are compared with membrane-damaged fibers treated with solutes that greatly alter fixed charge and total water content. Both water (97%) and solute (3%) protons are visible in continuous wave spectra of oriented fresh fibers. No local field inhomogeneities were detected, nor are cell solutes significantly bound. In pulse experiments, all cell water is visible and exhibits a single exponential decay. In fresh fibers, T2 approximately or equal to 40 ms; faster decaying signals are assigned to immobile and mobile protons on macromolecules. T1 and T1p are frequency dependent. Using equations derived for a two-compartment model with fast exchange, we calculate the following: tau b, the correlation time for anisotropic rotational motion of bound water; Sb, its order parameter; tau ex, the correlation time for exchange between bound and free fractions; f, the fraction of water bound; and Hr, the grams of water bound per gram of macromolecule. Whereas f varies inversely with total water content, the other parameters are virtually constant, with values: tau b approximately or equal to 1.3 X 10(-8) S; tau ex approximately or equal to 8 X 10(-6) s; Sb approximately or equal to 0.06; and Hr approximately or equal to 0.1g H2O/g macromolecule. Thus, the NMR relaxation detectable properties of water bound to macromolecules are unaffected by solutes that greatly alter the macromolecular surface charge. PMID:7272435

  3. Resonance Raman spectroscopy study of protonated porphyrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, A.; Starukhin, A.; Stavrov, S.; Gawinkowski, S.; Waluk, J.

    2017-02-01

    Resonance Raman microscopy was used to study the resonance Raman scattering of the diacid (diprotonated form) of free-base porphyrin (21H,23H-porphine) in a crystal powder and KBr pellets. Intensive lines in the spectral range between 100 ÷ 1000 cm- 1 have been detected and assigned as spectral manifestation of out-of-plane modes. The Raman spectra were simulated by means of DFT methods and compared with the experimental data. It is evident from experimental and theoretical results that the activation of out-of-plane modes arises from saddle distortion of the porphyrin macrocycle upon formation of its diprotonated form.

  4. Thermal decomposition of t-butylamine borane studied by in situ solid state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Feigerle, J.; Smyrl, N. R.; Morrell, J. S.; Stowe, A. C.

    2010-03-18

    of the amine borane fuel more feasible [22]. In the present study, tert-butylamine borane is investigated by heteronuclear in situ solid state NMR to understand hydrogen release from a hydrocarbon containing amine borane. tbutylamine borane has similar physical properties to amine borane with a melting point of 96 C. A single proton has been replaced with a t-butylamine group resulting in a weakening of the dihydrogen bonding framework. t-butylamine borane has a theoretical gravimetric hydrogen density of 15.1%; however, isobutane can also be evolved rather than hydrogen. If decomposition yields one mole isobutane and two moles hydrogen, 4.5 wt% H2 gas will be evolved. More importantly for the present work, the resulting spent fuel should be comprised of both (BNH)n and (CBNH)n polyimidoboranes.

  5. Urea's effect on the ribonuclease A catalytic efficiency: a kinetic, 1H NMR and molecular orbital study.

    PubMed

    Almarza, Jorge; Rincón, Luis; Bahsas, Alí; Pinto, María Angela; Brito, Francisco

    2013-02-01

    Understanding of protein-urea interactions is one of the greatest challenges to modern structural protein chemistry. Based in enzyme kinetics experiments and (1)H NMR spectroscopic analysis we proposed that urea, at low concentrations, directly interacts with the protonated histidines of the active center of RNase A, following a simple model of competitive inhibition. These results were supported by theoretical analysis based on the frontier molecular orbital theory and suggest that urea might establish a favorable interaction with the cationic amino acids. Our experimental evidence and theoretical analysis indicate that the initials steps of the molecular mechanism of Urea-RNase A interaction passes through the establishment of a three center four electron adduct. Also, our results would explain the observed disruption of the (1)H NMR signals corresponding to H12 and H119 (involved in catalysis) of the RNase A studied in the presence of urea. Our interaction model of urea-amino acids (cationic) can be extended to explain the inactivation of other enzymes with cationic amino acids at the active site.

  6. Solid-liquid transition and rejuvenation similarities in complex flows of thixotropic materials studied by NMR and MRI.

    PubMed

    Rodts, S; Boujlel, J; Rabideau, B; Ovarlez, G; Roussel, N; Moucheront, P; Lanos, C; Bertrand, F; Coussot, P

    2010-02-01

    We study the flow of a typical thixotropic material subjected to very different deformation histories (squeeze, shear, and extrusion) with either local (proton NMR and magnetic resonance imaging) or macroscopic measurements after different times of rest. Specifically, we measure the velocity fields and the spin-spin NMR relaxation of the material after different flow histories. The relaxation data exhibits a long relaxing component revealing information about the reversible microstructural evolution of the sample during aging-rejuvenation cycles. We show that for each deformation process, the evolution of the viscosity during the solid-liquid transition is similar by a factor related to the initial state of the material. Moreover, results examining the impact of the rate at which the deformation is imposed suggest that the state of the material during this transition may be described by a single parameter reflecting the average size and deformation of the material's flocs. These results also show that localization of flow occurs as a result of a progressive differential evolution of the material in different regions of the flow, and thus are determined by the boundary conditions of the flow.

  7. Solid-liquid transition and rejuvenation similarities in complex flows of thixotropic materials studied by NMR and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodts, S.; Boujlel, J.; Rabideau, B.; Ovarlez, G.; Roussel, N.; Moucheront, P.; Lanos, C.; Bertrand, F.; Coussot, P.

    2010-02-01

    We study the flow of a typical thixotropic material subjected to very different deformation histories (squeeze, shear, and extrusion) with either local (proton NMR and magnetic resonance imaging) or macroscopic measurements after different times of rest. Specifically, we measure the velocity fields and the spin-spin NMR relaxation of the material after different flow histories. The relaxation data exhibits a long relaxing component revealing information about the reversible microstructural evolution of the sample during aging-rejuvenation cycles. We show that for each deformation process, the evolution of the viscosity during the solid-liquid transition is similar by a factor related to the initial state of the material. Moreover, results examining the impact of the rate at which the deformation is imposed suggest that the state of the material during this transition may be described by a single parameter reflecting the average size and deformation of the material’s flocs. These results also show that localization of flow occurs as a result of a progressive differential evolution of the material in different regions of the flow, and thus are determined by the boundary conditions of the flow.

  8. ¹H-NMR study of the impact of high pressure and thermal processing on cell membrane integrity of onions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Maria E; Barrett, Diane M; McCarthy, Michael J; Vergeldt, Frank J; Gerkema, Edo; Matser, Ariette M; Van As, Henk

    2010-09-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR) relaxometry was used to study the effects of high pressure and thermal processing on membrane permeability and cell compartmentalization, important components of plant tissue texture. High pressure treated onions were subjected to pressure levels from 20 to 200 MPa at 5 min hold time at initial temperatures of 5 and 20 °C. Thermally treated onions were exposed for 30 min at temperatures from 40 to 90 °C. Loss of membrane integrity was clearly shown by changes in transverse relaxation time (T(2)) of water at temperatures of 60 °C and above. Destabilization effects on membranes exposed to high pressure were observed at 200 MPa as indicated by T(2) measurements and cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM). T(2) relaxation successfully discriminated different degrees of membrane damage based on the T(2) shift of the vacuolar component. Analyses of the average water self-diffusion coefficient indicated less restricted diffusion after membrane rupture occurred in cases of severe thermal treatments. Milder processing treatments yielded lower average diffusion coefficients than the controls. ¹H-NMR proved to be an effective method for quantification of cell membrane damage in onions and allowed for the comparison of different food processes based on their impact on tissue integrity.

  9. Cyclen-based bismacrocycles for biological anion recognition. A potentiometric and NMR study of AMP, ADP and ATP nucleotide complexation.

    PubMed

    Delépine, Anne-Sophie; Tripier, Raphaël; Handel, Henri

    2008-05-21

    The behaviour of two cyclen-based bismacrocycles linked by aromatic spacers as receptors of adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) anions is explored. The two bismacrocycles differ from one another by the nature of their spacers, which are respectively 1,3-dimethylbenzene (BMC), or 2,6-dimethylpyridine (BPyC). Potentiometric investigations supported by (1)H and (31)P NMR measurements were performed over a wide pH range to characterize and understand the driving forces implicated in the supramolecular assemblies. A comparison is also carried out with the results presented in this work and those obtained previously with these two ligands and inorganic phosphates. The comparison exhibits the importance of pi-stacking capability of the organic anions in the binding and hydrogen-bonding network. For BPyC, NMR studies highlight two coordination schemes depending on the protonation of the nitrogen atom of the pyridinyl spacer, which acts in acidic media as a supplementary anchoring point.

  10. 1H NMR study of the phase transitions of trissarcosine calcium chloride single crystals at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Moohee; Lee, Kwang Sei; Lim, Ae Ran

    2005-10-01

    The 1H NMR line-width and spin lattice relaxation time T1 of TSCC single crystals were studied. Variations in the temperature dependence of the spin lattice relaxation time were observed near 65 and 130 K, indicating drastic alterations of the spin dynamics at the phase transition temperatures. The changes in the temperature dependence of T1 near 65 and 130 K correspond to phase transitions of the crystal. The anomalous decrease in T1 around 130 K is due to the critical slowing down of the soft mode. The abrupt change in relaxation time at 65 K is associated with a structural phase transition. The proton spin lattice relaxation time of this crystal also has a minimum value in the vicinity of 185 K, which is governed by the reorientation of the CH3 groups of the sarcosine molecules. From this result, we conclude that the two phase transitions at 65 and 130 K can be discerned from abrupt variations in the 1H NMR relaxation behavior, and that 1H nuclei play important roles in the phase transitions of the TSCC single crystal.

  11. 1H, 13C NMR and DFT Study of Hydrogen Bonding in Imidazolium-based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Balevičius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Džiaugys, Lukas; Kuliešius, Feliksas; Maršalka, Arūnas

    2011-09-01

    The ionic liquid 1-decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide [C10mim][Br], the neat material, and also dissolved (~0.01 mole fraction) in various dielectric media (acetonitrile, benzene, chloroform, dichloromethane, methanol, 2-butanol and H2O) was studied using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The most important interaction in this compound is considered to be the Br-...H-C2+ hydrogen bond, which is formed between the anions and cations. The obtained results show that dielectric medium influence mostly the behavior of the Br-...H-C2+ bridge proton. The changes observed in 1H and 13C NMR spectra of [C10mim][Br] with increasing solvents polarity and temperature can be explained applying the model of the lengthening of the H2...Br- bond with the accompanying thickening of the solvation shell of bromine anion and C2-H bond contraction. The short-range order effects related to the configuration of neighboring dipoles of solvent molecules are more important for the solvation ability of small anions than the bulk solvent field effect. However, the solvents, molecules of which tend to associate via hydrogen bonding, can significantly affect the dynamics of anions.

  12. Structure of dimethylphenyl betaine hydrochloride studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculation, NMR and FTIR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, M.; Katrusiak, A.; Dega-Szafran, Z.; Kowalczyk, I.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of dimethylphenyl betaine hydrochloride (1) has been studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations, NMR and FTIR spectra. The crystals are monoclinic, space group P21/c. In the crystal, the Cl- anion is connected with protonated betaine through the O-H⋯Cl- hydrogen bond of 2.943(2) Å. The structures in the gas phase (2) and water solution (3) have been optimized by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) approach and the geometrical results have been compared with the X-ray data of 1. The FTIR spectrum of the solid compound is consistent with the X-ray results. The probable assignments of the anharmonic experimental vibrational frequencies of the investigated chloride (1) based on the calculated harmonic frequencies in water solution (3) are proposed. The correlations between the experimental 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts (δexp) of 1 in D2O and the magnetic isotropic shielding constants (σcalc) calculated by the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) approach, using the screening solvation model (COSMO), δexp = a + b σcalc, for optimized molecule 3 in water solution are linear and correctly reproduce the experimental chemical shifts.

  13. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite - Gelatine Mesocrystals.

    PubMed

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-10-30

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite-gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO4(3-) groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals.

  14. Positional isotope exchange studies on enzyme using NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopically enriched compounds, /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and /sup 18/O bridge-labeled pyrophosphate, synthesized previously in this laboratory, were used to investigate and measure the exchange vs. turnover of substrates and products from their central complexes in four selected enzyme systems. Using hi-field /sup 31/P NMR, we were able to differentiate between /sup 18/O labeled in the bridge vs. the non-bridge positions by virtue of the isotope shift upon the phosphorus nuclei. The bridge to non-bridge scrambling of the label was quantitated and the exchange vs. turnover ratios under a variety of conditions was determined. Using the substrate inhibitor carboxycreatinine, PIX experiments with /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and creatine kinase were conducted. It was shown that carboxycreatinine and creatine kinase promoted exchange of the /sup 18/O label as determined by NMR. We have concluded that carboxycreatinine is either a substrate that catalyzes very slow turnover or it catalyzes exchange by a dissociative (SN/sub 1//sub P/) type of mechanism

  15. NMR study of CeTe at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderer, J.; Weyeneth, S. M.; Weller, M.; Gavilano, J. L.; Felder, E.; Hulliger, F.; Ott, H. R.

    2006-05-01

    We present 125Te NMR measurements on CeTe powder at temperatures between 1 and 150 K and in magnetic fields between 5 and 8 T. CeTe is a rocksalt-type intermetallic compound. It orders antiferromagnetically at TN≈2.2 K with a much reduced ordered moment [H.R. Ott, J.K. Kjems, F. Hulliger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42 20 (1979) 1378]. From our low-temperature NMR spectra we infer the presence of at least three inequivalent Te sites at low temperatures. Considering the crystal structure this result is completely unexpected. The linewidths and the Knight shifts of the individual lines are significantly different and increase substantially with decreasing temperature. They follow the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility above 20 K. Above TN, hyperfine fields of 1.6, 0.8 and 0.0 T at the three Te sites per Bohr magneton of Ce moment are deduced from Knight shift vs. magnetic susceptibility data. These values are typical for transferred hyperfine fields via conduction electrons.

  16. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite - Gelatine Mesocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-10-01

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite—gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO43- groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals.

  17. Cell-free protein production for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2012-01-01

    The cell-free expression system using an Escherichia coli extract is a practical method for producing isotope-labeled proteins. The advantage of the cell-free system over cellular expression is that any isotope-labeled amino acid can be incorporated into the target protein with minimal scrambling, thus providing opportunities for advanced isotope labeling of proteins. We have modified the standard protocol for E. coli cell-free expression to cope with two problems specific to NMR sample preparation. First, endogenous amino acids present in the E. coli S30 extract lead to dilution of the added isotope. To minimize the content of the remaining amino acids, a gel filtration step is included in the preparation of the E. coli extract. Second, proteins produced by the cell-free system are not necessarily homogeneous due to incomplete processing of the N-terminal formyl-methionine residue, which complicates NMR spectra. Therefore, the protein of interest is engineered to contain a cleavable N-terminal histidine-tag, which generates a homogeneous protein after the digestion of the tag. Here, we describe the protocol for modified E. coli cell-free expression.

  18. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite – Gelatine Mesocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite—gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO43− groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals. PMID:26515127

  19. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-08-26

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs.

  20. Study of xenon binding in cryptophane-A using laser-induced NMR polarization enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Luhmer, M.; Goodson, B.M.; Song, Y.Q.; Laws, D.D.; Kaiser, L.; Pines, A. |

    1999-04-14

    Xenon is chemically inert, yet exhibits NMR parameters that are highly sensitive to its chemical environment. Considerable work has therefore capitalized on the utility of {sup 129}Xe (I = 1/2) as a magnetic resonance probe of molecules, materials, and biological systems. In solution, spin-polarization transfer between laser-polarized xenon and the hydrogen nuclei of nearby molecules leads to signal enhancements in the resolved {sup 1}H NMR spectrum, offering new opportunities for probing the chemical environment of xenon atoms. Following binding of laser-polarized xenon to molecules of cryptophane-A, selective enhancements of the {sup 1}H NMR signals were observed. A theoretical framework for the interpretation of such experimental results is provided, and the spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effects are shown to yield information about the molecular environment of xenon. The observed selective {sup 1}H enhancements allowed xenon-proton internuclear distances to be estimated. These distances reveal structural characteristics of the complex, including the preferred molecular conformations adopted by cryptophane-A upon binding of xenon.

  1. How proton pulse characteristics influence protoacoustic determination of proton-beam range: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin C; Seghal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    The unique dose deposition of proton beams generates a distinctive thermoacoustic (protoacoustic) signal, which can be used to calculate the proton range. To identify the expected protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and arrival time for different proton pulse characteristics encountered at hospital-based proton sources, the protoacoustic pressure emissions generated by 150 MeV, pencil-beam proton pulses were simulated in a homogeneous water medium. Proton pulses with Gaussian widths ranging up to 200 μs were considered. The protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and time-of-flight (TOF) range accuracy were assessed. For TOF calculations, the acoustic pulse arrival time was determined based on multiple features of the wave. Based on the simulations, Gaussian proton pulses can be categorized as Dirac-delta-function-like (FWHM < 4 μs) and longer. For the δ-function-like irradiation, the protoacoustic spectrum peaks at 44.5 kHz and the systematic error in determining the Bragg peak range is <2.6 mm. For longer proton pulses, the spectrum shifts to lower frequencies, and the range calculation systematic error increases (⩽ 23 mm for FWHM of 56 μs). By mapping the protoacoustic peak arrival time to range with simulations, the residual error can be reduced. Using a proton pulse with FWHM = 2 μs results in a maximum signal-to-noise ratio per total dose. Simulations predict that a 300 nA, 150 MeV, FWHM = 4 μs Gaussian proton pulse (8.0 × 10(6) protons, 3.1 cGy dose at the Bragg peak) will generate a 146 mPa pressure wave at 5 cm beyond the Bragg peak. There is an angle dependent systematic error in the protoacoustic TOF range calculations. Placing detectors along the proton beam axis and beyond the Bragg peak minimizes this error. For clinical proton beams, protoacoustic detectors should be sensitive to <400 kHz (for -20 dB). Hospital-based synchrocyclotrons and cyclotrons are promising sources of proton pulses for generating clinically measurable protoacoustic

  2. An NMR and ab initio quantum chemical study of acid-base equilibria for conformationally constrained acidic alpha-amino acids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P A; Jaroszewski, J W; Norrby, P O; Liljefors, T

    2001-03-07

    The protonation states of a series of piperidinedicarboxylic acids (PDAs), which are conformationally constrained acidic alpha-amino acids, have been studied by (13)C NMR titration in water. The resulting data have been correlated with theoretical results obtained by HF/6-31+G calculations using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) for the description of water. The PDAs are highly ionizable and contain one or two possible internal hydrogen bonds. In the present study, we show that the PCM model is able to reproduce the relative stabilities of the different protonation states of the PDAs. Furthermore, our results show that prediction of relative pK(a) values for two different types of ionizable functional groups covering a pK(a) range from 1.6 to 12.1 is possible with a high degree of accuracy.

  3. Extra thymidine stacks into the d(CTGGTGCGG).d(CCGCCCAG) duplex. An NMR and model-building study.

    PubMed Central

    van den Hoogen, Y T; van Beuzekom, A A; van den Elst, H; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Altona, C

    1988-01-01

    NMR and model-building studies were carried out on the duplex d(CTGGTGCGG).d(CCGCCCAG), referred to as (9+8)-mer, which contains an unpaired thymidine residue. Resonances of the base and of several sugar protons of the (9+8)-mer were assigned by means of a NOESY experiment. Interresidue NOEs between dG(4) and dT(5) as well as between dT(5) and dG(6) provided evidence that the extra dT is stacked into the duplex. Thermodynamic analysis of the chemical shift vs temperature profiles yielded an average TmD value of 334 K and delta HD of -289 kJmol-1 for the duplex in equilibrium random-coil transition. The shapes of the shift profiles as well as the thermodynamic parameters obtained for the extra dT residue and its neighbours again indicate that the unpaired dT base is incorporated inside an otherwise intact duplex. This conclusion is further supported by (a) the observation of an imino-proton resonance of the unpaired dT; (b) the relatively small dispersion in 31P chemical shifts (approximately 0.5 ppm) for the (9+8)-mer, which indicates the absence of t/g or g/t combinations for the phosphate diester torsion angles alpha/zeta. An energy-minimized model of the (9+8)-mer, which fits the present collection of experimental data, is presented. PMID:3368313

  4. Extra thymidine stacks into the d(CTGGTGCGG).d(CCGCCCAG) duplex. An NMR and model-building study.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogen, Y T; van Beuzekom, A A; van den Elst, H; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Altona, C

    1988-04-11

    NMR and model-building studies were carried out on the duplex d(CTGGTGCGG).d(CCGCCCAG), referred to as (9+8)-mer, which contains an unpaired thymidine residue. Resonances of the base and of several sugar protons of the (9+8)-mer were assigned by means of a NOESY experiment. Interresidue NOEs between dG(4) and dT(5) as well as between dT(5) and dG(6) provided evidence that the extra dT is stacked into the duplex. Thermodynamic analysis of the chemical shift vs temperature profiles yielded an average TmD value of 334 K and delta HD of -289 kJmol-1 for the duplex in equilibrium random-coil transition. The shapes of the shift profiles as well as the thermodynamic parameters obtained for the extra dT residue and its neighbours again indicate that the unpaired dT base is incorporated inside an otherwise intact duplex. This conclusion is further supported by (a) the observation of an imino-proton resonance of the unpaired dT; (b) the relatively small dispersion in 31P chemical shifts (approximately 0.5 ppm) for the (9+8)-mer, which indicates the absence of t/g or g/t combinations for the phosphate diester torsion angles alpha/zeta. An energy-minimized model of the (9+8)-mer, which fits the present collection of experimental data, is presented.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  6. Study on Solar Energetic proton (SEP) Prediction using Regression Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, KiChang; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young Yun; Kwon, Yongki; Wi, Gwan-sik

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Solar Energetic Proton (SEP) can cause significant effects on electric devices in satellite such as displacement damage and single event effect. It can be dangerous to flight crew/passenger flying high altitude with polar route, and therefore, it is essential that it should be predicted in advance to mitigate radiation exposure risk. However, SEP has been hard to predict, because it is not well-connected solar activities such as solar flare, coronal mass ejection (CME). In this study, we analyzed the variation pattern of proton event from 2000 to 2015, and suggested optimum Gaussian function which can well describe the maximum value of previous event, after then, we finally adopted the regression technique to predict SEP value repetitively. This paper shows that the maximum value and duration of ongoing SEP events can be well predicted, but this model typically has large errors in case of predicting starting point and occurrence of SEP events.

  7. NMR relaxometry as a versatile tool to study Li ion dynamics in potential battery materials.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Kunze, M; Sreeraj, P; Wiemhöfer, H D; Thangadurai, V; Wilkening, M; Heitjans, P

    2012-04-01

    NMR spin relaxometry is known to be a powerful tool for the investigation of Li(+) dynamics in (non-paramagnetic) crystalline and amorphous solids. As long as significant structural changes are absent in a relatively wide temperature range, with NMR spin-lattice (as well as spin-spin) relaxation measurements information on Li self-diffusion parameters such as jump rates and activation energies are accessible. Diffusion-induced NMR relaxation rates are governed by a motional correlation function describing the ion dynamics present. Besides the mean correlation rate of the dynamic process, the motional correlation function (i) reflects deviations from random motion (so-called correlation effects) and (ii) gives insights into the dimensionality of the hopping process. In favorable cases, i.e., when temperature- and frequency-dependent NMR relaxation rates are available over a large dynamic range, NMR spin relaxometry is able to provide a comprehensive picture of the relevant Li dynamic processes. In the present contribution, we exemplarily present two recent variable-temperature (7)Li NMR spin-lattice relaxation studies focussing on Li(+) dynamics in crystalline ion conductors which are of relevance for battery applications, viz. Li(7) La(3)Zr(2)O(12) and Li(12)Si(7).

  8. Protein folding and unfolding studied at atomic resolution by fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schanda, Paul; Forge, Vincent; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2007-07-03

    Atom-resolved real-time studies of kinetic processes in proteins have been hampered in the past by the lack of experimental techniques that yield sufficient temporal and atomic resolution. Here we present band-selective optimized flip-angle short transient (SOFAST) real-time 2D NMR spectroscopy, a method that allows simultaneous observation of reaction kinetics for a large number of nuclear sites along the polypeptide chain of a protein with an unprecedented time resolution of a few seconds. SOFAST real-time 2D NMR spectroscopy combines fast NMR data acquisition techniques with rapid sample mixing inside the NMR magnet to initiate the kinetic event. We demonstrate the use of SOFAST real-time 2D NMR to monitor the conformational transition of alpha-lactalbumin from a molten globular to the native state for a large number of amide sites along the polypeptide chain. The kinetic behavior observed for the disappearance of the molten globule and the appearance of the native state is monoexponential and uniform along the polypeptide chain. This observation confirms previous findings that a single transition state ensemble controls folding of alpha-lactalbumin from the molten globule to the native state. In a second application, the spontaneous unfolding of native ubiquitin under nondenaturing conditions is characterized by amide hydrogen exchange rate constants measured at high pH by using SOFAST real-time 2D NMR. Our data reveal that ubiquitin unfolds in a gradual manner with distinct unfolding regimes.

  9. Hydration of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II probed in the dark-stable S1 state using proton NMR dispersion profiles.

    PubMed

    Han, Guangye; Huang, Yang; Koua, Faisal Hammad Mekky; Shen, Jian-Ren; Westlund, Per-Olof; Messinger, Johannes

    2014-06-28

    The hydration of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) was characterized in the dark stable S1 state of photosystem II using water R1(ω) NMR dispersion (NMRD) profiles. The R1(ω) NMRD profiles were recorded over a frequency range from 0.01 MHz to 40 MHz for both intact and Mn-depleted photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus (T. vulcanus). The intact-minus-(Mn)-depleted difference NMRD profiles show a characteristic dispersion from approximately 0.03 MHz to 1 MHz, which is interpreted on the basis of the Solomon-Bloembergen-Morgan (SBM) and the slow motion theories as being due to a paramagnetic enhanced relaxation (PRE) of water protons. Both theories are qualitatively consistent with the ST = 1, g = 4.9 paramagnetic state previously described for the S1 state of the OEC; however, an alternative explanation involving the loss of a separate class of long-lived internal waters due to the Mn-depletion procedure can presently not be ruled out. Using a point-dipole approximation the PRE-NMRD effect can be described as being caused by 1-2 water molecules that are located about 10 Å away from the spin center of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC. The application of the SBM theory to the dispersion observed for PSII in the S1 state is questionable, because the parameters extracted do not fulfil the presupposed perturbation criterion. In contrast, the slow motion theory gives a consistent picture indicating that the water molecules are in fast chemical exchange with the bulk (τw < 1 μs). The modulation of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction suggests a (restricted) reorientation/structural equilibrium of the Mn4CaO5 cluster with a characteristic time constant of τZFS = 0.6-0.9 μs.

  10. NMR and EPR Studies of Chloroiron(III) Tetraphenylchlorin and Its Complexes with Imidazoles and Pyridines of Widely Differing Basicities

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Sheng; Shokhireva, Tatjana Kh.; Lichtenberger, Dennis L.; Walker, F. Ann

    2008-01-01

    The NMR and EPR spectra of two bis-imidazole and three bis-pyridine complexes of tetraphenylchlorinatoiron(III), [(TPC)Fe(L)2]+ (L = Im-d4, 2-MeHIm, 4-Me2NPy, Py and 4-CNPy) have been investigated. The full resonance assignments of the [(TPC)Fe(L)2]+ complexes of this study have been made from COSY and NOESY experiments and ADF calculations. Unlike the [(OEC)Fe(L)2]+ complexes reported previously (Cai, S.; Lichtenberger, D. L.; Walker, F. A. Inorg. Chem. 2005, 44, 1890-1903), the NMR data for the [(TPC)Fe(L)2]+ complexes of this study indicate that the ground state is S = ½ for each bis-ligand complex, whereas a higher spin state was present at NMR temperatures for the Py and 4-CNPy complexes of (OEC)Fe(III). The pyrrole-8,17 and pyrroline-H of all [TPCFe(L)2]+ show large magnitude chemical shifts (hence indicating large spin density on the adjacent carbons that are part of the π system), while pyrrole-12,13-CH2 and -7,18-CH2 protons show much smaller chemical shifts, as predicted by the spin densities obtained from ADF calculations. The magnitude of the chemical shifts decreases with decreasing donor ability of the substituted pyridine ligands, with the non-hindered imidazole ligand having slightly larger magnitude chemical shifts than the most basic pyridine, even though its basicity is significantly lower (4-Me2NPyH+ pKa = 9.7, H2Im+ pKa = 6.65 (adjusted for the statistical factor of 2 protons)). The temperature dependence of the chemical shifts of all but the 4-Me2NPy bis-ligand complexes studied over the temperature range of the NMR investigations shows that most of them have mixed (dxy)2(dxz,dyz)3/(dxzdyz)4(dxy)1 electron configurations that cannot be resolved by temperature-dependent fitting of the proton chemical shifts, with a S = 3/2 excited state in each case that in most cases lies at more than kT at room temperature above the ground state. The observed pattern of chemical shifts of the 4-CNPy complex and analysis of the temperature dependence

  11. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  12. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  13. Synthesis and 1H and 13C NMR spectral study of some r(2),c(4)-bis(isopropylcarbonyl)-c(5)-hydroxy-t(5)-methyl-t(3)-substituted phenyl, cyclohexanones and their oximes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachander, R.; Sameera, S. A.; Mohan, R. T. Sabapathy

    2016-07-01

    All the synthesized compounds have been characterized by 1H, 13C, 2D NMR and mass spectral studies. The spectral data suggest that compounds 2, 3, 5 and 6 exist in chair conformation with axial orientation of the hydroxyl group and equatorial orientations of all the other substituent. Long-range coupling is observed between OH proton to H-6a proton should be in a W arrangement. Compounds 1 and 4 diamagnetic anisotropic effect of the furyl group is not pronounced and absence of long-rang coupling between OH proton to H-6a proton. The oximation effects were discussed to all synthesized compounds using 1H and 13C chemical shifts.

  14. The NMR study of biologically active metallated alkanol ammoinium ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, I. A.; Voronov, V. K.; Adamovich, S. N.; Mirskov, R. G.; Mirskova, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The 1H, 13C, 15N, and 111Cd NMR spectra of a series of metallated alkanol ammonium ionic liquids (MAIL) series [n N(CH2CH2OH;)3M]+ · mX-, where M = Cd, Mg, Zn, Fe, Rh; X = Cl, OOCCH3, obtained in a wide range of temperatures of the studied samples, have been analyzed. It is found that, under biomimetic conditions (H2O, 25 °C), the compounds studied exist as mono- bi- and the tricyclic structures, which are in equilibrium. Shift of the equilibrium depends upon nature of a metal and effects all the parameters of the NMR spectra. Peculiarities of ligand exchange, typical for the studied compounds, have been studied in a wide range of temperatures. It is found that the NMR data can be used to control structure of the compounds formed in the course of synthesis.

  15. Synthesis and Protonation Studies of Molybdenum(0) Bis(dinitrogen) Complexes Supported by Diphosphine Ligands Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Labios, Liezel AN; Weiss, Charles J.; Egbert, Jonathan D.; Lense, Sheri J.; Bullock, R. Morris; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Mock, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    A series of molybdenum bis(dinitrogen) complexes of the formula trans-Mo(N2)2(PEtNRPEt)2 (PEtNRPEt = Et2PCH2N(R)CH2Et2; R = phenyl (1), 2,6-difluorobenzyl (2), 3,5-difluorobenzyl (3), CH2CH2NMe2 (4), CH2-o-Py (5)) have been synthesized and characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. Protonation studies with stoichiometric amounts of triflic acid (HOTf) were performed and the the protonated products were characterized by NMR and in situ IR spectroscopic methods. Protonolysis experiments with excess triflic acid were conducted to test for the formation of ammonia from reduction of the dinitrogen ligands. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. S.L. was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  16. Probing cation and vacancy ordering in the dry and hydrated yttrium-substituted BaSnO3 perovskite by NMR spectroscopy and first principles calculations: implications for proton mobility.

    PubMed

    Buannic, Lucienne; Blanc, Frédéric; Middlemiss, Derek S; Grey, Clare P

    2012-09-05

    Hydrated BaSn(1-x)Y(x)O(3-x/2) is a protonic conductor that, unlike many other related perovskites, shows high conductivity even at high substitution levels. A joint multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (total energy and GIPAW NMR calculations) investigation of BaSn(1-x)Y(x)O(3-x/2) (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.50) was performed to investigate cation ordering and the location of the oxygen vacancies in the dry material. The DFT energetics show that Y doping on the Sn site is favored over doping on the Ba site. The (119)Sn chemical shifts are sensitive to the number of neighboring Sn and Y cations, an experimental observation that is supported by the GIPAW calculations and that allows clustering to be monitored: Y substitution on the Sn sublattice is close to random up to x = 0.20, while at higher substitution levels, Y-O-Y linkages are avoided, leading, at x = 0.50, to strict Y-O-Sn alternation of B-site cations. These results are confirmed by the absence of a "Y-O-Y" (17)O resonance and supported by the (17)O NMR shift calculations. Although resonances due to six-coordinate Y cations were observed by (89)Y NMR, the agreement between the experimental and calculated shifts was poor. Five-coordinate Sn and Y sites (i.e., sites next to the vacancy) were observed by (119)Sn and (89)Y NMR, respectively, these sites disappearing on hydration. More five-coordinated Sn than five-coordinated Y sites are seen, even at x = 0.50, which is ascribed to the presence of residual Sn-O-Sn defects in the cation-ordered material and their ability to accommodate O vacancies. High-temperature (119)Sn NMR reveals that the O ions are mobile above 400 °C, oxygen mobility being required to hydrate these materials. The high protonic mobility, even in the high Y-content materials, is ascribed to the Y-O-Sn cation ordering, which prevents proton trapping on the more basic Y-O-Y sites.

  17. A comparative study between para-aminophenyl and ortho-aminophenyl benzothiazoles using NMR and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Pierens, G K; Venkatachalam, T K; Reutens, D

    2014-08-01

    Ortho-substituted and para-substituted aminophenyl benzothiazoles were synthesised and characterised using NMR spectroscopy. A comparison of the proton chemical shift values reveals significant differences in the observed chemical shift values for the NH protons indicating the presence of a hydrogen bond in all ortho-substituted compounds as compared to the para compounds. The presence of intramolecular hydrogen bond in the ortho amino substituted aminophenyl benzothiazole forces the molecule to be planar which may be an additional advantage in developing these compounds as Alzheimer's imaging agent because the binding to amyloid fibrils prefers planar compounds. The splitting pattern of the methylene proton next to the amino group also showed significant coupling to the amino proton consistent with the notion of the existence of slow exchange and hydrogen bond in the ortho-substituted compounds. This is further verified by density functional theory calculations which yielded a near planar low energy conformer for all the o-aminophenyl benzothiazoles and displayed a hydrogen bond from the amine proton to the nitrogen of the thiazole ring. A detailed analysis of the (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shifts and density functional theory calculated structures of the compounds are described.

  18. NMR study of the reversible trapping of SF6 by cucurbit[6]uril in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Locci, Emanuela; Lai, Adolfo; Luhmer, Michel

    2008-11-27

    The complexation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), a highly potent greenhouse gas, by cucurbit[6]uril (CB) was studied at various temperatures in Na(2)SO(4) aqueous solutions by (19)F and (1)H NMR. CB shows a remarkable affinity for SF(6), suggesting that it is a suitable molecular container for the design of materials tailored for SF(6) trapping. At 298 K, the equilibrium constant characterizing the inclusion of SF(6) by CB is 3.1 x 10(4) M(-1) and the residence time of SF(6) within the CB cavity is estimated to be of the order of a few seconds. The enthalpic and entropic contributions to the free energy of encapsulation were determined and are discussed. This work also reports on the interest of SF(6) in the framework of the spin-spy methodology. The advantages and drawbacks of solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) with respect to (129)Xe NMR are discussed. SF(6) comes forward as a versatile and informative spin-spy molecule for probing systems in solution because its detection limit by (19)F NMR reaches the micromolar range with standard equipment and because quantitative integral measurements, relaxation time measurements, and demanding experiments, such as translational diffusion coefficient measurements, are easily carried out in addition to chemical shift measurements. Solution-state (19)F NMR of SF(6) emerges as a promising alternative to (129)Xe NMR for probing cavities and for other applications relying on the encapsulation of an NMR active gaseous probe.

  19. NMR studies in chemistry. I. Organometallic tin and geramanium compounds. II. The sorbitol pathway in intact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized in the study of two very different chemical problems. The bonding and structure of various cyclopropyl derivatives of tin and germanium has been investigated by means of Sn-119, Ge-73, C-13, and H-1 NMR spectroscopy. Intact rabbit lenses have also been studied using NMR spectroscopy with regard to diabetic cataract formation. C-13 and P-31 NMR spectroscopies have been utilized in the study of the sorbitol pathway and aldose reductase inhibition.

  20. Ternary complexes between cationic GdIII chelates and anionic metabolites in aqueous solution: an NMR relaxometric study.

    PubMed

    Botta, Mauro; Aime, Silvio; Barge, Alessandro; Bobba, Gabriella; Dickins, Rachel S; Parker, David; Terreno, Enzo

    2003-05-09

    The (1)H and (17)O NMR relaxometric properties of two cationic complexes formed by Gd(III) with a macrocyclic heptadentate triamide ligand, L(1), and its Nmethylated analogue, L(2), have been investigated in aqueous media as a function of pH, temperature and magnetic field strength. The complexes possess two water molecules in their inner coordination sphere for which the rate of exchange has been found to be sensibly faster for the Nmethylated derivative and explained in terms of electronic effects (decrease of the charge density at the metal center) and perturbation of the network of hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the outer hydration sphere. The proton relaxivity shows a marked dependence from pH and decreases of about six units in the pH range 6.5 to 9.0. This has been accounted for by the displacement of the two water molecules by dissolved carbonate which acts as a chelating anion. The formation of ternary complexes with lactate, malonate, citrate, acetate, fluoride and hydrogenphosphate has been monitored by (1)H NMR relaxometric titrations at 20 MHz and pH 6.3 and the value of the affinity constant, K, and of the relaxivity of the adducts could be obtained. Lactate, malonate and citrate interact strongly with the complexes (log K > or =3.7) and coordinate in a bidendate mode by displacing both water molecules. Larger affinity constants have been measured for GdL(2). Acetate, fluoride and hydrogenphosphate form monoaqua ternary complexes which were investigated in detail with regard to their relaxometric properties. The NMR dispersion (NMRD) profiles indicate a large contribution to the relaxivity of the adducts from water molecules belonging to the second hydration shell of the complexes and hydrogen-bonded to the anion. A VT (17)O NMR study has shown a marked increase of the rate of water exchange upon binding which is explained by coordination of the anion in an equatorial site, thus leaving the water molecule in an apical position, more accessible for

  1. NMR study of 1,4-phenilene-bis(dithiadiazolyl), soil organic matter and copper aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, Francesca

    2000-10-01

    Crystals of the mixed valence salts 1,4-[(S2N2C)C 6H4(CN2S2][I] are conducting above a metal-insulator transition at about 200 K, and exhibit a paramagnetic susceptibility that increases strongly with increasing temperature. High-resolution CP-MAS 13C NMR spectra from samples of [2][I] show that carbon nuclei in the C6H4 structure contribute peaks at 132 and 136 ppm, and the carbon nuclei in the CN2S2 structure contribute one peak at 78 ppm. A shift of about 2 ppm of the 136-ppm peak suggests weak coupling of the protonated carbons to the conduction electrons. We discuss the suppression of the peak at 78 ppm at temperatures below 293 K in relation to the conduction mechanisms in the molecule. We used 13C CP/MAS NMR techniques on samples of sod organic matter (SOM) as part of a study on the effects of global warming on the global carbon cycle. We describe how global warming can affect the global carbon cycle, and the information that high-resolution 13C CP/MAS NMR on SOM provides. Finally we discuss changes in the relative proportions of the alkyl (0--50 ppm, CnH2n+1), O-alkyl (50--110 ppm), aromatic (110--160 ppm), and carbanyl (160--220 ppm, CO) carbon groups during decomposition occurring in four environments differing in temperature and CO2 levels. Thin films of CuAlO2 have been reported to be optically transparent, p-type conductors. An NMR investigation at 8 T on 63Cu and 65Cu in CuAlO2 has revealed a spectrum for the central transition of each isotope that is a few megahertz wide (4.633 MHZ and 3.69 MHz respectively). Sharp singularities appear at 87.122 MHz and 91.755 MHz for 63Cu, and at 97.79 MHz and 94.1 MHz for 65Cu. The values of the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 were deduced from the curves describing the recovery of the longitudinal magnetization. The ratio of the relaxation times for the two isotopes was found to be 65T1/63T 1 = 1.15, suggesting that energy transfer from the nuclei to the lattice happens via electric quadrupole interactions. Our

  2. Organic solute changes with acidification in Lake Skjervatjern as shown by 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; Hayes, T.

    1994-01-01

    1H-NMR spectroscopy has been found to be a useful tool to establish possible real differences and trends between all natural organic solute fractions (fulvic acids, humic acids, and XAD-4 acids) after acid-rain additions to the Lake Skjervatjern watershed. The proton NMR technique used in this study determined the spectral distribution of nonexchangeable protons among four peaks (aliphatic protons; aliphatic protons on carbon ?? or attached to electronegative groups; protons on carbons attached to O or N heteroatoms; and aromatic protons). Differences of 10% or more in the respective peak areas were considered to represent a real difference. After one year of acidification, fulvic acids decreased 13% (relative) in Peak 3 protons on carbon attached to N and O heteratoms and exhibited a decrease in aromatic protons between 27% and 31%. Humic acids also exhibited an 11% relative decrease in aromatic protons as a result of acidification. After one year of acidification, real changes were shown in three of the four proton assignments in XAD-4 acids. Peak 1 aliphatic protons increased by 14% (relative), Peak 3 protons on carbons attached to O and N heteroatoms decreased by 13% (relative), and aromatic protons (Peak 4) decreased by 35% (relative). Upon acidification, there was a trend in all solutes for aromatic protons to decrease and aliphatic protons to increase. The natural variation in organic solutes as shown in the Control Side B of the lake from 1990 to 1991 is perhaps a small limitation to the same data interpretations of acid rain changes at the Lake Skjervatjern site, but the proton NMR technique shows great promise as an independent scientific tool to detect and support other chemical techniques in establishing organic solute changes with different treatments (i.e., additions of acid rain).

  3. Calcium binding by phosphatidylserine headgroups. Deuterium NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, M; Bloom, M

    1991-01-01

    The binding of calcium to headgroup deuterated 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine (POPS) was investigated by using deuterium magnetic resonance in pure POPS membranes and in mixed 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/POPS 5:1 (m:m) bilayers. Addition of CaCl2 to pure POPS bilayers led to two component spectra attributed, respectively, to liquid-crystallin POPS (less than 15 kHz) and POPS molecules in the calcium-induced dehydrated phase (cochleate) (approximately 120 kHz). The liquid-crystalline component has nearly disappeared at a Ca2+ to POPS ratio of 0.5, indicating that, under such conditions, most of the POPS molecules are in the precipitated cochleate phase. After dilution of the POPS molecules in zwitterionic POPC membranes (POPC/POPS 5:1 m:m), single component spectra characteristic of POPS in the liquid-crystalline state were observed in the presence of Molar concentrations of calcium ions (Ca2+ to POPS ratio greater than 50), showing that the amount of dehydrated cochleate PS-Ca2+ phase, if any, was low (less than 5%) under such conditions. Deuterium NMR data obtained in the 15-50 degrees C temperature range with the mixed PC/PS membranes, either in the absence or the presence of Ca2+ ions, indicate that the serine headgroup undergoes a temperature-induced conformational change, independent of the presence of Ca2+. This is discussed in relation to other headgroup perturbations such as that observed upon change of the membrane surface charge density. PMID:1883944

  4. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices.

    PubMed

    Herbers, C R; Sauer, D; Vogel, M

    2012-03-28

    We use (2)H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids.

  5. Studies of 27Al NMR in SrAl4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Haruo; Higa, Nonoka; Kuroshima, Hiroko; Toji, Tatsuki; Morishima, Mach; Minei, Motofumi; Yogi, Mamoru; Nakamura, Ai; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Harima, Hisatomo

    A charge density wave (CDW) transition at TCDW = 243 K and a structural phase (SP) transition at approximately 100 K occur in SrAl4 with the BaAl4-type body center tetragonal structure, which is the divalent and non-4f electron reference compound of EuAl4. To understand the behaviors of the CDW and SP transitions, the 27Al NMR measurements using a single crystal and a powder sample of SrAl4 have been carried out. The line width below TCDW is modulated by an electrical quadruple interaction between 27Al nucleus and CDW charge modulation. The incommensurate CDW state below TCDW changes into a different structure below TSP. The temperature dependences of Knight shifts of 27Al(I) and 27Al(II) show the different behaviors. The temperature variation of 27Al(I) Knight shift shows anomalies at the CDW and SP transition temperatures, revealing the shift to negative side below TCDW, which is attributable to the core polarization of the d-electrons. However, 27Al(II) Knight shift keeps almost constant except for the small shift due to the SP transition. The 1/T1T of 27Al(I) indicates the obvious changes due to the CDW and SP transitions, while that of 27Al(II) takes a constant value. The density of state at the Fermi level at Al(I) site below 60 K would be about 0.9 times less than that above TCDW.

  6. 2H NMR studies of glycerol dynamics in protein matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbers, C. R.; Sauer, D.; Vogel, M.

    2012-03-01

    We use 2H NMR spectroscopy to investigate the rotational motion of glycerol molecules in matrices provided by the connective tissue proteins elastin and collagen. Analyzing spin-lattice relaxation, line-shape properties, and stimulated-echo decays, we determine the rates and geometries of the motion as a function of temperature and composition. It is found that embedding glycerol in an elastin matrix leads to a mild slowdown of glycerol reorientation at low temperatures and glycerol concentrations, while the effect vanishes at ambient temperatures or high solvent content. Furthermore, it is observed that the nonexponential character of the rotational correlation functions is much more prominent in the elastin matrix than in the bulk liquid. Results from spin-lattice relaxation and line shape measurements indicate that, in the mixed systems, the strong nonexponentiality is in large part due to the existence of distributions of correlation times, which are broader on the long-time flank and, hence, more symmetric than in the neat system. Stimulated-echo analysis of slow glycerol dynamics reveals that, when elastin is added, the mechanism for the reorientation crosses over from small-angle jump dynamics to large-angle jump dynamics and the geometry of the motion changes from isotropic to anisotropic. The results are discussed against the background of present and previous findings for glycerol and water dynamics in various protein matrices and compared with observations for other dynamically highly asymmetric mixtures so as to ascertain in which way the viscous freezing of a fast component in the matrix of a slow component differs from the glassy slowdown in neat supercooled liquids.

  7. NMR studies on the chemical alteration of soil organic matter precursors during controlled charring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    Beside the production of volatiles, vegetation fire transforms various amounts of labile organic components into recalcitrant dark colored and highly aromatic structures. They are incorporated into soils and are assumed to represent an important sink within the global carbon cycle. In order to elucidate the real importance of PyOM as a C-sink, a good understanding of its chemistry is crucial. Although several 'Black Carbon' (BC) models are reported, a commonly accepted view of the chemistry involved in its formation is still missing. Its biogeochemical recalcitrance is commonly associated with a highly condensed aromatic structure. However, recent studies indicated that this view may be oversimplified for PyOM derived from vegetation fire. In order to bring some more light on the structural properties of PyOM produced during vegetation fire, charred plant residues and model chars derived from typical plant macromolecules (casein, cellulose, lignin and condensed tannins) were subjected to controlled charring under oxic conditions (350°C and 450°C) and then characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Subsequently, the chemical features of the PyOM were related to its chemical recalcitrance as determined by chemical oxidation with acid potassium dichromate. Charring cellulose (350°C, 8 min) yielded in a low C-recovery (11%). Treating casein in the same way resulted in a survival of 62% of its C and 46% of its N. Comparable high C-recoveries are reported for lignin. After charring Lolium perenne, 34% of its N and C were recovered. NMR-spectroscopic studies revealed that for this sample most of the charred N and C occurred in pyrrole-type structures. Our studies further indicate that the aromatic skeleton of char accumulating after a vegetation fire must contain remains of the lignin backbone and considerable contributions of furans and anhydrosugars from thermally altered cellulose. Enhancing the temperature during the

  8. Practical applications of hydrostatic pressure to refold proteins from inclusion bodies for NMR structural studies.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Kenji; Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Saio, Tomohide; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Torikai, Shinnosuke; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the hydrostatic pressure refolding method was reported as a practical tool for solubilizing and refolding proteins from inclusion bodies; however, there have been only a few applications for protein structural studies. Here, we report the successful applications of the hydrostatic pressure refolding method to refold proteins, including the MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger, the p62 PB1 domain, the GCN2 RWD domain, and the mTOR FRB domain. Moreover, the absence of aggregation and the correct folding of solubilized protein samples were evaluated with size exclusion chromatography and NMR experiments. The analyses of NMR spectra for MOE-2 tandem zinc-finger and GCN2 RWD further led to the determination of tertiary structures, which are consistent with those from soluble fractions. Overall, our results indicate that the hydrostatic pressure method is effective for preparing samples for NMR structural studies.

  9. A Study of Polarized Proton Acceleration in J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A. U.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.; Molodojentsev, A.; Ohmori, C.; Sato, H.; Hatanaka, K.

    2007-06-13

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductve partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  10. A STUDY OF POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN J-PARC.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO, A.U.; BAI, M.; ROSER, T.

    2006-10-02

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductive partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  11. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  12. Magic-angle spinning NMR studies of molecular organization in multibilayers formed by 1-octadecanoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine.

    PubMed Central

    Halladay, H N; Stark, R E; Ali, S; Bittman, R

    1990-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been employed to study 50%-by-weight aqueous dispersions of 1-octadecanoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C[18]:C[10]PC) and 1-octadecanoyl-2-d19-decanoyl-PC (C[18]:C[10]PC-d19), mixed-chain phospholipids which can form interdigitated multibilayers. The 1H NMR linewidth for methyl protons of the choline headgroup has been used to monitor the liquid crystalline-to-gel (LC-to-G) phase transition and confirm variations between freezing and melting temperatures. Both 1H and 13C spin-lattice relaxation times indicate unusual restrictions on segmental reorientation at megahertz frequencies for C(18):C(10)PC as compared with symmetric-chain species in the LC state; nevertheless each chemical moiety of the mixed-chain phospholipid exhibits motional behavior that may be classified as liquidlike. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy (NOESY) on C(18):C(10)PC and C(18):C(10)PC-d19 reveals cross-peaks between the omega-methyl protons of the C18 chain and the N-methyl protons of the phosphocholine headgroup, and several experimental and theoretical considerations argue against an interpretation based on spin diffusion. Using NMR relaxation times and NOESY connectivities along with a computational formalism for four-spin systems (Keepers, J. W., and T. L. James. 1984. J. Magn. Reson. 57:404-426), an estimate of 3.5 A is obtained for the average distance between the omega-methyl protons of the C18 chain and the N-methyl protons of the phosphocholine headgroup. This finding is consistent with a degree of interdigitation similar to that proposed for organized assemblies of gel-state phosphatidylcholine molecules with widely disparate acyl-chain lengths (Hui, S. W., and C.-H. Huang. 1986. Biochemistry. 25:1330-1335); however, acyl-chain bendback or other intermolecular interactions may also contribute to the NOESY results. For multibilayers of C(18):C(10)PC in the gel phase, 13C chemical

  13. NMR relaxation and water self-diffusion studies in whey protein solutions and gels.

    PubMed

    Colsenet, Roxane; Mariette, François; Cambert, Mireille

    2005-08-24

    The changes in water proton transverse relaxation behavior induced by aggregation of whey proteins are explained in terms of the simple molecular processes of diffusion and chemical exchange. The water self-diffusion coefficient was measured in whey protein solutions and gels by the pulsed field gradient NMR method. As expected, water self-diffusion was reduced with increased protein concentrations. Whatever the concentration, the water molecules were free to diffuse over distances varying from 15 to 47 mum. Water diffusion was constant over these distances, demonstrating that no restrictions were found to explain the water hindrance. The modification in protein structure by gelation induced a decrease in water diffusion. The effects of protein concentration on water diffusion are discussed and modeled. Two approaches were compared, the obstruction effect induced by a spherical particle and the cell model, which considered two water compartments with specific self-diffusion coefficients.

  14. Mechanical Behavior of Polymer Gels for RDCs and RCSAs Collection: NMR Imaging Study of Buckling Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Hellemann, Erich; Teles, Rubens R; Hallwass, Fernando; Barros, W; Navarro-Vázquez, Armando; Gil, Roberto R

    2016-11-07

    Anisotropic NMR parameters, such as residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), residual chemical shift anisotropies (RCSAs) and residual quadrupolar couplings (RQCs or ΔνQ ), appear in solution-state NMR when the molecules under study are subjected to a degree of order. The tunable alignment by reversible compression/relaxation of gels (PMMA and p-HEMA) is an easy, user-friendly, and very affordable method to measure them. When using this method, a fraction of isotropic NMR signals is observed in the NMR spectra, even at a maximum degree of compression. To explain the origin of these isotropic signals we decided to investigate their physical location inside the NMR tube using deuterium 1D imaging and MRI micro-imaging experiments. It was observed that after a certain degree of compression the gels start to buckle and they generate pockets of isotropic solvent, which are never eliminated. The amount of buckling depends on the amount of cross-linker and the length of the gel.

  15. Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianfang; Liang, Zhengrong; Singanallur, Jayalakshmi V; Satogata, Todd J; Williams, David C; Schulte, Reinhard W

    2006-03-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) has been explored in the past decades because of its unique imaging characteristics, low radiation dose, and its possible use for treatment planning and on-line target localization in proton therapy. However, reconstruction of pCT images is challenging because the proton path within the object to be imaged is statistically affected by multiple Coulomb scattering. In this paper, we employ GEANT4-based Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional pCT reconstruction of an elliptical phantom to investigate the possible use of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) with three different path-estimation methods for pCT reconstruction. The first method assumes a straight-line path (SLP) connecting the proton entry and exit positions, the second method adapts the most-likely path (MLP) theoretically determined for a uniform medium, and the third method employs a cubic spline path (CSP). The ART reconstructions showed progressive improvement of spatial resolution when going from the SLP [2 line pairs (lp) cm(-1)] to the curved CSP and MLP path estimates (5 lp cm(-1)). The MLP-based ART algorithm had the fastest convergence and smallest residual error of all three estimates. This work demonstrates the advantage of tracking curved proton paths in conjunction with the ART algorithm and curved path estimates.

  16. Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Li Tianfang; Liang Zhengrong; Singanallur, Jayalakshmi V.; Satogata, Todd J.; Williams, David C.; Schulte, Reinhard W.

    2006-03-15

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) has been explored in the past decades because of its unique imaging characteristics, low radiation dose, and its possible use for treatment planning and on-line target localization in proton therapy. However, reconstruction of pCT images is challenging because the proton path within the object to be imaged is statistically affected by multiple Coulomb scattering. In this paper, we employ GEANT4-based Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional pCT reconstruction of an elliptical phantom to investigate the possible use of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) with three different path-estimation methods for pCT reconstruction. The first method assumes a straight-line path (SLP) connecting the proton entry and exit positions, the second method adapts the most-likely path (MLP) theoretically determined for a uniform medium, and the third method employs a cubic spline path (CSP). The ART reconstructions showed progressive improvement of spatial resolution when going from the SLP [2 line pairs (lp) cm{sup -1}] to the curved CSP and MLP path estimates (5 lp cm{sup -1}). The MLP-based ART algorithm had the fastest convergence and smallest residual error of all three estimates. This work demonstrates the advantage of tracking curved proton paths in conjunction with the ART algorithm and curved path estimates.

  17. NMR-BASED METABOLOMIC STUDIES OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION IN SMALL FISH MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics is now being widely used to obtain complementary information to genomic and proteomic studies. Among the various approaches used in metabolomics, NMR spectroscopy is particularly powerful, in part because it is relatively non-selective, and is amenable to the study o...

  18. Complete 1H assignments of the non-exchangeable protons of the non self-complementary heptadeoxyribonucleotide d[(GTCGTCA).(TGACGAC)] and its component strands by high field NMR.

    PubMed

    Lown, J W; Hanstock, C C; Lobe, C G; Bleackley, C

    1985-06-01

    The non self complementary heptadeoxyribonucleotides d(GTCGTCA) and d(TGACGAC) were synthesized by the phosphotriester method. While complete 1H-NMR assignments of the former were obtained by a combination of one and two-dimensional techniques at room temperature, extensive stacking of the latter under these conditions dictated analysis at 50 degrees C when the lines were sharply resolved. The duplex form of the annealed strands under the conditions of the 1H-NMR experiment was established independently of the NMR evidence by 32P end labeling with T4 polynucleotide kinase followed by butt end joining using the absolute specificity of T4 ligase for double strand DNA. Analysis of the resulting ladder of polymers was performed using gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Complete 1H-NMR assignments of the non-exchangeable protons in the self complementary heptamer was achieved. The assignments were confirmed using NOE differences, and two-dimensional COSY, and HH-INADEQUATE experiments at 400 and 500 MHz. The assignments are in accord with a conformation for the heptamer belonging to the B family of structures.

  19. Perspective study of exotics and flavour baryons in antiproton-proton annihilation and proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanov, Mikhail; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Abstract. The spectroscopy of exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. Together with charmonium, these provide a good tool for testing theories of the strong interactions including both perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, lattice QCD, potential and other phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of exotics spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimentally observed states with masses above the DD̅ threshold region are considered. Experimental results from different collaborations (BES, BaBar, Belle, LHCb) are analyzed with special attention given to recently discovered hidden charm states. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-lying charmonium states and others as tetraquarks with hidden charm. It has been shown that charged/neutral tetraquarks must have their neutral/charge partners with mass values differ by at most a few MeV/c2, hypotheses that tend to coincide with those proposed by Maiani and Polosa. However, measurements of different decay modes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using ahigh quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c and proton-proton collisions with momentum up to 26 GeV/c. DD

  20. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  1. 125Te and 139La NMR Studies of Single Crystal LaTe3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Michioka, Chishiro; Itoh, Yutaka; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi

    2007-12-01

    We report 125Te and 139La NMR studies for single crystals of LaTe3 between 10 and 160 K under an applied field of H = 7.4841 T. We observed the broad 125Te(1) NMR signals of metallic Te(1) sheets with a superlattice modulation and the sharp 125Te(2) and 139La NMR signals of LaTe(2) bi-layers. Temperature dependence of 125Te(1) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times of the modulated Te(1) sheets obeys a modified Korringa relation. The results indicate that the electronic state on the Te(1) sheets is a Landau-Fermi liquid on a misfit superlattice or a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid in a two-dimensional charge-density wave ordering state.

  2. Molecular motion of micellar solutes: a /sup 13/C NMR relaxation study

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, R.E.; Kasakevich, M.L.; Granger, J.W.

    1982-02-04

    A series of simple NMR relaxation experiments have been performed on nitrobenzene and aniline dissolved in the ionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Using /sup 13/C relaxation rates at various molecular sites, and comparing data obtained in organic media with those for micellar solutions, the viscosity at the solubilization site was estimated and a detailed picture of motional restrictions imposed by the micellar enviroment was derived. Viscosities of 8 to 17 cp indicate a rather fluid environment for solubilized nitrobenzene; both additives exhibit altered motional preferences in CTAB solutions only. As an aid in interpretation of the NMR data, quasi-elastic light scattering and other physical techniques have been used to evaluate the influence of organic solutes on micellar size and shape. The NMR methods are examined critically in terms of their general usefulness for studies of solubilization in detergent mice

  3. Solid-state NMR studies of form I of atorvastatin calcium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei David; Gao, Xudong; Strohmeier, Mark; Wang, Wei; Bai, Shi; Dybowski, Cecil

    2012-03-22

    Solid-state (13)C, (19)F, and (15)N magic angle spinning NMR studies of Form I of atorvastatin calcium are reported, including chemical shift tensors of all resolvable carbon sites and fluorine sites. The complete (13)C and (19)F chemical shift assignments are given based on an extensive analysis of (13)C-(1)H HETCOR and (13)C-(19)F HETCOR results. The solid-state NMR data indicate that the asymmetric unit of this material contains two atorvastatin molecules. A possible structure of Form I of atorvastatin calcium (ATC-I), derived from solid-state NMR data and density functional theory calculations of various structures, is proposed for this important active pharmaceutical ingredient (API).

  4. Multivalent ligand mimetics of LecA from P. aeruginosa: synthesis and NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Bini, Davide; Marchetti, Roberta; Russo, Laura; Molinaro, Antonio; Silipo, Alba; Cipolla, Laura

    2016-06-24

    Molecular recognition of glycans plays an important role in glycomic and glycobiology studies. For example, pathogens have a number of different types of lectin for targeting host sugars. In bacteria, lectins exist sometimes as domains of bacterial toxins and exploit adhesion to glycoconjugates as a means of entering host cells. Herein, we describe the synthesis of three glycodendrons with the aim to dissect the fine structural details involved in the multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions. LecA, from the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has been used to characterize galactose dendrons interaction using one of the most widespread NMR technique for the elucidation of receptor-ligand binding in solution, the saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR. Furthermore, the effective hydrodynamic radius of each dendrimer recognized by LecA was estimated from the diffusion coefficients determined by pulsed-field-gradient stimulated echo (PFG-STE) NMR experiments.

  5. The competition of drugs to serum albumin in combination chemotherapy: NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Rezner, P.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2005-06-01

    Combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide (CM), metotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (FU) is used in treatment of patients with breast carcinoma. Although clinical toxicity of CM combinated with FU is greater than that of CM, the levels were clinically acceptable. The mechanism of competition of CM and FU to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was examined with the use of 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The chemical shifts and the linewidth of individual proton and carbon resonances of each drug were measured as a function of the drug/BSA molar ratio in order to analyse the drug-protein interaction and the molecular motion of the drug. The effect of the second drug used in the combination chemotherapy on the analysed NMR parameters is discussed. It was found that FU and CM bind to BSA at molar ratio drug/BSA 160 and 330, respectively. The formation of lev-BSA complex was not confirmed. Whereas it was proved that in the presence of both lev and CM the number of FU molecules bound with BSA increases. It was also observed that FU induces the rising of the affinity between lev and BSA.

  6. NMR studies on a new method for selective degradation of lignins

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, F.; Ralph, J.

    1996-10-01

    The selectivity and cleanliness of reactions which form the basis of a proposed new alternative to the analytical thioacidolysis method have been examined by NMR using model compounds and isolated lignins The results from the model study show that all steps involved in the new selective method are almost quantitative. When applied to isolated lignins, the NMR spectra show that the main substructures of lignin a selectively and cleanly converted to desired derivatives which are further degraded by specific ether cleavage reactions resulting in high yields of analyzable monomers. The beautiful selectivity and cleanliness demonstrated here, combined with its mildness, should make this method very attractive to lignin researchers.

  7. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  8. Theoretical spectroscopic study of protonated and deuteronated PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit

    The study of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) plays a key role to understand astrophysical environments as they are ubiquitous in the Interstellar Medium (ISM). They account for about 5-10% of carbon budget in the universe and are responsible for the strong IR emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.2 and 12.7mum seen towards most of the interstellar objects including HII regions, reflection nebulae, planetary nebulae, late-type stars, as well as active star-forming regions. These IR features result from the relaxation of vibrationally excited PAHs. As PAHs are stable enough to survive the interstellar conditions, they could possibly be responsible for the enigmatic Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) which are optical absorption features on the interstellar extinction curve. The fact that interstellar PAHs are more likely to be ions has motivated the study of radical PAHs. Protonated PAHs formed by H(+) addition to neutral parent molecules, denoted as HPAH(+) , are an important form of closed shell PAH cation. Protonated forms show electronic transitions in the visible part of the spectrum where most DIBs are present, whereas neutral forms generally show their strongest electronic transitions in the UV region. We also report quantum chemical calculations on HPAH(+) and DPAH(+) (D(+) attached to PAH) to get the electronic and IR spectra to understand the IR emission and DIB features. A comparison of theoretical spectra with the available experimental spectra has also been carried out.

  9. Structure vs. composition: A solid-state 1H and 29Si NMR study of quenched glasses along the Na 2O-SiO 2-H 2O join

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, George D.; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Lee, Sung Keun

    2005-05-01

    A suite of six hydrous (7 wt.% H 2O) sodium silicate glasses spanning sodium octasilicate to sodium disilicate in composition were analyzed using 29Si single pulse (SP) magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, 1H- 29Si cross polarization (CP) MAS NMR, and fast MAS 1H-NMR. From the 29Si SPMAS data it is observed that at low sodium compositions dissolved water significantly depolymerizes the silicate network. At higher sodium contents, however, dissolved H 2O does not affect a significant increase in depolymerization over that predicted based on the Na/Si ratio alone. The fast MAS 1H-NMR data reveal considerable complexity in proton environments in each of the glasses studied. The fast MAS 1H-NMR spectra of the highest sodium concentration glasses do not exhibit evidence of signficantly greater fractions of dissolved water as molecular H 2O than the lower sodium concentration glasses requiring that the decrease in polymerization at high sodium contents involves a change in sodium solution mechanism. Variable contact time 1H- 29Si cross polarization (CP) MAS NMR data reveal an increase in the rotating frame spin lattice relaxation rate constant ( T1ρ*) for various Q n species with increasing sodium content that correlates with a reduction in the average 1H- 29Si coupling strength. At the highest sodium concentration, however, T1ρ* drops significantly, consistent with a change in the Na 2O solution mechanism.

  10. Antiferromagnetic properties of a water-vapor-inserted YBa2 Cu3 O6.5 compound studied byNMR, NQR, and μSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooglav, A. V.; Egorov, A. V.; Mukhamedshin, I. R.; Savinkov, A. V.; Alloul, H.; Bobroff, J.; Macfarlane, W. A.; Mendels, P.; Collin, G.; Blanchard, N.; Picard, P. G.; King, P. J. C.; Lord, J.

    2004-08-01

    We present a detailed NQR, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and μSR study of the magnetic phase obtained during a topotactic chemical reaction of YBa2Cu3O6.5 high-temperature superconductor with low-pressure water vapor. Cu65 -enriched samples have been used for NQR/NMR studies which allows to get a good resolution in the Cu(1) NQR and Cu(2) zero field NMR (ZFNMR) spectra. It is shown that the NQR spectrum of the starting material transforms progressively under insertion of water, and almost completely disappears when about one H2O molecule is inserted per unit cell. Similarly, a Cu65 ZFNMR signal characteristic of this water inserted material appears and grows with increasing water content, which indicates that the products of the reaction are nonsuperconducting antiferromagnetic phases in which the copper electronic magnetic moments in the CuO2 bilayers are ordered. The use of Cu65 -enriched samples allowed us to reliably resolve three different copper resonances which correspond to different internal magnetic fields. The antiferromagnetic phases are also felt by proton NMR which reveals two sites with static internal fields of 150 and about 15 Gauss, respectively. μSR studies performed on a series of samples prepared in the same way as the C65u -enriched ones reveal two muon sites with the same local fields as the proton sites, which vanish at T≈400K . This indicates that muons preferentially occupy proton vacancy sites, and that the magnetic phases have similar Néel temperatures as the other bilayer undoped cuprate compounds. An analysis of the internal fields on the different spin probes suggests that they can be all assigned to a single magnetic phase at large water content in which the Cu(1) electron spins order with those of the Cu(2) . The detailed evolution of the spectra with the progressive increase of water content is shown to be compatible with a coexistence of phases during the early stages ot the reaction. It appears that even samples packed

  11. 13C CP/MAS NMR studies of vitamin E model compounds.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Stanislaw; Paradowska, Katarzyna; Wawer, Iwona

    2004-10-01

    13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR data for 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol (2), 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox c) (3) and its acetate (4), 2-methoxy-2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol (5), 2-hydroxy-2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman-6-ol (6) and 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethylchroman (7) are reported. A deshielding of 7.7 ppm for the carboxylic carbon was observed in solid Trolox due to formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds within cyclic dimers. Such crystal packing permits effective cross-polarization and fast relaxation (short T1rho(H)). The impact of the proton concentration on the CP dynamics is reflected by the longer T(CP) and T1rhoH for Trolox-d2 (deuterated at mobile proton sites). The calculated GIAO RHF shielding constants are sensitive to intramolecular effects: rotation around the C-6-O bond (changes of sigma up to 8 ppm) and conformation at C-2.

  12. Saturation transfer difference NMR studies on substrates and inhibitors of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, Martin Rothacker, Boris; Ilg, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments on Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH, EC1.2.1.24) suggest that only the aldehyde forms and not the gem-diol forms of the specific substrate succinic semialdehyde (SSA), of selected aldehyde substrates, and of the inhibitor 3-tolualdehyde bind to these enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis of the active site cysteine311 to alanine in D. melanogaster SSADH leads to an inactive product binding both SSA aldehyde and gem-diol. Thus, the residue cysteine311 is crucial for their discrimination. STD experiments on SSADH and NAD{sup +}/NADP{sup +} indicate differential affinity in agreement with the respective cosubstrate properties. Epitope mapping by STD points to a strong interaction of the NAD{sup +}/NADP{sup +} adenine H2 proton with SSADH. Adenine H8, nicotinamide H2, H4, and H6 also show STD signals. Saturation transfer to the ribose moieties is limited to the anomeric protons of E. coli SSADH suggesting that the NAD{sup +}/NADP{sup +} adenine and nicotinamide, but not the ribose moieties are important for the binding of the coenzymes.

  13. Solid-state NMR and ESR studies of activated carbons produced from pecan shells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activated carbon from pecan shells has shown promise as an adsorbent in water treatment and sugar refining. However, the chemistry of the material is complex and not fully understood. We report here the application of solid state NMR and ESR to study the chemical structure, mobility, and pore volu...

  14. Genetic analysis of 16 NMR-lipoprotein fractions in humans, the GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy lipoprotein measurements of more than 1,000 subjects of GOLDN study, at fasting and at 3.5 and 6 h after a postprandial fat (PPL) challenge at visits 2 and 4, before and after a 3 weeks Fenofibrate (FF) treatment, were included in 6 time-independ...

  15. Silver metallation of hen egg white lysozyme: X-ray crystal structure and NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Panzner, Matthew J; Bilinovich, Stephanie M; Youngs, Wiley J; Leeper, Thomas C

    2011-12-14

    The X-ray crystal structure, NMR binding studies, and enzyme activity of silver(I) metallated hen egg white lysozyme are presented. Primary bonding of silver is observed through His15 with secondary bonding interactions coming from nearby Arg14 and Asp87. A covalently bound nitrate completes a four coordinate binding pocket.

  16. Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Haruhiro; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin (OXT) in phosphate buffer was elucidated by one-dimensional (1D)- and two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques, which involve the assignment of peptide amide NH protons and carbamoyl NH(2) protons. The (1)H-(15)N correlation of seven amide NH protons and three carbamoyl NH(2) protons were also shown by HSQC NMR of OXT without (15)N enrichment.

  17. Proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected CBCT image: Feasibility study for adaptive proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yang-Kyun; Sharp, Gregory C.; Phillips, Justin; Winey, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: CBCT projection images were acquired from anthropomorphic phantoms and a prostate patient using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. Two previously introduced techniques were used to correct the scattered x-rays in the raw projection images: uniform scatter correction (CBCTus) and a priori CT-based scatter correction (CBCTap). CBCT images were reconstructed using a standard FDK algorithm and GPU-based reconstruction toolkit. Soft tissue ROI-based HU shifting was used to improve HU accuracy of the uncorrected CBCT images and CBCTus, while no HU change was applied to the CBCTap. The degree of equivalence of the corrected CBCT images with respect to the reference CT image (CTref) was evaluated by using angular profiles of water equivalent path length (WEPL) and passively scattered proton treatment plans. The CBCTap was further evaluated in more realistic scenarios such as rectal filling and weight loss to assess the effect of mismatched prior information on the corrected images. Results: The uncorrected CBCT and CBCTus images demonstrated substantial WEPL discrepancies (7.3 ± 5.3 mm and 11.1 ± 6.6 mm, respectively) with respect to the CTref, while the CBCTap images showed substantially reduced WEPL errors (2.4 ± 2.0 mm). Similarly, the CBCTap-based treatment plans demonstrated a high pass rate (96.0% ± 2.5% in 2 mm/2% criteria) in a 3D gamma analysis. Conclusions: A priori CT-based scatter correction technique was shown to be promising for adaptive proton therapy, as it achieved equivalent proton dose distributions and water equivalent path lengths compared to those of a reference CT in a selection of anthropomorphic phantoms. PMID:26233175

  18. Study of cross - relaxation and molecular dynamics in the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid by solid state NMR off - resonance.

    PubMed

    Woźniak-Braszak, Aneta

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of the solid 3-(trifluoromethyl) benzoic acid containing proton (1)H and fluorine (19)F nuclei was explored by the solid-state NMR off - resonance technique. Contrary to the previous experiments the proton nuclei system I relaxed in the off - resonance effective field B→e while fluorine nuclei system S was saturated for short time in comparison to the relaxation time T1I. New cross - relaxation solid - state NMR off - resonance experiments were conducted on a homebuilt pulse spectrometer operating at the on-resonance frequency of 30.2MHz, at the off - resonance frequency varied between 30.2 and 30.6MHz for protons and at the frequency of 28.411MHz for fluorines, respectively. Based on the experimental data the dispersions of the proton off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(I), the fluorine off - resonance spin - lattice relaxation rate ρρ(S) and the cross - relaxation rate σρ in the rotating frame were determined.

  19. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  20. Protonation studies and multivariate curve resolution on oligodeoxynucleotides carrying the mutagenic base 2-aminopurine.

    PubMed Central

    Gargallo, R; Vives, M; Tauler, R; Eritja, R

    2001-01-01

    2-Aminopurine (P) is a mutagen causing A.T to G.C transitions in prokaryotic systems. To study the base-pairing schemes between P and cytosine (C) or thymine (T), two self-complementary dodecamers containing P paired with either C or T were synthesized, and their protonation equilibria were studied by acid-base titrations and melting experiments. The mismatches were incorporated into the self-complementary sequence d(CGCPCCGGXGCG), where X was C or T. Spectroscopic data obtained from molecular absorption, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular fluorescence spectroscopy were analyzed by a factor-analysis-based method, multivariate curve resolution based on the alternating least squares optimization procedure (MCR-ALS). This procedure allows determination of the number of acid-base species or conformations present in an acid-base or melting experiment and the resolution of the concentration profiles and pure spectra for each of them. Acid-base experiments have shown that at pH 7, 150 mM ionic strength, and 37 degrees C, both C and P are deprotonated. At pH near 4, the majority of species shows C protonated and P deprotonated. Finally, at pH values near 3, the majority of species shows both protonated C and P. These results are in agreement with NMR studies showing a wobble geometry for the P x C base pair and a Watson-Crick geometry for the P x T base pair at neutral pH. Melting experiments were carried out to confirm the proposed acid-base distribution profile. For the sequence including the P x T mismatch, only one transition was observed at neutral pH. However, for the sequence including the P x C mismatch, two transitions were detected by CD but only one by molecular absorption. This behavior agrees with that observed by other authors for oligonucleotides of similar sequence and suggests the following sequence of conformational changes during melting: duplex --> hairpin --> random coil. PMID:11606299

  1. Solid-state 207Pb NMR studies of mixed lead halides, PbFX (X=Cl, Br, or I).

    PubMed

    Glatfelter, Alicia; Dybowski, Cecil; Kragten, David D; Bai, Shi; Perry, Dale L; Lockard, Jenny

    2007-04-01

    Solid-state 207Pb NMR studies have been conducted on mixed lead(II) halides of the type PbFX, where X=Cl, Br, or I. NMR data for the mixed halides are compared to the solid-state NMR data for the divalent, binary lead halides, PbX2 (X=F, Cl, Br, I). The NMR data are evaluated in the context of the structures of the compounds and the effects of the mixed halides on the electronic structure of the divalent lead. Data sets for the mixed halides are discussed and compared to those for the regular lead(II) halides.

  2. 19F NMR study on the biodegradation of fluorophenols by various Rhodococcus species.

    PubMed

    Bondar, V S; Boersma, M G; Golovlev, E L; Vervoort, J; Van Berkel, W J; Finkelstein, Z I; Solyanikova, I P; Golovleva, L A; Rietjens, I M

    1998-01-01

    Of all NMR observable isotopes 19F is the one perhaps most convenient for studies on biodegradation of environmental pollutants. The reasons underlying this potential of 19F NMR are discussed and illustrated on the basis of a study on the biodegradation of fluorophenols by four Rhodococcus strains. The results indicate marked differences between the biodegradation pathways of fluorophenols among the various Rhodococcus species. This holds not only for the level and nature of the fluorinated biodegradation pathway intermediates that accumulate, but also for the regioselectivity of the initial hydroxylation step. Several of the Rhodococcus species contain a phenol hydroxylase that catalyses the oxidative defluorination of ortho-fluorinated di- and trifluorophenols. Furthermore, it is illustrated how the 19F NMR technique can be used as a tool in the process of identification of an accumulated unknown metabolite, in this case most likely 5-fluoromaleylacetate. Altogether, the 19F NMR technique proved valid to obtain detailed information on the microbial biodegradation pathways of fluorinated organics, but also to provide information on the specificity of enzymes generally considered unstable and, for this reason, not much studied so far.

  3. Interaction of phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin in rheumatoid therapy: 1H NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-09-01

    The monitoring of drug concentration in blood serum is necessary in multi-drug therapy. Mechanism of drug binding with serum albumin (SA) is one of the most important factors which determine drug concentration and its transport to the destination tissues. In rheumatoid diseases drugs which can induce various adverse effects are commonly used in combination therapy. Such proceeding may result in the enhancement of those side effects due to drug interaction. Interaction of phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin and competition between them in gout has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) technique. The aim of the study was to determine the low affinity binding sites, the strength and kind of interaction between serum albumin and drugs used in combination therapy. The study of competition between phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin points to the change of their affinity to serum albumin in the ternary systems. This should be taken into account in multi-drug therapy. This work is a subsequent part of the spectroscopic study on Phe-COL-SA interactions [A. Sułkowska, et al., J. Mol. Struct. 881 (2008) 97-106].

  4. Characterization of D-glucaric acid using NMR, x-ray crystal structure, and MM3 molecular modeling analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-glucaric acid was characterized in solution by comparing NMR spectra from the isotopically unlabeled molecule with those from D-glucaric acid labeled with deuterium or carbon-13 atoms. The NMR studies provided unequivocal assignments for all carbon atoms and non-hydroxyl protons of the molecule. ...

  5. A simulation study of Methane by proton at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quashie, Edwin E.; Correaa, Alfredo A.; Schwegler, Eric R.; Saha, Bidhan C.

    2014-05-01

    Proton impact molecular collisions have received considerable attentions over last few decades due to wide applications in various fields such as plasma physics, astrophysics, material science, and radiation therapy. Methane is the simplest hydrocarbon and has recently been detected in the atmosphere of the outer planets. In addition to provide the fundamental information, the charge exchange studies remain critical for understanding the phenomena in studies of comets, the solar wind, and space weather. The charge exchange processes in recent years have been used as diagnostics for temperature and transport. Using the time dependent density functional theory our results for both the elastic and inelastic scattering will be presented. Supported by National Nuclear Security Agency & Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  6. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts. Third quarterly report, March 1-May 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, L.B.

    1984-06-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by majic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable angle sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (Proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of /sup 17/O enriched Na-Y faujasites. The effort in each phase is broken into four tasks: (1) zeolite preparation. (2) standard zeolite characterization; (3) measurement of zeolite NMR properties; and (4) analysis of NMR data. The main efforts during the third three month period of the program have been the characterization of the /sup 17/O enriched zeolites, particularly X and Y zeolites, by high resolution sample spinning /sup 17/O NMR, and the preparation of additional /sup 17/O enriched zeolites. X and Y zeolites with Si/Al framework ratios from 1.22 to 7.6 have been prepared in either the Na, NH/sub 4/ or Ba form. MASS NMR and VASS NMR as well as static NMR measurements have been made on these materials for /sup 17/O NMR frequencies from 20.4 to 67.8 MHz. Computer simulations of the experimental NMR lineshapes are in progress. Results to date indicate that the observed spectra arise from two different types of oxygen sites, possibly O in Al-O-Si links and chemically bound OH groups. 2 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  7. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  8. 17O NMR study of diamagnetic and paramagnetic lanthanide(III)-DOTA complexes in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Luca; Luhmer, Michel

    2014-08-18

    The complexes between the polyaminocarboxylate DOTA ligand and the whole series of stable lanthanide(III) metal ions, except Gd(3+), were studied in aqueous solution by (17)O NMR. For all of the paramagnetic systems, the (17)O NMR signals of both the nonchelating (O1) and chelating (O2) oxygen atoms could be detected, and for some of them, the signals of both the SAP and TSAP (TSAP') conformational isomers were also observed. Line width data analysis reveals that signal broadening is not dominated by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, as it was believed to be. The data indicate that quadrupole relaxation and, for some complexes, chemical exchange between the SAP and TSAP isomers are the major contributions to the (17)O NMR line width at 25 °C. Besides, the Fermi contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed lanthanide-induced shifts could be extracted. The (17)O hyperfine coupling constants determined for O2 in the SAP and TSAP isomers are similar to each other and to the values reported for several Gd(III) complexes comprising fast-exchanging ligands. Interestingly, the results suggest that (17)O NMR should prove to be useful for the study of highly paramagnetic Gd(III) complexes of nonlabile ligands.

  9. Proton and deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amorphous hydrogenated silicon, carbon, and carbon alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernan, Mary Jane Wurth

    Despite the profound influence of semiconductors and the changes they have produced, many fundamental questions remain unanswered. We have used proton and deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to explore the role of hydrogens in amorphous silicon and amorphous carbon and carbon alloy films. In the carbon films, dipolar filtering techniques reveal a two-component shifted lineshape in the proton NMR spectra and deuteron magnetic resonance (DMR) data demonstrate a feedstock gas dependence in the film deposition process. In these measurements, DMR is used to examine the effect of hydrogen on the photovoltaic properties of amorphous silicon thin films. We have measured the effects of photoillumination on amorphous silicon, particularly with respect to the process of metastable defect formation (the Staebler-Wronski effect). The creation and passivation of dangling silicon bonds is observed and quantified. We report large-scale light-induced atomic rearrangements which produce shifts and broadenings of the DMR lineshapes. The deuterium NMR lineshape component most affected by atomic rearrangements is a broad central feature which is shown to be molecular in origin. This spectral feature includes hydrogens trapped and immobile on surfaces created by strains and dislocations in the material. Narrowing of the lineshape at elevated temperatures indicates motion with a small activation energy. The substantial population represented by this feature is shown to account for at least 15% of the total hydrogens in high-quality amorphous silicon samples.

  10. A solid-state NMR study of hydrogen-bonding networks and ion dynamics in benzimidazole salts.

    PubMed

    Traer, Jason W; Britten, James F; Goward, Gillian R

    2007-05-24

    On the basis of our solid-state NMR characterization of dynamics in two model salts, we draw the analogy to the fuel cell membrane candidate, phosphoric acid-doped poly(benzimidazole), and conclude that phosphate anion dynamics contribute to long-range proton transport, whereas the mobility of the polymer itself is not a contributing factor. This is contrasted with emerging membrane candidates, which rely on fully covalently bonded acid donors and acceptors, and target high-temperature PEM fuel cell operation in the absence of liquid electrolyte. The hydrogen-bonding structures of benzimidazolium phosphate and benzimidazolium methane phosphonate are established using X-ray diffraction paired with solid-state 1H DQF NMR. By comparing the dynamics of the phosphate and methane phosphonate anions with the dynamics of imidazolium and benzimidazolium cations, the relative importance of these processes in proton transport is determined. The imidazolium cation is known to undergo two-site ring reorientation on the millisecond time scale. In contrast, it is shown here that the benzimidazolium rings are immobile in analogous salts, on a time scale extending into the tens of seconds. Therefore, we look to the phosphate anions and demonstrate that the time scale of tetrahedral reorientation is comparably fast (50 ms). Moreover, the 31P CODEX NMR data clearly indicate a four-site jump process. In contrast, the methane phosphonate undergoes a three-site jump on a slower time scale (75 ms). A mechanism for a zigzag pathway of proton transport through the phosphonate salt crystallites is developed based on the 31P CODEX and 1H variable-temperature MAS NMR data.

  11. A 2H and 14N NMR study of molecular motion in polycrystalline choline salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratum, T. K.; Klein, M. P.

    2H and 14N solid-state NMR spectra of polycrystalline choline chloride, bromide, and iodide indicate that 180° cation flipping motion occurs in all three salts. From the temperature dependence of these spectra, the activation energy for this motion is determined to be 5.8 ± I kcal/mol in the iodide salt and 11 ± 1.5 kcal/mol in the chloride salt. In the bromide salt the reorientation rate is too rapid to be determined from the NMR lineshape, but the temperature dependence of the 2H quadrupole coupling parameters is indicative of a second-order phase transition at approximately 273 K. The spectral distortions in the 14N NMR spectra of the chloride and iodide salts are adequately explained using the motional model derived from the 2H NMR results, while the 14N spectra of the bromide salt show no motional effects. The axis of reorientation which is inferred from these data appears to be consistent with that indicated in a previous X-ray crystallographic study.

  12. Li NMR study of heavy-fermion LiV2O4 containing magnetic defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zong, X.; Das, S.; Borsa, F.; Vannette, M.; Prozorov, R.; Schmalian, J.; Johnston, D.

    2008-04-21

    We present a systematic study of the variations of the {sup 7}Li NMR properties versus magnetic defect concentration up to 0.83 mol% within the spinel structure of polycrystalline powder samples and a collection of small single crystals of LiV2O4 in the temperature range from 0.5 to 4.2 K. We also report static magnetization measurements and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements at 14 MHz on the samples at low temperatures. Both the NMR spectrum and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate are inhomogeneous in the presence of the magnetic defects. The NMR data for the powders are well explained by assuming that (i) there is a random distribution of magnetic point defects, (ii) the same heavy Fermi liquid is present in the samples containing the magnetic defects as in magnetically pure LiV2O4, and (iii) the influences of the magnetic defects and of the Fermi liquid on the magnetization and NMR properties are separable. In the single crystals, somewhat different behaviors are observed. Remarkably, the magnetic defects in the powder samples show evidence of spin freezing below T {approx} 1.0 K, whereas in the single crystals with similar magnetic defect concentration no spin freezing was found down to 0.5 K. Thus different types of magnetic defects and/or interactions between them appear to arise in the powders versus the crystals, possibly due to the substantially different synthesis conditions of the powders and crystals.

  13. Comparative study of inversion methods of three-dimensional NMR and sensitivity to fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Wang, Peng; Mao, Keyu

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (3D NMR) logging can simultaneously measure transverse relaxation time (T2), longitudinal relaxation time (T1), and diffusion coefficient (D). These parameters can be used to distinguish fluids in the porous reservoirs. For 3D NMR logging, the relaxation mechanism and mathematical model, Fredholm equation, are introduced, and the inversion methods including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD), and Global Inversion (GI) methods are studied in detail, respectively. During one simulation test, multi-echo CPMG sequence activation is designed firstly, echo trains of the ideal fluid models are synthesized, then an inversion algorithm is carried on these synthetic echo trains, and finally T2-T1-D map is built. Futhermore, SVD, BRD, and GI methods are respectively applied into a same fluid model, and the computing speed and inversion accuracy are compared and analyzed. When the optimal inversion method and matrix dimention are applied, the inversion results are in good aggreement with the supposed fluid model, which indicates that the inversion method of 3D NMR is applieable for fluid typing of oil and gas reservoirs. Additionally, the forward modeling and inversion tests are made in oil-water and gas-water models, respectively, the sensitivity to the fluids in different magnetic field gradients is also examined in detail. The effect of magnetic gradient on fluid typing in 3D NMR logging is stuied and the optimal manetic gradient is choosen.

  14. Layered structure of room-temperature ionic liquids in microemulsions by multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Falcone, R Dario; Baruah, Bharat; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Rithner, Christopher D; Correa, N Mariano; Silber, Juana J; Crans, Debbie C; Levinger, Nancy E

    2011-06-06

    Microemulsions form in mixtures of polar, nonpolar, and amphiphilic molecules. Typical microemulsions employ water as the polar phase. However, microemulsions can form with a polar phase other than water, which hold promise to diversify the range of properties, and hence utility, of microemulsions. Here microemulsions formed by using a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as the polar phase were created and characterized by using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. (1)H, (11)B, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy was applied to explore differences between microemulsions formed by using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF(4)]) as the polar phase with a cationic surfactant, benzylhexadecyldimethylammonium chloride (BHDC), and a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100 (TX-100). NMR spectroscopy showed distinct differences in the behavior of the RTIL as the charge of the surfactant head group varies in the different microemulsion environments. Minor changes in the chemical shifts were observed for [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) in the presence of TX-100 suggesting that the surfactant and the ionic liquid are separated in the microemulsion. The large changes in spectroscopic parameters observed are consistent with microstructure formation with layering of [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) and migration of Cl(-) within the BHDC microemulsions. Comparisons with NMR results for related ionic compounds in organic and aqueous environments as well as literature studies assisted the development of a simple organizational model for these microstructures.

  15. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies establish that heparanase is a retaining glycosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jennifer C.; Laloo, Andrew Elohim; Singh, Sanjesh; Ferro, Vito

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •{sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of fondaparinux were fully assigned by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. •Hydrolysis of fondaparinux by heparanase was monitored by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. •Heparanase is established to be a retaining glycosidase. -- Abstract: Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans in basement membranes and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Heparanase is implicated in several diverse pathological processes associated with ECM degradation such as metastasis, inflammation and angiogenesis and is thus an important target for anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drug discovery. Heparanase has been classed as belonging to the clan A glycoside hydrolase family 79 based on sequence analysis, secondary structure predictions and mutagenic analysis, and thus it has been inferred that it is a retaining glycosidase. However, there has been no direct experimental evidence to support this conclusion. Herein we describe {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies of the hydrolysis of the pentasaccharide substrate fondaparinux by heparanase, and provide conclusive evidence that heparanase hydrolyses its substrate with retention of configuration and is thus established as a retaining glycosidase. Knowledge of the mechanism of hydrolysis may have implications for future design of inhibitors for this important drug target.

  16. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing: Sequential assignment of resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Krishna, N.R. )

    1989-02-21

    The authors report the sequential assignment of resonances to specific residues in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the variant-3 neurotoxin from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing (range southwestern U.S.A.). A combination of two-dimensional NMR experiments such as 2D-COSY, 2D-NOESY, and single- and double-RELAY coherence transfer spectroscopy has been employed on samples of the protein dissolved in D{sub 2}O and in H{sub 2}O for assignment purposes. These studies provide a basis for the determination of the solution-phase conformation of this protein and for undertaking detailed structure-function studies of these neurotoxins that modulate the flow of sodium current by binding to the sodium channels of excitable membranes.

  17. The NMR investigation of the electromagnetic irradiation effects on bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drokina, T. V.; Lisin, V. V.; Popova, L. U.; Balandina, A. N.; Bitekhtina, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    The luminous marine bacteria (Photobacterium leiognathi, strain 54) are influenced by a nonthermal-intensity millimeter electromagnetic field, which was studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It is shown that the proton spectrum of luminous bacteria depends on the electromagnetic irradiation effect (v = 42.2 GHz).

  18. 13C NMR of tunnelling methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detken, A.

    The dipolar interactions between the protons and the central 13C nucleus of a 13CH3 group are used to study rotational tunnelling and incoherent dynamics of such groups in molecular solids. Single-crystal 13C NMR spectra are derived for arbitrary values of the tunnel frequency upsilon t. Similarities to ESR and 2H NMR are pointed out. The method is applied to three different materials. In the hydroquinone/acetonitrile clathrate, the unique features in the 13C NMR spectra which arise from tunnelling with a tunnel frequency that is much larger than the dipolar coupling between the methyl protons and the 13C nucleus are demonstrated, and the effects of incoherent dynamics are studied. The broadening of the 13C resonances is related to the width of the quasi-elastic line in neutron scattering. Selective magnetization transfer experiments for studying slow incoherent dynamics are proposed. For the strongly hindered methyl groups of L-alanine, an upper limit for upsilon is derived from the 13C NMR spectrum. In aspirinTM (acetylsalicylic acid), incoherent reorientations dominate the spectra down to the lowest temperatures studied; their rate apparently increases with decreasing temperature below 25K.

  19. Structural transformation and physical properties of a hydrogel-forming peptide studied by NMR, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic rheometer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongzhou; Herrera, Alvaro I; Luo, Zhiping; Prakash, Om; Sun, Xiuzhi S

    2012-09-05

    Peptide-based hydrogels are attractive biological materials. Study of their self-assembly pathways from their monomer structures is important not only for undertaking the rational design of peptide-based materials, but also for understanding their biological functions and the mechanism of many human diseases relative to protein aggregation. In this work, we have monitored the conformation, morphological, and mechanical properties of a hydrogel-forming peptide during hydrogelation in different dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)/H(2)O solutions. The peptide shows nanofiber morphologies in DMSO/H(2)O solution with a ratio lower than 4:1. Increased water percentage in the solution enhanced the hydrogelation rate and gel strength. One-dimensional and two-dimensional proton NMR and electron microscopy studies performed on the peptide in DMSO/H(2)O solution with different ratios indicate that the peptide monomer tends to adopt a more helical structure during the hydrogelation as the DMSO/H(2)O ratio is reduced. Interestingly, at the same DMSO/H(2)O ratio, adding Ca(2+) not only promotes peptide hydrogelation and gel strength, but also leads to special shear-thinning and recovery properties of the hydrogel. Without changing the peptide conformation, Ca(2+) binds to the charged Asp residues and induces the change of interfiber interactions that play an important role in hydrogel properties.

  20. Interaction between reduced glutathione and PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers in aqueous solutions: studied by 1H NMR and spin-lattice relaxation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lianwei; Guo, Chen; Yang, Liangrong; Xiang, Junfeng; Tang, Yalin; Liu, Huizhou

    2011-03-17

    In order to investigate the effect of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers on the glutathione (GSH)/glutathione-S-transferase (GST) detoxification system, interaction between the copolymers and GSH is studied by NMR measurements. Selective rotating-frame nuclear Overhauser effect (ROE) experiment confirms that glutamyl (Glu) α-H of GSH has spatial contact with EO methylene protons. Spin-lattice relaxation times of GSH Glu α-H show a decrease when PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers are added, and the decrease is greater with copolymers possessing more EO units. Other protons of GSH show little change in the presence of the copolymers. The addition of GSH promotes the dehydration of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers. This results from the breaking of hydrogen bonds between water and the polymers and the forming of hydrogen bonds between Glu α-carboxylate protons and oxygen atoms of EO units. The dissociation constant between GSH and P85 copolymer is determined by spin-lattice relaxation measurements, which shows the binding is of low affinity and the two molecules are in fast dissociation kinetics. This study suggests that GSH transporting or utilizing systems may be affected by treatment of PEO-PPO-PEO copolymers.

  1. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Hamed; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-03-01

    Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M+ ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of "internal proton affinity" (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule.

  2. Proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected CBCT image: Feasibility study for adaptive proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yang-Kyun Sharp, Gregory C.; Phillips, Justin; Winey, Brian A.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: CBCT projection images were acquired from anthropomorphic phantoms and a prostate patient using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. Two previously introduced techniques were used to correct the scattered x-rays in the raw projection images: uniform scatter correction (CBCT{sub us}) and a priori CT-based scatter correction (CBCT{sub ap}). CBCT images were reconstructed using a standard FDK algorithm and GPU-based reconstruction toolkit. Soft tissue ROI-based HU shifting was used to improve HU accuracy of the uncorrected CBCT images and CBCT{sub us}, while no HU change was applied to the CBCT{sub ap}. The degree of equivalence of the corrected CBCT images with respect to the reference CT image (CT{sub ref}) was evaluated by using angular profiles of water equivalent path length (WEPL) and passively scattered proton treatment plans. The CBCT{sub ap} was further evaluated in more realistic scenarios such as rectal filling and weight loss to assess the effect of mismatched prior information on the corrected images. Results: The uncorrected CBCT and CBCT{sub us} images demonstrated substantial WEPL discrepancies (7.3 ± 5.3 mm and 11.1 ± 6.6 mm, respectively) with respect to the CT{sub ref}, while the CBCT{sub ap} images showed substantially reduced WEPL errors (2.4 ± 2.0 mm). Similarly, the CBCT{sub ap}-based treatment plans demonstrated a high pass rate (96.0% ± 2.5% in 2 mm/2% criteria) in a 3D gamma analysis. Conclusions: A priori CT-based scatter correction technique was shown to be promising for adaptive proton therapy, as it achieved equivalent proton dose distributions and water equivalent path lengths compared to those of a reference CT in a selection of anthropomorphic phantoms.

  3. Solid state NMR study of SEI formation in lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dachun

    Recently, rechargeable lithium ion batteries, which offer high energy density and long cycle life, are in great demand as power sources for our mobile electronic society. The formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on the surface of electrodes in lithium ion batteries plays an essential role in their performance. This thesis presents solid state NMR and MAS NMR results on the SEI, which contribute to our understanding of SEI formation on both cathodes and anodes. This thesis is organized as following: Chapter 1 surveys the history of batteries and the challenges to further development of the lithium ion battery. Fundamental aspects and SEI formation mechanisms are also included in Chapter l. Chapter 2 deals with the principles and experimental techniques of solid state NMR. Chapter 3 presents studies of SEI formation on anode and cathode in lithium ion batteries using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and NMR. The results provide EIS and NMR evidence that cells containing electrolytes with high EC content display less irreversible capacity after high temperature storage. The irreversible capacity is attributed to SEI growth on electrode surfaces. NMR results on cathodes, on the other hand, imply that the presence of Ni in the cathode may reduce cell performance due to the oxidation of Ni 3+ to Ni4+. Our simulations show that a lower EC/DMC ratio is associated with a smaller SEI intensity for the cathode and higher intensity for the anode. Chapter 4 discusses the effect of temperature on SEI formation on anodes and cathodes. NMR measurements show that MCMB graphite based anodes exhibit high stability no chemical shift is evident over a wide temperature range. On cathodes, however, NMR does reveal changes in SEI intensity as a function of temperature. These changes are believed to be the result of decomposition of the SEI. Evidently, then, changes in the performance of the cell as a factor of temperature are, at least in part, due to changes in

  4. Polyoxomolybdate promoted hydrolysis of a DNA-model phosphoester studied by NMR and EXAFS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Absillis, Gregory; Van Deun, Rik; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2011-11-21

    Hydrolysis of (p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (NPP), a commonly used phosphatase model substrate, was examined in molybdate solutions by means of (1)H, (31)P, and (95)Mo NMR spectroscopy and Mo K-edge Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At 50 °C and pD 5.1 the cleavage of the phosphoester bond in NPP proceeds with a rate constant of 2.73 × 10(-5) s(-1) representing an acceleration of nearly 3 orders of magnitude as compared to the hydrolysis measured in the absence of molybdate. The pD dependence of k(obs) exhibits a bell-shaped profile, with the fastest cleavage observed in solutions where [Mo(7)O(24)](6-) is the major species in solution. Mixing of NPP and [Mo(7)O(24)](6-) resulted in formation of these two intermediate complexes that were detected by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Complex A was characterized by a (31)P NMR resonance at -4.27 ppm and complex B was characterized by a (31)P NMR resonance at -7.42 ppm. On the basis of the previous results from diffusion ordered NMR spectroscopy, performed with the hydrolytically inactive substrate phenylphosphonate (PhP), the structure of these two complexes was deduced to be (NPP)(2)Mo(5)O(21)(4-) (complex A) and (NPP)(2)Mo(12)O(36)(H(2)O)(6)(4-) (complex B). The pH studies point out that both complexes are hydrolytically active and lead to the hydrolysis of phosphoester bond in NPP. The NMR spectra did not show evidence of any paramagnetic species, excluding the possibility of Mo(VI) reduction to Mo(V), and indicating that the cleavage of the phosphomonoester bond is purely hydrolytic. The Mo K-edge XANES region also did not show any sign of Mo(VI) to Mo(V) reduction during the hydrolytic reaction. (95)Mo NMR and Mo K-edge EXAFS spectra measured during different stages of the hydrolytic reaction showed a gradual disappearance of [Mo(7)O(24)](6-) during the hydrolytic reaction and appearance of [P(2)Mo(5)O(23)](6-), which was the final complex observed at the end of hydrolytic reaction.

  5. 13C NMR study of halogen bonding of haloarenes: measurements of solvent effects and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Chen, Naijun; Wu, Hong; Knotts, Nathan; Kaupp, Martin

    2004-04-07

    Solvent effects on the NMR spectra of symmetrical (X = F (1), X = Cl (2), X = Br (3), X = I (4), X = NO2 (5), X = CN (6)) and unsymmetrical (X = I, Y = MeO (7), Y = PhO (8)) para-disubstituted acetophenone azines X-C6H4-CMe=N-N=CMe-C6H4-Y and of models X-C6H4-CMe=N-Z (X = I, Z = H (9), Z = NH2 (10)), 4-iodoacetophenone (11), and iodobenzene (12) were measured in CDCl(3), DMSO, THF, pyridine, and benzene to address one intramolecular and one intermolecular issue. Solvent effects on the (13)C NMR spectra are generally small, and this finding firmly establishes that the azine bridge indeed functions as a "conjugation stopper," an important design concept in our polar materials research. Since intermolecular halogen bonding of haloarenes do occur in polar organic crystalline materials, the NMR solution data pose the question as to whether the absence of solvent shifts indicates the absence of strong halogen bonding in solution. This question was studied by the theoretical analysis of the DMSO complexes of iodoarenes 4, 9-12, and of iodoacetylene. DFT and MP2 computations show iodine bonding, and characteristic structural and electronic features are described. The nonrelativistic complexation shifts and the change in the spin-orbit induced heavy atom effect of iodine compensate each other, and iodine bonding thus has no apparent effect on Ci in the iodoarenes. For iodides, complexation by DMSO occurs and may or may not manifest itself in the NMR spectra. The absence of complexation shifts in the NMR spectra of halides does not exclude the occurrence of halogen bonding in solution.

  6. 1H NMR study of the hetero-association of flavin-mononucleotide with mutagenic dyes: ethidium bromide and proflavine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Mukhina, Yu. V.; Davies, D. B.

    The hetero-association of the vitamin B2 derivative, flavin-mononucleotide (FMN), with a mutagenic dye, ethidium bromide (EB) or proflavine (PF), has been studied by 1D and 2D 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The variations of proton chemical shifts of both the vitamin and dye as a function of concentration and temperature were analysed in terms of the structural and thermodynamical properties of the FMN-EB and FMN-PF complexes in solution. The structures of the complexes were also investigated by observed intermolecular ROE contacts and molecular mechanics calculations. The results show that the 1 : 1 hetero-association complexes in solution are more stable than the self-association complexes, which is consistent with formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bond in the hetero-complexes of FMN-EB and FMN-PF. Hence it is possible that the toxicity of aromatic molecules such as EB and PF may be reduced in vitro by the presence of FMN, partly because of the known antimutagenic action of FMN and partly because it has been shown in this work that there is an effective intermolecular association between the mutagens and the vitamin.

  7. The role of water in protein's behavior: The two dynamical crossovers studied by NMR and FTIR techniques.

    PubMed

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The role the solvent plays in determining the biological activity of proteins is of primary importance. Water is the solvent of life and proteins need at least a water monolayer covering their surface in order to become biologically active. We study how the properties of water and the effect of its coupling with the hydrophilic moieties of proteins govern the regime of protein activity. In particular we follow, by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, the thermal evolution of the amide vibrational modes of hydrated lysozyme in the temperature interval 180 K < T < 350 K. In such a way we are able to observe the thermal limit of biological activity characterizing hydrated lysozyme. Finally we focus on the region of lysozyme thermal denaturation by following the evolution of the proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra for 298 K < T < 366 K with the High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning probe. Our data suggest that the hydrogen bond coupling between hydration water and protein hydrophilic groups is crucial in triggering the main mechanisms that define the enzymatic activity of proteins.

  8. The role of water in protein's behavior: The two dynamical crossovers studied by NMR and FTIR techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Dugo, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The role the solvent plays in determining the biological activity of proteins is of primary importance. Water is the solvent of life and proteins need at least a water monolayer covering their surface in order to become biologically active. We study how the properties of water and the effect of its coupling with the hydrophilic moieties of proteins govern the regime of protein activity. In particular we follow, by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, the thermal evolution of the amide vibrational modes of hydrated lysozyme in the temperature interval 180 K < T < 350 K. In such a way we are able to observe the thermal limit of biological activity characterizing hydrated lysozyme. Finally we focus on the region of lysozyme thermal denaturation by following the evolution of the proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra for 298 K < T < 366 K with the High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning probe. Our data suggest that the hydrogen bond coupling between hydration water and protein hydrophilic groups is crucial in triggering the main mechanisms that define the enzymatic activity of proteins. PMID:25750698

  9. Preliminary 1H NMR study on archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Maccotta, Antonella; Fantazzini, Paola; Garavaglia, Carla; Donato, Ines D; Perzia, Patrizia; Brai, Maria; Morreale, Filippa

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Relaxation (MRR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are powerful tools to obtain detailed information on the pore space structure that one is unlikely to obtain in other ways. These techniques are particularly suitable for Cultural Heritage materials, because they use water 1H nuclei as a probe. Interaction with water is one of the main causes of deterioration of materials. Porous structure in wood, for example, favours the penetration of water, which can carry polluting substances and promote mould growth. A particular case is waterlogged wood from underwater discoveries and moist sites; in fact, these finds are very fragile because of chemical, physical and biological decay from the long contact with the water. When wood artefacts are brought to the surface and directly dried in air, there is the collapse of the cellular structures, and wood loses its original form and dimensions and cannot be used for study and museum exhibits. In this work we have undertaken the study of some wood finds coming from Ercolano's harbour by MRR and MRI under different conditions, and we have obtained a characterization of pore space in wood and images of the spatial distribution of the confined water in the wood.

  10. Pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic) acid and 2-aminopyridine as building blocks of a novel proton transfer compound: Solution and X-ray crystal structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, A.; Moosavi, S. M.; Kordestani, D.; Maddah, B.; Shamsipur, M.; Aghabozorg, H.; Ramezanipour, F.; Kickelbick, G.

    2007-02-01

    The synthesis of a novel proton transfer compound (2-apyH)(pdtcH), L, derived from pyridine-2,6-bis(monothiocarboxylic) acid, (pdtcH 2), is reported. This compound was prepared from the reaction between pdtcH 2, and 2-aminopyridine, (2-apy), in water as solvent. The characterization was performed using 1H and 13C solution NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Crystal structure analysis reveals that intra- and intermolecular proton transfer from the diacid pdtcH 2 to the base 2-apy results in the formation of a supramolecular network, which is self-assembled via non-covalent interactions. The monocationic (2-apyH) + and monoanionic (pdtcH) - building blocks are connected through H-bonding, π-π interactions and ion-pairing simultaneously as shown in the X-ray crystal structure. The monoanionic fragments are located almost parallel to each other and the cationic species have also situations nearly parallel to each other, positioning almost perpendicular to anions. The aqueous solution studies were accomplished by spectrophotometric and potentiometric pH titrations. The most abundant proton transfer species present at pH < 6 is (2-apyH)(pdtcH), in support of association between (2-apyH) + and (pdtcH) - in L, being similar to that observed by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystal structure analysis.

  11. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Korn, C.; Goren, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T/sub 1/ in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH/sub 1.588/, ZrH/sub 1.629/, ZrH/sub 1.684/, ZrH/sub 1.736/, ZrH/sub 1.815/, ZrH/sub 1.910/, and ZrH/sub 1.960/. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with E/sub a/ = 13.4 +- 0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A = (1/2)(2-x)(45 +- 10) x 10/sup 12/ Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for approx.3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  12. NMR study of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, C.; Goren, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance method was used to study the diffusion of hydrogen in zirconium hydride by measuring the temperature dependence of T1 in a temperature range where the major relaxation mechanism was due to hydrogen diffusion. The samples investigated were ZrH1.588, ZrH1.629, ZrH1.684, ZrH1.736, ZrH1.815, ZrH1.910, and ZrH1.960. These spanned both the cubic and tetragonal phases. The activation energy was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration in the cubic phase with Ea=13.4+/-0.4 kcal/mol and a preexponential factor given by A=(1/2)(2-x)(45+/-10)×1012 Hz. In the tetragonal phase the activation energy of the bulk of the hydrogen increased modestly with concentration. In addition, it was discovered that a new very fast hydrogen channel was created by the tetragonality for ~3% of the hydrogen. They jump with a preexponential factor that is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the rest of the hydrogen. A comparison was also made between the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound, the Barton-Sholl, and the Bustard theories for nuclear magnetic relaxation due to diffusion.

  13. A novel salt of antidiabetic drug metformin resulting from a proton transfer reaction: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and solution studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Fatemeh; Ghasemi, Khaled; Rezvani, Ali Reza; Shokrollahi, Ardeshir; Refahi, Masoud; García-Granda, Santiago; Mendoza-Meroño, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    Reaction between N,N-dimethylebiguanidine, Met = Metformin, and 4-hydroxy-2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, HO-dipicH2, results in the formation of a novel proton transfer compound, [MetH2][HO-dipicH]2·H2O, 1. The characterization was performed using FTIR, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The crystal system is triclinic with space group P 1 bar and two molecules per unit cell. The protonation constants of O-dipic and Met, in all of probability protonated forms, and the equilibrium constants for the O-dipic-Met proton transfer system were investigated by the potentiometric pH titration method using the Hyperquad2008 program. The stoichiometry of the proton transfer species in solution were in agreement with the solid state result.

  14. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, quantitative, reproducible, untargeted and unbiased method that requires no or minimal sample preparation, and is one of the leading analytical tools for metabonomics research [1-3]. The easy quantification and the no need of prior knowledge about compounds present in a sample associated with NMR are advantageous over other techniques [1,4]. 1H NMR is especially attractive because protons are present in virtually all metabolites and its NMR sensitivity is high, enabling the simultaneous identification and monitoring of a wide range of low molecular weight metabolites.

  15. Interaction of ferulic acid derivatives with human erythrocytes monitored by pulse field gradient NMR diffusion and NMR relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Bernardi, Francesca; Centini, Marisanna; Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni

    2005-04-01

    Ferulic acid (Fer), a natural anti-oxidant and chemo-protector, is able to suppress experimental carcinogenesis in the forestomach, lungs, skin, tongue and colon. Several Fer derivatives have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention, being the biological activity related also to the capacity of partitioning between aqueous and lipid phases. In the present work, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurement and NMR relaxation rates have been adopted for investigating the interaction of three Fer derivatives (Fer-C11, Fer-C12 and Fer-C13) with human erythrocytes. Binding to the erythrocyte membrane has been shown for all derivatives, which displayed a similar interaction mode such that the aromatic moiety and the terminal part of the alkyl chain were the most affected. Quantitative analysis of the diffusion coefficients was used to show that Fer-C12 and Fer-C13 display higher affinity for the cell membrane when compared with Fer-C11. These findings agree with the higher anti-oxidant activity of the two derivatives.

  16. Hepatic lipid profiling of deer mice fed ethanol using {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy: A dose-dependent subchronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.

    2012-11-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is a 2nd major cause of liver disease resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by a wide spectrum of pathologies starting from fat accumulation (steatosis) in early reversible stage to inflammation with or without fibrosis and cirrhosis in later irreversible stages. Previously, we reported significant steatosis in the livers of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH{sup −}) vs. hepatic ADH-normal (ADH{sup +}) deer mice fed 4% ethanol daily for 2 months [Bhopale et al., 2006, Alcohol 39, 179–188]. However, ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 4% ethanol also showed a significant mortality. Therefore, a dose-dependent study was conducted to understand the mechanism and identify lipid(s) involved in the development of ethanol-induced fatty liver. ADH{sup −} and ADH{sup +} deer mice fed 1, 2 or 3.5% ethanol daily for 2 months and fatty infiltration in the livers were evaluated by histology and by measuring dry weights of extracted lipids. Lipid metabolomic changes in extracted lipids were determined by proton ({sup 1}H) and {sup 31}phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR data was analyzed by hierarchical clustering (HC) and principle component analysis (PCA) for pattern recognition. Extensive vacuolization by histology and significantly increased dry weights of total lipids found only in the livers of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls suggest a dose-dependent formation of fatty liver in ADH{sup −} deer mouse model. Analysis of NMR data of ADH{sup −} deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol vs. pair-fed controls shows increases for total cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), triacylglycerides and unsaturation, and decreases for free cholesterol, phospholipids and allylic and diallylic protons. Certain classes of neutral lipids (cholesterol esters, fatty acyl chain (-COCH{sub 2}-) and FAMEs) were

  17. Conformational equilibrium of phenylacetic acid and its halogenated analogues through theoretical studies, NMR and IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levandowski, Mariana N.; Rozada, Thiago C.; Melo, Ulisses Z.; Basso, Ernani A.; Fiorin, Barbara C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a study on the conformational preferences of phenylacetic acid (PA) and its halogenated analogues (FPA, CPA, BPA). To clarify the effects that rule these molecules' behaviour, theoretical calculations were used, for both the isolated phase and solution, combined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Most conformations of phenylacetic acid and its halogenated derivatives are stabilized through the hyperconjugative effect, which rules the conformational preference. NMR analyses showed that even with the variation in medium polarity, there was no significant change in the conformation population. Infrared spectroscopy showed similar results for all compounds under study. In most spectra, two bands were found through the carbonyl deconvolution, which is in accordance with the theoretical data. It was possible to prove that variation in the nature of the substituent in the ortho position had no significant influence on the conformational equilibrium.

  18. Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions Studied by NMR: From Molecular Recognition to Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alonso, María del Carmen; Díaz, Dolores; Berbis, Manuel Álvaro; Marcelo, Filipa; Cañada, Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Diseases that result from infection are, in general, a consequence of specific interactions between a pathogenic organism and the cells. The study of host-pathogen interactions has provided insights for the design of drugs with therapeutic properties. One area that has proved to be promising for such studies is the constituted by carbohydrates which participate in biological processes of paramount importance. On the one hand, carbohydrates have shown to be information carriers with similar, if not higher, importance than traditionally considered carriers as amino acids and nucleic acids. On the other hand, the knowledge on molecular recognition of sugars by lectins and other carbohydrate-binding proteins has been employed for the development of new biomedical strategies. Biophysical techniques such as X-Ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy lead currently the investigation on this field. In this review, a description of traditional and novel NMR methodologies employed in the study of sugar-protein interactions is briefly presented in combination with a palette of NMR-based studies related to biologically and/or pharmaceutically relevant applications. PMID:23305367

  19. Low-temperature NMR studies of Zn tautomerism and hindered rotations in solid zincocene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lopez del Amo, Juan Miguel; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Resa, Irene; Fernandez, Rafael; Carmona, Ernesto

    2008-04-24

    Using a combination of NMR methods we have detected and studied fluxional motions in the slip-sandwich structure of solid decamethylzincocene (I, [(eta5-C5Me5)Zn(eta1-C5Me5)]). For comparison, we have also studied the solid iminoacyl derivative [(eta5-C5Me5)Zn(eta1-C(NXyl)C5Me5)] (II). The variable temperature 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of I indicate fast rotations of both Cp* rings in the molecule down to 156 K as well as the presence of an order-disorder phase transition around 210 K. The disorder is shown to be dynamic arising from a fast combined Zn tautomerism and eta1/eta5 reorganization of the Cp* rings between two degenerate states A and B related by a molecular inversion. In the ordered phase, the degeneracy of A and B is lifted; that is, the two rings X and Y are inequivalent, where X exhibits a larger fraction of time in the eta5 state than Y. However, the interconversion is still fast and characterized by a reaction enthalpy of DeltaH = 2.4 kJ mol-1 and a reaction entropy of DeltaS = 4.9 J K-1 mol-1. In order to obtain quantitative kinetic information, variable temperature 2H NMR experiments were performed on static samples of I-d6 and II-d6 between 300 and 100 K, where in each ring one CH3 is replaced by one CD3 group. For II-d6, the 2H NMR line shapes indicate fast CD3 group rotations and a fast "eta5 rotation", corresponding to 72 degrees rotational jumps of the eta5 coordinated Cp* ring. The latter motion becomes slow around 130 K. By line shape analysis, an activation energy of the eta5 rotation of about 21 kJ mol-1 was obtained. 2H NMR line shapes analysis of I-d6 indicates fast CD3 group rotations at all temperatures. Moreover, between 100 and 150 K, a transition from the slow to the fast exchange regime is observed for the 5-fold rotational jumps of both Cp* rings, exhibiting an activation energy of 18 kJ mol-1. This value was corroborated by 2H NMR relaxometry from which additionally the activation energies 6.3 kJ mol-1 and 11.2 kJ mol-1 for the CD3

  20. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: NMR potentials for studying physical processes in fossil coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Anatolii D.; Ul'yanova, Ekaterina V.; Vasilenko, Tat'yana A.

    2005-11-01

    High-resolution, pulsed, and wide-line NMR studies of fossil coals are reviewed. Coal substance conversion due to outbursts is discussed. Results on water and methane interactions with coal substance, which provide insight into the dynamic characteristics of boundary water, the location of methane in coal structure, and water and methane's hazard implications for coal beds (gas- or geodynamic phenomena) are presented; these are shown to have potential for predicting and preventing life threatening situations.

  1. Protons in polar media: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Rosenvinge, Tycho

    1998-10-01

    The hydrates of hydrogen chloride are ionic crystals that contain hydronium (H3O+). The hydronium in the monohydrate has been reported to be statistically disordered between two possible sites related by inversion symmetry. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are presented for the monohydrate, as well as the di-, and tri-hydrates, of hydrogen chloride using the density functional based Car-Parrinello technique. The simulations were carried out with the goal of investigating proton disorder in these crystals. The possible role of nuclear quantum effects has been explored via path integral molecular dynamic simulations. The present results suggest that the proposed disordered sites in the monohydrate are dynamically unstable and therefore unlikely to be responsible for the reported disorder. No useful information was obtained for the dihydrate because the large unit cell leads to difficulties in carrying out the simulations. Nuclear quantum effects are shown to be important for characterizing the proton distributions in the trihydrate. The structure and dynamical behavior of liquid HF with dissolved KF have been investigated using the Car- Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics scheme. Specifically, a system with stoichiometry KFċ2HF was studied at temperatures of 400K and 1000K. This system, which was started from a phase separated mixture, rapidly formed into solvated potassium ions and HnFn+1/sp- polyfluoride anions with n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The resulting polyfluoride anions were classified, and their structures and dynamical behavior were compared with the known structures and spectra of crystalline compounds KF/cdot xHF and with theoretical predictions of isolated gas phase species. The present study reveals dramatic frequency shifts in the H atom vibrational modes with variation in the HF coordination number of the polyfluoride anion. In particular the FH wagging motion red shifts while the FH stretch blue shifts as n increases. The present calculations

  2. NMR and Mössbauer Study of Al2O3-Eu2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, N.; Salas, P.; Llanos, M. E.; Pérez-Pastenes, H.; Viveros, T.

    2005-02-01

    Alumina-europia mixed oxides with 5 and 10 wt.% Eu2O3 were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, 27Al MAS-NMR and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The samples were prepared by the sol-gel technique. The XRD patterns for the calcined samples show a broad peak around 2 θ = 30° which is assigned to the Eu2O3; after treatment with hydrogen at 1073 K no reduction to Eu+2 or Eu0 was observed. The NMR spectra show three peaks, which are assigned to the octahedral, pentahedral and tetrahedral aluminum sites; the intensity of each peak depends on the concentration of europium ions. The Mössbauer spectra of the calcined samples show a single peak near zero velocity which is attributed to the Eu+3; after H2 treatment at 1073 K similar spectra were obtained, suggesting Eu+3 is not reducibly at this temperature.

  3. Chiral Magnetism in an Itinerant Helical Magnet, MnSi - An Extended 29Si NMR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Motoya, Kiyoichiro; Majumder, Mayukh; Witt, Sebastian; Krellner, Cornelius; Baenitz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The microscopic magnetism in the helical, conical and ferromagnetically polarized phases in an itinerant helical magnet, MnSi, has been studied by an extended 29Si NMR at zero field and under external magnetic fields. The temperature dependence of the staggered moment, MQ(T), determined by the 29Si NMR frequency, ν(T), and the nuclear relaxation rate, 1/T1(T), at zero field is in general accord with the SCR theory for weak itinerant ferromagnetic metals and its extension to helical magnets. The external field dependence of resonance frequency, ν(H), follows a vector sum of the contributions from the atomic hyperfine and macroscopic fields with a field induced moment characteristic to itinerant magnets. A discontinuous jump of the resonance frequency at the critical field, Hc, between the conical and the polarized phases has also been found, which suggests a first order like change of the electronic states at Hc.

  4. Decomposition of adsorbed VX on activated carbons studied by 31P MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Ishay; Waysbort, Daniel; Shmueli, Liora; Nir, Ido; Kaplan, Doron

    2006-06-15

    The fate of the persistent OP nerve agent O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) on granular activated carbons that are used for gas filtration was studied by means of 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. VX as vapor or liquid was adsorbed on carbon granules, and MAS NMR spectra were recorded periodically. The results show that at least 90% of the adsorbed VX decomposes within 20 days or less to the nontoxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and bis(S-2-diisopropylaminoethane) {(DES)2}. Decomposition occurred irrespective of the phase from which VX was loaded, the presence of metal impregnation on the carbon surface, and the water content of the carbon. Theoretical and practical aspects of the degradation are discussed.

  5. Studies of Di-proton production at ANKE

    SciTech Connect

    Dymov, Sergey

    2011-10-21

    The study of NN-interactions with production of {sup 1}S{sub 0} proton pairs (diprotons) provides a new approach to hadron interactions at intermediate energies. The use of the polarised COSY beams and the ANKE polarised internal target allows one to conduct single and double polarization experiments. A number of processes including pd{yields}{l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s}n, production of one and two pions in pN collisions, and the pp{yields}{l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s}{gamma} process, have been investigated.Information on the near-threshold single pion production with formation of a diproton in the processes pp{yields}{l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s}{pi}{sup 0} and pn{yields}{l_brace}pp{r_brace}{sub s}{pi}{sup -} is urgently needed for further development of chiral perturbation theory. The measurements of d{sigma}/d{Omega}, A{sub y} and the spin-correlation coefficients A{sub x,x} and A{sub x,z} will permit an amplitude analysis that should provide a non-trivial test of the {chi}PT predictions. A combined study of these processes will lead to the isolation of the strength parameter d of the four-nucleon-pion contact interaction in {chi}PT. Preliminary ANKE results on d{sigma}/d{Omega} and A{sub y} in these processes are presented, and the future experimental programme is discussed.

  6. Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor for proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, Joao; Depauw, Nicolas

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) in producing proton radiographic images using the proton beam at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Methods: A CMOS APS, previously tested for use in s-ray radiation therapy applications, was used for proton beam radiographic imaging at the MGH. Two different setups were used as a proof of principle that CMOS can be used as proton imaging device: (i) a pen with two metal screws to assess spatial resolution of the CMOS and (ii) a phantom with lung tissue, bone tissue, and water to assess tissue contrast of the CMOS. The sensor was then traversed by a double scattered monoenergetic proton beam at 117 MeV, and the energy deposition inside the detector was recorded to assess its energy response. Conventional x-ray images with similar setup at voltages of 70 kVp and proton images using commercial Gafchromic EBT 2 and Kodak X-Omat V films were also taken for comparison purposes. Results: Images were successfully acquired and compared to x-ray kVp and proton EBT2/X-Omat film images. The spatial resolution of the CMOS detector image is subjectively comparable to the EBT2 and Kodak X-Omat V film images obtained at the same object-detector distance. X-rays have apparent higher spatial resolution than the CMOS. However, further studies with different commercial films using proton beam irradiation demonstrate that the distance of the detector to the object is important to the amount of proton scatter contributing to the proton image. Proton images obtained with films at different distances from the source indicate that proton scatter significantly affects the CMOS image quality. Conclusion: Proton radiographic images were successfully acquired at MGH using a CMOS active pixel sensor detector. The CMOS demonstrated spatial resolution subjectively comparable to films at the same object-detector distance. Further work will be done in order to establish the spatial and energy resolution of the

  7. A comprehensive NMR structural study of Titan aerosol analogs: Implications for Titan's atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    Titan has a thick atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane. Complex organic chemistry induced by solar ultraviolet radiation and energetic particles, takes place in Titan's upper atmosphere, producing an optically thick reddish brown carbon based haze encircling this moon. The chemistry in Titan's atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood in spite of a great many efforts being made. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of the 13C and 15N labeled, simulated Titan haze aerosols (tholin) by NMR and identified several dominant small molecules in the tholin. Here we report our expanded structural investigation of the bulk of the tholin by more comprehensive NMR study. The NMR results show that the tholin materials are dominated by heavily nitrogenated compounds, in which the macromolecular structures are highly branched polymeric or oligomeric compounds terminated in methyl, amine, and nitrile groups. The structural characteristic suggest that the tholin materials are formed via different copolymerization or incorporation mechanisms of small precursors, such as HCN, CH2dbnd NH, NH3 and C2H2. This study helps to understand the formation process of nitrogenated organic aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and their prebiotic implications.

  8. Cu(II)-Based Paramagnetic Probe to Study RNA-Protein Interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Seebald, Leah M; DeMott, Christopher M; Ranganathan, Srivathsan; Asare Okai, Papa Nii; Glazunova, Anastasia; Chen, Alan; Shekhtman, Alexander; Royzen, Maksim

    2017-04-03

    Paramagnetic NMR techniques allow for studying three-dimensional structures of RNA-protein complexes. In particular, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data can provide valuable information about long-range distances between different structural components. For PRE NMR experiments, oligonucleotides are typically spin-labeled using nitroxide reagents. The current work describes an alternative approach involving a Cu(II) cyclen-based probe that can be covalently attached to an RNA strand in the vicinity of the protein's binding site using "click" chemistry. The approach has been applied to study binding of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein 7 (NCp7) to a model RNA pentanucleotide, 5'-ACGCU-3'. Coordination of the paramagnetic metal to glutamic acid residue of NCp7 reduced flexibility of the probe, thus simplifying interpretation of the PRE data. NMR experiments showed attenuation of signal intensities from protein residues localized in proximity to the paramagnetic probe as the result of RNA-protein interactions. The extent of the attenuation was related to the probe's proximity allowing us to construct the protein's contact surface map.

  9. NMR study on small proteins from Helicobacter pylori for antibiotic target discovery: a review.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Kim, Do-Hee; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2013-10-30

    Due to the widespread and increasing appearance of antibiotic resistance, a new strategy is needed for developing novel antibiotics. Especially, there are no specific antibiotics for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). H. pylori are bacteria that live in the stomach and are related to many serious gastric problems such as peptic ulcers, chronic gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Because of its importance as a human pathogen, it's worth studying the structure and function of the proteins from H. pylori. After the sequencing of the H. pylori strain 26695 in 1997, more than 1,600 genes were identified from H. pylori. Until now, the structures of 334 proteins from H. pylori have been determined. Among them, 309 structures were determined by X-ray crystallography and 25 structures by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), respectively. Overall, the structures of large proteins were determined by X-ray crystallography and those of small proteins by NMR. In our lab, we have studied the structural and functional characteristics of small proteins from H. pylori. In this review, 25 NMR structures of H. pylori proteins will be introduced and their structure-function relationships will be discussed.

  10. 39K, 23Na, and 31P NMR Studies of Ion Transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, T.; den Hollander, J. A.; Shulman, R. G.

    1983-09-01

    The relationship between efflux and influx of K+, Na+, and intracellular pH (pHin) in yeast cells upon energizing by oxygenation was studied by using the noninvasive technique of 39K, 23Na, and 31P NMR spectroscopy. By introducing an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent, Dy3+(P3O105-)2, into the medium, NMR signals of intra- and extracellular K+ and Na+ could be resolved, enabling us to study ion transport processes by NMR. Measurements showed that 40% of the intracellular K+ and Na+ in yeast cells contributed to the NMR intensities. By applying this correction factor, the intracellular ion concentrations were determined to be 130-170 mM K+ and 2.5 mM Na+ for fresh yeast cells. With the aid of a home-built solenoidal coil probe for 39K and a double-tuned probe for 23Na and 31P, we could follow time courses of K+ and Na+ transport and of pHin with a time resolution of 1 min. It was shown that H+ extrusion is correlated with K+ uptake and not with Na+ uptake upon energizing yeast cells by oxygenation. When the cells were deenergized after the aerobic period, K+ efflux, H+ influx, and Na+ influx were calculated to be 1.6, 1.5, and 0.15 μ mol/min per ml of cell water, respectively. Therefore, under the present conditions, K+ efflux is balanced by exchange for H+ with an approximate stoichiometry of 1:1.

  11. Spin-lattice relaxation study of the methyl proton dynamics in solid 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT).

    PubMed

    Piślewski, N; Tritt-Goc, J; Bielejewski, M; Rachocki, A; Ratajczyk, T; Szymański, S

    2009-06-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation studies are performed for powder samples of 9,10-dimethyltriptycene (DMT) and its isotopomer DMT-d(12) in which all the non-methyl protons in the molecule are replaced by deuterons. The relaxation data are interpreted in terms of the conventional relaxation theory based on the random jump model in which the Pauli correlations between the relevant spin and torsional states are discarded. The Arrhenius activation energies, obtained from the relaxation data, 25.3 and 24.8 kJ mol(-1) for DMT and DMT-d(12), respectively, are very high as for the methyl groups. The validity of the jump model in the present case is considered from the perspective of Haupt theory in which the Pauli principle is explicitly invoked. To this purpose, the dynamic quantities entering the Haupt model are reinterpreted in the spirit of the damped quantum rotation (DQR) approach introduced recently for the purpose of NMR lineshape studies of hindered molecular rotators. Theoretical modelling of the relevant methyl group dynamics, based on the DQR theory, was performed. From these calculations it is inferred that direct assessments of the torsional barrier heights, based on the Arrhenius activation energies extracted from relaxation data, should be treated with caution.

  12. NMR studies on turn mimetic analogs derived from melanocyte-stimulating hormones.