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Sample records for proton pump-driven cutaneous

  1. Drug-Induced Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Associated with Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nitish

    2016-06-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is an autoimmune disease that may be induced by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in at-risk populations. The US FDA does not recognize SCLE as an adverse event associated with PPIs. We queried the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database, which contains adverse event case reports submitted by the public as well as by industry, and analyzed the data to quantify passive pharmacovigilance signals for SCLE associated with PPIs. A disproportionality analysis of the signals yielded a significant association between SCLE and PPIs. Discontinuation of PPI resulted in remission, with PPI re-challenge causing SCLE to reoccur. A follow-up analysis also yielded a significant association between SCLE and H2 receptor antagonists. We conducted a brief literature survey of published case reports and studies to discern the validity of PPI-induced SCLE signals. Healthcare prescribers and patients should be made aware that SCLE can be induced by PPIs. In such cases, PPIs should be discontinued and alternative clinical treatment sought. Regulatory bodies such as the FDA should incorporate the adverse reaction in PPI prescription labels.

  2. A Peristaltic Micro Pump Driven by a Rotating Motor with Magnetically Attracted Steel Balls

    PubMed Central

    Du, Min; Ye, Xiongying; Wu, Kang; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a membrane peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls for lab-on-a-chip applications. The fabrication process is based on standard soft lithography technology and bonding of a PDMS layer with a PMMA substrate. A linear flow rate range ∼490 μL/min was obtained by simply varying the rotation speed of a DC motor, and a maximum back pressure of 592 Pa was achieved at a rotation speed of 43 rpm. The flow rate of the pump can also be adjusted by using steel balls with different diameters or changing the number of balls. Nevertheless, the micro pump can also work in high speed mode. A high back pressure up to 10 kPa was achieved at 500 rpm using a high speed DC motor, and an utmost flow rate up to 5 mL/min was reached. PMID:22574035

  3. A peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls.

    PubMed

    Du, Min; Ye, Xiongying; Wu, Kang; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a membrane peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls for lab-on-a-chip applications. The fabrication process is based on standard soft lithography technology and bonding of a PDMS layer with a PMMA substrate. A linear flow rate range ∼490 μL/min was obtained by simply varying the rotation speed of a DC motor, and a maximum back pressure of 592 Pa was achieved at a rotation speed of 43 rpm. The flow rate of the pump can also be adjusted by using steel balls with different diameters or changing the number of balls. Nevertheless, the micro pump can also work in high speed mode. A high back pressure up to 10 kPa was achieved at 500 rpm using a high speed DC motor, and an utmost flow rate up to 5 mL/min was reached.

  4. A centrifugal pump driven tidal flow extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system tested with neonatal mock circulation.

    PubMed

    Trittenwein, G; Kölbl, R; Trittenwein, H; Golej, J; Burda, G; Hermon, M; Pollak, A

    1999-06-01

    In 1993, Chevalier published his experiences with tidal flow venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) featuring a single lumen cannula, non-occlusive roller pump, and alternating clamps. Using a neonatal mock circulation (NMC), which enables different hemodynamic states for neonatal ECMO research, the tested hypothesis was that it is possible to create a centrifugal pump driven tidal flow neonatal venovenous ECMO system. Additionally, the resulting hemodynamic effects in a condition of circulatory impairment were investigated. The ECMO circuit tested was assembled using a pediatric centrifugal pump head, a distensible reservoir, and a rotary clamp separating drainage from the injection phase. Using the NMC, end tidal volumes, mock circulation flow, and arterial and venous pressures were measured at different pump speeds after the drainage and injection phases. Effective venovenous ECMO flow (evvEF) was calculated. Mock circulation baseline values (ECMO clamped) were compared to values during tidal flow ECMO. At 3,000 rpm, a centrifugal pump speed of 75 ml/kg/min evvEF was reached, and it increased with higher pump speeds. At this point, the end tidal mock circulation flow (representing cardiac output) after drainage differed significantly from that during the injection phase (p < 0.01) but not from the baseline value. The end tidal arterial and venous pressures after the drainage phase were found to be significantly decreased compared to the baselines (p < 0.01). In conclusion, a centrifugal pump driven tidal flow venovenous ECMO system can be created enabling sufficient tidal volumes. Tested in the described NMC simulating posthypoxic circulatory impairment, significant hemodynamic effects could be demonstrated. Animal experiments for confirmation are necessary.

  5. Design and effectiveness of a membrane-pump-driven ventilator for mice.

    PubMed

    Winning, Johannes; Huwer, Hanno; Redjai, Jasmin; Naumann, Christian; Winning, Ilka; Bauer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    To perform mechanical ventilation of mice in the absence of highly expensive commercially available devices, we developed a membrane-pump-driven respirator and studied its practicability. The continuous airflow generated by the membrane pump was changed into an intermittent flow by using a multifunction timer. Tidal volume was adjusted by a rotary dimmer regulating the electric power onto the pump. The expiration air left the circuit through openings at the tube connection. Mice were ventilated with room air for 5 h with a tidal volume of approximately 200 muL. In group 1 (n = 6), ventilation was performed with a frequency of 110 min-1, in group 2 (n = 6) with a frequency of 150 min-1. Spontaneously breathing anesthetized mice (n = 6) served as controls. In addition we performed single-lung open-chest ventilation for 1 h in two animals. The parameters of arterial blood gas analyses were within the normal range except for moderate hyperventilation in group 2. Single-lung ventilation led to a significant decline (P < 0.05) of pO2 and SO2, whereas the pCO2 remained within the normal range. Respiratory rate, tidal volume and pressure limitation can be adjusted for optimal ventilation. In addition, the device provides a minimalized dead space and impedes potential alveolar damage caused by negative pressure generated by spontaneous inspiration during positive-pressure ventilation.

  6. A closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet for ultrafast spectroscopy of liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picchiotti, Alessandra; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and provide the results of the full characterization of a closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet system. The jet has excellent optical quality with a wide range of liquids spanning from alcohol to water based solutions, including phosphate buffers used for biological samples. The thickness of the jet film varies depending on the flow rate between 90 μm and 370 μm. The liquid film is very stable, and its thickness varies only by 0.76% under optimal conditions. Measured transmitted signal reveals a long term optical stability (hours) with a RMS of 0.8%, less than the overall noise of the spectroscopy setup used in our experiments. The closed loop nature of the overall jet design has been optimized for the study of precious biological samples, in limited volumes, to remove window contributions from spectroscopic observables. This feature is particularly important for femtosecond studies in the UV range.

  7. Preliminary in vivo study of an intra-aortic impeller pump driven by an extracorporeal whirling magnet.

    PubMed

    Li, Guorong; Zhao, Hong; Zhu, Xiaodong; Ren, Bing

    2002-10-01

    To achieve the aim of long-term heart-assist with a simple implantable device, we have been trying to develop a minimal intra-aortic impeller blood pump driven by an extracorporeal magnetic device. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate its feasibility by acute in vivo animal tests. The minimal intra-aortic pump was a cage-supported rotor-impeller, 17 mm in diameter with a total length of 30 mm. The driving magnet, mounted extracorporeally, was 55 mm in diameter and 50 mm in length. Seventeen dogs weighing from 28-34 kg were used in the study. After thoracic incision, heparin (50 U/kg) was infused. The impeller pump was inserted into the aortic chamber via a prosthetic vessel and fastened. Thin tubes were inserted into the left ventricular apex and the femoral artery to monitor the left ventricular (LV) and the aortic pressure. After closing the thoracic cavity, the extracorporeal whirling magnet, turned by an electric motor, was placed tightly against the thoracic wall parallel to the intra-aortic pump. The experiments, each lasting for about 40 min, were successful in 7 animals; the other 10 animals died of bleeding during pump implantation and were excluded from the experiment. The peak systolic pressure of the left ventricle could be considerably decreased by the pump and was reduced to as low as 28 mm Hg at a rotational speed of 9,000 rpm, showing that the simple intra-aortic impeller was effective in unloading the natural heart. The novel left ventricular assist device (LVAD) concept of an intra-aortic impeller pump, driven by an extracorporeal magnetic device, is feasible.

  8. Cutaneous Pseudolymphomas.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pérez, D; Blanes Martínez, M; Encabo-Durán, B

    2016-10-01

    The term cutaneous pseudolymphoma refers to benign reactive lymphoid proliferations in the skin that simulate cutaneous lymphomas. It is a purely descriptive term that encompasses various reactive conditions with a varied etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, histology, and behavior. We present a review of the different types of cutaneous pseudolymphoma. To reach a correct diagnosis, it is necessary to contrast clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular findings. Even with these data, in some cases only the clinical course will confirm the diagnosis, making follow-up essential.

  9. Cutaneous Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Amylynne; Penrose, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis occurs rarely, despite a high and increasing prevalence of tuberculosis worldwide. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterrium bovis, and the Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine can cause tuberculosis involving the skin. Cutaneous tuberculosis can be acquired exogenously or endogenously and present as a multitude of differing clinical morphologies. Diagnosis of these lesions can be difficult, as they resemble many other dermatological conditions that are often primarily considered. Further, microbiological confirmation is poor, despite scientific advances, such as the more frequent use of polymerase chain reaction. The authors report a case that illustrates the challenges faced by dermatologists when considering a diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis. PMID:20725570

  10. Cutaneous zygomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Vázquez-González, Denisse; Tirado-Sánchez, Andrés; Ponce-Olivera, Rosa María

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous zygomycosis is a fungal infection caused by zygomycetes that affects the skin. It occurs in uncontrolled diabetic patients and immunosuppressed individuals. It has 2 clinical forms: primary cutaneous zygomycosis and secondary cutaneous zygomycosis. The first is characterized by necrotic lesions and the fungus is usually inoculated by trauma. If diagnosed early, it generally has a good prognosis. Secondary zygomycosis is usually a complication and extension of the rhinocerebral variety that starts as a palpebral fistula and progresses to a necrotic lesion with a poor prognosis. The diagnosis is made by identification of the fungus by direct KOH examination, culture, and biopsy. Treatment for the primary disease is surgical debridement plus amphotericin B. The secondary type is treated with amphotericin B and/or posaconazole.

  11. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Porter, Christopher J W; Januszkiewicz, Janek S

    2002-03-01

    Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma with negligible metastatic potential, but local recurrence rates after surgical excision have ranged from 14 percent to 42 percent. Unlike other sarcomas, guidelines for the optimal surgical excision margin of cutaneous leiomyosarcoma are not clearly defined in the existing literature. A review of local experience with this condition revealed eight patients over 12 years, none of whom developed local recurrence or distant metastases. This is despite poor prognostic factors in seven patients and excision margins ranging from 1 to 27 mm. These findings are compared with previously published data, and conclusions are drawn based on analysis of the collective results. Complete surgical excision with a narrow margin is recommended, and patients should be observed for a minimum of 5 years after surgery.

  12. Cutaneous ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, James J

    2009-01-01

    Parasites inhabit many places in the world. Some of these can inhabit the human skin or body. Many of these have been eradicated in the developed countries but persist in some tropical environments that are fun places to visit. Visitors can bring such parasites home with them such as scabies, cutaneous larva migrans, tungiasis and myiasis. Their clinical manifestations and treatment are presented for physicians evaluating and treating travelers from exotic places.

  13. Cutaneous sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Marchell, Richard M; Judson, Marc A

    2010-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease with skin manifestations. Skin manifestations are classified as nonspecific if they are not characterized by granulomatous inflammation and specific if the lesions have granulomas histologically. Erythema nodosum is the most common nonspecific skin manifestation, and it portends a good prognosis. Specific skin lesions have a varied clinical appearance, although often they can be distinguished by their yellow translucent character. Despite the potential variable appearance, there are common clinical presentations. Lupus pernio lesions are nodular violaceous specific skin lesions found predominantly on the face associated with scarring and a poor prognosis. Treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis is primarily done to avoid scarring and cosmetic disfigurement. Local and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment for the disease. Corticosteroid-sparing agents used to manage the disease include antimalarials, methotrexate, and tetracycline antibiotics. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists such as infliximab may have a role in cutaneous sarcoidosis, especially in refractory cases that are resistant to the standard regimens.

  14. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J Andrew; Chen, Ko-Ron

    2007-02-01

    Cutaneous pseudovasculitis represents a heterogeneous collection of disorders that are capable of simulating cutaneous vasculitis and can be broadly classified into diseases that produce hemorrhage (petechiae, purpura, and ecchymoses) or vessel occlusion with resultant livedo, cyanosis, ulcers, digital necrosis, and/or gangrene. Overlap is not uncommon, but if present, one mechanism dominates. Hemorrhagic pseudovasculitis is due to vessel wall dysfunction (incompetence), which can be related to diverse factors that include vessel wall deposition of metabolic substances (amyloid, calcium), nutritional deficiencies (scurvy), nonvasculitic inflammatory purpura (pigmented purpuric dermatitis, arthropod, viral and drug reactions), degeneration of the vessel wall and supporting stroma (senile/solar purpura), direct vessel wall invasion of infective organisms, coagulation-fibrinolytic disorders (eg, thrombocytopenia), and vessel wall trauma. Cyanotic-infarctive pseudovasculitis is due vaso-occlusion by emboli, thrombi, or fibrointimal hyperplasia (endarteritis obliterans) and includes varied conditions such as purpura fulminans, Coumadin necrosis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, cardiac myxoma, cholesterol embolization, calciphylaxis, and radiation arteritis. Delayed and inappropriate diagnosis of pseudovasculitis leads to incorrect management and exposure to potentially deleterious treatment modalities such as corticosteroids and cytotoxic agents. The diagnosis of a pseudovasculitic disorder requires a high index of suspicion and should always be part of the differential diagnosis of vasculitis. Skin biopsy is a crucial step in differentiating pseudovasculitis from authentic vasculitis; absence of histologic evidence of vasculitis, particularly after multiple biopsies, should direct evaluation and diagnosis towards pseudovasculitis.

  15. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Enk, C D; Gardlo, K; Hochberg, M; Ingber, A; Ruzicka, T

    2003-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease caused by an obligate intracellular protozoa, Leishmania, which resides in macrophages. The parasite is transmitted by an infected female sandfly. The incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis approaches 2 million new cases per year with 90% of the cases occurring in the "Old World", while the "New World" accounts for the rest. Infection may be restricted to the skin with development of characteristic ulcers, or may affect the mucous membranes in its mucocutaneous form. The clinical diagnosis is verified by the presence of amastigotes in slit-skin smears. Therapeutic modalities include systemic treatments such as the pentavalent antimony compound sodium stibogluconate, liposomal formulations of amphotericin B, oral ketoconazole or itraconazole, as well as topical paromomycin sulphate, local heat, freezing with liquid nitrogen, or photodynamic therapy. An effective vaccine is not available.

  16. Cutaneous mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Skiada, Anna; Petrikkos, George

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an invasive fungal infection caused by fungi of the order Mucorales, mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. Cutaneous mucormycosis is the third most common clinical form of the disease, after pulmonary and rhino-cerebral. The usual factors predisposing to this infection are hematological malignancies and diabetes mellitus, but a significant proportion of patients are immunocompetent. The agents of mucormycosis are ubiquitous in nature and are transmitted to the skin by direct inoculation, as a result of various types of trauma. These include needle sticks, stings and bites by animals, motor vehicle accidents, natural disasters, and burn injuries. The typical presentation of mucormycosis is the necrotic eschar, but it can present with various other signs. The infection can be locally invasive and penetrate into the adjacent fat, muscle, fascia, and bone, or become disseminated. Diagnosis is difficult because of the nonspecific findings of mucormycosis. Biopsy and culture should be performed. The treatment of mucormycosis is multimodal and consists of surgical debridement, use of antifungal drugs (amphotericin B and posaconazole), and reversal of underlying risk factors, when possible. Mortality rates, although lower than in other forms of the disease, are significant, ranging from 4% to 10% when the infection is localized.

  17. H+-Pumping Driven by the Plasma Membrane ATPase in Membrane Vesicles from Radish: Stimulation by Fusicoccin 1

    PubMed Central

    Rasi-Caldogno, Franca; De Michelis, Maria I.; Pugliarello, Maria C.; Marrè, Erasmo

    1986-01-01

    The effect of fusicoccin on Mg:ATP-dependent H+-pumping in microsomal vesicles from 24-hour-old radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings was investigated by measuring the initial rate of decrease in the absorbance of the ΔpH probe acridine orange. Fusicoccin stimulated Mg:ATP-dependent H+-pumping when the pH of the assay medium was in the range 7.0 to 7.6 while no effect of fusicoccin was detected between pH 6.6 and pH 6.0. Both basal and fusicoccin-stimulated H+-pumping were completely inhibited by vanadate and almost unaffected by nitrate. Fusicoccin did not change membrane permeability to protons and fusicoccin-induced stimulation of Mg:ATP-dependent H+-pumping was not affected by changes in the buffer capacity of the incubation medium. Deacetylfusicoccin stimulated H+-pumping as much as fusicoccin, while the physiologically inactive derivative 8-oxo-9-epideacetylfusicoccin did not. Stimulation of H+-pumping was saturated by 100 nanomolar fusicoccin. These data indicate that fusicoccin activates the plasma membrane H+-ATPase by acting at the membrane level independently of the involvement of other cell components. The percent stimulation by fusicoccin was the same at all ATP concentrations tested (0.5-5.0 millimolar), thus suggesting that with fusicoccin there is an increase in Vmax of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase rather than a decrease in its apparent Km for Mg:ATP. PMID:16664978

  18. Zosteriform cutaneous leiomyoma: a rare cutaneous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Arfan-ul-Bari

    2013-08-01

    Cutaneous leiomyomas are firm, round to oval, skin-coloured to brownish papules and nodules that may present as a solitary, few discrete or multiple clustered lesions. Different uncommon patterns of multiple leiomyoma distribution have been noted as bilateral, symmetrical, linear, zosteriform, or dermatomal-like arrangement. One such rare presentation was seen in a 23-year-old patient who presented with zosteriform skin coloured, occasionally painful cutaneous lesions over left shoulder region. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous leiomyoma. He was symptomatically managed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and topical capcicum cream. Case is reported here due to rare occurrence of this benign cutaneous neoplasm in an atypical pattern and on uncommon site.

  19. The Homburg lung - efficacy and safety of a minimal-invasive pump-driven device for veno-venous extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Frederik; Trudzinski, Franziska; Hennemann, Kai; Niermeyer, Tom; Schmoll, Christian; Kamp, Annegret; Bals, Robert; Muellenbach, Ralf; Haake, Hendrik; Lepper, Philipp M

    2017-01-19

    Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) is increasingly considered a viable therapeutic approach in the management of hypercapnic lung failure in order to avoid intubation or to allow lung-protective ventilator settings. This study aimed to analyze efficacy and safety of a minimal-invasive ECCO2R device, the Homburg lung. The Homburg lung is a pump-driven system for veno-venous ECCO2R with ¼" tubing and a 0.8 m surface oxygenator. Vascular access is usually established via a 19F/21cm bilumen cannula in the right internal jugular vein. For this work we screened patient registries from two German centers for patients who underwent ECCO2R with the Homburg lung due to hypercapnic lung failure since 2013. Patients who underwent ECMO prior to ECCO2R were excluded. Patients who underwent ECCO2R more than one time were only included once. In total, 24 patients (age 53.86 ± 12.49 years. 62.5% male) were included in the retrospective data analysis. Ventilatory failure occurred due to COPD (50%), cystic fibrosis (16.7%), ARDS (12.5%), and other origins (20.8%). The system generated a blood flow of 1.18 ± 0.23 lpm. Sweep gas flow was 3.87 ± 2.97 lpm. Within four hours, PaCO2 could be reduced significantly from 82.05 ± 15.57 mmHg to 59.68 ± 12.27 mmHg, pH thereby increasing from 7.23 ± 0.10 to 7.36 ± 0.09. Cannulation-associated complications were transient arrhythmia (1/24 patients) and air embolism (1/24). Fatal complications did not occur. In conclusion, the Homburg Lung provides effective carbon dioxide removal in hypercapnic lung failure. The cannulation is a safe procedure with complication rates comparable to those in central venous catheter implantation.

  20. Clinically occult cutaneous metastases.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Kenneth S; DiLeonardo, Mario; Gibbons, George

    2006-12-01

    Cutaneous metastases present themselves in a variety of clinical patterns and tend to be manifested as indurated papules/nodules/tumors. Some of those clinical expressions are unique for certain types of metastases. This report describes an entirely different phenomenon of clinically incognito cutaneous metastases that were only apparent histopathologically as an incidental finding.

  1. Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa*

    PubMed Central

    Matteoda, María Alejandra; Stefano, Paola Cecilia; Bocián, Marcela; Katsicas, María Marta; Sala, Josefina; Cervini, Andrea Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare vasculitis in children characterized by necrotizing inflammation in small and medium size arteries. It is classified into systemic and cutaneous PAN according to the presence of systemic symptoms or visceral involvement. We describe the case of a 14-year-old girl with cutaneous Polyarteritis nodosa with an atypical clinical presentation. PMID:26312712

  2. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shurong; Hersh, Andrew M; Naughton, Greg; Mullins, Kevin; Fung, Maxwell A; Sharon, Victoria R

    2013-11-15

    The dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii commonly causes localized cutaneous disease with lymphocutaneous distribution. However, disseminated sporotrichosis occurs predominantly in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in a patient with newly diagnosed HIV with a CD4 count of 208. The patient presented with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules as well as fever and malaise. Tissue culture and skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sporotrichosis. He was started on itraconazole 200mg twice a day with rapid resolution of fever along with cessation of the development of new lesions.

  3. Cutaneous tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Sethuraman, Gomathy; Ramesh, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that accounts for 1% to 2% of cases. Childhood skin tuberculosis represents 18% to 82% of all cutaneous tuberculosis cases. Scrofuloderma and lupus vulgaris are the two most common clinical forms in children. An increase in the number of tuberculids, especially lichen scrofulosorum, has been observed in the last several years. Cutaneous tuberculosis in children can be severe and have a protracted course. Multiplicity of lesions and multifocal disseminated involvement in scrofuloderma and lupus vulgaris is common. Scrofuloderma progressing to gummatous lesions (scrofulous gumma) is mostly described in children. Morbidities and deformities are more severe in children.

  4. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  5. Cutaneous photosensitivity in dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Cheong, W K; Hughes, G R; Norris, P G; Hawk, J L

    1994-08-01

    The incidence and nature of cutaneous photosensitivity were studied in 10 patients suffering from dermatomyositis. Five reported an abnormality, which consisted of photoaggravation of preexisting cutaneous lesions in three, and abnormal transient erythemal responses in two. Monochromatic irradiation testing of all 10 patients demonstrated reduced minimal erythemal doses in two, at 307.5 nm, and at 340 and 360 nm, respectively; only the latter individual had clinical light sensitivity. Exposure to low-dose, solar-simulated radiation of the unaffected skin of the former patient, and five others who agreed to the procedure, three of whom complained of light sensitivity, induced a lesion with the clinical and immunofluorescence characteristics of dermatomyositis in only the first one. Four other patients replied to a mailed questionnaire, and three of these reported aggravation of their rash and provocation of new lesions by sunlight. Photosensitivity may thus be an important cutaneous feature of dermatomyositis.

  6. Update on Cutaneous Calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is a devastating disorder with a mortality rate of 80% due to sepsis and organ failure. Hallmarks of this rare disease are arteriolar media calcification, thrombotic cutaneous ischemia, and necrotic ulcerations. Different mechanisms of vascular calcification can lead to calciphylaxis. Early diagnosis by deep cutaneous ulcer biopsy is most important for prognosis. Here, dermatologists play a significant role although treatment usually needs an interdisciplinary approach. Surgical procedures had been the cornerstone of treatment in the past including parathyroidectomy, but recently new medical treatments emerged aiming to normalize disturbances of minerals to reduce the serum concentration of sodium phosphate and to prevent precipitation and calcification. Multimodal therapy is warranted but only aggressive surgical debridement of cutaneous ulcers has shown significant outcome improvement. PMID:23716795

  7. Nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis*

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Gustavo de Sá Menezes; Cavalcanti, Silvana Maria de Morais; Herênio, Alzinira Souza; Teixeira, Márcia Almeida Galvão; de Alencar, Eliane Ruth Barbosa; Gonçalves, Sergio Paulo Mendes

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis of Hoffman-Zurhelle (NCLS), with multiple lesions, in a ten-year-old child. The NLCS is considered rare. The classical clinical presentation is characterized by multiple skin-colored or yellowish papules and nodules, which can have a linear distribution. Histologically, it is characterized by the presence of mature ectopic adipocytes in the dermis. The main therapeutic option is surgical excision. The classical Nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis is reported in this case. PMID:28300914

  8. The cutaneous porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg-Brand, Danja; Katugampola, Ruwani; Anstey, Alexander V; Badminton, Michael N

    2014-07-01

    The porphyrias are a group of mainly inherited disorders of heme biosynthesis where accumulation of porphyrins and/or porphyrin precursors gives rise to 2 types of clinical presentation: cutaneous photosensitivity and/or acute neurovisceral attacks. The cutaneous porphyrias present with either bullous skin fragility or nonbullous acute photosensitivity. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, complications, and current approach to porphyria management. Although focusing mainly on their dermatological aspects, the article also covers the management of acute porphyria, which by virtue of its association with variegate porphyria and hereditary coproporphyria, may become the responsibility of the clinical dermatologist.

  9. The Cutaneous Rabbit Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Rudiger; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In the cutaneous rabbit effect (CRE), a tactile event (so-called attractee tap) is mislocalized toward an adjacent attractor tap. The effect depends on the time interval between the taps. The authors delivered sequences of taps to the forearm and asked participants to report the location of one of the taps. The authors replicated the original CRE…

  10. [Cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Amschler, K; Seitz, C S

    2017-03-17

    Skin manifestations of sarcoidosis occur in up to 30% of cases. This review summarizes and illustrates in detail the differences between specific and unspecific skin manifestations of sarcoidosis. Important differential diagnoses, such as tuberculosis, cutaneous lymphoma and syphilis have to be excluded. The indications for systemic treatment are primarily determined by the extent of organ involvement and also by the cosmetic impairment.

  11. Cutaneous Infections in Wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Eugene K.; deWeber, Kevin; Berry, James W.; Wilckens, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Cutaneous infections are common in wrestlers. Although many are simply a nuisance in the everyday population, they can be problematic to wrestlers because such infections may result in disqualification from practice or competition. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are therefore important. Evidence Acquisition: Medline and PubMed databases, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and UpToDate were searched through 2012 with the following keywords in various combinations: skin infections, cutaneous infections, wrestlers, athletes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, skin and soft tissue infections, tinea corporis, tinea capitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster, molluscum contagiosum, verruca vulgaris, warts, scabies, and pediculosis. Relevant articles found in the primary search, and selected references from those articles were reviewed for pertinent clinical information. Results: The most commonly reported cutaneous infections in wrestlers are herpes simplex virus infections (herpes gladiatorum), bacterial skin and soft tissue infections, and dermatophyte infections (tinea gladiatorum). The clinical appearance of these infections can be different in wrestlers than in the community at large. Conclusion: For most cutaneous infections, diagnosis and management options in wrestlers are similar to those in the community at large. With atypical presentations, testing methods are recommended to confirm the diagnosis of herpes gladiatorum and tinea gladiatorum. There is evidence to support the use of prophylactic medications to prevent recurrence of herpes simplex virus and reduce the incidence of dermatophyte infections in wrestlers. PMID:24427413

  12. [Cutaneous surgery workshop].

    PubMed

    Purim, Kátia Sheylla Malta

    2010-08-01

    The training of physician request knowledge, skills and attitudes for the effective exercise of professional practice. The training of basic surgical techniques, used in outpatient procedures, will prepare students to work in different scenarios. This work presents a proposal for teaching through workshops for cutaneous surgery in an experimental model.

  13. Cutaneous Melanoma in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yub

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a rare disease in Asians but potentially the most aggressive form of skin cancer worldwide. It can occur in any melanocyte-containing anatomic site. Four main cutaneous melanoma subtypes are recognized: lentigo maligna melanoma, superficial spreading melanoma, acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM), and nodular melanoma. Generally, excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation increases the risk of melanoma. The exception is ALM, which is the most common melanoma subtype in Asians and is not associated with UV radiation. ALM presents as dark brownish to black, irregular maculopatches, nodules, or ulcers on the palms, soles, and nails. The lesions may be misdiagnosed as more benign lesions, such as warts, ulcers, hematomas, foreign bodies, or fungal infections, especially in amelanotic acral melanomas where black pigments are absent. The aim of this brief review is to improve understanding and the rate of early detection thereby reducing mortality, especially regarding cutaneous melanoma in Asians. PMID:27689028

  14. Update on cutaneous tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; do Nascimento, Leninha Valério; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Azulay, David Rubem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to draw special attention from health care professionals and society in general. Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infection caused by M. tuberculosis complex, M. bovis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Depending on individual immunity, environmental factors and the type of inoculum, it may present varied clinical and evolutionary aspects. Patients with HIV and those using immunobiological drugs are more prone to infection, which is a great concern in centers where the disease is considered endemic. This paper aims to review the current situation of cutaneous tuberculosis in light of this new scenario, highlighting the emergence of new and more specific methods of diagnosis, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the parasite-host interaction. PMID:25387498

  15. Benign cutaneous Degos' disease.

    PubMed

    Ojeda Cuchillero, R M; Sánchez Regaña, M; Umbert Millet, P

    2003-03-01

    Malignant atrophic papulosis is a rare systemic vaso-occlusive disorder characterized by thrombosis of vessels of the dermis, gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system and, occasionally, other organs. Cutaneous lesions consist of erythematous, dome-shaped papules that develop a central area of necrosis to leave a porcelain-like scar. The most accepted theory of pathogenesis is based on endothelial cell damage. There is no effective treatment of the disease. We describe a 26-year-old man with Degos' disease, a diagnosis based on the clinical and histologic pattern of skin lesions. The good response to antiplatelet therapy and the absence of systemic involvement over 8 years' follow-up is noteworthy. We believe that this case represents the benign form of the disease, typically referred to as benign cutaneous Degos' disease.

  16. Chemotherapy of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    bacterial emerging diseases. 43rd Annual Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council Meeting. Ocho Rios, Jamaica, April, 1998. Palmer, C.J., J...1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0196 TITLE: CHEMOTHERAPY OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: DR. ARBA AGER CONTRACTING ...Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a

  17. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for e-updates Please leave this field empty Proton Therapy SHARE Home > Treatment and Care > Treatments Listen ... a nucleus, which holds two types of particles—protons and neutrons. The nucleus is surrounded by electrons. ...

  18. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  19. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer.

  20. [Hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms].

    PubMed

    Timonen, Kaisa; Nuutinen, Pauliina; Raili, Kauppinen

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms Cutaneous symptoms of porphyrias are initiated from a phototoxic reaction caused by sunlight and circulating porphyrins in the vascular walls of the skin. This leads in fragility, blistering and scarring of the skin on light-exposed areas. There are approximately 200 patients having hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms in Finland. Cutaneous symptoms of variegate porphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda are indistinguishable, but an effective treatment is available only for the latter. Differential diagnosis is important due to acute episodes occurring in variegate porphyria.

  1. Management of cutaneous erythrasma.

    PubMed

    Holdiness, Mack R

    2002-01-01

    Corynebacterium minutissimum is the bacteria that leads to cutaneous eruptions of erythrasma and is the most common cause of interdigital foot infections. It is found mostly in occluded intertriginous areas such as the axillae, inframammary areas, interspaces of the toes, intergluteal and crural folds, and is more common in individuals with diabetes mellitus than other clinical patients. This organism can be isolated from a cutaneous site along with a concurrent dermatophyte or Candida albicans infection. The differential diagnosis of erythrasma includes psoriasis, dermatophytosis, candidiasis and intertrigo, and methods for differentiating include Wood's light examination and bacterial and mycological cultures. Erythromycin 250mg four times daily for 14 days is the treatment of choice and other antibacterials include tetracycline and chloramphenicol; however, the use of chloramphenicol is limited by bone marrow suppression potentially leading to neutropenia, agranulocytosis and aplastic anaemia. Further studies are needed but clarithromycin may be an additional drug for use in the future. Where there is therapeutic failure or intertriginous involvement, topical solutions such as clindamycin, Whitfield's ointment, sodium fusidate ointment and antibacterial soaps may be required for both treatment and prophylaxis. Limited studies on the efficacy of these medications exist, however, systemic erythromycin demonstrates cure rates as high as 100%. Compared with tetracyclines, systemic erythromycin has greater efficacy in patients with involvement of the axillae and groin, and similar efficacy for interdigital infections. Whitfield's ointment has equal efficacy to systemic erythromycin in the axillae and groin, but shows greater efficacy in the interdigital areas and is comparable with 2% sodium fusidate ointment for treatment of all areas. Adverse drug effects and potential drug interactions need to be considered. No cost-effectiveness data are available but there are

  2. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  3. Cutaneous mucormycosis postcosmetic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tarrah, Khaled; Abdelaty, Mahmoud; Behbahani, Ahmad; Mokaddas, Eman; Soliman, Helmy; Albader, Ahdi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mucormycosis is a rare, aggressive, and life-threatening infection that is caused by organisms belonging to the order Mucorales. It is usually acquired through direct means and virtually always affects immunocompromised patients with the port of entry reflecting the site of infection, in this case, cutaneous. Unlike other mucormycoses, patients affected by Apophysomyces elegans (A elegans) are known to be immunocompetent. This locally aggressive disease penetrates through different tissue plains invading adjacent muscles, fascia, and even bone causing extensive morbidity and may prove fatal if treated inadequately. Cutaneous mucormycosis is associated with disruption of cutaneous barriers such as trauma. However, rarely, it may be iatrogenic. No cases have been previously reported postcosmetic surgery, especially one that is so commonly performed, lipofilling. Case Report: The patient is a, previously healthy, 41-year-old middle-eastern female who was admitted to the plastic surgery department 17 days after undergoing cosmetic surgery. She suffered from extensive tissue inflammation and necrosis in both gluteal regions. Following admission, she was initially started on empirical antimicrobial therapy which was changed to an antifungal agent, voriconazole, when preliminary microbiological results showed filamentous fungi. This was discontinued and liposomal amphotericin B was commenced when further mycological analysis identified A elegans. Furthermore, she underwent a total of 10 sessions of extensive debridement to the extent that portions of the sacrum and left femoral head became exposed. Her clinical status and wounds improved with the appropriate management and she remained an inpatient for 62 days. Subsequently, she had defects in both gluteal regions which required reconstructive surgery. Conclusion: A elegans is an uncommon cause of iatrogenic cutaneous mucormycosis. A high index of clinical suspicion is required, especially in the

  4. Cutaneous Manifestations of ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Antonia J.; Leslie, Kieron S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A broad range of skin diseases occurs in patients with ESRD: from the benign and asymptomatic to the physically disabling and life-threatening. Many of them negatively impact on quality of life. Their early recognition and treatment are essential in reducing morbidity and mortality. The cutaneous manifestations can be divided into two main categories: nonspecific and specific. The nonspecific manifestations are commonly seen and include skin color changes, xerosis, half-and-half nails, and pruritus. The specific disorders include acquired perforating dermatosis, bullous dermatoses, metastatic calcification, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This review article describes these conditions and considers the underlying pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:24115194

  5. Cutavirus in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fridholm, Helena; Vinner, Lasse; Kjartansdóttir, Kristín Rós; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Asplund, Maria; Herrera, Jose A.R.; Steiniche, Torben; Mourier, Tobias; Brunak, Søren; Willerslev, Eske; Izarzugaza, Jose M.G.; Hansen, Anders J.; Nielsen, Lars P.

    2017-01-01

    A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains to be investigated. PMID:28098541

  6. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  7. Cutaneous Melanoma in Women

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Eliades, Philip; Gupta, Sameer; Tsao, Hensin

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cutaneous melanoma (CM) continues to increase in the Caucasian population in the United States. In 2014, women only accounted for 42% of the 76,100 new melanoma cases and only 33% of the 9,710 deaths associated with CM in the US.1 These trends are consistently observed in populations around the world. Indeed, gender disparity in melanoma outcome is so consistently observed that gender has been suggested as an important prognostic factor in melanoma, despite not being formerly incorporated in staging algorithms.2 The source of this gender disparity in melanoma remains unclear but likely represents both biological and behavioral etiologies. Herein, we review the current knowledge of how melanoma differs between men and women. PMID:25844396

  8. Early Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Wiley M.

    1966-01-01

    Cutaneous disorders which manifest themselves on the exposed parts are more likely than are hidden lesions to cause the patient to seek professional services promptly. Usually he consults his family physician or the community dermatologist. The physician who first sees the patient is dependent upon his own resources for management and diagnosis. A background of experience, a measure of energy and an inquisitive attitude are the necessary ingredients for successful management. The difficulties involved in differentiating early lupus erythematosus and polymorphic light eruptions cannot be invariably resolved even with the most complete review. The course of the disorder and the response to environmental factors supply important clues. Investigative work, especially in the field of immunology, offers hope for the solution of some of our problems. PMID:5909872

  9. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Aileen Y.; Werth, Victoria P.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is an autoimmune, inflammatory skin disease seen in patients with or without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The management of CLE includes treatment and prevention of lesions, as well as routine assessment for systemic disease. Treatment options include both topical and systemic therapies. Topical therapies include corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. Systemic therapies generally fall under one of three categories: antimalarials, immunomodulators, such as dapsone and thalidomide, and immunosuppressives, such as methotrexate and mycophenolate. Evidence for the treatment of CLE is limited by few prospective studies, as well as lack of a validated outcome measure up until recently. There is good evidence to support the use of topical steroids and calcineurin inhibitors, though most of these trials have not used placebo or vehicle controls. There have been no randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating systemic therapies for the treatment of CLE. PMID:21503694

  10. Benign cutaneous Degos disease.

    PubMed

    Zamiri, Mozheh; Jarrett, Paul; Snow, John

    2005-08-01

    A 24-year-old woman presented with an 8-year history of a recurrent asymptomatic rash characterized by small erythematous papules which evolved to form atrophic porcelain white scars with a telangectatic rim. She had never had gastrointestinal or neurological symptoms. A short trial of aspirin did not alter the behavior of the disease. Histology confirmed the clinical diagnosis of Degos disease. Degos disease is a rare disorder that has been classified into the benign or malignant variety. The malignant type has a poor prognosis. Gastrointestinal involvement is the most frequent cause of death. The existence of patients with a prolonged, purely cutaneous or benign form has been increasingly recognized. It may be impossible to classify a patient at the time of initial presentation. Her progress is consistent with the benign form.

  11. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  12. Cutaneous hamartoma with pagetoid cells.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Dosal, F L; Estrada, J A; Piérard, G E

    1991-04-01

    We report an unusual cutaneous hamartoma with pagetoid cells characterized by the presence of intraepidermal cells resembling Toker's cells of the nipple. These cells were EMA positive and could be related to the histogenesis of some Paget's disease.

  13. Cutaneous toxoplasmosis in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Aline Rodrigues; Cadieu, Jennifer; Kiupel, Matti; Lim, Ailam; Bolin, Steve R; Mansell, Joanne

    2012-05-01

    Cutaneous toxoplasmosis has been previously reported in human beings, rarely reported in cats, and reported in 1 dog with systemic toxoplasmosis. The present report describes 2 cases of cutaneous toxoplasmosis in 2 dogs treated with immunosuppressive therapy. One of the dogs developed generalized cutaneous pustules and pruritus, and the other dog only had a single subcutaneous nodule. Microscopically, skin biopsies showed moderate to severe pyogranulomatous and necrotizing dermatitis and panniculitis, with multifocal vasculitis and vascular thrombosis. Single or aggregates of protozoal tachyzoites were mostly intracytoplasmic and occasionally extracellular. The etiology was confirmed in both cases by immunohistochemistry and by polymerase chain reaction assays, which were followed by nucleic acid sequencing. Both patients were treated with clindamycin. The dog with generalized lesions developed pulmonary and neurological signs and was euthanized. The dog with a single nodule recovered completely with no remission of cutaneous lesions.

  14. Systemic diseases with cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly discuss the following cutaneous manifestations of selected systemic diseases: poxvirus; feline leukemia virus (FeLV); feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); herpesvirus; calcivirus; pseudorabies; plague; tularemia; toxoplasmosis; leishmania; hypothyroidism; hyperthyroidism; hyperadrenocorticism; diabetes mellitus; acromegaly; thallium poisoning; pancreatic disease; hypereosinophilic syndrome; mucopolysaccharidosis; and pansteatitis. Recognition of these cutaneous signs may help alert the clinician to the possibility of an internal disorder so that the appropriate diagnostic tests can be considered.

  15. Selected Cutaneous Disorders in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, James D.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses selected cutaneous diseases seen in the athlete. These diseases may be caused by interaction with the elements, the playing surface, other athletes, or the clothing or equipment worn during sport. All of these dermatological conditions are relatively common, but the physically active individual can suffer from these maladies and their complications more often than the inactive person. The emphasis in caring for the participant is on prevention, early recognition and practical aspects of management of cutaneous diseases. PMID:21264034

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Kos, Liborka; Shwayder, Tor

    2006-01-01

    Dermatologists and child abuse are not frequently associated in the minds of most physicians. Yet the most common manifestations of child abuse are cutaneous. This article reviews cutaneous manifestations of physical abuse, including bruises, lacerations, abrasions, human bites, and burns. It also discusses ways that dermatologists can differentiate abusive injuries from accidental ones as well as from the many dermatologic conditions that can mimic child abuse. Finally, we review what actions the dermatologist should take when suspecting abuse in a patient.

  17. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of the treatment. top of page What equipment is used? Proton beam therapy uses special machines, ... tumor cells. top of page Who operates the equipment? With backgrounds in mechanical, electrical, software, hardware and ...

  18. Genotyping of cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Glitza, Isabella C; Davies, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Until recently, treatment options for patients with metastatic melanoma were very limited. This landscape has evolved dramatically since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF gene in ~45% of cutaneous melanomas. Vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib have all received regulatory approval for the treatment of metastatic melanoma patients with a BRAF(V600) mutation. Based on the necessity to document the presence of a BRAF(V600) mutation to prescribe these agents, molecular testing is now the standard of care in this disease. However, the options and rationale for testing are evolving rapidly due to an improved understanding of the molecular drivers and heterogeneity of melanoma. Such testing may identify rational combinatorial approaches to prevent or overcome resistance for the approved BRAF inhibitors. In addition, new clinical strategies have been identified for a number of other molecular changes that are detected in this disease, including somatic changes in NRAS, PTEN, CDKN2A, and c-KIT, among others. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic landscape of mutations in melanoma, their associations with clinicopathological features, and their implications for clinical testing and treatment.

  19. Cutaneous HPV and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Rosita; Gheit, Tarik

    2014-12-01

    Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small non-enveloped icosahedral viruses that infect the keratinocytes of skin and mucosa. The cutaneous HPV types are represented mainly by the beta and gamma genera, which are widely present in the skin of normal individuals. More than 40 beta-HPV types and 50 gamma-HPV types have been isolated, and these numbers are continuously growing. The main cause of non-melanoma skin cancer is exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, cutaneous HPVs that belong to the beta genus may act as a co-carcinogen with UVR. The association between beta-HPVs and skin cancer was first reported in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), who frequently develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) on sun-exposed areas. Isolation of HPVs from the lesions suggested that HPVs might act as a co-carcinogen with UVR in EV patients. Beta-HPVs may also play a role in cutaneous SCC in immunocompromised non-EV and in immunocompetent individuals. Several studies have reported an association of viral DNA and/or antibodies to beta HPV types with SCC. Interestingly, HPV prevalence and viral load decrease during skin carcinogenesis, being significantly higher in actinic keratosis than in SCC, suggesting that the virus may play a role in the early stages of tumour development (the "hit-and-run" hypothesis). Concordantly, in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that E6 and E7 from certain cutaneous HPV types display transforming activities, further confirming their potential role in carcinogenesis.

  20. Ultrasound findings in cutaneous sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Dybiec, Ewa; Pietrzak, Aldona; Kieszko, Robert; Kanitakis, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis relies mainly on the patient's history, presence of characteristic skin lesions and histological examination that shows a granulomatous, non-necrotizing dermal infiltration. The aim of the study was to assess the ultrasonographic features of cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis before and after treatment. A 38-year-old woman with systemic sarcoidosis and specific cutaneous lesions was treated with systemic steroids followed by hydroxychloroquine. Ultrasonographic examination of the cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions was performed with a Philips iU 22 and Siemens Acuson S 2000 device, with the use of linear 15 MHz and 17 MHz transducers. Histological examination of skin lesions showed characteristic, naked, non-necrotizing granulomas in the upper dermis. Ultrasound examination revealed well-demarcated, hypoechogenic changes. Power-Doppler scan revealed increased vascularity within the lesions and the surrounding tissue. Clinical improvement of the skin lesions was confirmed by ultrasound examination, which showed a decrease in their size and normalization of dermal echogenicity and vascularity. Ultrasound examination can show cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions and their regression after appropriate treatment. PMID:25821428

  1. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Grace K.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus is centered upon formulating a regimen of topical and systemic therapies designed to reduce disease activity and minimize cosmetic damage. Sun avoidance and sunscreen are important preventative measures proven to minimize cutaneous lupus erythematosus exacerbations. Limited disease is typically managed with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Antimalarial therapy is the gold standard of systemic therapy. Many other treatments have been studied in patients with recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and their use must be evaluated based on individual risk-benefit concerns. R-salbutamol and pulsed dye laser therapy have proven to be effective topical alternatives. Additional systemic agents include retinoids, immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, biologics, and other experimental therapies with novel modes of action. According to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria for evaluating the strength of evidence supporting an individual treatment measure, no therapy for cutaneous lupus erythematosus has achieved Level 1 status. This demonstrates the need for randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of all cutaneous lupus erythematosus interventions in order to meet increasing standards and demand for evidence-based practice. PMID:23320123

  2. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Gürel, Mehmet Salih; Yeşilova, Yavuz; Olgen, M Kirami; Ozbel, Yusuf

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania protozoon parasites is a disease which is characterized by long-term nodulo-ulcerative lesions healing spontaneously with scarring. The disease has been well-known in Anatolia for centuries and has different names such as; Urfa boil, Antep boil, year boil, Halep boil, oriental sore and beauty scar. The causative agents are Leishmania tropica and Leishmania tropica/Leishmania infantum in Southeastern Anatolia and East Mediterranean, respectively. CL is a notifiable disease in Turkey and, according to the Ministry of Health official records, 46.003 new cases were reported between 1990 and 2010. Among those cases, 96% of them were reported from the Şanlıurfa, Adana, Osmaniye, Hatay, Diyarbakır, İçel and Kahramanmaraş provinces. Although 45% of cases were notified from Şanlıurfa in the past 20 years, its ratio is currently decreasing while other regions' ratios have been showing an increasing trend. Easier transportation between cities, increased travel migration of the population from rural areas to the peripheral suburbs with inadequate infrastructure and unhealthy housing are thought to be the main factors for spreading the disease from Southeastern Anatolia to other regions of Turkey. Lack of treatment of patients as reservoir hosts because of different reasons and ineffective and inadequate use of insecticides against vector sand flies have also played an important role in spreading the disease. Neglect of this disease by patients and health institutions can also be considered as other factors for the spreading. We believe that, after the strategic plan for leishmaniasis prepared by the Turkish Ministry of Health with the contribution of scientists in 2011 is put into practice, the control of the disease will be more effective.

  3. Recent advances in cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Dummer, Reinhard; Asagoe, Kenji; Cozzio, Antonio; Burg, Günter; Doebbeling, Udo; Golling, Philippa; Fujii, Kazuyasu; Urosevic, Mirjana

    2007-12-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of extranodal lymphomas that are characterized by an initial accumulation of mononuclear, mostly lymphocytic cells in the skin. Recent discoveries of changes in molecular biology and immunology of these tumors have paved the way to a better understanding of the processes that govern lymphomagenesis in the skin and more importantly, they have contributed to the development of the new WHO-EORTC classification system. Only now has the field of cutaneous lymphomas gained a novel, long-awaited basis that may act as a new starting point in the collection of clinical as well molecular and immunological data on comparative basis. This review will try to highlight the newest findings in the pathogenesis of primary cutaneous T- and B-cell lymphomas, hematodermic neoplasm and HTLV-1 positive disorders as well as their translation into efficient therapeutic strategies.

  4. Reactive cutaneous cytophagocytosis in nocardiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Heung; Lee, Won-Sup; Lee, Ai-Young

    2002-01-01

    Cutaneous nocardiosis, which usually manifests in the form of pustules, abscesses, or subcutaneous nodules, is occasionally found in immunocompromised patients. A 59-yr-old Korean man with myasthenia gravis and thymoma developed nodular skin lesions on his trunk. Histopathologically, abscess formation with a dense infiltrate of neutrophils and many cytophagic histiocytes were observed. Numerous filamentous organisms, which turned out to be Nocardia asteroides by culture, were also found. After sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim therapy, all of the skin lesions rapidly decreased in size, with a marked diminution of the number of cytophagic histiocytes, and cleared up within four months. On reporting a case of cutaneous nocardiosis showing unusual histopathologic findings, we considered that reactive conditions should be included in the differential diagnosis of the cutaneous cytophagocytosis, and that nocardiosis could be one of the diseases showing reactive cytophagocytosis. PMID:11961320

  5. Commensal bacteria and cutaneous immunity.

    PubMed

    Nakamizo, Satoshi; Egawa, Gyohei; Honda, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Saeko; Belkaid, Yasmine; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the human body's largest organ and is home to a diverse and complex variety of innate and adaptive immune functions that protect against pathogenic invasion. Recent studies have demonstrated that cutaneous commensal bacteria modulated the host immune system. For example, Staphylococcus epidermidis, a skin commensal bacterium, has been demonstrated to induce cutaneous interferon (IFN)-γ- and interleukin (IL)-17A-producing T cells. In addition, cutaneous microbiota changes occur in the chronic inflammatory skin disorders, such as atopic dermatitis, and may influence the activity of skin diseases. In this article, we will review the recent findings related to the interactions of the commensal bacteria with skin homeostasis and discuss the role of the dysbiosis of these bacteria in the pathogenesis of skin diseases.

  6. Cutaneous lesions of the nose

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated. PMID:20525327

  7. RNase 7 in Cutaneous Defense

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Franziska; Simanski, Maren; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    RNase 7 belongs to the RNase A superfamily and exhibits a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. RNase 7 is expressed in human skin, and expression in keratinocytes can be induced by cytokines and microbes. These properties suggest that RNase 7 participates in innate cutaneous defense. In this review, we provide an overview about the role of RNase 7 in cutaneous defense with focus on the molecular mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of RNase 7, the regulation of RNase 7 expression, and the role of RNase 7 in skin diseases. PMID:27089327

  8. Cutaneous manifestation of gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous systems are closely linked in origin. Skin manifestations are frequently seen as a part of different GI syndromes. Gastroenterologists play an important role in recognizing the symptoms, patient workup and arriving at appropriate diagnoses, often in consultation with dermatologists. This review discusses the diseases with both cutaneous and intestinal involvement. Hereditary polyposis GI cancers, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (CRCs), hamartomatous disorders, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are reviewed with emphasis on the genetic basis, diagnostic, histologic findings, screening modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:27034812

  9. Cutaneous (non-HIV) infections.

    PubMed

    Callahan, E F; Adal, K A; Tomecki, K J

    2000-07-01

    Cutaneous infections continue to represent a large proportion of inpatient dermatology. Though most infectious skin diseases do not warrant hospitalization, some do and can rapidly become fatal if not treated promptly. A selected group of infections are reviewed--primary cutaneous infections, exotoxin-mediated syndromes, and systemic infections--that warrant hospitalization. Dermatologists play a critical role in the synthesis of patient history and appreciation of morphologic skin disease, which, when coupled with appropriate lab tests, may help to establish a diagnosis allowing for the timely implementation of effective and targeted therapy.

  10. Frontal cutaneous meningioma - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Leonor; Coutinho, Ines; Cardoso, José Carlos; Garcia, Helena; Cordeiro, Margarida Robalo

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous meningiomas are rare tumors most commonly located on the scalp. We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with a 2x3 cm tumoral lesion on the forehead. The lesion was hard, adherent and covered by normal skin. Incisional biopsy revelead a proliferation of monomorphic round cells, organized in nests and focally forming pseudovascular spaces. Immunohistochemical study revealed positivity for epithelial antigen membrane and vimentin. Vascular markers, cytokeratins and S100 protein were negative. A brain CT scan did not show any evidence of intracranial meningioma. The authors describe the case of a cutaneous frontal meningioma in probable relation with previous cranioencephalic trauma. PMID:26312695

  11. Cutaneous ectopic schistosomiasis: diagnostic challenge*

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Cláudia Renata Castro do Rêgo; Maia, Daniela Cristina Caetano; dos Santos, Josemir Belo; Medeiros, Camila Carolina Queiroz; de Araújo, Jessica Guido

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous schistosomiasis is a rare clinical manifestation of schistosomiasis, an infectious and parasitic disease, caused in Brazil by the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. The lesions are due to the deposition of eggs or, rarely, adult worms, usually involving the genital and groin areas. Extra-genital lesions occur mainly on the torso as papules of zosteriform appearance. The case of a patient with ectopic cutaneous schistosomiasis is reported in this article, due to the rarity of its occurrence and its difficult clinical diagnosis. PMID:26982792

  12. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Breast Esophagus Rectum Skull base sarcomas Pediatric brain tumors Head and neck - see the Head and Neck Cancer page Eye ... Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Brain Tumor Treatment Brain Tumors Prostate Cancer Lung Cancer ... related to Proton Therapy Videos related ...

  13. Proton Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed. PMID:25686476

  14. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases.

  15. Cutaneous vasculitis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J Andrew; Cavaliere, L Frank; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2006-01-01

    Vasculitis is histologically defined as inflammatory cell infiltration and destruction of blood vessels. Vasculitis is classified as primary (idiopathic, eg, cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis, Wegener's granulomatosis) or secondary, a manifestation of connective tissue diseases, infections, adverse drug eruptions, or a paraneoplastic phenomenon. Cutaneous vasculitis, manifested as urticaria, purpura, hemorrhagic vesicles, ulcers, nodules, livedo, infarcts, or digital gangrene, is a frequent and often significant component of many systemic vasculitic syndromes such as lupus or rheumatoid vasculitis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated primary vasculitic syndromes such as Churg-Strauss syndrome. In most instances, cutaneous vasculitis represents a self-limited, single-episode phenomenon, the treatment of which consists of general measures such as leg elevation, warming, avoidance of standing, cold temperatures and tight fitting clothing, and therapy with antihistamines, aspirin, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. More extensive therapy is indicated for symptomatic, recurrent, extensive, and persistent skin disease or coexistence of systemic disease. For mild recurrent or persistent disease, colchicine and dapsone are first-choice agents. Severe cutaneous and systemic disease requires more potent immunosuppression (prednisone plus azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, or mycophenolate mofetil). In cases of refractory vasculitis, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin are viable considerations. The new biologic therapies that work via cytokine blockade or lymphocyte depletion such as tumor alpha inhibitor infliximab and the anti-B-cell antibody rituximab, respectively, are showing benefit in certain settings such as Wegener's granulomatosis, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, Behçet's disease, and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis.

  16. Vacuum Enhanced Cutaneous Biopsy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Joseph

    1999-06-25

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  17. Cutaneous hazards of the coast.

    PubMed

    Burke, W A

    1997-06-01

    Through recreational and commercial pursuits, more people than ever before are coming in contact with coastal waters containing a variety of bacteria, aquatic flora, and sea creatures potentially harmful to the skin. It is important for dermatology nurses to be aware of some of the more common cutaneous hazards related to the coastal environment as well as the basic treatment of these problems.

  18. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  19. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  20. Proton maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensley, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    New calculations are reported which confirm the ability of an a priori random, initial-phase proton beam to drive a simple, single-stage microwave cavity maser or transit-time oscillator (TTO) to saturation conversion efficiencies of about 11 percent. The required initial TE(011) mode field can be provided from beam ramp-up bandwidth of excitation to a low level from an external source. A saturation field of 45 tesla and output power of 0.2 TW are calculated using an electron insulation field of 10 tesla and a 3 MeV, 400 Ka/sq cm beam. Results are compared to those for an electron beam of the same energy and geometry, and it is shown that proton beams potentially can provide a three order of magnitude increase in overall microwave power production density over that obtainable from electron beam TTOs.

  1. [Cutaneous ultrasound and dermal fillers].

    PubMed

    Villegas Fernández, C; Burón Álvarez, I; Fernández-Tresguerres Centeno, A; Alfageme Roldán, F; de Cabo Francés, F

    2015-11-01

    Requests for fillers or dermatological implants have dramatically increased in dermatology consultations in the last few years, either for the correction of superficial age-related wrinkles and cutaneous creases or to increase the volume of specific areas (cheeks, lips...). Dermatologists are often the first professionals to provide these treatments. Nevertheless, in other situations, the patients have already been treated, and many of them do not know the type of material that has been implanted or may even deny previous treatment, even when evident on clinical examination. In these occasions, cutaneous ultrasound is an effective and reliable tool for the real-time diagnosis of the kind of implant that has been used, its location, and the study of its possible complications.

  2. Cutaneous manifestations of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Gavignet, Béatrice; Piarroux, Renaud; Aubin, François; Millon, Laurence; Humbert, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    Human toxocariasis is a parasitic disease characterized by the presence of larvae of the genus Toxocara in human tissues. T canis and T cati, the adult roundworms of which are found in dog and cat intestines, respectively, are the most common causative agents of the disease. Toxocaral larvae usually cause two severe syndromes: visceral larva migrans and ocular larva migrans, depending on the location of the larvae. Two other syndromes, covert toxocariasis and common toxocariasis, which are less typical and not as severe, have also been described. During the last two decades, cutaneous manifestations such as chronic urticaria, chronic pruritus, and miscellaneous eczema, in patients with Toxocara antibodies, have been studied by different authors. In some cases, these cutaneous manifestations are the only signs indicating the presence of the disease, and they are cured after antihelmintic treatment when there is good patient compliance. In this review, we focus on these particular skin manifestations regarding their clinical description, diagnosis, and treatment.

  3. Cutaneous melanoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Papachristou, D N; Kinne, D W; Rosen, P P; Ashikari, R; Fortner, J G

    1979-03-01

    A study of 115 cutaneous melanomas of the breast demonstrated that these neoplasms follow different metastatic patterns than do primary carcinomas of the breast and require a different therapuetic approach. Lesions located below a 3 cm from the clavicle metastasized exclusively to the axillary nodes regardless of location. None of 19 internal mammary node chains examined histologically contained tumor deposits. Microstaging of the primary lesion correlated closely with prognosis and lymph node metastasis. Treatment by mastectomy (radical, modified, extended radical) offered no advantage over local excision of the primary plus axillary dissection. The latter procedure is recommended for all cutaneous melanomas of the breast which require node dissection. Mastectomy is not indicated unless the breast is in the field of wide local excision. Internal mammary node dissections are not indicated.

  4. Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa: an update.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Fukumi

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous symptoms are observed in 25%-60% of polyarteritis nodosa (PN) patients. On the other hand, cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPN) is designated for the cutaneous limited form of PN and demonstrates benign prognosis. However, there has been much debate on whether or not CPN can progress to PN. Although CPN lesions are fundamentally limited to skin, some CPN cases show extracutaneous symptoms such as peripheral neuropathy and myalgia. According to PN diagnostic criteria, a disease with both cutaneous and at least one extracutaneous symptom with appropriate histopathological findings can be diagnosed as PN. The same is true according to diagnostic criteria established by American College of Rheumatology (ACR). In addition, there are no specific diagnostic criteria for CPN. In this study, CPN cases were retrospectively collected from multiple Japanese clinics, and analyzed for detailed clinical and histopathological manifestations, in order to redefine the clinical entity of CPN and to propose appropriate diagnostic criteria for CPN and PN. According to the CPN description in Rook's Textbook of Dermatology, one of global standard textbooks, we collected 22 cases with appropriate histopathological findings. Of the 22 cases, none progressed to PN or death during the follow-up period, 32% had peripheral neuropathy, and 27% had myalgia. Regarding extracutaneous symptoms with CPN, 17 dermatological specialists in vasculitis sustained the opinion that CPN can be accompanied by peripheral neuropathy and myalgia, but these symptoms are limited to the same area as skin lesions. Based on these results, we devised new drafts for CPN and PN diagnostic criteria. Our study shows the efficacy of these criteria, and most dermatologists recognized that our new diagnostic criteria for CPN and PN are appropriate at the present time. In conclusion, this study suggests that CPN does not progress to PN, and introduces new drafts for CPN and PN diagnostic criteria. (*English

  5. Newly recognized cutaneous drug eruptions.

    PubMed

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2007-04-01

    Many new drugs are entering the marketplace and although some cutaneous reactions might be noted in the preclinical evaluation, some of the reactions, particularly those that are rare, will not be noted until the drugs enter widespread use. In addition, distinctive reactions may occur, as is the case with epidermal growth factor-receptor inhibitors. Careful observation and evaluation might result in a better understanding of "naturally" occurring skin disease.

  6. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-03-16

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

  7. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  8. Biology of Human Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Elias G.; Hasskamp, Joanne H.; Sharma, Bhuvnesh K.

    2010-01-01

    A review of the natural behavior of cutaneous melanoma, clinical and pathological factors, prognostic indicators, some basic research and the present and possible futuristic strategies in the management of this disease are presented. While surgery remains to be the most effective therapeutic approach in the management of early primary lesions, there is no standard adjuvant therapy after surgical resection, or for metastatic disease. PMID:24281039

  9. Cutaneous Chromatophoromas in Captive Snakes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, J F; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2016-11-01

    Chromatophoromas are neoplasms arising from pigment-bearing cells (chromatophores) of the dermis. While isolated cases have been reported in the literature, the prevalence and biological behavior of chromatophoromas in snakes are unknown. Forty-two chromatophoromas were identified among 4663 submissions (0.9%) to a private diagnostic laboratory in a 16-year period. The most commonly affected snakes were colubrids (23 cases, 55%) and vipers (8 cases, 19%). The San Francisco garter snake was the most commonly affected species (6 cases; 14% of all affected snake species and 3.7% of all garter snake submissions). No sex predilection was found. The age of 28 snakes ranged from 5 to 27 years. Single cutaneous chromatophoromas were most commonly observed and presented as pigmented cutaneous masses or plaques along any body segment. Euthanasia or death due to progressive neoplastic disease or metastasis was reported in 8 (19%) and 4 (10%) cases, respectively. The survival time of 4 animals ranged from 4 to 36 months. Microscopically, xanthophoromas, iridophoromas, melanocytic neoplasms, and mixed chromatophoromas were identified, with melanocytic neoplasms being most common. Microscopic examination alone was generally sufficient for the diagnosis of chromatophoroma, but immunohistochemistry for S-100 and PNL-2 may be helpful for diagnosing poorly pigmented cases. Moderate to marked nuclear atypia appears to be consistently present in cutaneous chromatophoromas with a high risk of metastasis, while mitotic count, lymphatic invasion, the level of infiltration, and the degree of pigmentation or ulceration were not reliable predictors of metastasis.

  10. Cutaneous Metastasis From Sacral Chordoma.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Kristyna; Goodwin, Brandon; Sanchez, Ramon

    2017-04-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone malignancy of notochord origin, representing 1-4% of malignant bone tumors., Typically, chordomas follow a slow progressive course with aggressive local extension, multiple recurrences, and metastases. Of particular interest to this case, cutaneous metastasis is exceedingly rare. Diagnosis of this entity can be a challenge due to the rarity of chordoma, as well as the infrequent presentation of distant cutaneous metastasis and non-specific clinical skin findings. We report a case of a 61-year-old male with a history of sacral chordoma treated by wide local excision 8 years prior to presentation developed a nodule on his scalp for 6 weeks. Physical examination revealed a 1 cm rubbery, pink, shiny dome-shaped nodule on his left occipital scalp. Hematoxylin and eosin sections revealed a lobular dermal proliferation of small ovoid cells and larger physaliferous cells with hyperchromatic, displaced nuclei and finely vacuolated "soap-bubble" cytoplasm in a myxoid stroma. Immunohistochemistry of tumor cells showed positivity for both S-100 protein and pancytokeratin (AE1/AE3), while smooth muscle actin (SMA), P63, and CK7 were negative. Additionally, tumor cells stained positive for brachyury. The medical history, clinical presentation, histopathological appearance and immunohistochemical profile are consistent with cutaneous metastasis from sacral chordoma, known as chordoma cutis. This case illustrates the integral role of dermatopathology in the diagnosis of a rare and critical condition.

  11. Proton scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  12. Cutaneous dermatomyositis in the era of biologicals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Natalie A; Vleugels, Ruth Ann; Callen, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a systemic inflammatory condition characterized by cutaneous and muscle findings, in addition to potential involvement of other organ systems. A distinct subtype of DM exists that is categorized by cutaneous findings with absent or minimal muscle involvement, referred to as clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis or dermatomyositis sine myositis. A variety of topical, immunosuppressive, and immunomodulatory therapies have been utilized to treat cutaneous DM. The advent of biological agents including tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and others has allowed for the use of these agents with varying degrees of success for the treatment of cutaneous DM.

  13. Cutaneous Larva Migrans in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Siddalingappa, Karjigi; Murthy, Sambasiviah Chidambara; Herakal, Kallappa; Kusuma, Marganahalli Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans or creeping eruptions is a cutaneous dermatosis caused by hookworm larvae, Ancylostoma braziliense. A 2-month-old female child presented with a progressive rash over the left buttock of 4 days duration. Cutaneous examination showed an urticarial papule progressing to erythematous, tortuous, thread-like tract extending a few centimeters from papule over the left gluteal region. A clinical diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans was considered. Treatment with albendazole led to complete resolution, confirming the diagnosis. This is to the best of our knowledge, the youngest age at which this condition is being reported. PMID:26538729

  14. Cutaneous histoplasmosis in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sun, N Z; Augustine, J J; Gerstenblith, M R

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous histoplasmosis is a rare entity, although it can be seen in a substantial portion of renal transplant recipients with disseminated disease. The prognosis of disseminated disease is worse than isolated cutaneous involvement, and significant delays in diagnosis are reported. We reviewed reports of cutaneous histoplasmosis with and without dissemination in the setting of renal transplantation to examine incidence, timing of diagnosis, clinical features, and prognosis. Remarkable morphologic variability and the non-specific appearance of skin findings suggest that tissue culture is required for definitive diagnosis. Cutaneous lesions represent an easily accessible source for early diagnosis.

  15. Cutaneous Vasodilation during Local Heating: Role of Local Cutaneous Thermosensation

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Gary W.; Foote, Kristopher M.; Nelson, W. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that cutaneous vasodilation during local skin heating in humans could be manipulated based upon the ability to desensitize TRPV4 ion channels by applying the thermal stimuli in a series of pulses. Each subject was instrumented with intradermal microdialysis probes in the dorsal forearm skin and perfused with 0.9% saline at 1.5 μl/min with local skin temperature controlled with a Peltier unit (9 cm2) at 34°C. Local skin temperature was manipulated for 50 min in two classic ways: a step increase to 38°C (0.1°C/s, n = 10), and a step increase to 42°C (n = 10). To desensitize TRPV4 ion channels local skin temperature was manipulated in the following way: pulsed increase to 38°C (1 pulse per min, 30 s duration, 1.0°C/s, n = 10), and 4) pulsed increase to 42°C (1.0°C/s, n = 9). Skin blood flow (SkBF, laser Doppler) was recorded directly over the middle microdialysis probe and the dialysate from all three probes were collected during baseline (34°C) and each skin heating period. The overall cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to local heating was estimated from the area under the % CVCmax-time curve. The appearance of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) in dialysate did not change with skin heating in any protocol. For the skin temperature challenge of 34 to 38°C, the area under the % CVCmax-time curve averaged 1196 ± 295 (SD) % CVCmax•min, which was larger than the 656 ± 282% CVCmax•min during pulsed heating (p < 0.05). For the skin temperature challenge of 34 to 42°C, the area under the % CVCmax-time curve averaged 2678 ± 458% CVCmax•min, which was larger than the 1954 ± 533% CVCmax•min during pulsed heating (p < 0.05). The area under the % CVCmax•min curve, was directly proportional to the accumulated local skin thermal stress (in °C•min) (r2 = 0.62, p < 0.05, n = 39). This association indicates a critical role of local integration of thermosensitive receptors in mediating the cutaneous

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of chikungunya fever.

    PubMed

    Seetharam, K A; Sridevi, K; Vidyasagar, P

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging RNA viral infection produces different cutaneous manifestations in children compared to adults. 52 children with chikungunya fever, confirmed by positive IgM antibody test were seen during 2009-2010. Pigmentary lesions were common (27/52) followed by vesiculobullous lesions (16/52) and maculopapular lesions (14/52). Vesiculobullous lesions were most common in infants, although rarely reported in adults. Psoriasis was exacerbated in 4 children resulting in more severe forms. In 2 children, guttate psoriasis was observed for the first time.

  17. Cutaneous melanomas of the eyelid.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Patrick R; Rubin, Peter A D

    2006-01-01

    Cutaneous eyelid melanomas are very rare lesions. The lentiginous subtypes are the most frequent melanocytic lesions of the eyelid and can be likened to conjunctival melanocytic lesions like PAM, PAM with atypia and conjunctival melanoma. Compared to melanomas elsewhere on the body, eyelid melanomas have special considerations. Eyelid skin is very thin, the mucocutaneous junction at the lid margin can affect prognosis, the lymphatic drainage pattern is very variable and there is an inherent difficulty to excise wide margins without sacrificing important structures. A customized excision approach, using tissue-sparing "Slow-Mohs" technique, is suggested. Sentinel lymph node dissection has an evolving therapeutic role but remains controversial.

  18. Targeted therapies for cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kee, Damien; McArthur, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Melanoma is resistant to cytotoxic therapy, and treatment options for advanced disease have been limited historically. However, improved understanding of melanoma driver mutations, particularly those involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has led to the development of targeted therapies that are effective in this previously treatment-refractory disease. In cutaneous melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations the selective RAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, have demonstrated survival benefits. Early signals of efficacy have also been demonstrated with MEK inhibitors in melanomas with NRAS mutations, and KIT inhibitors offer promise in melanomas driven through activation of their target receptor.

  19. Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Callen, J P

    2010-08-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus with unique immunologic and clinical features. The first description dates back to 1985 when a series of five patients were found to have hydrochlorothiazide-induced SCLE. Since that time, at least 40 other drugs have been implicated in the induction of SCLE.

  20. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  1. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  2. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  3. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  4. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  5. Cutaneous malakoplakia: case report and review*

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, João Paulo Junqueira Magalhães; Ando, Patricia Naomi; Padilha, Maria Helena Valle de Queiroz; Michalany, Nilceo Schwery; Porro, Adriana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Malakoplakia is a rare acquired disease that can affect many systems but is more common in the urogenital tract. Cutaneous malakoplakia is even rarer. It is far more frequent in immunodeficient patients. We report a case of cutaneous malakoplakia in a kidney transplant patient who had recently stopped receiving immunosuppressive therapy to illustrate a review of the relevant recent literature. PMID:23793204

  6. [Cutaneous abscess due to Gemella morbillorum].

    PubMed

    Villamil, Iago; Villar, Alberto; Masa, Luis A

    2009-10-01

    We report a cutaneous abscess due to Gemella morbillorum, a Gram positive coccus found in oropharyngeal flora, that rarely causes disease in humans. Infections associated to this agent are similar to those related to viridans streptococci. There have been reports of endovascular infections (predominantly endocarditis) and also of acute invasive infections. Few previous reports are available of cutaneous infection.

  7. [Uncommon clinical manifestations of cutaneous leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Hayani, K; Dandashli, A; Weisshaar, E

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most common dermatoses of the tropics. A major focus of this disease is the Syrian city of Aleppo, after which it was named in many textbooks ("Aleppo boil"). The first cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis were reported from Aleppo particularly more than 100 years ago. Syria is one of the most affected countries worldwide. This disease used to be well documented until the onset of the war in Syria in 2012, which is also supported by the numbers of the World Health Organisation (WHO), and Aleppo used to be the most affected Syrian city. Since 2012, the documentation of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Syria is no longer possible. An outbreak of cutaneous leishmaniasis has been detected especially in the besieged regions due to missing prevention measures against the sandflies and a lack of medical care. A short summary of the epidemiologic situation in Syria as well as outstanding and uncommon clinical manifestations of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Aleppo are presented.

  8. Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Steven T; Querfeld, Christiane

    2006-01-01

    Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) encompass a clinically and biologically heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) defined by clonal proliferation of skin-homing malignant T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. They account for up to 75% to 80% of all cutaneous lymphomas. The current WHO-EORTC classification of cutaneous lymphomas with primary cutaneous manifestations lists 13 entities. The most common subtypes-mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and lymphomatoid papulosis-which represent approximately 95% of CTCLs, will be discussed in the following review. Each entity has unique biological characteristics and clinical course. Topical and/or systemic therapies are employed based on the stage of the disease and the tempo of progression.

  9. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  10. Cutaneous fistulization of the hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahce, Zeynep Sener; Akbulut, Sami; Aday, Ulas; Demircan, Firat; Senol, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To provide an overview of the medical literature on cutaneous fistulization in patients with hydatid disease (HD). Methods: According to PRISMA guidelines a literature search was made in PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Google databases were searched using keywords to identify articles related to cutaneous fistulization of the HD. Keywords used were hydatid disease, hydatid cyst, cutaneous fistulization, cysto-cutaneous fistulization, external rupture, and external fistulization. The literature search included case reports, review articles, original articles, and meeting presentations published until July 2016 without restrictions on language, journal, or country. Articles and abstracts containing adequate information, such as age, sex, cyst size, cyst location, clinical presentation, fistula opening location, and management, were included in the study, whereas articles with insufficient clinical and demographic data were excluded. We also present a new case of cysto-cutaneous fistulization of a liver hydatid cyst. Results: The literature review included 38 articles (32 full text, 2 abstracts, and 4 unavailable) on cutaneous fistulization in patients with HD. Among the 38 articles included in the study, 22 were written in English, 13 in French, 1 in German, 1 in Italian, and 1 in Spanish. Forty patients (21 males and 19 females; mean age ± standard deviation, 54.0 ± 21.5 years; range, 7–93 years) were involved in the study. Twenty-four patients had cysto-cutaneous fistulization (Echinococcus granulosus); 10 had cutaneous fistulization (E multilocularis), 3 had cysto-cutaneo-bronchio-biliary fistulization, 2 had cysto-cutaneo-bronchial fistulization; and 1 had cutaneo-bronchial fistulization (E multilocularis). Twenty-nine patients were diagnosed with E granulosis and 11 had E multilocularis detected by clinical, radiological, and/or histopathological examinations. Conclusion: Cutaneous fistulization is a rare complication of HD

  11. Cutaneous signs of classical dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, M; Capo, A; Meogrossi, G; Amerio, P

    2014-10-01

    Idiopathic immune myopathies (IIM) are an heterogeneous group of autoimmune muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle involvement. Dermatomyositis (DM) is the most common form of IIM. It is a multisystem disorder characterized by symmetric proximal, extensor, inflammatory myopathy, vascular involvement and a characteristic cutaneous eruption. Six types of DM have been identified: idiopathic, juvenile (JDM), cancer-related other autoimmune diseases-related, iatrogenic DM and amyopathic DM. Cutaneous manifestations of DM are the most important aspect of this disease and can precede from several months to years muscle or systemic involvement. Three groups of signs have been described: pathognomonic, highly characteristic and compatible. Although differences exist among the different clinical presentation of skin lesions, they share common histological findings including the presence of interface dermatitis with epidermal atrophy, basement membrane degeneration, vacuolar alteration of basal keratinocytes, and dermal changes consisting of interstitial mucin deposition and a sparse lymphocytic infiltrate. DM is a serious disease; the correct evaluation of any skin lesion suggesting an early diagnosis is of utmost importance. Skin signs may, also, represent a marker of treatment efficacy even though systemic symptoms worsening may not always be followed by more severe skin lesions.

  12. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  13. Pseudolymphoma and cutaneous lymphoma: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Reuven

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous pseudolymphoma refers to a heterogenous group of benign reactive T-cell or B-cell lymphoproliferative processes of diverse causes that simulate cutaneous lymphomas clinically and histologically. Pseudolymphomas may arise in response to a wide variety of foreign antigens, but most are idiopathic. Major advances have been made in the histologic classification, immunohistochemistry, and molecular studies of cutaneous pseudolymphoma. Although this enables a more precise differentiation from cutaneous lymphoma, a substantial number of patients still present in whom the differential diagnosis is difficult or impossible. Some evidence suggests that pseudolymphomas may progress to cutaneous lymphoma due to persistent antigenic stimulation. More compelling evidence is needed, especially when most cutaneous pseudolymphoma are not associated with known antigens and the differentiation from cutaneous lymphoma may be difficult; therefore, a careful approach should be used, and the antigenic stimulus should be removed whenever possible. A watchful follow-up is warranted in idiopathic cases, and consideration should always be given to surgical or medical therapy.

  14. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  15. An overview of cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bagherani, Nooshin; Smoller, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that are characterized by a cutaneous infiltration of malignant monoclonal T lymphocytes. They typically afflict adults with a median age of 55 to 60 years, and the annual incidence is about 0.5 per 100,000. Mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, and primary cutaneous peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are the most important subtypes of CTCL. CTCL is a complicated concept in terms of etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. Herein, we summarize advances which have been achieved in these fields. PMID:27540476

  16. Cutaneous leishmaniasis: an increasing threat for travellers.

    PubMed

    Antinori, S; Gianelli, E; Calattini, S; Longhi, E; Gramiccia, M; Corbellino, M

    2005-05-01

    Analysis of the literature on cutaneous leishmaniasis in low-prevalence countries suggests an increase in imported cases that is attributable to the growing phenomenon of international tourism, migration and military operations in highly endemic regions. Cases of imported cutaneous leishmaniasis are often missed initially, but diagnosis can be made non-invasively by PCR using skin scrapings of lesions as starting material. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an emerging threat for travellers and should be considered in all patients presenting with slow-to-heal ulcers.

  17. Cutaneous aspergillosis in patients with haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, D; Pagano, L; Girmenia, C; Parruti, G; Mele, L; Candoni, A; Ricci, P; Martino, P

    2000-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate skin infections caused by Aspergillus in patients with haematological malignancies. Fifteen cases of cutaneous aspergillosis are reported, 12 of which occurred among 4448 consecutive patients with acute leukaemia. Cutaneous involvement occurred in 4% of patients with documented Aspergillus infection. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis was diagnosed in five cases. Infection was fatal in 11 of 15 cases; the absence of additional sites of infection other than cutis at presentation appeared to be the only factor related to a favourable outcome.

  18. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  19. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity.

  20. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Felinto de Brito, Maria Edileuza; Andrade, Maria Sandra; de Almeida, Éricka Lima; Medeiros, Ângela Cristina Rapela; Werkhäuser, Roberto Pereira; de Araújo, Ana Isabele Freitas; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Paiva de Almeida, Alzira Maria; Gomes Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL): one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples) and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis. PMID:23227369

  1. Cutaneous responses to environmental stressors

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Sticozzi, Claudia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Franco; Cervellati, Carlo; Maioli, Emanuela

    2012-01-01

    Living organisms are continuously exposed to environmental pollutants. Because of its critical location, the skin is a major interface between the body and the environment and provides a biological barrier against an array of chemical and physical environmental pollutants. The skin can be defined as our first defense against the environment because of its constant exposure to oxidants, including ultraviolet (UV) radiation and other environmental pollutants such as diesel fuel exhaust, cigarette smoke (CS), halogenated hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and ozone (O3). The exposure to environmental pro-oxidant agents leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the generation of bioactive molecules that can damage skin cells. This short review provides an overview of the effects and mechanisms of action of CS, O3, and UV on cutanous tissues. PMID:23050967

  2. Delay in cutaneous melanoma diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Marcus H.S.B.; Drummond-Lage, Ana P.; Baeta, Cyntia; Rocha, Lorena; Almeida, Alessandra M.; Wainstein, Alberto J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Advanced melanoma is an incurable disease with complex and expensive treatments. The best approach to prevent melanoma at advanced stages is an early diagnosis. A knowledge of factors associated with the process of detecting cutaneous melanomas and the reasons for delays in diagnosis is essential for the improvement of the secondary prevention of the disease. Identify sociodemographic, individual, and medical aspects related to cutaneous melanoma diagnosis delay. Interviews evaluated the knowledge of melanoma, signals, symptoms, persons who were suspected, delays in seeking medical attention, physician's deferrals, and related factors of 211 patients. Melanomas were self-discovered in 41.7% of the patients; healthcare providers detected 29.9% of patients and others detected 27%. The main component in delay was patient-related. Only 31.3% of the patients knew that melanoma was a serious skin cancer, and most thought that the pigmented lesion was not important, causing a delay in seeking medical assistance. Patients (36.4%) reported a wait interval of more than 6 months from the onset of an observed change in a pigmented lesion to the first visit to a physician. The delay interval from the first physician visit to a histopathological diagnosis was shorter (<1 month) in 55.5% of patients. Improper treatments without a histopathological confirmation occurred in 14.7% of patients. A professional delay was related to both inappropriate treatments performed without histopathological confirmation (P = 0.003) and long requirements for medical referrals (P < 0.001). A deficient knowledge in the population regarding melanoma and physicians’ misdiagnoses regarding suspicious lesions contributed to delays in diagnosis. PMID:27495055

  3. Immunopathology of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Reed, S. G.; Roters, S. B.; Sadigursky, M.

    1984-01-01

    Relatively susceptible BALB/c and relatively resistant A/J mice were infected subcutaneously in the right hind footpad with promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana amazonensis. A large localized lesion developed within 2 months after infection in the BALB/c mice, while A/J mice exhibited a small discrete fibrotic nodule. Sequential immunologic and histologic examination demonstrated that BALB/c mice developed a nodular foam-cell type of lesion and progressive depression of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to leishmania antigen, while the A/J mice had a mixed cellular fibrosing and encapsulating reaction and developed and maintained positive DTH responses to leishmania antigen. Anti-leishmania antibody responses were positive at similar levels in both strains. The lesions in BALB/c mice were found in bone marrow, tendon, skin appendages, and regional lymph nodes, with a tendency toward cutaneous metastases. Lesions in A/J mice remained localized. Fibrosis, focal fibrinoid necrosis, and lymphocytic and macrophagic infiltration were the outstanding features. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies indicated that no outstanding destruction of leishmanias seemed to occur within macrophages of either mouse strain. In the more resistant A/J mice, however, parasitized macrophages were frequently necrotic, and degenerating leishmanias were often seen free in the interstitial tissue. These observations help the interpretation of the histologic features, as well as the pathogenesis, of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in man. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6691411

  4. Ferrofluid-associated Cutaneous Dyschromia

    PubMed Central

    Arfa, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ferrofluid is a colloidal suspension that usually consists of surfactant-coated nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) in a carrier liquid. Ferromagnetic fluid forms spikes when the liquid is exposed to a magnetic field. Purpose: The authors describe a man who developed temporary discoloration of his right palm and fingers after accidental cutaneous contact with ferrofluid and discuss some of the current and potential applications of this unique liquid. Methods: A 28-year-old man was evaluating the effects of magnetic fields using ferrofluid. He performed a modification of the “leaping ferrofluid” demonstration in which he held a superstrong (14,800 gauss magnetic field strength) N52 rare earth neodymium magnet in his palm and slowly lowered that hand over an open bowl that was filled with ferrofluid. Results: As the magnet approached the liquid, the ferrofluid became magnetized. The liquid leaped from the bowl and contacted not only the magnet, but also the palmar surface of his hand and fingers, resulting in a black-brown dyschromia of the affected skin. The discoloration completely resolved after two weeks without any adverse sequellae. Conclusion: Ferrofluid has numerous current and potential applications; in addition to being of value educationally and aesthetically (after being subjected to magnetic fields), it is also utilized for audio loudspeakers, medical innovations (such as a component of either a research tool, a diagnostic aid, or a treatment modality), and seals. Although the authors’ patient did not experience any acute or chronic toxicity from his cutaneous exposure to ferrofluid, conservative follow-up for individuals who experience skin contact with ferromagnetic fluid may be appropriate. PMID:27354890

  5. Lymphocytes infiltrating primary cutaneous neoplasms selectively express the cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA).

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, A. B.; Smoller, B. R.; Warnke, R. A.; Picker, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    The cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA) is the T-cell ligand for E-selectin and is involved in tissue selective migration of memory/effector T cells to chronic inflammatory sites in skin. Here, we examine the hypothesis that CLA is also involved in the local host immune response to cutaneous neoplasms. Eleven primary cutaneous melanomas, nine primary cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas, and 11 assorted neoplasms metastatic to cutaneous and noncutaneous sites were immunostained with anti-CLA (HECA-452), as well as antibodies directed against B cells (CD20), T/NK cells (CD43), and memory/effector T cells (CD45RO). Essentially all of the lymphocytes surrounding and infiltrating both the cutaneous and noncutaneous tumors were CD43+/CD20-, and most expressed the memory/effector marker CD45RO. CLA was expressed on 10 to 80% (mean: 50%) of T cells associated with primary cutaneous neoplasms (including both melanomas and squamous cell carcinomas) but was essentially absent from noncutaneous primaries (including those metastatic to dermis) and from cutaneous primaries metastatic to dermis or other sites. Overall, the results suggest that CLA+memory T cells are a major component of the local host immune response to cutaneous neoplasms and are likely recruited to the skin by site-specific rather than tumor-specific mechanisms. The lack of a CLA+T-cell response to dermal metastases suggests that epidermal involvement may be required to attract this subset. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7684198

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic tropical parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Neil F; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2009-01-01

    Tropical diseases continue to cause significant health problems in developing nations. An overview of illnesses with notable cutaneous findings caused by protozoans and helminthes is provided. The role of the health care provider in disease management is described.

  7. Cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis and their management.

    PubMed

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2010-06-01

    Dermatomyositis is a condition with pathognomonic and characteristic cutaneous lesions. This article describes the skin manifestations observed in patients with dermatomyositis, their differential diagnosis, their relationship to internal disease (particularly malignancy), and their management.

  8. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Okon, L G; Werth, V P

    2013-06-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) encompasses a wide range of dermatologic manifestations, which may or may not be associated with the development of systemic disease. Cutaneous lupus is divided into several sub-types, including acute CLE (ACLE), sub-acute CLE (SCLE) and chronic CLE (CCLE). CCLE includes discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), LE profundus (LEP), chilblain cutaneous lupus and lupus tumidus. The diagnosis of these diseases requires proper classification of the sub-type, through a combination of physical examination, laboratory studies, histology, antibody serology and occasionally direct immunofluorescence, while ensuring to exclude systemic disease. The treatment of cutaneous lupus consists of patient education on proper sun protection along with appropriate topical and systemic agents. Systemic agents are indicated in cases of widespread, scarring or treatment-refractory disease. In this chapter, we discuss issues in classification and diagnosis of the various sub-types of CLE, as well as provide an update on therapeutic management.

  9. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus in skin of color.

    PubMed

    Nozile, Wallace; Adgerson, Cheri N; Cohen, George F

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (CLE) is a common manifestation in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. In a significant population of patients, CLE is the predominant feature and, in some cases, patients suffer from cutaneous disease alone. Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (CCLE) is a scarring subtype, more prevalent in blacks. Patients with skin of color may pose a challenge to physicians due to exaggerated cutaneous findings and increased risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation and hypertrophic scarring. With the demographics of the United States rapidly shifting towards a greater population of non-Caucasian racial and ethnic groups, it is imperative that we expand on the limited research into molecular variation, clinical presentation, and therapeutic efficacy in CLE. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to the unique and severe aspects of CLE in persons of color, which calls for early and aggressive treatment.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... AP, Hans-Filho G, Sakuma TH, Lai-Cheong J, Clements S, Odashiro M, Odashiro DN, Hans-Neto G, ... mutations underlie familial primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis. Am J Hum Genet. 2008 Jan;82(1):73-80. ...

  11. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome and obstetric misadventure.

    PubMed

    Thayaparan, A S; Lowe, S A

    2015-09-01

    We present two women with severe obstetric complications from antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome associated with a rare dermatological manifestation, cutaneous pseudovasculitis. Both of these women developed a rash on the palmar aspect of the hands during the post partum period, with histology consistent with microthrombotic disease, despite anticoagulation. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis appears to be a maternal manifestation of aPL coagulopathy, possibly reflecting the severity of the underlying pregnancy pathology.

  12. Cutaneous Sensibility Changes in Bell's Palsy Patients.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas Palacio, Carlos Andrés; Múnera Galarza, Francisco Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    Objective Bell's palsy is a cranial nerve VII dysfunction that renders the patient unable to control facial muscles from the affected side. Nevertheless, some patients have reported cutaneous changes in the paretic area. Therefore, cutaneous sensibility changes might be possible additional symptoms within the clinical presentation of this disorder. Accordingly, the aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensibility and facial paralysis severity in these patients. Study Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Settings Tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Twelve acute-onset Bell's palsy patients were enrolled from March to September 2009. In addition, 12 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers were tested. Cutaneous sensibility was evaluated with pressure threshold and 2-point discrimination at 6 areas of the face. Facial paralysis severity was evaluated with the House-Brackmann scale. Results Statistically significant correlations based on the Spearman's test were found between facial paralysis severity and cutaneous sensitivity on forehead, eyelid, cheek, nose, and lip ( P < .05). Additionally, significant differences based on the Student's t test were observed between both sides of the face in 2-point discrimination on eyelid, cheek, and lip ( P < .05) in Bell's palsy patients but not in healthy subjects. Conclusion Such results suggest a possible relationship between the loss of motor control of the face and changes in facial sensory information processing. Such findings are worth further research about the neurophysiologic changes associated with the cutaneous sensibility disturbances of these patients.

  13. Cutaneous Manifestations of Common Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Sunil; Jindal, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    Skin functions as a window to our overall health and a number of systemic diseases result in various cutaneous changes. Knowledge of these manifestations helps in suspecting an underlying systemic illness. Cutaneous abnormalities are quite common in patients with liver diseases and this article aims to focus on these dermatoses. Cutaneous manifestations seen in patients with liver disease though common are nonspecific. They can also be seen in patients without liver diseases and generally do not indicate about a specific underlying hepatic disorder. The presence of a constellation of signs and symptoms is more useful in pointing toward an underlying hepatobiliary condition. The commonest symptom in patients with liver disease is pruritus which is often protracted and disabling. Other common features include spider angiomas, palmar erythema, paper money skin, xanthelasmas, pigmentary changes, and nutritional deficiencies. In this article, first the common cutaneous manifestations that may be associated with liver disorders are discussed and then common liver diseases with their specific cutaneous findings are discussed. Cutaneous abnormalities may be the first clue to the underlying liver disease. Identifying them is crucial for early diagnosis and better management. PMID:25755383

  14. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  15. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  16. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  17. What's In a Proton?

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  18. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  19. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  20. Two cases of cutaneous cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Xiujiao, Xia; Ai'e, Xu

    2005-07-01

    We report two cases of cutaneous cryptococcosis in male patients without underlying disease. Case 1 had a granulomatous mass on his right neck, gradually enlarging for 3 months. After the mass was debrided surgically in a hospital, the incision wound gradually developed into a severe ulceration. Mycological examination revealed Cryptococcus neoformans infection. It was significant that histopathology of both pre-surgery granuloma and post-surgery ulceration revealed thick-walled spores with thick capsule. Chest X-ray revealed a shadow in the left lower lung. After treatment with amphotec for 21 days, the lesion healed. Case 2 had an approximately 2 x 2 cm solitary dull nodule on his right thigh, which had been present for 8 months. Mycological examination confirmed that the lesion was caused by C. neoformans. The patient's ratio of peripheral blood CD4(+) cell was slightly reduced. After 14 days of treatment with oral fluconazole, followed by oral itraconazole for 2 months, mycological and clinical cure were achieved. The two isolates were identified as C. neoformans var. gattii serotype C and C. neoformans var. grubii serotype A.

  1. Genomic Classification of Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    2015-06-18

    We describe the landscape of genomic alterations in cutaneous melanomas through DNA, RNA, and protein-based analysis of 333 primary and/or metastatic melanomas from 331 patients. We establish a framework for genomic classification into one of four subtypes based on the pattern of the most prevalent significantly mutated genes: mutant BRAF, mutant RAS, mutant NF1, and Triple-WT (wild-type). Integrative analysis reveals enrichment of KIT mutations and focal amplifications and complex structural rearrangements as a feature of the Triple-WT subtype. We found no significant outcome correlation with genomic classification, but samples assigned a transcriptomic subclass enriched for immune gene expression associated with lymphocyte infiltrate on pathology review and high LCK protein expression, a T cell marker, were associated with improved patient survival. This clinicopathological and multi-dimensional analysis suggests that the prognosis of melanoma patients with regional metastases is influenced by tumor stroma immunobiology, offering insights to further personalize therapeutic decision-making.

  2. Cutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.; Staberg, B.

    1983-12-01

    The disappearance rate of /sup 133/Xe was studied in 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, using an epicutaneous labeling technique in involved skin lesions or normal-appearing skin of the proximal extensor site of the forearm. Control experiments were performed in 10 normal subjects. Calculations of the cutaneous blood flow (CBF) in psoriatic skin lesions were performed using a tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for /sup 133/Xe, lambda c,pso, of 1.2 ml/100 g/min. lambda c,pso was estimated after the relative content of water, lipids, and proteins had been analyzed in psoriatic skin biopsies of 6 patients with untreated psoriasis. The mean relative content of water was markedly reduced to 23.5 +/- 1.5% (SEM), and lipids and proteins were markedly increased to 2.5 +/- 0.7% and 74.0 +/- 2.2, respectively, compared to previously published data for normal skin (water 72.5%, lipids 1%, proteins 26.5%). Mean CBF in untreated psoriatic skin was 63.5 +/- 9.0 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than the mean CBF in 10 normal subjects, 6.3 +/- 0.5 ml/100 g/min (p much less than 0.0001). Mean CBF in normal-appearing skin in patients with psoriasis was 11.0 +/- 1.3 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than CBF in normal subjects (p less than 0.0002).

  3. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus: An update

    PubMed Central

    Grönhagen, Carina M; Nyberg, Filippa

    2014-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is a chronic, autoimmune, multisystem disease that displays many diverse symptoms in which localized cutaneous LE (CLE) is on one end of the spectrum and severe systemic LE (SLE) on the other end. The underlying cause of LE is unknown but the etiology is thought to be multifactorial and polygenic. CLE is a disfiguring, chronic skin disease, with a significant impact on the patients’ everyday life. CLE are further divided into three main subsets: Acute CLE (ACLE), subacute CLE (SCLE) and chronic CLE (CCLE), where classic discoid LE (DLE) is the most common form. These subsets are defined by clinical symptoms, average duration of symptoms and histological and serological findings, although, the three subtypes can have overlapping clinical features. CLE patients display well-defined skin lesions, often in sun-exposed areas. The disease often has a chronic and relapsing course that can be induced or aggravated by UV light. It is important to confirm a CLE diagnosis histopathologically by a biopsy and in that there are several differential diagnoses and because CLE is a chronic disease in which regular follow-up is important and systemic treatment is sometimes indicated. PMID:24616847

  4. Cutaneous Manifestations of Familial Transthyretin Amyloid Polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lanoue, Julien; Wei, Nancy; Gorevic, Peter; Phelps, Robert G

    2016-10-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is a rare inherited autosomal dominant form of systemic amyloidosis, which classically presents with severe motor, sensory, and autonomic dysfunction. Cutaneous involvement does not become clinically apparent until late stage symptomatic disease and is rarely reported in modern literature. Here, the authors review the clinical and histologic cutaneous findings of FAP previously described in the literature and report on 3 patients with unique genetic mutations (Thr60Ala and Gly6Ser; Trp41Leu; Glu89Gln) for which cutaneous involvement has not previously been described. Histologically, our patients showed variable amyloid deposition in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, papillary dermis, and dermal blood vessel walls. A review of the literature suggests cutaneous transthyretin deposition is an underrecognized feature of FAP that occurs early on in disease, even before neural involvement and related symptoms as seen in one of our patients. As such, a cutaneous punch biopsy can serve as quick, easy, and relatively noninvasive diagnostic tool in suspected cases.

  5. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: laryngo-onycho-cutaneous syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... LOC syndrome is missing patches of skin (cutaneous erosions). The erosions heal slowly and may become infected. People with ... These abnormalities of laminin 332 cause the cutaneous erosions and overgrowth of granulation tissue that are characteristic ...

  7. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent individual.

    PubMed

    Yap, Felix Boon-Bin

    2011-10-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic fungal infection caused by the ubiquitous fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis is an uncommon entity and is usually present in the immunosuppressed. Here, a case of disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent patient is reported. This 70-year-old healthy woman presented with multiple painful ulcerated nodules on her face and upper and lower extremities of 6-month duration, associated with low-grade fever, night sweats, loss of appetite, and loss of weight. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy revealed epidermal hyperplasia and granulomatous inflammation in the dermis, with budding yeast. Fungal culture identified S. schenckii. She had total resolution of the lesions after 2 weeks of intravenous amphotericin B and 8 months of oral itraconazole. All investigations for underlying immunosuppression and internal organ involvement were negative. This case reiterates that disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis, although common in the immunosuppressed, can also be seen in immunocompetent patients.

  8. Understanding cutaneous tuberculosis: two clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Flavio; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Visconti, Elena; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Sali, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient human disease and remains today one of the most important public health problems and the second most frequent cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide. While pulmonary TB is the most common form, extra-pulmonary TB is on the rise due to the increase in immunosuppressed subjects. Cutaneous TB manifestations are rare forms of extra-pulmonary TB due to systemic dissemination of bacilli or direct inoculation, involving skin or skin-associated tissue, more common in immunocompromised subjects. Some risk factors and the features of the lesion may prompt the suspicion of cutaneous TB, but only microbiological assays can confirm the diagnosis. Our work summarizes cutaneous TB manifestations and differences from other skin mycobacterial infections, also describes two characteristic clinical cases. PMID:28348793

  9. Current approach to cutaneous mastocytosis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Tamay, Zeynep; Özçeker, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by clonal proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in one of more organs which may lead to different clinical pictures. Pathological increase and activation of mast cells in various tissues can cause different clinical pictures. Cutaneous mastocytosis limited to the skin is the most typical clinical picture observed in children and systemic mastocytosis is very rare in the pediatric age group. The diagnosis of cutaneous mastocytosis is based on clinical findings, but is often delayed due to lack of clinical awareness of the disease and lack of its consideration in the differential diagnosis. This article focuses on the current diagnosis, management and treatment of cutaneous mastocytosis in children in order to increase awareness about this issue. PMID:27738395

  10. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  11. Important cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Trost, L; McDonnell, J

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has many extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. Anyone presenting with IBD should be examined for cutaneous manifestations. Pyoderma gangrenosum is a severe painful ulcerating disease that requires moist wound management and, in the absence of secondary infection, systemic corticosteroids, cyclosporine, or both. Infliximab may also be used. Erythema nodosum is a common cause of tender red nodules of the shins. Management includes leg elevation, NSAIDs, and potassium iodide. Oral manifestations of IBD include aphthous stomatitis, mucosal nodularity (cobblestoning), and pyostomatitis vegetans. Treatment should be directed both at the cutaneous lesions and at the underlying systemic condition. PMID:16143688

  12. Pregnancy-Associated "Cutaneous Type" Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The development of pemphigus, including pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus, during pregnancy is rare. PV manifests with mucosal and/or cutaneous erosions with flaccid bullae that are histologically characterized by suprabasilar acantholysis. In contrast, pemphigus foliaceus manifests with cutaneous-only involvement and superficial epidermal acantholysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for autoantibodies against desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 aids in the diagnosis and differentiation between pemphigus subtypes. High-dose systemic corticosteroids are first-line agents in management of PV, yet their potential long-term use raises complex management issues associated with pregnancy and fetal risk. Here we report a rare case of cutaneous-limited PV in association with pregnancy.

  13. Ovarian carcinoma presenting as cutaneous nasal metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    António, Ana Marta; Alves, João Vitor; Goulão, João; Bártolo, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic ovarian cancer uncommonly presents with skin metastasis. When present, skin metastases of ovarian cancer are usually localized in the vicinity of the primary tumor. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman with a rapid growing erythematous, well-defined nodule localized on the left nasal ala. A skin biopsy was performed and histopathological and immunohistochemical findings were compatible with a cutaneous metastasis of adenocarcinoma. A systematic investigation revealed a bilateral ovarian cystadenocarcinoma associated with visceral dissemination, likely associated with nose cutaneous metastasis. We report a very uncommon case because of the presentation of ovarian carcinoma as cutaneous metastasis. To our knowledge, this atypical localization on the nose has not been described yet in the literature. PMID:28300910

  14. Perforin expression in feline epitheliotropic cutaneous lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Neta, Michal; Naigamwalla, Dinaz; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2008-11-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas are uncommon in people and companion animals. The tumors can be broadly categorized into epitheliotropic and nonepitheliotropic forms, which appear to have different biological behaviors. The present case describes a feline cutaneous epitheliotropic lymphoma. Masses in a 9-year-old cat were first identified on the tail. The cat was treated with chemotherapy, but additional skin masses developed on the flank, face, and ears. Local radiation induced transient tumor regression, but eventual dissemination prompted euthanasia 13 months after initial tumor appearance. Granular lymphocytes were consistently detected on blood smears, and histologically, the tumor involved the skin and superficial subcutis. Tumor lymphocytes expressed cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3) and perforin molecules, suggestive of a cytotoxic phenotype. Location, histopathological features, and perforin expression were similar to a distinct entity in human medicine designated primary cutaneous, CD8-positive, epidermotropic, cytotoxic, T-cell lymphoma.

  15. Cutaneous metastasis from gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin*

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Ana Lucia Ariano; Corbett, Ana Maria França; de Oliveira Filho, Jayme; Nasser, Kassila da Rosa; Haddad, Natalie Nejem; Tebet, Ana Carolina Franco

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis is a rare manifestation of visceral malignancies that indicates primarily advanced disease. Due to its low incidence and similarity to other cutaneous lesions, it is not uncommon to have a delayed diagnosis and a shortened prognosis. We describe the case of a patient who presented with a cutaneous nodule in the sternal region as a first sign of malignancy. PMID:26375228

  16. Problems in Cutaneous Communication from Psychophysics to Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmer, B. VonHaller; Clark, Leslie L., Ed.

    After reviewing the history of communication through the skin, this paper considers recent research into the problem of cutaneous stimulation induced both mechanically and electrically. The general demands of a cutaneous communication system are discussed, and four primary dimensions of cutaneous stimulation are summarized (locus, intensity,…

  17. Cutaneous metastasis from gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Ana Lucia Ariano; Corbett, Ana Maria França; Oliveira Filho, Jayme de; Nasser, Kassila da Rosa; Haddad, Natalie Nejem; Tebet, Ana Carolina Franco

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis is a rare manifestation of visceral malignancies that indicates primarily advanced disease. Due to its low incidence and similarity to other cutaneous lesions, it is not uncommon to have a delayed diagnosis and a shortened prognosis. We describe the case of a patient who presented with a cutaneous nodule in the sternal region as a first sign of malignancy.

  18. Cutaneous chancroid in a visitor from Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    McBride, William J H; Hannah, Rory C S; Le Cornec, Genevera M; Bletchly, Cheryl

    2008-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman from Vanuatu presented to an Australian hospital with a 3-week history of a non-healing ulcer on the lower leg. A swab was submitted for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction designed to investigate genital ulcerative conditions. Haemophilus ducreyi was detected and the gene product was subsequently sequenced, confirming the diagnosis of cutaneous chancroid. The lesion responded to intramuscular benzathine penicillin. This report adds further evidence that cutaneous chancroid should be considered in the evaluation of skin ulcers in the south Pacific.

  19. Three eyelid localized cutaneous anthrax cases.

    PubMed

    Esmer, Oktay; Karadag, Remzi; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Gultepe, Bilge; Bayramlar, Huseyin; Karadag, Ayse Serap

    2014-12-01

    Anthrax is primarily seen in the developing countries, but it can be a worldwide medical concern due to bioterrorism threats. Palpebral anthrax is a rare form of cutaneous anthrax. Untreated cutaneous anthrax can be lethal. Patients with palpebral anthrax can develop complications including cicatrisation and ectropion. Thus, anthrax should be considered in differential diagnosis for patients presenting with preseptal cellulitis in high-risk regions. Herein, we report three anthrax cases (with different age) involving eyelids that were cured without any complications due to early diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Primary cutaneous lymphomas: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (CLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative neoplasms, with lymphatic proliferation limited to the skin with no involvement of lymph nodes, bone marrow or viscera at the diagnosis. Cutaneous lymphomas originate from mature T-lymphocytes (65% of all cases), mature B-lymphocytes (25%) or NK cells. Histopathological evaluation including immunophenotyping of the skin biopsy specimen is the basis of the diagnosis, which must be complemented with a precise staging of the disease and identification of prognostic factors, to allow for the choice of the best treatment method as well as for the evaluation of the treatment results. PMID:26759546

  1. Cutaneous malignancies in immunosuppressed organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Seda, Ivette M Sosa; Zubair, Adeel; Brewer, Jerry D

    2014-01-01

    During the past century, organ transplantation has delivered the miracle of life to more than 500,000 patients in need. Secondary malignancies have developed as an unforeseen consequence of intense immunosuppressive regimens. Cutaneous malignancies have been recognized as the most frequent cancer that arises post-transplantation. Among organ transplant recipients (OTRs), skin cancer is a substantial cause of morbidity and potential mortality. The authors discuss epidemiology and clinical presentation of cutaneous malignancies; associated risk factors; recommendation for the care of immunosuppressed OTRs, and emerging therapies on the horizon.

  2. Cutaneous mucinosis in mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Favarato, Maria Helena Sampaio; Miranda, Sofia Silveira de Castro; Caleiro, Maria Teresa Correia; Assad, Ana Paula Luppino; Halpern, Ilana; Fuller, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous mucinosis is a group of conditions involving an accumulation of mucin or glycosaminoglycan in the skin and its annexes. It is described in some connective tissue diseases but never in association with mixed connective tissue disease. This report concerns two cases of cutaneous mucinosis in patients with mixed connective tissue disease in remission; one patient presented the papular form, and the other reticular erythematous mucinosis. These are the first cases of mucinosis described in mixed connective tissue disease. Both cases had skin lesions with no other clinical or laboratorial manifestations, with clinical response to azathioprine in one, and to an association of chloroquine and prednisone in the other.

  3. Frontal cutaneous meningioma--Case report.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Leonor; Coutinho, Ines; Cardoso, José Carlos; Garcia, Helena; Cordeiro, Margarida Robalo

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous meningiomas are rare tumors most commonly located on the scalp. We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with a 2 x 3 cm tumoral lesion on the forehead. The lesion was hard, adherent and covered by normal skin. Incisional biopsy revealed a proliferation of monomorphic round cells, organized in nests and focally forming pseudovascular spaces. Immunohistochemical study revealed positivity for epithelial antigen membrane and vimentin. Vascular markers, cytokeratins and S100 protein were negative. A brain CT scan did not show any evidence of intracranial meningioma. The authors describe the case of a cutaneous frontal meningioma in probable relation with previous cranioencephalic trauma.

  4. Cutaneous mucinosis in mixed connective tissue disease*

    PubMed Central

    Favarato, Maria Helena Sampaio; Assad, Ana Paula Luppino; Miranda, Sofia Silveira de Castro; Halpern, Ilana; Caleiro, Maria Teresa Correia; Fuller, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous mucinosis is a group of conditions involving an accumulation of mucin or glycosaminoglycan in the skin and its annexes. It is described in some connective tissue diseases but never in association with mixed connective tissue disease. This report concerns two cases of cutaneous mucinosis in patients with mixed connective tissue disease in remission; one patient presented the papular form, and the other reticular erythematous mucinosis. These are the first cases of mucinosis described in mixed connective tissue disease. Both cases had skin lesions with no other clinical or laboratorial manifestations, with clinical response to azathioprine in one, and to an association of chloroquine and prednisone in the other. PMID:24068142

  5. Cutaneous Manifestations in POEMS Syndrome: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Flauberto Sousa; Pirmez, Rodrigo; Nogueira, Renata; Cuzzi, Tullia; Sodré, Celso Tavares; Silva, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of sensorimotor polyneuropathy, diffuse cutaneous hyperpigmentation, skin sclerodermiform thickening and papular lesions in the infraclavicular and abdominal region. Besides weight loss, there were diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism. The alterations were consistent with POEMS (Polyneuropathy, Organomegaly, Endocrinopathy, Monoclonal gammopathy and Skin changes) syndrome, which is a rare systemic disease with monoclonal proliferation of plasmacytes and slow progression. Cutaneous alterations are present in 68% of patients with diffuse cutaneous hyperpigmentation, plethora and acrocyanosis. Leukonychia, necrotizing vasculitis, hypertrichosis and cutaneous thickening of sclerodermiform type are also cited. The onset of multiple cutaneous angiomas in this syndrome has been observed in 24–44% of patients. PMID:26034475

  6. Characterization of EPC Mobilization Following Cutaneous Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lee M.; Klanke, Charles A.; Lang, Stephanie A.; Pokall, Stefan; Maldonado, Arturo R.; Vuletin, Jose F.; Alaee, Datis; Keswani, Sundeep G.; Lim, Foong-Yen; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are known to play an important role in neovascularization and wound healing. We investigated the temporal effects of cutaneous wounding on EPC surface markers within the peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM), and better understand the role of the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis on EPC mobilization after wounding. FVB/NJ mice were administered bilateral 8mm circular full thickness skin wounds. PB and BM were isolated at daily intervals post wounding through day 7 for EPC mobilization characteristics and levels of SDF-1α. Cutaneous wounding was found to cause a transient increase in EPC mobilization that peaked on day 3. In contrast, SDF-1α protein within blood plasma was observed to significantly decrease on days 3, 4, and 7 following cutaneous wounding. BM levels of SDF-1α protein decreased to a nadir on day 3, the same day as peak mobilization was observed to occur. The decrease in BM SDF-1α protein levels was also associated with a decrease in SDF-1α mRNA suggesting transcriptional down regulation as a contributing factor. This study for the first time characterizes EPC mobilization following cutaneous wounding in mice and supports a major role for the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis in regulating mobilization within the BM, without evidence for systemic increases in SDF-1α. PMID:20546555

  7. Feline Cutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Caused by Phialophora verrucosa

    PubMed Central

    Dion, W. M.; Pukay, B. P.; Bundza, A.

    1982-01-01

    A cutaneous granuloma which developed on the muzzle of a nine year old cat was shown by histopathology to have been caused by a dematiaceous fungus which was cultured and identified as Phialophora verrucosa. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17422109

  8. Primary cutaneous adenoid carcinoma of the scalp.

    PubMed

    Keck, Meike; Ueberreiter, Klaus; Tanzella, Ursula; Doll, Dietrich; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Primary adenoid carcinoma are rare skin tumors. We present a 75-year-old female with this primary cutaneous tumor of the scalp with additional bone involvement. Wide scalp excision with bone enclosure, latissimus-dorsi-free-flap defect overage, and subsequent radiation slowed down the disease but could not prevent further skull infiltration.

  9. [Viruses as agents inducing cutaneous neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Bravo Puccio, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    The oncogenic role of viruses in cutaneous neoplasms has been known by humankind for more than a century, when the origin of the common wart, or verruca vulgaris, was attributed to the human papilloma virus (HPV). Currently, virus-induced cutaneous neoplasms may be grouped into solid tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders. HPV, from which various serotypes are now known, each being linked to a specific neoplasm, the human herpes virus type 8 producing Kaposi sarcoma, and the Merkel cell polyomavirus, highlight among the first group. Regarding the lymphoproliferative disorders, we should mention the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1), which is responsible for the T-cell lymphomas, in which the cutaneous manifestations are non-specific and have a wide spectrum, thus posing a challenge for differential diagnosis. The Epstein Barr virus, linked to nasal lymphomas of NK/T-cells and Hydroa-like cutaneous lymphomas, is also part of this group. In an era in which the genetic and molecular aspects of cancer research prevail, we may not leave behind the concept of neoplasms as a result an infection with a viral agent, which opens a wide array of new possibilities for cancer treatment based on antiviral drugs.

  10. Cutaneous sporotrichosis. Intermittent treatment (pulses) with itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Fierro, Leonel; Saúl, Amado; Ponce, Rosa María

    2008-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous and exceptionally deep mycosis caused by a dimorphic fungus, Sporothrix schenckii. Itraconazole is a triazole derivative leading to good results in the treatment of sporotrichosis. Patients with cutaneous sporotrichosis proven with mycological tests (direct examination and culture) were enrolled. All patients underwent laboratory tests (at baseline and on a monthly basis) and received oral itraconazole 400 mg/day for one week with a 3-week break (pulses); thereafter the drug was administered as pulses until clinical and mycological cure was achieved. Five patients with sporotrichosis were enrolled, 4 with cutaneous lymphangitic form and one with fixed cutaneous form. Clinical and mycological cure was achieved in 4/5 cases (80%), with a mean number of pulses of 3.5. No patient had side effects and no laboratory test abnormalities occurred. Intermittent or pulsed itraconazole was effective in treating cutaneous sporotrichosis. It may be considered as a new treatment choice that entails an important reduction in total medication use.

  11. [Cutaneous malignant melanoma and the new drugs].

    PubMed

    Nieweg, Omgo E; Gallegos-Hernández, José Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous melanoma has historically been essentially surgical. Much progress has been made in this area, and the resection margins have been established based on tumour depth. Candidates are also identified for lymphadenectomy, avoiding the morbidity of the procedure in patients who do not require it. But little progress has been made in systemic treatment, since the 70's when the use of dacarbazine was introduced for the treatment of patients with tumour progression or distant metastasis, with disappointing results. Despite this, Dacarbazine has been the most used drug to the present. Three years ago, two new drugs were introduced, one of them based on the target therapy and other one in the immunotherapy, offering, with the obtained results, an alternative in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma The objectives of this article are to show the pathways of these drugs, to describe the current role of surgery in cutaneous melanoma, with the arrival of these drugs, as well as to know the therapeutic alternatives that are emerging for the cutaneous melanoma based on scientific evidence.

  12. Revisiting determinants of prognosis in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sarah A; Hanniford, Douglas; Hernando, Eva; Osman, Iman

    2015-12-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for cutaneous melanoma is based on primary tumor thickness and the presence of ulceration, mitoses, lymph node spread, and distant metastases as determinants of prognosis. Although this cutaneous melanoma staging system has evolved over time to more accurately reflect patient prognosis, improvements are still needed, because current understanding of the particular factors (genetic mutation, expression alteration, host response, etc) that are critical for predicting patient outcomes is incomplete. Given the clinical and biologic heterogeneity of primary melanomas, new prognostic tools are needed to more precisely identify patients who are most likely to develop advanced disease. Such tools would affect clinical surveillance strategies and aid in patient selection for adjuvant therapy. The authors reviewed the literature on prognostic molecular and immunologic markers in primary cutaneous melanoma, their associations with clinicopathologic and survival outcomes, and their potential for incorporation into current staging models. Overall, the studies considered in this review did not define prognostic markers that could be readily incorporated into the current staging system. Therefore, efforts should be continued in these and other directions to maximize the likelihood of identifying clinically useful prognostic biomarkers for cutaneous melanoma.

  13. Human cutaneous anthrax, Georgia 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota; Blackburn, Jason K

    2014-02-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010--2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk.

  14. Periorbital cellulitis due to cutaneous anthrax.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Grant; Starks, Victoria; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2015-12-01

    Virgil's plague of the ancient world, Bacillus anthracis, is rare in developed nations. Unfortunately rural communities across the globe continue to be exposed to this potentially lethal bacterium. Herein we report a case of periorbital cutaneous anthrax infection in a 3-year-old girl from the rural area surrounding Harare, Zimbabwe with a brief review of the literature.

  15. Cutaneous blastomycosis masquerading as pyoderma gangrenosum.

    PubMed

    Azar, Marwan M; Relich, Ryan F; Schmitt, Bryan H; Spech, Robert W; Hage, Chadi A

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous blastomycosis (CB) is associated with a variety of skin manifestations. Among other entities, CB may be mistaken for pyoderma gangrenosum due to overlap of findings on histopathologic examination. We report a case of CB, initially diagnosed as pyoderma gangrenosum and treated with steroids, leading to disseminated blastomycosis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

  16. Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Erythroderma

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Varadraj V; Naveen, KN; Athanikar, SB; Dinesh, US; Reshme, Priyanka; Divyashree, RA

    2014-01-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a type of lupus erythematosus having distinct characteristic clinical, serologic, and genetic features. Other than the commonly occurring papulosquamous and annular polycyclic lesion, rarely it may present as erythema multiformae, toxic epidermo necrolysis like lesion (Rowell syndrome), erythroderma, and generalized poikiloderma. Herein, we report a case of SCLE presenting as erythroderma. PMID:25484433

  17. Human Cutaneous Anthrax, Georgia 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Kracalik, Ian; Malania, Lile; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Manvelyan, Julietta; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Tsanava, Shota

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the occurrence of human cutaneous anthrax in Georgia during 2010–-2012 by examining demographic and spatial characteristics of reported cases. Reporting increased substantially, as did clustering of cases near urban centers. Control efforts, including education about anthrax and livestock vaccination, can be directed at areas of high risk. PMID:24447721

  18. Cutaneous lesions of the external ear

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Sand, Daniel; Brors, Dominik; Altmeyer, Peter; Mann, Benno; Bechara, Falk G

    2008-01-01

    Skin diseases on the external aspect of the ear are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, othorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners, general and plastic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the ear. This article will focus on those diseases wherefore surgery or laser therapy is considered as a possible treatment option or which are potentially subject to surgical evaluation. PMID:18261212

  19. Clinical characteristics of cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Szczęch, Justyna; Rutka, Maja; Samotij, Dominik; Zalewska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lupus erythematosus (LE) shows a wide variety of clinical manifestations, skin involvement being one of the most important. Aim To analyze the clinical presentation of cutaneous variants of lupus erythematosus in terms of skin lesion spectrum and extracutaneous involvement. Material and methods A total of 64 patients with cutaneous LE (CLE) were included. The study was based on the “Core Set Questionnaire” developed by the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). Clinical severity of skin lesions was evaluated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI). All results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results Fifteen (23.4%) patients had an acute CLE (ACLE), 26 (40.6%) subacute CLE (SCLE) and 21 (32.8%) chronic CLE (CCLE). Two (3.2%) individuals only demonstrated urticarial vasculitis as a cutaneous manifestation of LE and these patients were excluded. Patients with ACLE were characterized by the earliest onset of the disease (mean age of 31.9 ±15.0 years; p < 0.001). On average, 4.8 ±1.8 criteria of systemic LE were found in the ACLE group compared to 2.7 ±1.3 criteria in SCLE and 2.5 ±1.5 criteria in CCLE (p < 0.001). The highest activity of skin lesions according to CLASI was found in the SCLE group (p = 0.002). On the other hand, the most severe skin damage was observed in CCLE (p < 0.01). Conclusions Each variant of CLE differs significantly from the others in respect of various aspects of clinical manifestations. Due to a number of different variants of LE skin lesions, a unified classification of CLE still remains a challenge. PMID:26985173

  20. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  1. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando–IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd–CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics.

  2. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando–IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd–CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics. PMID:27905505

  3. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  4. Proton therapy in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Furukawa, S.; Kawachi, K.; Kanai, T.; Ohara, H.; Kitagawa, T.; Inada, T.

    1985-01-01

    There are two facilities for clinical trials with protons in Japan: the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, and the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center (PARMS), University of Tsukuba. At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, patient treatment with the 70 MeV proton beam began in November 1979, and 29 patients were treated through December 1984. Of 11 patients who received protons only, 9 have had local control of the tumor. Two of the 9 patients, suffering from recurrent tumor after radical photon beam irradiation, developed complications after proton treatment. In the patients treated with photons or neutrons followed by proton boost, tumors were controlled in 12 of 18 patients (66.6%), and no complications were observed in this series. Malignant melanoma could not be controlled with the proton beam. A spot-beam-scanning system for protons has been effectively used in the clinical trials to minimize the dose to the normal tissues and to concentrate the dose in the target volume. At the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center, University of Tsukuba, treatment with a vertical 250 MeV proton beam was begun in April 1983, and 22 patients were treated through February 1984. Local control of the tumor was observed in 14 of 22 patients (63.6%), whereas there was no local control in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. There have been no severe complications in patients treated at PARMS. The results suggest that local control of tumors will be better with proton beams than with photon beams, whereas additional modalities are required to manage radioresistant tumors.

  5. Expertise effects in cutaneous wind perception.

    PubMed

    Pluijms, Joost P; Cañal-Bruland, Rouwen; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Mulder, Fabian A; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2015-08-01

    We examined whether expertise effects are present in cutaneous wind perception. To this end, we presented wind stimuli consisting of different wind directions and speeds in a wind simulator. The wind simulator generated wind stimuli from 16 directions and with three speeds by means of eight automotive wind fans. Participants were asked to judge cutaneously perceived wind directions and speeds without having access to any visual or auditory information. Expert sailors (n = 6), trained to make the most effective use of wind characteristics, were compared to less-skilled sailors (n = 6) and to a group of nonsailors (n = 6). The results indicated that expert sailors outperformed nonsailors in perceiving wind direction (i.e., smaller mean signed errors) when presented with low wind speeds. This suggests that expert sailors are more sensitive in picking up differences in wind direction, particularly when confronted with low wind speeds that demand higher sensitivity.

  6. Cutaneous anthrax in a school teacher.

    PubMed

    Nandi, A K; Kamal, M M; Alam, M A; Rahman, F; Uddin, M J; Baidya, N R; Mostafa, S M

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous anthrax is an infection of the skin caused by Bacillus anthracis. This is a report of a case of cutaneous anthrax attending outpatients of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital in October, 2010. The infected person was a retired school teacher with a very good body build. He reported to handle cow flesh about 4-5 days ago, developed few painless papules over shin of right leg, which gradually became large bullae and blackish eschar developed over the lesion. Smears from the lesions were investigated which confirmed the causative agent B. anthracis. The patient was treated with oral Ciprofloxacin (500mg) twice daily for seven days which cured the infection as observed on his subsequent follow up visits on 7 and 14 days later. Oral Ciprofloxacin is found effective as recommended by the World Health Organization.

  7. Ofloxacin Induced Cutaneous Reactions in Children.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Yerramalli Roja; Mishra, Sailen Kumar; Rath, Bandana; Rath, Saroj Sekhar

    2015-06-01

    Cutaneous adverse effects to antimicrobials are a major health problem. Though majority of them are mild and self-limiting, severe variants like Steven Johnson Syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are not uncommon. Ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone widely used for the treatment of urinary tract infections, acute bacterial diarrheas, enteric fever, STDs and other soft tissue infections either as a single drug or in combination with other drugs. Earlier a case of mucocutaneous maculopapular rash with oral ofloxacin and was reported in an adult. In the present hospital set up there were few reports of such reactions to adults. Here we report three different variants of reactions associated with oral ofloxacin in chlidren. Early detection of cutaneous lesions and immediate withdrawal of the offending drug can prevent progression of such reactions to their severe variants as well as morbidity and mortality.

  8. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Rambhia, Kinjal Deepak; Hadawale, Snehal D.; Khopkar, Uday S.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy (CCV) is a distinct, rare, and underdiagnosed condition. We report a case of CCV in a 50-year-old woman presenting as asymptomatic, erythematous to hyperpigmented nonblanchable macules over both the lower extremities. The clinical differential diagnosis of the lesions was pigmented purpuric dermatoses (Schamberg's purpura) and cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. Histology of the lesions revealed dilated superficial dermal vessels with abundant pink hyaline material in the vessel wall, which stained with periodic acid Schiff stain. The patient was diagnosed as CCV. This condition remains largely underdiagnosed and is commonly mistaken for pigmented purpuric dermatosis or generalized essential telangiectasia. Emphasis on the differentiation of CCV from its clinical and histological mimicks is made. PMID:26955587

  9. [88 years of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Morocco].

    PubMed

    El Alami, S; Aoufi, S

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis in its cutaneous form is a public health problem in Morocco. The objectives of this study were to assess the development of its epidemiological profile, identify the relevant species, and determine the location of the identified cases and their distribution by year, by sex, and by age. This retrospective epidemiological study covers a period of 88 years and concerns all reported cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Morocco from the first description in 1922 until 2010. During this period, 56,194 cases have been reported; they account for 95.7% of all cases of leishmaniasis (n = 58,710). The endemicity of CL has changed over time. The increase in its incidence is likely to be explained both by improved reporting and by a real increase in the number of cases.

  10. Cutaneous porphyrias part II: treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Tintle, Suzanne; Alikhan, Ali; Horner, Mary E; Hand, Jennifer L; Davis, Dawn Marie R

    2014-01-01

    The porphyrias are diverse in pathophysiology, clinical presentation, severity, and prognosis, presenting a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Although not easily curable, the dermatological manifestations of these diseases, photosensitivity and associated cutaneous pathology, can be effectively prevented and managed. Sun avoidance is essential, and patient education regarding the irreversibility of photocutaneous damage is a necessary corollary. Beyond preventative measures, the care of fragile, vulnerable skin, and pain management, each of the porphyrias has a limited number of unique additional therapeutic options. Many of the treatments have been published only in small case series or anecdotal reports and do not have well-understood nor proven mechanisms of action. This article presents a comprehensive review of available therapeutic options and long-term management recommendations for the cutaneous porphyrias.

  11. Efficacy of miltefosine for Bolivian cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jaime; Rea, Jaime; Balderrama, Margarita; Toledo, Julia; Soto, Paula; Valda, Luis; Berman, Jonathan D

    2008-02-01

    Oral miltefosine (2.5 mg/kg/d for 28 days) was compared with intramuscular antimony (20 mg/kg/d for 20 days) in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis in Palos Blancos, Bolivia. The cure rates with 6 months of follow-up were statistically similar: 36 of 41 evaluable miltefosine patients (88%) versus 15 of 16 (94%) evaluable antimony patients. However, antimony cured more rapidly, because, by 1 month after therapy, 31 of 44 miltefosine patients (70%) compared with 16 of 16 antimony patients (100%) had achieved cure. The two conclusions from this work are that oral miltefosine can be used for cutaneous disease in this part of Bolivia and that miltefosine was more effective for L. braziliensis in this region than for L. braziliensis in Guatemala. Chemotherapy needs to be evaluated in each endemic region, even if the "same" species of Leishmania causes disease in these locales.

  12. A cutaneous mixed tumor in a dog

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Ken-ichi; CHAMBERS, James K.; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; NIBE, Kazumi; USHIO, Nanako; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; NAKAYAMA, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The atypical cutaneous tumor of a 9-year-old mixed breed female dog was examined. The tumor was well-demarcated and histologically composed of a trichoblastic area, tricholemmal area and apocrine glandular area. Neoplastic cells in trichoblastic area and tricholemmal area had PAS-positive granules in the cytoplasm and were positive for pan-cytokeratin, cytokeratin 5/6, 14 and 19 and p63. Neoplastic cells in trichoblastic area were also positive for cytokeratin 15 and CD34. Neoplastic cells in apocrine glandular area were positive for pan-cytokeratin and cytokeratin 7, 18 and 19. Myoepithelial cell proliferation with osteocartilaginous metaplasia was observed in this area. Since neoplastic cells showed multiphenotypic differentiation for hair follicles and apocrine glands, the present case was diagnosed as a cutaneous mixed tumor. PMID:28132963

  13. The Proton launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, A.; Parfitt, J.

    1985-08-01

    The capabilities, design features and missions for the Soviet Proton booster are described. The Proton, outfitted with six strap-on boosters, launched the Vega 1 and 2 Venus/Halley dual mission spacecraft. RD-253 engines burn N2O4 and UDMH fuels, possibly through a preburner before the combustion chamber. A vacuum thrust of 450,000 lb is projected for the engine. Analyses are presented to set the launch weight at 1,600,000 lb, implying that the vehicle is based on an ICBM design. It is suggested that the Proton has sufficiently high noise and vibration levels to prohibit it from being man-rated.

  14. Are protons nonidentical fermions?

    SciTech Connect

    Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We briefly review the progress of our investigation on the electric (charge) radius of the proton. In order to explain the recently measured proton radius, which is significantly smaller than the standard CODATA value, we assume that the real protons radii are not identical, they are randomly distributed in a certain range. To obtain the measured radius we average the radii and fit both the mean radius and the range. By using an averaged dipole form factor we obtain the charge radius r{sub E} = 0.8333 fm, in accordance with the recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen.

  15. Cutaneous cryptococcosis in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Alexander, Barbara D; Lortholary, Olivier; Dromer, Francoise; Forrest, Graeme N; Lyon, G Marshall; Somani, Jyoti; Gupta, Krishan L; Del Busto, Ramon; Pruett, Timothy L; Sifri, Costi D; Limaye, Ajit P; John, George T; Klintmalm, Goran B; Pursell, Kenneth; Stosor, Valentina; Morris, Michele I; Dowdy, Lorraine A; Muñoz, Patricia; Kalil, Andre C; Garcia-Diaz, Julia; Orloff, Susan L; House, Andrew A; Houston, Sally H; Wray, Dannah; Huprikar, Shirish; Johnson, Leonard B; Humar, Atul; Razonable, Raymund R; Fisher, Robert A; Husain, Shahid; Wagener, Marilyn M; Singh, Nina

    2010-09-01

    Clinical manifestations, treatment, and outcomes of cutaneous cryptococcosis in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are not fully defined. In a prospective cohort comprising 146 SOT recipients with cryptococcosis, we describe the presentation, antifungal therapy, and outcome of cutaneous cryptococcal disease. Cutaneous cryptococcosis was documented in 26/146 (17.8%) of the patients and manifested as nodular/mass (34.8%), maculopapule (30.4%), ulcer/pustule/abscess (30.4%), and cellulitis (30.4%) with 65.2% of the skin lesions occurred in the lower extremities. Localized disease developed in 30.8% (8/26), and disseminated disease in 69.2% (18/26) with involvement of the central nervous system (88.9%, 16/18), lung (33.3%, 6/18), or fungemia (55.6%, 10/18). Fluconazole (37.5%) was employed most often for localized and lipid formulations of amphotericin B (61.1%) for disseminated disease. Overall mortality at 90 days was 15.4% (4/26) with 16.7% in disseminated and 12.5% in localized disease (P = 0.78). SOT recipients who died were more likely to have renal failure (75.0% vs. 13.6%, P = 0.028), longer time to onset of disease after transplantation (87.5 vs. 22.6 months, P = 0.023), and abnormal mental status (75% vs. 13.6%, P = 0.028) than those who survived. Cutaneous cryptococcosis represents disseminated disease in most SOT recipients and preferentially involves the extremities. Outcomes with appropriate management were comparable between SOT recipients with localized and disseminated cryptococcosis.

  16. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Paduraru, Mihai; Moreno-Sanz, Carlos; Olalla Gallardo, Jose Maria

    2016-08-16

    Mucormycosis is most common in immunocompromised patients, but it can also occur in healthy hosts, most frequently as primary cutaneous mucormycosis (PCM) and predominantly as a result of skin trauma. We present an uncommon case of PCM in a healthy, young man with no previous history of local trauma. Despite rapid progression of the infection, the patient was successfully treated through surgical intervention and by administering liposomal amphotericin B and posaconazole. He made a full recovery without the need for skin grafting.

  17. Cutaneous presentation preceding acute monocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xianhua; Li, Fuqiu; Li, Xue; Zhu, Wenjing; Mou, Yan; Huang, Yang; Zhao, Huanyu; Gao, Wei; Xia, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Cutaneous presentation preceding acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is rare, and the prognosis is poor. Patient concerns: We report 4 cases of AML cutis, where skin infiltration precedes any blood or bone marrow evidence of leukemia. We also reviewed 13 cases reported in English and Chinese literature. The 4 cases all presented typical cutaneous lesions without any systemic evidence of leukemia. Histopathological examination found that dense monomorphous cell infiltration involved the dermis. Some cells surrounded blood vessels and skin appendages in a concentric manner or showed single-row arrangement in the collagen fiber bundles. Uninvolved papillary dermis was found to separate normal epidermis from dermal infiltration. Minor cells had a large kidney-shaped or oval nucleus with nucleoli and slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive for CD4, CD56, while CD123 was negative in all cases. Diagnoses: AML-M5. Interventions: 2 patients received chemotherapy ,but others rejected treatment. Outcomes: Most patients died within 1 year after the onset of skin lesions. Lessons: These findings suggest that skin infiltration of AML may precede any systemic evidence, and typical cutaneous lesions in elderly individuals may be indicative for AML. PMID:28272239

  18. Infiltrative Cutaneous Hemangiolipoma in a Goat

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Jessica R.; Byers, Stacey R.; Schaffer, Paula A.; Worley, Deanna R.; Ehrhart, E. J.; Duncan, Colleen G.; Grossman, Alicia N.; Holt, Timothy; Callan, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    An approximately 4-year-old castrated male, Saanen cross goat presented to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation and removal of a 22 cm × 22 cm, dark red, thickened, and crusted cutaneous lesion along the left ventrolateral thorax. An initial incisional biopsy performed approximately 8 weeks earlier was suspicious for cutaneous hemangiosarcoma. Surgical excision was deemed to be the most appropriate treatment option for this goat. A complete physical exam, complete blood count, and chemistry profile were performed and results were within normal limits. Thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound were performed to rule out metastatic disease and comorbid conditions; no metastatic lesions or other abnormalities were observed. En bloc surgical excision of the affected skin was performed and the entire tissue was submitted for histopathology. A final diagnosis of cutaneous hemangiolipoma was reached upon extensive sectioning and histologic examination of the larger tissue specimen. The goat recovered well from surgery and has had no further complications up to 9 months postoperatively. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a hemangiolipoma in a goat and surgical excision for such lesions appears to be a viable treatment method. PMID:23956926

  19. Discoveries and controversies in cutaneous mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Tadini, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    Genetic mosaicism is thought to be a common phenomenon in inherited skin disorders. It is the leading molecular mechanism explaining cutaneous hamartomas and nevoid disorders, skin manifestations of most X-linked genodermatoses and specific forms of clinical variability and topographic distribution in autosomal skin disorders. The developmental (in utero) origin and timing dependence are two major attributes for the current definition of cutaneous mosaicism. Chromosomal mosaicism, lyonization in X-linked genodermatoses, and various types of mosaicism (i.e. type 1, type 2 and revertant mosaicism) in autosomal skin disorders are mechanisms well defined at the molecular level. All these concepts have been fully included in the current medical terminology in dermatology and genetics. Mitotic crossing-over, paradominant inheritance, monoallelic expression of autosomal traits and mosaicism in acquired skin disorders remain without a formal molecular proof and still represent sources of debate in the scientific community. This review summarizes current concepts, discoveries and controversies in the field of cutaneous mosaicism for practitioners and clinical researchers to enhance their understanding of such a underestimated clinical phenomenon and its biological basis.

  20. Epidemiology of cutaneous drug-induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Naldi, L; Crotti, S

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous reactions represent in many surveillance systems, the most frequent adverse events attributable to drugs. The spectrum of clinical manifestations is wide and virtually encompasses any known dermatological disease. The introduction of biological agents and so-called targeted therapies has further enlarged the number of reaction patterns especially linked with cytokine release or in balance. The frequency and clinical patterns of cutaneous reactions are influenced by drug use, prevalence of specific conditions (e.g., HIV infection) and pharmacogenetic traits of a population, and they may vary greatly among the different populations around the world. Studies of reaction rates in cohorts of hospitalized patients revealed incidence rates ranging from, 1 out 1000 to 2 out 100 of all hospitalized patients. For drugs such as aminopenicillines and sulfamides the incidence of skin reactions is in the order of 3-5 cases out of 100 exposed people. Although the majority of cutaneous reactions are mild and self-limiting, there are reactions such as Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Surveillance systems routed on sound epidemiologic methodology, are needed to raise signals and to assess risks associated with specific reactions and drug exposures. Identification of risk factors for adverse reactions and appropriate genetic screening of groups at higher risk may improve the outcomes of skin reactions.

  1. Hydroxychavicol: A phytochemical targeting cutaneous fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Intzar; Satti, Naresh Kumar; Dutt, Prabhu; Prasad, Rajendra; Khan, Inshad Ali

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the potency of hydroxychavicol on selected cutaneous human pathogenic fungi by the use of in vitro and in vivo assays and mechanistic characterization along with toxicological effects. Hydroxychavicol consistently displayed a fungicidal effect against all fungal species tested. Inoculum concentrations over the range of 104 to 107 CFU/ml did not significantly alter its antifungal potential and time–kill curve results revealed concentration–dependent killing. It also inhibited the growth of biofilm generated by Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Candida parapsilosis and reduced the preformed biofilms. Hydroxychavicol was highly effective in the treatment, and mycological eradication of an experimentally induced topical infection model of dermatophytosis (tinea corporis) and cutaneous candidiasis in guinea pigs, respectively. The mode of action of hydroxychavicol appears to originate from the disruption of cell membrane integrity. Administration of hydroxychavicol in mice at 500 mg per kg of body weight by orally produced no overt toxicity. The retention capacity of hydroxychavicol in vitro, in the presence of keratin has attributed to its in vivo effectiveness in the guinea pig model of topical infections. Furthermore, it is suggestive of its potential use as phytochemical for topical use in cutaneous fungal infections. PMID:27897199

  2. Cutaneous findings in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Gulsen; Metin, Ahmet; Emre, Selma; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2013-01-01

    Acromegaly is a systemic syndrome caused by overproduction of growth hormone. The syndrome affects cutaneous, endocrine, cardiovascular, skeletal, and respiratory systems. Cutaneous manifestations of acromegaly are various, usually being the first presenting findings of the disease. Forty-nine patients with acromegaly, followed-up at a tertiary referral hospital, underwent dermatological examination. There were 27 (55.1%) female and 22 (44.9%) male patients. The age at onset of the disease was older in females than males (P=0.045). Most patients had acral enlargements, large triangular nose, coarse face, thickened lower lip, and prognathism. Fourteen (28.6%) patients had multiple cherry angiomas, five (10.2%) had varicose veins in lower limbs, and two (4.1%) had psoriasis. In conclusion, a wide spectrum of cutaneous symptoms and features may be associated with acromegaly. Detailed dermatological examination of patients with acromegaly should be an essential component of systemic evaluation. Future prospective studies investigating the relationships between changes in skin signs, hormone levels, and response to treatments may help understand details of skin involvement in acromegaly.

  3. Cutaneous EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Gru, Alejandro A; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2017-01-01

    This article will focus on the cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders associated with EBV, with an emphasis on the upcoming changes in the revised 4th Edition of the WHO classification of tumors of the hematopoietic system, many of which deal with cutaneous disorders derived from NK-cells or T-cells. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma usually presents in the upper aerodigestive tract, but can involve the skin secondarily. EBV-associated T- and NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in the pediatric age group include the systemic diseases, chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and systemic EBV+ T-cell lymphoma of childhood. Hydroa vacciniforme (HV)-like LPD is a primarily cutaneous form of CAEBV and encompasses the lesions previously referred to as HV and HV-like lymphoma (HVLL). All the T/NK-cell-EBV-associated diseases occur with higher frequency in Asians, and indigenous populations from Central and South America and Mexico. Among the B-cell EBV-associated LPD two major changes have been introduced in the WHO. The previously designated EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV-DLBCL) of the elderly, has been changed to EBV-DLBCL with 'not otherwise specified' as a modifier (NOS). A new addition to the WHO system is the more recently identified EBV+ mucocutaneous ulcer, which involves skin and mucosal-associated sites.

  4. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis--an import from Belize].

    PubMed

    Schnedl, Jakob; Auer, Herbert; Fischer, Marcellus; Tomaso, Herbert; Pustelnik, Tom; Mooseder, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis of the New World, in particular when caused by Leishmania (L.) braziliensis, harbours the risk of lymphogenic as well as hematogenic dissemination. This may result in mucocutaneous leishmaniasis causing severe destruction of orofacial structures. Dissemination may occur years after the disappearance of the skin lesions. In contrast, cutaneous leishmaniasis of the old world, is typically restricted to the site of inoculation. Therefore, a conservative diagnostic and therapeutic approach is usually sufficient. Infections acquired in the new world should be treated systemically, if infection with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis complex cannot be excluded. Here we report on three Austrian soldiers, who, weeks after having participated in an international jungle patrol course in Belize, presented themselves with multiple ulcers on the upper limbs. Diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis was made based upon histological evaluation of biopsies taken from several ulcers revealing the presence of leishmanial bodies, and detection of amastigote leishmania in smears of material obtained from the ulcers. As species phenotyping could not be performed, infection with L. brasiliensis as well as progression into a mucocutaneous form were possible, demanding systemic therapy. Several treatment options including local cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen, paromomycin (Humatis Pulvis, Parke-Davis) 15% topically or oral fluconazole (Diflucan, Pfizer) 200 mg/d were applied, but showed no effect. Hence, a systemic therapy with intravenous pentamidine (Pentacarinat, Gerot), three times in total, 3-4 mg/kg body weight each, led to a complete regression of the lesions within four weeks.

  5. Chronic iritis associated with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jessica; Rodriguez, Alexis; Pearcy-Baluyot, Mischelle; Shahi, Sanjeet K

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) is a systemic condition that can be associated with iritis. LCV is characterized as a small-vessel vasculitis of the cutaneous area. The disease demonstrates purple lesions on the skin due to the destruction of small cutaneous blood vessels. These lesions are palpable and most often coalesce forming larger patches on the surface of the skin. During early stages of LCV, the disease can be undetected due to the infrequency and small size of the skin lesions. As such, the patient might go undiagnosed for years while having symptoms of LCV or iritis of unknown etiology. This article discusses the correlation seen with LCV and iritis. We report a case on a patient that presented to our clinic with a history of bilateral chronic iritis. After extensive laboratory testing, we concluded that the chronicity of her iritis was due to her LCV. The correlation between LCV and iritis was not evident for several years in our patient. We also discuss the correlation with systemic Sjogren's syndrome and LVC and how these two separate diseases are linked in many patients. We will illustrate the importance of serological testing, imaging, and skin lesion biopsy for the diagnosis of LCV.

  6. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Giles T. S.; Mills, Stuart J.; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials. PMID:26137471

  7. Primary Cutaneous Histoplasmosis Masquerading as Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Poonam; Aggarwal, Radhika; Kaushal, Seema

    2017-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a genus of dimorphic fungi having various varieties of which the commonest one causing infection is Histoplasma capsulatum known to cause histoplasmosis. It has a varied disease spectrum ranging from an acute infection to chronic disease especially in lungs, disseminated disease and cutaneous disorder. Histoplasma capsulatum usually causes subclinical infection and serious infections only manifest in immunocompromised patients. Frank cases of infection are seen in pulmonary histoplasmosis. The spores of these organisms are seen to be strongly associated with droppings of birds and bats. A combination of these droppings and some soil types provide for an excellent environment for the proliferation of spores. Pulmonary histoplasmosis and disseminated disease are very common in AIDS patients and are a great cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Primary cutaneous histoplasmosis is very rare and occurs due to penetrating injuries. Once diagnosis is made, the lesions respond very well to oral itraconazole, fluconazole or amphotericicn B. We report a rare case of Cutaneous Histoplasmosis (CHP) in a 70-year-old male with complaints of multiple nodules all over his body in a HIV seronegative and otherwise immunocompetent patient. PMID:28273974

  8. Engine having multiple pumps driven by a single shaft

    DOEpatents

    Blass, James R.

    2001-01-01

    An engine comprises an engine housing. A first engine fluid sub-system that includes a first pump and the engine housing defining a first fluid passage is also included in the engine. The engine also includes at least one additional engine fluid sub-system that includes a second pump and the engine housing defining a second fluid passage. A rotating shaft is at least partially positioned in the engine housing, the first pump and the second pump.

  9. How dogs lap: open pumping driven by acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-11-01

    Dogs drink by lapping because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck fluids into the mouth. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from a bath, which is then swallowed, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured the kinematics of lapping from nineteen dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments with an accelerating rod help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results suggest that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, and that dogs curl the tongue ventrally (backwards) and time their bite on the column to increase fluid intake per lap. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that though they both lap with the same frequency scaling with respect to body mass and have similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: a high-acceleration regime for dogs and a low-acceleration regime for cats.

  10. Uncertainty estimates for proton-proton fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Bijaya

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the proton-proton fusion cross section using chiral effective field theory (χEFT) and perform a rigorous analysis of the associated uncertainties. The statistical errors in the low-energy constants, which are fitted too scattering and bound-state observables in the pion-nucleon, nucleon-nucleon, and few-nucleon sectors, are propagated to the calculated cross section. We also investigate the sensitivity of the fusion cross section to the high-momentum cutoff of the χEFT. We extract a value for the zero-energy S-factor using a polynomial extrapolant and analyze the errors associated with this procedure. Our result is compared to that of another χEFT calculation in which the wave functions were represented in a truncated Hilbert space with discrete basis states. Supported by the NSF under Grant Nos. PHY-1516077 and PHY- 1555030.

  11. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  12. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  13. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  14. Varied Presentations of Cutaneous Rhinosporidiosis: A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Thurakkal; Komu, Fibin

    2016-01-01

    Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous disorder of infective etiology and it frequently affects the nasal cavity and nasopharynx. Involvement of skin in rhinosporidiosis is unusual and it may manifest itself in a diverse manner mimicking several common dermatological conditions. Three cases of cutaneous rhinosporidiosis with different presentations are reported here to highlight the manifold nature of the condition. Cutaneous rhinosporidiosis can mimic several common cutaneous disorders. PMID:27057026

  15. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. Localized cutaneous argyria: Report of two patients and literature review.

    PubMed

    Beutler, Bryce David; Lee, Robert A; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-11-15

    BackgroundLocalized cutaneous argyria is a rare skin condition caused by direct contact with silver or silver particles. It presents as asymptomatic gray or blue-gray macules that appear similar to blue nevi. Histologic features include brown-colored or black-colored silver granules in the basement membrane and dermis, most commonly surrounding eccrine glands, elastic fibers, and collagen fibrils. The condition is most frequently observed in individuals who are regularly exposed to small silver particles, such as silversmiths and welders. However, localized cutaneous argyria has also been associated with acupuncture needles, silver earrings, and topical medications containing silver nitrate. Although the condition is benign, patients who are concerned about the cosmetic features of localized cutaneous argyria may benefit from laser therapy.PurposeWe describe the clinical and pathologic findings of two women who developed localized cutaneous argyria. We also review the characteristics of other patients with localized cutaneous argyria and summarize the differential diagnosis and treatment options for this condition.Materials and methodsThe features of two women with localized cutaneous argyria are presented. Using PubMed, the following terms were searched and relevant citations assessed: acquired localized argyria, acupuncture, argyria, argyrosis, colloidal silver, cutaneous argyria, and localized cutaneous argyria. In addition, the literature on localized cutaneous argyria is reviewed.ResultsTwo women presented with small, asymptomatic blue-gray macules appearing at sites directly adjacent to ear piercings. A punch biopsy was performed on one woman. Microscopic examination revealed a yellowish-brown colored granular material found adjacent to elastic fibers. Based on correlation of the clinical presentation and histopathologic findings, a diagnosis of localized cutaneous argyria was established. The second woman did not undergo a biopsy. However, the clinical

  17. Reflex inhibition of cutaneous and muscle vasoconstrictor neurons during stimulation of cutaneous and muscle nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Kirillova-Woytke, Irina; Baron, Ralf; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous (CVC) and muscle (MVC) vasoconstrictor neurons exhibit typical reflex patterns to physiological stimulation of somatic and visceral afferent neurons. Here we tested the hypothesis that CVC neurons are inhibited by stimulation of cutaneous nociceptors but not of muscle nociceptors and that MVC neurons are inhibited by stimulation of muscle nociceptors but not of cutaneous nociceptors. Activity in the vasoconstrictor neurons was recorded from postganglionic axons isolated from the sural nerve or the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus nerve in anesthetized rats. The nociceptive afferents were excited by mechanical stimulation of the toes of the ipsilateral hindpaw (skin), by hypertonic saline injected into the ipsi- or contralateral gastrocnemius-soleus muscle, or by heat or noxious cold stimuli applied to the axons in the common peroneal nerve or tibial nerve. The results show that CVC neurons are inhibited by noxious stimulation of skin but not by noxious stimulation of skeletal muscle and that MVC neurons are inhibited by noxious stimulation of skeletal muscle but not by noxious stimulation of skin. These inhibitory reflexes are mostly lateralized and are most likely organized in the spinal cord. Stimulation of nociceptive cold-sensitive afferents does not elicit inhibitory or excitatory reflexes in CVC or MVC neurons. The reflex inhibition of activity in CVC or MVC neurons generated by stimulation of nociceptive cutaneous or muscle afferents during tissue injury leads to local increase of blood flow, resulting in an increase of transport of immunocompetent cells, proteins, and oxygen to the site of injury and enhancing the processes of healing.

  18. Proton dynamics in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth. Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC) in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology. PMID:20550689

  19. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  20. Cutaneous viral infections in organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Piaserico, S; Sandini, E; Peserico, A; Alaibac, M

    2014-08-01

    Cutaneous infections might occur in up to 80% of organ transplant recipients (OTR) and viral infections are the most common them. The risk of different skin infection is among related to the intensity of immunosuppression. During the first post-transplant period, herpes viruses are most common. After some months following transplantation, human papilloma viruses represent the most significant infections among OTR. Reactivation of herpes simplex virus in OTR can become more invasive, takes longer to heal, and shows greater potential for dissemination to visceral organs compared to the general population. Specific immunosuppressive drugs (namely muromonab and mycophenolate mofetil) have been associated with an increased risk of herpes virus reactivation after transplantation. On the other hand, there is evidence that the mTOR inhibitors, such as everolimus, may be associated with a decreased incidence of herpesvirus infections in transplant recipients. The incidence of herpes zoster in OTR is 10 to 100 fold higher than the general population, ranging from 1% to 12%. The chronic immunosuppression performed in OTR may lead to persistent replication of herpesviruses, dissemination of the virus with multivisceral involvement (hepatitis, pneumonitis, myocarditis, encephalitis and disseminated intravascular coagulation) and eventually, the emergence of antiviral-drug resistance. Viral warts are the most common cutaneous infection occurring in OTR. The number of warts increases with the duration of immunosuppressive therapy. Since warts in organ recipients are frequently multiple and only rarely undergo spontaneous regression, the therapeutic management of warts in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs might be challenging. Imiquimod, 1% cidofovir ointment, acitretin proved to be useful off-label strategies for recalcitrant cutaneous viral warts in OTR. Extensive and atypical presentation of molluscum contagiosum has been also reported in OTR, with a prevalence

  1. Postural reorganization induced by torso cutaneous covibration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom-Chan; Martin, Bernard J; Ho, Allison; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2013-05-01

    Cutaneous information from joints has been attributed proprioceptive properties similar to those of muscle spindles. This study aimed to assess whether vibration-induced changes in torso cutaneous information contribute to whole-body postural reorganization in humans. Ten healthy young adults stood in normal and Romberg stances with six vibrating actuators positioned on the torso in contact with the skin over the left and right external oblique, internal oblique, and erector spinae muscle locations at the L4/L5 vertebrae level. Vibrations around the torso were randomly applied at two locations simultaneously (covibration) or at all locations simultaneously. Kinematic analysis of the body segments indicated that covibration applied to the skin over the internal oblique muscles induced shifts of both the head and torso in the anterior direction (torso flexion) while the hips shifted in the posterior direction (ankle plantar flexion). Conversely, covibration applied to the skin over the erector spinae muscle locations produced opposite effects. However, covibration applied to the skin over the left internal oblique and left erector spinae, the right internal oblique and right erector spinae, or at all locations simultaneously did not induce any significant postural changes. In addition, the center of pressure position as measured by the force plate was unaffected by all covibration conditions tested. These results were independent of stance and suggest an integrated and coordinated reorganization of posture in response to vibration-induced changes in cutaneous information. In addition, combinations of vibrotactile stimuli over multiple locations exhibit directional summation properties in contrast to the individual responses we observed in our previous work.

  2. α-Synuclein in cutaneous autonomic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningshan; Gibbons, Christopher H.; Lafo, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop a cutaneous biomarker for Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Twenty patients with PD and 14 age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent examinations, autonomic testing, and skin biopsies at the distal leg, distal thigh, and proximal thigh. α-Synuclein deposition and the density of intraepidermal, sudomotor, and pilomotor nerve fibers were measured. α-Synuclein deposition was normalized to nerve fiber density (the α-synuclein ratio). Results were compared with examination scores and autonomic function testing. Results: Patients with PD had a distal sensory and autonomic neuropathy characterized by loss of intraepidermal and pilomotor fibers (p < 0.05 vs controls, all sites) and morphologic changes to sudomotor nerve fibers. Patients with PD had greater α-synuclein deposition and higher α-synuclein ratios compared with controls within pilomotor nerves and sudomotor nerves (p < 0.01, all sites) but not sensory nerves. Higher α-synuclein ratios correlated with Hoehn and Yahr scores (r = 0.58–0.71, p < 0.01), with sympathetic adrenergic function (r = −0.40 to −0.66, p < 0.01), and with parasympathetic function (r = −0.66 to −0.77, p > 0.01). Conclusions: We conclude that α-synuclein deposition is increased in cutaneous sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic fibers but not sensory fibers of patients with PD. Higher α-synuclein deposition is associated with greater autonomic dysfunction and more advanced PD. These data suggest that measures of α-synuclein deposition in cutaneous autonomic nerves may be a useful biomarker in patients with PD. PMID:24089386

  3. Cutaneous manifestations in disorders of hepatobiliary system

    PubMed Central

    Godara, Shashi K.; Thappa, Devinder M.; Pottakkatt, Biju; Hamide, Abdoul; Barath, Jagadisan; Munisamy, Malathi; Chiramel, Minu J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hepatobiliary diseases are associated with various mucocutaneous changes that are directly and indirectly associated with these diseases. There is a dearth of studies from India dealing with cutaneous manifestations in liver disorders. Aim: This study was conducted to know the spectrum of cutaneous changes and their correlation with liver function tests in patients with disorders of hepatobiliary system. Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted among in patients and outpatients with primary hepatobiliary disorders at a tertiary care center in South India. Detailed history taking and examination was done. Visual analog score (VAS) and 5D itch score was employed to quantify pruritus. Correlation of liver function tests with pruritus and comparison of skin changes in the major disease groups was attempted. Results: A total of 303 patients were recruited. Hepatic mass/malignancy followed by nonalcoholic liver disease were the most common diagnoses. Icterus followed by pruritus were the most common cutaneous complaints. The mean VAS and 5D itch scores among the patients with pruritus were 4.7 ± 1.9 and 13.6 ± 4.9. The most common mucocutaneous findings observed were icterus (241 patients; 79.5%), ichthyosis/xerosis (172 patients; 56.7%), pallor (131 patients; 43.2%), excoriations (118 patients; 38.9%), hyperpigmented palmar creases (118 patients; 38.9%), clubbing (113 patients; 37.2%), and pedal edema (85 patients; 28%). There was statistically significant correlation between serum bilirubin levels and pruritus. Conclusion: The common mucocutaneous manifestations associated with primary hepatobiliary disorders were icterus, ichthyosis/xerosis, pallor, excoriations, hyperpigmented palmar creases, clubbing, and pedal edema. PMID:28217465

  4. Platelet gel for healing cutaneous chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Crovetti, Giovanni; Martinelli, Giovanna; Issi, Marwan; Barone, Marilde; Guizzardi, Marco; Campanati, Barbara; Moroni, Marco; Carabelli, Angelo

    2004-04-01

    Wound healing is a specific host immune response for restoration of tissue integrity. Experimental studies demonstrated an alteration of growth factors activity due to their reduced synthesis, increased degradation and inactivation. In wound healing platelets play an essential role since they are rich of alpha-granules growth factors (platelet derived growth factor--PDGF; transforming growth factor-beta--TGF-beta; vascular endothelial growth factor--VEGF). Topical use of platelet gel (PG), hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets and cryoprecipitate, gives the exogenous and in situ adding of growth factors (GF). The hemocomponents are of autologous or homologous origin. We performed a technique based on: multicomponent apheretic procedure to obtain plasma rich platelet and cryoprecipitate; manual processing in an open system, in sterile environment, for gel activation. Every step of the gel synthesis was checked by a quality control programme. The therapeutic protocol consists of the once-weekly application of PG. Progressive reduction of the wound size, granulation tissue forming, wound bed detersion, regression and absence of infective processes were considered for evaluating clinical response to hemotherapy. 24 patients were enrolled. They had single or multiple cutaneous ulcers with different ethiopathogenesis. Only 3 patients could perform autologous withdrawal; in the others homologous hemocomponent were used, always considering suitability and traceability criteria for transfusional use of blood. Complete response was observed in 9 patients, 2 were subjected to cutaneous graft, 4 stopped treatment, 9 had partial response and are still receiving the treatment. In each case granulation tissue forming increased following to the first PG applications, while complete re-epithelization was obtained later. Pain was reduced in every treated patient. Topical haemotherapy with PG may be considered as an adjuvant treatment of a multidisciplinary process

  5. Cutaneous histopathology of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kao, G F; Evancho, C D; Ioffe, O; Lowitt, M H; Dumler, J S

    1997-11-01

    The dermatologic diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is often presumptive; the clinical presentation includes skin rash and febrile illness with or without a clear history of tick bite. The characteristic cutaneous manifestations include a generalized skin eruption with purpuric, blanching or non-blanching macules and papules usually involving the extremities. Although skin biopsies are often performed to confirm the diagnosis, the spectrum of cutaneous histopathology in RMSF has not been well described. We studied a series of 26 cases of RMSF, of which 10 were surgical specimens and 16 were autopsies. The microscopic changes were correlated with the duration of illness. The main histopathologic feature was lymphohistiocytic capillaritis and venulitis with extravasation of erythrocytes, edema, predominantly perivascular and some interstitial infiltrate. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) with neutrophilic infiltrate and nuclear dust was seen in 11 of 15 (73%) specimens from involved skin. These lesions with LCV also showed notable epidermal change including basal layer vacuolar degeneration with mild dermoepidermal interface lymphocytic exocytosis. Six lesions with LCV displayed focal fibrin thrombi and capillary wall necrosis. Apoptotic keratinocytes were noted in 3 lesions with LCV. Subepidermal blister was observed in the skin lesion of an autopsied patient with LCV changes. Another lesion of a fatal case with LCV also contained features of acute neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis. Focal small nerve twig inflammation was noted in a third autopsy case with LCV. Plasma cells were seen in 6 of 34 specimens (18%); and eosinophils were observed in 3 (9%). The subcutaneous fat contained a mild perivascular inflammation and one case revealed focal lobular neutrophilic inflammation. Immunohistologic (IH) staining using polyclonal rabbit anti-Rickettsia rickettsii demonstrated positive staining of the organisms in the affected endothelial cells in all 12 cases

  6. Cutaneous infections due to Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, W. H.; Boyko, W. J.; Allen, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    Toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae was grown from skin lesions of 44 indigent patients seen at the emergency or out-patient departments of this hospital, 43 of them within the last 16 months of the study period. In all cases staphylococci or hemolytic streptococci were also present in the wounds. An increase in the incidence of clinical diphtheria occurred in the few months preceding and overlapping the period of recognition of the cutaneous infections. The gravis strains, which accounted for the majority of the infections, were sensitive to erythromycin and to penicillin, but were relatively resistant to cloxacillin. PMID:4632361

  7. Diffuse cutaneous allergic reaction to Dermabond.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Joseph A; Parekh, Nirav N; Desai, Naman S

    2014-10-01

    Wound closure with 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (Dermabond; Ethicon, Somerville, New Jersey USA) has recently increased in popularity across a wide spectrum of physicians ranging from surgeons to emergency medicine practitioners. Generally, very few complications are associated with Dermabond and are usually related to application techniques. Uncommonly, patients present with allergic reactions to the adhesive compounds; these allergies are often misdiagnosed as cellulitis or another infectious process, and are incorrectly treated. This report describes a rare case of a diffuse cutaneous allergic reaction to Dermabond following its use to close a surgical incision, its prompt identification, and treatment after presentation to an emergency department.

  8. Musculoskeletal and cutaneous sarcoidosis: exuberant case report*

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Natalie; de Oliveira, Jayme; Nasser, Kassila da Rosa; Corbett, Ana Maria França; Tebet, Ana Carolina Franco; Reis, Mariana Lacerda Junqueira

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown cause. The osteoarticular involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and is often associated with cutaneous and long-standing chronic multisystem disease. More common in black women, osseous sarcoidosis is difficult to diagnose, with an incidence of 3 to 13%. The most characteristic radiological clinical picture evidences rounded, well-defined cysts, with no periosteal reaction and without peripheral sclerosis. The small bones of hands and feet are the most frequently involved sites. This report aims to demonstrate a rare case of osteoarticular sarcoidosis with characteristic clinical presentation, and highlight the importance of detecting osteoarticular involvement in this pathology. PMID:25054759

  9. Protective Immunity and Vaccination Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Mou, Zhirong; Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude

    2012-01-01

    Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained from studies on the immunobiology of leishmaniasis, there is still no universally acceptable, safe, and effective vaccine against the disease. This strongly suggests that we still do not completely understand the factors that control and/or regulate the development and sustenance of anti-Leishmania immunity, particularly those associated with secondary (memory) immunity. Such an understanding is critically important for designing safe, effective, and universally acceptable vaccine against the disease. Here we review the literature on the correlate of protective anti-Leishmania immunity and vaccination strategies against leishmaniasis with a bias emphasis on experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:22661975

  10. Multifocal Cutaneous Tuberculosis in Immunocompetent Individual

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Malay; Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Rathod, Kirti

    2015-01-01

    Most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis (TB) is lupus vulgaris, which usually occurs in previously sensitized individuals who have a high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Various forms including plaque, ulcerative, hypertrophic, vegetative, papular, and nodular forms have been described. We are reporting a case of a young female, who presented with 6 well defined erythematous scaly plaques involving both arms and a puckered scar on right forearm and right breast. Clinically, it was looking like lupus vulgaris with cold abscess, few lesions mimicking scrofuloderma, but skin biopsy from both the types of lesions revealed lupus vulgaris. Patient improved with Anti Tuberculous Therapy and surgical drainage of underlying cold abscess. PMID:26816978

  11. [Cutaneous lupus erythematosus, a multidimensional entity].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Flores, Silvia; Tinoco-Fragoso, Fátima; Hernández-Molina, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Skin lesions caused by systemic lupus erythematosus are among the most frequent manifestations of this disease. These lesions show great variability in both their clinical and histological expression, making their understanding and study difficult. Patients presenting with cutaneous lupus do not necessarily have serious systemic complications, but they do have significant morbidity from impact on quality of life given the extent of the lesions, chronic tendency, and the risk of scarring; hence the importance of establishing a fast and effective treatment. This paper addresses the different varieties of specific injuries attributed to lupus erythematosus, correlation with systemic activity, quality of life, and the treatments available.

  12. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer.

  13. Results in children managed by cutaneous ureterostomy.

    PubMed

    Sarduy, G S; Crooks, K K; Smith, J P; Wise, H A

    1982-05-01

    A review of 59 children with severe hydronephrosis managed by cutaneous ureterostomy reveals that the procedure is safe, quick, and effective in draining the kidney. Although chronic bacteriuria is common, pyelonephritis is rare. The major drawback of this technique for temporary urinary diversion in children is that the subsequent urinary reconstruction is formidable and more difficult than primary repair. The complications of urinary diversion using this technique are low, however, and it may remain the safest form of diversion available for long-term use in children with dilated ureters.

  14. Multifocal Cutaneous Tuberculosis in Immunocompetent Individual.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Malay; Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan; Rathod, Kirti; Vora, Rita V

    2015-12-01

    Most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis (TB) is lupus vulgaris, which usually occurs in previously sensitized individuals who have a high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Various forms including plaque, ulcerative, hypertrophic, vegetative, papular, and nodular forms have been described. We are reporting a case of a young female, who presented with 6 well defined erythematous scaly plaques involving both arms and a puckered scar on right forearm and right breast. Clinically, it was looking like lupus vulgaris with cold abscess, few lesions mimicking scrofuloderma, but skin biopsy from both the types of lesions revealed lupus vulgaris. Patient improved with Anti Tuberculous Therapy and surgical drainage of underlying cold abscess.

  15. Dermoscopic patterns of cutaneous melanoma metastases.

    PubMed

    Rubegni, Pietro; Lamberti, Arianna; Mandato, Filomena; Perotti, Roberto; Fimiani, Michele

    2014-04-01

    In 2-8% of patients with melanoma, the first clinical manifestation of the disease may be skin metastasis. In these cases, differential diagnosis with the primary melanoma, benign melanocytic lesions, and other malignant and benign skin growths is particularly challenging. For this reason, the dermatologist's approach to cutaneous metastases of malignant melanoma calls for knowledge of the great morphological variety of these lesions. Dermoscopic characteristics associated with CMMMs have not yet been codified. The aim of the present review is to provide additional information about dermoscopic aspects of these skin lesions.

  16. Nasal and cutaneous aspergillosis in a goat.

    PubMed

    do Carmo, P M S; Portela, R A; de Oliveira-Filho, J C; Dantas, A F M; Simões, S V D; Garino, F; Riet-Correa, F

    2014-01-01

    Nasal and cutaneous aspergillosis is reported in an adult goat. The clinical signs were severe respiratory distress due to partial nasal obstruction, bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge, skin nodules on the ears and dorsal nasal region and focal depigmentation of the ventral commissure of the right nostril. At necropsy examination, sagittal sectioning of the head revealed a yellow irregular mass extending from the nasal vestibule to the frontal portion of the nasal cavity. Microscopically, there was pyogranulomatous rhinitis and dermatitis, with numerous intralesional periodic acid-Schiff-positive fungal hyphae morphologically suggestive of Aspergillus spp. Aspergillus niger was isolated by microbiological examination.

  17. The Horizon for Treating Cutaneous Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Amit M.; Chou, Elizabeth L.; Findeiss, Laura; Kelly, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Dermatologists encounter a wide range of cutaneous vascular lesions, including infantile hemangiomas, port-wine stain birthmarks, arteriovenous malformations, venous malformations, Kaposi sarcomas, angiosarcomas, and angiofibromas. Current treatment modalities to reduce these lesions include topical and/or intralesional steroids, laser therapy, surgical resection, and endovascular therapy. However, each method has limitations owing to recurrence, comorbidities, toxicity, or lesion location. Photodynamic therapy, antiangiogenic therapy, and evolving methods of sclerotherapy are promising areas of development that may mitigate limitations of current treatments and offer exciting options for patients and their physicians. PMID:22640429

  18. Delayed cutaneous manifestations of drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J; Scherer, Kathrin

    2010-07-01

    Drugs may elicit a considerable variety of clinical signs, often affecting the skin and the mucous membranes. The most common are maculopapular exanthemas and urticaria, more rarely pustules, bullae vasculitic lesions, and lichenoid lesions may also be observed. Apart from the morphology, the chronology of the occurrence and the evolution of single skin lesions and exanthema are also paramount in the clinical diagnosis of cutaneous drug hypersensitivity. Often, the skin represents the only organ manifestation; however, it may be the herald for a systemic involvement of internal organs, such as in severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndromes or anaphylaxis.

  19. Molecular pathogenesis of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Nageatte; Haluska, Frank G

    2009-01-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer without an effective treatment. An understanding of the genetic basis of melanoma has recently shed light on some of the mechanisms of melanomagenesis. This review explores the major genes involved in familial and sporadic cutaneous melanoma with an emphasis on CDKN2A, CDK4, MC1R, and MAPK pathway targets (e.g., RAS and BRAF), apoptosis regulators (e.g., BCL-2, AKT, and APAF-1), and the tumor-suppressor genes TP53 and PTEN. New directions for therapeutics based on our current knowledge of the genes implicated in melanoma are also discussed.

  20. Primary Cutaneous Plasmacytosis: Masquerading as Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Zawar, Vijay; Sharma, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cutaneous plasmacytosis (CP) is a rare entity with few cases reported in world literature. CP masquerading as hidradenitis suppurativa like presentation is a unique case with some features differentiating it clinically from it which were further confirmed by histopathology and immunostaining. Our case showed hyperplasia of mature plasma cells and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, immunostaining for CD138 positivity and kappa: lambda ratio more than 3:1. Extensive clinical and laboratory investigations failed to reveal any underlying pathology, presence of any underlying disease accompanying the hypergammaglobulinemia and/or plasma cell proliferation. PMID:27057027

  1. The horizon for treating cutaneous vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit M; Chou, Elizabeth L; Findeiss, Laura; Kelly, Kristen M

    2012-06-01

    Dermatologists encounter a wide range of cutaneous vascular lesions, including infantile hemangiomas, port-wine stain birthmarks, arteriovenous malformations, venous malformations, Kaposi sarcomas, angiosarcomas, and angiofibromas. Current treatment modalities to reduce these lesions include topical and/or intralesional steroids, laser therapy, surgical resection, and endovascular therapy. However, each method has limitations owing to recurrence, comorbidities, toxicity, or lesion location. Photodynamic therapy, antiangiogenic therapy, and evolving methods of sclerotherapy are promising areas of development that may mitigate limitations of current treatments and offer exciting options for patients and their physicians.

  2. Chronic Cutaneous Draining Sinus of Dental Origin

    PubMed Central

    Sisodia, N; Manjunath, MK

    2014-01-01

    Extra oral sinus of odontogenic origin occurs when the purulent by-products of dental pulp necrosis spread along the path of least resistance from the root apex to the skin on the face. Patients presenting with cutaneous sinus usually visit a general physician or dermatologist first, as the lesion can mimic various dermatologic pathologies, ranging from an infected sebaceous cysts to a basal cell carcinoma. Despite systemic antibiotics, symptoms often persist causing further confusion, and at times leading to unnecessary surgical interventions. The location of this sinus in the head and neck region should lead the physician to seek a dental opinion in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:25506495

  3. Cutaneous histoplasmosis disclosing an HIV-infection*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Silvares, Maria Regina Cavariani; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis endemic in extensive areas of the Americas. The authors report on an urban adult male patient with uncommon oral-cutaneous lesions proven to be histoplasmosis. Additional investigation revealed unnoticed HIV infection with CD4+ cell count of 7/mm3. The treatment was performed with amphotericin B, a 2065 mg total dose followed by itraconazole 200mg/daily plus antiretroviral therapy with apparent cure. Histoplasmosis is an AIDS-defining opportunistic disease process; therefore, its clinical diagnosis must drive full laboratory investigation looking for unnoted HIV-infection. PMID:23793220

  4. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    PubMed

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  5. Cutaneous metastases of a mammary carcinoma in a llama.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, T L; Turner, O; Mason, G L; Barrington, G M

    2001-01-01

    An 8-year-old, female llama was evaluated for nonhealing, ulcerative, cutaneous lesions, which also involved the mammary gland. Biopsies of the lesions distant from and within the mammary gland area revealed an aggressive carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed at necropsy to be a mammary gland adenocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. Images Figure 1. PMID:11265189

  6. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis after cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: Periungual presentation.

    PubMed

    Cutlan, Jonathan E; Rashid, Rashid M; Torres-Cabala, Carlos; Tyring, Stephen K; Thomas, Valencia

    2010-08-15

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) has several clinical presentations and has been reported in various states of immune deregulation. We report the unique presentation of this disease as a pigmented periungual macule in a patient with a previous history of immune deregulation related to cutaneous lymphoma. A literature review did not reveal any previous reports of EV in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

  7. Radiology-pathology conference: cutaneous angiosarcoma of the leg.

    PubMed

    Linda, Dorota D; Harish, Srinivasan; Alowami, Salem; DeNardi, Franco; Deheshi, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous angiosarcoma is a rare aggressive vascular neoplasm with a poor prognosis, seen usually in the elderly population in a background of chronic lymphedema. We present a case of cutaneous angiosarcoma of the leg without any chronic lymphedema with clinicoradiological and histological correlation.

  8. The physics of proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-04-21

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy.

  9. The physics of proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy. PMID:25803097

  10. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing.

  11. Advances in the management of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sonal A.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most common non-melanoma skin cancers worldwide. While most cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas are easily managed, there is a high-risk subset of tumors that can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Tumor characteristics as well as patient characteristics contribute to the classification of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas as low-risk vs. high-risk. Advances in the treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas largely relate to the management of this high-risk subset. Surgical and non-surgical management options, including newer targeted molecular therapies, will be discussed here. Larger, multicenter studies are needed to determine the exact significance of individual risk factors with respect to aggressive clinical behavior and the risks of metastasis and death, as well as the role of surgical and adjuvant therapies in patients with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:25165569

  12. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references.

  13. Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

    1951-01-31

    The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

  14. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Valverde, N.J.; Da Silva, F.C.A.

    2015-01-01

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. PMID:26445332

  15. Molecular Bases of Cutaneous and Uveal Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaudi, Sudeep; Messina, Jane L.

    2011-01-01

    Intensive research in recent years has begun to unlock the mysteries surrounding the molecular pathogenesis of melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers. The high-penetrance, low-frequency susceptibility gene CDKN2A produces tumor suppressor proteins that function in concert with p53 and retinoblastoma protein to thwart melanomagenesis. Aberrant CDKN2A gene products have been implicated in a great many cases of familial cutaneous melanoma. Sporadic cases, on the other hand, often involve constitutive signal transduction along the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, with particular focus falling upon mutated RAS and RAF protooncogenes. The proliferative effects of the MAPK pathway may be complemented by the antiapoptotic signals of the PI3K/AKT pathway. After skin, melanoma most commonly affects the eye. Data for the constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway in uveal melanoma exists as well, however, not through mutations of RAS and RAF. Rather, evidence implicates the proto-oncogene GNAQ. In the following discussion, we review the major molecular pathways implicated in both familial and sporadic cutaneous melanomagenesis, the former accounting for approximately 10% of cases. Additionally, we discuss the molecular pathways for which preliminary evidence suggests a role in uveal melanomagenesis. PMID:21876842

  16. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma of the penile foreskin.

    PubMed

    Afrose, Ruquiya; Nebhnani, Deepa; Wadhwa, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma, considered to herald the onset of a blast crisis in the setting of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm/dysplasia, typically presents during the course of the disorder. Cutaneous involvement is uncommon and lesions on genital skin are seldom seen. We present a case of a well-differentiated myeloid sarcoma in the penile foreskin in an apparently healthy 29-year-old male presenting with phimosis. The unusual composition of the inflammatory cell infiltrate, and characteristic sparing of dermal blood vessels, nerves and smooth muscle fibres led to the correct diagnosis. Absence of commonly observed changes in the circumcision skin like those of balanitis xerotica was also helpful. Detailed hematological work up revealed a previously undiagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. The patient also had simultaneous priapism, another rare presentation of chronic myeloid leukemia. One year hence, the patient is in hematological remission with no evidence of extramedullary disease. Although priapism has been described as a rare presenting symptom in chronic myeloid leukemia, the present case is unique as this is the first time a cutaneous myeloid sarcoma has been documented in the penile foreskin.

  17. Optimization of DNA vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Susana; Belkaid, Yasmine; Seder, Robert A; Sacks, David

    2002-11-01

    The present studies were designed to examine the requirements of dose, route of inoculation and constituent antigens for the maintenance of complete and long lasting protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major conferred by a cocktail DNA vaccine encoding the Leishmania antigens LACK, LmST11 and TSA. Vaccination of C57Bl/6 mice with LACK DNA alone resulted in partial protection, whereas the combination of LmST11 and TSA provided stronger, though still incomplete protection compared to the combination of all three Ag DNAs. When intradermal (i.d), intramuscular (i.m.), and subcutaneous (s.c.) vaccination routes were compared, i.d. immunization reduced by five-fold the dose necessary to maintain complete protection. In vivo depletion of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells provided direct evidence that both populations are necessary to mediate complete protection. These results establish intradermal vaccination using DNA encoding multiple Leishmania antigens as a way to optimize priming of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells necessary for potent and durable protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  18. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  19. Ontogeny of the cutaneous sensory organs.

    PubMed

    Saxod, R

    1996-07-01

    The ontogeny of cutaneous sensory nerve organs is described in higher vertebrates, and includes the lamellated corpuscles of Meissner, Pacini and Herbst, and the Merkel cell-neurite complex with bird Merkel and Grandry corpuscles, and mammalian Merkel cells. The main common feature is that for most corpuscles there is an inside-out order of assembly around the nerve ending which is present from the beginning of end-organ ontogeny. The exception is the mammalian Merkel cell which is present in the epidermis before the entrance of nerve fibers, and could play a promotional role in the development of skin innervation. The developmental origin of Herbst and Merkel corpuscles in birds is reported as demonstrated using embryological experiments with cell markers. Conclusions are that inner bulb cells of Herbst corpuscles and bird Merkel cells are of neural crest origin, whereas other cells (inner space and capsular cells for Herbst corpuscle and capsular cells for Merkel corpuscles) are provided by the local mesenchyme. The question of the ontogeny of mammalian Merkel cells is discussed in relation to the two debated hypothesis of epidermal and neural crest origins. Morphogenetic interactions during the development of cutaneous sensory end organs are also discussed.

  20. Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Chrona, Eleni; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Damigos, Dimitrios; Batistaki, Chrysanthi

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES) is a commonly underdiagnosed and undertreated chronic state of pain. This syndrome is characterized by the entrapment of the cutaneous branches of the lower thoracoabdominal intercostal nerves at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle, which causes severe, often refractory, chronic pain. This narrative review aims to identify the possible therapeutic strategies for the management of the syndrome. Seventeen studies about ACNES therapy were reviewed; of them, 15 were case–control studies, case series, or case reports, and two were randomized controlled trials. The presently available management strategies for ACNES include trigger point injections (diagnostic and therapeutic), ultrasound-guided blocks, chemical neurolysis, and surgical neurectomy, in combination with systemic medication, as well as some emerging techniques, such as radiofrequency ablation and neuromodulation. An increased awareness of the syndrome and the use of specific diagnostic criteria for its recognition are required to facilitate an early and successful management. This review compiles the proposed management strategies for ACNES. PMID:28144159

  1. Primary cutaneous histiocytoid carcinoma with distant metastasis.

    PubMed

    Philips, Rebecca; Langston, Leila; Hwang, Helena; Vandergriff, Travis; Trynosky, Tanya; Berlingeri-Ramos, Alma C

    2017-04-01

    Distinguishing primary cutaneous adnexal carcinoma from metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary can be a diagnostic challenge due to the frequent overlap of histologic and immunohistochemical features. A 58-year-old man presented with a tender, indurated plaque on axillary skin. Biopsy revealed infiltrating atypical cells throughout the dermis, without connection to the epidermis. Tumor cells had a histiocytoid appearance and displayed mild pleomorphism. The tumor was discohesive and had areas with a single file pattern. Signet ring cells were also present. Cells were reactive with CK7, CK5/6, p63, GATA3, GCDFP-15 and Her 2-neu. Additional studies were negative, including TTF-1, CDX2, E-cadherin, mammaglobin, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor. Thorough clinical and radiologic evaluation failed to identify an occult primary extracutaneous malignancy; however, regional lymphadenopathy, widespread osteoblastic lesions and multiple subcentimeter liver hypodensities were noted. Considering the clinical and histopathologic features, the diagnosis of primary cutaneous histiocytoid carcinoma with distant metastasis was favored.

  2. Current clinical overview of cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lens, Marko

    This article reviews current evidence on epidemiology, diagnosis and management of cutaneous melanoma. Incidence of cutaneous melanoma is rising in all Caucasian populations across the world; thus, melanoma represents a significant public health burden. Although, incidence of melanoma is in continuous increase, a decrease of mortality and improved survival has been observed in most western European populations. Clinical characteristics of four major types of melanoma (superficial spreading, nodular, lentigo maligna melanoma and acral lentiginous melanoma) have been described. Surgical removal of melanoma remains the standard care in all primary melanomas. Current evidence suggests use of 1 to 2 cm excision margins. Wider margins may be necessary in patients with thicker melanomas with higher risk for local recurrence. In the treatment of regional lymph nodes elective lymphadenectomy has been surpassed by the sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). However, although prognostic value of SLNB has been confirmed, its therapeutical benefit still needs to be evaluated. Currently there is no standard adjuvant therapy for melanoma although interferon-alpha has been the most widely used treatment in the adjuvant setting. The role of metastasectomy (removal of distant metastases) is still controversial. Chemotherapeutic agents have a limited activity in patients with metastatic melanoma with response rates up to 25%. Although different vaccines have been tested in melanoma patients their role still remain to be established in phase III trials. Progresses in molecular biology and genetics of melanoma may lead to the development of novel melanoma therapies.

  3. Muscle pain inhibits cutaneous touch perception.

    PubMed

    Stohler, C S; Kowalski, C J; Lund, J P

    2001-06-01

    The processing of noxious and non-noxious sensations differs between chronic pain syndromes, and we believe that studies of sensory processing in the presence of pain will help to clarify the aetiology of the conditions. Here we measured in humans the threshold-level mechanosensitivity in tonic experimental muscle pain. We found (1) that muscle pain induced by hypertonic saline reduced cutaneous threshold-level mechanosensitivity at the site of pain and at the mirror site in the contralateral face, (2) that this effect outlasted the sensation of pain, (3) that it was more pronounced when the painful area was reported to be large, and (4) that the loss of mechanosensitivity was greater in males than females. Comparing our findings to results obtained with other pain models, all classes of nociceptors do not seem to have the same effect on cutaneous mechanosensitivity. The observed threshold-level hypoesthesia is consistent with the hypothesis that the increased mechanical thresholds found in clinic cases of temporomandibular disorders and cervicobrachialgia are a direct result of the activation of muscle nociceptors.

  4. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  5. Three new defined proton affinities for polybasic molecules in the gas-phase: Proton microaffinity, proton macroaffinity and proton overallaffinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Bayat, Mehdi

    2006-08-01

    A theoretical study on complete protonation of a series of tetrabasic molecules with general formula N[(CH 2) nNH 2][(CH 2) mNH 2][(CH 2) pNH 2] (tren, pee, ppe, tpt, epb and ppb) is reported. For first time, three kinds of gas-phase proton affinities for each polybasic molecule are defined as: 'proton microaffinity (PA n, i)', 'proton macroaffinity (PA)' and 'proton overall affinity ( PA)'. The variations of calculated logPA in the series of these molecules is very similar to that of their measured log Kn. There is also a good correlation between the calculated gas-phase proton macroaffinities and proton overallaffinities with corresponding equilibrium macroconstants and overall protonation constants in solution.

  6. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  7. Proton bunch compression strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Valeri; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The paper discusses main limitations on the beam power and other machine parameters for a 4 MW proton driver for muon collider. The strongest limitation comes from a longitudinal microwave instability limiting the beam power to about 1 MW for an 8 GeV compressor ring.

  8. High Power Proton Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities and challenges of high intensity proton accelerators, such as J-PARC, Fermilab MI, SNS, ISIS, PSI, ESS (in the future) and others. The presentation will focus on lessons learned, new concepts, beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate them.

  9. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  10. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose “painting” within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the

  11. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamonti, C.; Reggioli, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Civinini, C.; Marrazzo, L.; Menichelli, D.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Petterson, M.; Blumenkrantz, N.; Feldt, J.; Heimann, J.; Lucia, D.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Bashkirov, V.; Schulte, R.

    2010-01-01

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  12. Experimental comparison of bone revascularization by musculocutaneous and cutaneous flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.; Wood, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    Revascularization, one of the major components of bone healing, was examined in an experimental model. The radioactive microsphere technique demonstrated that after 4 weeks beneath a musculocutaneous flap, isolated bone segments had significant blood flow, whereas bone beneath a cutaneous flap did not. The muscle flap bone had a blood flow approximately half that of normal control bone. The muscle of the musculocutaneous flap had a blood flow three times that of the skin of the cutaneous flap. The bipedicle cutaneous flap used was designed to have a healthy blood supply, and at 4 weeks it had a blood flow twice that of control skin. Despite this, there was essentially no demonstrable blood flow in the cutaneous flap bone segments at 4 weeks. Only 3 of 17 bone segments underneath cutaneous flaps showed medullary vascularization, whereas 10 of 11 muscle flap bones did. All bone segments underneath muscle flaps showed osteoblasts and osteoclasts at 4 weeks; neither were seen in the cutaneous bone segments. The process of revascularization occurred through an intact cortex and penetrated into the cancellous bone. Because the bone segments were surrounded by an impervious barrier except for one cortical surface, the cellular activity seen is attributed to revascularization by the overlying flap. In this model, a muscle flap was superior to a cutaneous flap in revascularizing isolated bone segments at 4 weeks. This was documented by blood flow measured by the radioactive microsphere technique and by bone histology.

  13. Approach to Cutaneous Lymphoid Infiltrates: When to Consider Lymphoma?

    PubMed Central

    Charli-Joseph, Yann Vincent; Gatica-Torres, Michelle; Pincus, Laura Beth

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates (CLIs) are common in routine dermatopathology. However, differentiating a reactive CLI from a malignant lymphocytic infiltrate is often a significant challenge since many inflammatory dermatoses can clinically and/or histopathologically mimic cutaneous lymphomas, coined pseudolymphomas. We conducted a literature review from 1966 to July 1, 2015, at PubMed.gov using the search terms: Cutaneous lymphoma, cutaneous pseudolymphoma, cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, simulants/mimics/imitators of cutaneous lymphomas, and cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates. The diagnostic approach to CLIs and the most common differential imitators of lymphoma is discussed herein based on six predominant morphologic and immunophenotypic, histopathologic patterns: (1) Superficial dermal T-cell infiltrates (2) superficial and deep dermal perivascular and/or nodular natural killer/T-cell infiltrates (3) pan-dermal diffuse T-cell infiltrates (4) panniculitic T-cell infiltrates (5) small cell predominant B-cell infiltrates, and (6) large-cell predominant B-cell infiltrates. Since no single histopathological feature is sufficient to discern between a benign and a malignant CLI, the overall balance of clinical, histopathological, immunophenotypic, and molecular features should be considered carefully to establish a diagnosis. Despite advances in ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry and molecular clonality, these studies often display specificity and sensitivity limitations. Therefore, proper clinicopathological correlation still remains the gold standard for the precise diagnosis of CLIs. PMID:27512181

  14. Control of cutaneous blood flow by central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Ootsuka, Youichirou; Tanaka, Mutsumi

    2015-01-01

    Hairless skin acts as a heat exchanger between body and environment, and thus greatly contributes to body temperature regulation by changing blood flow to the skin (cutaneous) vascular bed during physiological responses such as cold- or warm-defense and fever. Cutaneous blood flow is also affected by alerting state; we ‘go pale with fright’. The rabbit ear pinna and the rat tail have hairless skin, and thus provide animal models for investigating central pathway regulating blood flow to cutaneous vascular beds. Cutaneous blood flow is controlled by the centrally regulated sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic premotor neurons in the medullary raphé in the lower brain stem are labeled at early stage after injection of trans-synaptic viral tracer into skin wall of the rat tail. Inactivation of these neurons abolishes cutaneous vasomotor changes evoked as part of thermoregulatory, febrile or psychological responses, indicating that the medullary raphé is a common final pathway to cutaneous sympathetic outflow, receiving neural inputs from upstream nuclei such as the preoptic area, hypothalamic nuclei and the midbrain. Summarizing evidences from rats and rabbits studies in the last 2 decades, we will review our current understanding of the central pathways mediating cutaneous vasomotor control. PMID:27227053

  15. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radici, Marco; Ricci, Alessandro M.; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-08-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions, and it allows us to test its universality.

  16. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-09-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues.

  17. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  18. Muscle metaboreceptor modulation of cutaneous active vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Stephens, D. P.; Johnson, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia has been shown to reduce cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) by inhibiting the cutaneous active vasodilator system. METHODS: To identify whether this response was initiated by muscle metaboreceptors, in seven subjects two 3-min bouts of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia were performed, followed by 2 min of postexercise ischemia (PEI). An index of forearm skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) was measured on the contralateral arm at an unblocked site and at a site at which adrenergic vasoconstrictor function was blocked via bretylium iontophoresis to reveal active cutaneous vasodilator function unambiguously. Sweat rate was measured via capacitance hygrometry, CVC was indexed from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure and was expressed as a percentage of maximal CVC at that site. In normothermia, neither isometric exercise nor PEI affected CVC (P > 0.05). RESULTS: The first bout of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia reduced CVC at control sites and this reduction persisted through PEI (pre-exercise: 59.8 +/- 5.4, exercise: 49.8 +/- 4.9, PEI: 49.7 +/- 5.3% of maximum; both P < 0.05), whereas there were no significant changes in CVC at the bretylium treated sites. The succeeding bout of isometric exercise in hyperthermia significantly reduced CVC at both untreated (pre-exercise: 59.0 +/- 4.8, exercise: 47.3 +/- 4.0, PEI: 50.1 +/- 4.1% of maximum; both P < 0.05) and bretylium treated sites (pre-exercise: 61.4 +/- 7.3, exercise: 50.6 +/- 5.1, PEI: 53.9 +/- 6.0% of maximum, both P < 0.05). At both sites, CVC during PEI was lower than during the pre-exercise period (P < 0.05). Sweat rate rose significantly during both bouts of isometric exercise and remained elevated during PEI. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the reduction in CVC during isometric exercise in hyperthermia, including the inhibition of the active vasodilator system, is primarily mediated by muscle

  19. Study on epidemiology of cutaneous amyloidosis in northern India and effectiveness of dimethylsulphoxide in cutaneous amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Arvind; Nath, Bhola; Dhir, G. G.; Kumari, Ranjeeta; Budhiraja, Virendra; Singh, Kalpana

    2012-01-01

    Context: Amyloidosis, which is characterized by the extracellular deposition of a proteinaceous substance, is usually associated with considerable tissue dysfunction. However, the etiology of the disease remains uncertain and the treatment disappointing. Aim: 1. To know the epidemiology of cutaneous amyloidosis 2. To evaluate the effect of dimethylsulphoxide on cutaneous amyloidosis. Settings and Design: Data was collected from patients attending the Outpatient Department (OPD) over a period of one year. Material and Methods: Patients were screened on the basis of signs and symptoms and then confirmed histologically. A total of 62 patients who were suspected to be suffering from amyloidosis on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms and 38 patients who were further confirmed histopathologically underwent the treatment. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test was used for testing the significance of proportions. Results: 63.15 percent of the patients had macular amyloidosis and the interscapular area was the most common area involved (52.63%). Pruritus, pigmentation, and papules responded excellently to dimethylsulphoxide after one month of treatment. Conclusions: Cutaneous amyloidosis is a disease found in middle-aged persons, with a female preponderance, and dimethylsulphoxide seems to be an effective therapy. PMID:23189250

  20. Multiple cutaneous melanomas associated with gastric and brain metastases*

    PubMed Central

    Grander, Lara Caroline; Cabral, Fernanda; Lisboa, Alice Paixão; Vale, Gabrielle; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista; Maceira, Juan Manuel Pineiro

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple primary melanomas in a single individual is rare. Most commonly, malignant melanocytic lesions subsequent to the initial diagnosis of melanoma are secondary cutaneous metastases. We report a patient with gastrointestinal bleeding from gastric metastasis of cutaneous melanoma. During clinical evaluation and staging, we discovered a brain metastasis associated with 3 synchronous primary cutaneous melanomas. We suggest the research on the mutation in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) (INK4a) in such cases. We also emphasize the importance of clinical examination and dermoscopy of the entire tegument, even after a malignant melanocytic lesion is identified. PMID:28300909

  1. Cutaneous metastasis revealing a relapse of gastric linitis: Another case

    PubMed Central

    Kairouani, Mouna; Perrin, Julie; Dietemann-Barabinot, Anne; Diab, Rafiq; Ruck, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cutaneous metastasis from gastric cancer is a rare occurrence. The linitis gastric carcinoma accounts only 8.7% of all gastric cancers. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of female patient who was followed for linits cancer with peritoneal metastasis treated by six cycles of chemotherapy. After seventeen months of control, the relapse of the disease revealed by occurrence of cutaneous metastatsis. DISCUSSION Cutaneous metastasis from linit gastric is rare and the prognostic remains poor. The treatment is palliative. CONCLUSION This rare presentation should encourage the practitioners to biopsy any suspicion skin lesion. PMID:23276763

  2. Primary Cutaneous Chrysosporium Infection following Ear Piercing: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Suchonwanit, Poonkiat; Chaiyabutr, Chayada; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2015-01-01

    Chrysosporium is a large genus of saprophytic fungi that is commonly found in the soil. Infection caused by this organism is rare in humans and typically occurs in immunocompromised patients. Primary cutaneous Chrysosporium infection is relatively rare and has been reported in a heart transplant patient. The prognosis is usually favorable, but very poor in the setting of persistent profound immunosuppression. We herein report a case of primary cutaneous Chrysosporium infection following ear piercing in an immunocompetent patient. It is important for clinicians to consider this condition in patients with slow-onset skin and soft tissue infection following cutaneous injury, even in an immunocompetent setting.

  3. A Literature Revision in Primary Cutaneous B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Selva, R La; Violetti, S Alberti; Delfino, C; Grandi, V; Cicchelli, S; Tomasini, C; Fierro, M T; Berti, E; Pimpinelli, N; Quaglino, P

    2017-01-01

    The term “Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma” (PCBCL) comprehends a variety of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by a clonal proliferation of B-cells primarily involving the skin. The absence of evident extra-cutaneous disease must be confirmed after six-month follow-up in order to exclude a nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with secondary cutaneous involvement, which may have a completely different clinical behavior and prognosis. In this article, we have summarized the clinico-pathological features of main types of PCBCL and we outline the guidelines for management based on a review of the available literature.

  4. Primary Cutaneous Ewing Sarcoma: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Veronica; Sierra, Elena; Ruano, David; Llamas-Velasco, Mar; Conde, Esther; Azorin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous Ewing's sarcoma is a rare entity. Although the diagnosis may be very difficult, it can be confirmed through molecular biology. We present the case of a 13-years old male with a lesion in the sole of the right foot, characterized by a monomorphous proliferation of small, round and blue cells. The histology and molecular biology allowed us to perform the diagnosis of cutaneous Ewing's sarcoma. This neoplasm must be distinguished from other round cell tumors with cutaneous involvement. The prognosis and treatment of this rare disease will also be discussed.

  5. PATTERN OF CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Abhishek; Raina, Sujeet; Kaushal, Satinder S; Mahajan, Vikram; Sharma, Nand Lal

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: Xerosis (44%), diabetic dermopathy (36%), skin tags (32%), cutaneous infections (31%), and seborrheic keratosis (30%). Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year. PMID:20418975

  6. Cutaneous foetal injuries related to amniocentesis.

    PubMed

    Papi, L; Farusi, F; Teti, G; Dini, V; Romanelli, M

    2013-10-01

    Amniocentesis is one of the most important prenatal diagnostic procedures available to assess congenital abnormalities. It is performed worldwide due to its simplicity of execution and lack of risk. The most frequent known accidents in amniocentesis are abortion, oligohydramnios, amniositis and placental abruption, while direct fetal injuries produced by contact with the needle are rarely seen. The injuries produced are extremely variable in severity, but the most frequent is skin wounds, which usually heal as small, round depressed scars. The cases we describe concern the occurrence of iatrogenic cutaneous wound lesions to a fetus during amniocentesis. The medical-legal analysis of the cases required dermatological expertise in order to exclude a different pathogenesis for the skin injuries to the child and were assigned by the court, in order to assess the administrative compensation due to the parents of the child as a result of medical malpractice.

  7. Proteome Profiling of Human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Lesion

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Santos, Claire; Attarha, Sanaz; Saini, Ravi Kanth; Boaventura, Viviane; Costa, Jackson; Khouri, Ricardo; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Cláudia Ida; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used proteomics and biological network analysis to evaluate the potential biological processes and components present in the identified proteins of biopsies from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) patients infected by Leishmania braziliensis in comparison with normal skin. We identified 59 proteins differently expressed in samples from infected and normal skin. Biological network analysis employing identified proteins showed the presence of networks that may be involved in the cell death mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. After immunohistochemical analyses, the expression of caspase-9, caspase-3, and granzyme B was validated in the tissue and positively correlated with the lesion size in CL patients. In conclusion, this work identified differentially expressed proteins in the inflammatory site of CL, revealed enhanced expression of caspase-9, and highlighted mechanisms associated with the progression of tissue damage observed in lesions. PMID:25207817

  8. Antibodies to laminin in American cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Rojas, M; Rieber, M

    1984-01-01

    We found that serum samples from patients with different clinical forms of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) contained immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibodies which reacted with laminin but not with various other purified connective tissue components, such as collagen types I, III, IV, and V and fibronectin. Eighty-one percent of ACL patients had high antilaminin antibody levels, with a relationship existing between ACL ulcers and antibody levels. This was not, however, the case with patients having treated and healed ACL ulcers; only 34% of these patients had elevated antilaminin antibodies. Eighty-four percent of chronic Chagas' disease patients were also found to contain antilaminin antibodies that were limited to the immunoglobulin G class, but these were not detected in patients suffering from any of 11 other infectious diseases. PMID:6418660

  9. Cutaneous manifestations of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rocha, N; Velho, G; Horta, M; Martins, A; Massa, A

    2005-09-01

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy is an autosomal dominant amyloidosis, characterized by the systemic deposition of amyloid with a particular involvement of the peripheral nerves. The disease generally manifests as a severe sensory, motor and autonomic neuropathy. Cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, vitreous opacities and carpal tunnel syndrome may occur in a variable association with the neuropathy. Trophic dermatological lesions are frequent in the more advanced stages of the disease. We examined the skin of 142 patients. The cutaneous manifestations more frequently observed were: xerosis (81.6%), seborrheic dermatitis (21.8%), traumatic and burn lesions (19.7%), acne (18.3%), neurotrophic ulcers (14%) and onychomycosis (10.5%). Among the hepatic transplanted patients (31%), seborrheic dermatitis and acne were the most frequent diagnoses.

  10. Therapy of cutaneous human Papillomavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Allison; Tyring, Stephen K

    2004-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) are double-stranded DNA viruses, which result in a variety of clinical manifestations according to type. The most common cutaneous lesions include warts located on the skin and genitalia. Because there is currently no cure for HPV infection, treatment focuses on the alleviation of signs and symptoms. Unfortunately, therapy has not been proved to affect transmissibility. Traditional treatment modalities have focused on the destruction of infected tissue through a variety of techniques. These include podophyllin resin, podophyllotoxin, salicylic acid, trichloroacetic acid, bichloroacetic acid, cryotherapy, laser, and surgical techniques. None of these modalities have been proved to be superior. More recently, immunomodulatory compounds with antiviral properties have demonstrated superior efficacy with clearance rates up to 77% and low recurrence rates. Most importantly, clinical trials of vaccines to prevent acquisition of oncogenic HPV are demonstrating marked safety and efficacy.

  11. The genomic landscape of cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tongwu; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Brown, Kevin M; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2016-05-01

    Somatic mutation analysis of melanoma has been performed at the single gene level extensively over the past several decades. This has provided considerable insight into the critical pathways controlling melanoma initiation and progression. During the last 5 yr, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled even more comprehensive mutational screening at the level of multigene panels, exomes and genomes. These studies have uncovered many new and unexpected players in melanoma development. The recent landmark study from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium describing the genomic architecture of 333 cutaneous melanomas provides the largest and broadest analysis to date on the somatic aberrations underlying melanoma genesis. It thus seems timely to review the mutational landscape of melanoma and highlight the key genes and cellular pathways that appear to drive this cancer.

  12. Multimodal imaging of cutaneous wound tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Ren, Wenqi; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, few methods are available for simultaneous assessment of these tissue parameters in a noninvasive and quantitative fashion. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities in a single-experimental setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Algorithms were developed for appropriate coregistration between wound images acquired by different imaging modalities at different times. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated in an occlusion experiment, where oxygenation and perfusion maps of a healthy subject's upper extremity were continuously monitored during a postocclusive reactive hyperemia procedure and compared with standard measurements. The system was also tested in a clinical trial where a wound of three millimeters in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject's lower extremity and the healing process was continuously monitored. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated the clinical feasibility of multimodal cutaneous wound imaging.

  13. Cutaneous markers of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Jhamb, Rajat

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is rapidly increasing in prevalence across the world and particularly in south Asians at a relatively younger age. As atherosclerosis starts in early childhood, the process of risk evaluation must start quite early. The present review addresses the issue of cutaneous markers associated with atherosclerosis, and the strengths and weaknesses of the markers in identifying early coronary atherosclerosis. A diligent search for such clinical markers, namely xanthelasma, xanthoma, arcus juvenilis, acanthosis nigricans, skin tags, ear lobe crease, nicotine stains, premature graying in smokers, hyperpigmented hands in betel quid sellers, central obesity, and signs of peripheral vascular disease may prove to be a rewarding exercise in identifying asymptomatic CAD in high risk individuals. PMID:21160602

  14. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended.

  15. Unusual Presentation of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Ocular Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Doroodgar, Masoud; Doroodgar, Moein

    2017-01-01

    The leishmaniases are parasitic diseases that are transmitted to humans by infected female sandflies. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is one of 3 main forms of the disease. CL is the most common form of the disease and is endemic in many urban and rural parts of Iran and usually caused by two species of Leishmania: L. major and L. tropica. We report a case of unusual leishmaniasis with 25 lesions on exposed parts of the body and right eyelid involvement (ocular leishmaniasis). The patient was a 75-year-old male farmer referred to health care center in Aran va Bidgol city. The disease was diagnosed by direct smear, culture, and PCR from the lesions. PCR was positive for Leishmania major. PMID:28210511

  16. [Cutaneous melanoma: a review of risk factors].

    PubMed

    Lacasaña Navarro, M; Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Llopis González, A; Ferrer Caraco, E

    1993-10-01

    In Europe, mortality due to cutaneous malignant melanoma represents 5,000 deaths a year, during this period about 17,000 people develop this disease. The highest incidence rates are those of Northern Europe, where this neoplasm has always been a public health problem, nevertheless countries of southern Europe (Spain, Portugal, Greece, Italy ...) are showing important increments in their rates, during the last years. Because of all of this, it is becoming a public health problem in every white race populations. This increment in its incidence is mainly attributed to changes in lifestyle, with an increase of solar radiation exposure during holidays and leisure activities, increase of tobacco and alcohol consumption, exposure to different chemical substances, use of ultraviolet lamps, etc.

  17. Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Zavattaro, Elisa; Veronese, Federica; Fava, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols. PMID:27548160

  18. Primary Cutaneous Aspergillosis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Chubado; Garbati, Musa; Nggada, Haruna A.; Yawe, Edith H. Terna; Abubakar, Auwal M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a 32-year-old woman with primary cutaneous aspergillosis and an apparently normal immune status. She is a dietitian who carried out research on Aspergillus contamination of palm oil over a six-month period, during which she apparently shaved her axillae and perineum using a safety razor blade. She presented with nodular lesions, which became extensive ulcers after an attempt at incision and drainage. Diagnosis was based on culture and histology. The patient was treated with itraconazole 200 mg twice a day, with surgical excision and a rhomboid flap cover of the axillae. She has remained disease-free five years after discharge. This highlights the likely benefits of a combination of surgical excision and drug therapy, in achieving a cure in this patient. PMID:22413053

  19. Evidence-based therapy for cutaneous sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Christy B; Rosen, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Although healthcare providers have arrived at a relatively comfortable zone of accepted clinical practice in the management of cutaneous sarcoidosis, virtually every treatment is based on minimal evidence-based data and relies almost exclusively on anecdotal information. Although it would be convenient to blame this state of affairs on the lack of certainty about disease aetiology, the unavoidable fact is that little has been executed, even in the realm of well designed comparative trials. Nonetheless, worldwide accepted standard therapies for sarcoidosis include the administration of corticosteroids, antimalarials and methotrexate. A stepwise approach to patient care is appropriate, and potent topical corticosteroids (e.g. clobetasol) or repeated intralesional injections of triamcinolone (3-10 mg/mL) may be all that is needed in mild skin-limited disease. In patients requiring systemic therapy for recalcitrant or deforming skin lesions (or for widespread disease), corticosteroids (e.g. prednisone 40-80 mg/day, tapered accordingly) used alone or in combination with antimalarials or methotrexate may be indicated. Antimalarials and methotrexate are considered second-line interventions and may be used as monotherapy for steroid-resistant sarcoidosis or in patients unable to tolerate steroids. Given the concern regarding ocular toxicity, the maximum dosages of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine should not exceed 3.5 and 6.5 mg/kg/day, respectively. Methotrexate is given in weekly doses of 10-30 mg, with the caveat that haematological, gastrointestinal, pulmonary and hepatic toxicities are possible. Despite universal acceptance as standard care, the aforementioned treatments often result in an incomplete clinical response or unacceptable adverse events. In such situations, more innovative treatment options may be used. Treatments that may well gain widespread future use include the tumour necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors infliximab and adalimumab. Experience is limited

  20. Overcoming the Cutaneous Barrier with Microemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Luciana B.

    2014-01-01

    Microemulsions are fluid and isotropic formulations that have been widely studied as delivery systems for a variety of routes, including the skin. In spite of what the name suggests, microemulsions are nanocarriers, and their use as topical delivery systems derives from their multiple advantages compared to other dermatological formulations, such as ease of preparation, thermodynamic stability and penetration-enhancing properties. Composition, charge and internal structure have been reported as determinant factors for the modulation of drug release and cutaneous and transdermal transport. This manuscript aims at reviewing how these and other characteristics affect delivery and make microemulsions appealing for topical and transdermal administration, as well as how they can be modulated during the formulation design to improve the potential and efficacy of the final system. PMID:24590260

  1. Mycobacterium fortuitum cutaneous infection from amateur tattoo.

    PubMed

    Suvanasuthi, Saroj; Wongpraparut, Chanisada; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas

    2012-06-01

    A case of cutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum infection after receiving an amateur tattoo is reported. A few days after tattooing, an otherwise healthy 25-year-old Thai male presented with multiple discrete erythematous papules confined to the tattoo area. He was initially treated with topical steroid and oral antihistamine without improvement. Skin biopsy was carried out, and the histopathology showed mixed cell granuloma with a foreign body reaction (tattoo color pigments). The acid-fast bacilli stain was positive. The tissue culture grew M. fortuitum two weeks later. He was treated with clarithromycin 1,000 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1,000 mg/day for 10 months with complete response. From the clinical aspect, tattoo-associated rapidly growing mycobacterium infection might be difficult to differentiate from the pigment-based skin reactions. Skin biopsy for histopathology and tissue culture for Mycobacterium probably will be needed in arriving at the diagnosis.

  2. Anastrozole-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Juliya; Patel, Mital; Miller, Michael; Burris, Katy

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (DI-SCLE) has been associated with numerous drugs, but there are limited reports of its association with aromatase inhibitor anastrozole. We report the case of a patient undergoing treatment with anastrozole for breast cancer who presented with clinical, serological, and histological evidence consistent with DI-SCLE. Her condition quickly began to improve after the use of anastrozole was discontinued and hydroxychloroquine therapy was initiated. Cases such as ours as well as several others that implicate antiestrogen drugs in association with DI-SCLE seem to be contradictory to studies looking at the usefulness of treating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with antiestrogen therapy. Further research on this relationship is warranted.

  3. [Normal cutaneous flora and secondary bacterial infection].

    PubMed

    Soria, X; Carrascosa, J M

    2007-09-01

    Normal skin microflora consists of those micro-organisms which are usually present on the skin, without causing infection. The infant's skin colonization starts during birth and after the first months of life the skin microbiota is composed of the same micro-organisms as in the adult. The skin microflora is composed of bacteria, mostly gram-positives Staphylococcus species, yeasts which the most prevalent is Malassezia, viruses and arthropods like Demodex folliculorum. In the last years, the development of molecular microbiology and specially techniques like amplification and comparison of 16S rRNA, have demonstrated that cutaneous microbiota is composed of a higher diversity of bacteria than the traditionally observed in culture methods. We also review the main secondary bacterial skin infections.

  4. Topically applied vitamins and their cutaneous effects.

    PubMed

    Grammaticopoulos, George T; Furtunopoulos, Demetrios G; Zisova, Lilia G

    2004-01-01

    The number of cosmetic products which include vitamins as a constituent has increased three-fold since 1991. Vitamins are commonly used as ingredients of products designed to improve the appearance and health of the skin; for this reason the cutaneous benefits of such products are actively researched by dermatologists and chemists. The present study does a review of the action of topically applied vitamins for local use which improves the function of the skin. We specifically consider the biologic activity of topically applied vitamins, their stability and usefulness. Ways of stabilizing different kinds of vitamins, as well as their stability to oxygen, light, temperature, acids, and bases, are shown. The conclusion suggested by the review is that the efficiency of topically applied vitamins is dependent not only on their good stabilization and concentration but also on the clinical individual tests that can determine the best product for each particular patient.

  5. Bacterial superinfection in Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Doudi, Monir; Setorki, Mahbubeh; Narimani, Manizheh

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ZCL) is a polymorphic disease. It is generally accepted that bacterial superinfection may play a role in the clinical appearance of the lesions and may delay or prevent the healing process. However, the pattern of bacterial pathogens involved has rarely been investigated. Material/Methods The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species contaminating the suspected ZCL and their susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics. Microscopic examination of stained smears and cultures were used to differentiate ZCL from non-ZCL lesions in a rural area north of Isfahan, Iran from July to December 2009. Bacteria were isolated from the lesions and identified and antibiotic susceptibility was determined by standard microbiological techniques. Results The results show that 602 (68%) of 855 patients were positive for ZCL, of which 83.4% with volcano-shape, 8.8% psoriasiform, 6.6% popular form and 1.2% with other atypical forms of ZCL. The bacteria were isolated from 66.8% of ZCL (70% of volcano-shape, 60% of psoriasiform and 25% of popular form) and 64.7% of non-ZCL lesions. The most common species were Staphylococcus aureus (41.7%) and S. epidermidis (28%) followed by Bacillus sp. Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Proteus sp., Enterobacter sp. and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Ciprofloxacin, Erythromycin, Cefazolin and Clindamycin were the most effective antibiotics. Conclusions Bacterial superinfection appears to be very common in ZCL, but its prevalence is not different from that of non-ZCL lesions and it has little effect on the clinical appearance of anthroponotic cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL). Local lesion care and management of bacterial superinfection must be considered in the treatment of ZCL. PMID:22936185

  6. Primary Cutaneous Melanoma: An 18-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Moris; Friedhofer, Henri; Fukutaki, Marina Fussae; Ferreira, Marcus Castro; Landman, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary cutaneous melanoma still constitutes the main cause of skin cancer death in developed countries, and its incidence in recent years has been increasing in a steady, worrisome manner. OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the clinical, epidemiological and demographic aspects of this disease, and correlated them with patient prognosis. METHODS: Using epidemiologic and clinical data, we analyzed 84 patients with mild to severe primary cutaneous melanoma treated between 1990 and 2007. Slides containing surgical specimens were analyzed, and new slides were made from archived paraffin sections when necessary. RESULTS: The melanoma incidence was higher in areas of sun exposure, with lesions commonly observed in the trunk for males, and lower limbs for females. In addition to Breslow’s thickness and ulceration (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively), the mitotic rate per mm2 also correlated with worse patient outcome (p = 0.0007). The sum of ulceration (0 when absent or 1 when present), the Breslow index (1 when <1 mm, 2 when >1 mm and <4 mm, 3 when >4 mm) and the mitotic index (0 when absent or 1 when ≥1 per mm2) allowed the establishment of a prognostic score: if the sum was equal to or over three, nearly all (91.7%) patients had systemic disease. The 5-year survival was approximately seventy percent. CONCLUSION: Because American Join Committee of Cancer Staging will update the classification of malignant tumors (TNM) staging in the near future, and introduce mitosis as a prognostic factor, our results show the importance of such a feature. Additional studies are necessary to confirm the importance of a prognostic score as proposed herein. PMID:20360915

  7. Blog and Podcast Watch: Cutaneous Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Morley, Eric J.; Roppolo, Lynn; Khadpe, Jay; Ankel, Felix; Lin, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM) based on the ongoing Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of cutaneous emergencies from the AIR series. Methods The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) annual testing schedule. For each module, relevant content is collected from the top 50 most accessed sites per the Social Media Index published within the previous 12 months and scored by eight board members using five equally weighted measurement outcomes: Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine (BEEM) score, accuracy, educational utility, evidence based, and references. Resources scoring ≥30 out of 35 available points receive an AIR label. Resources scoring 27–29 receive an “honorable mention” label, if the editorial board agrees that the post is accurate and educationally valuable. Results A total of 35 blog posts and podcasts were evaluated. None scored ≥30 points necessary for the AIR label, although four honorable mention posts were identified. Key educational pearls from these honorable mention posts are summarized. Conclusion This Blog and Podcast Watch series is based on the AIR and AIR-Pro series, which attempts to identify high quality educational content on open-access blogs and podcasts. This series provides an expert-based, post-publication curation of educational social media content for EM clinicians with this installment focusing on cutaneous emergencies. PMID:28210366

  8. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Proton Pump Inhibitors: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    PPIs are among the most commonly administered medications in the USA and are generally well tolerated. Immediate and delayed immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are rare but increasingly recognized adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions can occur due to IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to PPIs and can be evaluated by immediate hypersensitivity skin testing and oral provocation challenge testing. A desensitization protocol can be used when PPI use cannot be avoided in an allergic patient. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs have also been reported. Occupational exposures causing cutaneous reactions to PPIs are the most commonly reported delayed hypersensitivity reaction, followed by drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This review presents a summary of the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs.

  9. Measurement of the Proton + Proton Going to Proton + Proton + Neutral Pion Cross-Section Near Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M. Alan

    1991-02-01

    The first nuclear physics experiment at the IUCF Cooler is a measurement of the p+ptop+p+ pi^0 cross section near threshold. The Cooler, together with a thin internal H_2 gas jet target, allows for a precise cross section measurement by providing well-defined interaction energies and by eliminating background from p-nucleus pion production which has a much lower threshold. A cylindrically symmetric detector system has been installed in one of the straight sections of the ring and is used to detect the coincident protons in the exit channel with good energy and angular resolution. The mass of the unobserved is then deduced. Elastically scattered protons were detected at the same time and by the same detector as pion production events. Elastic scattering was used for normalization to obtain an absolute p+p top+p+pi^0 cross section.

  10. The HERA Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Shiraz

    2014-04-01

    The almost 1 fb-1 of ep data collected by the H1 and ZEUS collider experiments at HERA allows for a precise determination of the proton's parton distribution functions (PDFs). Measurements used to constrain the PDFs—inclusive and jet cross sections, charm contribution to the F2 proton structure function, F_2cbar c — are presented herein. The measurement process itself includes cataloguing the sensitivity of the cross sections to the various sources of correlated systematic uncertainties. In the jet measurement, correlations of a statistical nature are also quantified and catalogued. These correlations provide a basis to combine measurements of the same physical observable across different time periods, experiments and measurement methodology. The subsequent PDF fitting procedure also takes into account such correlations. The resulting HERAPDF1.5 set based on inclusive data as well as PDF sets derived from inclusive plus charm data are presented togeteher with their predictions for pp cross sections at the LHC.

  11. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  12. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  13. Smashing Protons to Smithereens

    ScienceCinema

    Marc-André Pleier

    2016-07-12

    Pleier discusses the extraordinary research taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world’s newest, biggest, and highest energy particle accelerator located at CERN. Pleier is one of hundreds of researchers from around the world working on ATLAS, a seven-story particle detector positioned at a point where the LHC’s oppositely circulating beams of protons slam into one another head-on.

  14. Proton computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantonio, Martina; Sauli, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a diagnostic method capable of in situ imaging the three-dimensional density distribution in a patient before irradiation with charged particle beams. Proposed long time ago, this technology has been developed by several groups, and may become an essential tool for advanced quality assessment in hadrontherapy. We describe the basic principles of the method, its performance and limitations as well as provide a summary of experimental systems and of results achieved.

  15. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  16. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  17. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  18. Zosteriform cutaneous leishmaniasis diagnosed with the help of dermoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ramot, Yuval; Nanova, Krassimira; Alper-Pinus, Ruslana; Zlotogorski, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is usually easy to recognize; however, several atypical features exist, which may pose a diagnostic challenge. Here we report a 55-year-old female patient, who presented with an itchy and painful eruption localized in a dermatomal distribution along the right upper chest. Although the clinical appearance of the lesions suggested the diagnosis of herpes zoster, dermoscopic evaluation revealed erythema, hyperkeratosis, burst star whitish appearance and hairpin vessels, compatible with the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Indeed, leishmania amastigotes were detected by smear from the lesions. Zosteriform presentation of cutaneous leishmaniasis, as exemplified by our patient, is especially rare. In our case dermoscopy has proven to be an accessible and easy tool to diagnose such atypical presentation of cutaneous leishmaniasis, and dermatologists in endemic areas should be familiar with its typical dermoscopic features. PMID:25126460

  19. Serologic and immunohistochemical prognostic biomarkers of cutaneous malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Utikal, Jochen; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    Biomarkers are important tools in clinical diagnosis and prognostic classification of various cutaneous malignancies. Besides clinical and histopathological aspects (e.g. anatomic site and type of the primary tumour, tumour size and invasion depth, ulceration, vascular invasion), an increasing variety of molecular markers have been identified, providing the possibility of a more detailed diagnostic and prognostic subgrouping of tumour entities, up to even changing existing classification systems. Recently published gene expression or proteomic profiling data relate to new marker molecules involved in skin cancer pathogenesis, which may, after validation by suitable studies, represent future prognostic or predictive biomarkers in cutaneous malignancies. We, here, give an overview on currently known serologic and newer immunohistochemical biomarker molecules in the most common cutaneous malignancies, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and cutaneous lymphoma, particularly emphasizing their prognostic and predictive significance. PMID:17221215

  20. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton radioactivity of 94Ag.

    PubMed

    Mukha, Ivan; Roeckl, Ernst; Batist, Leonid; Blazhev, Andrey; Döring, Joachim; Grawe, Hubert; Grigorenko, Leonid; Huyse, Mark; Janas, Zenon; Kirchner, Reinhard; La Commara, Marco; Mazzocchi, Chiara; Tabor, Sam L; Van Duppen, Piet

    2006-01-19

    The stability and spontaneous decay of naturally occurring atomic nuclei have been much studied ever since Becquerel discovered natural radioactivity in 1896. In 1960, proton-rich nuclei with an odd or an even atomic number Z were predicted to decay through one- and two-proton radioactivity, respectively. The experimental observation of one-proton radioactivity was first reported in 1982, and two-proton radioactivity has now also been detected by experimentally studying the decay properties of 45Fe (refs 3, 4) and 54Zn (ref. 5). Here we report proton-proton correlations observed during the radioactive decay of a spinning long-lived state of the lightest known isotope of silver, 94Ag, which is known to undergo one-proton decay. We infer from these correlations that the long-lived state must also decay through simultaneous two-proton emission, making 94Ag the first nucleus to exhibit one- as well as two-proton radioactivity. We attribute the two-proton emission behaviour and the unexpectedly large probability for this decay mechanism to a very large deformation of the parent nucleus into a prolate (cigar-like) shape, which facilitates emission of protons either from the same or from opposite ends of the 'cigar'.

  1. [Erythema multiforme secondary to cutaneous Trichophyton mentagrophytes infection].

    PubMed

    Contreras-Barrera, Martha E; Moreno-Coutiño, Gabriela; Torres-Guerrero, D Edoardo; Aguilar-Donis, Adriana; Arenas, Roberto

    2009-06-30

    Erythema multiforme is an acute self-limited cutaneous syndrome associated in more than 50% of the cases with herpes simplex virus infection; but it can also be a consequence of other infectious agents or drugs. We report on a 24 year-old female patient with erythema multiforme secondary to Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes cutaneous infection acquired from contact with animals in a research laboratory.

  2. Cutaneous metastasis of colon cancer: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Nicholas; Powers, Jeremy; Richmond, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous metastases arising from an internal malignancy are a rare phenomenon, occurring in 0.001% of all skin biopsies performed. Of these, 6.5% originate from the a primary colon cancer. Colon cancer, when metastatic to the skin, typically appears as a painless flesh-colored nodule or as a mass with occasional ulceration. We report a case of a large cutaneous metastasis to the suprascapular region as the initial presenting symptom of an underlying colon cancer.

  3. Correlation of hippocampal theta rhythm with changes in cutaneous temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Saleh, M. A.; Karem, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation of the possibility that the hippocampus performs the function of alerting an animal to changes in cutaneous temperature, using unanesthetized, loosely restrained rabbits. The results indicate that the hippocampal theta rhythm, which appears to be evoked by changes in cutaneous temperature, can be related to a specific type of hyppocampal neuron which is, in turn, connected with other areas of the brain involved in temperature regulation.

  4. Comparison of Meglumine Antimoniate and Pentamidine for Peruvian Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    2002. Patients. The patients lived in and around the city of Cusco, Peru and presented with a clinical diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis ...for investigation of chemotherapeutic agents in leishmaniasis . J Infect Dis 142: 83–86. 8. Davey RT, Masur H, 1990. Recent advances in the diagnosis ...COMPARISON OF MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE AND PENTAMIDINE FOR PERUVIAN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS ELLEN M. ANDERSEN, MARIA CRUZ-SALDARRIAGA, ALEJANDRO LLANOS

  5. Pyogenic granuloma underlying cutaneous horn in a young boy

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Pragya A.; Kota, Rahul Krishna S.; Pilani, Abhisheik P.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous horn is an elongated, keratinous projection that usually occurs over the sun-exposed areas. It is a clinical diagnosis and may overlie any benign, premalignant, or malignant conditions. Treatment includes wide surgical excision with careful histological examination to exclude a focus of malignancy. An unusual case of a pyogenic granuloma presenting as cutaneous horn on the lower lip in an 11-year-old boy is presented here. PMID:27057494

  6. Cutaneous responses to vaccinia in individuals with previous smallpox vaccination.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Eric L; Hercher, Michelle; Hammarlund, Erika K; Lewis, Matthew W; Slifka, Mark K; Hanifin, Jon M

    2007-09-01

    The durability of immune responses to smallpox vaccine is a subject of considerable debate. We compared cutaneous vaccinia responses in patients vaccinated in the distant past with vaccine-naïve individuals using serial close-up photographs. The previously vaccinated group had a significantly reduced time course and milder cutaneous reactions. Vaccinated individuals appear to maintain clinically detectable immunity against vaccinia for at least 20 years after smallpox vaccination.

  7. Ulcerative cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa treated with mycophenolate mofetil and pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas; Guillot, Bernard; Bessis, Didier

    2011-06-01

    Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPAN) is a self-limited cutaneous vasculitis characterized by painful nodules, affecting mostly the lower limbs, and livedo reticularis. Despite its benign course, CPAN may display a chronic relapsing evolution with repeated exacerbations. Ulcerative CPAN has a more prolonged evolution and is associated with peripheral neuropathy. We report on a patient with a 20-year history of ulcerative and painful CPAN, refractory to multiple immunosuppressive treatments, treated successfully by mycophenolate mofetil and pentoxifylline.

  8. THE POLARIZATION PARAMETER IN ELASTIC PROTON-PROTON SCATTERING FROM .75 TO 2.84 GEV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PROTON SCATTERING, POLARIZATION), (*NUCLEAR SPINS, POLARIZATION), PROTON REACTIONS, ELASTIC SCATTERING, MEASUREMENT, PARTICLE ACCELERATOR TARGETS, LIQUEFIED GASES, HELIUM, CARBON, ANTIPARTICLES , PROTON CROSS SECTIONS

  9. Cutaneous metastasis of transitional cell carcinoma in 12 dogs.

    PubMed

    Reed, L T; Knapp, D W; Miller, M A

    2013-07-01

    In humans, cutaneous metastasis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) has been attributed to direct extension, lymphatic or hematogenous dissemination, or surgical implantation. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical and histologic features of cutaneous TCC metastasis, confirmed by uroplakin-III immunohistochemistry, in dogs. The 12 cases were 9 spayed female and 3 neutered male dogs, 6 to 14 years old (mean, 11 years). Four dogs had a history of urinary incontinence. Three had undergone abdominal surgery for TCC diagnosis or treatment. The primary neoplasms were 7 papillary infiltrating and 5 nonpapillary infiltrating TCC. Cutaneous lesions were detected at a mean of 123 days (median, 38 days) after diagnosis of the primary TCC and appeared as plaques, papules, or nodules in, with 1 exception, perineal, inguinal, or ventral abdominal dermis or subcutis. Of 8 dogs with dermal TCC, 5 had epidermal erosion or ulceration. In 10 dogs, TCC was detected in cutaneous lymphatic vessels, identified by endothelial immunoreactivity for Prox1. Metastases were also detected in lymph nodes in all dogs and at distant noncutaneous sites, usually the lungs, in 10 dogs. Mean survival after diagnosis was 162 days (median, 90 days). Despite medical treatment of 10 dogs after the development of cutaneous metastasis, remission was not achieved; 4 dogs had stable disease. Although TCC could have spread to skin by direct extension or lymphatic or vascular dissemination, the proximity of most cutaneous metastases to the vulva or prepuce raises the additional possibility of transepidermal spread through urine-scalded skin.

  10. Cutaneous vasodilator and vasoconstrictor mechanisms in temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, John M; Minson, Christopher T; Kellogg, Dean L

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on significant developments in our understanding of the mechanisms that control the cutaneous vasculature in humans, with emphasis on the literature of the last half-century. To provide a background for subsequent sections, we review methods of measurement and techniques of importance in elucidating control mechanisms for studying skin blood flow. In addition, the anatomy of the skin relevant to its thermoregulatory function is outlined. The mechanisms by which sympathetic nerves mediate cutaneous active vasodilation during whole body heating and cutaneous vasoconstriction during whole body cooling are reviewed, including discussions of mechanisms involving cotransmission, NO, and other effectors. Current concepts for the mechanisms that effect local cutaneous vascular responses to local skin warming and cooling are examined, including the roles of temperature sensitive afferent neurons as well as NO and other mediators. Factors that can modulate control mechanisms of the cutaneous vasculature, such as gender, aging, and clinical conditions, are discussed, as are nonthermoregulatory reflex modifiers of thermoregulatory cutaneous vascular responses.

  11. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  12. Proton structure functions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Iris

    2014-05-01

    The "proton structure" is a wide field. Discussed are predominantly the precision measurements of the proton structure functions at HERA and some of their implications for the LHC measurements. In addition, a discussion of what a proton structure function represents is provided. Finally, a connection to nuclear physics is attempted. This contribution is an updated reprint of a contribution to "Deep Inelastic Scattering 2012".1

  13. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    Female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was 7 years after exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event, leading to the conclusion that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crewmembers.

  14. Proton Size Anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, Vernon; Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Keung, Wai-Yee; Marfatia, Danny

    2011-04-15

    A measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen yields a charge radius of the proton that is smaller than the CODATA value by about 5 standard deviations. We explore the possibility that new scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and tensor flavor-conserving nonuniversal interactions may be responsible for the discrepancy. We consider exotic particles that, among leptons, couple preferentially to muons and mediate an attractive nucleon-muon interaction. We find that the many constraints from low energy data disfavor new spin-0, spin-1, and spin-2 particles as an explanation.

  15. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  16. Objective evaluation of cutaneous thermal sensivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbeaumont, W.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining reliable and objective quantitative responses was investigated under conditions where only temperature changes in localized cutaneous areas evoked measurable changes in remote sudomotor activity. Both male and female subjects were studied to evaluate sex difference in thermal sensitivity. The results discussed include: sweat rate responses to contralateral cooling, comparison of sweat rate responses between men and women to contralateral cooling, influence of the menstrual cycle on the sweat rate responses to contralateral cooling, comparison of threshold of sweating responses between men and women, and correlation of latency to threshold for whole body sweating. It is concluded that the quantitative aspects of the reflex response is affected by both the density and activation of receptors as well as the rate of heat loss; men responded 8-10% more frequently than women to thermode cooling, the magnitude of responses being greater for men; and women responded 7-9% more frequently to thermode cooling on day 1 of menstruation, as compared to day 15.

  17. Self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis.

    PubMed

    Kołodziejczyk, Beata; Gazda, Agnieszka; Hernik, Elżbieta; Szczygielska, Izabela; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Koprowska, Marta Legatowicz

    2017-01-01

    Girl, aged 4 years old, began the disease with pain of the lower extremities, fever up to 38°C and signs of upper airway infection. Then the patient developed oedema and redness of the whole face, thickened skin, subcutaneous nodular foldings of the frontal, occipital, cervical and axillary regions, extensor areas of the joints; fine, hard whitish nodules in the frontal region and over interphalangeal joints of the hands, pruritus; oedemas of the ankles, knees and joints of the hands, cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. Blood tests at the moment of the diagnosis revealed elevation of markers of inflammation as ESR and CRP, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypoalbuminemia, and hyper-alfa-2-globulinemia. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy specimen and subcutaneous tissue revealed myxoid subcutaneous tissue located under the dermis and a section consisting of myxoid mesenchymal tissue with inflammatory infiltration by histiocytic cells. The presence of acid mucopolysaccharides in fields of the myxoid tissue was also observed. The self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis (SJCM) was diagnosed.

  18. Cutaneous manifestations associated with HTLV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Achiléa L; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Paim

    2010-10-01

    Skin lesions are frequent in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection and may constitute an alert for the diagnosis of this condition. The most severe skin diseases related to this virus are adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive form of leukemia/lymphoma that fails to respond to chemotherapy, and infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH), a severe and recurrent form of eczema occurring in childhood. ATLL affects the skin in 43-72% of cases. In this review, the clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemical aspects of ATLL and IDH will be discussed, as well as the differential diagnoses, giving particular focus to the primary cutaneous ATLL. IDH may progress to HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and to ATLL. Adult onset IDH and reactional and inflammatory dermatoses found in carriers and also in patients with HAM/TSP will be considered. Other dermatological diseases that occur more frequently in HTLV-1-infected individuals such as xerosis, acquired ichthyosis, seborrheic dermatitis and infectious and parasitic dermatoses will also be discussed.

  19. [NMF and cosmetology of cutaneous hydration].

    PubMed

    Marty, J-P

    2002-01-01

    In the stratum corneum, the water binds to the intracellular hygroscopic and hydrosoluble substances called "natural moisturizing factors" or NMF. These "natural moisturizing factors" contained in the corneocytes are formed during epidermal differentiation and may represent up to 10 p. cent of the corneocyte mass. They are principally amino acids, carboxylic pyrrolidone acid, lactic acid, urea, glucose and mineral ions. Keratinization plays an important part in the formation of NMF that exhibit strong osmotic potential attracting the water molecules. The binding of water to NMF is the static aspect of cutaneous hydration. The second, dynamic, aspect is related to the selective permeability of the stratum corneum and to its lipid barrier properties, the permeability of which depends on the integrity and nature of the inter-corneocyte lipids and their lamellar organization between the cells. In these conditions, hydration cosmetics rely on two concepts that can be isolated or associated: the supply of hydrophilic substances to the stratum corneum, capable of attracting and retaining water (moisturizer) or capable of restoring the barrier in order to restore normal water loss or of protecting it against aggression (occlusive).

  20. Fatal cutaneous mucormycosis after kidney transplant.

    PubMed

    Davuodi, Setareh; Manshadi, Seyed Ali Dehghan; Salehi, Mohammad Reza; Yazdi, Farhad; Khazravi, Mona; Fazli, Jafar Taghizade

    2015-02-01

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon opportunistic infection that is caused by Mucorales from the Zygomycetes class. Patients with severe immunodeficiency admitted to the hospital are at greatest risk for developing this infection. Mucormycosis usually is transmitted in humans by inhalation or inoculation of spores in the skin or mucous membranes. A 66-year-old man developed a surgical wound infection at 1 week after kidney transplant that did not improve despite broad-spectrum antibiotics and debridement. He was transferred to our hospital 45 days after transplant and had fever and a large purulent wound that was surrounded by a black necrotizing margin. Immunosuppressive drugs were discontinued and the dosage of prednisolone was decreased. Massive debridement was performed but was incomplete because he had full-thickness abdominal wall necrosis. Histopathology showed broad fungal hyphae without septation, consistent with the diagnosis of mucormycosis. Despite antifungal therapy with amphotericin B and additional debridement, the patient died of septic shock at 52 days after kidney transplant. Cutaneous fungal infections should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any nonhealing infected wound that does not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially in patients with predisposing risk factors such as transplant.

  1. TSLC1 gene silencing in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Ma, Liangjuan; You, Min; Li, Xiaomei; Wang, Shuhai; Li, Hongli; Wu, Debin; Yang, Huimin; Li, Zhen Yu

    2010-06-01

    Tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which is involved in the progression of some types of cancer. Several studies have shown that loss of TSLC1 expression is strongly correlated to methylation of the gene promoter, thus leading to poor prognosis in these cancers. However, the role of TSLC1 in cutaneous melanoma (CM) has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to understand the molecular mechanisms and clinical significance of TSLC1 inactivation in CM. The expression and promoter methylation of TSLC1 were analyzed in 120 CMs. TSLC1 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry, whereas its methylation status was determined by methylation-specific PCR. TSLC1 expression was lost in 84 of 120 (70%) CMs; 36 (30%) CMs were scored as positive for TSLC1 protein expression. The TSLC1 promoter was methylated in 58 (48.33%) of 120 CMs. The incidence of the loss of expression and methylation of TSLC1 significantly increased as the tumor stage advanced (P=0.032 and 0.0021, respectively). Furthermore, in CM, disease-related survival was significantly shorter in patients with tumors losing TSLC1 or harboring methylated TSLC1 (P=0.0003 and 0.0329, respectively). The epigenetic silencing of TSLC1 through methylation is an important event in the pathogenesis of CM, and TSLC1 provides an indicator for poor prognosis.

  2. [Cutaneous gnathostomiasis, first confirmed case in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Jurado, Leonardo F; Palacios, Diana M; López, Rocío; Baldión, Margarita; Matijasevic, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Gnathostomiasis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by some species of helminthes belonging to the genus Gnathostoma . It has a wide clinical presentation and its diagnosis is a challenge. Tropical and subtropical countries are endemic, and its transmission is associated with eating raw or undercooked meat from fresh water animals. Increasing global tourism and consuming exotic foods have produced a noticeable rise in cases of the disease in the last decades. However, in our country, there has not been any confirmed case of gnathostomiasis previously reported. We present the case of a 63-year-old Colombian man with an international travel history, who presented with gastrointestinal symptoms. During the hospital stay, he developed a cutaneous lesion on the upper right abdominal quadrant, where later, a larva was found. A morphological study allowed us to identify it as Gnathostoma spinigerum . As such, this is the first report of an imported case of gnathostomiasis confirmed in Colombia. This article describes the principles, etiology, pathogenic cycle and treatment of this disease with special considerations to our patient´s particular features.

  3. Self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis

    PubMed Central

    Kołodziejczyk, Beata; Gazda, Agnieszka; Hernik, Elżbieta; Szczygielska, Izabela; Koprowska, Marta Legatowicz

    2017-01-01

    Girl, aged 4 years old, began the disease with pain of the lower extremities, fever up to 38°C and signs of upper airway infection. Then the patient developed oedema and redness of the whole face, thickened skin, subcutaneous nodular foldings of the frontal, occipital, cervical and axillary regions, extensor areas of the joints; fine, hard whitish nodules in the frontal region and over interphalangeal joints of the hands, pruritus; oedemas of the ankles, knees and joints of the hands, cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. Blood tests at the moment of the diagnosis revealed elevation of markers of inflammation as ESR and CRP, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypoalbuminemia, and hyper-alfa-2-globulinemia. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy specimen and subcutaneous tissue revealed myxoid subcutaneous tissue located under the dermis and a section consisting of myxoid mesenchymal tissue with inflammatory infiltration by histiocytic cells. The presence of acid mucopolysaccharides in fields of the myxoid tissue was also observed. The self-healing juvenile cutaneous mucinosis (SJCM) was diagnosed. PMID:28386144

  4. [Cutaneous Melanoma (CM): Current Diagnosis and Treatment].

    PubMed

    Gallegos Hernández, José Francisco; Nieweg, Omgo E

    2014-12-01

    Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is the third most common cancer of the skin, but it is the neoplasia with the greatest impact on mortality. Its etiology is multifactorial and it has been reported that its prevalence has increased in the last two decades. In Mexico, CM ranks seventh in frequency among all malignancies and 80% of cases are in locally advanced stages. The prognosis depends on the stage. The prognostic factors with greatest impact in survival are nodal status, tumor thickness or Breslow depth, ulceration, and in thin melanomas (< 1 mm thickness, without ulceration and Clarck level III), the mitotic index. The diagnostic approach is of great importance to achieve adequate treatment. Adherence to global guidelines of treatment allows us to obtain the best rates of locoregional control, which is the first target to be achieved in patients with CM. The goal of this manuscript is to provide a synthesis of the most important aspects in the diagnosis and treatment of CM, based on current evidence obtained in the literature.

  5. Cutaneous melanoma: new advances in treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Foletto, Michele Ceolin; Haas, Sandra Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a challenge to treat. Over the last 30 years, no drug or combination of drugs demonstrated significant impact to improve patient survival. From 1995 to 2000, the use of cytokines such as interferon and interleukin become treatment options. In 2011, new drugs were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, including peginterferon alfa-2b for patients with stage III disease, vemurafenib for patients with metastatic melanoma with the BRAF V600E mutation, and ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody directed to the CTLA-4 T lymphocyte receptor, to combat metastatic melanoma in patients who do not have the BRAF V600E mutation. Both ipilimumab and vemurafenib showed results in terms of overall survival. Other trials with inhibitors of other genes, such as the KIT gene and MEK, are underway in the search for new discoveries. The discovery of new treatments for advanced or metastatic disease aims to relieve symptoms and improve patient quality of life. PMID:24770508

  6. Polymyxin B-Induced Diffuse Cutaneous Hyperpigmentation.

    PubMed

    Lahiry, Sandeep; Choudhury, Shouvik; Mukherjee, Ayan; Bhunya, Prajesh Kiran; Bala, Moumita

    2017-02-01

    Polymyxin B is a polypeptide-antibiotic, primarily used for resistant Gram-negative infections, first obtained from bacterium Bacillus polymyxa in the late 1940s. Antibiotic spectrum are restricted to mainly gram negative bacterias like Enterobacter, E. coli, Klebsiella, Salmonella, Pasteurella, Bordetella, Shigella; and particularly organisms like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, which are extremely potent to acquire antibiotic resistance. Side effects include neurotoxicity and acute renal tubular necrosis. Here, we present a rare case of skin hyper-pigmentation in a 65-year-old elderly male of Indian origin, diagnosed as a case of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumonia, treated with intravenous antibiotics. The manifestations were observed after 4 days of Polymyxin B therapy initiation. All other concomitant drugs, infections, or immunologic disorders that, could have caused this symptom, were carefully excluded. An objective causality assessment reveals that, the cutaneous hyperpigmentation was possibly associated with Polymyxin B therapy, though further studies may be needed to explain the underlying mechanism.

  7. Polymyxin B-Induced Diffuse Cutaneous Hyperpigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Shouvik; Mukherjee, Ayan; Bhunya, Prajesh Kiran; Bala, Moumita

    2017-01-01

    Polymyxin B is a polypeptide-antibiotic, primarily used for resistant Gram-negative infections, first obtained from bacterium Bacillus polymyxa in the late 1940s. Antibiotic spectrum are restricted to mainly gram negative bacterias like Enterobacter, E. coli, Klebsiella, Salmonella, Pasteurella, Bordetella, Shigella; and particularly organisms like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, which are extremely potent to acquire antibiotic resistance. Side effects include neurotoxicity and acute renal tubular necrosis. Here, we present a rare case of skin hyper-pigmentation in a 65-year-old elderly male of Indian origin, diagnosed as a case of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumonia, treated with intravenous antibiotics. The manifestations were observed after 4 days of Polymyxin B therapy initiation. All other concomitant drugs, infections, or immunologic disorders that, could have caused this symptom, were carefully excluded. An objective causality assessment reveals that, the cutaneous hyperpigmentation was possibly associated with Polymyxin B therapy, though further studies may be needed to explain the underlying mechanism. PMID:28384882

  8. Mechanosensory neurons, cutaneous mechanoreceptors, and putative mechanoproteins.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, M E; Cobo, T; Cobo, J L; Vega, J A

    2012-08-01

    The mammalian skin has developed sensory structures (mechanoreceptors) that are responsible for different modalities of mechanosensitivity like touch, vibration, and pressure sensation. These specialized sensory organs are anatomically and functionally connected to a special subset of sensory neurons called mechanosensory neurons, which electrophysiologically correspond with Aβ fibers. Although mechanosensory neurons and cutaneous mechanoreceptors are rather well known, the biology of the sense of touch still remains poorly understood. Basically, the process of mechanosensitivity requires the conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal through the activation of ion channels that gate in response to mechanical stimuli. These ion channels belong primarily to the family of the degenerin/epithelium sodium channels, especially the subfamily acid-sensing ion channels, and to the family of transient receptor potential channels. This review compiles the current knowledge on the occurrence of putative mechanoproteins in mechanosensory neurons and mechanoreceptors, as well as the involvement of these proteins on the biology of touch. Furthermore, we include a section about what the knock-out mice for mechanoproteins are teaching us. Finally, the possibilities for mechanotransduction in mechanoreceptors, and the common involvement of the ion channels, extracellular membrane, and cytoskeleton, are revisited.

  9. Cutaneous Bronchobiliary Fistula Treated with Tissucol Sealant

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto-Nieto, M. I. Perez-Robledo, J. P.; Alvarez-Luque, A. Suz, J. I. Acitores Torres, J. Novo

    2011-02-15

    Bronchobiliary fistula is a rare and is an uncommon but severe complication of hydatid disease of the liver. Treatment has traditionally been surgical resection, but embolization and stent placement have been described. The invasive method seems to be a key component of patient treatment. We describe a case of a 58-year-old woman who, 25 years before, had undergone surgery for a hydatid cyst. A total cystectomy without previous puncture or parasite extraction was carried out. The lower aspect of the cyst was found to be completely perforated over the biliary duct. During the postoperative course, the patient had subphrenic right-sided pleural effusion and biliary fistula that subsided with medical treatment. Afterward, the patient came to the outpatient area of our hospital complaining of leakage of purulent exudate through the cutaneous opening, pain located on the right hypochondrium radiating to the right hemithorax, malaise, fever, chronic cough, and occasional vomiting of bile. Fistulography revealed an anfractuous cavity communicating with a residual cystic cavity on the right hepatic lobe. We observed communication with the intrahepatic canaliculi. Computed tomographic scan revealed a fistulous tract on the anterior liver border through the abdominal wall. There were no posttreatment complications. The patient is asymptomatic.

  10. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in North Africa: a review

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Karim; Bouratbine, Aïda

    2014-01-01

    In North African countries, cutaneous leishmaniasis transmission has been increasing since the 1980s, with a significant increase in the incidence of cases and a spread of the geographical distribution. The disease currently represents a major public health problem with a productivity gap and an impediment for development, which results in dramatic socioeconomic and psycho-sanitary impacts. The incidence is more than thousands of cases every year in Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia. In Egypt, only a few dozen cases per year are reported, mainly in the Sinai Peninsula. Three Leishmania species, associated with distinct eco-epidemiological and clinical patterns, are involved, namely Leishmania infantum, L. major, and L. tropica. However, L. major is by far the most frequent in Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia, with more than 90% of the registered cases. It is mainly encountered in rural areas under semi-arid, arid and Saharan climates. Leishmania tropica is more prevalent in Morocco, reaching 30–40% of isolates in some districts. Much data is still missing concerning the risk factors of the infection and the lesion development, as well as vector and reservoir ecology and behavior. The knowledge of such parameters, following multidisciplinary and integrated approaches, is crucial for better management and control of the disease, that also faces a lack of resources and efficient control measures. PMID:24626301

  11. Acceleration of cutaneous wound healing by brassinosteroids.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Debora; Rathinasabapathy, Thirumurugan; Schmidt, Barbara; Shakarjian, Michael P; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are plant growth hormones involved in cell growth, division, and differentiation. Their effects in animals are largely unknown, although recent studies showed that the anabolic properties of brassinosteroids are possibly mediated through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathway. Here, we examined biological activity of homobrassinolide (HB) and its synthetic analogues in in vitro proliferation and migration assays in murine fibroblast and primary keratinocyte cell culture. HB stimulated fibroblast proliferation and migration and weakly induced keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. The effects of topical HB administration on progression of wound closure were further tested in the mouse model of cutaneous wound healing. C57BL/6J mice were given a full-thickness dermal wound, and the rate of wound closure was assessed daily for 10 days, with adenosine receptor agonist CGS-21680 as a positive control. Topical application of brassinosteroid significantly reduced wound size and accelerated wound healing in treated animals. mRNA levels of transforming growth factor beta and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 were significantly lower, while tumor necrosis factor alpha was nearly suppressed in the wounds from treated mice. Our data suggest that topical application of brassinosteroids accelerates wound healing by positively modulating inflammatory and reepithelialization phases of the wound repair process, in part by enhancing Akt signaling in the skin at the edges of the wound and enhancing migration of fibroblasts in the wounded area. Targeting this signaling pathway with brassinosteroids may represent a promising approach to the therapy of delayed wound healing.

  12. Cutaneous defenses against dermatophytes and yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, D K; Sohnle, P G

    1995-01-01

    Predispositions to the superficial mycoses include warmth and moisture, natural or iatrogenic immunosuppression, and perhaps some degree of inherited susceptibility. Some of these infections elicit a greater inflammatory response than others, and the noninflammatory ones are generally more chronic. The immune system is involved in the defense against these infections, and cell-mediated immunity appears to be particularly important. The mechanisms involved in generating immunologic reactions in the skin are complex, with epidermal Langerhans cells, other dendritic cells, lymphocytes, microvascular endothelial cells, and the keratinocytes themselves all participating in one way or another. A variety of defects in the immunologic response to the superficial mycoses have been described. In some cases the defect may be preexistent, whereas in others the infection itself may interfere with protective cell-mediated immune responses against the organisms. A number of different mechanisms may underlie these immunologic defects and lead to the development of chronic superficial fungal infection in individual patients. Although the immunologic defects appear to be involved in the chronicity of certain types of cutaneous fungal infections, treatment of these defects remains experimental at the present time. PMID:7553568

  13. Multimodal imaging of cutaneous wound tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Ren, Wenqi; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, few methods are available for simultaneous assessment of these tissue parameters in a noninvasive and quantitative fashion. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities in a single-experimental setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Algorithms were developed for appropriate coregistration between wound images acquired by different imaging modalities at different times. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated in an occlusion experiment, where oxygenation and perfusion maps of a healthy subject’s upper extremity were continuously monitored during a postocclusive reactive hyperemia procedure and compared with standard measurements. The system was also tested in a clinical trial where a wound of three millimeters in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject’s lower extremity and the healing process was continuously monitored. Our in vivo experiments demonstrated the clinical feasibility of multimodal cutaneous wound imaging. PMID:25604545

  14. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections from air shower data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Data on the fluctuations in depth of maximum development of cosmic ray air showers, corrected for the effects of mixed primary composition and shower development fluctuations, yield values of the inelastic proton-air cross section for laboratory energies in the range 10 to the 8th power to 10 to the 10th power GeV. From these values of proton-air cross section, corresponding values of the proton-proton total cross section are derived by means of Glauber theory and geometrical scaling. The resulting values of proton-proton cross section are inconsistent with a well known 1n(2)s extrapolation of ISR data which is consistent with SPS data; they indicate a less rapid rate of increase in the interval 540 sq root of s 100000 GeV.

  15. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging.

  16. Proton in SRF Niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John Paul

    2011-03-31

    Hydrogen is a difficult impurity to physically deal with in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium, therefore, its properties in the metals should be well understood to allow the metal's superconducting properties to be optimized for minimum loss in the construction of resonant accelerator cavities. It is known that hydrogen is a paramagnetic impurity in niobium from NMR studies. This paramagnetism and its effect on superconducting properties are important to understand. To that end analytical induction measurements aimed at isolating the magnetic properties of hydrogen in SRF niobium are introduced along with optical reflection spectroscopy which is also sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. From the variety, magnitude and rapid kinetics found in the optical and magnetic properties of niobium contaminated with hydrogen forced a search for an atomic model. This yielded quantum mechanical description that correctly generates the activation energy for diffusion of the proton and its isotopes not only in niobium but the remaining metals for which data is available. This interpretation provides a frame work for understanding the individual and collective behavior of protons in metals.

  17. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  18. Proton in SRF Niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John Paul

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen is a difficult impurity to physically deal with in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium, therefore, its properties in the metals should be well understood to allow the metal's superconducting properties to be optimized for minimum loss in the construction of resonant accelerator cavities. It is known that hydrogen is a paramagnetic impurity in niobium from NMR studies. This paramagnetism and its effect on superconducting properties are important to understand. To that end analytical induction measurements aimed at isolating the magnetic properties of hydrogen in SRF niobium are introduced along with optical reflection spectroscopy which is also sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. From the variety, magnitude and rapid kinetics found in the optical and magnetic properties of niobium contaminated with hydrogen forced a search for an atomic model. This yielded quantum mechanical description that correctly generates the activation energy for diffusion of the proton and its isotopes not only in niobium but the remaining metals for which data is available. This interpretation provides a frame work for understanding the individual and collective behavior of protons in metals.

  19. Emission of neutron-proton and proton-proton pairs in neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Simo, I.; Amaro, J. E.; Barbaro, M. B.; De Pace, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use a recently developed model of relativistic meson-exchange currents to compute the neutron-proton and proton-proton yields in (νμ ,μ-) scattering from 12C in the 2p-2h channel. We compute the response functions and cross sections with the relativistic Fermi gas model for different kinematics from intermediate to high momentum transfers. We find a large contribution of neutron-proton configurations in the initial state, as compared to proton-proton pairs. In the case of charge-changing neutrino scattering the 2p-2h cross section of proton-proton emission (i.e., np in the initial state) is much larger than for neutron-proton emission (i.e., two neutrons in the initial state) by a (ω , q)-dependent factor. The different emission probabilities of distinct species of nucleon pairs are produced in our model only by meson-exchange currents, mainly by the Δ isobar current. We also analyze other effects including exchange contributions and the effect of the axial and vector currents.

  20. Proton therapy - Present and future.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David

    2017-01-15

    In principle, proton therapy offers a substantial clinical advantage over conventional photon therapy. This is because of the unique depth-dose characteristics of protons, which can be exploited to achieve significant reductions in normal tissue doses proximal and distal to the target volume. These may, in turn, allow escalation of tumor doses and greater sparing of normal tissues, thus potentially improving local control and survival while at the same time reducing toxicity and improving quality of life. Protons, accelerated to therapeutic energies ranging from 70 to 250MeV, typically with a cyclotron or a synchrotron, are transported to the treatment room where they enter the treatment head mounted on a rotating gantry. The initial thin beams of protons are spread laterally and longitudinally and shaped appropriately to deliver treatments. Spreading and shaping can be achieved by electro-mechanical means to treat the patients with "passively-scattered proton therapy" (PSPT) or using magnetic scanning of thin "beamlets" of protons of a sequence of initial energies. The latter technique can be used to treat patients with optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), the most powerful proton modality. Despite the high potential of proton therapy, the clinical evidence supporting the broad use of protons is mixed. It is generally acknowledged that proton therapy is safe, effective and recommended for many types of pediatric cancers, ocular melanomas, chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Although promising results have been and continue to be reported for many other types of cancers, they are based on small studies. Considering the high cost of establishing and operating proton therapy centers, questions have been raised about their cost effectiveness. General consensus is that there is a need to conduct randomized trials and/or collect outcomes data in multi-institutional registries to unequivocally demonstrate the advantage of protons. Treatment planning and plan

  1. Tomographic image of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, R.; Guidal, M.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2017-01-01

    We have carried out a phenomenological analysis of the latest deep virtual Compton scattering experimental data based on the generalized parton distribution formalism. This allows us to extract the dependence of the spatial size of the proton on the quark's longitudinal momentum. This results in the first continuous two-dimensional momentum-space image and tomography of the proton based on experimental data.

  2. Proton Collimators for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, George H.; Momota, Hiromu

    2003-01-01

    Proton collimators have been proposed for incorporation into inertial-electrostatic-confinement (IEC) fusion reactors. Such reactors have been envisioned as thrusters and sources of electric power for spacecraft and as sources of energetic protons in commercial ion-beam applications.

  3. Cutaneous xanthomas with concurrent demodicosis and dermatophytosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Vogelnest, L J

    2001-07-01

    Multiple cutaneous xanthomas, associated with fasting hyperlipidaemia, are described in a 9-month-old domestic long-haired cat. A severely pruritic, papular, and crusting dermatitis affecting the head and neck, initially diagnosed as lesions of the eosinophilic granuloma complex, progressively developed on the head and pinnae. Pruritus was controlled with administration of prednisolone and chlorambucil. Repeat histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous xanthoma and concurrent mild demodicosis. Marked fasting hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia and transient hyperglycaemia were subsequently confirmed. Treatment for hyperlipidaemia and xanthomas with a low-fat diet (Hill's Feline r/d) and the previously unreported treatment for feline demodicosis of daily oral milbemycin were commenced. Multiple pink, alopecic plaques and papules gradually regressed, however pruritus recurred if immunosuppressive treatment was reduced, and well-demarcated areas of alopecia developed on the head, limbs and trunk, despite negative skin scrapings for demodex mites. Fungal culture of hair samples yielded Microsporum canis. All cutaneous lesions resolved with the addition of griseofulvin to the treatment regimen. Concurrent corneal ulceration and keratoconjunctivitis sicca ultimately resolved with treatment, including topical cyclosporin. Diabetes mellitus developed 6 months after resolution of skin lesions. No cutaneous or ocular abnormalities were present 6 months later with continued low-fat diet and insulin administration, although transient recurrence of papules and pruritus occurred after inadvertent access to a fatty meal. An underlying primary hyperlipidaemia was suspected, causing pruritic xanthomas. This may represent the first report of concurrent cutaneous xanthomas, demodicosis and dermatophytosis in a cat.

  4. Lupus erythematosus: considerations about clinical, cutaneous and therapeutic aspects*

    PubMed Central

    Moura Filho, Jucélio Pereira; Peixoto, Raiza Luna; Martins, Lívia Gomes; de Melo, Sillas Duarte; de Carvalho, Ligiana Leite; Pereira, Ana Karine F. da Trindade C.; Freire, Eutilia Andrade Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease with multifactorial etiology. Although clinical manifestations are varied, the skin is an important target-organ, which contributes to the inclusion of skin lesions in 4 out of the 17 new criteria for the diagnosis of the disease, according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics. The cutaneous manifestations of lupus are pleomorphic. Depending on their clinical characteristics, they can be classified into Acute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus and Intermittent Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus. Treatment is based on preventive measures, reversal of inflammation, prevention of damage to target organs and relief of adverse events due to pharmacological therapy. The most commonly used treatment options are topical, systemic and surgical treatment, as well as phototherapy. The correct handling of the cases depends on a careful evaluation of the morphology of the lesions and the patient's general status, always taking into consideration not only the benefits but also the side effects of each therapeutic proposal. PMID:24626656

  5. Immunocytochemical characterisation of cutaneous lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Ralfkiaer, E; Saati, T A; Bosq, J; Delsol, G; Gatter, K C; Mason, D Y

    1986-01-01

    The immunophenotypic properties of 25 cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides or Sezary syndrome were investigated and correlated with clinical and histopathological data. The 11 low grade lymphomas were all of B cell origin, whereas the 14 high grade lymphomas comprised B and T cell tumours, true histiocytic proliferations, and one "nul" cell lymphoid neoplasm. For the high grade lymphomas correct prediction of the immunological phenotype based on morphological criteria was only possible in three cases. In contrast, all of the low grade lymphomas showed the non-epidermotropic infiltration pattern considered to be characteristic of cutaneous B cell tumours. For these conditions, however, immunophenotypic investigations provided a convenient means of improving discrimination between benign (polyclonal) and malignant (monoclonal) lesions, and also showed similarities with nodal lymphomas in terms of expression of lymphoid subset markers and composition of the non-neoplastic white cell infiltrate. No differences were identified between primary and secondary or concurrent cutaneous and extracutaneous lymphomas. Cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides or Sezary syndrome constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms and most of these disorders are likely to represent cutaneous equivalents of nodal malignancies. Immunophenotypic investigations form a useful supplement to their histogenetic characterisation and may provide a common conceptual basis for their classification. Images PMID:3522633

  6. Melanoma inhibitory activity in Brazilian patients with cutaneous melanoma*

    PubMed Central

    Odashiro, Macanori; Hans Filho, Gunter; Pereira, Patricia Rusa; Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra Motta; Stief, Alcione Cavalheiro; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Melanoma inhibitory activity is a protein secreted by melanoma cells and has been used as a tumor marker. Increased Melanoma inhibitory activity serum levels are related to metastatic disease or tumor recurrence. Currently there are no studies on Melanoma inhibitory activity and cutaneous melanoma involving Brazilian patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance and feasibility of measuring Melanoma inhibitory activity levels in Brazilian patients with cutaneous melanoma. METHODS: Blood was obtained from ten patients with proved metastatic cutaneous melanoma (Group 1), 15 patients resected for cutaneous melanoma without metastasis (Group 2) and 5 healthy donors (Group 3). Melanoma inhibitory activity was measured using a commercially available ELISA kit. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference of Melanoma inhibitory activity levels between patients with and without metastasis (p=0.002), and between patients with metastasis and healthy donors (p=0.002). There was no difference between patients without metastasis and healthy donors (p=0.443). CONCLUSION: Melanoma inhibitory activity is a tumor marker for cutaneous melanoma and the Melanoma inhibitory activity-ELISA test can be easily performed. Patients with metastasis have increased Melanoma inhibitory activity serum levels when compared to patients without metastasis and healthy donors. PMID:26131861

  7. Modification of cutaneous reflexes during visually guided walking.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Casey R; Miller, Andreas B; Delva, Mona L; Lajoie, Kim; Marigold, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Although it has become apparent that cutaneous reflexes can be adjusted based on the phase and context of the locomotor task, it is not clear to what extent these reflexes are regulated when locomotion is modified under visual guidance. To address this, we compared the amplitude of cutaneous reflexes while subjects performed walking tasks that required precise foot placement. In one experiment, subjects walked overground and across a horizontal ladder with narrow raised rungs. In another experiment, subjects walked and stepped onto a series of flat targets, which required different levels of precision (large vs. narrow targets). The superficial peroneal or tibial nerve was electrically stimulated in multiple phases of the gait cycle in each condition and experiment. Reflexes between 50 and 120 ms poststimulation were sorted into 10 equal phase bins, and the amplitudes were then averaged. In each experiment, differences in cutaneous reflexes between conditions occurred predominantly during swing phase when preparation for precise foot placement was necessary. For instance, large excitatory cutaneous reflexes in ipsilateral tibialis anterior were present in the ladder condition and when stepping on narrow targets compared with inhibitory responses in the other conditions, regardless of the nerve stimulated. In the ladder experiments, additional effects of walking condition were evident during stance phase when subjects had to balance on the narrow ladder rungs and may be related to threat and/or the unstable foot-surface interaction. Taken together, these results suggest that cutaneous reflexes are modified when visual feedback regarding the terrain is critical for successful walking.

  8. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus: a personal approach to management.

    PubMed

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2006-02-01

    SUMMARY Skin disease in patients with lupus erythematosus may be subdivided into two broad categories - those lesions that when biopsied demonstrate interface dermatitis and those that do not demonstrate interface dermatitis. The skin lesions that are represented by the interface dermatitis include discoid lupus erythematosus, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus and acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Patients with these 'specific' manifestations have varying degrees of systemic involvement from rare systemic disease in patients with localized discoid lupus erythematosus to common and often severe involvement in patients with acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Patients who do not demonstrate interface dermatitis also may have systemic disease and in some instances the skin manifestations are linked to some of the more severe systemic manifestations. Many patients with cutaneous lesions characterized by the interface dermatitis can be controlled with 'standard' therapies including sunscreens, protective clothing and behavioural alteration, and topical corticosteroids with or without an oral antimalarial agent. This review presents a brief summary of each common cutaneous manifestation of lupus erythematosus, its relationship to systemic involvement and treatment issues to effectively deal with the lupus erythematosus patient who has skin disease.

  9. Eight cases of feline cutaneous leishmaniasis in Texas.

    PubMed

    Trainor, K E; Porter, B F; Logan, K S; Hoffman, R J; Snowden, K F

    2010-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease caused by intracellular Leishmania protozoa that are transmitted by sandflies. The disease occurs in 3 forms: cutaneous, mucocutaneous, and visceral. Cutaneous leishmaniasis has been reported in cats in Europe and South America and in 1 cat from Texas. Leishmania mexicana is endemic in Texas and has been reported to cause cutaneous lesions in humans. This article describes the pathology of 8 biopsy cases of feline cutaneous leishmaniasis presented to the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory over a 3.5-year period. The median age of the cats was 3 years; each was presented with nodular, ulcerative lesions on the pinnae and less commonly on the muzzle and periorbital skin. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse histiocytic dermatitis with numerous amastigotes (2-4 μm) within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within round, clear, intracellular vacuoles. In areas of necrosis, organisms were also free within the interstitium. The overlying epidermis was hyperkeratotic, hyperplastic, and often ulcerated. The organisms were not argyrophilic (Gomori methenamine silver), reacted poorly with periodic acid-Schiff reagent, and were inconsistently basophilic with Giemsa. Although not readily visible histologically, kinetoplasts were evident in amastigotes in cytologic preparations. The lesions were similar to those described for cutaneous L. mexicana infection in humans. In 5 of the 8 cats, Leishmania mexicana DNA was amplified from paraffin-embedded tissue by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced.

  10. Cutaneous primary B-cell lymphomas: from diagnosis to treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of mature B-cells neoplasms with tropism for the skin, whose biology and clinical course differ significantly from the equivalent nodal lymphomas. The most indolent forms comprise the primary cutaneous marginal zone and follicle center B-cell lymphomas that despite the excellent prognosis have cutaneous recurrences very commonly. The most aggressive forms include the primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, consisting in two major groups: the leg type, with poor prognosis, and others, the latter representing a heterogeneous group of lymphomas from which specific entities are supposed to be individualized over time, such as intravascular large B-cell lymphomas. Treatment may include surgical excision, radiotherapy, antibiotics, corticosteroids, interferon, monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy, depending on the type of lymphoma and on the type and location of the skin lesions. In subtypes with good prognosis is contraindicated overtreatment and in those associated with a worse prognosis the recommended therapy relies on CHOP-like regimens associated with rituximab, assisted or not with local radiotherapy. We review the primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, remembering the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, classification, and prognostic factors and presenting the available therapies. PMID:26560215

  11. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998 [2]), reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to s=500 GeV.

  12. Predicting Solar Protons: A Statistical Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    above the background flux of protons (Kahler and Vourlidas , 2005). These are known as solar energetic protons (SEP). Some of these groups of protons...tempsep,10, ’b+’); 79 Bibliography Aschwanden, M. Physics of the solar corona , Praxis Publishing Ltd. 2004 Balch, C. C. ―SEC proton...prediction of all models measured. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Solar Energetic Protons, Solar Flares, Protons, Solar Corona , Cosmic Radiation 16

  13. INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY OF CUTANEOUS MELANOMA METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Shada, Amber L.; Dengel, Lynn T.; Petroni, Gina R.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Acton, Scott; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Differentiating melanoma metastasis from benign cutaneous lesions currently requires biopsy or costly imaging, such as positron emission tomography scans. Melanoma metastases have been observed to be subjectively warmer than similarly appearing benign lesions. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) thermography would be sensitive and specific in differentiating palpable melanoma metastases from benign lesions. Materials and methods Seventy-four patients (36 females and 38 males) had 251 palpable lesions imaged for this pilot study. Diagnosis was determined using pathologic confirmation or clinical diagnosis. Lesions were divided into size strata for analysis: 0–5, >5–15, >15–30, and >30 mm. Images were scored on a scale from −1 (colder than the surrounding tissue) to +3 (significantly hotter than the surrounding tissue). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each stratum. Logistical challenges were scored. Results IR imaging was able to determine the malignancy of small (0–5 mm) lesions with a sensitivity of 39% and specificity of 100%. For lesions >5–15 mm, sensitivity was 58% and specificity 98%. For lesions >15–30 mm, sensitivity was 95% and specificity 100%, and for lesions >30 mm, sensitivity was 78% and specificity 89%. The positive predictive value was 88%–100% across all strata, and the negative predictive value was 95% for >15–30 mm lesions and 80% for >30 mm lesions. Conclusions Malignant lesions >15 mm were differentiated from benign lesions with excellent sensitivity and specificity. IR imaging was well tolerated and feasible in a clinic setting. This pilot study shows promise in the use of thermography for the diagnosis of malignant melanoma with further potential as a noninvasive tool to follow tumor responses to systemic therapies. PMID:23043862

  14. Clinical and morphological characteristics of cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Jagoda; Ninković Baroš, Djuka; Grujić, Dragana; Starović, Dragana; Ćelić, Milanka

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of cutaneous melanoma has increased significantly worldwide over the last several decades. The aim of this study is to determine clinical and morphology characteristics of primary melanoma, since some of them are important prognostic factors. This retrospective study included 172 patients. The data were collected by the Consulting team for malignant skin tumors in the Banja Luka Clinical Centre from 2009 to 2011. We did not use dermoscopy as a diagnostic tool in our investigation. We determined that melanoma occurs equally commonly in both sexes, in women in the sixth decade and the seventh in men. The most common sub-type was nodular melanoma (59.5%, P<0.05), followed by superficial spreading (27.8%) and acral lentiginous melanoma (11.4%). The most common localization was on the back in men (34.3%) and on the legs in women (P<0.05). More than half of our patients (55.8%) had melanoma thickness from 1.0 to 4.0 mm, and 38% had a melanoma thicker than 4.0 mm. The average Breslow thickness is 4.6 mm. More women than men had melanoma thicker than 4 mm (P<0.05). Spread of the primary tumor localization was found in 31.4% of patients, more frequently in men than in women (P<0.05). In most cases it was abstraction of lymph nodes (P<0.05). The average thickness of the melanoma in our patients is much higher than the average in the world and the countries of Europe. The results of this study indicate a need for better unique regional registry in this part of Bosnia and Herzegovina and improvement of preventive measures in the early diagnosis of melanoma.

  15. The histological assessment of cutaneous vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Vasculitis is defined as inflammation directed at vessels, which compromises or destroys the vessel wall leading to haemorrhagic and/or ischaemic events. Skin biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitis, whose manifestations include urticaria, infiltrative erythema, petechiae, purpura, purpuric papules, haemorrhagic vesicles and bullae, nodules, livedo racemosa, deep (punched out) ulcers and digital gangrene. These varied morphologies are a direct reflection of size of the vessels and extent of the vascular bed affected, ranging from a vasculitis affecting few superficial, small vessels in petechial eruptions to extensive pan-dermal small vessel vasculitis in haemorrhagic bullae to muscular vessel vasculitis in lower extremity nodules with livedo racemosa. Skin biopsy, extending to subcutis and taken from the earliest, most symptomatic, reddish or purpuric lesion is crucial for obtaining a high-yielding diagnostic sample. Based on histology, vasculitis can be classified on the size of vessels affected and the dominant immune cell mediating the inflammation (e.g. neutrophilic, granulomatous, lymphocytic, or eosinophilic). Disruption of small vessels by inflammatory cells, deposition of fibrin within the lumen and/or vessel wall coupled with nuclear debris allows for the confident recognition of small vessel, mostly neutrophilic vasculitis (also known as leukocytoclastic vasculitis). In contrast, muscular vessel vasculitis can be identified solely by infiltration of its wall by inflammatory cells. Extravasation of red blood cells (purpura) and necrosis are supportive, but not diagnostic of vasculitis as they are also seen in haemorrhagic and/or vaso-occlusive disorders (pseudovasculitis). Vasculitic foci associated with extravascular granulomas (palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis), tissue eosinophilia, or tissue neutrophilia signal the risk for, or co-existence of systemic disease. This essential histological information

  16. Proton decay, 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciano, W. J.

    1982-03-01

    Employing the current world average Lambda/sub MS/ = 0.160 GeV as input, the minimal Georgi-Glashow SU(5) model predicts sq sin theta/sub W/(m/sub W/) = 0.214, m/sub b/m/sub tau/ approximately 2.8 and tau/sub p approximately (0.4 approximately 12) x 10 approximately to the 29th power yr. The first two predictions are in excellent agreement with experiment; but the implied proton life time is already somewhat below the present experimental bound. In this status report, uncertainties in tau/sub p/ are described and effects of appendages to the SU(5) model (such as new fermion generations, scalars, supersymmetry, etc.) are examined.

  17. The proton (nuclear) microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, G. J. F.

    1989-04-01

    The scanning proton microprobe (SPMP) is closely related to the scanning electron microprobe (SEMP) or scanning electron microscope (SEM) with X-ray detector. Though the much greater elemental sensitivity of the SPMP is inherent in the physics, the generally inferior spatial resolution of the SPMP is not inherent and big improvements are possible, As its alternative name would imply, the SPMP is often used with heavier particle beams and with nuclear rather than atomic reactions. Its versatility and quantitative accuracy have justified greater instrumentation and computer power than that associated with other microprobes. It is fast becoming an industrially and commercially important instrument and there are few fields of scientific research in which it has not played a part. Notable contributions have been made in biology, medicine, agriculture, semiconductors, geology, mineralogy, extractive metallurgy, new materials, archaeology, forensic science, catalysis, industrial problems and reactor technology.

  18. Cutaneous Connective Tissue Diseases: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Bobby Y.; Hantash, Basil M.

    2010-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a group of clinical disorders that have an underlying autoimmune pathogenesis. These include a diverse set of diseases such as relapsing polychondritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and eosinophilic fasciitis, along with more common entities like Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, scleroderma, and lupus erythematosus. The latter three will be the focus of this review, as they constitute the most significant and common CTD with cutaneous manifestations. The cutaneous signs often represent the preliminary stages of disease and the presenting clinical symptoms. Therefore, comprehensive knowledge of CTD manifestations is essential for accurate diagnosis, better assessment of prognosis, and effective management. Although the precise etiologies of CTDs remain obscure, recent advances have allowed for further understanding of their pathogenesis and improved disease classifications. In addition, there have been developments in therapeutic options for CTDs. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, clinical presentations, and current treatment options of cutaneous lupus erythematous, dermatomyositis and scleroderma. PMID:21218179

  19. Treatment of metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease with certolizumab.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Maija; Camp, Brendan; Adhami, Katayun; Jacob, Vinita; Magro, Cynthia; Wildman, Horatio

    2015-11-18

    Metastatic Crohn disease is a rare cutaneous manifestation of Crohn disease characterized by granulomatous lesions discontinuous with the diseased areas of the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman with history of Crohn disease who was admitted for treatment of cellulitis after presenting with a tender erythematous plaque of the left calf. Microbiological tests including tissue cultures were negative. A skin biopsy revealed granulomatous dermatitis consistent with metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease. Owing to concomitant perianal fistulas and abscesses and prior infusion reaction to infliximab, the patient was treated with certolizumab, a pegylated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor combined with methotrexate resulting in complete resolution of the skin lesion. This case emphasizes the importance of recognizing this rare skin manifestation of Crohn disease and adds certolizumab as one of TNF inhibitors useful in the treatment of metastatic cutaneous Crohn disease.

  20. Multiple cutaneous malignancies in a patient of xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Grampurohit, Vandana U; Dinesh, U S; Rao, Ravikala

    2011-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a genodermatosis characterized by photosensitivity and the development of cutaneous and internal malignancies at an early age. The basic defect underlying the clinical manifestations is a nucleotide excision repair defect, leading to defective repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. These patients exhibit enhanced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum who are younger than 20 years of age have a greater than 1000-fold increased risk of developing skin cancer. Early detection of these malignancies is necessary because they are fast growing, metastasize early and lead to death. Although, early detection and treatment of cutaneous malignancies will reduce the morbidity and mortality, genetic counseling remains the most important measure for preventing xeroderma pigmentosum. We report a case of xeroderma pigmentosum in an 18-year-old male presenting with multiple cutaneous malignancies: squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma and pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

  1. On a Rare Cutaneous Metastasis from a Sacrococcygeal Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Matteo; Floccari, Federica; De Caro, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Chordomas are rare malignant tumors of notochordal origin and are rare locally aggressive ones with a metastatic potential. The skin rarely is seen as metastatic site. We describe a case of an adult woman with cutaneous metastasis of a primary sacral chordoma excised ten years before, which appeared as a painless cutaneous mass located in the dorsal region. Once removed, the surgical specimen was formalin fixed and in paraffin embedded. Sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin, and histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations were performed. Histologically, the neoplasia was characterized by cords or single tumor cells with an abundant myxoid stroma, conspicuous pale vacuolated cytoplasm (the classic “physaliphorous cells”), and mild nuclear atypia. Mitotic activity was scanty. At immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells were diffusely positive for S-100 protein, pan-keratins, EMA, and vimentin. A diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of chordoma was performed. This case illustrates a diagnostic challenge because of the unusual presentation of an already rare tumor.

  2. Pregnancy-Associated “Cutaneous Type” Pemphigus Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The development of pemphigus, including pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus, during pregnancy is rare. PV manifests with mucosal and/or cutaneous erosions with flaccid bullae that are histologically characterized by suprabasilar acantholysis. In contrast, pemphigus foliaceus manifests with cutaneous-only involvement and superficial epidermal acantholysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for autoantibodies against desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 aids in the diagnosis and differentiation between pemphigus subtypes. High-dose systemic corticosteroids are first-line agents in management of PV, yet their potential long-term use raises complex management issues associated with pregnancy and fetal risk. Here we report a rare case of cutaneous-limited PV in association with pregnancy. PMID:26824969

  3. Focal cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma following radium-223 extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Benjegerdes, Katie E.; Housewright, Chad D.

    2017-01-01

    Long-term sequelae due to extravasation of intravenous radioisotopes resulting in radiation injuries are rarely reported. As the use of radioactive isotopes for the treatment of osteoblastic metastases increases, information regarding the prevention, treatment, and long-term monitoring of suspected extravasation injury will become increasingly important. We present a patient with no previous history of skin cancer who developed an aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma at the site of prior radium-223 extravasation. We recommend that patients who experience extravasation of therapeutic radioisotopes be monitored by dermatologists for long-term sequelae. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma should be recognized as a rare but potential adverse event following cutaneous extravasation of radium-223 and is likely a side effect that is severely underreported. PMID:28127143

  4. Successful Treatment of Provisional Cutaneous Mastocytosis with Interferon Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Andrea; Bhat, Ramesh M

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a disorder characterized by the clonal proliferation of mast cells and their accumulation in skin, bone marrow, liver, and spleen. Cutaneous mastocytosis presents in children in over 90% of the cases and any cutaneous manifestation in an adult is the earliest sign of the systemic disease. A 45-year-old patient presented with itchy dark lesions over the body since childhood and Darier's sign was positive. Skin biopsy showed features of mastocytosis and immunohistochemistry was positive for CD34. Since the patient was refractory to treatment with antihistamines and psoralen-ultraviolet A therapy, injections of interferon alpha were given – 3 million IU twice weekly subcutaneously as they have been proven to improve constitutional symptoms. Very few reports of successful treatment of cutaneous mastocytosis using interferon alpha have been published. PMID:27293273

  5. Isolated cutaneous sarcoidosis: a new insight into the old entity.

    PubMed

    Kumar H K, Sharath; M N, Gayathri; M, Bharathi; T, Ravikumar

    2013-08-01

    Cutaneous lesions are a part of common manifestation in multi-systemic sarcoidosis and skin involvement occurs in 20% to 35% of the patients with systemic disease. An exclusive cutaneous involvement is rare and it is reported in about 4%-5% of the patients of sarcoidosis. These lesions have been classified into specific and non-specific, depending on the presence of non- caseating granulomas, on histopathologic studies. In the present study, we are reporting two cases of isolated cutaneous sarcoidosis without systemic manifestations, which is a rare presentation. Sarcoidosis will continue to challenge even the most experienced clinicians with respect to a high degree of suspicion and further investigations for diagnosing and treating this disorder.

  6. Cutaneous Granulomas in Dolphins Caused by Novel Uncultivated Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Raquel; Bossart, Gregory D.; St. Leger, Judy A.; Dalton, Leslie M.; Reif, John S.; Schaefer, Adam M.; McCarthy, Peter J.; Fair, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous granulomas in dolphins were believed to be caused by Lacazia loboi, which also causes a similar disease in humans. This hypothesis was recently challenged by reports that fungal DNA sequences from dolphins grouped this pathogen with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. We conducted phylogenetic analysis of fungi from 6 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) with cutaneous granulomas and chains of yeast cells in infected tissues. Kex gene sequences of P. brasiliensis from dolphins showed 100% homology with sequences from cultivated P. brasiliensis, 73% with those of L. loboi, and 93% with those of P. lutzii. Parsimony analysis placed DNA sequences from dolphins within a cluster with human P. brasiliensis strains. This cluster was the sister taxon to P. lutzii and L. loboi. Our molecular data support previous findings and suggest that a novel uncultivated strain of P. brasiliensis restricted to cutaneous lesions in dolphins is probably the cause of lacaziosis/lobomycosis, herein referred to as paracoccidioidomycosis ceti. PMID:27869614

  7. Endogenous nitric oxide attenuates neutrally mediated cutaneous vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Durand, Sylvain; Davis, Scott L; Cui, Jian; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Crandall, Craig G

    2007-12-01

    Cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness may be impaired by substance(s) directly or indirectly responsible for cutaneous active vasodilatation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that endogenous nitric oxide (NO) attenuates the reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during an orthostatic challenge combined with whole-body heating, as well as during whole-body cooling. In protocol 1, healthy subjects were pretreated with an intradermal injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX) to block the release of neurotransmitters from nerves responsible for cutaneous active vasodilatation. On the experimental day, a microdialysis probe was placed at the BTX-treated site as well as at two adjacent untreated sites. NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 mm) was perfused through the probe placed at the BTX-treated site and at one untreated site. After confirmation of the absence of cutaneous vasodilatation at the BTX site during whole-body heating, adenosine was infused through the microdialysis probe at this site to increase skin blood flow to a level similar to that at the untreated site. Subsequently, 30 and 40 mmHg lower-body negative pressures (LBNPs) were applied. The reduction in CVC to LBNP was greatest at the BTX-treated site (15.0 +/- 2.4% of the maximum level (% max)), followed by the L-NAME-treated site (11.3 +/- 2.6% max), and then the untreated site (3.8 +/- 3.0% max; P < 0.05 for all comparisons). In protocol 2, two microdialysis membranes were inserted in the dermal space of one forearm. Adenosine alone was infused at one site while the other site received adenosine and L-NAME. The reduction in CVC in response to whole-body cooling was significantly greater at the L-NAME-treated site than at the adjacent adenosine alone site. These results suggest that endogenous NO is capable of attenuating cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  8. Lenalidomide for refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, E Y; Schanberg, L E; Wershba, E C; Rabinovich, C E

    2017-05-01

    Objective Cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus cause significant morbidity. Lenalidomide, a thalidomide analogue, has shown promise treating cutaneous lupus erythematosus in adults. Our objective was to evaluate lenalidomide's efficacy and safety in treating refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 10 adolescents who received lenalidomide for recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Information was gathered at drug initiation and 6-month follow-up. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test was used to assess change in quantitative parameters of disease activity. Results Nine subjects were girls and six were African-American. Indications for lenalidomide treatment included alopecia, nasal and oral ulcers, extensive malar rash, discoid lesions, bullous lesions, panniculitis, cutaneous vasculitis, and Raynaud's phenomenon with digital ulcerations. Within 6 months, all patients demonstrated complete or near resolution based on physician report. Prednisone dose decreased from a mean 23.5 mg (SD± 13.3) to 12.25 mg (SD± 9.2) ( P= 0.008). Sedimentation rate decreased from a mean 29 mm/hour (SD± 31.5) to 17 mm/hour (SD± 18.1) ( P= 0.004). Lenalidomide was well tolerated. Conclusion Lenalidomide is an effective and safe treatment for a spectrum of dermatological conditions in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Its use may allow a reduction in prednisone dose and decreased disfigurement. Prospective study is needed to clarify lenalidomide's role in treating cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  9. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. 868.2480... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive...

  10. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. 868.2480... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive...

  11. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. 868... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a...

  12. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. 868.2480... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive...

  13. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. 868... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a...

  14. [Management of the cutaneous side effects of chemotherapies and targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Delyon, Julie; Gerard, Maud; Nicodeme, Marguerite; Fromantin, Isabelle; Loirat, Delphine

    2015-06-01

    The treatments used in oncology cause frequent cutaneous side effects. The different types of cutaneous toxicities depend on the class of anti-tumour therapies and can involve the skin, mucosa, nails and hair. Effectively managing these cutaneous toxicities requires adapted preventive and curative measures in order to reduce their impact, notably on patients' quality of life.

  15. 21 CFR 868.2500 - Cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor. 868.2500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2500 Cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor is a noninvasive, heated sensor (e.g.,...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2500 - Cutaneous oxygen (PcO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cutaneous oxygen (PcO 2) monitor. 868.2500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2500 Cutaneous oxygen (PcO 2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor is a noninvasive, heated sensor (e.g.,...

  17. 21 CFR 868.2500 - Cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor. 868.2500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2500 Cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor is a noninvasive, heated sensor (e.g.,...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2500 - Cutaneous oxygen (PcO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cutaneous oxygen (PcO 2) monitor. 868.2500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2500 Cutaneous oxygen (PcO 2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor is a noninvasive, heated sensor (e.g.,...

  19. 21 CFR 868.2500 - Cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor. 868.2500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2500 Cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor is a noninvasive, heated sensor (e.g.,...

  20. Proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Bradford; Henderson, Randal; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, Romaine C; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2011-06-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer for over 50 years. Due to its unique dose distribution with its spread-out Bragg peak, proton therapy can deliver highly conformal radiation to cancers located adjacent to critical normal structures. One of the important applications of its use is in prostate cancer, since the prostate is located adjacent to the rectum and bladder. Over 30 years of data have been published on the use of proton therapy in prostate cancer; these data have demonstrated high rates of local and biochemical control as well as low rates of urinary and rectal toxicity. Although before 2000 proton therapy was available at only a couple of centers in the United States, several new proton centers have been built in the last decade. With the increased availability of proton therapy, research on its use for prostate cancer has accelerated rapidly. Current research includes explorations of dose escalation, hypofractionation, and patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. Early results from these studies are promising and will likely help make proton therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer more cost-effective.

  1. Differences in cutaneous wound healing between dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bohling, Mark W; Henderson, Ralph A

    2006-07-01

    Regardless of the species involved, wound healing follows a predictable course of overlapping phases. In spite of these commonalities, significant species differences in cutaneous wound healing have been uncovered in the Equidae and, more recently, between the dog and cat. It has also recently been shown that the subcutaneous tissues play an important supporting role in cutaneous wound healing, which may help to ex-plain healing differences between cats and dogs. These discoveries may improve veterinarians' understanding of problem wound healing in the cat and, hopefully, lead to better strategies for wound management in this sometimes troublesome species.

  2. Atypical scleromyxedema presenting with cutaneous and cardiovascular manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Sue-Ann; Kandiah, David A

    2016-01-01

    Scleromyxedema is part of a group of cutaneous mucinoses, characterized by a generalized papular eruption, dermal mucin deposition, and an increase in dermal collagen. This condition can be localized as discrete papular lichen myxedematous skin or as a systemic condition usually associated with paraproteinaemia. To date, there is no unifying treatment and is limited by rarity, small number of case reports, and the lack of randomized controlled trials. We describe the case of a 56-year-old gentleman with features of scleromyxedema who had cutaneous and cardiac involvement, and significant mediastinal lymphadenopathy without monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:27698568

  3. Emerging infectious diseases with cutaneous manifestations: Viral and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Nawas, Zeena Y; Tong, Yun; Kollipara, Ramya; Peranteau, Andrew J; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Yan, Albert C; Lupi, Omar; Tyring, Stephen K

    2016-07-01

    Given increased international travel, immigration, and climate change, bacterial and viral infections that were once unrecognized or uncommon are being seen more frequently in the Western Hemisphere. A delay in diagnosis and treatment of these diseases can lead to significant patient morbidity and mortality. However, the diagnosis and management of these infections is fraught with a lack of consistency because there is a dearth of dermatology literature on the cutaneous manifestations of these infections. We review the epidemiology, cutaneous manifestations, diagnosis, and management of these emerging bacterial and viral diseases.

  4. Cutaneous Ossifying Fibroma in a Neon Tetra (Paracheirodon innesi).

    PubMed

    Murphy, B; Imai, D M

    2016-01-01

    A cutaneous proliferative mass was identified arising from the caudal peduncle of a captive neon tetra fish (Paracheirodon innesi). The lesion was histologically consistent with an ossifying fibroma (OF), a fibro-osseous proliferative lesion typically identified in the jaws or tooth-associated supportive tissues of mammals. Although it has been previously reported, there is no recent report of this lesion occurring in a fish. This is the first report of a cutaneous ossifying fibroma in a characin fish. The authors speculate on the pathogenesis of this lesion, which may have arisen from the scale-associated mesenchymal tissues.

  5. Localized cutaneous argyria: two case reports and clinicopathologic review.

    PubMed

    McClain, Colt M; Kantrow, Sara M; Abraham, Jerrold L; Price, Joey; Parker, Eva R; Robbins, Jason B

    2013-10-01

    We report 2 cases of patients who presented with blue macules clinically suspicious for blue nevi. One patient had no documented history of trauma or silver exposure, and the other reported exposure to silver over 30 years ago. Microscopic examination revealed a dermal population of brown-black globules predominantly adhering to collagen fibers. In both cases, no melanocytic proliferation was identified by immunohistochemistry. Analysis of the skin biopsies with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy demonstrated the presence of silver and selenium. These findings were diagnostic of localized cutaneous argyria. Our case reports highlight the importance of including localized cutaneous argyria in the differential diagnosis of pigmented lesions.

  6. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  7. The risk of cutaneous melanoma in melanocytic nevi*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Nurimar Conceição

    2013-01-01

    The data on melanoma associaed with melanocytic nevus are controversial. A longitudinal prospective study of 107 cases of cutaneous melanoma revealed that 9 (8.4%) cases were presumed to be linked to a precursor lesion, but only in 1 (0.9%) out of these cases the histopathological examination showed an associated melanocytic nevus. The vague information of a preexisting lesion of cutaneous melanoma is not sufficient to consider it a tumour precursor and it requires histopathological evidence to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:23739702

  8. Cutaneous myiasis presenting as chronic furunculosis--case report.

    PubMed

    Dada-Adegbola, Hannah O; Oluwatoba, Olufunke A

    2005-01-01

    Myiasis is the infection of tissue or organ of living humans or animals by the maggot or larval stages of flies. In Africa, the most common fly responsible for cutaneous myiasis is the tumbu fly, Cordylobia anthropophaga. We present two cases of cutaneous myiasis seen on the upper abdominal wall and anterior chest wall. Both were initially diagnosed as furuncle (common boil), but from high index of suspicion of myiasis, followed by application of petroleum jelly and palm oil to occlude the spiracle and the expulsion of larva stage of Cordylobia anthropophaga the diagnoses in both cases were confirmed.

  9. Imiquimod - Its role in the treatment of cutaneous malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bubna, Aditya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Imiquimod is a synthetic imidazoquinolone amine, which has potent immune response modifier activity, when topically used. This characteristic property of imiquimod has led to its use in a number of applications in dermatology, particularly in cutaneous malignancies, where it has been found to be effective and safe. Currently, additional mechanisms for its activity in actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma, and invasive squamous cell carcinoma have been elucidated. Its usage for cutaneous metastasis in breast cancer has been a further addition to its therapeutic armamentarium recently. PMID:26288465

  10. MicroRNA expression abnormalities in limited cutaneous scleroderma and diffuse cutaneous scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Honglin; Li, Yisha; Qu, Shunlin; Luo, Hui; Zhou, Yaou; Wang, Yanping; Zhao, Hongjun; You, Yunhui; Xiao, Xianzhong; Zuo, Xiaoxia

    2012-06-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, SSc) is a complex autoimmune disease caused by progressive fibrotic replacement of normal tissue architecture, a progressive and ultimately fatal process that currently has no cure. Although dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is known to be involved in a variety of pathophysiologic processes, the role of miRNAs in SSc is unclear. In comparison with the normal skin tissues, miRNAs were aberrantly expressed in limited cutaneous scleroderma and diffuse cutaneous scleroderma skin tissues. We also identified miRNAs whose expressions were correlated with SSc fibrosis: miR-21, miR-31, miR-146, miR-503, miR-145, and miR-29b were predicted to be involved. This study further confirmed that miR-21 was increased whereas miR-145 and miR-29b were decreased both in the skin tissues and fibroblasts. As predicted target genes, SMAD7, SAMD3, and COL1A1 were regulated by these miRNAs. After stimulation with transforming growth factor β, the expression of miR-21 was increased and that of SMAD7 mRNA was decreased. MiR-145 was upregulated whereas the mRNA level of SMAD3 was downregulated. The downregulation of miR-29b was correlated with the upregulation of COL1A1 mRNA. MiRNAs might play an important role in the pathogenesis of SSc and suggest a potential therapy.

  11. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  12. Selective vascular injury during cutaneous laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnell, James William

    Pulsed laser irradiation in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling (CSC) can induce selective vascular injury to remove cutaneous hypervascular malformations such as port wine stains (PWS), hemangiomas, and facial veins. In this group of studies, we characterized the cryogen heat removal process and determined the effects of pulsed laser irradiation in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling of human skin. First, we employed an inverse heat conduction algorithm to measure the thermal boundary condition due to CSC in in vitro skin phantoms. Second, we developed a mathematical model of laser irradiation in conjunction with CSC in human skin. We determined tissue damage and temperature profiles due to varying combinations of laser pulse duration, radiant exposure, and CSC application times. Finally, we used ex vivo and in vivo human skin to determine the effects of high radiant exposures and CSC on epidermal and vascular injury. CSC induces a dynamic cooling effect, removing heat from the skin both during and following the spurt application time. Residual cryogen, deposited on the skin surface during the cryogen spurt, remains on the skin surface several times as long as the as cryogen spurt itself. The heat removal rate during the cryogen spurt is greatest; however, the total energy removed following the cryogen spurt is also substantial (approximately half as much as during the spurt application time). CSC was effective in protecting the human skin epidermis in light to moderately pigmented skin. Mathematical modeling, ex vivo, and in vivo studies showed that the epidermal damage threshold could be increased by a factor of approximately two. Increased radiant exposures increased the risk of non-selective vascular injury observed in histology as injury to the epidermis and perivascular collagen; however, proper choice of cryogen cooling durations resulted in the elimination of epidermal injury as well as perivascular tissue injury. In addition, higher radiant

  13. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  14. Kaon photoproduction off proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoupil, Dalibor; Bydžovský, Petr

    2016-11-01

    We have recently constructed our version of the Regge-plus-resonance (RPR) model and two variants of an isobar model for photoproduction of kaons on the proton, utilizing new experimental data from CLAS, LEPS, and GRAAL collaborations for adjusting free parameters of the models. Higher-spin nucleon (3/2 and 5/2) and hyperon (3/2) resonances were included using the consistent formalism by Pascalutsa and found to play an important role in data description. The set of chosen nucleon resonances in our new isobar models agrees well with the set of the most probable contributing states determined in the Bayesian analysis with the RPR model whilst only 6 out of 10 N*'s selected in the RPR fit of ours overlap with the nucleon resonant states in the Bayesian analysis. Results of two versions of the isobar model are compared to the new version of the RPR model and experimental data in the third-resonance region and their properties are discussed. We place an emphasis on the choice of resonances, the predictions in the forward- and backward-angle region as well as the choice of the hadron form factor.

  15. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  16. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  17. Spectrum of solar flare protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Balabin, Yu. V.; Podgorny, A. I.; Vashenyuk, E. V.

    2010-08-01

    Most of big solar flares are accompanied by relativistic protons. The prompt component of relativistic protons moves along the interplanetary magnetic field lines and arrives at the Earth's orbit when the flare favorably located in the western solar hemisphere. The neutron monitor measurements reveal an exponential law energy spectrum. Calculations of relativistic proton acceleration in the flare current sheet with magnetic and electric fields found from 3D MHD simulations also demonstrate an exponential law spectrum. A comparison of the measured and calculated spectra permits to estimate the rate of reconnection in the Bastille flare (14 July 2000) as ˜107cm/s. The delay component of relativistic protons exhibits a power law energy spectrum.

  18. Studying the Proton Spin Puzzle with PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherity, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The proton spin puzzle remains one of the biggest mysteries in fundamental particle physics today. This talk will explore how the PHENIX Collaboration's forward W-boson program uses RHIC, the world's only polarized proton-proton collider, to probe the spin structure of the proton.

  19. Dose-Escalation Trial of Carfilzomib With and Without Romidepsin in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-10

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  20. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Niklas

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  1. Understanding the proton's spin structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Myhrer; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the tremendous progress that has been towards an understanding of how the spin of the proton is distributed on its quark and gluon constituents. This is a problem that began in earnest twenty years ago with the discovery of the proton "spin crisis" by the European Muon Collaboration. The discoveries prompted by that original work have given us unprecedented insight into the amount of spin carried by polarized gluons and the orbital angular momentum of the quarks.

  2. High intensity protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  3. Inelastic proton-solid collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echenique, P. M.; Flores, F.

    1987-05-01

    A first-principles calculation of charge states of moving protons in Al is presented. The many-body self-energy approach combined with ordinary atomic physics has been used. We find that at high velocities, V>2V0 or 3V0 (Bohr velocity), the processes are atomiclike, while at intermediate velocities, 0.7V0proton charges.

  4. Pegylated liposomal-encapsulated doxorubicin in cutaneous composite lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Langner, Dana; Hansel, Gesina; Haroske, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cutaneous composite lymphomas are very rare. Their treatment depends upon the different contributing lymphoma entities. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, (PTCL-NOS) represents an aggressive lymphoma subtype. Follicular cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (FCBCL) runs an indolent course. Treatment with pegylated liposomal encapsulated doxorubicin (PLE-DOXO) has yet not been reported in this entity. Case presentation: A 73-year-old male patient presented with 3 rapidly growing, painful nodules on his left leg. He was diagnosed as composite cutaneous lymphoma consisting of PTCL-NOS and FCBCL. All lesions had been surgically removed. Staging was unremarkable. After 4 months a relapse occurred with involvement of inguinal lymph nodes and systemic treatment with PEL-DOXO 20 mg/ m2 every 3 weeks was initiated. After 6 cycles PLE-DOXO, which were well tolerated without grade 3 or 4 toxicities, a mixed response was obtained with complete remission of cutaneous lesions. Lymph nodes were treated by radiotherapy. A second relapse occurred after 8 months and various polychemotherapy regimens were applied without remission. The overall survival was 28 months. Conclusion: PEL-DOXO is a possible initial systemic treatment in case of PCTL-NOS. Whether polychemotherapy offers an advantage for survival remains questionable but further investigations are needed. PMID:27787356

  5. Patterns of clinical nail appearances in patients with cutaneous psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    MARINA, ELENA MIHAELA; BOTAR-JID, CAROLINA; BOLBOACA, SORANA DANIELA; ROMAN, IULIA IOANA; SENILA, CORINA SIMONA; MIHU, CARMEN MIHAELA; TATARU, DUMITRU ALEXANDRU

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Nail manifestations are often an overlooked aspect in psoriatic disease, cutaneous and joint involvement being far more often reported and investigated. The reported prevalence of nail changes varies in literature, specific fingernail clinical features having different degrees of occurrence. The aim of this study was to describe specific clinical patterns of fingernail alterations in adult patients with plaque-type psoriasis in a university hospital in the North-West of Romania. Methods Clinical data of 35 patients with fingernail psoriasis were collected and analyzed. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI) scores were used to quantify disease extension in each patient. Results PASI score proved linearly correlated with NAPSI score (p<0.05). The age of onset of fingernail psoriasis was positively correlated with age of onset cutaneous psoriasis (p<0.0001). Furthermore, the duration of cutaneous involvement and NAPSI proved significantly related (p<0.05). The third fingernail in the right hand and first fingernail in the left hand were in most of the cases severely affected. The most common observed nail pattern was pitting, followed by salmon patches and subungual hyperkeratosis. Conclusion Important nail changes appear even in moderate forms of cutaneous psoriasis. Particular localization of specific fingernail psoriasis pattern enables the possibility of detecting early stage disease. PMID:28246493

  6. Bullous reactions to bed bug bites reflect cutaneous vasculitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates bullous cutaneous reactions and sequential histopathology in an individual sensitized to bed bug bites in an effort to better understand the allergic response and histology associated with these bites. There was a progression of the inflammatory response across time ranging from...

  7. Primary cutaneous smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gittler, Julia; Martires, Kathryn; Terushkin, Vitaly; Brinster, Nooshin; Ramsay, David

    2016-12-15

    HTLV-1 is a virus that is endemic in southwesternJapan and the Caribbean and has been implicatedin the development of ATLL. ATLL, which is anuncommon malignant condition of peripheralT-lymphocytes, is characterized by four clinicalsubtypes, which include acute, lymphomatous,chronic, and smoldering types, that are based onLDH levels, calcium levels, and extent of organinvolvement. We present a 52-year- old woman withpruritic patches with scale on the buttocks and withtender, hyperpigmented macules and papules oftwo-years duration. Histopathologic examinationwas suggestive of mycosis fungoides, laboratoryresults showed HTLV-I and II, and the patient wasdiagnosed with primary cutaneous ATLL. We reviewthe literature on HTLV-1 and ATLL and specifically theprognosis of cutaneous ATLL. The literature suggeststhat a diagnosis of ATLL should be considered amongpatients of Caribbean origin or other endemicareas with skin lesions that suggest a cutaneousT-cell lymphoma, with clinicopathologic features ofmycosis fungoides. Differentiation between ATLLand cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is imperative as theyhave different prognoses and treatment approaches.

  8. Concomitant early mucosal and cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Cafe, Virginia; Costa, Jackson; Oliveira, Fabiano; Bafica, Andre; Rosato, Andrea; de Freitas, Luiz A R; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2006-08-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is often clinically silent until reaching a highly advanced state. In this prospective study, 6 of 220 patients with early cutaneous leishmaniasis were diagnosed with mucosal involvement by otorhinolaryngological examination (a rate similar to the reported rate of late ML). Detection of early ML may represent an important strategy in preventing severe mucosal destruction in human leishmaniasis.

  9. Cutaneous Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Patient following Traditional Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Khazraiyan, Hamideh; Ghanbari, Fahime; Ahmadi, Bahram; Gerami Shoar, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis is a rare manifestation of an aggressive fungal infection. Early diagnosis and treatment are vitally important in improving outcome. We report an unusual case presenting with progressive necrotizing fasciitis due to mucormycosis following trauma and dressing by man-made herbal agents. PMID:23991340

  10. Cutaneous tactile allodynia associated with microvascular dysfunction in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Laferrière, Andre; Millecamps, Magali; Xanthos, Dimitris N; Xiao, Wen Hua; Siau, Chiang; de Mos, Marissa; Sachot, Christelle; Ragavendran, J Vaigunda; Huygen, Frank JPM; Bennett, Gary J; Coderre, Terence J

    2008-01-01

    Background Cutaneous tactile allodynia, or painful hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the skin, is typically associated with neuropathic pain, although also present in chronic pain patients who do not have evidence of nerve injury. We examine whether deep tissue microvascular dysfunction, a feature common in chronic non-neuropathic pain, contributes to allodynia. Results Persistent cutaneous allodynia is produced in rats following a hind paw ischemia-reperfusion injury that induces microvascular dysfunction, including arterial vasospasms and capillary slow flow/no-reflow, in muscle. Microvascular dysfunction leads to persistent muscle ischemia, a reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, and allodynia correlated with muscle ischemia, but not with skin nerve loss. The affected hind paw muscle shows lipid peroxidation, an upregulation of nuclear factor kappa B, and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokines, while allodynia is relieved by agents that inhibit these alterations. Allodynia is increased, along with hind paw muscle lactate, when these rats exercise, and is reduced by an acid sensing ion channel antagonist. Conclusion Our results demonstrate how microvascular dysfunction and ischemia in muscle can play a critical role in the development of cutaneous allodynia, and encourage the study of how these mechanisms contribute to chronic pain. We anticipate that focus on the pain mechanisms associated with microvascular dysfunction in muscle will provide new effective treatments for chronic pain patients with cutaneous tactile allodynia. PMID:18957097

  11. [Myositis and the skin: cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis].

    PubMed

    Jinnin, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies include dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and inclusion body myositis. Among them, cutaneous manifestations are observed most frequently in dermatomyositis. While dermatomyositis commonly affects the skin and muscles, it can also affect the lungs and other organs. Dermatomyositis presenting clinically and histopathologically with typical cutaneous lesions, but without myositis, is called amyopathic dermatomyositis. Given that the Bohan and Peter criteria cannot distinguish amyopathic dermatomyositis, understanding the characteristic skin manifestations may be essential for diagnosing this condition. The cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis are thought to be the result of the Koebner phenomenon, vasculopathy, or photosensitivity; manifestations include various eruptions, such as heliotrope rush, Gottron's sign, Gottron's papules, mechanic's hand, nail-fold bleeding, skin ulcer, vasculitis, flagellate erythema, V-sign, and Shawl sign. The presence of multiple types of eruptions can help diagnose the disease. Several skin diseases, including adult Still's disease, contact dermatitis, and sarcoidosis, can mimic the cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis. Skin biopsy is useful for differential diagnoses. Histopathologically, dermatomyositis of the skin is characterized by liquefaction degeneration, vacuolar degeneration, edema, and mucin deposition. Dermatologists, neurologists, and rheumatologists are responsible for the diagnosis and management of dermatomyositis, in cooperation with pulmonologists, pediatricians, and pathologists. This review aims to provide clinicians with recent findings regarding skin involvement in dermatomyositis.

  12. Atypical leiomyoma: An unusual variant of cutaneous pilar leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Nocito, Mabel Jimena; Lustia, María Marcela; Luna, Paula Carolina; Cañadas, Nadia Guadalupe; Castellanos Posse, María Laura; Marchesi, Carolina; Carabajal, Graciela; Mazzini, Miguel Angel

    2009-03-15

    Cutaneous atypical leiomyoma is an unusual benign tumor arising from arrector pili muscle that shares histological features with uterine atypical or symplastic leiomyoma: atypical cellularity with pleomorphic nuclei but minimal or no mitosis. Six other cases have been reported so far and, in spite of its name and of being a smooth muscle proliferation, no recurrences nor metastasis have been reported.

  13. [The cutaneous leishmaniasis of the face in Gafsa area, Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Masmoudi, A; Kitar, A; Rebai, M; Bouassida, S; Turki, H; Zahaf, A

    2005-12-01

    The cutaneous leishmaniasis is a frequent affection in Tunisia. In the Gafsa region it is a endemoepidemic infection. Our prospective study was carried out on 225 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis of the face collected over two years in the outpatients' department of dermatology at Gafsa hospital. The aim of our study was to know more about the evolutive epidemio-clinical particularities of the cutaneous leishmaniasis of the face. The relative frequency of the cutaneous leishmaniasis of the face for the new patients reached 5%. An equal distribution between the two sexes was noted. The average age of our patients was 24 years old and 6 months old with extremes ranging from 3 months to 77 years. The nodular and ulcerated forms were the most frequent (35.3%), followed by impetiginoid forms (23%), then the lupoid forms (15%). The papular form was quite frequent (13%). Impetiginoid lesions occurred frequently in the child. Lupoid lesions appeared particularly on the nose. The complicated forms: the cutaneuos necrosis or erysipelas of the face appeared after intralesional injections of meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime). The intramuscular meglumine antimoniate was used in 172 patients, among them 47 needed two treatments or more because of a particular resistance of the lesions of the face. The pimple of Gafsa, term initially used for ulcerated skin nodules, was actually characterised by a lesional polymorphism. The prognosis was good however the risk of in aesthetic scar of the face was important.

  14. Palmoplantar hyperkeratosis: a rare cutaneous manifestation of juvenile dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Vanessa M; Leone, Valentina; Clark, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 12-year-old girl with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). She had a 12-month history of palmoplantar hyperkeratosis that was initially treated as eczema. We wish to alert clinicians to this rare cutaneous manifestation of JDM.

  15. Cutaneous skeletal hypophosphatemia syndrome: clinical spectrum, natural history, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, D; Lim, Y H; Boyce, A M; Gafni, R I; McCarthy, E; Nguyen, T A; Eichenfield, L F; DeKlotz, C M C; Guthrie, L C; Tosi, L L; Thornton, P S; Choate, K A; Collins, M T

    2016-12-01

    Cutaneous skeletal hypophosphatemia syndrome (CSHS), caused by somatic RAS mutations, features excess fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) and skeletal dysplasia. Records from 56 individuals were reviewed and demonstrated fractures, scoliosis, and non-congenital hypophosphatemia that in some cases were resolved. Phosphate and calcitriol, but not skin lesion removal, were effective at controlling hypophosphatemia. No skeletal malignancies were found.

  16. Tinea corporis masquerading as subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Modi, Gunjan M; Maender, Jennifer L; Coleman, Neil; Hsu, Sylvia

    2008-04-15

    Few papers discuss the potential challenge of differentiating dermatophytosis from subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This masquerade, most often manifest on the face, is of both clinical and therapeutic importance. We report a patient whose extensive tinea corporis very closely mimicked SCLE. The threshold for biopsy should be low in cases that exhibit atypical features for either of these entities.

  17. Cryptococcal meningitis with secondary cutaneous involvement in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Saadia; Rahman, Atiya; Herekar, Fivzia; Masood, Sadia

    2013-09-16

    Cryptococcosis is a potentially fatal fungal disease caused by variants of Cryptococcus neoformans species.  The respiratory tract is the usual portal of entry, with a peculiar predilection to invade the central nervous system.  The skin can be secondarily involved in disseminated infection or be exceptionally involved as primary cutaneous infection by inoculation.  The disease is mostly seen in immunodeficiency states.  The diagnosis is frequently unsuspected in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of disseminated cryptococcal meningitis in an immunocompetent young adult. The cutaneous eruption prompted the accurate diagnosis.  The patient, a 20-year-old female, had fever, cough, headache and intractable vomiting for the past two months and was being managed as a case of tuberculous meningitis. Two weeks after starting antituberculous treatment she developed umbilicated papules on the head and neck region. Necessary laboratory workup identified C. neoformans in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skin specimens.  The titers of cryptococcal antigen were measured in CSF and serum for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.  Anti-fungal treatment resulted in regression of the cutaneous lesions and resolution of systemic complaints. The case highlights the need for high degree of suspicion, especially in healthy young adults, in the diagnosis of cryptococcosis. The cutaneous eruptions can be the first manifestation or a diagnostic clue of enormous significance.

  18. Vaccines and vaccination strategies against human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Uzonna, Jude

    2009-05-01

    One might think that the development of a vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasis would be relatively straightforward because the type of immune response required for protection is known and natural immunity occurs following recovery from primary infection. However, there is as yet no effective vaccine against the disease in humans. Although vaccination in murine studies has yielded promising results, these vaccines have failed miserably when tested in primates or humans. The reasons behind these failures are unknown and remain a major hurdle for vaccine design and development against cutaneous leishmaniasis. In contrast, recovery from natural, deliberate or experimental infections results in development of long-lasting immunity to re-infection. This so called infection-induced resistance is the strongest anti-Leishmania immunity known. Here, we briefly review the different approaches to vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis and argue that vaccines composed of genetically modified (attenuated) parasites, which induce immunity akin to infection-induced resistance, may provide best protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans.

  19. Patterning in the regeneration of type I cutaneous receptors

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, P. R.; English, Kathleen B.; Horch, K. W.; Stensaas, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    1. Type I sensory fibres in cat hairy skin innervate structures characterized by twenty to fifty specialized epithelial (Merkel) cells aggregated in a small dome-shaped elevation. Only one fibre enters each dome and it branches repeatedly to supply at least one terminal to each Merkel cell. After the nerve is cut, the Merkel cells and the dome ultimately disappear. 2. The distribution of domes on the posterior thigh was mapped before interruption of the femoral cutaneous nerve and after its regeneration. Regeneration after nerve crush was apparently complete, producing a coincidence pattern similar to those seen in control studies where the nerve was not damaged. After cutting the nerve fewer domes returned, but coincidence of regenerated femoral cutaneous domes with old sites generally was significantly greater than would be expected by chance alone. Non-femoral cutaneous fibres sprouting into the denervated femoral cutaneous field tended to form domes at old sites. Domes were also reformed on scars where domes had been excised. 3. Domes appearing at new locations and on excision scars were often small and close together (clustered). Individual domes in a cluster could be innervated by different Type I fibres. 4. Type I fibres are directed by some mechanism to sites formerly occupied by domes and to sites where domes are being induced. ImagesPlate 2Plate 3Plate 4Plate 1 PMID:4818522

  20. The classification and diagnosis of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Annegret; Landmann, Aysche

    2014-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is an inflammatory connective tissue disease of generalized autoimmunity characterized by pathogenic autoantibodies and immune complexes, attributed to loss of immune tolerance. Cutaneous involvement, which appears in the majority of patients with the disease, can present as LE-specific or LE-nonspecific manifestations. The LE-nonspecific manifestations include e.g. vascular skin changes and may be associated with systemic organ manifestations or other autoimmune diseases. In contrast, the LE-specific manifestations encompass the various subtypes of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), which are classified as separate entities without or with less severe systemic organ involvement. In the "Duesseldorf Classification", CLE is subdivided into four different categories: acute CLE (ACLE), subacute CLE (SCLE), chronic CLE (CCLE), and intermittent CLE (ICLE). Differentiation between these subtypes is based on clinical features and average duration of the cutaneous lesions, but can also consider histological changes of skin biopsy specimens and laboratory abnormalities. In addition, direct immunofluorescence and photoprovocation may be applied to confirm the diagnosis in specific cases. Further investigations should be considered dependent on the clinical symptoms of the CLE patient and the results of the laboratory tests. A revised scoring system, the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (RCLASI) has recently been validated to assess disease activity and damage in CLE. In this review, we focus on the classification of CLE and the diagnostic procedures to identify and confirm the different subtypes of the disease.

  1. Ongoing Epidemic of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis among Syrian Refugees, Lebanon1

    PubMed Central

    Saroufim, Maya; Charafeddine, Khalil; Issa, Grace; Khalifeh, Haifaa; Habib, Robert H.; Berry, Atika; Ghosn, Nada; Rady, Alissar

    2014-01-01

    In September 2012, a cutaneous leishmaniasis outbreak began among Syrian refugees in Lebanon. For 948 patients in whom leishmaniasis was not confirmed, we obtained samples for microscopic confirmation and molecular speciation. We identified Leishmania tropica in 85% and L. major in 15% of patients. After 3 months of megulamine antimonite therapy, patients initial cure rate was 82%. PMID:25279543

  2. Cardiofacio-cutaneous syndrome: Classical presentation of a rare genodermatoses

    PubMed Central

    Prajapat, Mahesh; Kothiwala, Sunil K; Sharma, Mohit; Kuldeep, CM

    2016-01-01

    Cardiofacio-cutaneous syndrome is a rare genodermatoses with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) and mental retardation. Although various mutations have been described, the diagnosis can be made clinically based on constellation of symptoms. Herein, we report a classical case with typical craniofacial features and atrial septal defect. PMID:27730037

  3. Cutaneous tuberculosis with nonreactive PPD skin test: a diagnostic challenge*

    PubMed Central

    Nassif, Priscila Wolf; Rosa, Ana Paula Zanatta; Gurgel, Ana Cristina Medeiros; Campanerut, Paula Aline Zanetti; Fillus Neto, José; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of cutaneous tuberculosis in a 63-year-old female patient, who had an infiltrated, erythematous-ferruginous plaque of indurated aspect on her right leg and a nonreactive PPD skin test. Diagnosis was made by tissue culture and PCR of skin biopsy material. The treatment was performed with pyrazinamide, rifampicin, isoniazid and ethambutol, with good response. PMID:25672314

  4. An Unusual Cutaneous Manifestation in a Patient with Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Lucas S.; Lea, Alfred S.; Kelly, Brent C.; Walker, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus is a flea-borne febrile illness caused by Rickettsia typhi. Although often accompanied by rash, an inoculation lesion has not been observed as it is with many tick- and mite-transmitted rickettsioses. We describe a patient with murine typhus and an unusual cutaneous manifestation at the site of rickettsial inoculation. PMID:26416115

  5. Optic Atrophy Secondary to Preseptal Cutaneous Anthrax: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Metin; Çağatay, H. Hüseyin; Hüseyinoğlu, Nergiz; Ceylan, Erdinç; Gökçe, Gökçen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bacillus anthracis, the agent of anthrax, is a nonmotile, aerobic gram-positive rod that can form very resistant spores in economically poor environments. Anthrax can manifest as cutaneous, gastrointestinal, or inhalational form. Cutaneous anthrax, caused by direct skin contact, presents with eschar, lymphadenopathy, and a febrile illness. The face and eyelids are most commonly involved in cutaneous anthrax. A 45-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with high fever and swelling of the right eyelid. One day later on re-examination, formation of ulcerous lesions in the right medial canthal region was observed, with general oedema in the upper and lower eyelids. The patient was evaluated as having cutaneous anthrax and medical treatment was continued until the 28th day; he was discharged from the hospital with no loss of vision. He returned for a follow-up examination after 2 months, with decreased visual acuity (

  6. Exploring the role of stem cells in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Lau, Katherine; Paus, Ralf; Tiede, Stephan; Day, Philip; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2009-11-01

    The skin offers a perfect model system for studying the wound healing cascade, which involves a finely tuned interplay between several cell types, pathways and processes. The dysregulation of these factors may lead to wound healing disorders resulting in chronic wounds, as well as abnormal scars such as hypertrophic and keloid scars. As the contribution of stem cells towards tissue regeneration and wound healing is increasingly appreciated, a rising number of stem cell therapies for cutaneous wounds are currently under development, encouraged by emerging preliminary findings in both animal models and human studies. However, we still lack an in-depth understanding of the underlying mechanisms through which stem cells contribute to cutaneous wound healing. The aim of this review is, therefore, to present a critical synthesis of our current understanding of the role of stem cells in normal cutaneous wound healing. In addition to summarizing wound healing principles and related key molecular and cellular players, we discuss the potential participation of different cutaneous stem cell populations in wound healing, and list corresponding stem cells markers. In summary, this review delineates current strategies, future applications, and limitations of stem cell-based or stem cell-targeted therapy in the management of acute and chronic skin wounds.

  7. Chronic cutaneous graft-versus-host disease in man.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, H. M.; Sale, G. E.; Lerner, K. G.; Barker, E. A.; Weiden, P. L.; Sullivan, K.; Gallucci, B.; Thomas, E. D.; Storb, R.

    1978-01-01

    This clinicopathologic study of patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic marrow transplantation emphasizes the most prominent feature of the syndrome, the cutaneous aspects, and describes the ophthalmic-oral sicca syndrome with sialoadenitis and the neurologic findings. Chronic cutaneous GVHD affected 19 of 92 recipients surviving 150 days or more. In 6 patients chronic GVHD presented as a continuation of acute GVHD; in 8 it occurred after the resolution of acute GVHD; and in 5 it arose without preceding acute GVHD, ie, de novo late onset. Two cutaneous types were distinguished. The generalized type affected 16 patients and ran a progressive course resulting in late complications of poikiloderma, diffuse dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis, and contractures. Microscopically, it resembled generalized morphea and lupus erythermatosus hypertrophicus et profundus. The local type affected 3 patients with a more variable picture of poikiloderma, dermal sclerosis, and contractures. Microscopically, it resembled lupus of erythematosus profundus and scleroderma. Guidelines for defining and subclassifying chronic cutaneous GVHD are proposed. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:26221

  8. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in British troops following jungle training in Belize.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Mark S

    2011-09-01

    British military personnel account for 45% of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) cases seen in the UK and 103 cases from Belize were seen in 1998-2009. Systemic treatment of CL from Belize should not be considered essential in immunocompetent patients because mucosal leishmaniasis very rarely occurs.

  9. Faun tail: a rare cutaneous sign of spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Kurtipek, Gülcan Saylam; Cihan, Fatma Göksin; Öner, Vefa; Ataseven, Arzu; Özer, İlkay; Akman, Zahide

    2015-01-01

    Faun tail is a triangle-shaped hypertrichosis of the lumbosacral region. It is a rare condition and it can be a cutaneous marker of underlying spinal cord anomaly. We report on a 17-year-old female patient with hypertrichosis on the lumbosacral area since birth that was later diagnosed with tethered cord in magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Complement modulates the cutaneous microbiome and inflammatory milieu

    PubMed Central

    Chehoud, Christel; Rafail, Stavros; Tyldsley, Amanda S.; Seykora, John T.; Lambris, John D.; Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The skin is colonized by a plethora of microbes that include commensals and potential pathogens, but it is currently unknown how cutaneous host immune mechanisms influence the composition, diversity, and quantity of the skin microbiota. Here we reveal an interactive role for complement in cutaneous host–microbiome interactions. Inhibiting signaling of the complement component C5a receptor (C5aR) altered the composition and diversity of the skin microbiota as revealed by deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. In parallel, we demonstrate that C5aR inhibition results in down-regulation of genes encoding cutaneous antimicrobial peptides, pattern recognition receptors, and proinflammatory mediators. Immunohistochemistry of inflammatory cell infiltrates in the skin showed reduced numbers of macrophages and lymphocytes with C5aR inhibition. Further, comparing cutaneous gene expression in germ-free mice vs. conventionally raised mice suggests that the commensal microbiota regulates expression of complement genes in the skin. These findings demonstrate a component of host immunity that impacts colonization of the skin by the commensal microbiota and vice versa, a critical step toward understanding host–microbe immune mutualism of the skin and its implications for health and disease. Additionally, we reveal a role for complement in homeostatic host–microbiome interactions of the skin. PMID:23980152

  11. Cutaneous lymphomas in European pet rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Ritter, J M; von Bomhard, W; Wise, A G; Maes, R K; Kiupel, M

    2012-09-01

    Cutaneous lymphoma is a common skin neoplasm of pet rabbits in Europe but is rarely reported in pet rabbits in North America. These neoplasms have not been previously characterized, nor has the cause for the apparent predilection for cutaneous lymphoma in European pet rabbits compared with North American pet rabbits been investigated. In this retrospective study, the authors morphologically and immunohistochemically characterized 25 cutaneous lymphomas in European pet rabbits according to the World Health Organization classification. Tumors were classified as diffuse large B cell lymphomas, with 14 lymphomas exhibiting a centroblastic/centrocytic subtype and 11 tumors exhibiting a T cell-rich B cell subtype. To investigate a potential viral etiology of these lymphomas, 3 diffuse large B cell and 3 T cell-rich B cell lymphomas were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction for retroviral and herpesviral genes. Neither virus was detected. In contrast to other domestic animals, cutaneous lymphomas in European pet rabbits were highly pleomorphic and frequently contained multinucleated giant cells. Unexpectedly, the second most common subtype was T cell-rich B cell lymphoma, a subtype that is rare in species other than horses. Based on a limited number of samples, there was no support for a viral etiology that would explain the higher incidence of lymphoma in European pet rabbits compared with American pet rabbits. Further investigation into genetic and extrinsic factors associated with the development of these tumors is warranted.

  12. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma revealing clinically unsuspected HIV infection*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Abbade, Luciana P. Fernandes; Guiotoku, Marcelo Massaki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma more frequently diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, mainly HIV-infected. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma is extremely rare, and in this patient it was the first clinical manifestation of unsuspected HIV-infection. PMID:27579749

  13. Cutaneous colesional acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated Kaposi sarcoma and cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Subrayan, Sumeshini; Calonje, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The clinicopathologic features of 4 AIDS patients with cutaneous colesional Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and cryptococcosis, a rare phenomenon, are described. Biopsies from 3 patients who were highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naive demonstrated predominant KS with a conspicuous spindle cell component and small aggregates of cryptococcal yeasts in 2 biopsies and predominant gelatinous cryptococcosis with attenuated KS spindle cells in 1 biopsy. One patient was HAART exposed. He had childhood pulmonary tuberculosis, was treated for disseminated cutaneous cryptococcosis 18 months earlier and presented with cutaneous lesions, odynophagia and massive cervical lymphadenopathy in the eighth week of HAART, after achieving viral suppression and a CD4 cell increase from 28 to 184 cells/μL. His skin biopsy demonstrated a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, neutrophils, and granulomas with admixed aggregates and single Cryptococcus neoformans and focal aggregation of human herpes virus 8-immunopositive spindle cells. Acid fast bacilli were not identified and mycobacterial molecular studies were negative. The features were compatible with cutaneous cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. His nodal and oropharyngeal biopsies demonstrated dense mixed, including granulomatous, inflammation with few cryptococcal yeasts and acid fast bacilli, confirmed to be Mycobacterium tuberculosis on polymerase chain reaction testing, without KS. These features were also compatible with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, but the exact role of each infection in the extracutaneous sites was unconfirmed. Colesional KS and cryptococcosis served as the sentinel lesion of AIDS in 3 patients and of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in 1 patient.

  14. Sigmoid-urachal-cutaneous fistula in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Coons, Benjamin J; Clark, Peter E; Maynes, Lincoln J; Terhune, Kyla P; Stokes, Myron C; Beech, Derrick J

    2009-02-01

    An infected urachal cyst is an uncommon finding in adults. We report the first case of a sigmoid-urachal-cutaneous fistula that resulted from rupture of an infected urachal cyst in an adult male. Definitive management consisted of resection of the urachus with a bladder cuff, along with removal of the affected bowel segments and bowel anastomosis.

  15. Loeffler's Syndrome Following Cutaneous Larva Migrans: An Uncommon Sequel

    PubMed Central

    Podder, Indrashis; Chandra, Somodyuti; Gharami, Ramesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is characterized by the formation of distinctive, tortuous, and serpentine skin lesions occurring as a result of epidermal burrowing by certain helminthic larvae. Although this condition is usually uneventful, rarely it may result in patchy pulmonary infiltration with peripheral eosinophilia, also called Loeffler's syndrome. This association is fairly uncommon and is thus being reported. PMID:27057020

  16. Leishmania infantum AS A CAUSATIVE AGENT OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS IN THE STATE OF MATO GROSSO DO SUL, BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ludiele Souza; França, Adriana de Oliveira; Ferreira, Eduardo de Castro; Hans Filho, Günther; Higa Júnior, Minoru German; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira; Pereira, Agnes Antônia Sampaio; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth Moraes C

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is caused by different species of the Leishmania genus. Leishmania(Leishmania) infantum, causing cutaneous leishmaniasis, has been described in patients living in areas where visceral leishmaniasis is endemic. In this study, it was possible to characterize this species in seven slides from cutaneous tissue imprints from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

  17. Strangeness asymmetry in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Strangeness asymmetry in the proton may arise from fluctuations of the proton into meson-baryon pairs. The leading contributions to proton strangeness are from the KΛ , KΣ , K* Λ and K* Σ states. We use a Fock state expansion of the proton in terms of these pairs to represent the strange meson cloud. We determine the strangeness distributions of the proton in a hybrid convolution model, in which the fluctuations are represented either by light-cone wave functions or meson-baryon splitting functions. For the parton distributions of the s(s) quarks in the bare baryons(mesons) of the Fock states, we use light cone wave functions or our statistical model, which expands the bare hadrons in terms of quark-gluon states. The momentum distributions of the s and s quarks in each Fock state differ because they are constituents of different hadrons. We present our results for proton strangeness asymmetry, and compare them to NuTeV and to global parton distributions. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  18. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-06-05

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2-10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora.

  19. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2–10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora. PMID:24898626

  20. The Spectrum of Paraneoplastic Cutaneous Vasculitis in a Defined Population

    PubMed Central

    Loricera, Javier; Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; González-López, Marcos A.; Fernández-Llaca, Hector; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; Gonzalez-Vela, Maria C.; Alvarez, Lino; Mata, Cristina; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Martínez-Taboada, Victor M.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Blanco, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cutaneous vasculitis may be associated with malignancies, and may behave as a paraneoplastic syndrome. This association has been reported in a variable proportion of patients depending on population selection. We conducted the current study to assess the frequency, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of paraneoplastic vasculitis in a large unselected series of 766 patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed at a single university hospital. Sixteen patients (10 men and 6 women; mean age ± standard deviation, 67.94 ± 14.20 yr; range, 40–85 yr) presenting with cutaneous vasculitis were ultimately diagnosed as having an underlying malignancy. They constituted 3.80% of the 421 adult patients. There were 9 hematologic and 7 solid underlying malignancies. Skin lesions were the initial clinical presentation in all of them, and the median interval from the onset of cutaneous vasculitis to the diagnosis of the malignancy was 17 days (range, 8–50 d). The most frequent skin lesions were palpable purpura (15 patients). Other clinical manifestations included constitutional syndrome (10 patients) and arthralgia and/or arthritis (4 cases). Hematologic cytopenias (11 cases) as well as immature peripheral blood cells (6 cases) were frequently observed in the full blood cell count, especially in those with vasculitis associated with hematologic malignancies. Specific treatment for vasculitis was prescribed in 10 patients; nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (4 patients), corticosteroids (3 patients), chloroquine (1 patient), antihistamines (1 patient), and cyclophosphamide (1 patient). Ten patients died due to the malignancy and 6 patients recovered following malignancy therapy. Patients with paraneoplastic vasculitis were older, more frequently had constitutional syndrome, and less frequently had organ damage due to the vasculitis than the remaining patients with cutaneous vasculitis. In summary, cutaneous paraneoplastic vasculitis is an entity not uncommonly

  1. Incidence of adverse cutaneous drug reactions in 22,866 Chinese inpatients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao-Yin; Liu, Bing; Shi, Hao; Zhao, Zi-Ran; Zhou, Xi-Ping; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Qiu-Ning; Zuo, Ya-Gang

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common. However, no prospective study assessing cutaneous ADRs is available for Chinese populations. This study aimed to assess the incidence, manifestations, causative drugs, and other factors related to cutaneous ADRs. A total of 22,866 inpatients were surveyed prospectively from January to April 2012 at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Only cutaneous ADRs induced by systemic drugs were considered. Fifty cases were confirmed as cutaneous ADRs, for an estimated incidence of 2.2 per 1000 during this period (95 % confidence interval 1.6-2.8). Cases of cutaneous ADRs comprised 69 % females, while 63 % of all inpatients were female (χ (2) = 0.641, P = 0.427). The department of infectious diseases was the most frequently involved department. Morbilliform exanthema (40 %) was the most frequent cutaneous ADR, followed by urticaria (23.1 %). Anti-infection drugs (36.9 %) caused most cases of cutaneous ADRs, followed by iodinated contrast media (ICM, 18.5 %) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, 18.5 %). The most frequently associated disorders were cancer (24 %), infection (22 %), cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases (20 %), and autoimmune diseases (18 %). In this first prospective study assessing the incidence of cutaneous ADRs in China, anti-infection drugs were the most commonly involved drugs, followed by ICM and NSAIDs. No evidence of increased cutaneous ADR incidence in AIDS or SLE patients was observed. Our findings indicate that cancer and its treatments were often related to cutaneous ADRs in China.

  2. Development of Proton Computed Tomography for Applications in Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirov, Vladimir; Schulte, Reinhard; Coutrakon, George; Erdelyi, Bela; Wong, Kent; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Penfold, Scott; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; McAllister, Scott; Schubert, Keith

    2009-03-01

    Determination of the Bragg peak position in proton therapy requires accurate knowledge of the electron density and ratio of effective atomic number and mass (Z/A) of the body tissues traversed. While the Z/A ratio is fairly constant for human tissues, the density of tissues varies significantly. One possibility to obtain accurate electron density information of tissues is to use protons of sufficient energy to penetrate the patient and measure their energy loss. From these transmission measurements, it is possible to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of electron densities using algebraic techniques. The interest in proton computed tomography (pCT) has considerably increased in recent years due to the more common use of proton accelerators for cancer treatment world-wide and a modern design concept based on current high-energy physics technology has been suggested. This contribution gives a status update on the pCT project carried out by the pCT Collaboration, a group of institutions sharing interest and expertise in the development of pCT. We will present updated imaging data obtained with a small pCT prototype developed in collaboration with the Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and installed on the proton research beam line at Loma Linda University Medical Center. We will discuss hardware decisions regarding the next-generation pCT scanner, which will permit scanning of head-sized objects. Progress has also been made in the formulation of the most likely path of protons through an object and parallelizable iterative reconstruction algorithms that can be implemented on general-purpose commodity graphics processing units. Finally, we will present simulation studies for utilizing pCT technology for on-line proton dose verification and tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET).

  3. Ethnic differences in the epidemiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, P; Thornley, S; Scragg, R

    2016-11-01

    Background The prevalence and variation by ethnicity of cutaneous lupus in New Zealand is not known. Therefore, a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence and variation by ethnicity of cutaneous lupus in the ethnically diverse community of South Auckland, New Zealand, was undertaken. Methods Multiple sources were examined to determine the prevalence of acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, subacute cutaneous erythematosus and discoid lupus erythematosus. Ethnicities examined were European, Māori/Pacific and Indian/Asian. Capture-recapture was used to determine the overall population prevalence of cutaneous lupus. Results A total of 145 cases of cutaneous lupus were identified. There were 22 men and 123 women, with an average age (standard deviation), respectively, of 46.4 (±21.5) and 43.1 (±14.8) years. There were 53 cases of acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, 19 cases of subacute cutaneous erythematosus and 66 cases of discoid lupus erythematosus. The age and sex adjusted relative risk (95% confidence interval; CI) of Māori/Pacific compared to the European population was 2.47 (95% CI 1.67-3.67) for all types of cutaneous lupus, 1.60 (95% CI 0.84-3.18) for acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, 0.09 (95% CI 0.01-1.1) for subacute cutaneous erythematosus and 5.96 (95% CI 3.06-11.6) for discoid lupus erythematosus. The overall prevalence of cutaneous lupus was 30.1 (95% CI 25.5-35.4) per 100,000. However, capture-recapture estimated the unadjusted prevalence of cutaneous lupus to be 86.0 (95% CI 78.1-94.7) per 100,000. Conclusion Māori and Pacific people in Auckland, New Zealand, have a greater relative risk of all types of cutaneous lupus compared to the European population and a particularly high risk of discoid lupus erythematosus.

  4. Cutaneous lymphocyte antigen expression loss and PD1 positivity in early cutaneous lesions of rapidly progressive mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Ogunrinade, Olakunle; Ahn, Christine S; Gergis, Usama; Yassin, Aminah H; Magro, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message It's important to assess cases both clinically and pathologically for factors potentially predictive of an aggressive clinical course. We concluded that the relative immunosuppressive effects of PD1 may contribute to tumor progression while the lack of staining for cutaneous lymphocyte antigen may be an additional factor facilitating distant extracutaneous migration. PMID:25614814

  5. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong; Min, Byungjun; Kwak, Jungwon; Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sungyong

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  6. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  7. Measurement of the Wolfenstein parameters for proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering at 500 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.A.

    1984-07-01

    Using liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium targets respectively, forward angle (ten degrees to sixty degrees in the center of Mass) free proton-proton and quasielastic proton-proton and proton-neutron triple scattering data at 500 MeV have been obtained using the high resolution spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The data are in reasonable agreement with recent predictions from phase shift analyses, indicating that the proton-nucleon scattering amplitudes are fairly well determined at 500 MeV. 32 references.

  8. The Spin of the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Anthony

    2008-07-01

    doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ppnp.2007.12.039
    The twenty years since the announcement of the proton spin crisis by the European Muon Collaboration has seen tremendous progress in our knowledge of the distribution of spin within the proton. The problem is reviewed, beginning with the original data and the suggestion that polarized gluons may play a crucial role in resolving the problem through the U(1) axial anomaly. The discussion continues to the present day where not only have strong limits have been placed on the amount of polarized glue in the proton but the experimental determination of the spin content has become much more precise. It is now clear that the origin of the discrepancy between experiment and the naive expectation of the fraction of spin carried by the quarks and anti-quarks in the proton lies in the non-perturabtive structure of the proton. We explain how the features expected in a modern, relativistic and chirally symmetric description of nucleon str

  9. The Structure of the Proton

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  10. Prospective study of the frequency of hepatic hemangiomas in infants with multiple cutaneous infantile hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Horii, Kimberly A; Drolet, Beth A; Frieden, Ilona J; Baselga, Eulalia; Chamlin, Sarah L; Haggstrom, Anita N; Holland, Kristen E; Mancini, Anthony J; McCuaig, Catherine C; Metry, Denise W; Morel, Kimberly D; Newell, Brandon D; Nopper, Amy J; Powell, Julie; Garzon, Maria C

    2011-01-01

    Multiple cutaneous infantile hemangiomas have been associated with hepatic hemangiomas. Screening of infants with five or more cutaneous infantile hemangiomas with abdominal ultrasound is often recommended. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency with which hepatic hemangiomas occur in infants with five or more cutaneous infantile hemangiomas compared to those with one to four cutaneous infantile hemangiomas and to characterize the clinical features of these hepatic hemangiomas. A multicenter prospective study of children with cutaneous infantile hemangiomas was conducted at pediatric dermatology clinics at Hemangioma Investigator Groups sites in the United States, Canada, and Spain between October 2005 and December 2008. Data were collected, and abdominal ultrasonography was performed on infants younger than 6 months old with five or more cutaneous infantile hemangiomas and those with one to four cutaneous infantile hemangiomas. Twenty-four (16%) of the 151 infants with five or more cutaneous infantile hemangiomas had hepatic hemangiomas identified on abdominal ultrasound, versus none of the infants with fewer than five (p = 0.003). Two of the 24 infants with hepatic hemangiomas received treatment specifically for their hepatic hemangiomas. Infants with five or more cutaneous infantile hemangiomas have a statistically significantly greater frequency of hepatic hemangiomas than those with fewer than 5. These findings support the recommendation of five or more cutaneous infantile hemangiomas as a threshold for screening infants younger than 6 months old for hepatic hemangiomas but also demonstrate that the large majority of these infants with hepatic hemangiomas do not require treatment.

  11. [Protocol proposal for the histological report of the primary tumor in patients with cutaneous melanoma from the Task Force for Cutaneous Melanoma of the Valencian Community].

    PubMed

    Nagore, E; Monteagudo, C; Pinazo, M I; Botella-Estrada, R; Oliver, V; Bañuls, J; Moragón, M; Valcuende, F; Calatrava, A; Mayol-Belda, M J; Lázaro, R; Niveiro, M; Guillén, C

    2007-09-01

    This text compiles a histological protocol proposal for cutaneous melanoma agreed by the Task Force for Cutaneous Melanoma of the Valencian Community. It brings together the protocol itself and, in addition, includes a description of each of the proposed variables that has shown to have a greater prognostic impact in previous works.

  12. Proton therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rutenberg, Michael S; Flampouri, Stella; Hoppe, Bradford S

    2014-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma has gone from an incurable disease to one for which the majority of patients will be cured. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy achieves the best disease control rates and results in many long-term survivors. As a result, a majority of long-term Hodgkin lymphoma survivors live to experience severe late treatment-related complications, especially cardiovascular disease and second malignancies. The focus of research and treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma is to maintain the current high rates of disease control while reducing treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Efforts to reduce late treatment complications focus on improvements in both systemic therapies and radiotherapy. Herein we review the basis for the benefits of proton therapy over conventional X-ray therapy. We review outcomes of Hodgkin lymphoma treated with proton therapy, and discuss the ability of protons to reduce radiation dose to organs at risk and the impact on the most significant late complications related to the treatment.

  13. Proton aurora and substorm intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. C.; Xu, B.; Lyons, L. R.; Newell, P. T.; Creutzberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ground based measurements from the CANOPUS array of meridian scanning photometers and precipitating ion and electron data from the DMSP F9 satellite show that the electron arc which brightens to initiate substorm intensifications is formed within a region of intense proton precipitation that is well equatorward (approximately four to six degrees) of the nightside open-closed field line boundary. The precipitating protons are from a population that is energized via earthward convection from the magnetotail into the dipolar region of the magnetosphere and may play an important role in the formation of the electron arcs leading to substorm intensifications on dipole-like field lines.

  14. Cutaneous Melioidosis Cluster Caused by Contaminated Wound Irrigation Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Adam J.; Peck, Mariani; Gayle, Dionne; Levy, Avram; Ler, Yi-Horng; Raby, Edward; Gibbs, Tristan M.

    2016-01-01

    Melioidosis usually occurs after environmental exposure to Burkholderia pseudomallei in the tropics. A cluster of 5 cutaneous melioidosis cases occurred in suburban southwest Australia after an earlier case in January 2012. We collected environmental samples at the first patient’s home in January 2012 and from a nearby health center in December 2013 after 2 new cases occurred in the same postal district. We isolated genotypically identical B. pseudomallei from the first patient and 5 other patients in the district. Environmental sampling implicated an opened bottle of saline wound irrigation fluid containing >106 B. pseudomallei/mL. The bottle included instructions to discard within 24 hours of opening. No further cases of B. pseudomallei infection occurred after removing the contaminated bottle. This cutaneous melioidosis cluster demonstrates that B. pseudomallei can survive and disseminate in widely used medical fluids beyond its known geographic distribution, highlighting a need to use these products according to manufacturers’ instructions. PMID:27438887

  15. Epitheliotropic cutaneous lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bhang, Dong Ha; Choi, Ul Soo; Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, Eun-Hwa; Kang, Min-Soo; Hwang, Cheol-Yong; Kim, Dae-Yong; Youn, Hwa Young; Lee, Chang Woo

    2006-03-01

    A seven-year-old castrated male Yorkshire terrier dog was presented for a recurrent skin disease. Erythematous skin during the first visit progressed from multiple plaques to patch lesions and exudative erosion in the oral mucosa membrane. Biopsy samples were taken from erythematous skin and were diagnosed with epitheliotropic T cell cutaneous lymphoma by histopathology and immunochemical stain. In serum chemistry, the dog had a hypercalcemia (15.7 mg/dl) and mild increased alkaline phosphatase (417 U/l). Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTH-rP) in epitheliotropic cutaneous lymphoma tissues but the neoplastic cells were not labeled with anti-PTH-rP antibodies. The patient was treated with prednisolone and isotretinoin. However, the dog died unexpectedly.

  16. Unusual Sites of Cutaneous Tuberculosis: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Dimple; Sharma, Aastha; Chopra, Siddharth; Aggarwal, Shivali; Goyal, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB) is an uncommon small subset of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, comprising 1–1.5% of all extrapulmonary tuberculosis manifestations, which manifests only in 8.4–13.7% of all tuberculosis cases. Lupus vulgaris (LV) and tuberculosis verrucosa cutis (TBVC) are forms of reinfection tuberculosis and often occur in presensitized patients, by exogenous inoculation. We report two cases of cutaneous tuberculosis at unusual sites. A 35-year-old female having a forehead lesion for 2 years was diagnosed as having tuberculosis verrucosa cutis and another 16-year-old girl with lesion in left axilla for 10 years was proven to have lupus vulgaris. The delayed diagnosis was possibly due to lower clinical suspicion due to the presentation of CTB at unusual sites. This highlights the importance of keeping TB as an important differential as misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of this entity can lead to prolonged morbidity. PMID:28348900

  17. Integrated analysis of multidimensional omics data on cutaneous melanoma prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Shi, Xingjie; Zhao, Qing; Krauthammer, Michael; Rothberg, Bonnie E Gould; Ma, Shuangge

    2016-06-01

    Multiple types of genetic, epigenetic, and genomic changes have been implicated in cutaneous melanoma prognosis. Many of the existing studies are limited in analyzing a single type of omics measurement and cannot comprehensively describe the biological processes underlying prognosis. As a result, the obtained prognostic models may be less satisfactory, and the identified prognostic markers may be less informative. The recently collected TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) data have a high quality and comprehensive omics measurements, making it possible to more comprehensively and more accurately model prognosis. In this study, we first describe the statistical approaches that can integrate multiple types of omics measurements with the assistance of variable selection and dimension reduction techniques. Data analysis suggests that, for cutaneous melanoma, integrating multiple types of measurements leads to prognostic models with an improved prediction performance. Informative individual markers and pathways are identified, which can provide valuable insights into melanoma prognosis.

  18. Cutaneous invasion from sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma: clinical and dermatopathologic features*

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes Filho, Fred; de Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves; Pires, Andréa Rodriguez Cordovil; Lupi, Omar; Neves, Daniel Gama das; da Cruz, Margareth Fernandes; Kac, Bernard Kawa

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, without considering the non-melanoma skin tumors, bladder cancer in men is the eighth most common, and the urothelial carcinoma or transitional cell carcinoma is the most common among these. Cutaneous metastases from urothelial neoplasms appear as single or multiple erythematous, infiltrated nodules or plaques, and like other cases of distant disease, it is indicative of poor prognosis. The invasive urothelial carcinoma is recognized for its ability to present divergent differentiation and morphological variants. The sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma is a rare cancer that consists of two different components: one composed of epithelial tissue and the other with sarcomatoid features of mesenchymal origin. The authors describe a case of cutaneous metastasis of sarcomatoid urothelial carcinoma in a 63-year-old male patient. PMID:26982782

  19. The current status of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Tlamçani, Zineb; Er-Rami, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a public health problem on a global level because it affects the population of 88 countries. In Morocco, it is widely distributed, caused by Leishmania tropica, Leishmania major and Leishmania infantum rarely. The geographical distribution of different forms of leishmaniasis in Morocco is linked to well described bioclimatic zones. Over the past two decades, the epidemiological situation of CL has changed significantly. It acquire an increasingly epidemic status with geographic expansion to previously free areas and the emergence of overlapping foci of cutaneous leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis in several provinces of Morocco. In this review the evolution of the epidemiological situation and epidemiological factors which influenced the course of it in the past two decades will be reported.

  20. Managing the Cutaneous Sinus Tract of Dental Origine

    PubMed Central

    Janev, Edvard; Redzep, Enis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Draining cutaneous sinus tract in chin area may be caused by chronic periapical dental infections. Misdiagnosis of these lesions usually leads to destructive invasive treatment of the sinus tract that is not correct and curative. CASE REPORT: A 31-year-old male patient referred to us with a chronically draining lesion on his chin. The lesion previously was misdiagnosed by medical doctors and had undergone two times surgery with a focus on the skin lesion and had received antibiotic therapy for a prolonged period of time. After clinical and radiologic examination the dental origin of the lesion was evident and proper endodontic and surgical treatment was performed. Three months later, after the treatment, the lesion showed total healing and reoccurrence occurred. CONCLUSION: The key to successful treatment of cutaneous sinus tract of dental origin must be in appropriate communication between the dentist and the physician in order to achieve correct diagnosis and therapy in such cases. PMID:27703580

  1. Functional characterization of cutaneous mechanoreceptor properties in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Reinke, H; Dinse, H R

    1996-10-04

    We investigated the effects of aging on rapidly (RA) and slowly adapting (SA) cutaneous mechanoreceptors by means of single fiber recordings and evoked sensory nerve action potentials (EAPs) of the hindpaw of the N. plantaris in adult and old Wistar rats. EAPs revealed comparable shapes and amplitudes in all animals of all age groups. In old rats, conduction velocities were slightly (15%) lengthened. The mechanoreceptor composition was different from adults, resulting in a lower number of SA units. We were not able to detect significant differences in the sizes of receptive fields and in the thresholds between old and adult animals. The absence of significant age-related changes in the cutaneous periphery of the hindpaw is discussed in respect to the previously reported alterations of cortical receptive field properties in old rats.

  2. Socioeconomic and Ethnic Disparities in Periocular Cutaneous Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Talmage; Bingham, Brian; Mawn, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous malignancies make up the majority of periocular tumors diagnosed and treated by ophthalmologists. In this review, we examine literature regarding ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in incidence and clinical outcomes of the three most common cutaneous periocular tumors: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. In all three tumor types, the literature shows an increased incidence among two groups: those with lightly pigmented skin and those of higher socioeconomic status. While incidence is high in these groups, clinical outcomes for these patients tend to be good. Those with lower socioeconomic status and ethnic minorities, on the other hand, have a low incidence but are more likely to have poor clinical outcomes. These disparities are likely the result of both biologic and behavioral differences between patients and could provide opportunities for intervention to change risk perception and improve outcomes.

  3. [The morphogenesis of mammalian cutaneous glands in evolutionary perspective].

    PubMed

    Chernova, O F

    2012-01-01

    The morphogenesis of mammalian cutaneous glands is considered based on the analysis of the literature and our own original data with the focus on the issues of gland polymorphism and specific features in postnatal development (from the case study of circumanal hepatoid glands of newborn domestic dogs), including the features reflecting the evolutionary relationships of various types of cutaneous glands. The hepatoid glands are a component of the glandular complex ofthe hair follicle, which also includes sebaceous and sweat glands; have a specific structure; and produce protein secretion by a merocrine pathway. Characteristic of these glands are wide polymorphism, sex- and age-related differences in the degree of development, occurrence in only a few phylogenetically related mammalian taxa (even-toed ungulates and carnivores); and a signaling type of their secretion. The data support the "generative concept," relying on the idea of a separate and independent origination of diverse derivatives of the external integuments.

  4. Current status of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Aleppo, Syrian Arab Republic.

    PubMed

    Douba, M; Mowakeh, A; Wali, A

    1997-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis has been endemic in Aleppo, Syria, for generations. Recently there has been a clear increase in the incidence of the disease, and more patients have shown a lack of response to antimonials. We report the results of a survey, undertaken over the period 2-17 January 1995, at a general hospital in Aleppo, of all patients presenting with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Patients were grouped according to the stage of their disease, and surgical biopsies were carried out for histopathological investigation. Patients who were unresponsive to treatment and proceeded to chronicity were predominantly children aged under 15 years with facial lesions. Histopathological examination showed that the inflammatory changes had reached the upper layers of the subcutaneous tissues in 10 of the 25 chronic cases (40%) and three of the four acute cases (75%). These levels of the skin are not directly reached by the antimonials administered intralesionally. The inadequacy of the intralesional method alone and technical errors in administration are discussed.

  5. Cutaneous malignant melanoma in association with mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alun V; Scarisbrick, Julia J; Child, F J; Acland, Katharine M; Whittaker, Sean J; Russell-Jones, Robin

    2004-05-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the first 461 cases entered into our cutaneous lymphoma database and found 285 cases of mycosis fungoides. We also identified 6 cases of malignant melanoma, all of which were found in patients with mycosis fungoides. The crude rate of melanoma in the general population in England, United Kingdom, in 1998 was 8.8/100,000 in men and 11.4/100,000 in women. The incidence of melanoma found in our cohort of patients with mycosis fungoides was far higher, and in 4 of the 6 patients cannot be explained on the basis of prior therapy. The reason for this association is unclear, but this report emphasizes the risk of second malignancies for patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and melanoma.

  6. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Catania (Italy): persistently endemic and underestimated].

    PubMed

    Ragusa, Rosalia; Cicciù, Francesca; Lombardo, Carmen; Cuccia, Mario; Salvo, Santa

    2009-01-01

    Cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis diagnosed at the laboratory of Department of Hygiene of the University of Catania (Italy), from 1998-2007 were evaluated. Specifically, demographic and personal data, area of origin and temporal trend of the 97 cases confirmed by microscopy in this 10-year period were examined. The data collected shows that the disease is still widely present in this area ; on the other hand official data regarding this disease appears incomplete and shows various inconsistencies. This is due to underreporting but also to scarce knowledge of the disease by physicians. Elimination of cutaneous leishmaniasis can be achieved by controlling leishmaniasis in dogs and improving environmental conditions; this requires greater efforts not only by institutions but also by individuals.

  7. Sentinel lymph node biopsy for cutaneous head and neck malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dwojak, Sunshine; Emerick, Kevin S

    2015-03-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is a procedure that can provide critical information regarding pathologic lymph node status and accurate regional staging. This is very important for developing treatment plans and providing prognostic guidance for cutaneous malignancies. The head and neck (HN) region is unique from other body sites due to its complex lymphatic drainage pathways, multiple lymph node basins, proximity of important cranial nerves and potential for contralateral or bilateral drainage. These unique aspects of the HN previously created some uncertainty about the use of SLNB in the HN. This review will discuss the current reliable status of HN SLNB and provide a guide for its current application in cutaneous malignancy of the HN.

  8. [Adverse cutaneous reactions induced by exposure to woods].

    PubMed

    Chomiczewska-Skóra, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Various adverse cutaneous reactions may occur as a result of exposure to wood dust or solid woods. These include allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis and, more rarely, contact urticaria, photoallergic and phototoxic reactions. Also cases of erythema multiforme-like reactions have been reported. Contact dermatitis, both allergic and irritant, is most frequently provoked by exotic woods, e.g. wood of the Dalbergia spp., Machaerium scleroxylon or Tectona grandis. Cutaneous reactions are usually associated with manual or machine woodworking, in occupational setting or as a hobby. As a result of exposure to wood dust, airborne contact dermatitis is often diagnosed. Cases of allergic contact dermatitis due to solid woods of finished articles as jewelry or musical instruments have also been reported. The aim of the paper is to present various adverse skin reactions related to exposure to woods, their causal factors and sources of exposure, based on the review of literature.

  9. [Cutaneous and mucosal manifestations associated with cocaine use].

    PubMed

    Imbernón-Moya, Adrián; Chico, Ricardo; Aguilar-Martínez, Antonio

    2016-06-17

    Complications due to cocaine are a public health problem. The typical cutaneous disease is leukocytoclastic vasculitis and/or thrombotic vasculopathy affecting mainly the ears. No intense systemic involvement is usually present, but there may be several cutaneous, mucosal and systemic manifestations. Other findings associated as arthralgia, neutropaenia or agranulocytosis, low titer positive antinuclear antibodies, antiphospholipid antibody positivity and neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies against multiple antigens help the diagnosis. This disease requires a clinical suspicion with a clinical history, a complete physical examination and a broad differential diagnosis for an early and correct diagnosis. The course is usually self-limited. In most cases the only treatment is to discontinue the use of cocaine associated with symptomatic treatment, no proven benefit of systemic corticosteroids.

  10. [Cutaneous loxoscelism in Portugal: a rare cause of dermonecrosis].

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Inês; Rocha, Sónia; Ferreira, Maria Eugénia; Vieira, Ricardo; Cordeiro, Margarida Robalo; Reis, José Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous loxoscelism is an exceptional diagnosis in Portugal, regardless of the documented presence of Loxosceles rufescens.We report a 33-year old female patient presenting to our clinic after having visualized a bite from a spider in the inner aspect of the right thigh. Afterwards, she developed a warm, painful erythematous plaque, progressing to skin necrosis and torpid ulcer formation. Considering the failure of conservative measures, surgical debridement of the ulcer followed by repair using an O-Z plasty achieved good functional outcome. Definite diagnosis of cutaneous loxoscelism may be difficult since it relies on the visualization of the bite, capture of the spider for identification and typical clinical features. This case meets several criteria that allow the establishment of a causative link between spider bite and dermonecrosis. It is, to the best of our knowledge, the first diagnosis of loxoscelism reported in Portugal.

  11. Defining the dermoscopic characteristics of fast-growing cutaneous melanomas.

    PubMed

    Tejera-Vaquerizo, Antonio; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; Nagore, Eduardo; Martín-Cuevas, Paula; Orgaz-Molina, Javier; Traves, Victor; Herrera-Acosta, Enrique; Naranjo-Sintes, Ramón; Guillén, Carlos; Herrera-Ceballos, Enrique

    2015-06-01

    A high growth rate in melanomas has been associated with a more aggressive phenotype and worse survival. The aim of this study was to define the dermoscopic characteristics associated with this type of cutaneous melanoma. We carried out a retrospective study of 132 cutaneous melanomas, analyzing certain clinical characteristics and the most important dermoscopic variables related to the melanomas. Fast-growing melanomas were considered to be those with a growth rate of more than 0.5 mm per month. Fast-growing melanomas more often lacked an atypical network, were symmetrical, presented ulceration, and were hypopigmented. The dermoscopic vascular pattern often showed atypical irregular vessels and milky-red areas. The association of these two is a specific characteristic. Fast-growing melanomas have a characteristic phenotype and dermoscopy can be useful for their identification.

  12. Niacin use and cutaneous flushing: mechanisms and strategies for prevention.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Michael H

    2008-04-17

    Niacin, or nicotinic acid, has established efficacy for the treatment of dyslipidemia, but the clinical use of niacin has been limited by cutaneous flushing, a well-recognized associated adverse effect. Flushing has been cited as the major reason for the discontinuation of niacin therapy, estimated at rates as high as 25%-40%. A number of studies have established that moderate doses of prostaglandin inhibitors reduce the cutaneous flushing response from niacin administration. Other strategies for reducing flushing include regular consistent dosing, the use of extended-release formulations, patient education, dosing with meals or at bedtime, and the avoidance of alcohol, hot beverages, spicy foods, and hot baths or showers close to or after dosing. Because niacin has recognized cardiovascular benefits, promoting patient awareness of factors that can minimize niacin-induced flushing can help enhance the tolerability of this valuable dyslipidemic agent.

  13. Multispectral autofluorescence diagnosis of non-melanoma cutaneous tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Dogandjiiska, Daniela; Bliznakova, Irina; Avramov, Latchezar; Pavlova, Elmira; Troyanova, Petranka

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescent analysis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), keratoacanthoma and benign cutaneous lesions is carried out under initial phase of clinical trial in the National Oncological Center - Sofia. Excitation sources with maximum of emission at 365, 380, 405, 450 and 630 nm are applied for better differentiation between nonmelanoma malignant cutaneous lesions fluorescence and spectral discrimination from the benign pathologies. Major spectral features are addressed and diagnostic discrimination algorithms based on lesions' emission properties are proposed. The diagnostic algorithms and evaluation procedures found will be applied for development of an optical biopsy clinical system for skin cancer detection in the frames of National Oncological Center and other university hospital dermatological departments in our country.

  14. Management of cutaneous disorders related to inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer, Zaira; Santiago, Jesus Manuel; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Alonso, Vicent; Antón, Rosario; Bosca, Marta Maia

    2012-01-01

    Almost one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develop skin lesions. Cutaneous disorders associated with IBD may be divided into 5 groups based on the nature of the association: specific manifestations (orofacial and metastatic IBD), reactive disorders (erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans, Sweet’s syndrome and cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), miscellaneous (epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous disease, squamous cell carcinoma-Bowen’s disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, secondary amyloidosis and psoriasis), manifestations secondary to malnutrition and malabsorption (zinc, vitamins and iron deficiency), and manifestations secondary to drug therapy (salicylates, immunosupressors, biological agents, antibiotics and steroids). Treatment should be individualized and directed to treating the underlying IBD as well as the specific dermatologic condition. The aim of this review includes the description of clinical manifestations, course, work-up and, most importantly, management of these disorders, providing an assessment of the literature on the topic. PMID:24713996

  15. Cutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis in a clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa).

    PubMed

    Cerveny, Shannon N S; Thompson, Michelle E; Corner, Sarah M; Swinford, Amy K; Coke, Rob L

    2013-09-01

    A 16-yr-old male clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) was presented for lethargy and anorexia. A cutaneous abdominal mass extending from the pubis to just caudal to the xiphoid process was present. A biopsy revealed histologic lesions consistent with an atypical mycobacterial infection consisting of diffuse, severe, pyogranulomatous dermatitis and panniculitis, with clear vacuoles and 3-5 microm, intravacuolar, faintly eosinophilic, filamentous bacilli that stained positively with FiteFaraco modified acid-fast stain. The clouded leopard had biochemical findings suggestive of chronic renal failure and euthanasia was elected. Histological evaluation of tissues collected at postmortem examination revealed multicentric B-cell lymphoma involving the oral cavity, liver, spleen, and multiple lymph nodes, bilateral testicular seminomas, thyroid follicular cell adenoma, thyroid C cell adenoma, and biliary cystadenomas. Bacterial culture and molecular sequencing identified the causative agent of the cutaneous abdominal mass as belonging to the Mycobacterium fortuitum group.

  16. Search for sphalerons in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2016-04-01

    In a recent paper, Tye and Wong (TW) have argued that sphaleron-induced transitions in high-energy proton-proton collisions should be enhanced compared to previous calculations, based on a construction of a Bloch wave function in the periodic sphaleron potential and the corresponding pass band structure. Here we convolute the calculations of TW with parton distribution functions and simulations of final states to explore the signatures of sphaleron transitions at the LHC and possible future colliders. We calculate the increase of sphaleron transition rates in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 13/14/33/100 TeV for different sphaleron barrier heights, while recognising that the rates have large overall uncertainties. We use a simulation to show that LHC searches for microscopic black holes should have good efficiency for detecting sphaleron-induced final states, and discuss their experimental signatures and observability in Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. We recast the early ATLAS Run-2 search for microscopic black holes to constrain the rate of sphaleron transitions at 13 TeV, deriving a significant limit on the sphaleron transition rate for the nominal sphaleron barrier height of 9 TeV.

  17. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  18. Atropine-Induced Cutaneous Vasodilation Decreases Body Temperature during Exercise,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    during exercise in a cool environment after atropine treatment decreased body temperature and resulted in further suppression of eccrine sweating , thereby...block nsumber) FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP cholinergic blockage, skin blood flow, sweating , temperature regulation, vasodilation * 19. ABSTRACT (Contine on...revese sf neceury and Ilentify by block number) Jil ystemic atropine enhances forearm cutaneous blood flow (FBF) but depresses forearm sweating (Ia5) in

  19. [Atypical presentation of cutaneous sporotrichosis in an alcoholic patient].

    PubMed

    Nassif, Priscila Wolf; Granado, Inandiara Rafaela Marco de Oliveira; Ferraz, Juliana Soares; Souza, Robson; Nassif, Aissar Eduardo

    2012-06-15

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis with a high prevalence in Brasil. It is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii, and may lead to different clinical presentations. The disseminated cutaneous form is uncommon and corresponds to 4 percent of the total number of cases. We report a case of atypical disseminated sporotrichosis in an alcoholic patient, whose culture for fungi revealed the presence of Sporothrix schenckii. The patient was treated with itraconazole 200 mg/day for 6 months with clinical clearing.

  20. Cutaneous tuberculosis: epidemiologic, etiopathogenic and clinical aspects - Part I*

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Josemir Belo; Figueiredo, Ana Roberta; Ferraz, Cláudia Elise; de Oliveira, Márcia Helena; da Silva, Perla Gomes; de Medeiros, Vanessa Lucília Silveira

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB) is the result of a chronic infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. ovis and occasionally by the Calmette-Guerin bacillus. The clinical manifestations are variable and depend on the interaction of several factors including the site of infection and the host's immunity. This article revises the current knowledge about this disease's physiopathology and immunology as well as detailing the possible clinical presentations. PMID:24770496