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Sample records for proton translocation coupled

  1. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine. PMID:24943718

  2. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine.

  3. Proton translocation in cytochrome c oxidase: insights from proton exchange kinetics and vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Izumi; Hikita, Masahide; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the released energy to translocate protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mechanism by which the oxygen chemistry is coupled to proton translocation is not yet resolved owing to the difficulty of monitoring dynamic proton transfer events. Here we summarize several postulated mechanisms for proton translocation, which have been supported by a variety of vibrational spectroscopic studies. We recently proposed a proton translocation model involving proton accessibility to the regions near the propionate groups of the heme a and heme a3 redox centers of the enzyme based by hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange Raman scattering studies (Egawa et al., PLoS ONE 2013). To advance our understanding of this model and to refine the proton accessibility to the hemes, the H/D exchange dependence of the heme propionate group vibrational modes on temperature and pH was measured. The H/D exchange detected at the propionate groups of heme a3 takes place within a few seconds under all conditions. In contrast, that detected at the heme a propionates occurs in the oxidized but not the reduced enzyme and the H/D exchange is pH-dependent with a pKa of ~8.0 (faster at high pH). Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed that, as the pH is varied, entropy/enthalpy compensation held the free energy of activation in a narrow range. The redox dependence of the possible proton pathways to the heme groups is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems.

  4. Proton Translocation in Cytochrome c Oxidase: Insights from Proton Exchange Kinetics and Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ishigami, Izumi; Hikita, Masahide; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the released energy to translocate protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mechanism by which the oxygen chemistry is coupled to proton translocation is not yet resolved owing to the difficulty of monitoring dynamic proton transfer events. Here we summarize several postulated mechanisms for proton translocation, which have been supported by a variety of vibrational spectroscopic studies. We recently proposed a proton translocation model involving proton accessibility to the regions near the propionate groups of the heme a and heme a3 redox centers of the enzyme based by hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange Raman scattering studies (Egawa et al., PLOS ONE 2013). To advance our understanding of this model and to refine the proton accessibility to the hemes, the H/D exchange dependence of the heme propionate group vibrational modes on temperature and pH was measured. The H/D exchange detected at the propionate groups of heme a3 takes place within a few seconds under all conditions. In contrast, that detected at the heme a propionates occurs in the oxidized but not the reduced enzyme and the H/D exchange is pH-dependent with a pKa of ~8.0 (faster at high pH). Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed that, as the pH is varied, entropy/enthalpy compensation held the free energy of activation in a narrow range. The redox dependence of the possible proton pathways to the heme groups is discussed. PMID:25268561

  5. Electrogenic Proton Translocation by the ATPase of Sugarcane Vacuoles 1

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Margaret; Komor, Ewald

    1985-01-01

    Existence of a proton-translocating ATPase on the tonoplast of higher plants has been further confirmed by use of two experimental systems: (a) intact isolated vacuoles from sugarcane cells and (b) vesicles prepared from the same source. Addition of MgATP to vacuoles polarized the tonoplast by 40 millivolts to a value of +20 millivolts, but a large preexisting pH gradient across the membrane restricted the pH change to 0.2 unit. In vesicle preparations, the tonoplast was polarized to +66 millivolts by the addition of MgATP and the intravesicular space was acidified by 1 pH unit to pH 5.5. Proton translocation equilibrium is controlled by the protonmotive potential difference, maximal at 125 millivolts for sugarcane cells. Energization of the tonoplast occurred at physiological concentrations of MgATP. Specificity of MgATP for proton translocation was indicated by a much smaller effect of MgADP and MgGDP on the electrochemical gradient, although these substrates were also hydrolyzed by tonoplast preparation. PMID:16664053

  6. Electronic transduction of proton translocations in nanoassembled lamellae of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Gerardo; Magliulo, Maria; Mallardi, Antonia; Angione, Maria Daniela; Gobeljic, Danka; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Torsi, Luisa

    2014-08-26

    An organic field-effect transistor (OFET) integrating bacteriorhodopsin (bR) nanoassembled lamellae is proposed for an in-depth study of the proton translocation processes occurring as the bioelectronic device is exposed either to light or to low concentrations of general anesthetic vapors. The study involves the morphological, structural, electrical, and spectroscopic characterizations necessary to assess the functional properties of the device as well as the bR biological activity once integrated into the functional biointerlayer (FBI)-OFET structure. The electronic transduction of the protons phototranslocation is shown as a current increase in the p-type channel only when the device is irradiated with photons known to trigger the bR photocycle, while Raman spectroscopy reveals an associated C═C isomer switch. Notably, higher energy photons bring the cis isomer back to its trans form, switching the proton pumping process off. The investigation is extended also to the study of a PM FBI-OFET exposed to volatile general anesthetics such as halothane. In this case an electronic current increase is seen upon exposure to low, clinically relevant, concentrations of anesthetics, while no evidence of isomer-switching is observed. The study of the direct electronic detection of the two different externally triggered proton translocation effects allows gathering insights into the underpinning of different bR molecular switching processes. PMID:25077939

  7. Respiration-driven proton translocation in rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Peter; Moyle, Jennifer

    1967-01-01

    1. Pulses of acidity of the outer aqueous phase of rat liver mitochondrial suspensions induced by pulses of respiration are due to the translocation of H+ (or OH−) ions across the osmotic barrier (M phase) of the cristae membrane and cannot be attributed to the formation (with acid production) of a chemical intermediate that subsequently decomposes. 2. The effective quantity of protons translocated per bivalent reducing equivalent passing through the succinate-oxidizing and β-hydroxybutyrate-oxidizing spans of the respiratory chain are very close to 4 and 6 respectively. These quotients are constant between pH5·5 and 8·5 and are independent of changes in the ionic composition of the mitochondrial suspension medium provided that the conditions permit the accurate experimental measurement of the proton translocation. 3. Apparent changes in the →H+/O quotients may be induced by conditions preventing the occurrence of the usual backlash; these apparent changes of →H+/O are attributable to a very fast electrically driven component of the decay of the acid pulses that is not included in the experimental extrapolations. 4. Apparent changes in the →H+/O quotients may also be induced by the presence of anions, such as succinate, malonate and phosphate, or by cations such as Na+. These apparent changes of →H+/O are due to an increase in the rate of the pH-driven decay of the acid pulses. 5. The uncoupling agents, 2,4-dinitrophenol, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone and gramicidin increase the effective proton conductance of the M phase and thus increase the rate of decay of the respiration-driven acid pulses, but do not change the initial →H+/O quotients. The increase in effective proton conductance of the M phase caused by these uncouplers accounts quantitatively for their uncoupling action; and the fact that the initial →H+/O quotients are unchanged shows that uncoupler-sensitive chemical intermediates do not exist between the respiratory

  8. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  9. Proton transfer is rate-limiting for translocation of precursor proteins by the Escherichia coli translocase.

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, A J; Wickner, W

    1991-01-01

    The protonmotive force stimulates translocation in vivo, in crude in vitro reactions, and in a purified, reconstituted reaction. Translocation activity is a function of the pH at the inner face of the membrane. Both the transmembrane pH gradient and the transmembrane electrical potential stimulate translocation. A late-stage translocation intermediate of the proOmpA preprotein completes its translocation in the absence of ATP when a protonmotive force is imposed. This completion of translocation is retarded by a factor of greater than 3 in deuterium oxide relative to water, demonstrating that translocation involves proton-transfer reactions in rate-limiting steps. Images PMID:1826054

  10. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD(+) Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Dar, SA; Leang, C; Lovley, DR

    2012-12-26

    It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin: NAD(+) oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H-2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms for energy conservation in the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii are of interest because of its potential value as a chassis for the production of biocommodities with novel electron donors such as carbon monoxide, syngas, and electrons derived from electrodes. Characterizing the components implicated in the chemiosmotic ATP synthesis during acetogenesis by C. ljungdahlii is a prerequisite for the development of highly productive strains. The Rnf complex has been considered the prime candidate to be the pump responsible for the formation of an ion gradient coupled with ATP synthesis in multiple acetogens. However, experimental evidence for a proton-pumping Rnf complex has been lacking. This study establishes the C. ljungdahlii Rnf complex as

  11. Hydration and translocation of an excess proton in water clusters: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2005-10-01

    The hydration structure and translocation of an excess proton in hydrogen bonded water clusters of two different sizes are investigated by means of finite temperature quantum simulations. The simulations are performed by employing the method of Car--Parrinello molecular dynamics where the forces on the nuclei are obtained directly from `on the fly' quantum electronic structure calculations. Since no predefined interaction potentials are used in this scheme, it is ideally suited to study proton translocation processes which proceed through breaking and formation of chemical bonds. The coordination number of the hydrated proton and the index of oxygen to which the excess proton is attached are calculated along the simulation trajectories for both the clusters.

  12. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  13. Transverse relaxation of scalar-coupled protons.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Takuya F; Baishya, Bikash; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-10-25

    In a preliminary communication (B. Baishya, T. F. Segawa, G. Bodenhausen, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 17538-17539), we recently demonstrated that it is possible to obtain clean echo decays of protons in biomolecules despite the presence of homonuclear scalar couplings. These unmodulated decays allow one to determine apparent transverse relaxation rates R(2) (app) of individual protons. Herein, we report the observation of R(2) (app) for three methyl protons, four amide H(N) protons, and all 11 backbone H(α) protons in cyclosporin A. If the proton resonances overlap, their R(2) (app) rates can be measured by transferring their magnetization to neighboring (13)C nuclei, which are less prone to overlap. The R(2) (app) rates of protons attached to (13)C are faster than those attached to (12)C because of (13)C-(1)H dipolar interactions. The differences of these rates allow the determination of local correlation functions. Backbone H(N) and H(α) protons that have fast decay rates R(2) (app) also feature fast longitudinal relaxation rates R(1) and intense NOESY cross peaks that are typical of crowded environments. Variations of R(2) (app) rates of backbone H(α) protons in similar amino acids reflect differences in local environments.

  14. Stoichiometry of proton translocation by respiratory complex I and its mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and several bacteria functions as a redox-driven proton pump that contributes to the generation of the protonmotive force across the inner mitochondrial or bacterial membrane and thus to the aerobic synthesis of ATP. The stoichiometry of proton translocation is thought to be 4 H+ per NADH oxidized (2 e-). Here we show that a H+/2 e- ratio of 3 appears more likely on the basis of the recently determined H+/ATP ratio of the mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthase of animal mitochondria and of a set of carefully determined ATP/2 e- ratios for different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This lower H+/2 e- ratio of 3 is independently supported by thermodynamic analyses of experiments with both mitochondria and submitochondrial particles. A reduced H+/2 e- stoichiometry of 3 has important mechanistic implications for this proton pump. In a rough mechanistic model, we suggest a concerted proton translocation mechanism in the three homologous and tightly packed antiporter-like subunits L, M, and N of the proton-translocating membrane domain of complex I. PMID:22392981

  15. Protein translocation through the anthrax toxin transmembrane pore is driven by a proton gradient.

    PubMed

    Krantz, Bryan A; Finkelstein, Alan; Collier, R John

    2006-02-01

    Protective antigen (PA) from anthrax toxin assembles into a homoheptamer on cell surfaces and forms complexes with the enzymatic components: lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF). Endocytic vesicles containing these complexes are acidified, causing the heptamer to transform into a transmembrane pore that chaperones the passage of unfolded LF and EF into the cytosol. We show in planar lipid bilayers that a physiologically relevant proton gradient (DeltapH, where the endosome is acidified relative to the cytosol) is a potent driving force for translocation of LF, EF and the LF amino-terminal domain (LFN) through the PA63 pore. DeltapH-driven translocation occurs even under a negligible membrane potential. We found that acidic endosomal conditions known to destabilize LFN correlate with an increased translocation rate. The hydrophobic heptad of lumen-facing Phe427 residues in PA (or phi clamp) drives translocation synergistically under a DeltapH. We propose that a Brownian ratchet mechanism proposed earlier for the phi clamp is cooperatively linked to a protonation-state, DeltapH-driven ratchet acting trans to the phi-clamp site. In a sense, the channel functions as a proton/protein symporter.

  16. Alternative translocation of protons and halide ions by bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Der, A.; Szaraz, S.; Toth-Boconadi, R.; Tokaji, Z.; Keszthelyi, L.; Stoeckenius, W. )

    1991-06-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR568) in purple membrane near pH 2 shifts its absorption maximum from 568 to 605 nm forming the blue protein bRacid605, which no longer transports protons and which shows no transient deprotonation of the Schiff base upon illumination. Continued acid titration with HCl or HBr but not H2SO4 restores the purple chromophore to yield bRHCl564 or bRHBr568. These acid purple forms also regain transmembrane charge transport, but no transient Schiff base deprotonation is observed. In contrast to bR568, no rate decrease of the bRacidpurple transport kinetics is detected in 2H2O; however, the transport rate decreases by a factor of {approximately} 2 in bRHBr568 compared with bRHCl564. The data indicate that in the acid purple form bR transports the halide anions instead of protons. The authors present a testable model for the transport mechanism, which should also be applicable to halorhodopsin.

  17. PROTON-COUPLED DYNAMICS IN LACTOSE PERMEASE

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Magnus; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Freites, J. Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J.; Kaback, H. Ronald; White, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lactose permease of Escherichia coli (LacY) catalyzes symport of a galactopyranoside and an H+ via an alternating access mechanism. The transition from an inward- to an outward-facing conformation of LacY involves sugar-release followed by deprotonation. Because the transition depends intimately upon the dynamics of LacY in a bilayer environment, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations may be the only means of following the accompanying structural changes in atomic detail. We describe here MD simulations of wild-type apo LacY in phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) lipids that features two protonation states of the critical Glu325. While the protonated system displays configurational stability, deprotonation of Glu325 causes significant structural rearrangements that bring into proximity sidechains important for H+ translocation and sugar binding and closes the internal cavity. Moreover, protonated LacY in phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids shows that the observed dynamics are lipid-dependent. Together, the simulations describe early dynamics of the inward-to-outward transition of LacY that agree well with experimental data. PMID:23000385

  18. Structure of the c14 Rotor Ring of the Proton Translocating Chloroplast ATP Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Vollmar, Melanie; Schlieper, Daniel; Winn, Martyn; Büchner, Claudia; Groth, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the membrane integral rotor ring of the proton translocating F1F0 ATP synthase from spinach chloroplasts was determined to 3.8 Å resolution by x-ray crystallography. The rotor ring consists of 14 identical protomers that are symmetrically arranged around a central pore. Comparisons with the c11 rotor ring of the sodium translocating ATPase from Ilyobacter tartaricus show that the conserved carboxylates involved in proton or sodium transport, respectively, are 10.6–10.8 Å apart in both c ring rotors. This finding suggests that both ATPases have the same gear distance despite their different stoichiometries. The putative proton-binding site at the conserved carboxylate Glu61 in the chloroplast ATP synthase differs from the sodium-binding site in Ilyobacter. Residues adjacent to the conserved carboxylate show increased hydrophobicity and reduced hydrogen bonding. The crystal structure reflects the protonated form of the chloroplast c ring rotor. We propose that upon deprotonation, the conformation of Glu61 is changed to another rotamer and becomes fully exposed to the periphery of the ring. Reprotonation of Glu61 by a conserved arginine in the adjacent a subunit returns the carboxylate to its initial conformation. PMID:19423706

  19. Salt-Excluding Artificial Water Channels Exhibiting Enhanced Dipolar Water and Proton Translocation.

    PubMed

    Licsandru, Erol; Kocsis, Istvan; Shen, Yue-Xiao; Murail, Samuel; Legrand, Yves-Marie; van der Lee, Arie; Tsai, Daniel; Baaden, Marc; Kumar, Manish; Barboiu, Mihail

    2016-04-27

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are biological water channels known for fast water transport (∼10(8)-10(9) molecules/s/channel) with ion exclusion. Few synthetic channels have been designed to mimic this high water permeability, and none reject ions at a significant level. Selective water translocation has previously been shown to depend on water-wires spanning the AQP pore that reverse their orientation, combined with correlated channel motions. No quantitative correlation between the dipolar orientation of the water-wires and their effects on water and proton translocation has been reported. Here, we use complementary X-ray structural data, bilayer transport experiments, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to gain key insights and quantify transport. We report artificial imidazole-quartet water channels with 2.6 Å pores, similar to AQP channels, that encapsulate oriented dipolar water-wires in a confined chiral conduit. These channels are able to transport ∼10(6) water molecules/s, which is within 2 orders of magnitude of AQPs' rates, and reject all ions except protons. The proton conductance is high (∼5 H(+)/s/channel) and approximately half that of the M2 proton channel at neutral pH. Chirality is a key feature influencing channel efficiency. PMID:27063409

  20. Proton translocation during denitrification by a nitrifying--denitrifying Alcaligenes sp.

    PubMed

    Castignetti, D; Hollocher, T C

    1983-04-01

    A heterotrophic nitrifying Alcaligenes sp. from soil was grown as a denitrifier on nitrate and subjected to oxidant pulse experiments to ascertain the apparent efficiencies of proton translocations during O2 and nitrogen-oxide respirations. With endogenous substrate as the reducing agent the leads to H+/2e- ratios, extrapolated to zero amount of oxidant per pulse, were 9.4, 3.7, 4.3 and 3.5 for O2, nitrate, nitrite and N2O, respectively. The value for O2 and those for the N-oxides are, respectively, somewhat larger and smaller than corresponding values for Paracoccus denitrificans. None of the three permeant ions employed with the Alcaligenes sp. (valinomycin-K+, thiocyanate and triphenylmethylphosphonium) was ideal for all purposes. Thiocyanate provided highest ratios for O2 but abolished the oxidant pulse response for nitrate and N2O. Valinomycin was slow to penetrate to the cytoplasmic membrane and relatively high concentrations were required for optimal performance. Triphenylmethylphosphonium enhanced passive proton permeability and diminished proton translocation at concentrations required to realize the maximal oxidant pulse response. PMID:6311094

  1. Configurationally-Coupled Protonation of Polyproline-7.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E; Khanal, Neelam; Russell, David H; Clemmer, David E

    2015-07-15

    Structure and dynamics regulate protein function, but much less is known about how biomolecule-solvent interactions affect the structure-function relationship. Even less is known about the thermodynamics of biomolecule-solvent interactions and how such interactions influence conformational entropy. When transferred from propanol into 40:60 propanol:water under acidic conditions, a remarkably slow protonation reaction coupled with the conversion of the polyproline-I helix (PPI, having all cis-configured peptide bonds) into polyproline-II (PPII, all trans) helix is observed in this work. Kinetics and equilibrium measurements as a function of temperature allow determination of the thermochemistry and insight into how proton transfer is regulated in this system. For the proton-transfer process, PPI(+)(PrOH) + H3O(+) → PPII(2+)(PrOH/aq) + H2O, we determine ΔG = -20 ± 19 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH = -75 ± 14 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS= -188 ± 48 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for the overall reaction, and values of ΔG(⧧) = 91 ± 3 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH(⧧) = 84 ± 9 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS(⧧) = -23 ± 31 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for the transition state. For a minor process, PPI(+)(PrOH) → PPII(+)(PrOH/aq) without protonation, we determine ΔG = -9 ± 20 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH = 64 ± 14 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS= 247 ± 50 J·mol(-1)·K(-1). This thermochemistry yields ΔG = -10 ± 29 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH = -139 ± 20 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS= -435 ± 70 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for PPII(+)(PrOH/aq) + H3O(+) → PPII(2+)(PrOH/aq) +H2O. The extraordinarily slow proton transfer appears to be an outcome of configurational coupling through a PPI-like transition state. PMID:26115587

  2. A redirected proton pathway in the bacteriorhodopsin mutant Tyr-57-->Asp. Evidence for proton translocation without Schiff base deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S; Marti, T; Rath, P; Fischer, W; Coleman, M; Nilsson, A; Khorana, H G; Rothschild, K J

    1994-11-18

    Light-driven proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin involves deprotonation of the retinylidene Schiff base during M formation and reprotonation during N formation as key steps. This study reports on the spectroscopic characterization of the bacteriorhodopsin mutant Tyr-57-->Asp (Y57D). The results reveal that although formation of the M intermediate and Schiff base deprotonation is blocked, the mutant still exhibits a significant level of light-driven proton translocation. The photocycle of Y57D involves formation of K and L intermediates accompanied by the normal chromophore isomerization and changes in the hydrogen bonding of Asp-96 and Asp-115. However, an additional Asp residue deprotonates during formation of the L intermediate along with a transmembrane alpha-helical structural change that normally occurs upon N formation. We postulate that proton transport in Y57D occurs through a redirected pathway that does not involve the deprotonation of the Schiff base. Chromophore isomerization, which normally results in the transfer of a proton from the Schiff base to Asp-85, instead causes the deprotonation of Asp-57 in Y57D, most likely through an interaction involving Asp-212. This deprotonation of Asp-57 causes the release of a proton into the extracellular medium. Reprotonation of Asp-57 occurs through the Schiff base reprotonation pathway, which consists of a hydrogen-bonded network of residues spanning from Asp-96 to Asp-212. The results also indicate that the transmembrane alpha-helical structural changes observed during N formation (Rothschild, K.J., Marti, T., Sonar, S., He, Y.W., Rath, P., Fischer, W., Bousche, O., and Khorana, H. G. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 27046-27052) do not require deprotonation of Asp-96 or of the Schiff base.

  3. Protein Mediated Magnetic Coupling between Lactate and Water Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Scott D.

    1998-11-01

    The magnetic coupling between methyl lactate protons and water protons in samples of cross-linked bovine serum albumin (BSA) is studied. Cross-relaxation spectroscopy shows efficient magnetization transfer from immobilized BSA to both water and methyl lactate protons. Transient and steady-state NOE experiments reveal a negative intermolecular NOE between methyl lactate and water protons. Lactate is indirectly detected by selectively saturating the methyl lactate protons and measuring the decrease in water proton magnetization. Indirect detection of methyl lactate protons is an order of magnitude more sensitive than direct detection in these model systems. Lactate was indirectly imaged, via the water proton resonance, with 1.1-μl voxels in 2 min. Immobilized BSA reduces the intermolecular correlation time between water and lactate protons into the spin-diffusion limit where the NOE is negative. Possible molecular mechanisms for this coupling and applications toin vivospectroscopy are discussed.

  4. Bacteriorhodopsin mutants containing single substitutions of serine or threonine residues are all active in proton translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Marti, T.; Otto, H.; Mogi, T.; Roesselet, S.J.H.; Heyn, M.P.; Khorana, H.G. )

    1991-04-15

    To study their role in proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin, 22 serine and threonine residues presumed to be located within and near the border of the transmembrane segments have been individually replaced by alanine or valine, respectively. Thr-89 was substituted by alanine, valine, and aspartic acid, and Ser-141 by alanine and cysteine. Most of the mutants showed essentially wild-type phenotype with regard to chromophore regeneration and absorption spectrum. However, replacement of Thr-89 by Val and of Ser-141 by Cys caused striking blue shifts of the chromophore by 100 and 80 nm, respectively. All substitutions of Thr-89 regenerated the chromophore at least 10-fold faster with 13-cis retinal than with all-trans retinal. The substitutions at positions 89, 90, and 141 also showed abnormal dark-light adaptation, suggesting interactions between these residues and the retinylidene chromophore. Proton pumping measurements revealed 60-75% activity for mutants of Thr-46, -89, -90, -205, and Ser-226, and about 20% for Ser-141----Cys, whereas the remaining mutants showed normal pumping. Kinetic studies of the photocycle and of proton release and uptake for mutants in which proton pumping was reduced revealed generally little alterations. The reduced activity in several of these mutants is most likely due to a lower percentage of all-trans retinal in the light-adapted state. In the mutants Thr-46----Val and Ser-226----Ala the decay of the photointer-mediate M was significantly accelerated, indicating an interaction between these residues and Asp-96 which reprotonates the Schiff base. Our results show that no single serine or threonine residue is obligatory for proton pumping.

  5. Bacteriorhodopsin mutants containing single tyrosine to phenylalanine substitutions are all active in proton translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Mogi, T; Stern, L J; Hackett, N R; Khorana, H G

    1987-01-01

    To study the possible role of the tyrosine residues in proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin, we have replaced these residues individually by phenylalanine. The required codon changes were introduced in the bacterioopsin gene by replacement of appropriate restriction fragments by synthetic counterparts containing the desired nucleotide changes. The denatured opsin polypeptides obtained by expression of the mutant genes in Escherichia coli were purified and treated with a mixture of detergents, phospholipids, and retinal in a previously established renaturation procedure. All of the mutant proteins folded to regenerate bacteriorhodopsin-like chromophores. Three mutants with tyrosine to phenylalanine substitutions at positions 57, 83, and 185 regenerated the chromophore more slowly than the wild-type protein, and two of these mutants, Phe-57 and -83, showed slightly blue-shifted chromophores. When reconstituted into liposomes all of the mutant proteins with single Tyr----Phe substitutions pumped protons at rates and levels comparable to those of the wild-type bacteriorhodopsin. We conclude that single substitutions of tyrosine by phenylalanine do not affect folding, retinal binding, or light-dependent proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:3039495

  6. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD+ Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Dar, Shabir A.; Leang, Ching; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. PMID:23269825

  7. Adaptation of the Mitochondrial Genome in Cephalopods: Enhancing Proton Translocation Channels and the Subunit Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Daniela; Maldonado, Emanuel; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein-coding genes (mt genes) encode subunits forming complexes of crucial cellular pathways, including those involved in the vital process of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Despite the vital role of the mitochondrial genome (mt genome) in the survival of organisms, little is known with respect to its adaptive implications within marine invertebrates. The molluscan Class Cephalopoda is represented by a marine group of species known to occupy contrasting environments ranging from the intertidal to the deep sea, having distinct metabolic requirements, varied body shapes and highly advanced visual and nervous systems that make them highly competitive and successful worldwide predators. Thus, cephalopods are valuable models for testing natural selection acting on their mitochondrial subunits (mt subunits). Here, we used concatenated mt genes from 17 fully sequenced mt genomes of diverse cephalopod species to generate a robust mitochondrial phylogeny for the Class Cephalopoda. We followed an integrative approach considering several branches of interest–covering cephalopods with distinct morphologies, metabolic rates and habitats–to identify sites under positive selection and localize them in the respective protein alignment and/or tridimensional structure of the mt subunits. Our results revealed significant adaptive variation in several mt subunits involved in the energy production pathway of cephalopods: ND5 and ND6 from Complex I, CYTB from Complex III, COX2 and COX3 from Complex IV, and in ATP8 from Complex V. Furthermore, we identified relevant sites involved in protein-interactions, lining proton translocation channels, as well as disease/deficiencies related sites in the aforementioned complexes. A particular case, revealed by this study, is the involvement of some positively selected sites, found in Octopoda lineage in lining proton translocation channels (site 74 from ND5) and in interactions between subunits (site 507 from ND5) of

  8. Adaptation of the Mitochondrial Genome in Cephalopods: Enhancing Proton Translocation Channels and the Subunit Interactions.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Daniela; Maldonado, Emanuel; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein-coding genes (mt genes) encode subunits forming complexes of crucial cellular pathways, including those involved in the vital process of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Despite the vital role of the mitochondrial genome (mt genome) in the survival of organisms, little is known with respect to its adaptive implications within marine invertebrates. The molluscan Class Cephalopoda is represented by a marine group of species known to occupy contrasting environments ranging from the intertidal to the deep sea, having distinct metabolic requirements, varied body shapes and highly advanced visual and nervous systems that make them highly competitive and successful worldwide predators. Thus, cephalopods are valuable models for testing natural selection acting on their mitochondrial subunits (mt subunits). Here, we used concatenated mt genes from 17 fully sequenced mt genomes of diverse cephalopod species to generate a robust mitochondrial phylogeny for the Class Cephalopoda. We followed an integrative approach considering several branches of interest-covering cephalopods with distinct morphologies, metabolic rates and habitats-to identify sites under positive selection and localize them in the respective protein alignment and/or tridimensional structure of the mt subunits. Our results revealed significant adaptive variation in several mt subunits involved in the energy production pathway of cephalopods: ND5 and ND6 from Complex I, CYTB from Complex III, COX2 and COX3 from Complex IV, and in ATP8 from Complex V. Furthermore, we identified relevant sites involved in protein-interactions, lining proton translocation channels, as well as disease/deficiencies related sites in the aforementioned complexes. A particular case, revealed by this study, is the involvement of some positively selected sites, found in Octopoda lineage in lining proton translocation channels (site 74 from ND5) and in interactions between subunits (site 507 from ND5) of Complex I

  9. Adaptation of the Mitochondrial Genome in Cephalopods: Enhancing Proton Translocation Channels and the Subunit Interactions.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Daniela; Maldonado, Emanuel; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein-coding genes (mt genes) encode subunits forming complexes of crucial cellular pathways, including those involved in the vital process of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Despite the vital role of the mitochondrial genome (mt genome) in the survival of organisms, little is known with respect to its adaptive implications within marine invertebrates. The molluscan Class Cephalopoda is represented by a marine group of species known to occupy contrasting environments ranging from the intertidal to the deep sea, having distinct metabolic requirements, varied body shapes and highly advanced visual and nervous systems that make them highly competitive and successful worldwide predators. Thus, cephalopods are valuable models for testing natural selection acting on their mitochondrial subunits (mt subunits). Here, we used concatenated mt genes from 17 fully sequenced mt genomes of diverse cephalopod species to generate a robust mitochondrial phylogeny for the Class Cephalopoda. We followed an integrative approach considering several branches of interest-covering cephalopods with distinct morphologies, metabolic rates and habitats-to identify sites under positive selection and localize them in the respective protein alignment and/or tridimensional structure of the mt subunits. Our results revealed significant adaptive variation in several mt subunits involved in the energy production pathway of cephalopods: ND5 and ND6 from Complex I, CYTB from Complex III, COX2 and COX3 from Complex IV, and in ATP8 from Complex V. Furthermore, we identified relevant sites involved in protein-interactions, lining proton translocation channels, as well as disease/deficiencies related sites in the aforementioned complexes. A particular case, revealed by this study, is the involvement of some positively selected sites, found in Octopoda lineage in lining proton translocation channels (site 74 from ND5) and in interactions between subunits (site 507 from ND5) of Complex I.

  10. A protonation-coupled feedback mechanism controls the signalling process in bathy phytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; Piwowarski, Patrick; Salewski, Johannes; Michael, Norbert; Fernandez Lopez, Maria; Rupp, Anna; Muhammad Qureshi, Bilal; Scheerer, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Siebert, Friedrich; Andrea Mroginski, Maria; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Phytochromes are bimodal photoswitches composed of a photosensor and an output module. Photoactivation of the sensor is initiated by a double bond isomerization of the tetrapyrrole chromophore and eventually leads to protein conformational changes. Recently determined structural models of phytochromes identify differences between the inactive and the signalling state but do not reveal the mechanism of photosensor activation or deactivation. Here, we report a vibrational spectroscopic study on bathy phytochromes that demonstrates that the formation of the photoactivated state and thus (de)activation of the output module is based on proton translocations in the chromophore pocket coupling chromophore and protein structural changes. These proton transfer steps, involving the tetrapyrrole and a nearby histidine, also enable thermal back-isomerization of the chromophore via keto-enol tautomerization to afford the initial dark state. Thus, the same proton re-arrangements inducing the (de)activation of the output module simultaneously initiate the reversal of this process, corresponding to a negative feedback mechanism.

  11. The human proton-coupled folate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Desmoulin, Sita Kugel; Hou, Zhanjun; Gangjee, Aleem; Matherly, Larry H.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). PCFT was identified in 2006 as the primary transporter for intestinal absorption of dietary folates, as mutations in PCFT are causal in hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) syndrome. Since 2006, there have been major advances in understanding the mechanistic roles of critical amino acids and/or domains in the PCFT protein, many of which were identified as mutated in HFM patients, and in characterizing transcriptional control of the human PCFT gene. With the recognition that PCFT is abundantly expressed in human tumors and is active at pHs characterizing the tumor microenvironment, attention turned to exploiting PCFT for delivering novel cytotoxic antifolates for solid tumors. The finding that pemetrexed is an excellent PCFT substrate explains its demonstrated clinical efficacy for mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer, and prompted development of more PCFT-selective tumor-targeted 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates that derive their cytotoxic effects by targeting de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis. PMID:22954694

  12. Real-time transmembrane translocation of penetratin driven by light-generated proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Jörgen; Biverståhl, Henrik; Gräslund, Astrid; Mäler, Lena; Brzezinski, Peter

    2006-08-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides that are able to penetrate the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. Because these peptides can also carry large hydrophilic cargos such as proteins, they could potentially be used to transport biologically active drugs across cell membranes to modulate in vivo biology. One characteristic feature of the CPPs is that they typically have a net positive charge. Therefore, a key issue associated with the transport mechanism is the role of the transmembrane electrochemical potential in driving the peptides across the membrane. In this study, we have reconstituted bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) with fluorescein-labeled CPP penetratin enclosed within the LUVs under conditions when the fluorescence is quenched. Illumination of the bacteriorhodopsin-containing LUVs resulted in creation of a transmembrane proton electrochemical gradient (positive on the inside). Upon generation of this gradient, an increase in fluorescence was observed, which shows that the proton gradient drives the translocation of penetratin. The mechanism most likely can be generalized to other CPPs.

  13. Crystal structures reveal the molecular basis of ion translocation in sodium/proton antiporters.

    PubMed

    Coincon, Mathieu; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Nji, Emmanuel; Dotson, David L; Winkelmann, Iven; Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Cameron, Alexander D; Beckstein, Oliver; Drew, David

    2016-03-01

    To fully understand the transport mechanism of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, it is necessary to clearly establish the global rearrangements required to facilitate ion translocation. Currently, two different transport models have been proposed. Some reports have suggested that structural isomerization is achieved through large elevator-like rearrangements similar to those seen in the structurally unrelated sodium-coupled glutamate-transporter homolog GltPh. Others have proposed that only small domain movements are required for ion exchange, and a conventional rocking-bundle model has been proposed instead. Here, to resolve these differences, we report atomic-resolution structures of the same Na(+)/H(+) antiporter (NapA from Thermus thermophilus) in both outward- and inward-facing conformations. These data combined with cross-linking, molecular dynamics simulations and isothermal calorimetry suggest that Na(+)/H(+) antiporters provide alternating access to the ion-binding site by using elevator-like structural transitions. PMID:26828964

  14. Critical role of a conserved transmembrane lysine in substrate recognition by the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YjdL.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Johanne M; Aduri, Nanda G; Prabhala, Bala K; Jahnsen, Rasmus; Franzyk, Henrik; Mirza, Osman

    2014-10-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) utilize an electrochemical proton gradient to accumulate peptides in the cytoplasm. Changing the highly conserved active-site Lys117 in the Escherichia coli POT YjdL to glutamine resulted in loss of ligand affinity as well as inability to distinguish between a dipeptide ligand and the corresponding dipeptide amide. The radically changed pH(Bulk) profiles of Lys117Gln and Lys117Arg mutants indicate an important role of Lys117 in facilitating protonation of the transporter; a notion that is supported by the close proximity of Lys117 to the conserved ExxERFxYY POT motif previously shown to be involved in proton translocation. These results point toward a novel dual role of Lys117 in direct or indirect interaction with both proton and peptide.

  15. Critical role of a conserved transmembrane lysine in substrate recognition by the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YjdL.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Johanne M; Aduri, Nanda G; Prabhala, Bala K; Jahnsen, Rasmus; Franzyk, Henrik; Mirza, Osman

    2014-10-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) utilize an electrochemical proton gradient to accumulate peptides in the cytoplasm. Changing the highly conserved active-site Lys117 in the Escherichia coli POT YjdL to glutamine resulted in loss of ligand affinity as well as inability to distinguish between a dipeptide ligand and the corresponding dipeptide amide. The radically changed pH(Bulk) profiles of Lys117Gln and Lys117Arg mutants indicate an important role of Lys117 in facilitating protonation of the transporter; a notion that is supported by the close proximity of Lys117 to the conserved ExxERFxYY POT motif previously shown to be involved in proton translocation. These results point toward a novel dual role of Lys117 in direct or indirect interaction with both proton and peptide. PMID:25261786

  16. Effect of an uncE ribosome-binding site mutation on the synthesis and assembly of the Escherichia coli proton-translocating ATPase.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K A; Brusilow, W S

    1988-04-15

    Plasmid pRPG54, which carries the genes for the eight subunits of the proton-translocating ATPase of Escherichia coli, has been found to carry a single base change of a G to an A in the ribosome-binding site for uncE, the gene which codes for the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding subunit c of the Fo. This noncoding region mutation both lowers expression of uncE by a factor of 2-3 and affects the function of the ATPase, specifically of the Fo sector. The presence of the mutation results in a decrease in the proton permeability of the Fo or of the entire F1Fo-ATPase complex when either is synthesized from genes on a multicopy plasmid. Expression of uncE from an F1Fo plasmid carrying the wild type ribosome binding site results in increased membrane proton permeability and decreased ability of the resultant ATPase to couple a transmembrane proton gradient to ATP synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. Also, although an Fo plasmid carrying the correct ribosome-binding site causes harmful, F1-dependent proton permeability in unc+ cells (Brusilow, W. S. S. (1987) J. Bacteriol. 169, 4984-4990), an identical plasmid carrying the mutation does not, even though it still codes for a functional reconstitutable Fo. The results show a relationship between the relative level of expression of uncE from a multicopy plasmid and the assembly pathway, proton permeability, and energy-coupling characteristics of the ATPase. PMID:2895768

  17. Constraining the Lateral Helix of Respiratory Complex I by Cross-linking Does Not Impair Enzyme Activity or Proton Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shaotong; Vik, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a multisubunit, membrane-bound enzyme of the respiratory chain. The energy from NADH oxidation in the peripheral region of the enzyme is used to drive proton translocation across the membrane. One of the integral membrane subunits, nuoL in Escherichia coli, has an unusual lateral helix of ∼75 residues that lies parallel to the membrane surface and has been proposed to play a mechanical role as a piston during proton translocation (Efremov, R. G., Baradaran, R., and Sazanov, L. A. (2010) Nature 465, 441–445). To test this hypothesis we have introduced 11 pairs of cysteine residues into Complex I; in each pair one is in the lateral helix, and the other is in a nearby region of subunit N, M, or L. The double mutants were treated with Cu2+ ions or with bi-functional methanethiosulfonate reagents to catalyze cross-link formation in membrane vesicles. The yields of cross-linked products were typically 50–90%, as judged by immunoblotting, but in no case did the activity of Complex I decrease by >10–20%, as indicated by deamino-NADH oxidase activity or rates of proton translocation. In contrast, several pairs of cysteine residues introduced at other interfaces of N:M and M:L subunits led to significant loss of activity, in particular, in the region of residue Glu-144 of subunit M. The results do not support the hypothesis that the lateral helix of subunit L functions like a piston, but rather, they suggest that conformational changes might be transmitted more directly through the functional residues of the proton translocation apparatus. PMID:26134569

  18. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions. PMID:27500804

  19. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions.

  20. Thermodynamics of proton transport coupled ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Turina, Paola; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio of the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts was measured in proteoliposomes after energization of the membrane by an acid base transition (Turina et al. 2003 [13], 418-422). The method is discussed, and all published data obtained with this system are combined and analyzed as a single dataset. This meta-analysis led to the following results. 1) At equilibrium, the transmembrane ΔpH is energetically equivalent to the transmembrane electric potential difference. 2) The standard free energy for ATP synthesis (reference reaction) is ΔG°(ref)=33.8±1.3kJ/mol. 3) The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio, as obtained from the shift of the ATP synthesis equilibrium induced by changing the transmembrane ΔpH (varying either pH(in) or pH(out)) is 4.0±0.1. The structural H(+)/ATP ratio, calculated from the ratio of proton binding sites on the c-subunit-ring in F(0) to the catalytic nucleotide binding sites on the β-subunits in F(1), is c/β=14/3=4.7. We infer that the energy of 0.7 protons per ATP that flow through the enzyme, but do not contribute to shifting the ATP/(ADP·Pi) ratio, is used for additional processes within the enzyme, such as activation, and/or energy dissipation, due e.g. to internal uncoupling. The ratio between the thermodynamic and the structural H(+)/ATP values is 0.85, and we conclude that this value represents the efficiency of the chemiosmotic energy conversion within the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase.

  1. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2

    PubMed Central

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  2. IFSERF, an isotope-filtered SERF experiment for the precise measurement of proton-proton coupling constants between chemically equivalent protons.

    PubMed

    Nolis, Pau; Roglans, Anna; Parella, Teodor

    2005-04-01

    An isotope-filtered selective refocusing (IFSERF) experiment is presented for the sensitive and precise measurement of the proton-proton coupling constant between chemically equivalent protons. The 2D NMR method combines an initial doubly selective isotope filter based on heteronuclear cross-polarization followed by a selective J-resolved block. The coupling topologies obtained from several 2D variants of the IFSERF experiment are described for the simultaneous measurement of both proton-proton and proton-carbon coupling constants in the involved AA'XX' spin system. Application on the determination of the relative configuration of double bonds in symmetrical molecules is illustrated.

  3. Proton-coupled electron transfer in solution, proteins, and electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Soudackov, Alexander V

    2008-11-13

    Recent advances in the theoretical treatment of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions are reviewed. These reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological processes, as well as in fuel cells, solar cells, chemical sensors, and electrochemical devices. A unified theoretical framework has been developed to describe both sequential and concerted PCET, as well as hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). A quantitative diagnostic has been proposed to differentiate between HAT and PCET in terms of the degree of electronic nonadiabaticity, where HAT corresponds to electronically adiabatic proton transfer and PCET corresponds to electronically nonadiabatic proton transfer. In both cases, the overall reaction is typically vibronically nonadiabatic. A series of rate constant expressions have been derived in various limits by describing the PCET reactions in terms of nonadiabatic transitions between electron-proton vibronic states. These expressions account for the solvent response to both electron and proton transfer and the effects of the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. The solvent and protein environment can be represented by a dielectric continuum or described with explicit molecular dynamics. These theoretical treatments have been applied to numerous PCET reactions in solution and proteins. Expressions for heterogeneous rate constants and current densities for electrochemical PCET have also been derived and applied to model systems.

  4. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca(2+) exchangers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca(2+) transporters encoded by cation/H(+) exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca(2+) into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca(2+) release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Recen...

  5. Functional Coupling of Duplex Translocation to DNA Cleavage in a Type I Restriction Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Csefalvay, Eva; Lapkouski, Mikalai; Guzanova, Alena; Csefalvay, Ladislav; Baikova, Tatsiana; Bialevich, Vitali; Shamayeva, Katsiaryna; Janscak, Pavel; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana; Panjikar, Santosh; Carey, Jannette; Weiserova, Marie; Ettrich, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multifunctional heteromeric complexes with DNA cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities located on motor subunit HsdR. Functional coupling of DNA cleavage and translocation is a hallmark of the Type I restriction systems that is consistent with their proposed role in horizontal gene transfer. DNA cleavage occurs at nonspecific sites distant from the cognate recognition sequence, apparently triggered by stalled translocation. The X-ray crystal structure of the complete HsdR subunit from E. coli plasmid R124 suggested that the triggering mechanism involves interdomain contacts mediated by ATP. In the present work, in vivo and in vitro activity assays and crystal structures of three mutants of EcoR124I HsdR designed to probe this mechanism are reported. The results indicate that interdomain engagement via ATP is indeed responsible for signal transmission between the endonuclease and helicase domains of the motor subunit. A previously identified sequence motif that is shared by the RecB nucleases and some Type I endonucleases is implicated in signaling. PMID:26039067

  6. Effect of proton transfer on the electronic coupling in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Janusz; Makowska, Joanna; Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-06-01

    The effects of single and double proton transfer within Watson-Crick base pairs on donor-acceptor electronic couplings, Vda, in DNA are studied on the bases of quantum chemical calculations. Four dimers [AT,AT], [GC,GC], [GC,AT] and [GC,TA)] are considered. Three techniques - the generalized Mulliken-Hush scheme, the fragment charge method and the diabatic states method - are employed to estimate Vda for hole transfer between base pairs. We show that both single- and double proton transfer (PT) reactions may substantially affect the electronic coupling in DNA. The electronic coupling in [AT,AT] is predicted to be most sensitive to PT. Single PT within the first base pair in the dimer leads to increase in the hole transfer efficiency by a factor of 4, while proton transfer within the second pair should substantially, by 2.7 times, decrease the rate of charge transfer. Thus, directional asymmetry of the PT effects on the electronic coupling is predicted. The changes in the Vda matrix elements correlate with the topological properties of orbitals of donor and acceptor and can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of resonance structures of donor and acceptor. Atomic pair contributions to the Vda matrix elements are also analyzed.

  7. Protonation and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer at S-Ligated [4Fe-4S] Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Wesley D.; Darcy, Julia W.; Mayer, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological [Fe-S] clusters are increasingly recognized to undergo proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), but the site of protonation, mechanism, and role for PCET remains largely unknown. Here we explore this reactivity with synthetic model clusters. Protonation of the arylthiolate-ligated [4Fe-4S] cluster [Fe4S4(SAr)4]2- (1, SAr = S-2,4-6-(iPr)3C6H2) leads to thiol dissociation, reversibly forming [Fe4S4(SAr)3L]1- (2) + ArSH (L = solvent, and/or conjugate base). Solutions of 2 + ArSH react with the nitroxyl radical TEMPO to give [Fe4S4(SAr)4]1- (1ox) and TEMPOH. This reaction involves PCET coupled to thiolate association and may proceed via the unobserved protonated cluster [Fe4S4(SAr)3(HSAr)]1-(1-H). Similar reactions with this and related clusters proceed comparably. An understanding of the PCET thermochemistry of this cluster system has been developed, encompassing three different redox levels and two protonation states. PMID:25965413

  8. Protonation and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer at S-Ligated [4Fe-4S] Clusters.

    PubMed

    Saouma, Caroline T; Morris, Wesley D; Darcy, Julia W; Mayer, James M

    2015-06-15

    Biological [Fe-S] clusters are increasingly recognized to undergo proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), but the site of protonation, mechanism, and role for PCET remains largely unknown. Here we explore this reactivity with synthetic model clusters. Protonation of the arylthiolate-ligated [4Fe-4S] cluster [Fe4 S4 (SAr)4 ](2-) (1, SAr=S-2,4-6-(iPr)3 C6 H2 ) leads to thiol dissociation, reversibly forming [Fe4 S4 (SAr)3 L](1-) (2) and ArSH (L=solvent, and/or conjugate base). Solutions of 2+ArSH react with the nitroxyl radical TEMPO to give [Fe4 S4 (SAr)4 ](1-) (1ox ) and TEMPOH. This reaction involves PCET coupled to thiolate association and may proceed via the unobserved protonated cluster [Fe4 S4 (SAr)3 (HSAr)](1-) (1-H). Similar reactions with this and related clusters proceed comparably. An understanding of the PCET thermochemistry of this cluster system has been developed, encompassing three different redox levels and two protonation states. PMID:25965413

  9. Revealing various coupling of electron transfer and proton pumping in mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Zhou, Qiangjun; Pang, Xiaoyun; Xu, Yingzhi; Rao, Zihe

    2013-08-01

    Cellular respiration is the process that releases energy from food and supplies energy for life processes. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the final and most important step for cellular respiration and is located on the inner membrane of mitochondrion and comprises four large trans-membrane protein complexes (respiratory chain Complexes I, II, III and IV) as well as ubiquinone between Complexes I/II and III and cytochrome c between Complexes III and IV. The function of mitochondrial respiratory chain is biological oxidation by transferring electrons from NADH and succinate to oxygen and then generating proton gradient across the inner membrane. Such proton gradient is utilized by ATP synthase (ATPase, also called as Complex V) to produce energy molecules ATP. Structural studies of mitochondrial respiratory membrane protein complexes are important to understand the mechanism of electron transfer and the redox-coupled proton translocation across the inner membrane. Here, according to the time line, we reviewed the great achievements on structural studies of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in the past twenty years as well as the recent research progresses on the structures of mitochondrial respiratory supra-complexes.

  10. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A

    2016-08-23

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor-translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  11. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins—protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor—translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  12. Transverse beam coupling impedance of the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichelli, S.; Migliorati, M.; Biancacci, N.; Gilardoni, S.; Metral, E.; Salvant, B.

    2016-04-01

    Beam coupling impedance is a fundamental parameter to characterize the electromagnetic interaction of a particle beam with the surrounding environment. Synchrotron machine performances are critically affected by instabilities and collective effects triggered by beam coupling impedance. In particular, transverse beam coupling impedance is expected to impact beam dynamics of the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS), since a significant increase in beam intensity is foreseen within the framework of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project. In this paper we describe the study of the transverse beam coupling impedance of the PS, taking into account the main sources of geometrical impedance and the contribution of indirect space charge at different energies. The total machine impedance budget, determined from beam-based dedicated machine measurement sessions, is also discussed and compared with the theoretical model.

  13. Respiration-dependent proton translocation in alkalophilic Bacillus firmus RAB and its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Krulwich, T A; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1983-02-25

    Obligately alkalophilic Bacillus firmus RAB had a higher molar growth yield on L-malate (Ymal = 38 mg, dry weight/mmol of L-malate) than its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative, strain RABN (Ymal = 12 mg, dry weight/mmol of L-malate). Measurements of respiration dependent proton translocation by the two strains in the presence of K+ and valinomycin showed that the alkalophile also has much higher H+/O stoichiometries (at pH 9.0) than does the mutant (at pH 7.0). H+/O ratios for B. firmus RAB at pH 9.0 were as high as 13, with a frequently observed value of 9. These high values were observed in the first phase of a set of biphasic curves for both oxygen consumption and proton ejection. At pH 7.0, both the wild type and the mutant exhibited H+/O ratios near 4 in a single phase of oxygen consumption and proton ejection. The results are consistent with suggestions that the alkalophilic respiratory chain is especially well adapted for effective energy transduction at alkaline but not neutral pH.

  14. Integrating proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Kent, Caleb A.; Paul, Jared J.; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-11-01

    In many of the chemical steps in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis, proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays an essential role. An important issue is how excited state reactivity can be integrated with PCET to carry out solar fuel reactions such as water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen or water reduction of CO2 to methanol or hydrocarbons. The principles behind PCET and concerted electron–proton transfer (EPT) pathways are reasonably well understood. In Photosystem II antenna light absorption is followed by sensitization of chlorophyll P680 and electron transfer quenching to give P680+. The oxidized chlorophyll activates the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), a CaMn4 cluster, through an intervening tyrosine–histidine pair, YZ. EPT plays a major role in a series of four activation steps that ultimately result in loss of 4e-/4H+ from the OEC with oxygen evolution. The key elements in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis – light absorption, excited state energy and electron transfer, electron transfer activation of multiple-electron, multiple-proton catalysis – can also be assembled in dye sensitized photoelectrochemical synthesis cells (DS-PEC). In this approach, molecular or nanoscale assemblies are incorporated at separate electrodes for coupled, light driven oxidation and reduction. Separate excited state electron transfer followed by proton transfer can be combined in single semi-concerted steps (photo-EPT) by photolysis of organic charge transfer excited states with H-bonded bases or in metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states in pre-associated assemblies with H-bonded electron transfer donors or acceptors. In these assemblies, photochemically induced electron and proton transfer occur in a single, semi-concerted event to give high-energy, redox active intermediates.

  15. Evidence for a wide occurrence of proton-translocating pyrophosphatase genes in parasitic and free-living protozoa.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castiñeira, José R; Alvar, Jorge; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M; Serrano, Aurelio

    2002-06-14

    Proton-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatases (H(+)-PPase, EC 3.6.1.1) are integral membrane proteins that have been extensively studied in higher plants, the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum and, more recently, in some human pathogenic protozoa. By using a PCR-based approach, fragments of genes coding for H(+)-PPases in a number of protists, both free-living and parasites of animals and plants, that belong to diverse taxonomic groups (trypanosomatids, ciliates, apicomplexans, euglenoids, amoeboid mycetozoa, heterokonts) have been isolated. The experimental procedure involved the use of degenerate oligonucleotides designed from protein domains conserved in H(+)-PPases from plants and bacteria. The PCR-amplified DNA fragments exhibited the characteristic genomic structure and codon usage of the corresponding protozoan group. Paralogous genes were found in some species suggesting the occurrence of protein isoforms. These results indicate that H(+)-PPases are more widely distributed among protozoa than previously thought.

  16. Stoichiometry of mitochondrial H+ translocation coupled to succinate oxidation at level flow.

    PubMed

    Costa, L E; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-04-25

    The mechanistic stoichiometry of vectorial H+ translocation coupled to succinate oxidation by rat liver mitochondria in the presence of a permeant cation has been determined under level flow conditions with a membraneless fast responding O2 electrode kinetically matched with a glass pH electrode. The reactions were initiated by rapid injection of O2 into the anaerobically preincubated test system under conditions in which interfering H+ backflow was minimized. The rates of O2 uptake and H+ ejection, obtained from computer-fitted regression lines, were monotonic and first order over 75% of the course of O2 consumption. Extrapolation of the observed rates to zero time, at which zero delta mu H+ and thus level flow prevails, yielded vectorial H+/O flow ratios above 7 and closely approaching 8. The mitochondria undergo no irreversible change and give identical H+/O ratios on repeated tests. In a further refinement, the lower and upper limits of the mechanistic H+/O ratio were determined to be 7.55 and 8.56, respectively, from plots of the rates of O2 uptake versus H+ ejection at increasing malonate and increasing valinomycin concentrations, respectively. It is therefore concluded that the mechanistic H+/O ratio for energy-conserving sites 2 + 3 is 8, in confirmation of earlier measurements. KCl concentration is critical for maximal observed H+/O ratios. Optimum conditions and possible errors in determination of mechanistic H+/O translocation ratios are discussed.

  17. Enhanced Proton Translocating Pyrophosphatase Activity Improves Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Romaine Lettuce1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Valencia, Julio; Sanchez-Lares, Jonathan; Marsh, Ellen; Dorneles, Liane T.; Santos, Mirella P.; Sanchez, Diego; Winter, Alexander; Murphy, Sean; Cox, Jennifer; Trzaska, Marcin; Metler, Jason; Kozic, Alex; Facanha, Arnoldo R.; Schachtman, Daniel; Sanchez, Charles A.; Gaxiola, Roberto A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant nitrate (NO3−) acquisition depends on the combined activities of root high- and low-affinity NO3− transporters and the proton gradient generated by the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. These processes are coordinated with photosynthesis and the carbon status of the plant. Here, we present the characterization of romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa ‘Conquistador’) plants engineered to overexpress an intragenic gain-of-function allele of the type I proton translocating pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The proton-pumping and inorganic pyrophosphate hydrolytic activities of these plants are augmented compared with control plants. Immunohistochemical data show a conspicuous increase in H+-PPase protein abundance at the vasculature of the transgenic plants. Transgenic plants displayed an enhanced rhizosphere acidification capacity consistent with the augmented plasma membrane H+-ATPase proton transport values, and ATP hydrolytic capacities evaluated in vitro. These transgenic lines outperform control plants when challenged with NO3− limitations in laboratory, greenhouse, and field scenarios. Furthermore, we report the characterization of a lettuce LsNRT2.1 gene that is constitutive up-regulated in the transgenic plants. Of note, the expression of the LsNRT2.1 gene in control plants is regulated by NO3− and sugars. Enhanced accumulation of 15N-labeled fertilizer by transgenic lettuce compared with control plants was observed in greenhouse experiments. A negative correlation between the level of root soluble sugars and biomass is consistent with the strong root growth that characterizes these transgenic plants. PMID:23307651

  18. Proton transfer and energy coupling in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    A description of the rate constants and the energetics of the elementary reaction steps of the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin has been helpful in understanding the mechanism of proton transport in this light-driven pump. The evidence suggests a single unbranched reaction sequence, BR-hv----K in equilibrium with L in equilibrium with M1----M2 in equilibrium with N in equilibrium with O----BR, where coupling to the proton-motive force is at the energetically and mechanistically important M1----M2 step. The consequences of site-specific mutations expressed homologously in Halobacterium halobium have revealed characteristics of the Schiff base deprotonation in the L----M1 reaction, the reorientation of the Schiff base from the extracellular to the cytoplasmic side in the M1----M2 reaction, and the reprotonation of the Schiff base in the M2----N reaction.

  19. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups. PMID:26439818

  20. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Miller, David C; Choi, Gilbert J; Orbe, Hudson S; Knowles, Robert R

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups.

  1. Search for a coupling of the proton spin to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson Kimball, Derek; Dudley, Jordan; Li, Yan; Patel, Dilan

    2016-05-01

    We present an overview of progress in our search for a long-range coupling between rubidium (Rb) nuclear spins and the mass of the Earth, which can be interpreted as a search for a long-range monopole-dipole interaction or a spin-gravity coupling. The experiment consists of simultaneous measurement of the spin precession frequencies of overlapping ensembles of Rb-85 and Rb-87 atoms contained within an evacuated, antirelaxation-coated vapor cell. Because of the nuclear structure of Rb-85 and Rb-87, the experiment is particularly sensitive to anomalous spin-dependent interactions of the proton. We have studied a number of important systematic effects related to vector and tensor light shifts, optical pumping effects, the ac and nonlinear Zeeman effects, and magnetic field gradients. We anticipate that our experiment can improve sensitivity to anomalous long-range spin-mass couplings of the proton compared to previous experiments by more than an order of magnitude. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1307507.

  2. Linear energy relationships in ground state proton transfer and excited state proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Magomedov, Artiom; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-02-12

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes are elementary chemical reactions involved in a broad range of radical and redox reactions. Elucidating fundamental PCET reaction mechanisms are thus of central importance for chemical and biochemical research. Here we use quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), and the algebraic diagrammatic-construction through second-order (ADC(2)) to study the mechanism, thermodynamic driving force effects, and reaction barriers of both ground state proton transfer (pT) and photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) between nitrosylated phenyl-phenol compounds and hydrogen-bonded t-butylamine as an external base. We show that the obtained reaction barriers for the ground state pT reactions depend linearly on the thermodynamic driving force, with a Brønsted slope of 1 or 0. Photoexcitation leads to a PCET reaction, for which we find that the excited state reaction barrier depends on the thermodynamic driving force with a Brønsted slope of 1/2. To support the mechanistic picture arising from the static potential energy surfaces, we perform additional molecular dynamics simulations on the excited state energy surface, in which we observe a spontaneous PCET between the donor and the acceptor groups. Our findings suggest that a Brønsted analysis may distinguish the ground state pT and excited state PCET processes.

  3. Auxin regulation of a proton translocating ATPase in pea root plasma membrane vesicles. [Pisum sativum. L

    SciTech Connect

    Gabathuler, R.; Cleland, R.E.

    1985-12-01

    Pea root microsomal vesicles have been fractionated on a Dextran step gradient to give three fractions, each of which carries out ATP-dependent proton accumulation as measured by fluorescence quenching of quinacrine. The fraction at the 4/6% Dextran interface is enriched in plasma membrane, as determined by UDPG sterol glucosyltransferase and vanadate-inhibited ATPase. The vanadate-sensitive phosphohydrolase is not specific for ATP, has a K/sub m/ of about 0.23 millimolar for MgATP, is only slightly affected by K/sup +/ or Cl/sup -/ and is insensitive to auxin. Proton transport, on the other hand, is more specific for ATP, enhanced by anions (NO/sub 3//sup -/ > Cl/sup -/) and has a K/sub m/ of about 0.7 millimolar. Auxins decrease the K/sub m/ to about 0.35 millimolar, with no significant effect on the V/sub max/, while antiauxins or weak acids have no such effect. It appears that auxin has the ability to alter the efficiency of the ATP-driven proton transport.

  4. On the Importance of Exchangeable NH Protons in Creatine for the Magnetic Coupling of Creatine Methyl Protons in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruiskamp, M. J.; Nicolay, K.

    2001-03-01

    The methyl protons of creatine in skeletal muscle exhibit a strong off-resonance magnetization transfer effect. The mechanism of this process is unknown. We previously hypothesized that the exchangeable amide/amino protons of creatine might be involved. To test this the characteristics of the creatine magnetization transfer effect were investigated in excised rat hindleg skeletal muscle that was equilibrated in either H2O or D2O solutions containing creatine. The efficiency of off-resonance magnetization transfer to the protons of mobile creatine in excised muscle was similar to that previously reported in intact muscle in vivo. Equilibrating the isolated muscle in D2O solution had no effect on the magnetic coupling to the immobile protons. It is concluded that exchangeable protons play a negligible role in the magnetic coupling of creatine methyl protons in muscle.

  5. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion.

    PubMed

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  6. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  7. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion.

    PubMed

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  8. Kinetic Effects Of Increased Proton Transfer Distance On Proton-Coupled Oxidations Of Phenol-Amines

    PubMed Central

    Rhile, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    To test the effect of varying the proton donor-acceptor distance in proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, the oxidation of a bicyclic amino-indanol (2) is compared with that of a closely related phenol with an ortho CPh2NH2 substituent (1). Spectroscopic, structural, thermochemical and computational studies show that the two amino-phenols are very similar, except that the O⋯N distance (dON) is >0.1 Å longer in 2 than in 1. The difference in dON is 0.13 ± 0.03 Å from X-ray crystallography and 0.165 Å from DFT calculations. Oxidations of these phenols by outer-sphere oxidants yield distonic radical cations •OAr–NH3+ by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET). Simple tunneling and classical kinetic models both predict that the longer donor-acceptor distance in 2 should lead to slower reactions, by ca. two orders of magnitude, as well as larger H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). However, kinetic studies show that the compound with the longer proton-transfer distance, 2, exhibits smaller KIEs and has rate constants that are quite close to those of 1. For example, the oxidation of 2 by the triarylamminium radical cation N(C6H4OMe)3•+ (3a+) occurs at (1.4 ± 0.1) × 104 M-1 s-1, only a factor of two slower than the closely related reaction of 1 with N(C6H4OMe)2(C6H4Br)•+ (3b+). This difference in rate constants is well accounted for by the slightly different free energies of reaction: ΔG°(2 + 3a+) = +0.078 V vs. ΔG°(1 + 3b+) = +0.04 V. The two phenol-amines do display some subtle kinetic differences: for instance, compound 2 has a shallower dependence of CPET rate constants on driving force (Brønsted α, Δln(k)/Δln(Keq)). These results show that the simple tunneling model is not a good predictor of the effect of proton donor-acceptor distance on concerted-electron transfer reactions involving strongly hydrogen-bonded systems. Computational analysis of the observed similarity of the two phenols emphasizes the importance of the highly

  9. Redox-linked proton translocation in the b-c1 complex from beef-heart mitochondria reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Studies with chemical modifiers of amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, M; Gatti, D; Boffoli, D; Bellomo, E; Papa, S

    1983-12-15

    Possible involvement of polypeptides of b-c1 complex of beef-heart mitochondria in its redox and protonmotive activity has been investigated, by means of chemical modification of amino acid residues in the soluble as well as in the phospholipid-reconstituted b-c1 complex. Treatment of the enzyme with tetranitromethane (C(NO2)4) or with ethoxyformic anhydride (EFA), that modify reversibly tyrosyl and hystidyl residues respectively, resulted in a marked inhibition of electron transport from reduced quinols to cytochrome c. This was accompanied, in b-c1 reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles, by a parallel inhibition of respiratory-linked proton translocation; the H+/e- stoichiometry remained unchanged. Treatment of b-c1 complex with DCCD, that specifically modifies carboxylic groups of glutammic or aspartic residues caused a marked depression of proton translocation in b-c1 vesicles, under conditions where the rate of electron flow in the coupled state, was enhanced. As a consequence the H+/e- stoichiometry was lowered. SDS gel electrophoresis and [14C]DCCD-labelling of the polypeptides of the b-c1 complex showed a major binding of 14C-DCCD to the 8-kDa subunit of the complex and possible cross-linking, induced by DCCD treatment, of polypeptide(s) in the 8-kDa band and the 12-kDa band, with the Fe-s protein of the complex, with the appearance of a new polypeptide band with an apparent molecular mass of about 40 kDa. Involvement of polypeptides of low molecular mass, for which no functional role was so far described, and possibly of the Fe-S protein in the redox-linked proton translocation in b-c1 complex is suggested.

  10. Direct and indirect proton proton coupling in quantum-chemical theory of H-bonded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, A. A.; Dolin, S. P.

    2000-09-01

    The direct (electrostatic) and indirect mechanisms of proton-proton coupling in H-bonded solids of different nature and dimensionalities are treated. The 3D crystals of the KH 2PO 4 family, squaric acid (H 2C 4O 4, 2D) as well as the 0D K 3H(SO 4) 2-like compounds are examined as examples. We found out the role of direct and indirect mechanisms in the formation of coupling parameters ( Jij) of the Ising model, commonly applied to describe the thermodynamic and dielectric properties of H-bonded materials. It was shown that the evaluated contribution to any Jij due to the direct mechanism does not exceed 30 K for all the H-bonded materials of interest. In the cases of the KH 2PO 4 family and squaric acid these contributions are minor in comparison with the indirect one, whereas the relative direct contribution in the Ising parameter can be more significant in the case of the K 3H(SO 4) 2-like materials.

  11. The H+/O ratio of proton translocation linked to the oxidation of succinate by mitochondria. Reply to a commentary.

    PubMed

    Lehninger, A L; Reynafarje, B; Hendler, R W; Shrager, R I

    1985-11-18

    Costa, L.E., Reynafarje, B. and Lehninger, A.L. [(1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 4802-4811] have reported 'second-generation' measurements of the H+/O ratio approaching 8.0 for vectorial H+ translocation coupled to succinate oxidation by rat liver mitochondria. In a Commentary in this Journal [Krab, K., Soos, J. and Wikström, M. (1984) FEBS Lett. 178, 187-192] it was concluded that the measurements of Costa et al. significantly overestimated the true H+/O stoichiometry. It is shown here that the mathematical simulation on which Krab et al. based this claim is faulty and that data reported by Costa et al. had already excluded the criticism advanced by Krab et al. Also reported are new data, obtained under conditions in which the arguments of Krab et al. are irrelevant, which confirm that the H+/O ratio for succinate oxidation extrapolated to level flow is close to 8.

  12. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-17

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency regimes for the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term does not significantly impact the rate constants derived using the cumulant expansion approach in any of the regimes studied. The effects of the quadratic term may become significant when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant, however, particularly at high temperatures and for proton transfer interfaces with extremely soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with extraordinarily weak hydrogen bonds. Even with the thermal averaging procedure, the effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances, and the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer in chemical and biological processes. We are grateful for support from National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (applications to enzymes) and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy

  13. Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provorse, Makenzie R.

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is utilized throughout Nature to facilitate essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and DNA replication and repair. The general approach to studying PCET processes is based on a two-dimensional More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram in which electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) occur in a sequential or concerted fashion. Experimentally, it is difficult to discern the contributing factors of concerted PCET mechanisms. Several theoretical approaches have arisen to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate these reactions. Here, we present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) method to efficiently and accurately model PCET mechanisms. The MSDFT method is validated against experimental and computational data previously reported on an isoelectronic series of small molecule self-exchange hydrogen atom transfer reactions and a model complex specifically designed to study long-range ET through a hydrogen-bonded salt-bridge interface. Further application of this method to the hydrogen atom abstraction of ascorbate by a nitroxyl radical demonstrates the sensitivity of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties to solvent effects. In particular, the origin of the unusual kinetic isotope effect is investigated. Lastly, the MSDFT is employed in a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to explicitly model PCET in condensed phases.

  14. TLR4 Signaling augments monocyte chemotaxis by regulating G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 translocation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Jiang, Yong; Li, Yuehua; Wang, Juan; Fan, Liyan; Scott, Melanie J; Xiao, Guozhi; Li, Song; Billiar, Timothy R; Wilson, Mark A; Fan, Jie

    2013-07-15

    Monocytes are critical effector cells of the innate immune system that protect the host by migrating to inflammatory sites, differentiating to macrophages and dendritic cells, eliciting immune responses, and killing pathogenic microbes. MCP-1, also known as CCL2, plays an important role in monocyte activation and migration. The chemotactic function of MCP-1 is mediated by binding to the CCR2 receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Desensitization of GPCR chemokine receptors is an important regulator of the intensity and duration of chemokine stimulation. GPCR kinases (GRKs) induce GPCR phosphorylation, and this leads to GPCR desensitization. Regulation of subcellular localization of GRKs is considered an important early regulatory mechanism of GRK function and subsequent GPCR desensitization. Chemokines and LPS are both present during Gram-negative bacterial infection, and LPS often synergistically exaggerates leukocyte migration in response to chemokines. In this study, we investigated the role and mechanism of LPS-TLR4 signaling on the regulation of monocyte chemotaxis. We demonstrate that LPS augments MCP-1-induced monocyte migration. We also show that LPS, through p38 MAPK signaling, induces phosphorylation of GRK2 at serine 670, which, in turn, suppresses GRK2 translocation to the membrane, thereby preventing GRK2-initiated internalization and desensitization of CCR2 in response to MCP-1. This results in enhanced monocyte migration. These findings reveal a novel function for TLR4 signaling in promoting innate immune cell migration.

  15. Gating Topology of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W.; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Radestock, Sebastian; Solcan, Nicolae; Dijkman, Patricia M.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Kwok, Jane; Caffrey, Martin; Watts, Anthony; Forrest, Lucy R.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. Recent crystal structures suggest the MFS fold facilitates transport through rearrangement of their two six-helix bundles around a central ligand binding site; how this is achieved, however, is poorly understood. Using modeling, molecular dynamics, crystallography, functional assays, and site-directed spin labeling combined with double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we present a detailed study of the transport dynamics of two bacterial oligopeptide transporters, PepTSo and PepTSt. Our results identify several salt bridges that stabilize outward-facing conformations and we show that, for all the current structures of MFS transporters, the first two helices of each of the four inverted-topology repeat units form half of either the periplasmic or cytoplasmic gate and that these function cooperatively in a scissor-like motion to control access to the peptide binding site during transport. PMID:25651061

  16. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  17. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-07-22

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa's for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  18. Proton translocation stoichiometry of cytochrome oxidase: use of a fast-responding oxygen electrode.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Alexandre, A; Davies, P; Lehninger, A L

    1982-12-01

    The mechanistic stoichiometry of vectorial H+ ejection coupled to electron transport from added ferrocytochrome c to oxygen by the cytochrome oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1) of rat liver mitoplasts was determined from measurements of the initial rates of electron flow and H+ ejection in the presence of K+ (with valinomycin). Three different methods of measuring electron flow were used: (a) dual-wavelength spectrophotometry of ferrocytochrome c oxidation, (b) uptake of scalar H+ for the reduction of O2 in the presence of a protonophore, and (c) a fast-responding membraneless oxygen electrode. The reliability of the rate measurements was first established against the known stoichiometry of the scalar reaction of cytochrome oxidase (2ferrocytochrome c + 2H+ + 1/2O2 leads to 2ferricytochrome c + H2O) in the presence of excess protonophore. With all three methods the directly observed vectorial H+/O ejection ratios in the presence of K+ + valinomycin significantly exceeded 3.0. However, because the rate of backflow of the ejected H+ into the mitoplasts is very high and increases with the increasing delta pH generated across the membrane, there is a very rapid decline in the observed H+/O ratio from the beginning of the reaction. Kinetic analysis of ferrocytochrome c oxidation by the mitoplasts, carried out with a fast-responding membraneless oxygen electrode, showed the reaction to be first order in O2 and allowed accurate extrapolation of the rates of O2 uptake and H+ ejection to zero time. At this point, at which there is zero delta pH across the membrane, the H+/O ejection ratio of the cytochrome oxidase reaction, obtained from the rates at zero time, is close to 4.0.

  19. Phylogenomic Analysis and Predicted Physiological Role of the Proton-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Complex I) Across Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Aylward, Frank O.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a multisubunit integral membrane enzyme found in the respiratory chains of both bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. Although much research has focused on the enzyme’s central role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, comparatively little is known about its role in the diverse energetic lifestyles of different bacteria. Here, we used a phylogenomic approach to better understand the distribution of complex I across bacteria, the evolution of this enzyme, and its potential roles in shaping the physiology of different bacterial groups. By surveying 970 representative bacterial genomes, we predict complex I to be present in ~50% of bacteria. While this includes bacteria with a wide range of energetic schemes, the presence of complex I is associated with specific lifestyles, including aerobic respiration and specific types of phototrophy (bacteria with only a type II reaction center). A phylogeny of bacterial complex I revealed five main clades of enzymes whose evolution is largely congruent with the evolution of the bacterial groups that encode complex I. A notable exception includes the gammaproteobacteria, whose members encode one of two distantly related complex I enzymes predicted to participate in different types of respiratory chains (aerobic versus anaerobic). Comparative genomic analyses suggest a broad role for complex I in reoxidizing NADH produced from various catabolic reactions, including the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Together, these findings suggest diverse roles for complex I across bacteria and highlight the importance of this enzyme in shaping diverse physiologies across the bacterial domain. PMID:25873378

  20. Two tyrosyl radicals stabilize high oxidation states in cytochrome c oxidase for efficient energy conservation and proton translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2012-02-01

    The reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (bCcO) was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to determine the properties of radical intermediates. Two distinct radicals with widths of 12 and 46 G are directly observed by X-band CW-EPR in the reaction of bCcO with H2O2 at pH 6 and pH 8. High-frequency EPR (D-band) provides assignments to tyrosine for both radicals based on well-resolved g-tensors. The 46 G wide radical has extensive hyperfine structure and can be fit with parameters consistent with Y129. However, the 12 G wide radical has minimal hyperfine structure and can be fit using parameters unique to the post-translationally modified Y244 in CcO. The results are supported by mixed quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. This study reports spectroscopic evidence of a radical formed on the modified tyrosine in CcO and resolves the much debated controversy of whether the wide radical seen at low pH in the bovine system is a tyrosine or tryptophan. A model is presented showing how radical formation and migration may play an essential role in proton translocation. This work was done in collaboration with Michelle A. Yu, Tsuyoshi Egawa, Syun-Ru Yeh and Gary J. Gerfen from Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Kyoko Shinzawa-Itoh and Shinya Yoshikawa from the University of Hyogo; and Victor Guallar from the Barcelona Supercomputing Center.

  1. Synthetic Applications of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Emily C; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-08-16

    Redox events in which an electron and proton are exchanged in a concerted elementary step are commonly referred to as proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs). PCETs are known to operate in numerous important biological redox processes, as well as recent inorganic technologies for small molecule activation. These studies suggest that PCET catalysis might also function as a general mode of substrate activation in organic synthesis. Over the past three years, our group has worked to advance this hypothesis and to demonstrate the synthetic utility of PCET through the development of novel catalytic radical chemistries. The central aim of these efforts has been to demonstrate the ability of PCET to homolytically activate a wide variety of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using known molecular H atom transfer catalysts. To do so, we made use of a simple formalism first introduced by Mayer and co-workers that allowed us to predict the thermodynamic capacity of any oxidant/base or reductant/acid pair to formally add or remove H· from a given substrate. With this insight, we were able to rationally select catalyst combinations thermodynamically competent to homolyze the extraordinarily strong E-H σ-bonds found in many common protic functional groups (BDFEs > 100 kcal/mol) or to form unusually weak bonds to hydrogen via the reductive action of common organic π-systems (BDFEs < 35 kcal/mol). These ideas were reduced to practice through the development of new catalyst systems for reductive PCET activations of ketones and oxidative PCET activation of amide N-H bonds to directly furnish reactive ketyl and amidyl radicals, respectively. In both systems, the reaction outcomes were found to be successfully predicted using the effective bond strength formalism, suggesting that these simple thermochemical considerations can provide useful and actionable insights into PCET reaction design. The ability of PCET catalysis to control

  2. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-06-25

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced processes, are also described. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. The work described herein was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CHE-13-61293 (theory development), National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (soybean lipoxygenase), Center for Chemical Innovation of the National Science Foundation Solar Fuels Grant CHE-1305124 (cobalt catalysts), Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (nickel catalysts), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Award No. FA9550-14-1-0295 (photoinduced PCET).

  3. Redox-linked proton translocation in cytochrome oxidase: the importance of gating electron flow. The effects of slip in a model transducer.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, D F; Gelles, J; Chan, S I

    1986-01-01

    In at least one component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase, exothermic electron transfer reactions are used to drive vectorial proton transport against an electrochemical hydrogen ion gradient across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The role of the gating of electrons (the regulation of the rates of electron transfer into and out of the proton transport site) in this coupling between electron transfer and proton pumping has been explored. The approach involves the solution of the steady-state rate equations pertinent to proton pump models which include, to various degrees, the uncoupled (i.e., not linked to proton pumping) electron transfer processes which are likely to occur in any real electron transfer-driven proton pump. This analysis furnishes a quantitative framework for examining the effects of variations in proton binding site pKas and metal center reduction potentials, the relationship between energy conservation efficiency and turnover rate, the conditions for maximum power output or minimum heat production, and required efficiency of the gating of electrons. Some novel conclusions emerge from the analysis, including: An efficient electron transfer-driven proton pump need not exhibit a pH-dependent reduction potential; Very efficient gating of electrons is required for efficient electron transfer driven proton pumping, especially when a reasonable correlation of electron transfer rate and electron transfer exoergonicity is assumed; and A consideration of the importance and possible mechanisms of the gating of electrons suggests that efficient proton pumping by CuA in cytochrome oxidase could, in principle, take place with structural changes confined to the immediate vicinity of the copper ion, while proton pumping by Fea would probably require conformational coupling between the iron and more remote structures in the enzyme. The conclusions are discussed with reference to proton pumping by cytochrome c oxidase, and some

  4. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chand, Mahesh K; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-11-01

    Production of endonucleolytic double-strand DNA breaks requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple, dimeric endonucleases are known, there are many complex nuclease machines that are poorly understood. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide after convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are located upstream of the direction of translocation, an observation inconsistent with simple nuclease-domain dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex in which the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of the products of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand-nicking events combine to produce DNA scission.

  5. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chand, Mahesh K; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-11-01

    Production of endonucleolytic double-strand DNA breaks requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple, dimeric endonucleases are known, there are many complex nuclease machines that are poorly understood. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide after convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are located upstream of the direction of translocation, an observation inconsistent with simple nuclease-domain dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex in which the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of the products of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand-nicking events combine to produce DNA scission. PMID:26389736

  6. A Functional EXXEK Motif is Essential for Proton Coupling and Active Glucosinolate Transport by NPF2.11.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Geiger, Dietmar; Mirza, Osman; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan

    2015-12-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT/PTR) family shares a highly conserved E1X1X2E2RFXYY (E1X1X2E2R) motif across all kingdoms of life. This motif is suggested to have a role in proton coupling and active transport in bacterial homologs. For the plant POT/PTR family, also known as the NRT1/PTR family (NPF), little is known about the role of the E1X1X2E2R motif. Moreover, nothing is known about the role of the X1 and X2 residues within the E1X1X2E2R motif. We used NPF2.11-a proton-coupled glucosinolate (GLS) symporter from Arabidopsis thaliana-to investigate the role of the E1X1X2E2K motif variant in a plant NPF transporter. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based uptake assays and two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) electrophysiology, we demonstrate an essential role for the E1X1X2E2K motif for accumulation of substrate by NPF2.11. Our data suggest that the highly conserved E1, E2 and K residues are involved in translocation of protons, as has been proposed for the E1X1X2E2R motif in bacteria. Furthermore, we show that the two residues X1 and X2 in the E1X1X2E2[K/R] motif are conserved as uncharged amino acids in POT/PTRs from bacteria to mammals and that introducing a positive or negative charge in either position hampers the ability to overaccumulate substrate relative to the assay medium. We hypothesize that introducing a charge at X1 and X2 interferes with the function of the conserved glutamate and lysine residues of the E1X1X2E2K motif and affects the mechanism behind proton coupling. PMID:26443378

  7. A Functional EXXEK Motif is Essential for Proton Coupling and Active Glucosinolate Transport by NPF2.11.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Geiger, Dietmar; Mirza, Osman; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan

    2015-12-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT/PTR) family shares a highly conserved E1X1X2E2RFXYY (E1X1X2E2R) motif across all kingdoms of life. This motif is suggested to have a role in proton coupling and active transport in bacterial homologs. For the plant POT/PTR family, also known as the NRT1/PTR family (NPF), little is known about the role of the E1X1X2E2R motif. Moreover, nothing is known about the role of the X1 and X2 residues within the E1X1X2E2R motif. We used NPF2.11-a proton-coupled glucosinolate (GLS) symporter from Arabidopsis thaliana-to investigate the role of the E1X1X2E2K motif variant in a plant NPF transporter. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based uptake assays and two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) electrophysiology, we demonstrate an essential role for the E1X1X2E2K motif for accumulation of substrate by NPF2.11. Our data suggest that the highly conserved E1, E2 and K residues are involved in translocation of protons, as has been proposed for the E1X1X2E2R motif in bacteria. Furthermore, we show that the two residues X1 and X2 in the E1X1X2E2[K/R] motif are conserved as uncharged amino acids in POT/PTRs from bacteria to mammals and that introducing a positive or negative charge in either position hampers the ability to overaccumulate substrate relative to the assay medium. We hypothesize that introducing a charge at X1 and X2 interferes with the function of the conserved glutamate and lysine residues of the E1X1X2E2K motif and affects the mechanism behind proton coupling.

  8. Proton-coupled electron transfer dynamics in the catalytic mechanism of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-04-01

    The movement of protons and electrons is common to the synthesis of all chemical fuels such as H2. Hydrogenases, which catalyze the reversible reduction of protons, necessitate transport and reactivity between protons and electrons, but a detailed mechanism has thus far been elusive. Here, we use a phototriggered chemical potential jump method to rapidly initiate the proton reduction activity of a [NiFe] hydrogenase. Coupling the photochemical initiation approach to nanosecond transient infrared and visible absorbance spectroscopy afforded direct observation of interfacial electron transfer and active site chemistry. Tuning of intramolecular proton transport by pH and isotopic substitution revealed distinct concerted and stepwise proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in catalysis. The observed heterogeneity in the two sequential proton-associated reduction processes suggests a highly engineered protein environment modulating catalysis and implicates three new reaction intermediates; Nia-I, Nia-D, and Nia-SR(-). The results establish an elementary mechanistic understanding of catalysis in a [NiFe] hydrogenase with implications in enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer and biomimetic catalyst design.

  9. Transient characteristics for proton gating in laterally coupled indium-zinc-oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Zhu, Li Qiang; Xiao, Hui; Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Chao, Jin Yu

    2015-03-25

    The control and detection over processing, transport and delivery of chemical species is of great importance in sensors and biological systems. The transient characteristics of the migration of chemical species reflect the basic properties in the processings of chemical species. Here, we observed the field-configurable proton effects in a laterally coupled transistor gated by phosphorosilicate glass (PSG). The bias on the lateral gate would modulate the interplay between protons and electrons at the PSG/indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) channel interface. Due to the modulation of protons flux within the PSG films, the IZO channel current would be modified correspondingly. The characteristic time for the proton gating is estimated to be on the order of 20 ms. Such laterally coupled oxide based transistors with proton gating are promising for low-cost portable biosensors and neuromorphic system applications. PMID:25741771

  10. Transient characteristics for proton gating in laterally coupled indium-zinc-oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Zhu, Li Qiang; Xiao, Hui; Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Chao, Jin Yu

    2015-03-25

    The control and detection over processing, transport and delivery of chemical species is of great importance in sensors and biological systems. The transient characteristics of the migration of chemical species reflect the basic properties in the processings of chemical species. Here, we observed the field-configurable proton effects in a laterally coupled transistor gated by phosphorosilicate glass (PSG). The bias on the lateral gate would modulate the interplay between protons and electrons at the PSG/indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) channel interface. Due to the modulation of protons flux within the PSG films, the IZO channel current would be modified correspondingly. The characteristic time for the proton gating is estimated to be on the order of 20 ms. Such laterally coupled oxide based transistors with proton gating are promising for low-cost portable biosensors and neuromorphic system applications.

  11. Redox-linked proton translocation in the b-c1 complex from beef-heart mitochondria reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. General characteristics and control of electron flow by delta micro H+.

    PubMed

    Papa, S; Lorusso, M; Boffoli, D; Bellomo, E

    1983-12-15

    A study is presented of the characteristics of redox-linked proton translocation in the b-c1 complex isolated from beef-heart mitochondria and reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Measurements of the H+/e- stoichiometry, with three different methods, show that four protons are released from the vesicles per 2e- flowing from quinols to cytochrome c, two of these protons formally deriving from scalar oxidation of quinols by cytochrome c. This H+/e- stoicheiometry is independent of the initial redox state of the b-c1 complex (fully reduced or oxidized) and the rate of electron flow through the complex. It does not change in the pH range 6.0 - 7.2, but declines to 1.5 going with pH from 7.2 - 8.3. This decrease is accompanied by enhancement of the rate of electron flow in the coupled state. Collapse of delta psi effected by valinomycin addition to turning-over b-c1 vesicles resulted in substantial oxidation of cytochrome b-566 and comparable reduction of cytochrome c1, with little oxidation of cytochrome b-562. Nigericin alone had no effect on the steady-state redox levels of b and c cytochromes. Its addition in the presence of valinomycin caused oxidation of b cytochromes but no change in the redox state of cytochrome c1. Valinomycin alone caused a marked enhancement of the rate of electron flow through the complex. Nigericin alone was ineffective, but caused further stimulation of electron flow when added in the presence of valinomycin. The data presented are discussed in terms of two mechanisms: the Q cycle and a model based on combination of protonmotive catalysis by special bound quinone and proton conduction along pathways in the apoproteins.

  12. High-Affinity Proton Donors Promote Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer by Samarium Diiodide.

    PubMed

    Chciuk, Tesia V; Anderson, William R; Flowers, Robert A

    2016-05-10

    The relationship between proton-donor affinity for Sm(II) ions and the reduction of two substrates (anthracene and benzyl chloride) was examined. A combination of spectroscopic, thermochemical, and kinetic studies show that only those proton donors that coordinate or chelate strongly to Sm(II) promote anthracene reduction through a PCET process. These studies demonstrate that the combination of Sm(II) ions and water does not provide a unique reagent system for formal hydrogen atom transfer to substrates. PMID:27061351

  13. Alteration of interleaflet coupling due to compounds displaying rapid translocation in lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Reigada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The spatial coincidence of lipid domains at both layers of the cell membrane is expected to play an important role in many cellular functions. Competition between the surface interleaflet tension and a line hydrophobic mismatch penalty are conjectured to determine the transversal behavior of laterally heterogeneous lipid membranes. Here, by a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, a continuum field theory and kinetic equations, I demonstrate that the presence of small, rapidly translocating molecules residing in the lipid bilayer may alter its transversal behavior by favoring the spatial coincidence of similar lipid phases. PMID:27596355

  14. Alteration of interleaflet coupling due to compounds displaying rapid translocation in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigada, Ramon

    2016-09-01

    The spatial coincidence of lipid domains at both layers of the cell membrane is expected to play an important role in many cellular functions. Competition between the surface interleaflet tension and a line hydrophobic mismatch penalty are conjectured to determine the transversal behavior of laterally heterogeneous lipid membranes. Here, by a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, a continuum field theory and kinetic equations, I demonstrate that the presence of small, rapidly translocating molecules residing in the lipid bilayer may alter its transversal behavior by favoring the spatial coincidence of similar lipid phases.

  15. Alteration of interleaflet coupling due to compounds displaying rapid translocation in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reigada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The spatial coincidence of lipid domains at both layers of the cell membrane is expected to play an important role in many cellular functions. Competition between the surface interleaflet tension and a line hydrophobic mismatch penalty are conjectured to determine the transversal behavior of laterally heterogeneous lipid membranes. Here, by a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, a continuum field theory and kinetic equations, I demonstrate that the presence of small, rapidly translocating molecules residing in the lipid bilayer may alter its transversal behavior by favoring the spatial coincidence of similar lipid phases. PMID:27596355

  16. Carbon relaxation analysis in proton coupled spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Claudio; Marchettini, Nadia; Bastianoni, Simone; Dongti, Alessandro

    1995-07-01

    Selective, non-selective and biselective carbon spin-lattice relaxation measurements were determined in methyl-salicylate DMSO-d 6 solution. The frequency dependence of biselective relaxation measurements of protonated aromatic carbons showed the effects of J-scalar modulation. The dipolar contribution induced by asymmetric selective proton inversion of the spin population of a single satellite peak could be useful for investigating of the Shimizu-Fujiwara-Mackor-Maclean relaxation rate. Analysis of the ratios is also proposed for the calculation of dipolar relaxation mechanism efficiency.

  17. Visualizing the kinetic power stroke that drives proton-coupled Zn(II) transport

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Chai, Jin; Cheng, Jie; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Chance, Mark R.; Fu, Dax

    2014-01-01

    The proton gradient is a principal energy source for respiration-dependent active transport, but the structural mechanisms of proton-coupled transport processes are poorly understood. YiiP is a proton-coupled zinc transporter found in the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, and the transport-site of YiiP receives protons from water molecules that gain access to its hydrophobic environment and transduces the energy of an inward proton gradient to drive Zn(II) efflux1,2. This membrane protein is a well characterized member3-7 of the protein family of cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) that occurs at all phylogenetic levels8-10. X-ray mediated hydroxyl radical labeling of YiiP and mass spectrometric analysis showed that Zn(II) binding triggered a highly localized, all-or-none change of water accessibility to the transport-site and an adjacent hydrophobic gate. Millisecond time-resolved dynamics revealed a concerted and reciprocal pattern of accessibility changes along a transmembrane helix, suggesting a rigid-body helical reorientation linked to Zn(II) binding that triggers the closing of the hydrophobic gate. The gated water access to the transport-site enables a stationary proton gradient to facilitate the conversion of zinc binding energy to the kinetic power stroke of a vectorial zinc transport. The kinetic details provide energetic insights into a proton-coupled active transport reaction. PMID:25043033

  18. Anomalous temperature-isotope dependence in proton-coupled electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Presse, Steve; Silbey, Robert

    2006-04-28

    Motivated by the experiments of Hodgkiss et al. [J. Phys. Chem. (submitted)] on electron transfer (ET) through a H-bonding interface, we present a new theoretical model for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in the condensed phase, that does not involve real proton transfer. These experiments, which directly probe the joint T-isotope effects in coupled charge transfer reactions, show anomalous T dependence in k{sub H}/k{sub D}, where k{sub H} and k{sub D} are the ET rates through the H-bonding interface with H-bonded protons and deuterons, respectively. We address the anomalous T dependence of the k{sub H}/k{sub D} in our model by attributing the modulation of the electron tunneling dynamics to bath-induced fluctuations in the proton coordinate, so that the mechanism for coupled charge transfer might be better termed vibrationally assisted ET rather than PCET. We argue that such a mechanism may be relevant to understanding traditional PCET processes, i.e., those in which protons undergo a transfer from donor to acceptor during the course of ET, provided there is an appropriate time scale separating both coupled charge transfers. Likewise, it may also be useful in understanding long-range ET in proteins, where tunneling pathways between redox cofactors often pass through H-bonded amino acid residues, or other systems with sufficiently decoupled proton and electron donating functionalities.

  19. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Izatt, R.M.

    1992-07-01

    A number of new macrocyclic ligands was prepared for transport studies. The cryptands were prpepared (18-40% yield) by a new metal carbonate-catalyzed one-step method from 1 mole oligoethyleneoxy diamine and 2 moles diahlide derivative of oligoethylene glycol. Bis-crown ethers were also isolated in 17-30% yields. Cage compounds were also prepared; they interact with various metal ions and protons. Back extraction and dual module hollow fiber membrane separation experiments were used to study the cation selectivity of new ligands, including crown thioethers. An isothermal flow calorimeter is being constructed for studies of macrocycle-cation reactions. 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  20. The roles of the alpha and gamma subunits in proton conduction through the Fo sector of the proton-translocating ATPase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pati, S; Brusilow, W S

    1989-02-15

    Previous genetic and biochemical studies have shown that the Fo sector of the Escherichia coli H+-ATPase is synthesized and assembled in a nonleaky form from plasmid-borne genes. The proton channel then appears to be opened by an interaction of F1 subunits, especially the alpha subunit, with the nonleaky Fo (Brusilow, W. S. A. (1987) J. Bacteriol. 169, 4984-4990; Solomon, K. A., and Brusilow, W. S. A. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 5402-5407). To study the role of the alpha and gamma subunits in proton conduction, we constructed an inducible alpha plasmid. In an alpha-gamma- background, the induction of alpha synthesis caused lethal proton leakiness, as assayed by the loss of respiration-dependent acridine orange fluorescence quenching of E. coli membranes. The presence of a gamma subunit counteracted the lethal effects as if gamma were blocking the opened channel. PMID:2536718

  1. Proton Dynamics on Goethite Nanoparticles and Coupling to Electron Transport.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Smith, Dayle M; Rosso, Kevin M

    2015-04-14

    The surface chemistry of metal oxide particles is governed by the charge that develops at the interface with aqueous solution. Mineral transformation, biogeochemical reactions, remediation, and sorption dynamics are profoundly affected in response. Here we report implementation of replica-exchange constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations that use classical molecular dynamics for exploring configurational space and Metropolis Monte Carlo walking through protonation space with a simulated annealing escape route from metastable configurations. By examining the archetypal metal oxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), we find that electrostatic potential gradients spontaneously arise between intersecting low-index crystal faces and across explicitly treated oxide nanoparticles at a magnitude exceeding the Johnson-Nyquist voltage fluctuation. Fluctuations in adsorbed proton density continuously repolarize the surface potential bias between edge-sharing crystal faces, at a rate slower than the reported electron-polaron hopping rate in goethite interiors. This suggests that these spontaneous surface potential fluctuations will control the net movement of charge carriers in the lattice. PMID:26574382

  2. Proton Dynamics on Goethite Nanoparticles and Coupling to Electron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Smith, Dayle MA; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-04-14

    The surface chemistry of metal oxide particles is governed by the charge that develops at the interface with aqueous solution. Mineral transformation, biogeochemical reactions, remediation, and sorption dynamics are profoundly affected in response. Here we report implementation of replica-exchange constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations that use classical molecular dynamics for exploring configurational space and Metropolis Monte Carlo walking through protonation space with a simulated annealing escape route from metastable configurations. By examining the archetypal metal oxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), we find that electrostatic potential gradients spontaneously arise between intersecting low-index crystal faces and across explicitly treated oxide nanoparticles at a magnitude exceeding the Johnson–Nyquist voltage fluctuation. Fluctuations in adsorbed proton density continuously repolarize the surface potential bias between edge-sharing crystal faces, at a rate slower than the reported electron–polaron hopping rate in goethite interiors. This suggests that these spontaneous surface potential fluctuations will control the net movement of charge carriers in the lattice.

  3. Protein (tyrosine)-chromophore (protonated Schiff base) coupling in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Hanamoto, J.H.; Dupuis, P.; El-Sayed, M.A.

    1984-11-01

    The kinetics of formation of both the tyrosinate ion (from its absorption at 296 nm) and the deprotonated Schiff base (M/sub 412/) (from its absorption at 404 nm) are studied simultaneously at different pH values (7-11) and temperatures (5-25/sup 0/C). Two formation rates are observed for M/sub 412/ in agreement with previous observations. The slow one is dominant under physiological conditions and is found to be slightly faster than that for the tyrosinate formation. This is in disagreement with the proposal that the tyrosinate formation is a prerequisite to the deprotonation of the Schiff base (M/sub 412/). The ratio of the amplitudes of the fast and slow components is found to be sensitive to pH and, at any pH, it can be used to calculate an amino acid pK/sub a/ value of 9.6. This is explained by proposing the existence of two sites for the protonated Schiff base within the protein. In one site, the Schiff base is near the neutral form of an amino acid residue with a pK/sub a/ value of 9.6 (giving rise to the slow component), while in the other, it is near its conjugate base. The formation of the tyrosinate ion as well as the formation of the slow and fast components of M/sub 412/ all have activation energies that are comparable to H-bond energies. A model is suggested to account for this and the comparable deprotonation rates of tyrosine and the slow component of the protonated Schiff base. It involves the reduction of their pK/sub a/ by their exposure to a positively charged species. 43 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Probing Nonadiabaticity in the Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reaction Catalyzed by Soybean Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. PCET rate constant expressions are available for various well-defined regimes, and determining which expression is appropriate for a given system is essential for reliable modeling. Quantitative diagnostics have been devised to characterize the vibronic nonadiabaticity between the electron–proton quantum subsystem and the classical nuclei, as well as the electron–proton nonadiabaticity between the electrons and proton(s) within the quantum subsystem. Herein these diagnostics are applied to a model of the active site of the enzyme soybean lipoxygenase, which catalyzes a PCET reaction that exhibits unusually high deuterium kinetic isotope effects at room temperature. Both semiclassical and electronic charge density diagnostics illustrate vibronic and electron–proton nonadiabaticity for this PCET reaction, supporting the use of the Golden rule nonadiabatic rate constant expression with a specific form of the vibronic coupling. This type of characterization will be useful for theoretical modeling of a broad range of PCET processes. PMID:25258676

  5. Nickel phlorin intermediate formed by proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen evolution mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Brian H.; Maher, Andrew G.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Nocera, Daniel G.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The development of more effective energy conversion processes is critical for global energy sustainability. The design of molecular electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction is an important component of these efforts. Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer, play an important role in these processes and can be enhanced by incorporating proton relays into the molecular electrocatalysts. Herein nickel porphyrin electrocatalysts with and without an internal proton relay are investigated to elucidate the hydrogen evolution mechanisms and thereby enable the design of more effective catalysts. Density functional theory calculations indicate that electrochemical reduction leads to dearomatization of the porphyrin conjugated system, thereby favoring protonation at the meso carbon of the porphyrin ring to produce a phlorin intermediate. A key step in the proposed mechanisms is a thermodynamically favorable PCET reaction composed of intramolecular electron transfer from the nickel to the porphyrin and proton transfer from a carboxylic acid hanging group or an external acid to the meso carbon of the porphyrin. The C–H bond of the active phlorin acts similarly to the more traditional metal-hydride by reacting with acid to produce H2. Support for the theoretically predicted mechanism is provided by the agreement between simulated and experimental cyclic voltammograms in weak and strong acid and by the detection of a phlorin intermediate through spectroelectrochemical measurements. These results suggest that phlorin species have the potential to perform unique chemistry that could prove useful in designing more effective electrocatalysts. PMID:26655344

  6. Thermochemistry of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reagents and its Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Tronic, Tristan A.; Mayer, James M.

    2010-12-08

    Many, if not most, redox reactions are coupled to proton transfers. This includes most common sources of chemical potential energy, from the bioenergetic processes that power cells to the fossil fuel combustion that powers cars. These proton-coupled electron transfer or PCET processes may involve multiple electrons and multiple protons, as in the 4 e–, 4 H+ reduction of dioxygen (O2) to water (eq 1), or can involve one electron and one proton such as the formation of tyrosyl radicals from tyrosine residues (TyrOH) in enzymatic catalytic cycles (eq 2). In addition, many multi-electron, multi-proton processes proceed in one-electron and one-proton steps. Organic reactions that proceed in one-electron steps involve radical intermediates, which play critical roles in a wide range of chemical, biological, and industrial processes. This broad and diverse class of PCET reactions are central to a great many chemical and biochemical processes, from biological catalysis and energy transduction, to bulk industrial chemical processes, to new approaches to solar energy conversion. PCET is therefore of broad and increasing interest, as illustrated by this issue and a number of other recent reviews.

  7. Transverse Mode-Coupling Instability in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métral, E.; Arduini, G.; Benedetto, E.; Burkhardt, H.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Rumolo, G.

    2005-06-01

    A vertical single-bunch instability has been observed in 2003 right after injection at 26 GeV/c in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). High-intensity proton bunches (˜1.2 1011 p/b) with low longitudinal emittance (˜0.2 eVs) are affected by heavy losses after less than one synchrotron period. Such phenomenon has already been observed with leptons in many machines, e.g. in the SPS, or with protons at transition, e.g. in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS). However, to the authors' knowledge, it is the first time with protons far from transition. The absence of transverse mode-coupling instability in hadron machines is generally explained by three mechanisms: (i) the intensity threshold for the longitudinal microwave instability is generally lower than for the transverse mode-coupling instability, (ii) the intensity threshold due to mode-coupling between the two lowest azimuthal modes increases with space charge, and (iii) the intensity threshold increases with bunch length (in the long-bunch regime). In this talk measurements performed in the SPS are compared to analytical and simulation predictions.

  8. Photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer: model study of isotope effects on reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Charulatha; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-10-21

    A model Hamiltonian for photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer reactions is presented, and the equations of motion for the reduced density matrix elements in an electron-proton vibronic basis are derived. This formalism enables a detailed analysis of the proton vibrational dynamics, as well as the dynamics of the electronic state populations, following photoexcitation. The application of this theory to model systems provides insight into the fundamental physical principles underlying these types of processes. The initial nonequilibrium state is prepared by vertical photoexcitation from the ground electronic state to a coherent vibrational mixture in the donor electronic state. This nonstationary state relaxes to the equilibrium distributions in the donor and acceptor electronic states via dynamical processes arising from nonadiabatic transitions between the donor and acceptor vibronic states concurrent with energy dissipation to the bath. During the initial stage, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state is distributed among higher vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket is oscillating with large amplitude, the electronic state population dynamics exhibits virtually no hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect. After vibrational relaxation, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state becomes concentrated in the lower vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket becomes more localized near the minimum of the donor potential, a significant hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect on the electronic state population dynamics is exhibited. These model system calculations lead to experimentally testable predictions about the qualitative behavior of these isotope effects. PMID:20568867

  9. Obligatory coupling between proton entry and the synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate in Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, P C

    1977-01-01

    Proton influx was measured after imposition of an electrochemical potential difference for protons (delta muH+) across the cell membrane of the anaerobe, Streptococcus lactis. As delta muH+ was increased, there was an approximately parallel increase in proton entry, until delta muH+ attained 175 to 200 mV. At this point, a new pathway became available for proton entry, allowing an abrupt increase in both the rate and extent of H+ influx. This gated response depended upon the value of delta muH+ itself, and not upon the value of either the membrane potential or the pH gradient. For delta muH+ above 175 to 200 mV, elevated proton entry occurred only in cells having a functional membrane-bound Ca2+-stimulated, Mg2+stimulated adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.3). When present, elevated proton entry coincided with the appearance of net synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate catalyzed by this adenosine 5'-triphosphatase. These observations demonstrate that membrane-bound adenosine 5'-triphosphatase catalyzes an obligatory coupling between the inward movement of protons and synthesis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. PMID:21165

  10. Thermal Coupling of Protons and Neutral Hydrogen in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L.; Habbal, S. R.

    1997-05-01

    Motivated by the recent Spartan and UVCS observations [Kohl et al. 1996] of hot protons with temperatures exceeding 4 x 10(6) K below 3.5 R_s in coronal holes, as inferred from the measured broadening of the Lyman alpha spectral line profile, we studied the thermal coupling of neutral hydrogen to protons in the presence of Alfven waves in the solar wind. The approach used is adopted from Olsen et al. [1994] in which the neutral hydrogen atoms are treated as test particles in a background electron-proton solar wind. The model computations show that an anisotropy in the neutral hydrogen temperature in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field develops in the inner corona well below 5 R_s for background solar wind solutions consistent with observational constraints of the high speed wind. In particular, we find that the neutral hydrogen temperature parallel to the magnetic field direction remains strongly coupled to the proton temperature, T_p, while the perpendicular neutral hydrogen temperature exceeds this by ~ 10(6) K for a wide range of proton flow speeds, densities and temperatures for a spectrum of Alfven waves. The neutral hydrogen effective temperature, T_{H(eff)}(perpendicular to ) , incorporating both random thermal motion and wave motion of the particles, is found to be independent of frequency and significantly less than the proton effective temperature, T_{p(eff)}, in the inner corona. Thus, without additional information about the waves, which would allow T_H(perpendicular to ) and T_p to be extracted from the models, T_{H(eff)}(perpendicular to ) provides an upper limit on T_p and a lower limit on T_{p(eff)}. However, with increasing proton temperature, the anisotropy in the inner corona decreases, with a temperature difference of < 8 x 10(5) K between the protons and neutrals below 3 R_s when the latter reach 6 x 10(6) K.

  11. Mass prediction of proton-rich nuclides with the Coulomb displacement energies in the relativistic point-coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, BaoHua; Zhao, PengWei; Meng, Jie

    2011-02-01

    The masses, one- and two-proton separation energies of proton-rich nuclei with Z = 20-55, are computed using the measured masses of mirror neutron-rich nuclei and the Coulomb displacement energies calculated from the relativistic point-coupling model. The implications for the proton drip lines, candidates for two-proton emitters, as well as the impact on the astrophysical rp-process are discussed.

  12. Thermochemistry of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reagents and its Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey J; Tronic, Tristan A; Mayer, James M

    2010-01-01

    The primary goals of this review are (1) to assemble thermochemical data—reduction potentials, pK{sub a} values, and bond dissociation free energies and enthalpies—from disparate sources and (2) to illustrate the utility of these data in understanding proton-coupled redox chemistry. We hope to have illustrated the value and power of thermochemical cycles (“square schemes”).

  13. Ultrafast proton-coupled electron transfer in heterogenous photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jin; Onda, Ken; Li, Bin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2006-08-01

    At metal-oxide/protic-solvent interfaces, partially hydrated or "wet electron" states represent the lowest energy pathway for electron transfer. Here we study the photoinduced charge transfer at the H IIO/TiO II(110) interface by means of timeresolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy and electronic structure theory. At ~1 monolayer coverage of H IIO on partially hydroxylated TiO II surfaces we find an unoccupied electronic state 2.4+/-0.1 eV above the Fermi level. Density functional theory shows this to be a two-dimensional "wet electron" state, which is distinct from hydrated electrons observed on water-covered metal surfaces. The decay of electrons from the wet electron state by the resonant charge transfer to the conduction band of TiO II occurs in <=15 femtoseconds. Similar unoccupied electronic structure is observed for CH 3OH covered TiO II(110) surfaces; however, the electron dynamics are considerably more complex. The wet electron state dynamics of CH 3OH/TiO II exhibit both energy and population decay. The excited state lifetime is strongly coverage dependent increasing to >100 fs range above 1 ML CH 3OH coverage. Significantly, a pronounced deuterium isotope effect (CH 3OD) indicates a strong correlation between the interfacial electron transfer and the motion of protons in the molecular overlayer.

  14. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min.

  15. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min. PMID:25158224

  16. United Atom Rotational Coupling in Proton + Helium Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chiiling

    United-atom 2p(sigma)-2p(pi) rotational coupling in asymmetric collisions is influenced by an avoided crossing between the 2p(sigma) and 2s(sigma) orbitals. This influence is studied using the HeH('+) system as a prototype. In (SIGMA)(,2)-(SIGMA)(,3)-(pi)(,1) three-state calculations, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved numerically. Substantial population of the 2s(sigma) state is found, which disagrees with the estimates based on the Landau-Zener model. The (SIGMA)(,3) level is populated directly by transitions near the avoided crossing at b = 0.4 au and indirectly by (SIGMA)(,2)-(pi)(,1)-(SIGMA)(,3) rotational coupling for b > 0.4 au. The ratios of P(,(SIGMA)(,3))(b)/ P(,(SIGMA)(,3))(b) + P(,(pi)(,1))(b) are calculated and compared with Dr. R. Hippler's experimental data. A six-state calculation, in the basis of (SIGMA)(,1), (SIGMA)(,2), (SIGMA)(,3), (SIGMA)(,4), (pi)(,1) and (pi)(,2) molecular states, is also made. Cross sections and alignment and orientation parameters have been computed from the transition amplitudes for various energies.

  17. Image analysis of single event transient effects on charge coupled devices irradiated by protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Xue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jing; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Ma, Wuying

    2016-10-01

    The experiments of single event transient (SET) effects on charge coupled devices (CCDs) irradiated by protons are presented. The radiation experiments have been carried out at the accelerator protons with the energy of 200 MeV and 60 MeV.The incident angles of the protons are at 30°and 90° to the plane of the CCDs to obtain the images induced by the perpendicularity and incline incident angles. The experimental results show that the typical characteristics of the SET effects on a CCD induced by protons are the generation of a large number of dark signal spikes (hot pixels) which are randomly distributed in the "pepper" images. The characteristics of SET effects are investigated by observing the same imaging area at different time during proton radiation to verify the transient effects. The experiment results also show that the number of dark signal spikes increases with increasing integration time during proton radiation. The CCDs were tested at on-line and off-line to distinguish the radiation damage induced by the SET effects or DD effects. The mechanisms of the dark signal spike generation induced by the SET effects and the DD effects are demonstrated respectively.

  18. Reciprocal translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 26, describes reciprocal translocations of chromosomes: their occurrence, breakpoints, and multiple rearrangements. In addition, phenotypes of balanced and unbalanced translocation carriers and fetal death are discussed. Examples of translocation families are given. Meiosis and genetic risk in translocation carriers is presented. Finally, sperm chromosomes in meiotic segregation analysis is mentioned. 39 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Insights into proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms of electrocatalytic H2 oxidation and production

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura E.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The design of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and production is important for the development of alternative renewable energy sources that are abundant, inexpensive, and environmentally benign. Recently, nickel-based molecular electrocatalysts with pendant amines that act as proton relays for the nickel center were shown to effectively catalyze H2 oxidation and production. We developed a quantum mechanical approach for studying proton-coupled electron transfer processes in these types of molecular electrocatalysts. This theoretical approach is applied to a nickel-based catalyst in which phosphorous atoms are directly bonded to the nickel center, and nitrogen atoms of the ligand rings act as proton relays. The catalytic step of interest involves electron transfer between the nickel complex and the electrode as well as intramolecular proton transfer between the nickel and nitrogen atoms. This process can occur sequentially, with either the electron or proton transferring first, or concertedly, with the electron and proton transferring simultaneously without a stable intermediate. The electrochemical rate constants are calculated as functions of overpotential for the concerted electron-proton transfer reaction and the two electron transfer reactions in the sequential mechanisms. Our calculations illustrate that the concerted electron-proton transfer standard rate constant will increase as the equilibrium distance between the nickel and nitrogen atoms decreases and as the pendant amines become more flexible to facilitate the contraction of this distance with a lower energy penalty. This approach identifies the favored mechanisms under various experimental conditions and provides insight into the impact of substituents on the nitrogen and phosphorous atoms. PMID:22529352

  20. Insights into proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms of electrocatalytic H2 oxidation and production

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.; Fernandez, L. E.; Soudackov, A. V.; Hammes-Schiffer, S.

    2012-04-23

    The design of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and production is important for the development of alternative renewable energy sources that are abundant, inexpensive, and environmentally benign. Recently nickel-based molecular electrocatalysts with pendant amines that act as proton relays for the nickel center were shown to effectively catalyze H2 oxidation and production. We developed a quantum mechanical approach for studying proton-coupled electron transfer processes in these types of molecular electrocatalysts. This theoretical approach is applied to a nickel-based catalyst in which phosphorous atoms are directly bonded to the nickel center and nitrogen atoms of the ligand rings act as proton relays. The cataly c step of interest involves electron transfer between the nickel complex and the electrode as well as intramolecular proton transfer between the nickel and nitrogen atoms. This process can occur sequentially, with either the electron or proton transferring first, or concertedly, with the electron and proton transferring simultaneously without a stable intermediate. The heterogeneous rate constants are calculated as functions of overpotential for the concerted electron-proton transfer reaction and the two electron transfer reactions in the sequential mechanisms. Our calculations illustrate that the concerted electron-proton transfer standard rate constant will increase as the equilibrium distance between the nickel and nitrogen atoms decreases and as the nitrogen atoms become more mobile to facilitate the contraction of this distance. This approach assists in the identification of the favored mechanisms under various experimental conditions and provides insight into the qualitative impact of substituents on the nitrogen and phosphorous atoms. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy

  1. Thermal coupling between neutral hydrogen and protons in the fast solar wind: Models and inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Lorraine Ann

    2001-10-01

    In response to the recent Spartan and UVCS/SOHO observations of Ly α spectral line profiles in the inner corona implying large temperature anisotropies and proton temperatures as high as 6 × 106 K [ Kohl et al., 1996, 1997]1, we investigate the thermal coupling between neutral hydrogen atoms and protons in the fast solar wind. We include charge exchange between neutrals and protons, radiative recombination, collisional ionization of the neutrals, and the effects of Alfvén waves, described by a single frequency or a spectrum. We follow the approach developed by Olsen et al. [1994]2 to incorporate the collisional interaction between the neutrals and protons and the resulting wave motion of the neutrals. A fluid approach is used in which the neutrals are treated as test particles in a background electron- proton solar wind driven out from the Sun by thermal and Alfvén wave pressure against gravity. Coulomb collisions and thermal conductivity of the electrons and protons are included, as well as the allowance for non- radially expanding flow tubes and additional heating to the electrons and protons. We study the behavior of the neutral hydrogen in the solar wind for cases with isotropic and anisotropic proton temperatures. Our model solutions show, and we confirm by analytical calculation, that the effective temperature, T⊥H(eff) , incorporating both random and wave motions of the neutral hydrogen, is independent of Alfvén wave frequency. We find that for solutions with either isotropic or anisotropic proton temperatures the proton and neutral hydrogen effective temperatures and outflow velocities are comparable, with a temperature difference less than 5 × 105 K, below 3 Rs. For plasma conditions typical of the fast solar wind, these results imply that the measured Ly α spectral line profiles, from which the neutral hydrogen temperature, anisotropy ratio, and outflow velocity are inferred, are equivalent to measurements of protons below 3 R s. To relate our

  2. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pH regulation has a fundamental role in several intracellular processes and its variation via exogenous compounds is a potential tool for intervening in the intracellular processes. Proton caged compounds (PPCs) release protons upon UV irradiation and may efficiently provoke intracellular on-command acidification. Here, we explore the intracellular pH variation, when purposely synthesized PCCs are coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dosed to HEK-293 cells. We detected the acidification process caused by the UV irradiation by monitoring the intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode of the CO(2) molecule at 2343 cm(-1). The comparison between free and AuNPs functionalized proton caged compound demonstrates a highly enhanced CO(2) yield, hence pH variation, in the latter case. Finally, PCC functionalized AuNPs were marked with a purposely synthesized fluorescent marker and dosed to HEK-293 cells. The corresponding fluorescence optical images show green grains throughout the whole cytoplasm.

  3. Progress toward a search for spin-mass couplings of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, Julian; Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Rios, Cesar; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Kimball, Derek Jackson

    2012-06-01

    We report progress in our experiment to use a dual-isotope rubidium magnetometer to search for a long-range coupling between proton spins and the mass of the Earth. The valence electron dominates magnetic interactions and serves as a precise co-magnetometer for the nuclei in a simultaneous measurement of Rb-85 and Rb-87 spin precession frequencies, enabling accurate subtraction of magnetic perturbations. Both Rb nuclei have valence protons, but in Rb-87 the proton spin is parallel to the nuclear spin and magnetic moment while for Rb-85 the proton spin is anti-parallel to the nuclear spin and magnetic moment. Thus anomalous interactions of the proton spin produce a differential shift between the Rb spin-precession frequencies, whereas many sources of systematic error produce common-mode shifts of the spin-precession frequencies which can be controlled through auxiliary measurements. We discuss optimization of the magnetometer sensitivity, methods to control systematic effects due to light shifts, collisions, and the gyro-compass effect, and preliminary data.

  4. Progress toward a search for spin-mass couplings of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Valdez, Julian; Lacey, Ian; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Kimball, Derek Jackson

    2011-11-01

    We report progress in our development of a dual-isotope rubidium magnetometer to be used to search for a long-range coupling between proton spins and the mass of the Earth. The valence electron dominates magnetic interactions and serves as a precise co-magnetometer for the nuclei in a simultaneous measurement of Rb-85 and Rb-87 spin precession frequencies, enabling accurate subtraction of magnetic perturbations. Both Rb nuclei have valence protons, but in Rb-87 the proton spin is parallel to the nuclear spin and magnetic moment while for Rb-85 the proton spin is anti-parallel to the nuclear spin and magnetic moment. Thus anomalous interactions of the proton spin produce a differential shift between the Rb spin-precession frequencies, whereas many sources of systematic error produce common-mode shifts of the spin-precession frequencies which can be controlled through auxiliary measurements. We discuss our optimization of the magnetometer sensitivity and methods to control systematic effects due to light shifts, collisions, and the gyro-compass effect.

  5. EPR Studies of V-ATPase with Spin-Labeled Inhibitors DCC and Archazolid: Interaction Dynamics with Proton Translocating Subunit c.

    PubMed

    Gölz, Jan Philipp; Bockelmann, Svenja; Mayer, Kerstin; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Wieczorek, Helmut; Huss, Markus; Klare, Johann P; Menche, Dirk

    2016-02-17

    Vacuolar-type H(+) -ATPases (V-ATPases) have gained recent attention as highly promising anticancer drug targets, and therefore detailed structural analyses and studies of inhibitor interactions are very important research objectives. Spin labeling of the V-ATPase holoenzyme from the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta and V-ATPase in isolated yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) vacuoles was accomplished by two novel methods involving the covalent binding of a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) derivative of N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) to the essential glutamate residue in the active site and the noncovalent interaction of a radical analogue of the highly potent inhibitor archazolid, a natural product from myxobacteria. Both complexes were evaluated in detail by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements, revealing insight into the inhibitor binding mode, dynamics, and stoichiometry as well as into the structure of the central functional subunit c of these medicinally important hetero-multimeric proton-translocating proteins. This study also demonstrates the usefulness of natural product derived spin labels as tools in medicinal chemistry. PMID:26662886

  6. EPR Studies of V-ATPase with Spin-Labeled Inhibitors DCC and Archazolid: Interaction Dynamics with Proton Translocating Subunit c.

    PubMed

    Gölz, Jan Philipp; Bockelmann, Svenja; Mayer, Kerstin; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Wieczorek, Helmut; Huss, Markus; Klare, Johann P; Menche, Dirk

    2016-02-17

    Vacuolar-type H(+) -ATPases (V-ATPases) have gained recent attention as highly promising anticancer drug targets, and therefore detailed structural analyses and studies of inhibitor interactions are very important research objectives. Spin labeling of the V-ATPase holoenzyme from the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta and V-ATPase in isolated yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) vacuoles was accomplished by two novel methods involving the covalent binding of a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) derivative of N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) to the essential glutamate residue in the active site and the noncovalent interaction of a radical analogue of the highly potent inhibitor archazolid, a natural product from myxobacteria. Both complexes were evaluated in detail by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements, revealing insight into the inhibitor binding mode, dynamics, and stoichiometry as well as into the structure of the central functional subunit c of these medicinally important hetero-multimeric proton-translocating proteins. This study also demonstrates the usefulness of natural product derived spin labels as tools in medicinal chemistry.

  7. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  8. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  9. Fourier transform numerical analysis of the long-range proton hyperfine coupling in nitroxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Trousson, P.; Lion, Y.

    1985-05-09

    A study of long-range proton coupling in nitroxide radicals has been performed with a numerical analysis program using the Fourier transform technique. The present method provides a means for further identification of radicals which is particularly useful for species that are otherwise indistinguishable. The superhyperfine structure of piperidine and pyrrolidine-1-oxyl derivatives, showing ..gamma..-nuclei coupling constants as small as 0.2 G, has been brought out. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by other resolution-enhancement methods. 17 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme–substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes. PMID:26929369

  11. Proton coupled electron transfer from the excited state of a ruthenium(II) pyridylimidazole complex.

    PubMed

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-04-28

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the excited state of [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; pyimH = 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole) to N-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (monoquat, MQ(+)) was studied. While this complex has been investigated previously, our study is the first to show that the formal bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the imidazole-N-H bond decreases from (91 ± 1) kcal mol(-1) in the electronic ground state to (43 ± 5) kcal mol(-1) in the lowest-energetic (3)MLCT excited state. This makes the [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) complex a very strong (formal) hydrogen atom donor even when compared to metal hydride complexes, and this is interesting for light-driven (formal) hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with a variety of different substrates. Mechanistically, formal HAT between (3)MLCT excited [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) and monoquat in buffered 1 : 1 (v : v) CH3CN/H2O was found to occur via a sequence of reaction steps involving electron transfer from Ru(ii) to MQ(+) coupled to release of the N-H proton to buffer base, followed by protonation of reduced MQ(+) by buffer acid. Our study is relevant in the larger contexts of photoredox catalysis and light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27094541

  12. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E P; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-03-15

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme-substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes.

  13. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Biology: Results from Synergistic Studies in Natural and Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Steven Y.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) underpins energy conversion in biology. PCET may occur with the unidirectional or bidirectional transfer of a proton and electron and may proceed synchronously or asynchronously. To illustrate the role of PCET in biology, this review presents complementary biological and model systems that explore PCET in electron transfer (ET) through hydrogen bonds [azurin as compared to donor-acceptor (D–A) hydrogen-bonded networks], the activation of C–H bonds [alcohol dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase (SLO) as compared to Fe(III) metal complexes], and the generation and transport of amino acid radicals [photosystem II (PSII) and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR)as compared to tyrosine-modified photoactive Re(I) and Ru(II) complexes]. In providing these comparisons, the fundamental principles of PCET in biology are illustrated in a tangible way. PMID:19344235

  14. Absence of Rapid Proton Decay and Origin of Low-Energy Particlesand Yukawa Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Watari, Taizan

    2006-01-01

    In string theory, massless particles often originate from a symmetry breaking of a large gauge symmetry G to its subgroup H. The absence of dimension-4 proton decay in supersymmetric theories suggests that ({bar D},L) are different from {bar H}({bar 5}) in their origins. In this article, we consider a possibility that they come from different irreducible components in g/h. Requiring that all the Yukawa coupling constants of quarks and leptons be generated from the super Yang-Mills interactions of G, we found in the context of Georgi-Glashow H = SU(5) unification that the minimal choice of G is E{sub 7} and E{sub 8} is the only alternative. This idea is systematically implemented in Heterotic String, M theory and F theory, confirming the absence of dimension 4 proton decay operators. Not only H = SU(5) but also G constrain operators of effective field theories, providing non-trivial information.

  15. Excited-state proton coupled charge transfer modulated by molecular structure and media polarization.

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Alexander P; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2013-02-01

    Charge and proton transfer reactions in the excited states of organic dyes can be coupled in many different ways. Despite the complementarity of charges, they can occur on different time scales and in different directions of the molecular framework. In certain cases, excited-state equilibrium can be established between the charge-transfer and proton-transfer species. The interplay of these reactions can be modulated and even reversed by variations in dye molecular structures and changes of the surrounding media. With knowledge of the mechanisms of these processes, desired rates and directions can be achieved, and thus the multiple emission spectral features can be harnessed. These features have found versatile applications in a number of cutting-edge technological areas, particularly in fluorescence sensing and imaging.

  16. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Organic Synthesis: Fundamentals, Applications, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Miller, David C; Tarantino, Kyle T; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) are unconventional redox processes in which both protons and electrons are exchanged, often in a concerted elementary step. While PCET is now recognized to play a central a role in biological redox catalysis and inorganic energy conversion technologies, its applications in organic synthesis are only beginning to be explored. In this chapter, we aim to highlight the origins, development, and evolution of the PCET processes most relevant to applications in organic synthesis. Particular emphasis is given to the ability of PCET to serve as a non-classical mechanism for homolytic bond activation that is complimentary to more traditional hydrogen atom transfer processes, enabling the direct generation of valuable organic radical intermediates directly from their native functional group precursors under comparatively mild catalytic conditions. The synthetically advantageous features of PCET reactivity are described in detail, along with examples from the literature describing the PCET activation of common organic functional groups. PMID:27573270

  17. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Organic Synthesis: Fundamentals, Applications, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Miller, David C; Tarantino, Kyle T; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) are unconventional redox processes in which both protons and electrons are exchanged, often in a concerted elementary step. While PCET is now recognized to play a central a role in biological redox catalysis and inorganic energy conversion technologies, its applications in organic synthesis are only beginning to be explored. In this chapter, we aim to highlight the origins, development, and evolution of the PCET processes most relevant to applications in organic synthesis. Particular emphasis is given to the ability of PCET to serve as a non-classical mechanism for homolytic bond activation that is complimentary to more traditional hydrogen atom transfer processes, enabling the direct generation of valuable organic radical intermediates directly from their native functional group precursors under comparatively mild catalytic conditions. The synthetically advantageous features of PCET reactivity are described in detail, along with examples from the literature describing the PCET activation of common organic functional groups.

  18. Calculated coupling of electron and proton transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, C R; Michel, H; Honig, B; Gunner, M R

    1996-01-01

    Based on new Rhodopseudomonas (Rp.) viridis reaction center (RC) coordinates with a reliable structure of the secondary acceptor quinone (QB) site, a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique have been used to identify clusters of electrostatically interacting ionizable residues. Twenty-three residues within a distance of 25 A from QB (QB cluster) have been shown to be strongly electrostatically coupled to QB, either directly or indirectly. An analogous cluster of 24 residues is found to interact with QA (QA cluster). Both clusters extend to the cytoplasmic surface in at least two directions. However, the QB cluster differs from the QA cluster in that it has a surplus of acidic residues, more strong electrostatic interactions, is less solvated, and experiences a strong positive electrostatic field arising from the polypeptide backbone. Consequently, upon reduction of QA or QB, it is the QB cluster, and not the QA cluster, which is responsible for substoichiometric proton uptake at neutral pH. The bulk of the changes in the QB cluster are calculated to be due to the protonation of a tightly coupled cluster of the three Glu residues (L212, H177, and M234) within the QB cluster. If the lifetime of the doubly reduced state QB2- is long enough, Asp M43 and Ser L223 are predicted to also become protonated. The calculated complex titration behavior of the strongly interacting residues of the QB cluster and the resulting electrostatic response to electron transfer may be a common feature in proton-transferring membrane protein complexes. Images FIGURE 2 p2482-a FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8744288

  19. Electrogenic, proton-coupled, intestinal dipeptide transport in herbivorous and carnivorous teleosts.

    PubMed

    Thamotharan, M; Gomme, J; Zonno, V; Maffia, M; Storelli, C; Ahearn, G A

    1996-05-01

    In both herbivorous tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and carnivorous rockfish (Sebastes caurinus) intestinal and pyloric cecal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV), [14C]glycylsarcosine ([14C]Gly-Sar) uptake was stimulated by a transmembrane proton gradient. A transmembrane K(+)-diffusion potential (inside negative) stimulated [14C]Gly-Sar uptake above that observed with short-circuited vesicles, whereas an inwardly directed Na+ gradient in both fishes had no effect on peptide uptake. In tilapia, [14C]Gly-Sar influx occurred by the combination of 1) a high-affinity, saturable, proton gradient-dependent carrier system [Kt [concentration that equals one-half of maximum influx (Jmax)] = 0.56 +/- 0.08 mM; Jmax = 1,945.0 +/- 174.6 pmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1]; 2) a low-affinity, nonsaturable (within 1-10 mM), proton gradient-dependent carrier system (nonsaturable carrier-mediated transport component = 4,514.0 +/- 28.1 pmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1.mM-1); and 3) a diffusional component accounting for < 10% of total influx within the concentration range tested. Influx (10 s) of 1-10 mM [14C]Gly-Sar in tilapia intestine was significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited by 10 mM diethylpyrocarbonate, a specific inhibitor of proton-coupled peptide transport systems. [14C]Gly-Sar influx into tilapia BBMV showed cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation by Gly-Pro, suggesting that [14C]Gly-Sar and Gly-Pro shared the same mucosal peptide transporter in fish. These observations strongly suggest that intestinal transport of peptides in herbivorous and carnivorous fishes is proton gradient dependent, electrogenic, sodium independent, and qualitatively resembles the peptide transport paradigm proposed for mammals. PMID:8928924

  20. Minimal nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) model: Gauge coupling unification, proton decay, and fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; Khan, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present a minimal renormalizable nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) grand unified model with a symmetry breaking sector consisting of Higgs fields in the 5 4H+12 6H+1 0H representations. This model admits a single intermediate scale associated with Pati-Salam symmetry along with a discrete parity. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the unification of gauge couplings, and proton lifetime estimates are studied in detail in this framework. Including threshold corrections self-consistently obtained from a full analysis of the Higgs potential, we show that the model is compatible with the current experimental bound on proton lifetime. The model generally predicts an upper bound of few times 1035 yr for proton lifetime, which is not too far from the present Super-Kamiokande limit of τp≳1.29 ×1034 yr . With the help of a Pecci-Quinn symmetry and the resulting axion, the model provides a suitable dark matter candidate while also solving the strong C P problem. The intermediate scale, MI≈(1013- 1014) GeV which is also the B -L scale, is of the right order for the right-handed neutrino mass which enables a successful description of light neutrino masses and oscillations. The Yukawa sector of the model consists of only two matrices in family space and leads to a predictive scenario for quark and lepton masses and mixings. The branching ratios for proton decay are calculable with the leading modes being p →e+π0 and p →ν ¯π+. Even though the model predicts no new physics within the reach of the LHC, the next-generation proton decay detectors and axion search experiments have the capability to reach a verdict on this minimal scenario.

  1. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Molecular Electrocatalysis: Theoretical Methods and Design Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, Brian H.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-07-07

    Molecular electrocatalysts play an essential role in a wide range of energy conversion processes. The objective of electrocatalyst design is to maximize the turnover frequency and minimize the overpotential for the overall catalytic cycle. Typically the catalytic cycle is dominated by key proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes comprised of sequential or concerted electron transfer and proton transfer steps. A variety of theoretical methods have been developed to investigate the mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics of PCET processes in electrocatalytic cycles. Electronic structure methods can be used to calculate the reduction potentials and pKa’s and to generate thermodynamic schemes, free energy reaction pathways, and Pourbaix diagrams, which indicate the most stable species at each pH and potential. These types of calculations have assisted in identifying the thermodynamically favorable mechanisms under specified experimental conditions, such as acid strength and overpotential. Such calculations have also revealed linear correlations among the thermodynamic properties, which can be used to predict the impact of modifying the ligand, substituents, or metal center. The role of non-innocent ligands, namely ligand protonation or reduction, has also been examined theoretically. In addition, the rate constants for electron and proton transfer reactions, as well as concerted PCET reactions, have been calculated to investigate the kinetics of molecular electrocatalysts. The concerted PCET mechanism is thought to lower the overpotential required for catalysis by avoiding high-energy intermediates. Rate constant calculations have revealed that the concerted mechanism involving intramolecular proton transfer will be favored by designing more flexible ligands that facilitate the proton donor-acceptor motion while also maintaining a sufficiently short equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance. Overall, theoretical methods have assisted in the interpretation

  2. Redox-controlled proton gating in bovine cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain of essentially all organisms that utilize oxygen to generate energy. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the energy to pump protons across the mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes and the plasma membrane in prokaryotes. The mechanism by which proton pumping is coupled to the oxygen reduction reaction remains unresolved, owing to the difficulty of visualizing proton movement within the massive membrane-associated protein matrix. Here, with a novel hydrogen/deuterium exchange resonance Raman spectroscopy method, we have identified two critical elements of the proton pump: a proton loading site near the propionate groups of heme a, which is capable of transiently storing protons uploaded from the negative-side of the membrane prior to their release into the positive-side of the membrane and a conformational gate that controls proton translocation in response to the change in the redox state of heme a. These findings form the basis for a postulated molecular model describing a detailed mechanism by which unidirectional proton translocation is coupled to electron transfer from heme a to heme a3, associated with oxygen chemistry occurring in the heme a3 site, during enzymatic turnover. Each time heme a undergoes an oxidation-reduction transition a proton is translocated across the membrane accounting for the observation that two protons are translocated during the oxidative phase of the enzymatic cycle and two more are translocated during the reductive phase. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Tsuyoshi Egawa and Syun-Ru Yeh. This work was supported the National Institutes of Health Grant GM098799 to D.L.R and National Science Foundation Grant NSF 0956358 to S.-R.Y.

  3. Proton-lattice coupling and vibronic effects in KDP-family thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, A. A.; Dolin, S. P.; Mikhailova, T. Yu; Solin, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Based on the vibronic theory of heteroligand complexes a new model Hamiltonian is proposed for the ferroelectrics of KDP (KH2PO4) family. In local representation three items of this Hamiltonian describe the H-bond protons, the potential energy of lattice's oscillators and the coupling of these two subsystems respectively. In Ising form, convenient for numerical calculations, the Hamiltonian offered includes explicitly the characteristics of the electronic structure as well as the orbital vibronic constants of the AO4 tetrahedra. The Ising version of theory is then applied to numerical studying of some questions for KDP thermodynamics.

  4. Proton-coupled electron transfer and multielectron oxidations in complexes of ruthenium and osmium

    SciTech Connect

    Dovletoglou, A.

    1992-01-01

    This doctoral research concerns the mechanism of proton-coupled electron transfer over an extended pH range. These processes between ruthenium and osmium complexes and hydroquinones have been studied using spectrophotometric methods and cyclic voltammetry. Elucidation of the mechanistic details has been attempted by using isotopic labelling, kinetic analysis, and numerical simulation of complex kinetic schemes. The coordination and redox chemistry of polypyridyl-acetylacetonato and -oxalato complexes of ruthenium and the role of ancillary ligands in defining the properties of Ru[sup IV]O complexes were explored. These studies represent the first attempt to probe possible 2e[sup [minus

  5. Photoregenerative I⁻/I₃⁻ couple as a liquid cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yadong; Ai, Xinping; Tu, Wenmao; Pan, Mu

    2014-10-28

    A photoassisted oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) through I(-)/I3(-) redox couple was investigated for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cathode reaction. The I(-)/I3(-)-based liquid cathode was used to replace conventional oxygen cathode, and its discharge product I(-) was regenerated to I3(-) by photocatalytic oxidation with the participation of oxygen. This new and innovative approach may provide a strategy to eliminate the usage of challenging ORR electrocatalysts, resulting in an avenue for developing low-cost and high-efficiency PEM fuel cells.

  6. Reproductive outcomes following preimplantation genetic diagnosis using fluorescence in situ hybridization for 52 translocation carrier couples with a history of recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Kato, Keiichi; Aoyama, Naoki; Kawasaki, Nami; Hayashi, Hiroko; Xiaohui, Tang; Abe, Takashi; Kuroda, Tomoko

    2016-08-01

    Forty-six reciprocal and six Robertsonian translocation carrier couples who experienced recurrent pregnancy loss underwent fluorescence in situ hybridization-based preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for the presence of the two translocated chromosomes. Out of 52 couples, 17 (33%) were undergoing infertility treatment. In total, 239 PGD cycles as oocyte retrieval (OR) were applied. The transferrable rate of negatively diagnosed embryos at the cleavage stage was 26.3%; 71 embryos were transferred as single blastocysts. The clinical pregnancy rate per transfer was 60.6%. We obtained 41 healthy live births with 3 incidences of miscarriage (7.0%). The average cumulative live birth rate was 76.9% during 4.6 OR cycles using a mild ovarian stimulation strategy. The outcomes were classified into four groups based on carrier gender and maternal age (young (<38 years) or advanced). PGD was performed for 52 couples of which the average number of OR cycles was 4.1, 2.1, 6.7 and 4.5 in young female and male carriers and female and male carriers of advanced age; the live birth rate for a primiparity was 77.8, 72.7, 66.7 and 50.0% in those groups. These results suggest that the final live birth rate might be influenced by maternal age regardless of the gender of the carrier.

  7. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pH regulation has a fundamental role in several intracellular processes and its variation via exogenous compounds is a potential tool for intervening in the intracellular processes. Proton caged compounds (PPCs) release protons upon UV irradiation and may efficiently provoke intracellular on-command acidification. Here, we explore the intracellular pH variation, when purposely synthesized PCCs are coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dosed to HEK-293 cells. We detected the acidification process caused by the UV irradiation by monitoring the intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode of the CO(2) molecule at 2343 cm(-1). The comparison between free and AuNPs functionalized proton caged compound demonstrates a highly enhanced CO(2) yield, hence pH variation, in the latter case. Finally, PCC functionalized AuNPs were marked with a purposely synthesized fluorescent marker and dosed to HEK-293 cells. The corresponding fluorescence optical images show green grains throughout the whole cytoplasm. PMID:26235337

  8. Peroxyl Radical Reactions in Water Solution: A Gym for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Theories.

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Baschieri, Andrea; Morroni, Gloria; Gambino, Rossana; Valgimigli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The reactions of alkylperoxyl radicals with phenols have remained difficult to investigate in water. We describe herein a simple and reliable method based on the inhibited autoxidation of water/THF mixtures, which we calibrated against pulse radiolysis. With this method we measured the rate constants kinh for the reactions of 2-tetrahydrofuranylperoxyl radicals with reference compounds: urate, ascorbate, ferrocenes, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-chromanol, Trolox, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-acetic acid, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, catechol and 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. The role of pH was investigated: the value of kinh for Trolox and 4-methoxyphenol increased 11- and 50-fold from pH 2.1 to 12, respectively, which indicate the occurrence of a SPLET-like mechanism. H(D) kinetic isotope effects combined with pH and solvent effects suggest that different types of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanisms are involved in water: less electron-rich phenols react at low pH by concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT) to the peroxyl radical, whereas more electron-rich phenols and phenoxide anions react by multi-site EPT in which water acts as proton relay.

  9. Theoretical Studies of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Models and Concepts Relevant to Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Ishikita, Hiroshi; Skone, Jonathan H.; Soudackov, Alexander V.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical studies of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions for model systems provide insight into fundamental concepts relevant to bioenergetics. A dynamical theoretical formulation for vibronically nonadiabatic PCET reactions has been developed. This theory enables the calculation of rates and kinetic isotope effects, as well as the pH and temperature dependences, of PCET reactions. Methods for calculating the vibronic couplings for PCET systems have also been developed and implemented. These theoretical approaches have been applied to a wide range of PCET reactions, including tyrosyl radical generation in a tyrosine-bound rhenium polypyridyl complex, phenoxyl/phenol and benzyl/toluene self-exchange reactions, and hydrogen abstraction catalyzed by the enzyme lipoxygenase. These applications have elucidated some of the key underlying physical principles of PCET reactions. The tools and concepts derived from these theoretical studies provide the foundation for future theoretical studies of PCET in more complex bioenergetic systems such as Photosystem II. PMID:21057592

  10. Theory of proton-coupled electron transfer in energy conversion processes.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-12-21

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes, including photosynthesis and respiration. These reactions also form the basis of many types of solar fuel cells and electrochemical devices. Recent advances in the theory of PCET enable the prediction of the impact of system properties on the reaction rates. These predictions may guide the design of more efficient catalysts for energy production, including those based on artificial photosynthesis and solar energy conversion. This Account summarizes the theoretically predicted dependence of PCET rates on system properties and illustrates potential approaches for tuning the reaction rates in chemical systems. A general theoretical formulation for PCET reactions has been developed over the past decade. In this theory, PCET reactions are described in terms of nonadiabatic transitions between the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states. A series of nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for both homogeneous and electrochemical PCET reactions have been derived in various well-defined limits. Recently this theory has been extended to include the effects of solvent dynamics and to describe ultrafast interfacial PCET. Analysis of the rate constant expressions provides insight into the underlying physical principles of PCET and enables the prediction of the dependence of the rates on the physical properties of the system. Moreover, the kinetic isotope effect, which is the ratio of the rates for hydrogen and deuterium, provides a useful mechanistic probe. Typically the PCET rate will increase as the electronic coupling and temperature increase and as the total reorganization energy and equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance decrease. The rate constant is predicted to increase as the driving force becomes more negative, rather than exhibit turnover behavior in the inverted region, because excited vibronic product states associated with low

  11. Proton-Coupled Organic Cation Antiporter Contributes to the Hepatic Uptake of Matrine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunyong; Sun, Xiaomin; Feng, Chao; Liu, Xiaoying; Wang, Hufang; Feng, Fang; Zhang, Junying

    2016-03-01

    Matrine is the major bioactive alkaloid found in certain Sophora plants and has been used for the treatment of liver diseases and protection of liver function. The aim of this study was to investigate the human liver uptake mechanism of matrine by using HepG2 cells as the in vitro model. Matrine was transported into HepG2 cells in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The cellular uptake was saturable and was significantly reduced by the metabolic inhibitors, such as sodium azide and rotenone. Furthermore, the uptake of matrine was found to be regulated by a protonophore (carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone) and pH, indicating that this influx transporter may be a proton-coupled antiporter. The uptake of matrine was sensitive to inhibition by the cationic drugs including pyrilamine, quinidine, verapamil, amantadine, diphenhydramine, and cimetidine but insensitive to other typical substrates or inhibitors of well-known organic cation transport systems. The present study reveals that, for the first time, in HepG2 cells, the existence of a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter that contributes substantially to the hepatic uptake of matrine.

  12. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer reaction dynamics and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F., III

    2014-03-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which both an electron and an associated proton undergo reactive transfer, play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. Due to the complexity of this class of reactions, a variety of different mechanisms fall under the umbrella of PCET. However, the physical driving forces that determine the preferred mechanism in a given system still remain poorly understood. Towards this end, we extend ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), a path-integral quantum dynamics method, to enable the direct simulation and characterization of PCET reaction dynamics in both fully atomistic and system-bath models of organometallic catalysts. In addition to providing validation for the simulation method via extensive comparison with existing PCET rate theories, we analyze the RPMD trajectories to investigate the competition between the concerted and sequential reaction mechanisms for PCET, elucidating the large role of the solvent in controlling the preferred mechanism. We further employ RPMD to determine the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across different regimes of electronic and vibrational coupling, providing evidence for a new and distinct PCET reaction mechanism.

  13. Proton-Coupled Organic Cation Antiporter Contributes to the Hepatic Uptake of Matrine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunyong; Sun, Xiaomin; Feng, Chao; Liu, Xiaoying; Wang, Hufang; Feng, Fang; Zhang, Junying

    2016-03-01

    Matrine is the major bioactive alkaloid found in certain Sophora plants and has been used for the treatment of liver diseases and protection of liver function. The aim of this study was to investigate the human liver uptake mechanism of matrine by using HepG2 cells as the in vitro model. Matrine was transported into HepG2 cells in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The cellular uptake was saturable and was significantly reduced by the metabolic inhibitors, such as sodium azide and rotenone. Furthermore, the uptake of matrine was found to be regulated by a protonophore (carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone) and pH, indicating that this influx transporter may be a proton-coupled antiporter. The uptake of matrine was sensitive to inhibition by the cationic drugs including pyrilamine, quinidine, verapamil, amantadine, diphenhydramine, and cimetidine but insensitive to other typical substrates or inhibitors of well-known organic cation transport systems. The present study reveals that, for the first time, in HepG2 cells, the existence of a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter that contributes substantially to the hepatic uptake of matrine. PMID:26886331

  14. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3− to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments. PMID:26870760

  15. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3 (-) to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments. PMID:26870760

  16. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3 (-) to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments.

  17. Hydrogen Bonding Networks Tune Proton-Coupled Redox Steps during the Enzymatic Six-Electron Conversion of Nitrite to Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multielectron multiproton reactions play an important role in both biological systems and chemical reactions involved in energy storage and manipulation. A key strategy employed by nature in achieving such complex chemistry is the use of proton-coupled redox steps. Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) catalyzes the six-electron seven-proton reduction of nitrite to ammonia. While a catalytic mechanism for ccNiR has been proposed on the basis of studies combining computation and crystallography, there have been few studies directly addressing the nature of the proton-coupled events that are predicted to occur along the nitrite reduction pathway. Here we use protein film voltammetry to directly interrogate the proton-coupled steps that occur during nitrite reduction by ccNiR. We find that conversion of nitrite to ammonia by ccNiR adsorbed to graphite electrodes is defined by two distinct phases; one is proton-coupled, and the other is not. Mutation of key active site residues (H257, R103, and Y206) modulates these phases and specifically alters the properties of the detected proton-dependent step but does not inhibit the ability of ccNiR to conduct the full reduction of nitrite to ammonia. We conclude that the active site residues examined are responsible for tuning the protonation steps that occur during catalysis, likely through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, but are not necessarily required for the reaction to proceed. These results provide important insight into how enzymes can specifically tune proton- and electron transfer steps to achieve high turnover numbers in a physiological pH range. PMID:25137350

  18. Effect of vanadate on proton-sucrose cotransport in Ricinus cotyledons

    SciTech Connect

    Vreugdenhil, D.; Spanswick, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The effects of orthovanadate on the uptake of sucrose by Ricinus cotyledons and on sucrose-coupled proton influx were measured in order to gain insight into the relationship to the plasma membrane proton pump. Vanadate had no effect on short-term sucrose uptake. In long-term experiments (> 30 min) sucrose uptake was progressively inhibited, but only at high external sucrose concentrations. Vanadate did not affect proton efflux pumping in the absence of sucrose and neither did it change the initial rate of sucrose-coupled proton influx. However, it enhanced the maximal level of sucrose-induced alkalization of the medium at all sucrose concentrations tested. This is interpreted as an inhibiting effect of vanadate on the proton pump that recycles protons during sucrose-proton cotransport. The sensitivity towards vanadate indicates that this proton pump is an ATPase. A second proton-translocating system, that is insensitive to vanadate, is postulated to function in the absence of sucrose.

  19. Electron/proton coupling in bacterial nitric oxide reductase during reduction of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Flock, Ulrika; Watmough, Nicholas J; Adelroth, Pia

    2005-08-01

    The respiratory nitric oxide reductase (NOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans catalyzes the two-electron reduction of NO to N(2)O (2NO + 2H(+) + 2e(-) --> N(2)O + H(2)O), which is an obligatory step in the sequential reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen known as denitrification. NOR has four redox-active cofactors, namely, two low-spin hemes c and b, one high-spin heme b(3), and a non-heme iron Fe(B), and belongs to same superfamily as the oxygen-reducing heme-copper oxidases. NOR can also use oxygen as an electron acceptor; this catalytic activity was investigated in this study. We show that the product in the steady-state reduction of oxygen is water. A single turnover of the fully reduced NOR with oxygen was initiated using the flow-flash technique, and the progress of the reaction monitored by time-resolved optical absorption spectroscopy. Two major phases with time constants of 40 micros and 25 ms (pH 7.5, 1 mM O(2)) were observed. The rate constant for the faster process was dependent on the O(2) concentration and is assigned to O(2) binding to heme b(3) at a bimolecular rate constant of 2 x 10(7) M(-)(1) s(-)(1). The second phase (tau = 25 ms) involves oxidation of the low-spin hemes b and c, and is coupled to the uptake of protons from the bulk solution. The rate constant for this phase shows a pH dependence consistent with rate limitation by proton transfer from an internal group with a pK(a) = 6.6. This group is presumably an amino acid residue that is crucial for proton transfer to the catalytic site also during NO reduction. PMID:16060680

  20. Ionosphere-exosphere coupling through charge exchange and momentum transfer in hydrogen-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The implications of a traditional assumption of exospheric physics, that collisions of hydrogen atoms and protons preferentially result in charge exchange with negligible momentum transfer are examined. Initially adopted as a necessary convenience to accommodate limited computer resources in exosphere model calculations, this approximation results in a direct transformation of the proton velocity distribution into a hot component of neutral hydrogen. With expanding computational facilities, the need for the approximation has passed. As the first step toward its replacement with a realistic, quantum mechanical model of the H - H(+) collision process, differential and cumulative cross sections were calculated for quantum elastic scattering of indistinguishable nuclei for a fine grid of encounter energies and scattering angles. These data are used to study the nature of ionosphere-exosphere coupling through H - H(+) collisions, and to demonstrate that the distribution of velocities of scattered H produced in the traditional exospheric charge exchange approximation, as well as that arising from an alternative, fluid dynamic approach, leads to unacceptable abundances of coronal atoms in long-term, highly elliptic trajectories.

  1. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Constitutes the Photoactivation Mechanism of the Plant Photoreceptor UVR8.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Tilo; Heilmann, Monika; Pandit, Anjali; Zhu, Jingyi; Ravensbergen, Janneke; Kloz, Miroslav; Fu, Yinan; Smith, Brian O; Christie, John M; Jenkins, Gareth I; Kennis, John T M

    2015-07-01

    UVR8 is a novel UV-B photoreceptor that regulates a range of plant responses and is already used as a versatile optogenetic tool. Instead of an exogenous chromophore, UVR8 uniquely employs tryptophan side chains to accomplish UV-B photoreception. UV-B absorption by homodimeric UVR8 induces monomerization and hence signaling, but the underlying photodynamic mechanisms are not known. Here, by using a combination of time-resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy from femto- to microseconds, we provide the first experimental evidence for the UVR8 molecular signaling mechanism. The results indicate that tryptophan residues at the dimer interface engage in photoinduced proton coupled electron transfer reactions that induce monomerization.

  2. Elastic Proton Scattering of Medium Mass Nuclei from Coupled-Cluster Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, G.; MichelN.,

    2012-01-01

    Using coupled-cluster theory and interactions from chiral effective field theory, we compute overlap functions for transfer and scattering of low-energy protons on the target nucleus 40Ca. Effects of three-nucleon forces are included phenomenologically as in-medium two-nucleon interactions. Using known asymptotic forms for one-nucleon overlap functions we derive a simple and intuitive way of computing scattering observables such as elastic scattering phase shifts and cross sections. As a first application and proof of principle, we compute phase shifts and differential interaction cross sections at energies of 9.6 and 12.44 MeV and compare with experimental data. Our computed diffraction minima are in fair agreement with experimental results, while we tend to overestimate the cross sections at large scattering angles.

  3. Core-coupled states and split proton-neutron quasiparticle multiplets in 122-126Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalkovski, S.; Bruce, A. M.; Jungclaus, A.; Górska, M.; Pfützner, M.; Cáceres, L.; Naqvi, F.; Pietri, S.; Podolyák, Zs.; Simpson, G. S.; Andgren, K.; Bednarczyk, P.; Beck, T.; Benlliure, J.; Benzoni, G.; Casarejos, E.; Cederwall, B.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Cuenca-García, J. J.; Cullen, I. J.; Denis Bacelar, A. M.; Detistov, P.; Doornenbal, P.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Geissel, H.; Gelletly, W.; Gerl, J.; Grebosz, J.; Hadinia, B.; Hellström, M.; Hinke, C.; Hoischen, R.; Ilie, G.; Jaworski, G.; Jolie, J.; Khaplanov, A.; Kisyov, S.; Kmiecik, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Kumar, R.; Kurz, N.; Maj, A.; Mandal, S.; Modamio, V.; Montes, F.; Myalski, S.; Palacz, M.; Prokopowicz, W.; Reiter, P.; Regan, P. H.; Rudolph, D.; Schaffner, H.; Sohler, D.; Steer, S. J.; Tashenov, S.; Walker, J.; Walker, P. M.; Weick, H.; Werner-Malento, E.; Wieland, O.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Zhekova, M.

    2013-03-01

    Neutron-rich silver isotopes were populated in the fragmentation of a 136Xe beam and the relativistic fission of 238U. The fragments were mass analyzed with the GSI Fragment Separator and subsequently implanted into a passive stopper. Isomeric transitions were detected by 105 high-purity germanium detectors. Eight isomeric states were observed in 122-126Ag nuclei. The level schemes of 122,123,125Ag were revised and extended with isomeric transitions being observed for the first time. The excited states in the odd-mass silver isotopes are interpreted as core-coupled states. The isomeric states in the even-mass silver isotopes are discussed in the framework of the proton-neutron split multiplets. The results of shell-model calculations, performed for the most neutron-rich silver nuclei are compared to the experimental data.

  4. Catalytic Alkene Carboaminations Enabled by Oxidative Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Gilbert J.; Knowles, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a dual catalyst system comprised of an iridium photocatalyst and weak phosphate base that is capable of both selectively homolyzing the N–H bonds of N-arylamides (bond dissociation free energies ~ 100 kcal/mol) via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and mediating efficient carboamination reactions of the resulting amidyl radicals. This manner of PCET activation, which finds its basis in numerous biological redox processes, enables the formal homolysis of a stronger amide N–H bond in the presence of weaker allylic C–H bonds, a selectivity that is uncommon in conventional molecular H atom acceptors. Moreover, this transformation affords access to a broad range of structurally complex heterocycles from simple amide starting materials. The design, synthetic scope, and mechanistic evaluation of the PCET process are described. PMID:26166022

  5. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in the Reduction of Carbonyls by Samarium Diiodide-Water Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chciuk, Tesia V; Anderson, William R; Flowers, Robert A

    2016-07-20

    Reduction of carbonyls by SmI2 is significantly impacted by the presence of water, but the fundamental step(s) of initial transfer of a formal hydrogen atom from the SmI2-water reagent system to produce an intermediate radical is not fully understood. In this work, we provide evidence consistent with the reduction of carbonyls by SmI2-water proceeding through proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). Combined rate and computational studies show that a model aldehyde and ketone are likely reduced through an asynchronous PCET, whereas reduction of a representative lactone occurs through a concerted PCET. In the latter case, concerted PCET is likely a consequence of significantly endergonic initial electron transfer. PMID:27367158

  6. Proton-Nucleus Total Cross Sections in Coupled-Channel Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross sections in the medium have been extracted directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the Langley Research Center. In the present study the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium was investigated. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  7. Crystal structure of a membrane-embedded H+-translocating pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Ming; Tsai, Jia-Yin; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Chiu, Chen-Liang; Liu, Mu-Hsuan; Tung, Jung-Yu; Liu, Tseng-Huang; Pan, Rong-Long; Sun, Yuh-Ju

    2012-04-19

    H(+)-translocating pyrophosphatases (H(+)-PPases) are active proton transporters that establish a proton gradient across the endomembrane by means of pyrophosphate (PP(i)) hydrolysis. H(+)-PPases are found primarily as homodimers in the vacuolar membrane of plants and the plasma membrane of several protozoa and prokaryotes. The three-dimensional structure and detailed mechanisms underlying the enzymatic and proton translocation reactions of H(+)-PPases are unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of a Vigna radiata H(+)-PPase (VrH(+)-PPase) in complex with a non-hydrolysable substrate analogue, imidodiphosphate (IDP), at 2.35 Å resolution. Each VrH(+)-PPase subunit consists of an integral membrane domain formed by 16 transmembrane helices. IDP is bound in the cytosolic region of each subunit and trapped by numerous charged residues and five Mg(2+) ions. A previously undescribed proton translocation pathway is formed by six core transmembrane helices. Proton pumping can be initialized by PP(i) hydrolysis, and H(+) is then transported into the vacuolar lumen through a pathway consisting of Arg 242, Asp 294, Lys 742 and Glu 301. We propose a working model of the mechanism for the coupling between proton pumping and PP(i) hydrolysis by H(+)-PPases. PMID:22456709

  8. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-06-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH.

  9. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH. PMID:24977746

  10. Cyclic reactions catalysed by detergent-dispersed and reconstituted transhydrogenase from beef-heart mitochondria; implications for the mechanism of proton translocation.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, L A; Jackson, J B

    1995-10-10

    Transhydrogenase from beef-heart mitochondria was solubilised with Triton X-100 and purified by column chromatography. The detergent-dispersed enzyme catalysed the reduction of acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide (AcPdAD+) by NADH, but only in the presence of NADP+. Experiments showed that this reaction was cyclic; NADP(H), whilst remaining bound to the enzyme, was alternately reduced by NADH and oxidised by AcPdAD+. A period of incubation of the enzyme with NADPH at pH 6.0 led to inhibition of the simple transhydrogenation reaction between AcPdAD+ and NADPH. However, after such treatment, transhydrogenase acquired the ability to catalyse the (NADPH-dependent) reduction of AcPdAD+ by NADH. It is suggested that this is a similar cycle to the one described above. Evidently, the binding affinity for NADP+ increases as a consequence of the inhibition process resulting from prolonged incubation with NADPH. The pH dependences of simple and cyclic transhydrogenation reactions are described. Though more complex than those in Escherichia coli transhydrogenase, they are consistent with the view [Hutton, M., Day, J.M., Bizouarn, T. and Jackson, J.B. (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 219, 1041-1051] that, also in the mitochondrial enzyme, binding and release of NADP+ and NADPH are accompanied by binding and release of a proton. The enzyme was successfully reconstituted into liposomes by a cholate dilution procedure. The proteoliposomes catalysed cyclic NADPH-dependent reduction of AcPdAD+ by NADH only when they were tightly coupled. However, they catalysed cyclic NADP(+)-dependent reduction of AcPdAD+ by NADH only when they were uncoupled eg. by addition of carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Identification of the coupling step in Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from real-time kinetics of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Belevich, Nikolai P; Bertsova, Yulia V; Verkhovskaya, Marina L; Baykov, Alexander A; Bogachev, Alexander V

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) uses a unique set of prosthetic redox groups-two covalently bound FMN residues, a [2Fe-2S] cluster, FAD, riboflavin and a Cys4[Fe] center-to catalyze electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in a reaction coupled with Na(+) translocation across the membrane. Here we used an ultra-fast microfluidic stopped-flow instrument to determine rate constants and the difference spectra for the six consecutive reaction steps of Vibrio harveyi Na(+)-NQR reduction by NADH. The instrument, with a dead time of 0.25 ms and optical path length of 1 cm allowed collection of visible spectra in 50-μs intervals. By comparing the spectra of reaction steps with the spectra of known redox transitions of individual enzyme cofactors, we were able to identify the chemical nature of most intermediates and the sequence of electron transfer events. A previously unknown spectral transition was detected and assigned to the Cys4[Fe] center reduction. Electron transfer from the [2Fe-2S] cluster to the Cys4[Fe] center and all subsequent steps were markedly accelerated when Na(+) concentration was increased from 20 μM to 25 mM, suggesting coupling of the former step with tight Na(+) binding to or occlusion by the enzyme. An alternating access mechanism was proposed to explain electron transfer between subunits NqrF and NqrC. According to the proposed mechanism, the Cys4[Fe] center is alternatively exposed to either side of the membrane, allowing the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NqrF and the FMN residue of NqrC to alternatively approach the Cys4[Fe] center from different sides of the membrane. PMID:26655930

  12. Studies of the Maltose Transport System Reveal a Mechanism for Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Substrate Translocation without Direct Recognition of Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Alister D.; Shilton, Brian H.

    2010-10-11

    The ATPase activity of the maltose transporter (MalFGK{sub 2}) is dependent on interactions with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). To determine whether direct interactions between the translocated sugar and MalFGK{sub 2} are important for the regulation of ATP hydrolysis, we used an MBP mutant (sMBP) that is able to bind either maltose or sucrose. We observed that maltose- and sucrose-bound sMBP stimulate equal levels of MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase activity. Therefore, the ATPase activity of MalFGK{sub 2} is coupled to translocation of maltose solely by interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and MBP. For both maltose and sucrose, the ability of sMBP to stimulate the MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase was greatly reduced compared with wild-type MBP, indicating that the mutations in sMBP have interfered with important interactions between MBP and MalFGK{sub 2}. High resolution crystal structure analysis of sMBP shows that in the closed conformation with bound sucrose, three of four mutations are buried, and the fourth causes only a minor change in the accessible surface. In contrast, in the open form of sMBP, all of the mutations are accessible, and the main chain of Tyr{sup 62}-Gly{sup 69} is destabilized and occupies an alternative conformation due to the W62Y mutation. On this basis, the compromised ability of sMBP to stimulate ATP hydrolysis by MalFGK{sub 2} is most likely due to a disruption of interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and the open, rather than the closed, conformation of sMBP. Modeling the open sMBP structure bound to MalFGK{sub 2} in the transition state for ATP hydrolysis points to an important site of interaction and suggests a mechanism for coupling ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation that is independent of the exact structure of the substrate.

  13. Coupling between protonation and conformation in cytochrome c oxidase: Insights from constant-pH MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A Sofia F; Campos, Sara R R; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2016-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidases (CcOs) are the terminal enzymes of the respiratory chain in mitochondria and most bacteria. These enzymes reduce dioxygen (O(2)) to water and, simultaneously, generate a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. Despite their importance in the aerobic metabolism and the large amount of structural and biochemical data available for the A1-type CcO family, there is still no consensually accepted description of the molecular mechanisms operating in this protein. A substantial number of questions about the CcO's working mechanism remain to be answered, including how the protonation behavior of some key residues is modulated during a reduction cycle and how is the conformation of the protein affected by protonation. The main objective of this work was to study the protonation-conformation coupling in CcOs and identify the molecular factors that control the protonation state of some key residues. In order to directly capture the interplay between protonation and conformational effects, we have performed constant-pH MD simulations of an A1-type CcO inserted into a lipid bilayer in two redox states (oxidized and reduced) at physiological pH. From the simulations, we were able to identify several groups with unusual titration behavior that are highly dependent on the protein redox state, including the A-propionate from heme a and the D-propionate from heme a3, two key groups possibly involved in proton pumping. The protonation state of these two groups is heavily influenced by subtle conformational changes in the protein (notably of R481(I) and R482(I)) and by small changes in the hydrogen bond network.

  14. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We discuss large modulated fractions in the Maxwellian case showing that they imply a departure from the usual cosine time dependence of the expected signal in DAMA. However we explicitly show that the DAMA data is not sensitive to this distortion, both in time and frequency space, even in the extreme case of a 100 % modulated fraction. Moreover the same scenario provides an explanation of the maximum in the energy spectrum of the modulation amplitude detected by DAMA in terms of WIMPs whose minimal incoming speed matches the kinematic threshold for inelastic upscatters. For the elastic case the detection of such maximum suggests an inversion of the modulation phase below the present DAMA energy threshold, while this is not expected for inelastic scattering. This may allow to discriminate between the two scenarios in a future low-threshold analysis of the DAMA data.

  15. The human proton-coupled folate transporter: Biology and therapeutic applications to cancer.

    PubMed

    Desmoulin, Sita Kugel; Hou, Zhanjun; Gangjee, Aleem; Matherly, Larry H

    2012-12-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). PCFT was identified in 2006 as the primary transporter for intestinal absorption of dietary folates, as mutations in PCFT are causal in hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) syndrome. Since 2006, there have been major advances in understanding the mechanistic roles of critical amino acids and/or domains in the PCFT protein, many of which were identified as mutated in HFM patients, and in characterizing transcriptional control of the human PCFT gene. With the recognition that PCFT is abundantly expressed in human tumors and is active at pHs characterizing the tumor microenvironment, attention turned to exploiting PCFT for delivering novel cytotoxic antifolates for solid tumors. The finding that pemetrexed is an excellent PCFT substrate explains its demonstrated clinical efficacy for mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer, and prompted development of more PCFT-selective tumor-targeted 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates that derive their cytotoxic effects by targeting de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis.

  16. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.; Izatt, R.M.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Shirts, R.B.

    1996-08-24

    The objective of this research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period. In addition, new, more convenient synthetic routes were achieved for several nitrogen-containing bicyclic and tricyclic macrocycles. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber and other membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. A study of the effect of methoxyalkyl macrocycle substituents on metal ion transport was completed. A new calorimeter was constructed which made it possible to study the thermodynamics of macrocycle-cation binding to very high temperatures. Measurements of thermodynamic data for the interaction of crown ethers with alkali and alkaline earth cations were achieved to 473 K. Molecular modeling work was begun for the first time on this project and fundamental principles were identified and developed for the establishment of working models in the future.

  17. Tyrosine oxidation in heme oxygenase: examination of long-range proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Valeriy V; Roth, Justine P

    2014-10-01

    Heme oxygenase is responsible for the degradation of a histidine-ligated ferric protoporphyrin IX (Por) to biliverdin, CO, and the free ferrous ion. Described here are studies of tyrosyl radical formation reactions that occur after oxidizing Fe(III)(Por) to Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) in human heme oxygenase isoform-1 (hHO-1) and the structurally homologous protein from Corynebacterium diphtheriae (cdHO). Site-directed mutagenesis on hHO-1 probes the reduction of Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) by tyrosine residues within 11 Å of the prosthetic group. In hHO-1, Y58· is implicated as the most likely site of oxidation, based on the pH and pD dependent kinetics. The absence of solvent deuterium isotope effects in basic solutions of hHO-1 and cdHO contrasts with the behavior of these proteins in the acidic solution, suggesting that long-range proton-coupled electron transfer predominates over electron transfer.

  18. Effect of pressure on the proton-proton vicinal coupling constants in 1,1,2-tricholoethane and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane-1- sup 13 C. A new approach to hig-pressure study of molecular conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Kazuoka, T.; Sera, A. )

    1988-10-26

    The first observation of a pressure-induced change in the proton-proton vicinal coupling constants, J{sub vic}, are reported here. It is also demonstrated that the experiment possibly provides a new, straightforward approach to conformation studies at high pressure. The pressure effects on coupling constants of 1,1,2-trichloroethane + 10 mol % of cyclopentane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane 1-{sup 13}C are reported. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Accurate determination of one-bond heteronuclear coupling constants with “pure shift” broadband proton-decoupled CLIP/CLAP-HSQC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timári, István; Kaltschnee, Lukas; Kolmer, Andreas; Adams, Ralph W.; Nilsson, Mathias; Thiele, Christina M.; Morris, Gareth A.; Kövér, Katalin E.

    2014-02-01

    We report broadband proton-decoupled CLIP/CLAP-HSQC experiments for the accurate determination of one-bond heteronuclear couplings and, by extension, for the reliable measurement of small residual dipolar coupling constants. The combination of an isotope-selective BIRD(d) filter module with a non-selective 1H inversion pulse is employed to refocus proton-proton coupling evolution prior to the acquisition of brief chunks of free induction decay that are subsequently assembled to reconstruct the fully-decoupled signal evolution. As a result, the cross-peaks obtained are split only by the heteronuclear one-bond coupling along the F2 dimension, allowing coupling constants to be extracted by measuring simple frequency differences between singlet maxima. The proton decoupling scheme presented has also been utilized in standard HSQC experiments, resulting in a fully-decoupled pure shift correlation map with significantly improved resolution.

  20. On-shell coupled-channel approach to proton-hydrogen collisions without partial-wave expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2006-01-15

    A fully quantal approach to proton collisions with hydrogen based on the atomic-orbital close-coupling method is presented. The method leads to a system of coupled three-dimensional momentum-space integral equations for the scattering amplitudes. These equations are reduced to two-dimensional ones using an on-shell approximation. Furthermore, by considering the symmetry of the problem, we demonstrate that these can be reduced to just one dimension. The resulting equations are solved without partial-wave expansion. Cross sections for electron transfer in proton collisions with the ground state of atomic hydrogen are calculated and shown to agree well with experiment over a wide energy range.

  1. Multidrug Transport Protein NorM from Vibrio cholerae Simultaneously Couples to Sodium- and Proton-Motive Force*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yoonhee; Nair, Asha; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family mediate the efflux of unrelated pharmaceuticals from the interior of the cell in organisms ranging from bacteria to human. These proteins are thought to fall into two classes that couple substrate efflux to the influx of either Na+ or H+. We studied the energetics of drug extrusion by NorM from Vibrio cholerae in proteoliposomes in which purified NorM protein was functionally reconstituted in an inside-out orientation. We establish that NorM simultaneously couples to the sodium-motive force and proton-motive force, and biochemically identify protein regions and residues that play important roles in Na+ or H+ binding. As the positions of protons are not available in current medium and high-resolution crystal structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters, our findings add a previously unrecognized parameter to mechanistic models based of these structures. PMID:24711447

  2. Minimalist Relativistic Force Field: Prediction of Proton-Proton Coupling Constants in (1)H NMR Spectra Is Perfected with NBO Hybridization Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-05-15

    We previously developed a reliable method for multiparametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. We now report that utilization of NBO hybridization coefficients for carbon atoms in the involved C-H bonds allows for a significant simplification of this parametric scheme, requiring only four general types of SSCCs: geminal, vicinal, 1,3-, and long-range constants. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries. A new DU8 basis set, based on a training set of 475 experimental spin-spin coupling constants, is developed for hydrogen and common non-hydrogen atoms (Li, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl, Se, Br, I) to calculate Fermi contacts. On a test set of 919 SSCCs from a diverse collection of natural products and complex synthetic molecules the method gave excellent accuracy of 0.29 Hz (rmsd) with the maximum unsigned error not exceeding 1 Hz.

  3. Minimalist Relativistic Force Field: Prediction of Proton-Proton Coupling Constants in (1)H NMR Spectra Is Perfected with NBO Hybridization Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-05-15

    We previously developed a reliable method for multiparametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. We now report that utilization of NBO hybridization coefficients for carbon atoms in the involved C-H bonds allows for a significant simplification of this parametric scheme, requiring only four general types of SSCCs: geminal, vicinal, 1,3-, and long-range constants. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries. A new DU8 basis set, based on a training set of 475 experimental spin-spin coupling constants, is developed for hydrogen and common non-hydrogen atoms (Li, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl, Se, Br, I) to calculate Fermi contacts. On a test set of 919 SSCCs from a diverse collection of natural products and complex synthetic molecules the method gave excellent accuracy of 0.29 Hz (rmsd) with the maximum unsigned error not exceeding 1 Hz. PMID:25885091

  4. Kinetic isotope effect of proton-coupled electron transfer in a hydrogen bonded phenol-pyrrolidino[60]fullerene.

    PubMed

    Ravensbergen, Janneke; Brown, Chelsea L; Moore, Gary F; Frese, Raoul N; van Grondelle, Rienk; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Kennis, John T M

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a central role in photosynthesis and potentially in solar-to-fuel systems. We report a spectroscopy study on a phenol-pyrrolidino[60]fullerene. Quenching of the singlet excited state from 1 ns to 250 ps is assigned to PCET. A H/D exchange study reveals a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 3.0, consistent with a concerted PCET mechanism.

  5. Polymer stabilized silver nanoparticle: An efficient catalyst for proton-coupled electron transfer reaction and the electrochemical recognition of biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Siwal, Samarjeet; Ul Islam, Rafique; Witcomb, Michael J.; Mallick, Kaushik

    2014-07-01

    A facile in situ synthesis route [1] has been described for the preparation of polymer stabilized silver nanoparticles. Such in situ synthesized silver nanoparticles are shown to have excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenolate (4NP), an example of a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction mechanism. Also, the silver-polymer nanocomposite material is shown to perform as an efficient electro-catalyst for the oxidation of ascorbic acid.

  6. Review. The mammalian proton-coupled peptide cotransporter PepT1: sitting on the transporter-channel fence?

    PubMed

    Meredith, David

    2009-01-27

    The proton-coupled di- and tripeptide transporter PepT1 (SLC15a1) is the major route by which dietary nitrogen is taken up from the small intestine, as well as being the route of entry for important therapeutic (pro)drugs such as the beta-lactam antibiotics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and antiviral and anti-cancer agents. PepT1 is a member of the major facilitator superfamily of 12 transmembrane domain transporter proteins. Expression studies in Xenopus laevis on rabbit PepT1 that had undergone site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved arginine residue (arginine282 in transmembrane domain 7) to a glutamate revealed that this residue played a role in the coupling of proton and peptide transport and prevented the movement of non-coupled ions during the transporter cycle. Mutations of arginine282 to other non-positive residues did not uncouple proton-peptide cotransport, but did allow additional ion movements when substrate was added. By contrast, mutations to positive residues appeared to function the same as wild-type. These findings are discussed in relation to the functional role that arginine282 may play in the way PepT1 operates, together with structural information from the homology model of PepT1 based on the Escherichia coli lactose permease crystal structure.

  7. Classical and quantum proton vibration in a nonharmonic strongly coupled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. M.; Thorson, W. R.; Choi, J. H.

    1993-09-01

    Classical and quantum descriptions of proton vibration are compared for a coupled nonharmonic model based on an ab initio potential for the bifluoride ion, [FHF]-. Accurate quantum calculations and exact classical dynamics are compared with quantum and classical versions of the self-consistent-field (SCF) approximation. Semiclassical and quantum SCF eigenvalues agree within JWKB-type errors. The SCF scheme closely approximates exact quantum states for the lowest 4-5 vibrational levels of each symmetry, except at avoided crossings where strong CI mixing of SCF levels occurs. True classical motion, however, is mainly irregular except at very low energies, and even where it remains regular it may be strongly reorganized by a 1:1 periodic resonance associated with major potential surface features. Strongly mixed CI states at systematic avoided crossings of SCF levels at higher energies do have classical analogs in the reorganized classical motions seen at low energies; stabilized CI components correspond to a stable periodic 1:1 orbit, destabilized components to an unstable periodic 1:1 elliptical orbit. Canonical perturbation theory is used to study further the sense in which the exactly separable classical SCF Hamiltonian is ``close'' to the true Hamiltonian. Where true motion is modal or SCF-like, first-order perturbed trajectories and second-order perturbed energies describe it very accurately. However since the dynamics can be strongly disturbed even at very low energies, correlation effects are obviously not ``small'' in the sense usually meant in classical dynamics, i.e., that regular trajectories mostly remain regular in the nonseparable perturbed system.

  8. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  9. Dependence of Vibronic Coupling on Molecular Geometry and Environment: Bridging Hydrogen Atom Transfer and Electron–Proton Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The rate constants for typical concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions depend on the vibronic coupling between the diabatic reactant and product states. The form of the vibronic coupling is different for electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, which are associated with hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and electron–proton transfer (EPT) mechanisms, respectively. Most PCET rate constant expressions rely on the Condon approximation, which assumes that the vibronic coupling is independent of the nuclear coordinates of the solute and the solvent or protein. Herein we test the Condon approximation for PCET vibronic couplings. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on molecular geometry is investigated for an open and a stacked transition state geometry of the phenoxyl-phenol self-exchange reaction. The calculations indicate that the open geometry is electronically nonadiabatic, corresponding to an EPT mechanism that involves significant electronic charge redistribution, while the stacked geometry is predominantly electronically adiabatic, corresponding primarily to an HAT mechanism. Consequently, a single molecular system can exhibit both HAT and EPT character. The dependence of the vibronic coupling on the solvent or protein configuration is examined for the soybean lipoxygenase enzyme. The calculations indicate that this PCET reaction is electronically nonadiabatic with a vibronic coupling that does not depend significantly on the protein environment. Thus, the Condon approximation is shown to be valid for the solvent and protein nuclear coordinates but invalid for the solute nuclear coordinates in certain PCET systems. These results have significant implications for the calculation of rate constants, as well as mechanistic interpretations, of PCET reactions. PMID:26412613

  10. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Strongly Coupled Photosystem II-Inspired Chromophore-Imidazole-Phenol Complex: Stepwise Oxidation and Concerted Reduction.

    PubMed

    Manbeck, Gerald F; Fujita, Etsuko; Concepcion, Javier J

    2016-09-14

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions were studied in acetonitrile for a Photosystem II (PSII)-inspired [Ru(bpy)2(phen-imidazole-Ph(OH)((t)Bu)2)](2+), in which Ru(III) generated by a flash-quench sequence oxidizes the appended phenol and the proton is transferred to the hydrogen-bonded imidazole base. In contrast to related systems, the donor and acceptor are strongly coupled, as indicated by the shift in the Ru(III/II) couple upon phenol oxidation, and intramolecular oxidation of the phenol by Ru(III) is energetically favorable by both stepwise and concerted pathways. The phenol oxidation occurs via a stepwise ET-PT mechanism with kET = 2.7 × 10(7) s(-1) and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 0.99 ± 0.03. The electron transfer reaction was characterized as adiabatic with λDA = 1.16 eV and 280 < HDA < 540 cm(-1) consistent with strong electronic coupling and slow solvent dynamics. Reduction of the phenoxyl radical by the quencher radical was examined as the analogue of the redox reaction between the PSII tyrosyl radical and the oxygen-evolving complex. In our PSII-inspired complex, the recombination reaction activation energy is <2 kcal mol(-1). The reaction is nonadiabatic (VPCET ≈ 22 cm(-1) (H) and 49 cm(-1) (D)) and concerted, and it exhibits an unexpected inverse KIE = 0.55 that is attributed to greater overlap of the reactant vibronic ground state with the OD vibronic states of the proton acceptor due to the smaller quantum spacing of the deuterium vibrational levels.

  11. Robertsonian translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 27, describes the occurrence of Robertsonian translocations (RTs), which refer to the recombination of whole chromosome arms, in both monocentric and dicentric chromosomes. The nonrandom participation of acrocentric chromosomes in RTs is documented by various methods, including unbiased ascertainment and ascertainment through trisomy, infertility, unspecified mental retardation, and Prader-Willi syndrome. Causes of nonrandom participation of chromosomes in RTs is presented, as are the following topics: segregation in carriers of RTs and segregation in sperm cells of RT carriers, interchromosomal effects and conclusions. 48 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at a Heme-Propionate in an Iron-Protoporphyrin-IX Model Compound

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A heme model system has been developed in which the heme-propionate is the only proton donating/accepting site, using protoporphyrin IX-monomethyl esters (PPIXMME) and N-methylimidazole (MeIm). Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions of these model compounds have been examined in acetonitrile solvent. (PPIXMME)FeIII(MeIm)2-propionate (FeIII~CO2) is readily reduced by the ascorbate derivative 5,6-isopropylidine ascorbate to give (PPIXMME)FeII(MeIm)2-propionic acid (FeII~CO2H). Excess of the hydroxylamine TEMPOH or of hydroquinone similarly reduce FeIII~CO2, and TEMPO and benzoquinone oxidize FeII~CO2H to return to FeIII~CO2. The measured equilibrium constants, and the determined pKa and E1/2 values, indicate that FeII~CO2H has an effective bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of 67.8 ± 0.6 kcal mol–1. In these PPIX models, electron transfer occurs at the iron center and proton transfer occurs at the remote heme propionate. According to thermochemical and other arguments, the TEMPOH reaction occurs by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET), and a similar pathway is indicated for the ascorbate derivative. Based on these results, heme propionates should be considered as potential key components of PCET/CPET active sites in heme proteins. PMID:21524059

  13. Nonlinear QCD meets data: A global analysis of lepton-proton scattering with running coupling Balitsky-Kovchegov evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Armesto, Nestor; Salgado, Carlos A.; Milhano, Jose Guilherme

    2009-08-01

    We perform a global fit to the structure function F{sub 2} measured in lepton-proton experiments at small values of Bjorken-x, x{<=}0.01, for all experimentally available values of Q{sup 2}, 0.045 GeV{sup 2}{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}800 GeV{sup 2}. We show that the recent improvements resulting from the inclusion of running coupling corrections allow for a description of data in terms of nonlinear QCD evolution equations. In this approach F{sub 2} is calculated within the dipole model with all Bjorken-x dependence described by the running coupling Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. Two different initial conditions for the evolution are used, both yielding good fits to data with {chi}{sup 2}/d.o.f.<1.1. The proton longitudinal structure function F{sub L}, not included in the fits, is also well described. Our analysis allows to perform a first principle extrapolation of the proton-dipole scattering amplitude once the initial condition has been fitted to presently available data. We provide predictions for F{sub 2} and F{sub L} in the kinematical regions of interest for future colliders and ultra-high energy cosmic rays. A numerical implementation of our results down to x=10{sup -12} is released as a computer code for public use.

  14. Metal-free aqueous redox capacitor via proton rocking-chair system in an organic-based couple

    PubMed Central

    Tomai, Takaaki; Mitani, Satoshi; Komatsu, Daiki; Kawaguchi, Yuji; Honma, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    Safe and inexpensive energy storage devices with long cycle lifetimes and high power and energy densities are mandatory for the development of electrical power grids that connect with renewable energy sources. In this study, we demonstrated metal-free aqueous redox capacitors using couples comprising low-molecular-weight organic compounds. In addition to the electric double layer formation, proton insertion/extraction reactions between a couple consisting of inexpensive quinones/hydroquinones contributed to the energy storage. This energy storage mechanism, in which protons are shuttled back and forth between two electrodes upon charge and discharge, can be regarded as a proton rocking-chair system. The fabricated capacitor showed a large capacity (>20 Wh/kg), even in the applied potential range between 0–1 V, and high power capability (>5 A/g). The support of the organic compounds in nanoporous carbon facilitated the efficient use of the organic compounds with a lifetime of thousands of cycles. PMID:24395117

  15. A new set of regulatory molecules in plants: A plant phospholipid similar to platelet-activating factor stimulates protein kinase and proton-translocating ATPase in membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Scherer, G F; Martiny-Baron, G; Stoffel, B

    1988-08-01

    1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, an ether phospholipid from mammals known as platelet-activating factor (PAF), specifically stimulates proton transport in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) microsomes (G.F.E. Scherer, 1985, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commm. 133, 1160-1167). When plant lipids were analyzed by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography a lipid was found with chromatographic properties very similar to the PAF (G.F.E. Scherer and B. Stoffel, 1987, Planta, 172, 127-130). This lipid was isolated from zucchini hypocotyls, red beet root, lupin root, maize seedlings and crude soybean phospholipids. It had biological activity similar to that of the PAF, based on phosphorus content, and stimulated the steady-state ΔpH in zucchini hypocotyl microsomes about twofold. Other phospholipids, monoglyceride, diglyceride, triglyceride, oleic acid, phorbol ester, and 1-O-alkylglycerol did not stimulate proton transport. When microsomes were washed the PAF was ineffective but when soluble protein was added the PAF stimulation of H(+) transport was reconstituted. The soluble protein responsible for the PAF-dependent stimulation of transport activity could be partially purified by diethylaminoethyl Sephacel column chromatography. In the same fractions where the PAF-dependent transport-stimulatory protien was found, a protein kinase was active. This protein kinase was stimulated twofold either by the PAF or by Ca(2+). When Ca(2+) was present the PAF did not stimulate protein-kinase activity. When either the PAF, protein kinase, or both were added to membranes isolated on a linear sucrose gradient, ATPase activity was stimulated up to 30%. Comparison with marker enzymes indicated the possibility that tonoplast and plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase might be stimulated by the PAF and protein kinase. We speculate that a PAF-dependent protein kinase is involved in the regulation of proton transport in plants in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one- and two-proton transfer reactions for the 28Si + 90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Sandal, Rohit; Chakraborty, Santosh; Verma, Shashi; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one- and two-proton stripping reactions for 28Si + 90,94Zr systems were performed at 120 MeV. The experiment was carried out with the 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. The theoretical calculations were performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code fresco. The distorted wave Born approximation calculations reproduced the experimental angular distributions for the one-proton transfer channel for both the systems reasonably well but failed for the two-proton transfer channel. Coupled channels calculations including various intermediate states (involving target and projectile inelastic excitations before and/or after transfer) along with the sequential transfer were able to reproduce the two-proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It seems that at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, there is significant contribution of the indirect multistep and sequential transfer to the two-proton stripping reaction.

  17. Coupling of proton source and sink via H+-migration along the membrane surface as revealed by double patch-clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Y N; Pohl, P

    1998-06-12

    Long-range proton transfer along the surface of black lipid bilayers was observed between two integral membrane channels (gramicidins), one operating as a proton source, the other as a sink, by patch-clamp technique. In contrast, potassium ions were shown to equilibrate with the aqueous bulk phase before being consumed. Both channels opened and closed simultaneously only if the charge between them was carried by protons. In this case an anomalous high conductance between two patched membrane fragments was measured, each of them containing one single gramicidin channel. The coupled state disappeared when the distance between these two channels was increased above the critical value. The latter was shown to increase with the channel lifetime. Our results support the idea of the 'localized' proton coupling, in which protons that have been pumped across membranes migrate along the membrane surface to reach another membrane protein that utilizes the established pH gradient. PMID:9650589

  18. Crystal structure of the pristine peroxidase ferryl center and its relevance to proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Chreifi, Georges; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Doukov, Tzanko; Cohen, Aina E; McPhillips, Scott E; Song, Jinhu; Meharenna, Yergalem T; Soltis, S Michael; Poulos, Thomas L

    2016-02-01

    The reaction of peroxides with peroxidases oxidizes the heme iron from Fe(III) to Fe(IV)=O and a porphyrin or aromatic side chain to a cationic radical. X-ray-generated hydrated electrons rapidly reduce Fe(IV), thereby requiring very short exposures using many crystals, and, even then, some reduction cannot be avoided. The new generation of X-ray free electron lasers capable of generating intense X-rays on the tenths of femtosecond time scale enables structure determination with no reduction or X-ray damage. Here, we report the 1.5-Å crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) compound I (CmpI) using data obtained with the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This structure is consistent with previous structures. Of particular importance is the active site water structure that can mediate the proton transfer reactions required for both CmpI formation and reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. The structures indicate that a water molecule is ideally positioned to shuttle protons between an iron-linked oxygen and the active site catalytic His. We therefore have carried out both computational and kinetic studies to probe the reduction of Fe(IV)=O. Kinetic solvent isotope experiments show that the transfer of a single proton is critical in the peroxidase rate-limiting step, which is very likely the proton-coupled reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. We also find that the pKa of the catalytic His substantially increases in CmpI, indicating that this active site His is the source of the proton required in the reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(IV)-OH.

  19. A minimal non-supersymmetric S O(10) model: Gauge coupling unification, proton decay and fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saki

    2016-06-01

    We present a minimal renormalizable non-supersymmetric S O(10) grand unified model with a symmetry breaking sector consisting of Higgs fields in the 54H + 126H + 10H representations. This model admits a single intermediate scale associated with Pati-Salam symmetry along with a discrete parity. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the unification of gauge couplings and proton lifetime estimates are studied in detail in this framework. Including threshold corrections self-consistently, obtained from a full analysis of the Higgs potential, we show that the model is compatible with the current experimental bound on proton lifetime. The model generally predicts an upper bound of few times 1035 yrs for proton lifetime, which is not too far from the present Super-Kamiokande limit of τp ≳ 1.29 × 1034 yrs. With the help of a Pecci-Quinn symmetry and the resulting axion, the model provides a suitable dark matter candidate while also solving the strong CP problem. The intermediate scale, MI ≈ (1013 - 1014) GeV which is also the B - L scale, is of the right order for the right-handed neutrino mass which enables a successful description of light neutrino masses and oscillations. The Yukawa sector of the model consists of only two matrices in family space and leads to a predictive scenario for quark and lepton masses and mixings. The branching ratios for proton decay are calculable with the leading modes being p → e+π0 and p →v ¯π+ . Even though the model predicts no new physics within the reach of LHC, the next generation proton decay detectors and axion search experiments have the capability to pass verdict on this minimal scenario.

  20. Crystal structure of the pristine peroxidase ferryl center and its relevance to proton-coupled electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Chreifi, Georges; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Doukov, Tzanko; Cohen, Aina E.; McPhillips, Scott E.; Song, Jinhu; Meharenna, Yergalem T.; Soltis, S. Michael; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of peroxides with peroxidases oxidizes the heme iron from Fe(III) to Fe(IV)=O and a porphyrin or aromatic side chain to a cationic radical. X-ray–generated hydrated electrons rapidly reduce Fe(IV), thereby requiring very short exposures using many crystals, and, even then, some reduction cannot be avoided. The new generation of X-ray free electron lasers capable of generating intense X-rays on the tenths of femtosecond time scale enables structure determination with no reduction or X-ray damage. Here, we report the 1.5-Å crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) compound I (CmpI) using data obtained with the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This structure is consistent with previous structures. Of particular importance is the active site water structure that can mediate the proton transfer reactions required for both CmpI formation and reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. The structures indicate that a water molecule is ideally positioned to shuttle protons between an iron-linked oxygen and the active site catalytic His. We therefore have carried out both computational and kinetic studies to probe the reduction of Fe(IV)=O. Kinetic solvent isotope experiments show that the transfer of a single proton is critical in the peroxidase rate-limiting step, which is very likely the proton-coupled reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(III)-OH. We also find that the pKa of the catalytic His substantially increases in CmpI, indicating that this active site His is the source of the proton required in the reduction of Fe(IV)=O to Fe(IV)-OH. PMID:26787871

  1. Beta-agonist- and prostaglandin E1-induced translocation of the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase: evidence that the kinase may act on multiple adenylate cyclase-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, R H; Benovic, J L; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1986-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor kinase (beta-AR kinase) is a cytosolic enzyme that phosphorylates the beta-adrenergic receptor only when it is occupied by an agonist [Benovic, J. Strasser, R. H., Caron, M. G. & Lefkowitz, R. J. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 2797-2801.] It may be crucially involved in the processes that lead to homologous or agonist-specific desensitization of the receptor. Stimulation of DDT1MF-2 hamster smooth muscle cells or S49 mouse lymphoma cells with a beta-agonist leads to translocation of 80-90% of the beta-AR kinase activity from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. The translocation process is quite rapid, is concurrent with receptor phosphorylation, and precedes receptor desensitization and sequestration. It is also transient, since much of the activity returns to the cytosol as the receptors become sequestered. Stimulation of beta-AR kinase translocation is a receptor-mediated event, since the beta-antagonist propranolol blocks the effect of agonist. In the kin- mutant of the S49 cells (lacks cAMP-dependent protein kinase), prostaglandin E1, which provokes homologous desensitization of its own receptor, is at least as effective as isoproterenol in promoting beta-AR kinase translocation to the plasma membrane. However, in the DDT1MF-2 cells, which contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors coupled to phosphatidylinositol turnover, the alpha 1-agonist phenylephrine is ineffective. These results suggest that the first step in homologous desensitization of the beta-adrenergic receptor may be an agonist-promoted translocation of beta-AR kinase from cytosol to plasma membrane and that beta-AR kinase may represent a more general adenylate cyclase-coupled receptor kinase that participates in regulating the function of many such receptors. Images PMID:3018728

  2. Proton-coupled electron transfer: Metal hydrides find the sweet spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, Jillian L.

    2015-02-01

    The synchronous movement of protons and electrons orchestrated by enzymes gives rise to highly efficient catalytic processes in nature, such as photosynthesis. Now, researchers have choreographed similar reactivity for a metal hydride complex, setting the stage for efficient solar fuel production in artificial systems.

  3. Tunable electrochemical pH modulation in a microchannel monitored via the proton-coupled electro-oxidation of hydroquinone

    PubMed Central

    Contento, Nicholas M.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemistry is a promising tool for microfluidic systems because it is relatively inexpensive, structures are simple to fabricate, and it is straight-forward to interface electronically. While most widely used in microfluidics for chemical detection or as the transduction mechanism for molecular probes, electrochemical methods can also be used to efficiently alter the chemical composition of small (typically <100 nl) microfluidic volumes in a manner that improves or enables subsequent measurements and sample processing steps. Here, solvent (H2O) electrolysis is performed quantitatively at a microchannel Pt band electrode to increase microchannel pH. The change in microchannel pH is simultaneously tracked at a downstream electrode by monitoring changes in the i-V characteristics of the proton-coupled electro-oxidation of hydroquinone, thus providing real-time measurement of the protonated forms of hydroquinone from which the pH can be determined in a straightforward manner. Relative peak heights for protonated and deprotonated hydroquinone forms are in good agreement with expected pH changes by measured electrolysis rates, demonstrating that solvent electrolysis can be used to provide tunable, quantitative pH control within a microchannel. PMID:25379105

  4. Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex: theoretical analysis of asymmetric tafel plots and transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Michelle K; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-01

    Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex attached to a self-assembled monolayer on a gold electrode is studied with a recently developed theoretical formulation. The calculated hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect for the standard rate constant, the cathodic transfer coefficient at zero overpotential, and the Tafel plot are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The input quantities to the heterogeneous rate constant expressions were calculated with density functional theory in conjunction with dielectric continuum models, and no parameters were fit to experimental data. The theoretical calculations indicate that the asymmetry of the Tafel plot and the deviation of the transfer coefficient at zero overpotential from the standard value of one-half arise from the change in the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance upon electron transfer. The direction of the asymmetry and deviation from one-half is determined by the sign of this distance change, and the magnitude of these effects is determined by the magnitude of this distance change, as well as the reorganization energy and the distance dependence of the overlap between the initial and final proton vibrational wave functions. This theory provides experimentally testable predictions for the impact of specific system properties on the qualitative behavior of the Tafel plots. PMID:20067257

  5. Laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of β-mercaptoethanol mediated photo induced proton coupled electron transfer in proteins.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, S; Satish Rao, B S; Satyamoorthy, K; Mahato, K K

    2015-01-01

    Photo induced proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) is an important process that many organisms use for progression of catalytic reactions leading to energy conversion. In the present study, the influence of SDS and BME on the redox properties of tyrosine and tryptophan for five different globular proteins, BSA, HSA, RNase-A, trypsin and lysozyme were studied using laser induced autofluorescence. The proteins were subjected to denaturation under SDS, SDS plus heat and SDS plus β-mercaptoethanol (BME) plus heat and the corresponding fluorescence were recorded. The influence of BME on the autofluorescence properties of the proteins were evaluated upon tris-2-corboxy-ethyl phosphine (TCEP) denaturation. The BSA and HSA when exposed to SDS alone, exhibited hydrophobic collapse around their tryptophan moieties. However, these proteins when treated with SDS plus BME plus heat, an unusual red shift in the emission was observed, may be due to proton transfer from hydroxyl group of the excited tyrosine residues to the local microenvironments. The observation was further confirmed with similar proton transfer in absence of tryptophan in RNase-A showing involvement of tyrosine in the process. A drastic quenching of fluorescence in all of the proteins under study were also observed, may be due to photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from BME to the intrinsic fluorophores resulting in radical ions formation, evaluated upon DCFDA measurements. PMID:25985124

  6. Ultrafast Photoinduced Interfacial Proton Coupled Electron Transfer from CdSe Quantum Dots to 4,4'-Bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinquan; Wu, Kaifeng; Rudshteyn, Benjamin; Jia, Yanyan; Ding, Wendu; Xie, Zhao-Xiong; Batista, Victor S; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-01-27

    Pyridine and derivatives have been reported as efficient and selective catalysts for the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2 to methanol. Although the catalytic mechanism remains a subject of considerable recent debate, most proposed models involve interfacial proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) to electrode-bound catalysts. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the photoreduction of 4,4'-bipyridium (bPYD) using CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as a model system for interfacial PCET. We observed ultrafast photoinduced PCET from CdSe QDs to form doubly protonated [bPYDH2](+•) radical cations at low pH (4-6). Through studies of the dependence of PCET rate on isotopic substitution, pH and bPYD concentration, the radical formation mechanism was identified to be a sequential interfacial electron and proton transfer (ET/PT) process with a rate-limiting pH independent electron transfer rate constant, kint, of 1.05 ± 0.13 × 10(10) s(-1) between a QD and an adsorbed singly protonated [bPYDH](+). Theoretical studies of the adsorption of [bPYDH](+) and methylviologen on QD surfaces revealed important effects of hydrogen bonding with the capping ligand (3-mercaptopropionic acid) on binding geometry and interfacial PCET. In the presence of sacrificial electron donors, this system was shown to be capable of generating [bPYDH2](+•) radical cations under continuous illumination at 405 nm with a steady-state photoreduction quantum yield of 1.1 ± 0.1% at pH 4. The mechanism of bPYD photoreduction reported in this work may provide useful insights into the catalytic roles of pyridine and pyridine derivatives in the electrochemical and photoelectrochemical reduction of CO2. PMID:26713752

  7. Proton-Coupled Reduction of an Iron Cyanide Complex to Methane and Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Rittle, Jonathan; Peters, Jonas C

    2016-09-26

    Nitrogenase enzymes mediate the six-electron reductive cleavage of cyanide to CH4 and NH3 . Herein we demonstrate for the first time the liberation of CH4 and NH3 from a well-defined iron cyanide coordination complex, [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CN) (where [SiP(iPr) 3 ] represents a tris(phosphine)silyl ligand), on exposure to proton and electron equivalents. [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CN) additionally serves as a useful entry point to rare examples of terminally-bound Fe(CNH) and Fe(CNH2 ) species that, in accord with preliminary mechanistic studies, are plausible intermediates of the cyanide reductive protonation to generate CH4 and NH3 . Comparative studies with a related [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CNMe2 ) complex suggests the possibility of multiple, competing mechanisms for cyanide activation and reduction. PMID:27607732

  8. Proton irradiation test to scintillator-directory-coupled CCD onboard FFAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagino, Ryo; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Sadamoto, Masaaki; Sasaki, Masayuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Anabuki, Naohisa; Kitamura, Hisashi; Uchihori, Yukio

    2013-09-01

    FFAST is a large area sky survey mission at hard X-ray region by using a spacecraft formation flying. It consists of two small satellites, a telescope satellite, carrying a multilayer super mirror, and a detector satellite, carrying scintillator-deposited CCDs (SD-CCDs). SD-CCD is the imaging device which realized sensitivity to 80 keV by pasting up a scintillator on CCD directly. Soft X-ray events are directly detected in the CCD. On the other hand, Hard X-ray events are converted to optical photons by the scintillator and then the CCD detects the photons. We have obtained the spectrum with 109Cd and successfully detected the events originated from the CsI. For a space use of a CCD, we have to understand aged deterioration of CCD in high radiative environments. In addition, in the case of SD-CCD, we must investigate the influence of radio-activation of a scintillator. We performed experiments of proton irradiation to the SD-CCD as space environmental tests of cosmic rays. The SD-CCD is irradiated with the protons with the energy of 100 MeV and neglected for about 150 hours. As a result, the derived CTI profile of SD-CCD is similarly to ones of XIS/Suzaku and NeXT4 CCD/ASTRO-H. In contrast, CTIs derived from the data within 4 hours after irradiation is 10 times or more larger than the ones after 150 hours. This may be due to influence of an annealing. We also report a performance study of SD-CCD, including the detection of scintillation events, before proton irradiation.

  9. Inorganic proton conducting electrolyte coupled oxide-based dendritic transistors for synaptic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Zhou, Ju Mei; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Ionic/electronic hybrid devices with synaptic functions are considered to be the essential building blocks for neuromorphic systems and brain-inspired computing. Here, artificial synapses based on indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) transistors gated by nanogranular SiO2 proton-conducting electrolyte films are fabricated on glass substrates. Spike-timing dependent plasticity and paired-pulse facilitation are successfully mimicked in an individual bottom-gate transistor. Most importantly, dynamic logic and dendritic integration established by spatiotemporally correlated spikes are also mimicked in dendritic transistors with two in-plane gates as the presynaptic input terminals.Ionic/electronic hybrid devices with synaptic functions are considered to be the essential building blocks for neuromorphic systems and brain-inspired computing. Here, artificial synapses based on indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) transistors gated by nanogranular SiO2 proton-conducting electrolyte films are fabricated on glass substrates. Spike-timing dependent plasticity and paired-pulse facilitation are successfully mimicked in an individual bottom-gate transistor. Most importantly, dynamic logic and dendritic integration established by spatiotemporally correlated spikes are also mimicked in dendritic transistors with two in-plane gates as the presynaptic input terminals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The structures and transfer characteristics of the IZO junctionless transistor working in bottom-gate mode and in-plane gate mode. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05882d

  10. Ratcheting up protein translocation with anthrax toxin

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Geoffrey K; Brown, Michael J; Krantz, Bryan A

    2012-01-01

    Energy-consuming nanomachines catalyze the directed movement of biopolymers in the cell. They are found both dissolved in the aqueous cytosol as well as embedded in lipid bilayers. Inquiries into the molecular mechanism of nanomachine-catalyzed biopolymer transport have revealed that these machines are equipped with molecular parts, including adjustable clamps, levers, and adaptors, which interact favorably with substrate polypeptides. Biological nanomachines that catalyze protein transport, known as translocases, often require that their substrate proteins unfold before translocation. An unstructured protein chain is likely entropically challenging to bind, push, or pull in a directional manner, especially in a way that produces an unfolding force. A number of ingenious solutions to this problem are now evident in the anthrax toxin system, a model used to study protein translocation. Here we highlight molecular ratchets and current research on anthrax toxin translocation. A picture is emerging of proton-gradient-driven anthrax toxin translocation, and its associated ratchet mechanism likely applies broadly to other systems. We suggest a cyclical thermodynamic order-to-disorder mechanism (akin to a heat-engine cycle) is central to underlying protein translocation: peptide substrates nonspecifically bind to molecular clamps, which possess adjustable affinities; polypeptide substrates compress into helical structures; these clamps undergo proton-gated switching; and the substrate subsequently expands regaining its unfolded state conformational entropy upon translocation. PMID:22374876

  11. Structural Changes and Proton Transfer in Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Vilhjálmsdóttir, Jóhanna; Johansson, Ann-Louise; Brzezinski, Peter

    2015-08-27

    In cytochrome c oxidase electron transfer from cytochrome c to O2 is linked to transmembrane proton pumping, which contributes to maintaining a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane. The mechanism by which cytochrome c oxidase couples the exergonic electron transfer to the endergonic proton translocation is not known, but it presumably involves local structural changes that control the alternating proton access to the two sides of the membrane. Such redox-induced structural changes have been observed in X-ray crystallographic studies at residues 423-425 (in the R. sphaeroides oxidase), located near heme a. The aim of the present study is to investigate the functional effects of these structural changes on reaction steps associated with proton pumping. Residue Ser425 was modified using site-directed mutagenesis and time-resolved spectroscopy was used to investigate coupled electron-proton transfer upon reaction of the oxidase with O2. The data indicate that the structural change at position 425 propagates to the D proton pathway, which suggests a link between redox changes at heme a and modulation of intramolecular proton-transfer rates.

  12. Weak-coupling structure of proton resonant states in 23Al studied with RI beam at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Michimasa, S.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Gono, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Kato, S.

    2006-07-01

    Proton resonances in 23Al have been investigated for the first time by the resonant elastic and inelastic scattering of 22Mg+p by using a 4.38 MeV/nucleon 22Mg beam bombarding a thick Hydrogen target. The low-energy 22Mg beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB). A new resonant state due to elastic scattering was observed at Ex = 3.00 MeV with a Jπ = (3/2+) assignment. Other three excited states due to resonant inelastic scattering at 3.14, 3.26 and 3.95 MeV were identified and all mainly decay to the first excited state in 22Mg by the proton emissions. The newly observed 3.95-MeV state probably has a spin-parity of Jπ = (7/2+). The resonant properties were determined from an R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions. The weak-coupling structure in 23Al is discussed in conjunction with a shell-model calculation.

  13. Pivotal Roles of Three Conserved Carboxyl Residues of NuoC (30k) Segment in the Structural Integrity of Proton-translocating NADH-Quinone Oxidoreductase (NDH-1) from Escherichia coli#

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Guerrero, Norma; Sinha, Prem Kumar; Torres-Bacete, Jesus; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2010-01-01

    The prokaryotic proton-translocating NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1) is an L-shaped membrane-bound enzyme that contains 14 subunits (NuoA-NuoN/Nqo1-Nqo14). All subunits have their counterparts in the eukaryotic enzyme (complex I). NDH-1 consists of two domains: the peripheral arm (NuoB,C,D,E,F,G, and I) and the membrane arm (NuoA,H,J,K,L,M, and N). In Escherichia coli NDH-1 the hydrophilic subunits NuoC/Nqo5/30k and NuoD/Nqo4/49k are fused together in a single polypeptide as the NuoCD subunit. The NuoCD subunit is the only subunit that does not bear a cofactor in the peripheral arm. While some roles for inhibitor- and quinone-association have been reported for the NuoD segment, structural and functional roles of the NuoC segment remain mostly elusive. In the current work, 14 highly conserved residues of the NuoC segment were mutated and 21 mutants were constructed using the chromosomal gene manipulation technique. From the enzymatic assays and immunochemical and blue-native gel analyses, it was found that residues Glu-138, Glu-140, and Asp-143 that are anticipated to be in the third α-helix are absolutely required for the energy-transducing NDH-1 activities and the assembly of the whole enzyme. Together with available information for the hydrophobic subunits, it is proposed that Glu-138, Glu-140, and Asp-143 of the NuoC segment may have a pivotal role in structural stability of NDH-1. PMID:20979355

  14. Measurement of muon capture on the proton to 1% precision and determination of the pseudoscalar coupling gP.

    PubMed

    Andreev, V A; Banks, T I; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2013-01-01

    The MuCap experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute has measured the rate Λ(S) of muon capture from the singlet state of the muonic hydrogen atom to a precision of 1%. A muon beam was stopped in a time projection chamber filled with 10-bar, ultrapure hydrogen gas. Cylindrical wire chambers and a segmented scintillator barrel detected electrons from muon decay. Λ(S) is determined from the difference between the μ(-) disappearance rate in hydrogen and the free muon decay rate. The result is based on the analysis of 1.2 × 10(10) μ(-) decays, from which we extract the capture rate Λ(S) = (714.9 ± 5.4(stat) ± 5.1(syst)) s(-1) and derive the proton's pseudoscalar coupling g(P)(q(0)(2) = -0.88 m(μ)(2)) = 8.06 ± 0.55.

  15. Coupled electron transfer and proton hopping in the final step of CYP19-catalyzed androgen aromatization.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kakali; Hackett, John C

    2012-04-10

    Aromatase (CYP19) catalyzes the terminal step in estrogen biosynthesis, which requires three separate oxidation reactions, culminating in an enigmatic aromatization that converts an androgen to an estrogen. A stable ferric peroxo (Fe(3+)O(2)(2-)) intermediate is seen by electron paramagnetic resonance, but its role in this complex reaction remains controversial. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics, we show that ferric peroxo addition to the 19-aldehyde initiates the reaction. Stepwise cleavage of the C10-C19 and O-O bonds of the peroxohemiacetal extrudes formate and yields Compound II, which in turn desaturates the steroid through successive abstraction of the 1β-hydrogen atom and deprotonation of the 2β-position. Throughout the transformation, a proton is cyclically relayed between D309 and the substrate to stabilize reaction intermediates. This mechanism invokes novel oxygen intermediates and provides a unifying interpretation of past experimental mechanistic studies.

  16. Proton conducting sodium alginate electrolyte laterally coupled low-voltage oxide-based transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang Hui; Qiang Zhu, Li; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-03-01

    Solution-processed sodium alginate electrolyte film shows a high proton conductivity of ˜5.5 × 10-3 S/cm and a high lateral electric-double-layer (EDL) capacitance of ˜2.0 μF/cm2 at room temperature with a relative humidity of 57%. Low-voltage in-plane-gate indium-zinc-oxide-based EDL transistors laterally gated by sodium alginate electrolytes are fabricated on glass substrates. The field-effect mobility, current ON/OFF ratio, and subthreshold swing of such EDL transistors are estimated to be 4.2 cm2 V-1 s-1, 2.8 × 106, and 130 mV/decade, respectively. At last, a low-voltage driven resistor-load inverter is also demonstrated. Such in-plane-gate EDL transistors have potential applications in portable electronics and low-cost biosensors.

  17. Proton-coupled self-assembly of a porphyrin-naphthalenediimide dyad.

    PubMed

    Tu, Siyu; Kim, Se Hye; Joseph, Jojo; Modarelli, David A; Parquette, Jon R

    2013-06-01

    The construction of an n-p heterojunction through the self-assembly of a dyad based on tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) and 1,4,5,8-naphthalenedimide (NDI) (1) is described. Proton transfer from the lysine head group of 1 to the porphyrin ring occurs concomitantly with self-assembly into 1D nanorods in CHCl3. TEM and AFM studies showed that the nanorods are formed by the lateral and vertical fusion of multilameller vesicles into networks and hollow ribbons, respectively. These intermediate structures transitioned to nanorods over the course of 4-6 days. Time-resolved spectroscopy revealed that photoinduced charge separation occurs with rate constants that depend on the nature of the aggregation. PMID:23564748

  18. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one and two proton transfer reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Verma, S.; Sandal, Rohit; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one and two proton stripping reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems were performed at lab energy 120 MeV with 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. Theoretical calculations performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code FRESCO (including various intermediate states involving target and projectile excitations before and/or after transfer along with sequential transfer) were able to reproduce one and two proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It was found that the DWBA calculations could describe the one proton transfer data well for both the systems but failed to reproduce the angular distributions for two proton transfer channels. The present measurements underline the importance of sequential transfer at energies much above the Coulomb barrier. We had also performed transfer reaction measurements for these systems in the sub- and near barrier region using recoil mass separator.

  19. Pseudo-scalar pi N coupling and relativistic proton-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Franz; Maung, Khin Maung; Tjon, J. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wallace, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    Relativistic p-Ca-40 elastic scattering observables are calculated using relativistic NN amplitudes obtained from the solution of a two-body relativistic equation in which one particle is kept on its mass-shell. Results at 200 MeV are presented for two sets of NN amplitudes, one with pure pseudo-vector coupling for the pion and another with a 25 percent admixture of pseudo-scaling coupling. Both give a very good fit to the positive energy on-shell NN data. Differences between the predictions of these two models (which are shown to be due only to the differences in their corresponding negative energy amplitudes) provide a measure of the uncertainty in contructing Dirac optical potentials from NN amplitudes.

  20. Overexpression of a proton-coupled vacuolar glucose exporter impairs freezing tolerance and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Trentmann, Oliver; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schulz, Alexander; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Arabidopsis vacuoles harbor, besides sugar transporter of the TMT-type, an early response to dehydration like 6 (ERDL6) protein involved in glucose export into the cytosol. However, the mode of transport of ERDL6 and the plant's feedback to overexpression of its activity on essential properties such as, for example, seed germination or freezing tolerance, remain unexplored. Using patch-clamp studies on vacuoles expressing AtERDL6 we demonstrated directly that this carrier operates as a proton-driven glucose exporter. Overexpression of BvIMP, the closest sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) homolog to AtERDL6, in Arabidopsis leads surprisingly to impaired seed germination under both conditions, sugar application and low environmental temperatures, but not under standard conditions. Upon cold treatment, BvIMP overexpressor plants accumulated lower quantities of monosaccharides than the wild-type, a response in line with the reduced frost tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and the fact that cold temperatures inhibits BvIMP transcription in sugar beet leaves. With these findings we show that the tight control of vacuolar sugar import and export is a key requisite for cold tolerance and seed germination of plants.

  1. Overexpression of a proton-coupled vacuolar glucose exporter impairs freezing tolerance and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Trentmann, Oliver; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schulz, Alexander; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Arabidopsis vacuoles harbor, besides sugar transporter of the TMT-type, an early response to dehydration like 6 (ERDL6) protein involved in glucose export into the cytosol. However, the mode of transport of ERDL6 and the plant's feedback to overexpression of its activity on essential properties such as, for example, seed germination or freezing tolerance, remain unexplored. Using patch-clamp studies on vacuoles expressing AtERDL6 we demonstrated directly that this carrier operates as a proton-driven glucose exporter. Overexpression of BvIMP, the closest sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) homolog to AtERDL6, in Arabidopsis leads surprisingly to impaired seed germination under both conditions, sugar application and low environmental temperatures, but not under standard conditions. Upon cold treatment, BvIMP overexpressor plants accumulated lower quantities of monosaccharides than the wild-type, a response in line with the reduced frost tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and the fact that cold temperatures inhibits BvIMP transcription in sugar beet leaves. With these findings we show that the tight control of vacuolar sugar import and export is a key requisite for cold tolerance and seed germination of plants. PMID:24329902

  2. Proton conducting sodium alginate electrolyte laterally coupled low-voltage oxide-based transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang Hui; Wan, Qing; Qiang Zhu, Li; Shi, Yi

    2014-03-31

    Solution-processed sodium alginate electrolyte film shows a high proton conductivity of ∼5.5 × 10{sup −3} S/cm and a high lateral electric-double-layer (EDL) capacitance of ∼2.0 μF/cm{sup 2} at room temperature with a relative humidity of 57%. Low-voltage in-plane-gate indium-zinc-oxide-based EDL transistors laterally gated by sodium alginate electrolytes are fabricated on glass substrates. The field-effect mobility, current ON/OFF ratio, and subthreshold swing of such EDL transistors are estimated to be 4.2 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, 2.8 × 10{sup 6}, and 130 mV/decade, respectively. At last, a low-voltage driven resistor-load inverter is also demonstrated. Such in-plane-gate EDL transistors have potential applications in portable electronics and low-cost biosensors.

  3. Solar-Driven Water Oxidation and Decoupled Hydrogen Production Mediated by an Electron-Coupled-Proton Buffer.

    PubMed

    Bloor, Leanne G; Solarska, Renata; Bienkowski, Krzysztof; Kulesza, Pawel J; Augustynski, Jan; Symes, Mark D; Cronin, Leroy

    2016-06-01

    Solar-to-hydrogen photoelectrochemical cells (PECs) have been proposed as a means of converting sunlight into H2 fuel. However, in traditional PECs, the oxygen evolution reaction and the hydrogen evolution reaction are coupled, and so the rate of both of these is limited by the photocurrents that can be generated from the solar flux. This in turn leads to slow rates of gas evolution that favor crossover of H2 into the O2 stream and vice versa, even through ostensibly impermeable membranes such as Nafion. Herein, we show that the use of the electron-coupled-proton buffer (ECPB) H3PMo12O40 allows solar-driven O2 evolution from water to proceed at rates of over 1 mA cm(-2) on WO3 photoanodes without the need for any additional electrochemical bias. No H2 is produced in the PEC, and instead H3PMo12O40 is reduced to H5PMo12O40. If the reduced ECPB is subjected to a separate electrochemical reoxidation, then H2 is produced with full overall Faradaic efficiency. PMID:27159121

  4. Solar-Driven Water Oxidation and Decoupled Hydrogen Production Mediated by an Electron-Coupled-Proton Buffer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solar-to-hydrogen photoelectrochemical cells (PECs) have been proposed as a means of converting sunlight into H2 fuel. However, in traditional PECs, the oxygen evolution reaction and the hydrogen evolution reaction are coupled, and so the rate of both of these is limited by the photocurrents that can be generated from the solar flux. This in turn leads to slow rates of gas evolution that favor crossover of H2 into the O2 stream and vice versa, even through ostensibly impermeable membranes such as Nafion. Herein, we show that the use of the electron-coupled-proton buffer (ECPB) H3PMo12O40 allows solar-driven O2 evolution from water to proceed at rates of over 1 mA cm–2 on WO3 photoanodes without the need for any additional electrochemical bias. No H2 is produced in the PEC, and instead H3PMo12O40 is reduced to H5PMo12O40. If the reduced ECPB is subjected to a separate electrochemical reoxidation, then H2 is produced with full overall Faradaic efficiency. PMID:27159121

  5. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    channel is large enough to contain water molecules. and is normally filled with water. In analogy to the mechanism of proton transfer in some other channels, it has been postulated that protons are translocated along the network of water molecules filling the pore of the channel. This mechanism, however, must involve an additional important step because the channel contains four histidine amino acid residues, one from each of the helices, which are sufficiently large to occlude the pore and interrupt the water network. The histidine residues ensure channel selectivity by blocking transport of small ions, such as sodium or potassium. They have been also implicated in gating protons due to the ability of each histidine to become positively charged by accepting an additional proton. Two mechanisms of gating have been proposed. In one mechanism, all four histidines acquire an additional proton and, due to repulsion between their positive charges, move away from one another, thus opening the channel. The alternative mechanism relies of the ability of protons to move between different atoms in a molecule (tautomerization). Thus, a proton is captured on one side of the gate while another proton is released from the opposite side, and the molecule returns to the initial state through tautomerization. The simulations were designed to test these two mechanisms. Large-scale, atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations of the channel with the histidine residues in different protonation states revealed that all intermediate states of the system involved in the tautomerization mechanism are structurally stable and the arrangement of water molecules in the channel is conducive to the proton transport. In contrast, in the four-protonated state, postulated to exist in the gate-opening mechanism, the electrostatic repulsion between the histidine residues appears to be so large that the channel loses its structural integrity and one helix moves away from the remaining three. Additional

  6. Dynamical coupled-channels approach to hadronic and electromagnetic kaon-hyperon production on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Saghai, B.; Tabakin, F.

    2006-05-15

    A dynamical coupled-channels formalism for processes {pi}N{yields}KY and {gamma}N{yields}KY is presented that provides a comprehensive investigation of recent data on the {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda} reaction. The nonresonant interactions within the subspace KY+{pi}N are derived from effective Lagrangians, using a unitary transformation method. The calculations of photoproduction amplitudes are simplified by casting the coupled-channels equations into a form such that the empirical {gamma}N{yields}{pi}N amplitudes are input and only the parameters associated with the KY channel are determined by performing {chi}{sup 2} fits to all of the available data for {pi}{sup -}p{yields}K deg.{lambda},K deg.{sigma} deg., and {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda}. Good agreement between our models and those data are obtained. In the fits to {pi}N{yields}KY channels, most of the parameters are constrained within {+-}20% of the values given by the Particle Data Group and/or quark model predictions, whereas for {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda} parameters, ranges compatible with broken SU(6) x O(3) symmetry are imposed. The main reaction mechanisms in K{sup +}{lambda} photoproduction are singled out and issues related to newly suggested resonances S{sub 11},P{sub 13}, and D{sub 13} are studied. Results illustrating the importance of using a coupled-channels treatment are reported. Meson cloud effects on the {gamma}N{yields}N* transitions are also discussed.

  7. An efficient proton-coupled electron-transfer process during oxidation of ferulic acid by horseradish peroxidase: coming full cycle.

    PubMed

    Derat, Etienne; Shaik, Sason

    2006-10-25

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations were utilized to study the process of oxidation of a native substrate (ferulic acid) by the active species of horseradish peroxidase (Dunford, H. B. Heme Peroxidases; Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999), Compound I and Compound II, and the manner by which the enzyme returns to its resting state. The results match experimental findings and reveal additional novel features. The calculations demonstrate that both oxidation processes are initiated by a proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step, in which the active species of the enzyme participate only as electron-transfer partners, while the entire proton-transfer event is being relayed from the substrate to and from the His42 residue by a water molecule (W402). The reason for the observed (Henriksen, A; Smith, A. T.; Gajhede, M. J. Biol. Chem. 1999, 274, 35005-35011) similar reactivities of Compound I and Compound II toward ferulic acid is that the reactive isomer of Compound II is the, hitherto unobserved, Por(*)(+)Fe(III)OH isomer that resembles Compound I. The PCET mechanism reveals that His42 and W402 are crucial moieties and they determine the function of the HRP enzyme and account for its ability to perform substrate oxidation (Poulos, T. L. Peroxidases and Cytochrome P450. In The Porphyrin Handbook; Kadish, K. M., Smith, K. M., Guilard, R., Eds.; Academic Press: New York, 2000; Vol. 4, pp 189). In view of the results, the possibility of manipulating substrate oxidation by magnetic fields is an intriguing possibility. PMID:17044722

  8. Investigations on the role of proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen activation by [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mulder, David W; Ratzloff, Michael W; Bruschi, Maurizio; Greco, Claudio; Koonce, Evangeline; Peters, John W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-29

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is a fundamental process at the core of oxidation-reduction reactions for energy conversion. The [FeFe]-hydrogenases catalyze the reversible activation of molecular H2 through a unique metallocofactor, the H-cluster, which is finely tuned by the surrounding protein environment to undergo fast PCET transitions. The correlation of electronic and structural transitions at the H-cluster with proton-transfer (PT) steps has not been well-resolved experimentally. Here, we explore how modification of the conserved PT network via a Cys → Ser substitution at position 169 proximal to the H-cluster of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CrHydA1) affects the H-cluster using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Despite a substantial decrease in catalytic activity, the EPR and FTIR spectra reveal different H-cluster catalytic states under reducing and oxidizing conditions. Under H2 or sodium dithionite reductive treatments, the EPR spectra show signals that are consistent with a reduced [4Fe-4S]H(+) subcluster. The FTIR spectra showed upshifts of νCO modes to energies that are consistent with an increase in oxidation state of the [2Fe]H subcluster, which was corroborated by DFT analysis. In contrast to the case for wild-type CrHydA1, spectra associated with Hred and Hsred states are less populated in the Cys → Ser variant, demonstrating that the exchange of -SH with -OH alters how the H-cluster equilibrates among different reduced states of the catalytic cycle under steady-state conditions. PMID:25286239

  9. pH-Dependent Reduction Potentials and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Hydrogen-Producing Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Appel, Aaron M.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-04-01

    The nickel-based Ph Bz 2 2 P N electrocatalysts, which are comprised of a nickel atom and two 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands, have been shown to effectively catalyze H2 production in acetonitrile. Recent electrochemical experiments revealed a linear dependence of the NiII/I reduction potential on pH, suggesting a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. In the proposed mechanism, the catalytic cycle begins with a PCET process involving electrochemical electron transfer to the nickel center and intermolecular proton transfer from an acid to the pendant amine ligand. This paper presents quantum mechanical calculations of this PCET process to examine the thermodynamics of the sequential mechanisms, in which either the electron or the proton transfers first (ET–PT and PT–ET, respectively), and the concerted mechanism (EPT). The favored mechanism depends on a balance among many factors, including the acid strength, association free energy for the acid–catalyst complex, PT free energy barrier, and ET reduction potential. The ET reduction potential is less negative after PT, favoring the PT–ET mechanism, and the association free energy is less positive after reduction, favoring the ET–PT mechanism. The calculations, along with analysis of the experimental data, indicate that the sequential ET–PT mechanism is favored for weak acids because of the substantial decrease in the association free energy after reduction. For strong acids, however, the PT–ET mechanism may be favored because the association free energy is somewhat smaller and PT is more thermodynamically favorable. The concerted mechanism could also occur, particularly for intermediate acid strengths. In the context of the entire catalytic cycle for H2 production, the initial PCET process involving intermolecular PT has a more negative reduction potential than the subsequent PCET process involving intramolecular PT. As a result, the second PCET should

  10. Photocatalytic Conversion of Nitrobenzene to Aniline through Sequential Proton-Coupled One-Electron Transfers from a Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stephen C; Homan, Stephanie Bettis; Weiss, Emily A

    2016-02-10

    This paper describes the use of cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) as visible-light photocatalysts for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline through six sequential photoinduced, proton-coupled electron transfers. At pH 3.6-4.3, the internal quantum yield of photons-to-reducing electrons is 37.1% over 54 h of illumination, with no apparent decrease in catalyst activity. Monitoring of the QD exciton by transient absorption reveals that, for each step in the catalytic cycle, the sacrificial reductant, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, scavenges the excitonic hole in ∼5 ps to form QD(•-); electron transfer to nitrobenzene or the intermediates nitrosobenzene and phenylhydroxylamine then occurs on the nanosecond time scale. The rate constants for the single-electron transfer reactions are correlated with the driving forces for the corresponding proton-coupled electron transfers. This result suggests, but does not prove, that electron transfer, not proton transfer, is rate-limiting for these reactions. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the QD-molecule systems shows that the photoproduct aniline, left unprotonated, serves as a poison for the QD catalyst by adsorbing to its surface. Performing the reaction at an acidic pH not only encourages aniline to desorb but also increases the probability of protonated intermediates; the latter effect probably ensures that recruitment of protons is not rate-limiting.

  11. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Bagaturia, I.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. 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R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, [Authorinst]The CMS

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of.

  12. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Series of Ruthenium-Linked Tyrosines with Internal Bases: Evaluation of a Tunneling Model for Experimental Temperature-Dependent Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Markle, Todd F; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Santoni, Marie-Pierre; Johannissen, Linus O; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-09-01

    Photoinitiated proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) kinetics has been investigated in a series of four modified tyrosines linked to a ruthenium photosensitizer in acetonitrile, with each tyrosine bearing an internal hydrogen bond to a covalently linked pyridine or benzimidazole base. After correcting for differences in driving force, it is found that the intrinsic PCET rate constant still varies by 2 orders of magnitude. The differences in rates, as well as the magnitude of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE = kH/kD), both generally correlate with DFT calculated proton donor-acceptor distances. An Arrhenius analysis of temperature dependent data shows that the difference in reactivity arises primarily from differences in activation energies. We use this kinetic data to evaluate a commonly employed theoretical model for proton tunneling which includes a harmonic distribution of proton donor-acceptor distances due to vibrational motions of the molecule. Applying this model to the experimental data yields the conclusion that donor-acceptor compression is more facile in the compounds with shorter PT distance; however, this is contrary to independent calculations for the same compounds. This discrepancy is likely because the assumption in the model of Morse-shaped proton potential energy surfaces is inappropriate for (strongly) hydrogen-bonded systems. These results question the general applicability of this model. The results also suggest that a correlation of rate vs proton tunneling distance for the series of compounds is complicated by a concomitant variation of other relevant parameters.

  13. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Series of Ruthenium-Linked Tyrosines with Internal Bases: Evaluation of a Tunneling Model for Experimental Temperature-Dependent Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Markle, Todd F; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Santoni, Marie-Pierre; Johannissen, Linus O; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-09-01

    Photoinitiated proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) kinetics has been investigated in a series of four modified tyrosines linked to a ruthenium photosensitizer in acetonitrile, with each tyrosine bearing an internal hydrogen bond to a covalently linked pyridine or benzimidazole base. After correcting for differences in driving force, it is found that the intrinsic PCET rate constant still varies by 2 orders of magnitude. The differences in rates, as well as the magnitude of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE = kH/kD), both generally correlate with DFT calculated proton donor-acceptor distances. An Arrhenius analysis of temperature dependent data shows that the difference in reactivity arises primarily from differences in activation energies. We use this kinetic data to evaluate a commonly employed theoretical model for proton tunneling which includes a harmonic distribution of proton donor-acceptor distances due to vibrational motions of the molecule. Applying this model to the experimental data yields the conclusion that donor-acceptor compression is more facile in the compounds with shorter PT distance; however, this is contrary to independent calculations for the same compounds. This discrepancy is likely because the assumption in the model of Morse-shaped proton potential energy surfaces is inappropriate for (strongly) hydrogen-bonded systems. These results question the general applicability of this model. The results also suggest that a correlation of rate vs proton tunneling distance for the series of compounds is complicated by a concomitant variation of other relevant parameters. PMID:27490689

  14. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  15. Electron Transfer Reactivity of the Aqueous Iron(IV)-Oxo Complex. Outer-Sphere vs Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, Fe(IV)(H2O)5O(2+) (hereafter Fe(IV)aqO(2+)), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)3(2+) (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS(-)/ABTS(2-), phenothiazines, Co(II)(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. Fe(IV)aqO(2+) oxidizes even Ce(III) (E(0) in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7 V) with a rate constant greater than 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)3(2+) (k = 2.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), IrCl6(3-) (1.6 × 10(6)), ABTS(2-) (4.7 × 10(7)), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 10(7)) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)3(2+) and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H(+)] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of Fe(IV)aqO(2+) and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E(0)Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E(0)Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+) couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10(-5) M(-1) s(-1) and thus E(0)(Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+)) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E(0) (Fe(IV)aqO(2+), H(+)/Fe(III)aqOH(2+)) ≥ 1.95 V. PMID:27320290

  16. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of J-coupled resonances in human brain at 3 and 4 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Bustillo, Juan; Chen, Hongji; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Gasparovic, Charles; Zuo, Chun; Magnotta, Vincent; Mueller, Bryon; Mullins, Paul; Renshaw, Perry; Ugurbil, Kamil; Lim, Kelvin O; Alger, Jeffry R

    2007-08-01

    In this multicenter study, 2D spatial mapping of J-coupled resonances at 3T and 4T was performed using short-TE (15 ms) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI). Water-suppressed (WS) data were acquired in 8.5 min with 1-cm(3) spatial resolution from a supraventricular axial slice. Optimized outer volume suppression (OVS) enabled mapping in close proximity to peripheral scalp regions. Constrained spectral fitting in reference to a non-WS (NWS) scan was performed with LCModel using correction for relaxation attenuation and partial-volume effects. The concentrations of total choline (tCho), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamate + glutamine (Glu+Gln), myo-inositol (Ins), NAA, NAA+NAAG, and two macromolecular resonances at 0.9 and 2.0 ppm were mapped with mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) between 6% and 18% and approximately 150-cm(3) sensitive volumes. Aspartate, GABA, glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and macromolecules (MMs) at 1.2 ppm were also mapped, although with larger mean CRLBs between 30% and 44%. The CRLBs at 4T were 19% lower on average as compared to 3T, consistent with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral resolution. Metabolite concentrations were in the ranges reported in previous studies. Glu concentration was significantly higher in gray matter (GM) compared to white matter (WM), as anticipated. The short acquisition time makes this methodology suitable for clinical studies.

  17. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of J-coupled resonances in human brain at 3 and 4 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Bustillo, Juan; Chen, Hongji; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Gasparovic, Charles; Zuo, Chun; Magnotta, Vincent; Mueller, Bryon; Mullins, Paul; Renshaw, Perry; Ugurbil, Kamil; Lim, Kelvin O; Alger, Jeffry R

    2007-08-01

    In this multicenter study, 2D spatial mapping of J-coupled resonances at 3T and 4T was performed using short-TE (15 ms) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI). Water-suppressed (WS) data were acquired in 8.5 min with 1-cm(3) spatial resolution from a supraventricular axial slice. Optimized outer volume suppression (OVS) enabled mapping in close proximity to peripheral scalp regions. Constrained spectral fitting in reference to a non-WS (NWS) scan was performed with LCModel using correction for relaxation attenuation and partial-volume effects. The concentrations of total choline (tCho), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamate + glutamine (Glu+Gln), myo-inositol (Ins), NAA, NAA+NAAG, and two macromolecular resonances at 0.9 and 2.0 ppm were mapped with mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) between 6% and 18% and approximately 150-cm(3) sensitive volumes. Aspartate, GABA, glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and macromolecules (MMs) at 1.2 ppm were also mapped, although with larger mean CRLBs between 30% and 44%. The CRLBs at 4T were 19% lower on average as compared to 3T, consistent with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral resolution. Metabolite concentrations were in the ranges reported in previous studies. Glu concentration was significantly higher in gray matter (GM) compared to white matter (WM), as anticipated. The short acquisition time makes this methodology suitable for clinical studies. PMID:17610279

  18. Coupled modeling of water transport and air-droplet interaction in the electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Pianese, Cesare; Guezennec, Yann G.

    In this work, an accurate and computationally fast model for liquid water transport within a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) electrode is developed by lumping the space-dependence of the relevant variables. Capillarity is considered as the main transport mechanism within the gas diffusion layer (GDL). The novelty of the model lies in the coupled simulation of the water transport at the interface between gas diffusion layer and gas flow channel (GFC). This is achieved with a phenomenological description of the process that allows its simulation with relative simplicity. Moreover, a detailed two-dimensional visualization of such interface is achieved via geometric simulation of water droplets formation, growth, coalescence and detachment on the surface of the GDL. The model is useful for optimization analysis oriented to both PEMFC design and balance of plant. Furthermore, the accomplishment of reduced computational time and good accuracy makes the model suitable for control strategy implementation to ensure PEM fuel cells operation within optimal electrode water content.

  19. Roles of multiple-proton transfer pathways and proton-coupled electron transfer in the reactivity of the bis-FeIV state of MauG.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongxin; Williamson, Heather R; Davidson, Victor L

    2015-09-01

    The high-valent state of the diheme enzyme MauG exhibits charge-resonance (CR) stabilization in which the major species is a bis-Fe(IV) state with one heme present as Fe(IV)=O and the other as Fe(IV) with axial heme ligands provided by His and Tyr side chains. In the absence of its substrate, the high-valent state is relatively stable and returns to the diferric state over several minutes. It is shown that this process occurs in two phases. The first phase is redistribution of the resonance species that support the CR. The second phase is the loss of CR and reduction to the diferric state. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the rates of the two phases exhibited different temperature dependencies and activation energies of 8.9 and 19.6 kcal/mol. The two phases exhibited kinetic solvent isotope effects of 2.5 and 2.3. Proton inventory plots of each reaction phase exhibited extreme curvature that could not be fit to models for one- or multiple-proton transfers in the transition state. Each did fit well to a model for two alternative pathways for proton transfer, each involving multiple protons. In each case the experimentally determined fractionation factors were consistent with one of the pathways involving tunneling. The percent of the reaction that involved the tunneling pathway differed for the two reaction phases. Using the crystal structure of MauG it was possible to propose proton-transfer pathways consistent with the experimental data using water molecules and amino acid side chains in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme.

  20. Proton-coupled organic cation antiporter-mediated uptake of apomorphine enantiomers in human brain capillary endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3.

    PubMed

    Okura, Takashi; Higuchi, Kei; Kitamura, Atsushi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    R(-)-Apomorphine is a dopamine agonist used for rescue management of motor function impairment associated with levodopa therapy in Parkinson's disease patients. The aim of this study was to examine the role of proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in uptake of R(-)-apomorphine and its S-enantiomer in human brain, using human endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 as a model. Uptake of R(-)- or S(+)-apomorphine into hCMEC/D3 cells was measured under various conditions to evaluate its time-, concentration-, energy- and ion-dependency. Inhibition by selected organic cations was also examined. Uptakes of both R(-)- and S(+)-apomorphine increased with time. The initial uptake velocities of R(-)- and S(+)-apomorphine were concentration-dependent, with similar Km and Vmax values. The cell-to-medium (C/M) ratio of R(-)-apomorphine was significantly reduced by pretreatment with sodium azide, but was not affected by replacement of extracellular sodium ion with N-methylglucamine or potassium. Intracellular alkalization markedly reduced the uptake, while intracellular acidification increased it, suggesting that the uptake is driven by an oppositely directed proton gradient. The C/M ratio was significantly decreased by amantadine, verapamil, pyrilamine and diphenhydramine (substrates or inhibitors of proton-coupled organic cation antiporter), while tetraethylammonium (substrate of organic cation transporters (OCTs)) and carnitine (substrate of carnitine/organic cation transporter 2; (OCTN2)) had no effect. R(-)-Apomorphine uptake was competitively inhibited by diphenhydramine. Our results indicate that R(-)-apomorphine transport in human blood-brain barrier (BBB) model cells is similar to S(+)-apomorphine uptake. The transport was dependent on an oppositely directed proton gradient, but was sodium- or membrane potential-independent. The transport characteristics were consistent with involvement of the previously reported proton-coupled organic cation antiporter.

  1. Surface modification of Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles by silane coupling agent: Synthesis and application in proton exchange composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Salarizadeh, Parisa; Javanbakht, Mehran; Pourmahdian, Saeed; Bagheri, Ahmad; Beydaghi, Hossein; Enhessari, Morteza

    2016-06-15

    Modifying surfaces of nanoparticles with silane coupling agent provides a simple method to alter their surface properties and improve their dispersibility in organic solvents and polymer matrix. Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles (IT) were modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as novel reinforcing filler for proton exchange membranes. The main operating parameters such as reaction time (R.T), APTES/IT and triethylamine (TEA)/IT ratios have been optimized for maximum grafting efficiency. The optimum conditions for R.T, APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were 6h, 4 and 0.3 respectively. It was observed that the APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were the most significant parameters affecting the grafting percentage. Modified nanoparticles were characterized using FT-IR, TGA, SEM, TEM and XRD techniques. Effects of modified nanoparticles in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) were evaluated. The resulting nanocomposite membranes exhibited higher proton conductivity in comparison with pristine SPPEK and SPPEK/IT membranes. This increase is attributed to connectivity of the water channels which creates more direct pathways for proton transport. Composite membrane with 3% AIT (6.46% grafting amount) showed 0.024 S cm(-1) proton conductivity at 25 °C and 149 mW cm(-2) power density (at 0.5V) at 80 °C which were about 243% and 51%, respectively higher than that of pure SPPEK.

  2. Nitric oxide is reduced to HNO by proton-coupled nucleophilic attack by ascorbate, tyrosine, and other alcohols. A new route to HNO in biological media?

    PubMed

    Suarez, Sebastián A; Neuman, Nicolás I; Muñoz, Martina; Álvarez, Lucía; Bikiel, Damián E; Brondino, Carlos D; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Miljkovic, Jan Lj; Filipovic, Milos R; Martí, Marcelo A; Doctorovich, Fabio

    2015-04-15

    The role of NO in biology is well established. However, an increasing body of evidence suggests that azanone (HNO), could also be involved in biological processes, some of which are attributed to NO. In this context, one of the most important and yet unanswered questions is whether and how HNO is produced in vivo. A possible route concerns the chemical or enzymatic reduction of NO. In the present work, we have taken advantage of a selective HNO sensing method, to show that NO is reduced to HNO by biologically relevant alcohols with moderate reducing capacity, such as ascorbate or tyrosine. The proposed mechanism involves a nucleophilic attack to NO by the alcohol, coupled to a proton transfer (PCNA: proton-coupled nucleophilic attack) and a subsequent decomposition of the so-produced radical to yield HNO and an alkoxyl radical.

  3. H/sup +/-translocating ATPases: advances using membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, two primary active transport systems (H/sup +/ -ATPases) in plant cells are examined using membrane vesicles as a simple experimental tool. One electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPase is vanadate-sensitive and associated with the plasma membrane. Another electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPases is anion-sensitive, and localized on the tonoplast (and perhaps other membranes). According to the working model, the plasma membrane and tonoplast-type H/sup +/ -ATPases are detectable in inside-out plasma membrane and right-side-out tonoplast vesicles. The direction of H/sup +/ pumping into these vesicles would be consistent with the results from intact cells where H/sup +/ are extruded from the cell across the plasma membrane and pumped into the vacuole from the cytoplasm. Understanding the properties of H/sup +/ -pumping ATPases using membrane vesicles has paved the way for studies to identify secondary active transport systems coupled to the proton electrochemical gradient. Redox-driven transport systems can also be studied directly using the isolated vesicles. As transport proteins are identified, the functional activities can be specifically studied after reconstitution of the purified protein(s) into phospholipid membrane vesicles. 154 references.

  4. A simple, quantitative approach to the coupling of photophosphorylation to electron flow in terms of proton fluxes.

    PubMed

    McCarty, R E; Portis, A R

    1976-11-16

    A simple relationship between observed phosphorylation efficiencies (P/e ratios) and internal proton concentration in spinach chloroplast thylakoids has been derived. P/e ratios, varked by either changing the light intensity or by adding the energy transfer inhibitor, 4'-deoxyphlorizin, were found to change with internal proton concentration in accordance with this relationship. A quantitative prediction of the effect of uncouplers on the P/e ratio can probably also be made. By extrapolation of plots of observed P/e ratios against internal proton concentration divided by the overall rate of electron flow, a maximum intrinsic P/e of about 0.66 is obtained. Assuming that two protons appear inside thylakoids per electron transferred, a P/e ratio of 0.66 suggests that three internal protons are consumed for each ATP formed. Internal protons may be considered to be substrates for the phosphorylation reaction. Hill plots of phosphorylation rate vs. internal proton concentration also indicate that three protons are consumed for each ATP synthesized. Thus, the H+ concentration gradient behaves quantitatively, as well as qualitatively, as if it is the connecting link between electron flow and phosphorylation in illuminated thylakoids.

  5. The potential utility of predicted one bond carbon-proton coupling constants in the structure elucidation of small organic molecules by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkata, Chandrasekhar; Forster, Mark J; Howe, Peter W A; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is the most popular technique used for structure elucidation of small organic molecules in solution, but incorrect structures are regularly reported. One-bond proton-carbon J-couplings provide additional information about chemical structure because they are determined by different features of molecular structure than are proton and carbon chemical shifts. However, these couplings are not routinely used to validate proposed structures because few software tools exist to predict them. This study assesses the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for predicting them using 396 published experimental observations from a diverse range of small organic molecules. With the B3LYP functional and the TZVP basis set, Density Functional Theory calculations using the open-source software package NWChem can predict one-bond CH J-couplings with good accuracy for most classes of small organic molecule. The root-mean-square deviation after correction is 1.5 Hz for most sp3 CH pairs and 1.9 Hz for sp2 pairs; larger errors are observed for sp3 pairs with multiple electronegative substituents and for sp pairs. These results suggest that prediction of one-bond CH J-couplings by Density Functional Theory is sufficiently accurate for structure validation. This will be of particular use in strained ring systems and heterocycles which have characteristic couplings and which pose challenges for structure elucidation.

  6. The Potential Utility of Predicted One Bond Carbon-Proton Coupling Constants in the Structure Elucidation of Small Organic Molecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Chandrasekhar; Forster, Mark J.; Howe, Peter W. A.; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is the most popular technique used for structure elucidation of small organic molecules in solution, but incorrect structures are regularly reported. One-bond proton-carbon J-couplings provide additional information about chemical structure because they are determined by different features of molecular structure than are proton and carbon chemical shifts. However, these couplings are not routinely used to validate proposed structures because few software tools exist to predict them. This study assesses the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for predicting them using 396 published experimental observations from a diverse range of small organic molecules. With the B3LYP functional and the TZVP basis set, Density Functional Theory calculations using the open-source software package NWChem can predict one-bond CH J-couplings with good accuracy for most classes of small organic molecule. The root-mean-square deviation after correction is 1.5 Hz for most sp3 CH pairs and 1.9 Hz for sp2 pairs; larger errors are observed for sp3 pairs with multiple electronegative substituents and for sp pairs. These results suggest that prediction of one-bond CH J-couplings by Density Functional Theory is sufficiently accurate for structure validation. This will be of particular use in strained ring systems and heterocycles which have characteristic couplings and which pose challenges for structure elucidation. PMID:25365289

  7. Expression cloning and functional characterization of the kidney cortex high-affinity proton-coupled peptide transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Boll, M; Herget, M; Wagener, M; Weber, W M; Markovich, D; Biber, J; Clauss, W; Murer, H; Daniel, H

    1996-01-01

    The presence of a proton-coupled electrogenic high-affinity peptide transporter in the apical membrane of tubular cells has been demonstrated by microperfusion studies and by use of brush border membrane vesicles. The transporter mediates tubular uptake of filtered di- and tripeptides and aminocephalosporin antibiotics. We have used expression cloning in Xenopus laevis oocytes for identification and characterization of the renal high-affinity peptide transporter. Injection of poly(A)+ RNA isolated from rabbit kidney cortex into oocytes resulted in expression of a pH-dependent transport activity for the aminocephalosporin antibiotic cefadroxil. After size fractionation of poly(A)+ RNA the transport activity was identified in the 3.0- to 5.0-kb fractions, which were used for construction of a cDNA library. The library was screened for expression of cefadroxil transport after injection of complementary RNA synthesized in vitro from different pools of clones. A single clone (rPepT2) was isolated that stimulated cefadroxil uptake into oocytes approximately 70-fold at a pH of 6.0. Kinetic analysis of cefadroxil uptake expressed by the transporter's complementary RNA showed a single saturable high-affinity transport system shared by dipeptides, tripeptides, and selected amino-beta-lactam antibiotics. Electrophysiological studies established that the transport activity is electrogenic and affected by membrane potential. Sequencing of the cDNA predicts a protein of 729 amino acids with 12 membrane-spanning domains. Although there is a significant amino acid sequence identity (47%) to the recently cloned peptide transporters from rabbit and human small intestine, the renal transporter shows distinct structural and functional differences. Images Fig. 7 PMID:8552623

  8. Monoterpene separation by coupling proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry with fastGC.

    PubMed

    Materić, Dušan; Lanza, Matteo; Sulzer, Philipp; Herbig, Jens; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Mason, Nigel; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a well-established technique for real-time analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Although it is extremely sensitive (with sensitivities of up to 4500 cps/ppbv, limits of detection <1 pptv and the response times of approximately 100 ms), the selectivity of PTR-MS is still somewhat limited, as isomers cannot be separated. Recently, selectivity-enhancing measures, such as manipulation of drift tube parameters (reduced electric field strength) and using primary ions other than H3O(+), such as NO(+) and O2 (+), have been introduced. However, monoterpenes, which belong to the most important plant VOCs, still cannot be distinguished so more traditional technologies, such as gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), have to be utilised. GC-MS is very time consuming (up to 1 h) and cannot be used for real-time analysis. Here, we introduce a sensitive, near-to-real-time method for plant monoterpene research-PTR-MS coupled with fastGC. We successfully separated and identified six of the most abundant monoterpenes in plant studies (α- and β-pinenes, limonene, 3-carene, camphene and myrcene) in less than 80 s, using both standards and conifer branch enclosures (Norway spruce, Scots pine and black pine). Five monoterpenes usually present in Norway spruce samples with a high abundance were separated even when the compound concentrations were diluted to 20 ppbv. Thus, fastGC-PTR-ToF-MS was shown to be an adequate one-instrument solution for plant monoterpene research. PMID:26253230

  9. Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT) family expression in human nasal epithelium and their drug transport potential.

    PubMed

    Agu, Remigius; Cowley, Elizabeth; Shao, Di; Macdonald, Christopher; Kirkpatrick, David; Renton, Ken; Massoud, Emad

    2011-06-01

    The molecular and functional expression of peptide transporters (PEPT1 and PEPT2, PHT1, PHT2) in human nasal epithelium was investigated. Quantitative/reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qPCR/RT-PCR), Western blotting and indirect immuno-histochemistry were used to investigate the functional gene and protein expression for the transporters. Uptake and transport studies were performed using metabolically stable peptides [β-alanyl-L-lysyl-Nε-7-amino-4-methyl-coumarin-3-acetic acid (β-Ala-Lys-AMCA) and β-alanyl-L-histidine (carnosine)]. The effects of concentration, temperature, polarity, competing peptides, and inhibitors on peptide uptake and transport were investigated. PCR products corresponding to PEPT1 (150 bp), PEPT2 (127 bp), PHT1 (110 bp) and PHT2 (198 bp) were detected. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting confirmed the functional expression of PEPT1 and PEPT2 genes. The uptake of β-Ala-Lys-AMCA was concentration-dependent and saturable (Vmax =4.1 ( 0.07 μmol/min/mg protein, Km = 0.6 ( 0.07 μM). The optimal pH for intracellular accumulation of β-Ala-Lys-AMCA was 6.5. Whereas dipeptides and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) significantly inhibited peptide uptake and transport, L-Phe had no effect on peptide transport. The permeation of β-alanyl-L-histidine was concentration-, direction-, and temperature-dependent. The uptake, permeation, qPCR/RT-PCR and protein expression data showed that the human nasal epithelium functionally expresses proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters.

  10. Structure of the hexameric HerA ATPase reveals a mechanism of translocation-coupled DNA-end processing in archaea.

    PubMed

    Rzechorzek, Neil J; Blackwood, John K; Bray, Sian M; Maman, Joseph D; Pellegrini, Luca; Robinson, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    The HerA ATPase cooperates with the NurA nuclease and the Mre11-Rad50 complex for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks in thermophilic archaea. Here we extend our structural knowledge of this minimal end-resection apparatus by presenting the first crystal structure of hexameric HerA. The full-length structure visualizes at atomic resolution the N-terminal HerA-ATP synthase domain and a conserved C-terminal extension, which acts as a physical brace between adjacent protomers. The brace also interacts in trans with nucleotide-binding residues of the neighbouring subunit. Our observations support a model in which the coaxial interaction of the HerA ring with the toroidal NurA dimer generates a continuous channel traversing the complex. HerA-driven translocation would propel the DNA towards the narrow annulus of NurA, leading to duplex melting and nucleolytic digestion. This system differs substantially from the bacterial end-resection paradigms. Our findings suggest a novel mode of DNA-end processing by this integrated archaeal helicase-nuclease machine.

  11. Physiology in conservation translocations.

    PubMed

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R; Munn, Adam J

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining 'success' as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall under a

  12. Physiology in conservation translocations

    PubMed Central

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  13. The Proton-Sensing G-Protein Coupled Receptor GPR4 Promotes Angiogenesis in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohong; Zhong, Qi; Huang, Junwei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Wei; Yang, Zheng; Ding, Shuo; Chen, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is an aggressive disease with poor survival and is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Gastroesophageal reflux is a common event in SCCHN patients. GPR4 is a proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which can be activated by acidosis. The objective of this study was to explore the role of GPR4 in acid exposure and tumor angiogenesis in SCCHN. In this study, we confirmed that overexpressing GPR4 in SCCHN cells could increase the expression and secretion of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA at pH 5.9. This effect could be inhibited by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of p38 increased in GPR4 infected cells at pH 5.9, which could be inhibited by SB203580. In tube formation assay, HMEC-1 cells were incubated with conditioned medium (CM, pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) derived from control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells. Tube length was significantly increased in HMEC-1 cells incubated with CM from GPR4 infected cells compared with control cells at pH5.9, which indicated the pro-angiogenic effect of GPR4 in acidic pH. The neutralizing antibodies of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA could inhibit tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In vivo, the effect of GPR4 on angiogenesis was investigated with the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells were seeded onto the upper CAM surface (n = 5 in each group) and 5 μL DMEM/F12 (pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) was added to the surface of the cell every 24 h. Four days later, the upper CAM were harvested and the ratio of the vascular area to the CAM area was quantified using Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. GPR4 infected cells could recruit more vascular than control cells at pH5.9. In conclusion, we suggested that GPR4 induces angiogenesis via GPR4-induced p38-mediated IL6, IL8 and VEGFA secretion at acidic extracellular pH in SCCHN. PMID:27078157

  14. The Proton-Sensing G-Protein Coupled Receptor GPR4 Promotes Angiogenesis in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhibin; Xu, Hongbo; Chen, Xiaohong; Zhong, Qi; Huang, Junwei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Wei; Yang, Zheng; Ding, Shuo; Chen, Ping; Huang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is an aggressive disease with poor survival and is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Gastroesophageal reflux is a common event in SCCHN patients. GPR4 is a proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which can be activated by acidosis. The objective of this study was to explore the role of GPR4 in acid exposure and tumor angiogenesis in SCCHN. In this study, we confirmed that overexpressing GPR4 in SCCHN cells could increase the expression and secretion of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA at pH 5.9. This effect could be inhibited by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of p38 increased in GPR4 infected cells at pH 5.9, which could be inhibited by SB203580. In tube formation assay, HMEC-1 cells were incubated with conditioned medium (CM, pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) derived from control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells. Tube length was significantly increased in HMEC-1 cells incubated with CM from GPR4 infected cells compared with control cells at pH5.9, which indicated the pro-angiogenic effect of GPR4 in acidic pH. The neutralizing antibodies of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA could inhibit tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In vivo, the effect of GPR4 on angiogenesis was investigated with the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells were seeded onto the upper CAM surface (n = 5 in each group) and 5 μL DMEM/F12 (pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) was added to the surface of the cell every 24 h. Four days later, the upper CAM were harvested and the ratio of the vascular area to the CAM area was quantified using Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. GPR4 infected cells could recruit more vascular than control cells at pH5.9. In conclusion, we suggested that GPR4 induces angiogenesis via GPR4-induced p38-mediated IL6, IL8 and VEGFA secretion at acidic extracellular pH in SCCHN. PMID:27078157

  15. The protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Walter, P; Gilmore, R; Müller, M; Blobel, G

    1982-12-24

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum (r.e.r.) has been postulated to possess a single translation-coupled translocation system (in multiple copies) that effects signal sequence-mediated translocation of all secretory and lysosomal proteins and integration of all integral membrane proteins whose port of entry is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (G. Blobel 1980 Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 1496-1500). Two proteins have been isolated that are components of the r.e.r. translocation system. Their properties and function in protein translocation across and integration into membranes are discussed. PMID:6131460

  16. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (101¯0) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    SciTech Connect

    Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Kharche, Neerav; Batista, Victor S.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Tully, John C.; Muckerman, James T.

    2015-03-12

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (101¯0) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation of free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of –Ga-OH to –Ga-O˙⁻ requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface –NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than –OH sites. However, proton transfer from –OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (101¯0)–water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface –OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.

  17. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (101¯0) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    DOE PAGES

    Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Kharche, Neerav; Batista, Victor S.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Tully, John C.; Muckerman, James T.

    2015-03-12

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (101¯0) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation ofmore » free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of –Ga-OH to –Ga-O˙⁻ requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface –NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than –OH sites. However, proton transfer from –OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (101¯0)–water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface –OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.« less

  18. Optically transmitted and inductively coupled electric reference to access in vivo concentrations for quantitative proton-decoupled ¹³C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Pavan, Matteo; Heinzer-Schweizer, Susanne; Boesiger, Peter; Henning, Anke

    2012-01-01

    This report describes our efforts on quantification of tissue metabolite concentrations in mM by nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the Electric Reference To access In vivo Concentrations (ERETIC) method. Previous work showed that a calibrated synthetic magnetic resonance spectroscopy-like signal transmitted through an optical fiber and inductively coupled into a transmit/receive coil represents a reliable reference standard for in vivo (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy quantification on a clinical platform. In this work, we introduce a related implementation that enables simultaneous proton decoupling and ERETIC-based metabolite quantification and hence extends the applicability of the ERETIC method to nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled in vivo (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, ERETIC signal stability under the influence of simultaneous proton decoupling is investigated. The proposed quantification method was cross-validated against internal and external reference standards on human skeletal muscle. The ERETIC signal intensity stability was 100.65 ± 4.18% over 3 months including measurements with and without proton decoupling. Glycogen and unsaturated fatty acid concentrations measured with the ERETIC method were in excellent agreement with internal creatine and external phantom reference methods, showing a difference of 1.85 ± 1.21% for glycogen and 1.84 ± 1.00% for unsaturated fatty acid between ERETIC and creatine-based quantification, whereas the deviations between external reference and creatine-based quantification are 6.95 ± 9.52% and 3.19 ± 2.60%, respectively.

  19. Elucidating collision induced dissociation products and reaction mechanisms of protonated uracil by coupling chemical dynamics simulations with tandem mass spectrometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Molina, Estefanía Rossich; Ortiz, Daniel; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Spezia, Riccardo

    2015-12-01

    In this study we have coupled mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) direct chemical dynamics simulations with electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry experiments in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the fragmentation mechanisms occurring during the collision induced dissociation of gaseous protonated uracil. Using this approach, we were able to successfully characterize the fragmentation pathways corresponding to ammonia loss (m/z 96), water loss (m/z 95) and cyanic or isocyanic acid loss (m/z 70). Furthermore, we also performed experiments with isotopic labeling completing the fragmentation picture. Remarkably, fragmentation mechanisms obtained from chemical dynamics simulations are consistent with those deduced from isotopic labeling.

  20. Proton transport and torque generation in rotary biomotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. Yu.; Savel'Ev, S.; Mourokh, L. G.; Nori, Franco

    2008-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of rotary biomotors within a simple nanoelectromechanical model, consisting of a stator part and a ring-shaped rotor having 12 proton-binding sites. This model is closely related to the membrane-embedded F0 motor of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase, which converts the energy of the transmembrane electrochemical gradient of protons into mechanical motion of the rotor. It is shown that the Coulomb coupling between the negative charge of the empty rotor site and the positive stator charge, located near the periplasmic proton-conducting channel (proton source), plays a dominant role in the torque-generating process. When approaching the source outlet, the rotor site has a proton energy level higher than the energy level of the site, located near the cytoplasmic channel (proton drain). In the first stage of this torque-generating process, the energy of the electrochemical potential is converted into potential energy of the proton-binding sites on the rotor. Afterwards, the tangential component of the Coulomb force produces a mechanical torque. We demonstrate that, at low temperatures, the loaded motor works in the shuttling regime where the energy of the electrochemical potential is consumed without producing any unidirectional rotation. The motor switches to the torque-generating regime at high temperatures, when the Brownian ratchet mechanism turns on. In the presence of a significant external torque, created by ATP hydrolysis, the system operates as a proton pump, which translocates protons against the transmembrane potential gradient. Here we focus on the F0 motor, even though our analysis is applicable to the bacterial flagellar motor.

  1. Measurement of total and differential W+W– production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-09-06

    The production of W boson pairs in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV is studied using data corresponding to 20.3 fb–1 of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS detector during 2012 at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The W bosons are reconstructed using their leptonic decays into electrons or muons and neutrinos. Events with reconstructed jets are not included in the candidate event sample. A total of 6636 WW candidate events are observed. Measurements are performed in fiducial regions closely approximating the detector acceptance. The integrated measurement is corrected for all acceptance effects and for the W branching fractionsmore » to leptons in order to obtain the total WW production cross section, which is found to be 71.1 ± 1.1(stat)–5.0+ 5.7(syst) ± 1.4(lumi) pb. This agrees with the next-to-next-to-leading-order Standard Model prediction of 63.2–1.4+1.6(scale) ± 1.2(PDF) pb. Fiducial differential cross sections are measured as a function of each of six kinematic variables. In conclusion, the distribution of the transverse momentum of the leading lepton is used to set limits on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings.« less

  2. Measurement of total and differential W + W - production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawade, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knapik, J.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. 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Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-09-01

    The production of W boson pairs in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV is studied using data corresponding to 20.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS detector during 2012 at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The W bosons are reconstructed using their leptonic decays into electrons or muons and neutrinos. Events with reconstructed jets are not included in the candidate event sample. A total of 6636 WW candidate events are observed. Measurements are performed in fiducial regions closely approximating the detector acceptance. The integrated measurement is corrected for all acceptance effects and for the W branching fractions to leptons in order to obtain the total WW production cross section, which is found to be 71 .1 ± 1 .1(stat) - 5.0 + 5.7 (syst) ± 1.4(lumi) pb. This agrees with the next-to-next-to-leading-order Standard Model prediction of 63. 2 - 1.4 + 1.6 (scale) ± 1.2(PDF) pb. Fiducial differential cross sections are measured as a function of each of six kinematic variables. The distribution of the transverse momentum of the leading lepton is used to set limits on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Selective 4e-/4H+ O2 reduction by an iron(tetraferrocenyl)porphyrin complex: from proton transfer followed by electron transfer in organic solvent to proton coupled electron transfer in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Kaustuv; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Samanta, Subhra; Dey, Abhishek

    2013-12-16

    An iron porphyrin catalyst bearing four ferrocenes and a hydrogen bonding distal pocket is found to catalyze 4e(-)/4H(+) oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in organic solvent under homogeneous conditions in the presence of 2-3 equiv of Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. Absorption spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and resonance Raman data along with H2O2 assay indicate that one out of the four electrons necessary to reduce O2 to H2O is donated by the ferrous porphyrin while three are donated by the distal ferrocene residues. The same catalyst shows 4e(-)/4H(+) reduction of O2 in an aqueous medium, under heterogeneous conditions, over a wide range of pH. Both the selectivity and the rate of ORR are found to be pH independent in an aqueous medium. The ORR proceeds via a proton transfer followed by electron transfer (PET) step in an organic medium and while a 2e(-)/1H(+) proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) step determines the electrochemical potential of ORR in an aqueous medium.

  4. Biochemical and proton NMR characterization of the isolated functional beta-subunit of coupling factor one from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roux-Fromy, M.; Neumann, J.M.; Andre, F.; Berger, G.; Girault, G.; Galmiche, J.M.; Remy, R.

    1987-04-29

    Beta subunits have been dissociated from CF1 of spinach chloroplasts, purified by HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional electrophoresis and fluorescence emission. The solutions of isolated beta subunits are able to hydrolyze MgATP; this ATPase activity is an intrinsic property of the beta molecule. From proton NMR at 300 and 500 MHz, it is shown that the preparations are fully reproducible and that beta subunits remain monomeric with 75% aliphatic protons associated with rigid parts of the molecule. The other 25% give rise to separate resonances and belong to mobile side-chains and/or to flexible regions. The measurement of the transverse relaxation times T2 has permitted a detailed characterization of the molecular dynamics of the isolated beta subunits.

  5. Simulations of Polymer Translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, H.

    2008-07-01

    Transport of molecules across membranes is an essential mechanism for life processes. These molecules are often long, and the pores in the membranes are too narrow for the molecules to pass through as a single unit. In such circumstances, the molecules have to squeeze -- i.e., translocate -- themselves through the pores. DNA, RNA and proteins are such naturally occuring long molecules in a variety of biological processes. Understandably, the process of translocation has been an active topic of current research: not only because it is a cornerstone of many biological processes, but also due to its relevance for practical applications. Translocation is a complicated process in living organisms -- the presence of chaperone molecules, pH, chemical potential gradients, and assisting molecular motors strongly influence its dynamics. Consequently, the translocation process has been empirically studied in great variety in biological literature. Study of translocation as a biophysical process is more recent. Herein, the polymer is simplified to a sequentially connected string of N monomers as it passes through a narrow pore on a membrane. The quantities of interest are the typical time scale for the polymer to leave a confining cell (the ``escape of a polymer from a vesicle'' time scale), and the typical time scale the polymer spends in the pore (the ``dwell'' time scale) as a function of N and other parameters like membrane thickness, membrane adsorption, electrochemical potential gradient, etc. Our research is focused on computer simulations of translocation. Since our main interest is in the scaling properties, we use a highly simplified description of the translocation process. The polymer is described as a self-avoiding walk on a lattice, and its dynamics consists of single-monomer jumps from one lattice site to another neighboring one. Since we have a very efficient program to simulate such polymer dynamics, which we decribe in Chapter 2, we can perform long

  6. Problem-elephant translocation: translocating the problem and the elephant?

    PubMed

    Fernando, Prithiviraj; Leimgruber, Peter; Prasad, Tharaka; Pastorini, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Human-elephant conflict (HEC) threatens the survival of endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Translocating "problem-elephants" is an important HEC mitigation and elephant conservation strategy across elephant range, with hundreds translocated annually. In the first comprehensive assessment of elephant translocation, we monitored 16 translocations in Sri Lanka with GPS collars. All translocated elephants were released into national parks. Two were killed within the parks where they were released, while all the others left those parks. Translocated elephants showed variable responses: "homers" returned to the capture site, "wanderers" ranged widely, and "settlers" established home ranges in new areas soon after release. Translocation caused wider propagation and intensification of HEC, and increased elephant mortality. We conclude that translocation defeats both HEC mitigation and elephant conservation goals.

  7. Quantum-chemical simulation of 1H NMR spectra. 2. Comparison of DFT-based procedures for computing proton-proton coupling constants in organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Bally, Thomas; Rablen, Paul R

    2011-06-17

    The performance of 250 different computational protocols (combinations of density functionals, basis sets and methods) was assessed on a set of 165 well-established experimental (1)H-(1)H nuclear coupling constants (J(H-H)) from 65 molecules spanning a wide range of "chemical space". Thereby we found that, if one uses core-augmented basis sets and allows for linear scaling of the raw results, calculations of only the Fermi contact term yield more accurate predictions than calculations where all four terms that contribute to J(H-H) are evaluated. It turns out that B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)u+1s is the best (and, in addition, one of the most economical) of all tested methods, yielding predictions of J(H-H) with a root-mean-square deviation from experiment of less than 0.5 Hz for our test set. Another method that does similarly well, without the need for additional 1s basis functions, is B3LYP/cc-pVTZ, which is, however, ca. 8 times more "expensive" in terms of CPU time. A selection of the better methods was tested on a probe set comprising 61 J(H-H) values from 37 molecules. In this set we also included five molecules where conformational averaging is required. The rms deviations were better than or equal to those with the training set, which indicates that the method we recommend is generally applicable for organic molecules. We give instructions on how to carry out calculations of (1)H chemical shifts and J(H-H) most economically and provide scripts to extract the relevant information from the outputs of calculations with the Gaussian program in clearly arranged form, e.g., to feed them into programs for simulating entire (1)H NMR spectra.

  8. The Proton-Driven Rotor of ATP Synthase: Ohmic Conductance (10 fS), and Absence of Voltage Gating

    PubMed Central

    Feniouk, Boris A.; Kozlova, Maria A.; Knorre, Dmitry A.; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.; Junge, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    The membrane portion of F0F1-ATP synthase, F0, translocates protons by a rotary mechanism. Proton conduction by F0 was studied in chromatophores of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. The discharge of a light-induced voltage jump was monitored by electrochromic absorption transients to yield the unitary conductance of F0. The current-voltage relationship of F0 was linear from 7 to 70 mV. The current was extremely proton-specific (>107) and varied only slightly (≈threefold) from pH 6 to 10. The maximum conductance was ≈10 fS at pH 8, equivalent to 6240 H+ s−1 at 100-mV driving force, which is an order-of-magnitude greater than of coupled F0F1. There was no voltage-gating of F0 even at low voltage, and proton translocation could be driven by ΔpH alone, without voltage. The reported voltage gating in F0F1 is thus attributable to the interaction of F0 with F1 but not to F0 proper. We simulated proton conduction by a minimal rotary model including the rotating c-ring and two relay groups mediating proton exchange between the ring and the respective membrane surface. The data fit attributed pK values of ≈6 and ≈10 to these relays, and placed them close to the membrane/electrolyte interface. PMID:15189903

  9. Oncogene Translocations and NHL

    Cancer.gov

    A colloboration with several large population-based cohorts to determine whether the prevalence or level of t14;18 is associated with risk of NHL and to investigate the clonal relationship between translocation-bearing cells and subsequent tumors

  10. Role of phosphate and other proton-donating anions in respiration-coupled transport of Ca2+ by mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lehninger, A L

    1974-04-01

    Measurements of extra oxygen consumption, (45)Ca(2+) uptake, and the osmotic expansion of the matrix compartment show that not all permeant anions are capable of supporting and accompanying the energy-dependent transport of Ca(2+) from the medium into the matrix in respiring rat-liver mitochondria. Phosphate, arsenate, acetate, butyrate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, and bicarbonate + CO(2) supported Ca(2+) uptake, whereas the permeant anions, nitrate, thiocyanate, chlorate, and perchlorate, did not. The active anions share a common denominator, the potential ability to donate a proton to the mitochondrial matrix; the inactive anions lack this capacity. Phosphate and the other active permeant anions move into the matrix in response to the alkaline-inside electrochemical gradient of protons generated across the mitochondrial membrane by electron transport, thus forming a negative-inside anion gradient. It is postulated that the latter gradient is the immediate "pulling" force for the influx of Ca(2+) on the electrogenic Ca(2+) carrier in respiring mitochondria under intracellular conditions. Since mitochondria in the cell are normally exposed to an excess of phosphate (and the bicarbonate-CO(2) system), particularly in state 4, inward transport of these proton-yielding anions probably precedes and is necessary for inward transport of Ca(2+) and other cations under biological conditions. These observations indicate that a negative-inside gradient of phosphate generated by electron transport is a common step and provides the immediate motive power not only for (a) the inward transport of dicarboxylates and tricarboxylates and (b) the energy-dependent exchange of external ADP(3-) for internal ATP(4-) during oxidative phosphorylation, as has already been established, but also for (c) the inward transport of Ca(2+), K(+), and other cations.

  11. Calculated protein and proton motions coupled to electron transfer: electron transfer from QA- to QB in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Alexov, E G; Gunner, M R

    1999-06-29

    Reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were subjected to Monte Carlo sampling to determine the Boltzmann distribution of side-chain ionization states and positions and buried water orientation and site occupancy. Changing the oxidation states of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer electron donor (P) and primary (QA) and secondary (QB) quinone electron acceptors allows preparation of the ground (all neutral), P+QA-, P+QB-, P0QA-, and P0QB- states. The calculated proton binding going from ground to other oxidation states and the free energy of electron transfer from QA-QB to form QAQB- (DeltaGAB) compare well with experiment from pH 5 to pH 11. At pH 7 DeltaGAB is measured as -65 meV and calculated to be -80 meV. With fixed protein positions as in standard electrostatic calculations, DeltaGAB is +170 meV. At pH 7 approximately 0.2 H+/protein is bound on QA reduction. On electron transfer to QB there is little additional proton uptake, but shifts in side chain protonation and position occur throughout the protein. Waters in channels leading from QB to the surface change site occupancy and orientation. A cluster of acids (GluL212, AspL210, and L213) and SerL223 near QB play important roles. A simplified view shows this cluster with a single negative charge (on AspL213 with a hydrogen bond to SerL233) in the ground state. In the QB- state the cluster still has one negative charge, now on the more distant AspL210. AspL213 and SerL223 move so SerL223 can hydrogen bond to QB-. These rearrangements plus other changes throughout the protein make the reaction energetically favorable.

  12. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Izatt, R.M.

    1992-07-01

    A number of new macrocyclic ligands was prepared for transport studies. The cryptands were prpepared (18-40% yield) by a new metal carbonate-catalyzed one-step method from 1 mole oligoethyleneoxy diamine and 2 moles diahlide derivative of oligoethylene glycol. Bis-crown ethers were also isolated in 17-30% yields. Cage compounds were also prepared; they interact with various metal ions and protons. Back extraction and dual module hollow fiber membrane separation experiments were used to study the cation selectivity of new ligands, including crown thioethers. An isothermal flow calorimeter is being constructed for studies of macrocycle-cation reactions. 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  13. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  14. Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals in aqueous solutions; electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasović, Brunislav; Bonifačić, Marija

    2011-06-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals CO2-rad , rad CH 2OH, rad CH(CH 3)OH, and rad CH(CH 3)O - have been studied in oxygen free aqueous solutions in the presence of organic additives: formate, methanol or ethanol. For radicals production 60Co γ-radiolysis was employed and the yield of bromide was measured by means of ion chromatography. Both radical anions have reducing potential negative enough to transfer an electron to BrU producing bromide ion and U rad radical. High yields of bromide have been measured increasing proportional to the concentration of the corresponding organic additives at a constant dose rate. This is characteristic for a chain process where regeneration of radical ions occurs by H-atom abstraction by U rad radical from formate or ethanol. Results with the neutral radicals conformed earlier proposition that the reduction reaction of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals proceeds by the proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism ( Matasović and Bonifačić, 2007). Thus, while both rad CH 2OH and rad CH(CH 3)OH did not react with BrU in water/alcohol solutions, addition of bicarbonate and acetate in mmol dm -3 concentrations, pH 7, brought about chain debromination to occur in the case of rad CH(CH 3)OH radical as reactant. Under the same conditions phosphate buffer, a base with higher bulk proton affinity, failed to have any influence. The results are taken as additional proofs for the specific complex formation of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals with suitable bases which enhances radicals' reduction potential in comparison with only water molecules as proton acceptors. Rate constants for the H-atom abstraction from ethanol and formate by U rad radicals have been estimated to amount to about ≥85 and 1200 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, respectively.

  15. Ketyl Radical Formation via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in an Aqueous Solution versus Hydrogen Atom Transfer in Isopropanol after Photoexcitation of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiting; Ma, Jiani; Li, Songbo; Li, Ming-De; Guan, Xiangguo; Lan, Xin; Zhu, Ruixue; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-07-01

    The excited nπ* and ππ* triplets of two benzophenone (BP) and two anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives have been observed in acetonitrile, isopropanol, and mixed aqueous solutions using time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopic and nanosecond transient absorption experiments. These experimental results, combined with results from density functional theory calculations, reveal the effects of solvent and substituents on the properties, relative energies, and chemical reactivities of the nπ* and ππ* triplets. The triplet nπ* configuration was found to act as the reactive species for a subsequent hydrogen atom transfer reaction to produce a ketyl radical intermediate in the isopropanol solvent, while the triplet ππ* undergoes a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in aqueous solutions to produce a ketyl radical intermediate. This PCET reaction, which occurs via a concerted proton transfer (to the excited carbonyl group) and electron transfer (to the excited phenyl ring), can account for the experimental observation by several different research groups over the past 40 years of the formation of ketyl radicals after photolysis of a number of BP and AQ derivatives in aqueous solutions, although water is considered to be a relatively "inert" hydrogen-donor solvent. PMID:27266916

  16. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  17. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  18. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqian; Cabrera, Robert M.; Li, Yue; Miller, David S.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with many adverse clinical manifestations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, protects the brain from exposure to neurotoxicants. The function of BBB is modulated by multiple ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein. A proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT)-deficient mouse has been previously described as a model for systemic folate deficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that exposing mouse brain capillaries to the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (VPA; 5 μM), significantly increased P-glycoprotein transport function in the wild-type animals. A ligand to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produced a similar induction of P-glycoprotein, which tightened the BBB, thereby increasing the neuroprotection. However, VPA- or TCDD-induced P-glycoprotein transport was blocked in the PCFT-nullizygous mice, indicating that multiple neuroprotective mechanisms are compromised under folate-deficient conditions. Brain capillaries from S-folinic acid (SFA; 40 mg/kg)-treated PCFT-nullizygous mice exhibited increased P-glycoprotein transport following VPA exposure. This suggests that SFA supplementation restored the normal BBB function. In addition, we show that tight-junction proteins are disintegrated in the PCFT mutant mice. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that folate deficiency disrupts the BBB function by targeting the transporter and tight junctions, which may contribute to the development of neurological disorders.—Wang, X., Cabrera, R. M., Li, Y., Miller, D. S., Finnell, R. H. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice. PMID:23212123

  19. Fast Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Observed for a High-Fidelity Structural and Functional [2Fe–2S] Rieske Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rieske cofactors have a [2Fe–2S] cluster with unique {His2Cys2} ligation and distinct Fe subsites. The histidine ligands are functionally relevant, since they allow for coupling of electron and proton transfer (PCET) during quinol oxidation in respiratory and photosynthetic ET chains. Here we present the highest fidelity synthetic analogue for the Rieske [2Fe–2S] cluster reported so far. This synthetic analogue 5x– emulates the heteroleptic {His2Cys2} ligation of the [2Fe–2S] core, and it also serves as a functional model that undergoes fast concerted proton and electron transfer (CPET) upon reaction of the mixed-valent (ferrous/ferric) protonated 5H2– with TEMPO. The thermodynamics of the PCET square scheme for 5x– have been determined, and three species (diferric 52–, protonated diferric 5H–, and mixed-valent 53–) have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. pKa values for 5H– and 5H2– differ by about 4 units, and the reduction potential of 5H– is shifted anodically by about +230 mV compared to that of 52–. While the N–H bond dissociation free energy of 5H2– (60.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol–1) and the free energy, ΔG°CPET, of its reaction with TEMPO (−6.3 kcal mol–1) are similar to values recently reported for a homoleptic {N2/N2}-coordinated [2Fe–2S] cluster, CPET is significantly faster for 5H2– with biomimetic {N2/S2} ligation (k = (9.5 ± 1.2) × 104 M–1 s–1, ΔH‡ = 8.7 ± 1.0 kJ mol–1, ΔS‡ = −120 ± 40 J mol–1 K–1, and ΔG‡ = 43.8 ± 0.3 kJ mol–1 at 293 K). These parameters, and the comparison with homoleptic analogues, provide important information and new perspectives for the mechanistic understanding of the biological Rieske cofactor. PMID:24506804

  20. Indirect DNA readout on the protein side: coupling between histidine protonation, global structural cooperativity, dynamics, and DNA binding of the human papillomavirus type 16 E2C domain.

    PubMed

    Eliseo, Tommaso; Sánchez, Ignacio E; Nadra, Alejandro D; Dellarole, Mariano; Paci, Maurizio; de Prat Gay, Gonzalo; Cicero, Daniel O

    2009-05-01

    DNA sequence recognition by the homodimeric C-terminal domain of the human papillomavirus type 16 E2 protein (E2C) is known to involve both direct readout and DNA-dependent indirect readout mechanisms, while protein-dependent indirect readout has been deduced but not directly observed. We have investigated coupling between specific DNA binding and the dynamics of the unusual E2C fold, using pH as an external variable. Nuclear magnetic resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry show that pH titration of His318 in the complex interface and His288 in the core of the domain is coupled to both binding and the dynamics of the beta-barrel core of E2C, with a tradeoff between dimer stability and function. Specific DNA binding is, in turn, coupled to the slow dynamics and amide hydrogen exchange in the entire beta-barrel, reaching residues far apart from the DNA recognition elements but not affecting the two helices of each monomer. The changes are largest in the dimerization interface, suggesting that the E2C beta-barrel acts as a hinge that regulates the relative position of the DNA recognition helices. In conclusion, the cooperative dynamics of the human papillomavirus type 16 E2C beta-barrel is coupled to sequence recognition in a protein-dependent indirect readout mechanism. The patterns of residue substitution in genital papillomaviruses support the importance of the protonation states of His288 and His318 and suggest that protein-dependent indirect readout and histidine pH titration may regulate DNA binding in the cell.

  1. Proton-coupled electron transfer of flavodoxin immobilized on nanostructured tin dioxide electrodes: thermodynamics versus kinetics control of protein redox function.

    PubMed

    Astuti, Yeni; Topoglidis, Emmanuel; Briscoe, Paul B; Fantuzzi, Andrea; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Durrant, James R

    2004-06-30

    In this paper, we report a spectroelectrochemical investigation of proton-coupled electron transfer in flavodoxin D. vulgaris Hildenborough (Fld). Poly-L-lysine is used to promote the binding of Fld to the nanocrystalline, mesoporous SnO(2) electrodes. Two reversible redox couples of the immobilized Fld are observed electrochemically and are assigned by spectroelectrochemistry to the quinone/semiquinone and semiquinone/hydroquinone couples of the protein's flavin mononucleotide (FMN) redox cofactor. Comparison with control data for free FMN indicates no contamination of the Fld data by dissociated FMN. The quinone/semiquinone and semiquinone/hydroquinone midpoint potentials (E(q/sq) and E(sq/hq)) at pH 7 were determined to be -340 and -585 mV vs Ag/AgCl, in good agreement with the literature. E(q/sq) exhibited a pH dependence of 51 mV/pH. The kinetics of these redox couples were studied using cyclic voltammetry, cyclic voltabsorptometry, and chronoabsorptometry. The semiquinone/quinone reoxidation is found to exhibit slow, potential-independent but pH-sensitive kinetics with a reoxidation rate constant varying from 1.56 s(-)(1) at pH 10 to 0.0074 s(-)(1) at pH 5. The slow kinetics are discussed in terms of a simple kinetics model and are assigned to the reoxidation process being rate limited by semiquinone deprotonation. It is proposed that this slow deprotonation step has the physiological benefit of preventing the undesirable loss of reducing equivalents which results from semiquinone oxidation to quinone. PMID:15212550

  2. Mutation of a single residue in the ba3 oxidase specifically impairs protonation of the pump site.

    PubMed

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Gonska, Nathalie; Lachmann, Peter; Gennis, Robert B; Ädelroth, Pia; Brzezinski, Peter

    2015-03-17

    The ba3-type cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus is a membrane-bound protein complex that couples electron transfer to O2 to proton translocation across the membrane. To elucidate the mechanism of the redox-driven proton pumping, we investigated the kinetics of electron and proton transfer in a structural variant of the ba3 oxidase where a putative "pump site" was modified by replacement of Asp372 by Ile. In this structural variant, proton pumping was uncoupled from internal electron transfer and O2 reduction. The results from our studies show that proton uptake to the pump site (time constant ∼65 μs in the wild-type cytochrome c oxidase) was impaired in the Asp372Ile variant. Furthermore, a reaction step that in the wild-type cytochrome c oxidase is linked to simultaneous proton uptake and release with a time constant of ∼1.2 ms was slowed to ∼8.4 ms, and in Asp372Ile was only associated with proton uptake to the catalytic site. These data identify reaction steps that are associated with protonation and deprotonation of the pump site, and point to the area around Asp372 as the location of this site in the ba3 cytochrome c oxidase.

  3. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the (15)N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H(2)O/D(2)O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu(II) to enable rapid data acquisition. PMID:18462963

  4. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1–2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10051.001 PMID:26895087

  5. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-02-19

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome.

  6. Translocations in epithelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chad Brenner, J.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic translocations leading to the expression of chimeric transcripts characterize several hematologic, mesenchymal and epithelial malignancies. While several gene fusions have been linked to essential molecular events in hematologic malignancies, the identification and characterization of recurrent chimeric transcripts in epithelial cancers has been limited. However, the recent discovery of the recurrent gene fusions in prostate cancer has sparked a revitalization of the quest to identify novel rearrangements in epithelial malignancies. Here, the molecular mechanisms of gene fusions that drive several epithelial cancers and the recent technological advances that increase the speed and reliability of recurrent gene fusion discovery are explored. PMID:19406209

  7. Functional coupling of chloride-proton exchanger ClC-5 to gastric H+,K+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuji; Fujii, Takuto; Fujita, Kyosuke; Shimizu, Takahiro; Higuchi, Taiga; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Hisato; Naito, Ichiro; Manabe, Koji; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Ikari, Akira; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Sakai, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that chloride-proton exchanger ClC-5 and vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase are essential for endosomal acidification in the renal proximal cells. Here, we found that ClC-5 is expressed in the gastric parietal cells which secrete actively hydrochloric acid at the luminal region of the gland, and that it is partially localized in the intracellular tubulovesicles in which gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase is abundantly expressed. ClC-5 was co-immunoprecipitated with H(+),K(+)-ATPase in the lysate of tubulovesicles. The ATP-dependent uptake of (36)Cl(-) into the vesicles was abolished by 2-methyl-8-(phenylmethoxy)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetonitrile (SCH28080), an inhibitor of H(+),K(+)-ATPase, suggesting functional expression of ClC-5. In the tetracycline-regulated expression system of ClC-5 in the HEK293 cells stably expressing gastric H(+),K(+)-ATPase, ClC-5 was co-immunoprecipitated with H(+),K(+)-ATPase, but not with endogenous Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. The SCH28080-sensitive (36)Cl(-) transporting activity was observed in the ClC-5-expressing cells, but not in the ClC-5-non-expressing cells. The mutant (E211A-ClC-5), which has no H(+) transport activity, did not show the SCH28080-sensitive (36)Cl(-) transport. On the other hand, both ClC-5 and its mutant (E211A) significantly increased the activity of H(+),K(+)-ATPase. Our results suggest that ClC-5 and H(+),K(+)-ATPase are functionally associated and that they may contribute to gastric acid secretion.

  8. Measurement of Z+ γ production and search for anomalous triple gauge couplings in proton-antiproton collisions at √S = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    The author presents a measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → Zγ + X → e+e-γ + X production using proton-antiproton collisions data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Zγ production provides a direct test of the triple neutral gauge couplings. A measurement of Zγ production cross section and search for anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are presented. The data presented are from 1.1 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ integrated luminosity collected at the CDF Detector. Electrons from Z decays are selected with Et > 20 Gev. Photons (Et > 7 GeV) are required to be well-separated from the electrons. There are 390 eeγ candidate events found with 1.1 fb-1 of data, compared to the SM prediction of 375.3 ± 25.2 events. The Standard Model prediction for the cross section for p$\\bar{p}$ → e+e-γ + X production at √s = 1.96 TeV is 4.5 ± 0.4 pb. The measured cross section is 4.7 ± 0.6 pb. The cross section and kinematic distributions of the eeγ events are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Limits on the ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are extracted using the photon Et distribution of eeγ events with meeγ > 100 GeV/c2. These are the first limits measured using CDF Run II data. These limits provide important test of the interaction of the photon and the Z boson.

  9. Energy coupling to nitrite respiration in the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, L.L.; LeGall, J.; Odom, J.M.; Peck, H.D. Jr.

    1983-02-01

    By use of a membrane fraction prepared from Desulfovibrio gigas grown in a lactate-sulfate medium, synthesis of ATP was demonstrated to be coupled to the oxidation of molecular hydrogen and reduction of either nitrite or hydroxylamine. This phosphorylation was uncoupled from electron transport by pentachlorophenol, methyl viologen, and gramicidin, but not by oligomycin. The extrusion of protons from the cells was shown to be coupled to the hydrogen-nitrite respiratory system, and, assuming the localization of nitrite reductase on the outer side of the plasma membrane, H/sup +//2e/sup -/ values of 2.0 +/- 0.3 were obtained. Energy coupling observed with this system appears to be due to electron transfer-coupled proton translocation rather than vectorial electron transfer associated with hydrogen oxidation. 29 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  10. Substituted cysteine accessibility reveals a novel transmembrane 2-3 reentrant loop and functional role for transmembrane domain 2 in the human proton-coupled folate transporter.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mike R; Hou, Zhanjun; Matherly, Larry H

    2014-09-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) is a folate-proton symporter highly expressed in solid tumors that can selectively target cytotoxic antifolates to tumors under acidic microenvironment conditions. Predicted topology models for PCFT suggest that the loop domain between transmembrane domains (TMDs) 2 and 3 resides in the cytosol. Mutations involving Asp-109 or Arg-113 in the TMD2-3 loop result in loss of activity. By structural homology to other solute carriers, TMD2 may form part of the PCFT substrate binding domain. In this study we mutated the seven cysteine (Cys) residues of human PCFT to serine, creating Cys-less PCFT. Thirty-three single-Cys mutants spanning TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop in a Cys-less PCFT background were transfected into PCFT-null HeLa cells. All 33 mutants were detected by Western blotting, and 28 were active for [(3)H]methotrexate uptake at pH 5.5. For the active residues, we performed pulldown assays with membrane-impermeable 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin and streptavidin beads to determine their aqueous-accessibilities. Multiple residues in TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop domain reacted with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin, establishing aqueous accessibilities. Pemetrexed pretreatment inhibited biotinylation of TMD2 mutants G93C and F94C, and biotinylation of these residues inhibited methotrexate transport activity. Our results suggest that the TMD 2-3 loop domain is aqueous-accessible and forms a novel reentrant loop structure. Residues in TMD2 form an aqueous transmembrane pathway for folate substrates, and Gly-93 and Phe-94 may contribute to a substrate binding domain. Characterization of PCFT structure is essential to understanding the transport mechanism including the critical determinants of substrate binding.

  11. Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Reveals a Novel Transmembrane 2–3 Reentrant Loop and Functional Role for Transmembrane Domain 2 in the Human Proton-coupled Folate Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mike R.; Hou, Zhanjun; Matherly, Larry H.

    2014-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) is a folate-proton symporter highly expressed in solid tumors that can selectively target cytotoxic antifolates to tumors under acidic microenvironment conditions. Predicted topology models for PCFT suggest that the loop domain between transmembrane domains (TMDs) 2 and 3 resides in the cytosol. Mutations involving Asp-109 or Arg-113 in the TMD2-3 loop result in loss of activity. By structural homology to other solute carriers, TMD2 may form part of the PCFT substrate binding domain. In this study we mutated the seven cysteine (Cys) residues of human PCFT to serine, creating Cys-less PCFT. Thirty-three single-Cys mutants spanning TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop in a Cys-less PCFT background were transfected into PCFT-null HeLa cells. All 33 mutants were detected by Western blotting, and 28 were active for [3H]methotrexate uptake at pH 5.5. For the active residues, we performed pulldown assays with membrane-impermeable 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin and streptavidin beads to determine their aqueous-accessibilities. Multiple residues in TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop domain reacted with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin, establishing aqueous accessibilities. Pemetrexed pretreatment inhibited biotinylation of TMD2 mutants G93C and F94C, and biotinylation of these residues inhibited methotrexate transport activity. Our results suggest that the TMD 2–3 loop domain is aqueous-accessible and forms a novel reentrant loop structure. Residues in TMD2 form an aqueous transmembrane pathway for folate substrates, and Gly-93 and Phe-94 may contribute to a substrate binding domain. Characterization of PCFT structure is essential to understanding the transport mechanism including the critical determinants of substrate binding. PMID:25053408

  12. Photochemical Tyrosine Oxidation in the Structurally Well-Defined α3Y Protein: Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and a Long-Lived Tyrosine Radical

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine oxidation–reduction involves proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and a reactive radical state. These properties are effectively controlled in enzymes that use tyrosine as a high-potential, one-electron redox cofactor. The α3Y model protein contains Y32, which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced in voltammetry measurements. Structural and kinetic properties of α3Y are presented. A solution NMR structural analysis reveals that Y32 is the most deeply buried residue in α3Y. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a soluble flash-quench generated [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+ oxidant provides high-quality Y32–O• absorption spectra. The rate constant of Y32 oxidation (kPCET) is pH dependent: 1.4 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pH 5.5), 1.8 × 105 M–1 s–1 (pH 8.5), 5.4 × 103 M–1 s–1 (pD 5.5), and 4.0 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pD 8.5). kH/kD of Y32 oxidation is 2.5 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.9 at pH(D) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. These pH and isotope characteristics suggest a concerted or stepwise, proton-first Y32 oxidation mechanism. The photochemical yield of Y32–O• is 28–58% versus the concentration of [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+. Y32–O• decays slowly, t1/2 in the range of 2–10 s, at both pH 5.5 and 8.5, via radical–radical dimerization as shown by second-order kinetics and fluorescence data. The high stability of Y32–O• is discussed relative to the structural properties of the Y32 site. Finally, the static α3Y NMR structure cannot explain (i) how the phenolic proton released upon oxidation is removed or (ii) how two Y32–O• come together to form dityrosine. These observations suggest that the dynamic properties of the protein ensemble may play an essential role in controlling the PCET and radical decay characteristics of α3Y. PMID:25121576

  13. Origin of translocation barriers for polyelectrolyte chains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Muthukumar, M

    2009-11-21

    For single-file translocations of a charged macromolecule through a narrow pore, the crucial step of arrival of an end at the pore suffers from free energy barriers, arising from changes in intrachain electrostatic interaction, distribution of ionic clouds and solvent molecules, and conformational entropy of the chain. All contributing factors to the barrier in the initial stage of translocation are evaluated by using the self-consistent field theory for the polyelectrolyte and the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann description for ions without radial symmetry. The barrier is found to be essentially entropic due to conformational changes. For moderate and high salt concentrations, the barriers for the polyelectrolyte chain are quantitatively equivalent to that of uncharged self-avoiding walks. Electrostatic effects are shown to increase the free energy barriers, but only slightly. The degree of ionization, electrostatic interaction strength, decreasing salt concentration, and the solvent quality all result in increases in the barrier.

  14. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution.

  15. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution.

  16. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution. PMID:27394120

  17. Kinetic mechanism of DNA translocation by the RSC molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Eastlund, Allen; Malik, Shuja Shafi; Fischer, Christopher J

    2013-04-15

    ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by chromatin remodeling enzymes requires the translocation of these enzymes along the nucleosomal DNA. Using a fluorescence stopped-flow assay we monitored DNA translocation by a minimal RSC motor and through global analysis of these time courses we have determined that this motor has a macroscopic translocation rate of 2.9 bp/s with a step size of 1.24 bp. From the complementary quantitative analysis of the associated time courses of ATP consumption during DNA translocation we have determined that this motor has an efficiency of 3.0 ATP/bp, which is slightly less that the efficiency observed for several genetically related DNA helicases and which likely results from random pausing by the motor during translocation. Nevertheless, this motor is able to exert enough force during translocation to displace streptavidin from biotinylated DNA. Taken together these results are the necessary first step for quantifying both the role of DNA translocation in nucleosome repositioning by RSC and the efficiency at which RSC couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to nucleosome repositioning.

  18. Steric and Electronic Influence on Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactivity of a Mononuclear Mn(III)-Hydroxo Complex.

    PubMed

    Rice, Derek B; Wijeratne, Gayan B; Burr, Andrew D; Parham, Joshua D; Day, Victor W; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-08-15

    A mononuclear hydroxomanganese(III) complex was synthesized utilizing the N5 amide-containing ligand 2-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)]amino-N-2-methyl-quinolin-8-yl-acetamidate (dpaq(2Me) ). This complex is similar to previously reported [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+) [Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 7622-7634] but contains a methyl group adjacent to the hydroxo moiety. This α-methylquinoline group in [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) gives rise to a 0.1 Å elongation in the Mn-N(quinoline) distance relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). Similar bond elongation is observed in the corresponding Mn(II) complex. In MeCN, [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) reacts rapidly with 2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-ol (TEMPOH) at -35 °C by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism (second-order rate constant k2 of 3.9(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Using enthalpies and entropies of activation from variable-temperature studies of TEMPOH oxidation by [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) (ΔH(‡) = 5.7(3) kcal(-1) M(-1); ΔS(‡) = -41(1) cal M(-1) K(-1)), it was determined that [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) oxidizes TEMPOH ∼240 times faster than [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). The [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) complex is also capable of oxidizing the stronger O-H and C-H bonds of 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol and xanthene, respectively. However, for these reactions [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) displays, at best, modest rate enhancement relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). A combination of density function theory (DFT) and cyclic voltammetry studies establish an increase in the Mn(III)/Mn(II) reduction potential of [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+), which gives rise to a larger driving force for CPET for the former complex. Thus, more favorable thermodynamics for [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) can account for the dramatic increase in rate with TEMPOH. For the more sterically encumbered substrates, DFT computations suggest that this effect is mitigated by unfavorable steric interactions between the

  19. Steric and Electronic Influence on Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactivity of a Mononuclear Mn(III)-Hydroxo Complex.

    PubMed

    Rice, Derek B; Wijeratne, Gayan B; Burr, Andrew D; Parham, Joshua D; Day, Victor W; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-08-15

    A mononuclear hydroxomanganese(III) complex was synthesized utilizing the N5 amide-containing ligand 2-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)]amino-N-2-methyl-quinolin-8-yl-acetamidate (dpaq(2Me) ). This complex is similar to previously reported [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+) [Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 7622-7634] but contains a methyl group adjacent to the hydroxo moiety. This α-methylquinoline group in [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) gives rise to a 0.1 Å elongation in the Mn-N(quinoline) distance relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). Similar bond elongation is observed in the corresponding Mn(II) complex. In MeCN, [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) reacts rapidly with 2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-ol (TEMPOH) at -35 °C by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism (second-order rate constant k2 of 3.9(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Using enthalpies and entropies of activation from variable-temperature studies of TEMPOH oxidation by [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) (ΔH(‡) = 5.7(3) kcal(-1) M(-1); ΔS(‡) = -41(1) cal M(-1) K(-1)), it was determined that [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) oxidizes TEMPOH ∼240 times faster than [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). The [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) complex is also capable of oxidizing the stronger O-H and C-H bonds of 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol and xanthene, respectively. However, for these reactions [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) displays, at best, modest rate enhancement relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). A combination of density function theory (DFT) and cyclic voltammetry studies establish an increase in the Mn(III)/Mn(II) reduction potential of [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+), which gives rise to a larger driving force for CPET for the former complex. Thus, more favorable thermodynamics for [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) can account for the dramatic increase in rate with TEMPOH. For the more sterically encumbered substrates, DFT computations suggest that this effect is mitigated by unfavorable steric interactions between the

  20. Electron transfer reactivity of the aqueous iron(IV)–oxo complex. Outer-sphere vs proton-coupled electron transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-06-18

    Here, the kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, FeIV(H2O)5O2+ (hereafter FeIVaqO2+), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)32+ (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS–/ABTS2–, phenothiazines, CoII(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. FeIVaqO2+ oxidizes even Ce(III) (E0 in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7more » V) with a rate constant greater than 104 M–1 s–1. In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)32+ (k = 2.5 × 105 M–1 s–1), IrCl63– (1.6 × 106), ABTS2– (4.7 × 107), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 107) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)32+ and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H+] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of FeIVaqO2+ and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E0Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E0Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the FeIVaqO2+/FeIIIaqO+ couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10–5 M–1 s–1 and thus E0(FeIVaqO2+/FeIIIaqO+) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E0 (FeIVaqO2+, H+/FeIIIaqOH2+) ≥ 1.95 V.« less

  1. Coupling of electron transfer with proton transfer at heme a and Cu(A) (redox Bohr effects) in cytochrome c oxidase. Studies with the carbon monoxide inhibited enzyme.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, N; Capitanio, G; Minuto, M; De Nitto, E; Palese, L L; Nicholls, P; Papa, S

    2000-05-30

    A study is presented on the coupling of electron transfer with proton transfer at heme a and Cu(A) (redox Bohr effects) in carbon monoxide inhibited cytochrome c oxidase isolated from bovine heart mitochondria. Detailed analysis of the coupling number for H(+) release per heme a, Cu(A) oxidized (H(+)/heme a, Cu(A) ratio) was based on direct measurement of the balance between the oxidizing equivalents added as ferricyanide to the CO-inhibited fully reduced COX, the equivalents of heme a, Cu(A), and added cytochrome c oxidized and the H(+) released upon oxidation and all taken up back by the oxidase upon rereduction of the metal centers. One of two reductants was used, either succinate plus a trace of mitochondrial membranes (providing a source of succinate-c reductase) or hexaammineruthenium(II) as the chloride salt. The experimental H(+)/heme a, Cu(A) ratios varied between 0.65 and 0.90 in the pH range 6.0-8.5. The pH dependence of the H(+)/heme a, Cu(A) ratios could be best-fitted by a function involving two redox-linked acid-base groups with pK(o)-pK(r) of 5.4-6.9 and 7.3-9.0, respectively. Redox titrations in the same samples of the CO-inhibited oxidase showed that Cu(A) and heme a exhibited superimposed E'(m) values, which decreased, for both metals, by around 20 mV/pH unit increase in the range 6.0-8.5. A model in which oxido-reduction of heme a and Cu(A) are both linked to the pK shifts of the two acid-base groups, characterized by the analysis of the pH dependence of the H(+)/heme a, Cu(A) ratios, provided a satisfactory fit for the pH dependence of the E'(m) of heme a and Cu(A). The results presented are consistent with a primary involvement of the redox Bohr effects shared by heme a and Cu(A) in the proton-pumping activity of cytochrome c oxidase.

  2. Proton-pumping mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase: a kinetic master-equation approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young C; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-04-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is an efficient energy transducer that reduces oxygen to water and converts the released chemical energy into an electrochemical membrane potential. As a true proton pump, cytochrome c oxidase translocates protons across the membrane against this potential. Based on a wealth of experiments and calculations, an increasingly detailed picture of the reaction intermediates in the redox cycle has emerged. However, the fundamental mechanism of proton pumping coupled to redox chemistry remains largely unresolved. Here we examine and extend a kinetic master-equation approach to gain insight into redox-coupled proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase. Basic principles of the cytochrome c oxidase proton pump emerge from an analysis of the simplest kinetic models that retain essential elements of the experimentally determined structure, energetics, and kinetics, and that satisfy fundamental physical principles. The master-equation models allow us to address the question of how pumping can be achieved in a system in which all reaction steps are reversible. Whereas proton pumping does not require the direct modulation of microscopic reaction barriers, such kinetic gating greatly increases the pumping efficiency. Further efficiency gains can be achieved by partially decoupling the proton uptake pathway from the active-site region. Such a mechanism is consistent with the proposed Glu valve, in which the side chain of a key glutamic acid shuttles between the D channel and the active-site region. We also show that the models predict only small proton leaks even in the absence of turnover. The design principles identified here for cytochrome c oxidase provide a blueprint for novel biology-inspired fuel cells, and the master-equation formulation should prove useful also for other molecular machines. . PMID:21946020

  3. Response of a delta-doped charge-coupled device to low energy protons and nitrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, S.T.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Jones, T.; Blacksberg, J.; Zurbuchen, T.H.

    2006-05-15

    We present the results of a study of the response of a delta-doped charge-coupled device (CCD) exposed to ions with energies less than 10 keV. The study of ions in the solar wind, the majority having energies in the 1-5 keV range, has proven to be vital in understanding the solar atmosphere and the near Earth space environment. Delta-doped CCD technology has essentially removed the dead layer of the silicon detector. Using the delta-doped detector, we are able to detect H{sup +} and N{sup +} ions with energies ranging from 1 to 10 keV in the laboratory. This is a remarkable improvement in the low energy detection threshold over conventional solid-state detectors, such as those used in space sensors, one example being the solar wind ion composition spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft, which can only detect ions with energies greater than 30 keV because of the solid-state detector's minimum energy threshold. Because this threshold is much higher than the average energy of the solar wind ions, the SWICS instrument employs a bulky high voltage postacceleration stage that accelerates ions above the 30 keV detection threshold. This stage is massive, exposes the instrument to hazardous high voltages, and is therefore problematic both in terms of price and its impact on spacecraft resources. Adaptation of delta-doping technology in future space missions may be successful in reducing the need for heavy postacceleration stages allowing for miniaturization of space-borne ion detectors.

  4. Kinetic Steering of Quinol Oxidation by ‘Proton Stripping’ at the Cytochrome bc1 Complex Qo Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, David M.; Cape, Jonathan L.; Forquer, Isaac P.; Bowman, Michael K.

    2005-05-13

    The cyt bc1 complex and the related cyt b6f and bc-type complexes are key components of chemiosmotic energy conversion in mitochondria, chloroplasts and many bacteria. These complexes oxidize a range of different quinol or hydroquinone (QH2) molecules—ubihydroquinone (UQH2) in the case of mitochondria and many bacteria, plastohydroquinone (PQH2) in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria, and menahydroquinone in many bacteria—to the corresponding quinone (Q), and reduce a range of soluble electron carriers, e.g. cyt c in purple bacteria and mitochondria, plastocyanin in chloroplasts. The redox reactions are coupled to the translocation of protons across the energetic membrane to store energy in an electrochemical proton gradient, or proton motive force (pmf) which drives ATP synthesis.

  5. 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine Thienoyl Regioisomers as Targeted Antifolates for Folate Receptor α and the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wallace, Adrianne; Raghavan, Sudhir; Deis, Siobhan M.; Wilson, Mike R.; Yang, Si; Polin, Lisa; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; Orr, Steven; George, Christina; O’Connor, Carrie; Hou, Zhanjun; Mitchell-Ryan, Shermaine; Dann, Charles E.; Matherly, Larry H.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2016-01-01

    2-Amino-4-oxo-6-substituted-pyrrolo[2,3-d]-pyrimidine antifolate thiophene regioisomers of AGF94 (4) with a thienoyl side chain and three-carbon bridge lengths [AGF150 (5) and AGF154 (7)] were synthesized as potential antitumor agents. These analogues inhibited proliferation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) sublines expressing folate receptors (FRs) α or β (IC50s < 1 nM) or the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (IC50 < 7 nM). Compounds 5 and 7 inhibited KB, IGROV1, and SKOV3 human tumor cells at subnanomolar concentrations, reflecting both FRα and PCFT uptake. AGF152 (6) and AGF163 (8), 2,4-diamino-5-substituted-furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thiophene regioisomers, also inhibited growth of FR-expressing CHO and KB cells. All four analogues inhibited glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). Crystal structures of human GARFTase complexed with 5 and 7 were reported. In severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing SKOV3 tumors, 7 was efficacious. The selectivity of these compounds for PCFT and for FRα and β over the ubiquitously expressed reduced folate carrier is a paradigm for selective tumor targeting. PMID:26317331

  6. Kinetic and time-dependent features of sustained inhibitory effect of myricetin on folate transport by proton-coupled folate transporter.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Takahiro; Ohta, Kinya; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Furumiya, Mai; Hayashi, Yayoi; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    Myricetin is a flavonoid that has recently been suggested to induce sustained inhibition of proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1), which operates for intestinal folate uptake. The present study was conducted to characterize the inhibitory effect in more detail, using human PCFT stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells, to gain information to cope with problems potentially arising from that. The kinetics of saturable folate transport was first assessed in the absence of myricetin in the cells pretreated with the flavonoid for 60 min. The pretreatment induced PCFT inhibition in a manner dependent on the concentration of myricetin, where the maximum transport rate was reduced by 35.5% and 83.1%, respectively, at its concentrations of 20 μM and 50 μM. The inhibitory effect was, however, less extensive at lower folate concentrations, because the Michaelis constant was also reduced similarly in a manner dependent on myricetin concentration. The inhibition was induced depending on the time of pretreatment and, after removal of myricetin (50 μM) upon the manifestation of an extensive inhibition at 60 min, reversed almost completely in 90 min. This rather short time required for recovery may suggest that the sustained inhibition of PCFT is of a reversible type.

  7. Memantine transport by a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in hCMEC/D3 cells, an in vitro human blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Kei; Kitamura, Atsushi; Okura, Takashi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Memantine is clinically used for the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease and is highly distributed to the brain. The aim of this study is to characterize memantine transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) using hCMEC/D3 cells, a human BBB model. The initial uptake velocity of memantine in hCMEC/D3 cells was concentration-dependent, and was reduced by metabolic inhibitors, but was independent of extracellular sodium ion and membrane potential. Intracellular alkalization and intracellular acidification markedly reduced and enhanced the uptake, respectively. The uptake was strongly inhibited by quinidine, pyrilamine and verapamil, and was moderately inhibited by TEA (substrate of OCTs and OCTNs) and l-carnitine (substrate of OCTN2), but was not inhibited by MPP(+) (substrate of OCTs and PMAT) or ergothioneine (substrate of OCTN1). Although relatively abundant expression of OCTN2 gene has been observed in hCMEC/D3 cells, knockdown of OCTN2 with siRNA did not decrease memantine uptake. Memantine and diphenhydramine each showed inhibition of the other's uptake in a competitive manner. Thus, proton-coupled organic cation antiporter(s) appears to be involved in the transport of memantine in hCMEC/D3 cells, at least in part. Our results indicate that the in vivo BBB permeability of memantine in humans can be predicted from the in vitro uptake clearance in hCMEC/D3 cells.

  8. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer and Redox Active Tyrosines: Structure and Function of the Tyrosyl Radicals in Ribonucleotide Reductase and Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Bridgette A.; Chen, Jun; Keough, James; Jenson, David; Offenbacher, Adam; Pagba, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions are important in many biological processes. Tyrosine oxidation/reduction can play a critical role in facilitating these reactions. Two examples are photosystem II (PSII) and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR is essential in DNA synthesis in all organisms. In E. coli RNR, a tyrosyl radical, Y122•, is required as a radical initiator. Photosystem II (PSII) generates molecular oxygen from water. In PSII, an essential tyrosyl radical, YZ•, oxidizes the oxygen evolving center. However, the mechanisms, by which the extraordinary oxidizing power of the tyrosyl radical is controlled, are not well understood. This is due to the difficulty in acquiring high-resolution structural information about the radical state. Spectroscopic approaches, such as EPR and UV resonance Raman (UVRR), can give new information. Here, we discuss EPR studies of PCET and the PSII YZ radical. We also present UVRR results, which support the conclusion that Y122 undergoes an alteration in ring and backbone dihedral angle when it is oxidized. This conformational change results in a loss of hydrogen bonding to the phenolic oxygen. Our analysis suggests that access of water is an important factor in determining tyrosyl radical lifetime and function. TOC graphic PMID:22662289

  9. A Measurement of the Rate of Muon Capture in Hydrogen Gas andDetermination of the Proton's Induced Pseudoscalar Coupling gP

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, Thomas Ira

    2007-07-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate ofnuclear muon capture by the proton, performed by the MuCap Collaborationusing a new technique based on a time projection chamber operating inultraclean, deuterium-depleted hydrogen gas at room temperature and 1 MPapressure. The hydrogen target's low gas density of 1 percent compared toliquid hydrogen is key to avoiding uncertainties that arise from theformation of muonic molecules. The capture rate was obtained from thedifference between the μ- disappearance rate in hydrogen--as determinedfrom data collected in the experiment's first physics run in fall2004--and the world averagefor the μ+ decay rate. After combining theresults of my analysis with the results from another independent analysisof the 2004 data, the muon capture rate from the hyperfine singlet groundstate of the mu-p atom is found to be ΛS = 725.0 ± 17.4 1/s, fromwhich the induced pseudoscalar coupling of the nucleon, gP(q2 = -0.88m$2\\atop{μ}$)= 7.3 ± 1.1, is extracted. This result for gP is consistent withtheoretical predictions that are based on the approximate chiral symmetryof QCD.

  10. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Cabrera, Robert M; Li, Yue; Miller, David S; Finnell, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with many adverse clinical manifestations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, protects the brain from exposure to neurotoxicants. The function of BBB is modulated by multiple ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein. A proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT)-deficient mouse has been previously described as a model for systemic folate deficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that exposing mouse brain capillaries to the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (VPA; 5 μM), significantly increased P-glycoprotein transport function in the wild-type animals. A ligand to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produced a similar induction of P-glycoprotein, which tightened the BBB, thereby increasing the neuroprotection. However, VPA- or TCDD-induced P-glycoprotein transport was blocked in the PCFT-nullizygous mice, indicating that multiple neuroprotective mechanisms are compromised under folate-deficient conditions. Brain capillaries from S-folinic acid (SFA; 40 mg/kg)-treated PCFT-nullizygous mice exhibited increased P-glycoprotein transport following VPA exposure. This suggests that SFA supplementation restored the normal BBB function. In addition, we show that tight-junction proteins are disintegrated in the PCFT mutant mice. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that folate deficiency disrupts the BBB function by targeting the transporter and tight junctions, which may contribute to the development of neurological disorders.

  11. The SLC36 family of proton-coupled amino acid transporters and their potential role in drug transport

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, David T; Anderson, Catriona MH

    2011-01-01

    Members of the solute carrier (SLC) 36 family are involved in transmembrane movement of amino acids and derivatives. SLC36 consists of four members. SLC36A1 and SLC36A2 both function as H+-coupled amino acid symporters. SLC36A1 is expressed at the luminal surface of the small intestine but is also commonly found in lysosomes in many cell types (including neurones), suggesting that it is a multipurpose carrier with distinct roles in different cells including absorption in the small intestine and as an efflux pathway following intralysosomal protein breakdown. SLC36A1 has a relatively low affinity (Km 1–10 mM) for its substrates, which include zwitterionic amino and imino acids, heterocyclic amino acids and amino acid-based drugs and derivatives used experimentally and/or clinically to treat epilepsy, schizophrenia, bacterial infections, hyperglycaemia and cancer. SLC36A2 is expressed at the apical surface of the human renal proximal tubule where it functions in the reabsorption of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. SLC36A2 also transports amino acid derivatives but has a narrower substrate selectivity and higher affinity (Km 0.1–0.7 mM) than SLC36A1. Mutations in SLC36A2 lead to hyperglycinuria and iminoglycinuria. SLC36A3 is expressed only in testes and is an orphan transporter with no known function. SLC36A4 is widely distributed at the mRNA level and is a high-affinity (Km 2–3 µM) transporter for proline and tryptophan. We have much to learn about this family of transporters, but from current knowledge, it seems likely that their function will influence the pharmacokinetic profiles of amino acid-based drugs by mediating transport in both the small intestine and kidney. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Transporters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-7 PMID:21501141

  12. Stepwise translocation of nucleic acid motors

    PubMed Central

    Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent single molecule studies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in the movement of motor proteins which process DNA and RNA. Measurement of stepsize in two disparate motors, NS3 helicase and ribosome both revealed three basepair steps which consist of three hidden substeps. Combined with previous structural studies, NS3 is likely taking a single nucleotide step of translocation coupled to one ATP binding event and this mode may be conserved in multitude of helicases. Such a stepwise translocation movement appears to occur through main contacts with the phosphate backbone. Double stranded RNA and DNA motor, RIG-I and Φ29 respectively showed translocation on a duplex while tracking exclusively a single stranded RNA/DNA in a directional manner, 5′ to 3′ in both cases. Spontaneous dynamics displayed by ribosome ratcheting and SSB (single stranded DNA binding protein) diffusing on DNA were rectified by interacting cofactors and proteins, EF-G and RecA respectively. PMID:20061135

  13. Measurement of Small One-Bond Proton-Carbon Residual Dipolar Coupling Constants in Partially Oriented 13C Natural Abundance Oligosaccharide Samples: Analysis of Heteronuclear 1JCH-Modulated Spectra with the BIRD Inversion Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tran Nghia; Liptaj, Tibor; Bromek, Krystyna; Uhrín, Dušan

    2002-08-01

    Two 2D J-modulated HSQC-based experiments were designed for precise determination of small residual dipolar one-bond carbon-proton coupling constants in 13C natural abundance carbohydrates. Crucial to the precision of a few hundredths of Hz achieved by these methods was the use of long modulation intervals and BIRD pulses, which acted as semiselective inversion pulses. The BIRD pulses eliminated effective evolution of all but 1JCH couplings, resulting in signal modulation that can be described by simple modulation functions. A thorough analysis of such modulation functions for a typical four-spin carbohydrate spin system was performed for both experiments. The results showed that the evolution of the 1H- 1H and long-range 1H- 13C couplings during the BIRD pulses did not necessitate the introduction of more complicated modulation functions. The effects of pulse imperfections were also inspected. While weakly coupled spin systems can be analyzed by simple fitting of cross peak intensities, in strongly coupled spin systems the evolution of the density matrix needs to be considered in order to analyse data accurately. However, if strong coupling effects are modest the errors in coupling constants determined by the "weak coupling" analysis are of similar magnitudes in oriented and isotropic samples and are partially cancelled during dipolar coupling calculation. Simple criteria have been established as to when the strong coupling treatment needs to be invoked.

  14. Study of coupled transport and its effect on different electrochemical systems: Implications in high temperature energy storage batteries and proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Preethy

    Coupled transport is studied on two electrochemical systems: Na-ZnCl 2 batteries and Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). The energy storage system of interest here is based on sodium β"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE): Na/BASE/ZnCl2. BASE is an excellent Na+ conductor with a very high conductivity at 300°C. Its high Na+ ion conductivity and high stability are the principal reasons for its application in electrochemical storage systems. A novel vapor phase process was invented facilitating the fabrication of high strength and moisture/CO 2 resistant BASE. A two-phase composite of alumiNa+YSZ is formed by sintering and exposed to Na2O vapor, keeping the activity of Na2O lower than that in NaAlO2. This prevents the formation of hygroscopic NaAlO2 at the grain boundaries. A thin layer of β"-alumina is formed on the surface upon exposure. Further reaction occurs by transporting Na+ ions through the formed β"-alumina and a parallel transport of O2- ions through YSZ. This occurs by a coupled transport of Na+ through β"-alumina and O 2- ions through YSZ, thus expediting the process. The second electrochemical system of interest is PEMFC. The degradation mechanism of catalysts is studied using inexpensive copper particles. The mechanism of growth involves a coupled transport of Cu2+ through the aqueous medium and an electron transport through the direct particle-to-particle contact. Effect of applied stress on coarsening of platinum was also investigated. Two platinum wires/foils were immersed in a PtCl4+DMSO (Dimethyl sulfoxide) solution. A tensile load was applied to one wire/foil and the other one was left load-free. The wire/foil subjected to a tensile load became cathodic with respect to the unstressed wire/foil. Thus, under a tensile stress, the chemical potential of Pt decreases. This result suggests design strategies for core-shell catalysts used in PEMFCs: stable core-shell catalysts for PEMFC with Pt shell should be designed such that the shell is

  15. A mechano-chemiosmotic model for the coupling of electron and proton transfer to ATP synthesis in energy-transforming membranes: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Kasumov, Eldar A; Kasumov, Ruslan E; Kasumova, Irina V

    2015-01-01

    ATP is synthesized using ATP synthase by utilizing energy either from the oxidation of organic compounds, or from light, via redox reactions (oxidative- or photo phosphorylation), in energy-transforming membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts, and bacteria. ATP synthase undergoes several changes during its functioning. The generally accepted model for ATP synthesis is the well-known rotatory model (see e.g., Junge et al., Nature 459:364-370, 2009; Junge and Müller, Science 333:704-705, 2011). Here, we present an alternative modified model for the coupling of electron and proton transfer to ATP synthesis, which was initially developed by Albert Lester Lehninger (1917-1986). Details of the molecular mechanism of ATP synthesis are described here that involves cyclic low-amplitude shrinkage and swelling of mitochondria. A comparison of the well-known current model and the mechano-chemiosmotic model is also presented. Based on structural, and other data, we suggest that ATP synthase is a Ca(2+)/H(+)-K(+) Cl(-)-pump-pore-enzyme complex, in which γ-subunit rotates 360° in steps of 30°, and 90° due to the binding of phosphate ions to positively charged amino acid residues in the N-terminal γ-subunit, while in the electric field. The coiled coil b 2-subunits are suggested to act as ropes that are shortened by binding of phosphate ions to positively charged lysines or arginines; this process is suggested to pull the α 3 β 3-hexamer to the membrane during the energization process. ATP is then synthesized during the reverse rotation of the γ-subunit by destabilizing the phosphated N-terminal γ-subunit and b 2-subunits under the influence of Ca(2+) ions, which are pumped over from storage-intermembrane space into the matrix, during swelling of intermembrane space. In the process of ATP synthesis, energy is first, predominantly, used in the delivery of phosphate ions and protons to the α 3 β 3-hexamer against the energy barrier with the help of C-terminal alpha

  16. Genomic Comparison of Translocating and Non-Translocating Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Nathan L.; Katouli, Mohammad; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of E. coli across the gut epithelium can result in fatal sepsis in post-surgical patients. In vitro and in vivo experiments have identified the existence of a novel pathotype of translocating E. coli (TEC) that employs an unknown mechanism for translocating across epithelial cells to the mesenteric lymph nodes and the blood stream in both humans and animal models. In this study the genomes of four TEC strains isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes of a fatal case of hospitalised patient (HMLN-1), blood of pigs after experimental shock (PC-1) and after non-lethal haemorrhage in rats (KIC-1 and KIC-2) were sequenced in order to identify the genes associated with their adhesion and/or translocation. To facilitate the comparison, the genomes of a non-adhering, non-translocating E. coli (46–4) and adhering but non-translocating E. coli (73–89) were also sequenced and compared. Whole genome comparison revealed that three (HMLN-1, PC-1 and KIC-2) of the four TEC strains carried a genomic island that encodes a Type 6 Secretion System that may contribute to adhesion of the bacteria to gut epithelial cells. The human TEC strain HMLN-1 also carried the invasion ibeA gene, which was absent in the animal TEC strains and is likely to be associated with host-specific translocation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four TEC strains were distributed amongst three distinct E. coli phylogroups, which was supported by the presence of phylogroup specific fimbriae gene clusters. The genomic comparison has identified potential genes that can be targeted with knock-out experiments to further characterise the mechanisms of E. coli translocation. PMID:26317913

  17. Efficient Epoxidation of Styrene Derivatives by a Nonheme Iron(IV)-Oxo Complex via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer with Triflic Acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyun; Lee, Yong-Min; Ohkubo, Kei; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-06-15

    Styrene derivatives are not oxidized by [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) in acetonitrile at 298 K, whereas epoxidation of styrene derivatives by the iron(IV)-oxo complex occurs efficiently in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) via proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) from styrene derivatives to the diprotonated species of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) with HOTf. Logarithms of the first-order rate constants of HOTf-promoted expoxidation of styrene derivatives with [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) and PCET from electron donors to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) in the precursor complexes exhibit a remarkably unified correlation with the driving force of PCET in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes are taken into account. The same PCET driving force dependence is obtained for the first-order rate constants of HOTf-promoted oxygen atom transfer from thioanisols to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) and HOTf-promoted hydrogen atom transfer from toluene derivatives to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) in the precursor complexes. Thus, HOTf-promoted epoxidation of styrene derivatives by [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) proceeds via the rate-determining electron transfer from styrene derivatives to the diprotonated species of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+), as shown in the reactions of HOTf-promoted oxygen atom transfer from thioanisols to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) and HOTf-promoted hydrogen atom transfer from toluene derivatives to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+).

  18. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  19. The process of microbial translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J W; Boyce, S T; Babcock, G F; Gianotti, L; Peck, M D; Dunn, D L; Pyles, T; Childress, C P; Ash, S K

    1990-01-01

    The process of microbial translocation was studied using Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, or endotoxin instilled into Thiry-Vella loops of thermally injured guinea pigs and rats. Translocation of C. albicans occurred by direct penetration of enterocytes by a unique process different from classical phagocytosis. Translocation between enterocytes was not observed. Internalization was associated with a disturbance of the plasma membrane and brush border, but most internalized organisms were not surrounded by a plasma membrane. Passage of the candida into the lamina propria appeared to be associated with disruption of the basal membrane with extrusion of cytoplasm of the cell and candida. Organisms in the lamina propria were commonly phagocytized by macrophages but also were found free in lymphatics and blood vessels. Translocation of E. coli and endotoxin also occurred directly through enterocytes rather than between them, but translocated endotoxin diffused through the lamina propria and muscular wall of the bowel wall by passing between rather than through the myocytes. These descriptive phenomena provide new insight into the role of the enterocyte and intestinal immune cells in the translocation process. Images Figs. 11A-E. Figs. 11A-E. Figs. 12A-C. Figs. 1A-F. Figs. 2A-D. Figs. 2A-D. Figs. 2A-D. Figs. 2A-D. Fig. 3. Figs. 4A and B. Figs. 5A-B. Fig. 5C. Fig. 6. Fig. 6. Figs. 7A and B. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:2222015

  20. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... direction of the tumor. A machine called a synchrotron or cyclotron creates and speeds up the protons. ... redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should ...

  1. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  2. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  3. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  4. Crystallographic snapshot of cellulose synthesis and membrane translocation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jacob L.W.; Strumillo, Joanna; Zimmer, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant biological macromolecule, is an extracellular, linear polymer of glucose molecules. It represents an essential component of plant cell walls but is also found in algae and bacteria. In bacteria, cellulose production frequently correlates with the formation of biofilms, a sessile, multicellular growth form. Cellulose synthesis and transport across the inner bacterial membrane is mediated by a complex of the multi-spanning catalytic BcsA subunit and the membrane-anchored, periplasmic BcsB protein. Here we present the crystal structure of a complex of BcsA and BcsB from Rhodobacter sphaeroides containing a translocating polysaccharide. The structure of the BcsA-B translocation intermediate reveals the architecture of the cellulose synthase, demonstrates how BcsA forms a cellulose-conducting channel, and suggests a model for the coupling of cellulose synthesis and translocation in which the nascent polysaccharide is extended by one glucose molecule at a time. PMID:23222542

  5. Downside risk of wildlife translocation.

    PubMed

    Chipman, R; Slate, D; Rupprecht, C; Mendoza, M

    2008-01-01

    Translocation has been used successfully by wildlife professionals to enhance or reintroduce populations of rare or extirpated wildlife, provide hunting or wildlife viewing opportunities, farm wild game, and reduce local human-wildlife conflicts. However, accidental and intentional translocations may have multiple unintended negative consequences, including increased stress and mortality of relocated animals, negative impacts on resident animals at release sites, increased conflicts with human interests, and the spread of diseases. Many wildlife professionals now question the practice of translocation, particularly in light of the need to contain or eliminate high profile, economically important wildlife diseases and because using this technique may jeopardize international wildlife disease management initiatives to control rabies in raccoons, coyotes, and foxes in North America. Incidents have been documented where specific rabies variants (Texas gray fox, canine variant in coyotes, and raccoon) have been moved well beyond their current range as a result of translocation, including the emergence of raccoon rabies in the eastern United States. Here, we review and discuss the substantial challenges of curtailing translocation in the USA, focusing on movement of animals by the public, nuisance wildlife control operators, and wildlife rehabilitators. PMID:18634483

  6. Intestinal Transport of Aminopterin Enantiomers in Dogs and Humans with Psoriasis Is Stereoselective: Evidence for a Mechanism Involving the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Menter, Alan; Thrash, Breck; Cherian, Christina; Matherly, Larry H.; Wang, Lei; Gangjee, Aleem; Morgan, Joel R.; Maeda, Dean Y.; Schuler, Aaron D.; Zebala, John A.

    2012-01-01

    N-[4-[[(2,4-diamino-6-pterdinyl)methyl]amino]benzoyl]-l/d-glutamic acid (l/d-AMT) is an investigational drug in phase 1 clinical development that consists of the l-and d-enantiomers of aminopterin (AMT). l/d-AMT is obtained from a novel process for making the l-enantiomer (l-AMT), a potent oral anti-inflammatory agent. The purpose of these studies was to characterize oral uptake and safety in the dog and human of each enantiomer alone and in combination and provide in vitro evidence for a mechanism of intestinal absorption. This is the first report of l /d-AMT in humans. In dogs (n = 40) orally dosed with l-AMT or d-AMT absorption was stereoselective for the l-enantiomer (6- to 12-fold larger peak plasma concentration after oral administration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve at 0–4 h; p < 0.001). d-AMT was not toxic at the maximal dose tested (82.5 mg/kg), which was 100-fold larger than the maximal nonlethal l-AMT dose (0.8 mg/kg). Dogs (n = 10) and humans with psoriasis (n = 21) orally administered l-AMT and l /d-AMT at the same l-enantiomer dose resulted in stereoselective absorption (absent d-enantiomer in plasma), bioequivalent l-enantiomer pharmacokinetics, and equivalent safety. Thus, the d-enantiomer in l/d-AMT did not perturb l-enantiomer absorption or alter the safety of l-AMT. In vitro uptake by the human proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) demonstrated minimal transport of d-AMT compared with l-AMT, mirroring the in vivo findings. Enantiomer selectivity by PCFT was attributable almost entirely to decreased binding affinity rather than changes in transport rate. Collectively, our results demonstrate a strong in vitro-in vivo correlation implicating stereoselective transport by PCFT as the mechanism underlying stereoselective absorption observed in vivo. PMID:22653877

  7. Mutations alter the sodium versus proton use of a Bacillus clausii flagellar motor and confer dual ion use on Bacillus subtilis motors.

    PubMed

    Terahara, Naoya; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2008-09-23

    Bacterial flagella contain membrane-embedded stators, Mot complexes, that harness the energy of either transmembrane proton or sodium ion gradients to power motility. Use of sodium ion gradients is associated with elevated pH and sodium concentrations. The Mot complexes studied to date contain channels that use either protons or sodium ions, with some bacteria having only one type and others having two distinct Mot types with different ion-coupling. Here, alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 was shown to be motile in a pH range from 7 to 11 although its genome encodes only one Mot (BCl-MotAB). Assays of swimming as a function of pH, sodium concentration, and ion-selective motility inhibitors showed that BCl-MotAB couples motility to sodium at the high end of its pH range but uses protons at lower pH. This pattern was confirmed in swimming assays of a statorless Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing either BCl-MotAB or one of the two B. subtilis stators, sodium-coupled Bs-MotPS or proton-coupled Bs-MotAB. Pairs of mutations in BCl-MotB were identified that converted the naturally bifunctional BCl-MotAB to stators that preferentially use either protons or sodium ions across the full pH range. We then identified trios of mutations that added a capacity for dual-ion coupling on the distinct B. subtilis Bs-MotAB and Bs-MotPS motors. Determinants that alter the specificity of bifunctional and single-coupled flagellar stators add to insights from studies of other ion-translocating transporters that use both protons and sodium ions. PMID:18796609

  8. Proton pump of clathrin-coated vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X.

    1985-01-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles were prepared from bovine brain catalyze ATP-driven proton translocation and a /sup 32/Pi-ATP exchange reaction. N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) at 1 mM and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) at 0.5 mM inhibit the pump completely, whereas neither vanadate, efrapeptin, NaN/sub 3/, nor mitochondrial ATPase inhibitor has an effect. The coated vesicle proton pump is characterized by ATP specificity. dATP, but no other nucleotide, can replace ATP as a substrate. The pump is electrogenic and the electrogenicity is neutralized by chloride or bromide serving as co-ions. ATP-driven proton translocation can be observed in the absence of chloride, provided that the membrane potential is collapsed by K/sup +/ moving out in the presence of valinomycin. Chloride transport can be observed independent of proton movements in the absence of ATP, provided that an inside positive membrane potential is generated by K/sup +/ influx in the presence of valinomycin. The proton-translocating ATPase of coated vesicles was solubilized with a nonionic detergent polyoxyethylene 9 lauryl ether, and purified about 700 fold to near homogeneity. During purification the enzymatic activity was lost. A purified brain phospholipid fraction restored the activity and was subsequently identified as phosphatidylserine.

  9. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed

    Corey, Robin A; Allen, William J; Collinson, Ian

    2016-06-15

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process-commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons.

  10. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Robin A.; Allen, William J.; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process–commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  11. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed

    Corey, Robin A; Allen, William J; Collinson, Ian

    2016-06-15

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process-commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  12. Permeation of membranes by the neutral form of amino acids and peptides: relevance to the origin of peptide translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The flux of amino acids and other nutrient solutes such as phosphate across lipid bilayers (liposomes) is 10(5) slower than facilitated inward transport across biological membranes. This suggest that primitive cells lacking highly evolved transport systems would have difficulty transporting sufficient nutrients for cell growth to occur. There are two possible ways by which early life may have overcome this difficulty: (1) The membranes of the earliest cellular life-forms may have been intrinsically more permeable to solutes; or (2) some transport mechanism may have been available to facilitate transbilayer movement of solutes essential for cell survival and growth prior to the evolution of membrane transport proteins. Translocation of neutral species represents one such mechanism. The neutral forms of amino acids modified by methylation (creating protonated weak bases) permeate membranes up to 10(10) times faster than charged forms. This increased permeability when coupled to a transmembrane pH gradient can result in significantly increased rates of net unidirectional transport. Such pH gradients can be generated in vesicles used to model protocells that preceded and were presumably ancestral to early forms of life. This transport mechanism may still play a role in some protein translocation processes (e.g. for certain signal sequences, toxins and thylakoid proteins) in vivo.

  13. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15598.001 PMID:27183269

  14. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Baldwin, Steve A; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-05-16

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids.

  15. Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  16. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  17. Voltage-gated proton channels.

    PubMed

    Decoursey, Thomas E

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely, the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance approximately 10(3) times smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn(2+) (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B-lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H(+) for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens.

  18. Distinguishing between Luminal and Localized Proton Buffering Pools in Thylakoid Membranes1

    PubMed Central

    Ewy, Robert G.; Dilley, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The dual gradient energy coupling hypothesis posits that chloroplast thylakoid membranes are energized for ATP formation by either a delocalized or a localized proton gradient geometry. Localized energy coupling is characterized by sequestered domains with a buffering capacity of approximately 150 nmol H+ mg−1 chlorophyll (Chl). A total of 30 to 40 nmol mg−1 Chl of the total sequestered domain buffering capacity is contributed by lysines with anomolously low pKas, which can be covalently derivatized with acetic anhydride. We report that in thylakoid membranes treated with acetic anhydride, luminal acidification by a photosystem I (duraquinol [DQH2] to methyl viologen [MV]) proton pumping partial reaction was nearly completely inhibited, as measured by three separate assays, yet surprisingly, H+ accumulation still occurred to the significant level of more than 100 nmol H+ mg Chl−1, presumably into the sequestered domains. The treatment did not increase the observed rate constant of dark H+ efflux, nor was electron transport significantly inhibited. These data provide support for the existence of a sequestered proton translocating pathway linking the redox reaction H+ ion sources with the CF0 H+ channel. The sequestered, low-pKa Lys groups appear to have a role in the H+ diffusion process and chemically modifying them blocks the putative H+ relay system. PMID:10677451

  19. Protons @ interfaces: implications for biological energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Mulkidjanian, Armen Y; Heberle, Joachim; Cherepanov, Dmitry A

    2006-08-01

    The review focuses on the anisotropy of proton transfer at the surface of biological membranes. We consider (i) the data from "pulsed" experiments, where light-triggered enzymes capture or eject protons at the membrane surface, (ii) the electrostatic properties of water at charged interfaces, and (iii) the specific structural attributes of proton-translocating enzymes. The pulsed experiments revealed that proton exchange between the membrane surface and the bulk aqueous phase takes as much as about 1 ms, but could be accelerated by added mobile pH-buffers. Since the accelerating capacity of the latter decreased with the increase in their electric charge, it was concluded that the membrane surface is separated from the bulk aqueous phase by a barrier of electrostatic nature. The barrier could arise owing to the water polarization at the negatively charged membrane surface. The barrier height depends linearly on the charge of penetrating ions; for protons, it has been estimated as about 0.12 eV. While the proton exchange between the surface and the bulk aqueous phase is retarded by the interfacial barrier, the proton diffusion along the membrane, between neighboring enzymes, takes only microseconds. The proton spreading over the membrane is facilitated by the hydrogen-bonded networks at the surface. The membrane-buried layers of these networks can eventually serve as a storage/buffer for protons (proton sponges). As the proton equilibration between the surface and the bulk aqueous phase is slower than the lateral proton diffusion between the "sources" and "sinks", the proton activity at the membrane surface, as sensed by the energy transducing enzymes at steady state, might deviate from that measured in the adjoining water phase. This trait should increase the driving force for ATP synthesis, especially in the case of alkaliphilic bacteria.

  20. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  1. Suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation.

    PubMed

    Germano, Jennifer M; Bishop, Phillip J

    2009-02-01

    Translocations are important tools in the field of conservation. Despite increased use over the last few decades, the appropriateness of translocations for amphibians and reptiles has been debated widely over the past 20 years. To provide a comprehensive evaluation of the suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation, we reviewed the results of amphibian and reptile translocation projects published between 1991 and 2006. The success rate of amphibian and reptile translocations reported over this period was twice that reported in an earlier review in 1991. Success and failure rates were independent of the taxonomic class (Amphibia or Reptilia) released. Reptile translocations driven by human-wildlife conflict mitigation had a higher failure rate than those motivated by conservation, and more recent projects of reptile translocations had unknown outcomes. The outcomes of amphibian translocations were significantly related to the number of animals released, with projects releasing over 1000 individuals being most successful. The most common reported causes of translocation failure were homing and migration of introduced individuals out of release sites and poor habitat. The increased success of amphibian and reptile translocations reviewed in this study compared with the 1991 review is encouraging for future conservation projects. Nevertheless, more preparation, monitoring, reporting of results, and experimental testing of techniques and reintroduction questions need to occur to improve translocations of amphibians and reptiles as a whole.

  2. Linkage map construction involving a reciprocal translocation.

    PubMed

    Farré, A; Benito, I Lacasa; Cistué, L; de Jong, J H; Romagosa, I; Jansen, J

    2011-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a novel statistical-genetic approach for the construction of linkage maps in populations obtained from reciprocal translocation heterozygotes of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Using standard linkage analysis, translocations usually lead to 'pseudo-linkage': the mixing up of markers from the chromosomes involved in the translocation into a single linkage group. Close to the translocation breakpoints recombination is severely suppressed and, as a consequence, ordering markers in those regions is not feasible. The novel strategy presented in this paper is based on (1) disentangling the "pseudo-linkage" using principal coordinate analysis, (2) separating individuals into translocated types and normal types and (3) separating markers into those close to and those more distant from the translocation breakpoints. The methods make use of a consensus map of the species involved. The final product consists of integrated linkage maps of the distal parts of the chromosomes involved in the translocation.

  3. Polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chiu TaiAndrew; Muthukumar, M.

    2008-01-01

    A formalism of polymer translocation through a cylindrical channel of finite diameter and length between two spherical compartments is developed. Unlike previous simplified systems, the finite diameter of the channel allows the number of polymer segments inside the channel to be adjusted during translocation according to the free energy of possible conformations. The translocation process of a Gaussian chain without excluded volume and hydrodynamic interactions is studied using exact formulas of confinement free energy under this formalism. The free energy landscape for the translocation process, the distribution of the translocation time, and the average translocation time are presented. The complex dependencies of the average translocation time on the length and diameter of the channel, the sizes of the donor and receptor compartments, and the chain length are illustrated. PMID:18433273

  4. Impact of OH Radical-Initiated H2CO3 Degradation in the Earth's Atmosphere via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Sourav; Hazra, Montu K

    2016-02-01

    The decomposition of isolated carbonic acid (H2CO3) molecule into CO2 and H2O (H2CO3 → CO2 + H2O) is prevented by a large activation barrier (>35 kcal/mol). Nevertheless, it is surprising that the detection of the H2CO3 molecule has not been possible yet, and the hunt for the free H2CO3 molecule has become challenging not only in the Earth's atmosphere but also on Mars. In view of this fact, we report here the high levels of quantum chemistry calculations investigating both the energetics and kinetics of the OH radical-initiated H2CO3 degradation reaction to interpret the loss of the H2CO3 molecule in the Earth's atmosphere. It is seen from our study that proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) are the two mechanisms by which the OH radical initiates the degradation of the H2CO3 molecule. Moreover, the PCET mechanism is potentially the important one, as the effective barrier, defined as the difference between the zero point vibrational energy (ZPE) corrected energy of the transition state and the total energy of the isolated starting reactants in terms of bimolecular encounters, for the PCET mechanism at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory is ∼3 to 4 kcal/mol lower than the effective barrier height associated with the HAT mechanism. The CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level predicted effective barrier heights for the degradations of the two most stable conformers of H2CO3 molecule via the PCET mechanism are only ∼2.7 and 4.3 kcal/mol. A comparative reaction rate analysis at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory has also been carried out to explore the potential impact of the OH radical-initiated H2CO3 degradation relative to that from water (H2O), formic acid (FA), acetic acid (AA) and sulfuric acid (SA) assisted H2CO3 → CO2 + H2O decomposition reactions in both the Earth's troposphere and stratosphere. The comparison of the reaction rates reveals that, although the atmospheric concentration of the OH radical is

  5. Impact of OH Radical-Initiated H2CO3 Degradation in the Earth's Atmosphere via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Sourav; Hazra, Montu K

    2016-02-01

    The decomposition of isolated carbonic acid (H2CO3) molecule into CO2 and H2O (H2CO3 → CO2 + H2O) is prevented by a large activation barrier (>35 kcal/mol). Nevertheless, it is surprising that the detection of the H2CO3 molecule has not been possible yet, and the hunt for the free H2CO3 molecule has become challenging not only in the Earth's atmosphere but also on Mars. In view of this fact, we report here the high levels of quantum chemistry calculations investigating both the energetics and kinetics of the OH radical-initiated H2CO3 degradation reaction to interpret the loss of the H2CO3 molecule in the Earth's atmosphere. It is seen from our study that proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) are the two mechanisms by which the OH radical initiates the degradation of the H2CO3 molecule. Moreover, the PCET mechanism is potentially the important one, as the effective barrier, defined as the difference between the zero point vibrational energy (ZPE) corrected energy of the transition state and the total energy of the isolated starting reactants in terms of bimolecular encounters, for the PCET mechanism at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory is ∼3 to 4 kcal/mol lower than the effective barrier height associated with the HAT mechanism. The CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level predicted effective barrier heights for the degradations of the two most stable conformers of H2CO3 molecule via the PCET mechanism are only ∼2.7 and 4.3 kcal/mol. A comparative reaction rate analysis at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory has also been carried out to explore the potential impact of the OH radical-initiated H2CO3 degradation relative to that from water (H2O), formic acid (FA), acetic acid (AA) and sulfuric acid (SA) assisted H2CO3 → CO2 + H2O decomposition reactions in both the Earth's troposphere and stratosphere. The comparison of the reaction rates reveals that, although the atmospheric concentration of the OH radical is

  6. The pathway for serial proton supply to the active site of nitrogenase: enhanced density functional modeling of the Grotthuss mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogenase contains a well defined and conserved chain of water molecules leading to the FeMo cofactor (FeMo-co, an [Fe7MoCS9] cluster with bidentate chelation of Mo by homocitrate) that is the active site where N2 and other substrates are sequentially hydrogenated using multiple protons and electrons. The function of this chain is proposed to be a proton wire, serially translocating protons to triply-bridging S3B of FeMo-co, where, concomitant with electron transfer to FeMo-co, an H atom is generated on S3B. Density functional simulations of this proton translocation mechanism are reported here, using a large 269-atom model that includes all residues hydrogen bonded to and surrounding the water chain, and likely to influence proton transfer: three carboxylate O atoms of obligatory homocitrate are essential. The mechanism involves the standard two components of the Grotthuss mechanism, namely H atom slides that shift H3O(+) from one water site to the next, and HOH molecular rotations that convert backward (posterior) OH bonds in the water chain to forward (anterior) OH bonds. The topography of the potential energy surface for each of these steps has been mapped. H atom slides pass through very short (ca. 2.5 Å) O-H-O hydrogen bonds, while HOH rotations involve the breaking of O-HO hydrogen bonds, and the occurrence of long (up to 3.6 Å) separations between contiguous water molecules. Both steps involve low potential energy barriers, <7 kcal mol(-1). During operation of the Grotthuss mechanism in nitrogenase there are substantial displacements of water molecules along the chain, occurring as ripples. These characteristics of the 'Grotthuss two-step', coupled with a buffering ability of two carboxylate O atoms of homocitrate, and combined with density functional characterisation of the final proton slide from the ultimate water molecule to S3B (including electron addition), have been choreographed into a complete mechanism for serial hydrogenation of FeMo-co. The

  7. Problems with mitigation translocation of herpetofauna.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Brian K; Nowak, Erika M; Kwiatkowski, Matthew A

    2015-02-01

    Mitigation translocation of nuisance animals is a commonly used management practice aimed at resolution of human-animal conflict by removal and release of an individual animal. Long considered a reasonable undertaking, especially by the general public, it is now known that translocated subjects are negatively affected by the practice. Mitigation translocation is typically undertaken with individual adult organisms and has a much lower success rate than the more widely practiced conservation translocation of threatened and endangered species. Nonetheless, the public and many conservation practitioners believe that because population-level conservation translocations have been successful that mitigation translocation can be satisfactorily applied to a wide variety of human-wildlife conflict situations. We reviewed mitigation translocations of reptiles, including our own work with 3 long-lived species (Gila monsters [Heloderma suspectum], Sonoran desert tortoises [Gopherus morafkai], and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes [Crotalus atrox]). Overall, mitigation translocation had a low success rate when judged either by effects on individuals (in all studies reviewed they exhibited increased movement or increased mortality) or by the success of the resolution of the human-animal conflict (translocated individuals often returned to the capture site). Careful planning and identification of knowledge gaps are critical to increasing success rates in mitigation translocations in the face of increasing pressure to find solutions for species threatened by diverse anthropogenic factors, including climate change and exurban and energy development.

  8. Problems with mitigation translocation of herpetofauna.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Brian K; Nowak, Erika M; Kwiatkowski, Matthew A

    2015-02-01

    Mitigation translocation of nuisance animals is a commonly used management practice aimed at resolution of human-animal conflict by removal and release of an individual animal. Long considered a reasonable undertaking, especially by the general public, it is now known that translocated subjects are negatively affected by the practice. Mitigation translocation is typically undertaken with individual adult organisms and has a much lower success rate than the more widely practiced conservation translocation of threatened and endangered species. Nonetheless, the public and many conservation practitioners believe that because population-level conservation translocations have been successful that mitigation translocation can be satisfactorily applied to a wide variety of human-wildlife conflict situations. We reviewed mitigation translocations of reptiles, including our own work with 3 long-lived species (Gila monsters [Heloderma suspectum], Sonoran desert tortoises [Gopherus morafkai], and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes [Crotalus atrox]). Overall, mitigation translocation had a low success rate when judged either by effects on individuals (in all studies reviewed they exhibited increased movement or increased mortality) or by the success of the resolution of the human-animal conflict (translocated individuals often returned to the capture site). Careful planning and identification of knowledge gaps are critical to increasing success rates in mitigation translocations in the face of increasing pressure to find solutions for species threatened by diverse anthropogenic factors, including climate change and exurban and energy development. PMID:25040040

  9. Dichotomous Hydrogen Atom Transfer vs. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer During Activation of X-H Bonds (X = C, N, O) by Nonheme Iron-Oxo Complexes of Variable Basicity

    PubMed Central

    Usharani, Dandamudi; Lacy, David C.; Borovik, A. S.; Shaik, Sason

    2013-01-01

    We describe herein the hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT)/ proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactivity for FeIV-oxo and FeIII-oxo complexes (1–4) that activate C-H, N-H, and O-H bonds in 9,10 dihydroanthracene (S1), dimethylformamide (S2), 1,2 diphenylhydrazine (S3), p-methoxyphenol (S4), and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (S5). In 1–3, the iron is pentacoordinated by tris[N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethylene]aminato ([H3buea]3−) or its derivatives. These complexes are basic, in the order 3 >> 1 > 2. Oxidant 4, [FeIVN4Py(O)]2+ (N4Py: N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-bis(2-pyridyl) methylamine), is the least basic oxidant. The DFT results match experimental trends and exhibit a mechanistic spectrum ranging from concerted HAT and PCET reactions to concerted-asynchronous proton transfer (PT) / electron transfer (ET) mechanisms, all the way to PT. The singly occupied orbital along the O---H---X (X= C, N, O) moiety in the TS shows clearly that in the PCET cases, the electron is transferred separately from the proton. The Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not account for the observed reactivity pattern, as evidenced by the scatter in the plot of calculated barrier vs. reactions driving forces. However, a plot of the deformation energy in the TS vs. the respective barrier provides a clear signature of the HAT/PCET dichotomy. Thus, in all C-H bond activations, the barrier derives from the deformation energy required to create the TS, whereas in N-H/O-H bond activations, the deformation energy is much larger than the corresponding barrier, indicating the presence of stabilizing interaction between the TS fragments. A valence bond model is used to link the observed results with the basicity/acidity of the reactants. PMID:24124906

  10. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-14

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, bb, and μμ pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1fb-1 at 7TeV and up to 19.7fb-1 at 8TeV. From the high-resolution γγ and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02+0.26–0.27 (stat) +0.14–0.15 (syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtained in themore » different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 ± 0.09(stat)+0.08–0.07 (theo) ± 0.07(syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. As a result, no significant deviations are found.« less

  11. Electronic Origins of the Variable Efficiency of Room-Temperature Methane Activation by Homo- and Heteronuclear Cluster Oxide Cations [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg): Competition between Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Weiske, Thomas; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-06-29

    The reactivity of the homo- and heteronuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) toward methane was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. The most reactive cluster by both experiment and theory is [Al2O2](•+). In its favorable pathway, this cluster abstracts a hydrogen atom by means of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) instead of following the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) route. This mechanistic choice originates in the strong Lewis acidity of the aluminum site of [Al2O2](•+), which cleaves the C-H bond heterolytically to form an Al-CH3 entity, while the proton is transferred to the bridging oxygen atom of the cluster ion. In addition, a comparison of the reactivity of heteronuclear and homonuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) reveals a striking doping effect by aluminum. Thus, the vacant s-p hybrid orbital on Al acts as an acceptor of the electron pair from methyl anion (CH3(-)) and is therefore eminently important for bringing about thermal methane activation by PCET. For the Al-doped cluster ions, the spin density at an oxygen atom, which is crucial for the HAT mechanism, acts here as a spectator during the course of the PCET mediated C-H bond cleavage. A diagnostic plot of the deformation energy vis-à-vis the barrier shows the different HAT/PCET reactivity map for the entire series. This is a strong connection to the recently discussed mechanism of oxidative coupling of methane on magnesium oxide surfaces proceeding through Grignard-type intermediates. PMID:27241233

  12. Intramolecular, Exciplex-Mediated, Proton-Coupled, Charge-Transfer Processes in N,N-Dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium Cations: Influence of Anion, Solvent Polarity, and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Safko, Trevor M; Faleiros, Marcelo M; Atvars, Teresa D Z; Weiss, Richard G

    2016-06-16

    An intramolecular exciplex-mediated, proton-coupled, charge-transfer (PCCT) process has been investigated for a series of N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium cations with different anions (PyS) in solvents of low to intermediate polarity over a wide temperature range. Solvent mediates both the equilibrium between conformations of the cation that place the pyrenyl and ammonium groups in proximity (conformation C) or far from each other (conformation O) and the ability of the ammonium group to transfer a proton adiabatically in the PyS excited singlet state. Thus, exciplex emission, concurrent with the PCCT process, was observed only in hydrogen-bond accepting solvents of relatively low polarity (tetrahydrofuran, ethyl acetate, and 1,4-dioxane) and not in dichloromethane. From the exciplex emission and other spectroscopic and thermodynamic data, the acidity of the ammonium group in conformation C of the excited singlet state of PyS (pKa*) has been estimated to be ca. -3.4 in tetrahydrofuran. The ratios between the intensities of emission from the exciplex and the locally excited state (IEx/ILE) appear to be much more dependent on the nature of the anion than are the rates of exciplex formation and decay, although the excited state data do not provide a quantitative measure of the anion effect on the C-O equilibrium. The activation energies associated with exciplex formation in THF are calculated to be 0.08 to 0.15 eV lower than for the neutral amine, N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-amine. Decay of the exciplexes formed from the deprotonation of PyS is hypothesized to occur through charge-recombination processes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in which photoacidity and intramolecular exciplex formation (i.e., a PCCT reaction) are coupled.

  13. Kinetics of photoinduced electron transfer between DNA bases and triplet 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid in aqueous solution of different pH's: proton-coupled electron transfer?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Truong X; Kattnig, Daniel; Mansha, Asim; Grampp, Günter; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Lukzen, Nikita

    2012-11-01

    The kinetics of triplet state quenching of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (BPTC) by DNA bases adenine, adenosine, thymine, and thymidine has been investigated in aqueous solution using time-resolved laser flash photolysis. The observation of the BPTC ketyl radical anion at λ(max) = 630 nm indicates that one electron transfer is involved in the quenching reactions. The pH-dependence of the quenching rate constants is measured in detail. As a result, the chemical reactivity of the reactants is assigned. The bimolecular rate constants of the quenching reactions between triplet BPTC and adenine, adenosine, thymine, and thymidine are k(q) = 2.3 × 10(9) (4.7 < pH < 9.9), k(q) = 4.0 × 10(9) (3.5 < pH < 4.7), k(q) = 1.0 × 10(9) (4.7 < pH < 9.9), and k(q) = 4.0 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) (4.7 < pH < 9.8), respectively. Moreover, it reveals that in strong basic medium (pH = 12.0) a keto-enol tautomerism of thymine inhibits its reaction with triplet BPTC. Such a behavior is not possible for thymidine because of its deoxyribose group. In addition, the pH-dependence of the apparent electrochemical standard potential of thymine in aqueous solution was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The ΔE/ΔpH ≈ -59 mV/pH result is characteristic of proton-coupled electron transfer. This behavior, together with the kinetic analysis, leads to the conclusion that the quenching reactions between triplet BPTC and thymine involve one proton-coupled electron transfer. PMID:23038981

  14. Intramolecular, Exciplex-Mediated, Proton-Coupled, Charge-Transfer Processes in N,N-Dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium Cations: Influence of Anion, Solvent Polarity, and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Safko, Trevor M; Faleiros, Marcelo M; Atvars, Teresa D Z; Weiss, Richard G

    2016-06-16

    An intramolecular exciplex-mediated, proton-coupled, charge-transfer (PCCT) process has been investigated for a series of N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium cations with different anions (PyS) in solvents of low to intermediate polarity over a wide temperature range. Solvent mediates both the equilibrium between conformations of the cation that place the pyrenyl and ammonium groups in proximity (conformation C) or far from each other (conformation O) and the ability of the ammonium group to transfer a proton adiabatically in the PyS excited singlet state. Thus, exciplex emission, concurrent with the PCCT process, was observed only in hydrogen-bond accepting solvents of relatively low polarity (tetrahydrofuran, ethyl acetate, and 1,4-dioxane) and not in dichloromethane. From the exciplex emission and other spectroscopic and thermodynamic data, the acidity of the ammonium group in conformation C of the excited singlet state of PyS (pKa*) has been estimated to be ca. -3.4 in tetrahydrofuran. The ratios between the intensities of emission from the exciplex and the locally excited state (IEx/ILE) appear to be much more dependent on the nature of the anion than are the rates of exciplex formation and decay, although the excited state data do not provide a quantitative measure of the anion effect on the C-O equilibrium. The activation energies associated with exciplex formation in THF are calculated to be 0.08 to 0.15 eV lower than for the neutral amine, N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-amine. Decay of the exciplexes formed from the deprotonation of PyS is hypothesized to occur through charge-recombination processes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in which photoacidity and intramolecular exciplex formation (i.e., a PCCT reaction) are coupled. PMID:27268751

  15. Electronic Origins of the Variable Efficiency of Room-Temperature Methane Activation by Homo- and Heteronuclear Cluster Oxide Cations [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg): Competition between Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Weiske, Thomas; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-06-29

    The reactivity of the homo- and heteronuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) toward methane was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. The most reactive cluster by both experiment and theory is [Al2O2](•+). In its favorable pathway, this cluster abstracts a hydrogen atom by means of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) instead of following the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) route. This mechanistic choice originates in the strong Lewis acidity of the aluminum site of [Al2O2](•+), which cleaves the C-H bond heterolytically to form an Al-CH3 entity, while the proton is transferred to the bridging oxygen atom of the cluster ion. In addition, a comparison of the reactivity of heteronuclear and homonuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) reveals a striking doping effect by aluminum. Thus, the vacant s-p hybrid orbital on Al acts as an acceptor of the electron pair from methyl anion (CH3(-)) and is therefore eminently important for bringing about thermal methane activation by PCET. For the Al-doped cluster ions, the spin density at an oxygen atom, which is crucial for the HAT mechanism, acts here as a spectator during the course of the PCET mediated C-H bond cleavage. A diagnostic plot of the deformation energy vis-à-vis the barrier shows the different HAT/PCET reactivity map for the entire series. This is a strong connection to the recently discussed mechanism of oxidative coupling of methane on magnesium oxide surfaces proceeding through Grignard-type intermediates.

  16. Dermatoglyphics and Reproductive Risk in a Family with Robertsonian Translocation 14q;21q

    PubMed Central

    Kolgeci, Selim; Kolgeci, Jehona; Azemi, Mehmedali; Daka, Aferdita; Shala-Beqiraj, Ruke; Kurtishi, Ilir; Sopjani, Mentor

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study is carried out to evaluate the risk of giving birth to children with Down syndrome in a family with Robertsonian translocation 14q;21q, and to find the dermatoglyphic changes present in carriers of this translocation. Methods: Cytogenetics diagnosis has been made according to Moorhead and Seabright method, while the analysis of prints (dermatoglyphics analysis) was made with the Cummins and Midlo method. Results: Cytogenetic diagnosis has been made in a couple who suffered the spontaneous miscarriages and children with Down syndrome. Robertsonian translocation between chromosomes 14 and 21 (45, XX, der (14; 21) (q10; q10)) was found in a female partner who had four pregnancies, in two of which was found fetus karyotype with trisomy in chromosome 21 and pregnancies were terminated. The outcome of fourth pregnancy was twin birth, one of them with normal karyotype and another with Down syndrome due to Robertsonian translocation inherited by mother side. Specific dermatoglyphics traits are found in the child carrying Down syndrome, whereas several traits of dermatoglyphics characteristic of Down syndrome have been displayed among the silent carriers of Robertsonian translocation 14q;21q. Conclusion: Robertsonian translocation found in female partner was the cause of spontaneous miscarriages, of giving birth to a child with Down syndrome, and of trisomy of chromosome 21 due to translocation in two pregnancies. PMID:26236088

  17. Translocation (Y;12) in lipoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cher-Wei; Mariño-Enríquez, Adrian; Johannessen, Catherine; Hornick, Jason L; Dal Cin, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Lipomas are the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm in adults, and have been extensively characterized at the cytogenetic level. Chromosomal aberrations have been observed in the majority of lipomas, two-thirds of which involve chromosomal region 12q14.3. To date, structural rearrangements have been reported affecting every chromosome except chromosome Y. Here we report a case of a lipoma that shows a novel apparently balanced translocation involving chromosomes Y and 12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a break-apart HMGA2 in-house probe set detected a single signal on the normal chromosome 12 but not on either the derivative chromosome Y or 12, indicating a cryptic loss of 12q14.3, where HMGA2 is mapped. Immunohistochemical studies, however, revealed overexpression of HMGA2 with nuclear expression in the majority of tumor cells, whereas MDM2 and CDK4 were negative. The overexpression of HMGA2 may be caused by a cryptic chromosomal aberration affecting either the cytogenetically unaltered HMGA2 allele or HMGA2 regulators elsewhere. The current case broadens our knowledge about the translocation partners of HMGA2 in lipomas and highlights the biological complexity in regulating HMGA2 expression. PMID:21356192

  18. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  19. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G.; Boynton, Lin S.; Eguchi, Raphael R.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E.; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J.; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Villereal, Mitchel L.; Beacham, Daniel W.; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H+ into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired. PMID:26604306

  20. Interactions of histatin 5 and histatin 5-derived peptides with liposome membranes: surface effects, translocation and permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Den Hertog, Alice L; Wong Fong Sang, Harro W; Kraayenhof, Ruud; Bolscher, Jan G M; Van't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno C I; Nieuw Amerongen, Arie V

    2004-01-01

    A number of cationic antimicrobial peptides, among which are histatin 5 and the derived peptides dhvar4 and dhvar5, enter their target cells and interact with internal organelles. There still are questions about the mechanisms by which antimicrobial peptides translocate across the membrane. We used a liposome model to study membrane binding, translocation and membrane-perturbing capacities of histatin 5, dhvar4 and dhvar5. Despite the differences in amphipathic characters of these peptides, they bound equally well to liposomes, whereas their membrane activities differed remarkably: dhvar4 translocated at the fastest rate, followed by dhvar5, whereas the histatin 5 translocation rate was much lower. The same pattern was seen for the extent of calcein release: highest with dhvar4, less with dhvar5 and almost none with histatin 5. The translocation and disruptive actions of dhvar5 did not seem to be coupled, because translocation occurred on a much longer timescale than calcein release, which ended within a few minutes. We conclude that peptide translocation can occur through peptide-phospholipid interactions, and that this is a possible mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides enter cells. However, the translocation rate was much lower in this model membrane system than that seen in yeast cells. Thus it is likely that, at least for some peptides, additional features promoting the translocation across biological membranes are involved as well. PMID:14733612

  1. The Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, Carlos Garcia; Sassot, Rodolfo

    2003-10-01

    In this talk we present a collection of selected topics concerning the structure of the proton and the fundamental interactions as seen inside it. These topics have been thoroughly covered by high energy experiments with ever increasing precision in recent years and beautifully illustrate our present knowledge of the standard model.

  2. Proton Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed. PMID:25686476

  3. Theoretical Analysis of the Sequential Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms for H₂ Oxidation and Production Pathways Catalyzed by Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Laura E.; Horvath, Samantha; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-12-22

    The design of electrocatalysts for the oxidation and production of H2 is important for the development of alternative energy sources. This Article focuses on the [Ni(P2RN2R')2]2+ electrocatalysts, where P2RN2R' denotes 1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands with substituent groups R and R' covalently bound to the phosphorus and nitrogen atoms, respectively. Theoretical methods are used to investigate the mechanism of the step in the catalytic cycle corresponding to [HNiII(P2N2)2]+ – e → [NiI(P2HN2)(P2N2)]2+ for H2 oxidation and the reverse reaction for H2 production. This step involves electron transfer (ET) between the Ni complex and the electrode as well as proton transfer (PT) between the Ni and the N. The sequential mechanisms, PT–ET and ET–PT, are investigated for the following (R,R') substituents: (Me,Me), (Ph,Ph), and (Ph,Bz), where Me, Ph, and Bz denote methyl, phenyl, and benzyl substituents. Density functional theory is used to calculate reduction potentials, pKa values, and PT pathways, and the inner- and outer-sphere reorganization energies for electrochemical ET are calculated within the framework of Marcus theory. For the (Ph,Ph) and (Ph,Bz) systems, the sequential PT–ET mechanism for H2 production would require surmounting a large free energy barrier for the initial PT step, followed by thermodynamically favorable ET. The sequential ET–PT mechanism for these systems would require a moderate initial applied overpotential, followed by a PT reaction with a relatively low free energy barrier. Consistent with experimental data, the calculated overpotential required for the initial reduction in the ET–PT mechanism is lower for the (Ph,Bz) system than for the (Ph,Ph) system for

  4. Resolution and measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings of a noncrystalline protein immobilized in a biological supramolecular assembly by proton-detected MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Ho; Yang, Chen; Opella, Stanley J.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional 15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift and three-dimensional 1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift MAS solid-state NMR correlation spectra of the filamentous bacteriophage Pf1 major coat protein show single-site resolution in noncrystalline, intact-phage preparations. The high sensitivity and resolution result from 1H detection at 600 MHz under 50 kHz magic angle spinning using ∼0.5 mg of perdeuterated and uniformly 15N-labeled protein in which the exchangeable amide sites are partially or completely back-exchanged (reprotonated). Notably, the heteronuclear 1H-15N dipolar coupling frequency dimension is shown to select among 15N resonances, which will be useful in structural studies of larger proteins where the resonances exhibit a high degree of overlap in multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra.

  5. Proton and cation transport activity of the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Leiding, Thom; Wang, Jun; Martinsson, Jonas; DeGrado, William F; Arsköld, Sindra Peterson

    2010-08-31

    The M2 protein is a small, single-span transmembrane (TM) protein from the influenza A virus. This virus enters cells via endosomes; as the endosomes mature and become more acidic M2 facilitates proton transport into the viral interior, thereby disrupting matrix protein/RNA interactions required for infectivity. A mystery has been how protons can accumulate in the viral interior without developing a large electrical potential that impedes further inward proton translocation. Progress in addressing this question has been limited by the availability of robust methods of unidirectional insertion of the protein into virus-like vesicles. Using an optimized procedure for reconstitution, we show that M2 has antiporter-like activity, facilitating K(+) or Na(+) efflux when protons flow down a concentration gradient into the vesicles. Cation efflux is very small except under conditions mimicking those encountered by the endosomally entrapped virus, in which protons are flowing through the channel. This proton/cation exchange function is consistent with the known high proton selectivity of the channel. Thus, M2 acts as a proton uniporter that occasionally allows K(+) to flow to maintain electrical neutrality. Remarkably, as the pH inside M2-containing vesicles (pH(in)) decreases, the proton channel activity of M2 is inhibited, but its cation transport activity is activated. This reciprocal inhibition of proton flux and activation of cation flux with decreasing pH(in) first allows accumulation of protons in the early stages of acidification, then trapping of protons within the virus when low pH(in) is achieved.

  6. Search for heavy neutrinos and W bosons with right-handed couplings in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-26

    A search for heavy, right-handed neutrinos, Nℓ (ℓ=e,μ), and right-handed WR bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model, has been performed by the CMS experiment. The search was based on a sample of two lepton plus two jet events collected in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. For models with strict left-right symmetry, and assuming only one N flavor contributes significantly to the WR decay width, the region in the two-dimensional (MWR,MN) mass plane excluded at a 95% confidence level extends to approximately MWR = 3.0TeV and covers a large range of neutrino masses below the WR boson mass, depending on the value of MWR. This search significantly extends the (MWR, MN) exclusion region beyond previous results.

  7. Search for heavy neutrinos and W bosons with right-handed couplings in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-26

    A search for heavy, right-handed neutrinos, Nℓ (ℓ=e,μ), and right-handed WR bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model, has been performed by the CMS experiment. The search was based on a sample of two lepton plus two jet events collected in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. For models with strict left-right symmetry, and assuming only one Nℓ flavor contributes significantly to the WR decay width, the region in the two-dimensional (MWR,MNℓ) mass plane excluded at a 95% confidence level extends to approximately MWR =more » 3.0TeV and covers a large range of neutrino masses below the WR boson mass, depending on the value of MWR. This search significantly extends the (MWR, MNℓ) exclusion region beyond previous results.« less

  8. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leadingmore » order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).« less

  9. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).

  10. Time dependent quantum dynamics study of the Ne + H2(+)(v0 = 0-4, j0 = 1) → NeH(+) + H proton transfer reaction, including the Coriolis coupling. A system with oscillatory cross sections.

    PubMed

    Gamallo, Pablo; Defazio, Paolo; González, Miguel

    2011-10-27

    The Ne + H(2)(+)(v(0) = 0-4, j(0) = 1) proton transfer reaction has been studied in a wide collision energy (E(col)) interval, using the time dependent real wave packet method and taking into account the Coriolis coupling (CC-RWP method) and employing a recent ab initio potential energy surface, widely extending the reaction conditions previously explored at the CC level. The reaction probability shows a strong oscillatory behavior vs E(col) and the presence of sharp resonances, arising from metastable NeH(2)(+) states. The behavior of the reaction cross section σ vs E(col) depends on the vibrational level and can in general be interpreted in terms of the late barrier character of the potential energy surface and the existence (or not) of threshold energy. The situation is particularly complex for v(0) = 2, as σ(v0=2, j0=1) presents significant oscillations with E(col) up to ≈0.33 eV, which probably reflect the resonances found in the reaction probability. Hence, it would be particularly interesting to investigate the Ne + H(2)(+)(v(0) = 2, j(0) = 1) reaction experimentally, as some resonances survive the partial wave summation. The state selected cross sections compare well with previous CC quantum and experimental results, and although the previous centrifugal sudden RWP cross sections are reasonable, the inclusion of the Coriolis coupling is important to achieve a quantitative description of this and similar systems.

  11. Non-adiabatic couplings and dynamics in proton transfer reactions of Hn+ systems: application to H2+H2+→H+H3+ collisions

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Aguado, Alfredo; Roncero, Octavio; Naumkin, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    Analytical derivatives and non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are derived for Hn+ systems (n=3, 4 and 5). The method uses a generalized Hellmann-Feynman theorem applied to a multi-state description based on diatomics-in-molecules (for H3+) or triatomics-in-molecules (for H4+ and H5+) formalisms, corrected with a permutationally invariant many-body term to get high accuracy. The analytical non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are compared with ab initio calculations performed at multi-reference configuration interaction level. These magnitudes are used to calculate H2(v′=0,j′=0)+H2+(v,j=0) collisions, to determine the effect of electronic transitions using a molecular dynamics method with electronic transitions. Cross sections for several initial vibrational states of H2+ are calculated and compared with the available experimental data, yielding an excellent agreement. The effect of vibrational excitation of H2+ reactant, and its relation with non-adiabatic processes are discussed. Also, the behavior at low collisional energies, in the 1 meV-0.1 eV interval, of interest in astrophysical environments, are discussed in terms of the long range behaviour of the interaction potential which is properly described within the TRIM formalism. PMID:26696058

  12. Non-adiabatic couplings and dynamics in proton transfer reactions of Hn (+) systems: Application to H2+H2 (+)→H+H3 (+) collisions.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Aguado, Alfredo; Roncero, Octavio; Naumkin, Fedor

    2015-12-21

    Analytical derivatives and non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are derived for Hn (+) systems (n = 3-5). The method uses a generalized Hellmann-Feynman theorem applied to a multi-state description based on diatomics-in-molecules (for H3 (+)) or triatomics-in-molecules (for H4 (+) and H5 (+)) formalisms, corrected with a permutationally invariant many-body term to get high accuracy. The analytical non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are compared with ab initio calculations performed at multi-reference configuration interaction level. These magnitudes are used to calculate H2(v(')=0,j(')=0)+H2 (+)(v,j=0) collisions, to determine the effect of electronic transitions using a molecular dynamics method with electronic transitions. Cross sections for several initial vibrational states of H2 (+) are calculated and compared with the available experimental data, yielding an excellent agreement. The effect of vibrational excitation of H2 (+) reactant and its relation with non-adiabatic processes are discussed. Also, the behavior at low collisional energies, in the 1 meV-0.1 eV interval, of interest in astrophysical environments, is discussed in terms of the long range behaviour of the interaction potential which is properly described within the triatomics-in-molecules formalism. PMID:26696058

  13. The transmembrane tyrosines Y56, Y91 and Y167 play important roles in determining the affinity and transport rate of the rabbit proton-coupled peptide transporter PepT1.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Myrtani; Gan, Christine; Bailey, Patrick; Meredith, David

    2009-11-01

    The mammalian proton-coupled peptide transporter PepT1 is widely accepted as the major route of uptake for dietary nitrogen, as well as being responsible for the oral absorption of a number of classes of drugs, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Using site-directed mutagenesis and zero-trans transport assays, we investigated the role of conserved tyrosines in the transmembrane domains (TMDs) of rabbit PepT1 as predicted by hydropathy plots. All the individual TMD tyrosines were substituted with phenylalanine and shown to retain the ability to traffic to the plasma membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes. These single substitutions of TMD tyrosines by phenylalanine residues did not affect the proton dependence of peptide uptake, with all retaining wild-type PepT1-like pH dependence. Individual mutations of four of the nine TMD residue tyrosines (Y64, Y287, Y345 and Y587) were without measurable effect on PepT1 function, whereas the other five (Y12, Y56, Y91, Y167 and Y345) were shown to result in altered transport function compared to the wild-type PepT1. Intriguingly, the affinity of Y56F-PepT1 was found to be dramatically increased (approximately 100-fold) in comparison to that of the wild-type rabbit PepT1. Y91 mutations also affected the substrate affinity of the transporter, which increased in line with the hydrophilicity of the substituted amino acid (F>Y>Q>R). Y167 was demonstrated to play a pivotal role in rabbit PepT1 function since Y167F, Y167R and Y167Q demonstrated very little transport function. These results are discussed with regard to a proposed mechanism for PepT1 substrate binding.

  14. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-14

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, bb, and μμ pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1fb-1 at 7TeV and up to 19.7fb-1 at 8TeV. From the high-resolution γγ and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02+0.26–0.27 (stat) +0.14–0.15 (syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtained in the different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 ± 0.09(stat)+0.08–0.07 (theo) ± 0.07(syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. As a result, no significant deviations are found.

  15. Structural determinants of proton blockage in aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Roux, Benoît; Pomès, Régis

    2004-10-15

    Aquaporins are an important class of membrane channels selective for water and linear polyols but impermeable to ions, including protons. Recent computational studies have revealed that the relay of protons through the water-conduction pathway of aquaporin channels is opposed by a substantial free energy barrier peaking at the signature NPA motifs. Here, free-energy simulations and continuum electrostatic calculations are combined to examine the nature and the magnitude of the contribution of specific structural elements to proton blockage in the bacterial glycerol uptake facilitator, GlpF. Potential of mean-force profiles for both hop and turn steps of structural diffusion in the narrow pore are obtained for artificial variants of the GlpF channel in which coulombic interactions between the pore contents and conserved residues Asn68 and Asn203 at the NPA signature motifs, Arg206 at the selectivity filter, and the peptidic backbone of the two half-helices M3 and M7, which are arranged in head-to-head fashion around the NPA motifs, are turned off selectively. A comparison of these results with electrostatic energy profiles for the translocation of a probe cation throughout the water permeation pathway indicates that the free-energy profile for proton movement inside the narrow pore is dominated by static effects arising from the distribution of charged and polar groups of the channel, whereas dielectric effects contribute primarily to opposing the access of H+ to the pore mouths (desolvation penalty). The single most effective way to abolish the free-energy gradients opposing the movement of H+ around the NPA motif is to turn off the dipole moments of helices M3 and M7. Mutation of either of the two NPA Asn residues to Asp compensates for charge-dipole and dipole-dipole effects opposing the hop and turn steps of structural diffusion, respectively, and dramatically reduces the free energy barrier of proton translocation, suggesting that these single mutants could

  16. H2 and (H2)2 molecules with an ab initio optimization of wave functions in correlated state: electron-proton couplings and intermolecular microscopic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kądzielawa, Andrzej P.; Bielas, Agata; Acquarone, Marcello; Biborski, Andrzej; Maśka, Maciej M.; Spałek, Józef

    2014-12-01

    The hydrogen molecules H2 and {{≤ft( {{H}2} \\right)}2} are analyzed with electronic correlations taken into account between the 1s electrons in an exact manner. The optimal single-particle Slater orbitals are evaluated in the correlated state of H2 by combining their variational determination with the diagonalization of the full Hamiltonian in the second-quantization language. All electron-ion coupling constants are determined explicitly and their relative importance is discussed. Sizable zero-point motion amplitude and the corresponding energy are then evaluated by taking into account the anharmonic contributions up to the ninth order in the relative displacement of the ions from their static equilibrium value. The applicability of the model to solid molecular hydrogen is briefly analyzed by calculating intermolecular microscopic parameters for the 2× {{H}2} rectangular configuration, as well its ground state energy.

  17. Photoresponsive molecular switch for regulating transmembrane proton-transfer kinetics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Tse, Edmund C M; Barile, Christopher J; Gewirth, Andrew A; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2015-11-11

    To control proton delivery across biological membranes, we synthesized a photoresponsive molecular switch and incorporated it in a lipid layer. This proton gate was reversibly activated with 390 nm light (Z-isomer) and then deactivated by 360 nm irradiation (E-isomer). In a lipid layer this stimuli responsive proton gate allowed the regulation of proton flux with irradiation to a lipid-buried O2 reduction electrocatalyst. Thus, the catalyst was turned on and off with the E-to-Z interconversion. This light-induced membrane proton delivery system may be useful in developing any functional device that performs proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions.

  18. Proton scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  19. Observing N-Acetyl Aspartate via Both Its N-Acetyl and Its Strongly Coupled Aspartate Groups in in VivoProton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilman, Alan H.; Allen, Peter S.

    1996-12-01

    The ∼2.6 ppm aspartate multiplet ofN-acetyl aspartate (NAA) is considered a potential source of additional information onN-acetyl aspartatein vivo.Because the aspartate multiplet is the AB part of a strongly coupled ABX system it gives rise, as is shown in the analysis presented, to a significant field-strength dependence in the echo-time-dependent modulations of the response to typical spatial-localization sequences. The echo-time dependence of this response is developed analytically, not only for the STEAM and the PRESS localization sequences, but also for a spin-echo sequence. It is then verified experimentally at 2.35 T. The field-strength dependence of the response is demonstrated by evaluating the changes in the echo-time-dependent responses to each of the three sequences at field strengths of 1.5, 2.35, and 4.0 T. By means of these results, the preferred sequence (PRESS) can be optimized for the NAA aspartate multiplet at each field strength, as is illustrated with the human brain spectra obtainedin vivoat 1.5 T. Thesein vivospectra compare the optimal, long TE timing (163 ms) with a suboptimal TE (70 ms), for the observation of the ∼2.6 ppm aspartate resonances of NAA.

  20. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    Our study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the H→ZZ,Zγ*,γ*γ*→4ℓ, H→WW→ℓνℓν, and H→γγ decay modes. The full data set recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 is used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. A wide range of spin-two models is excluded at a 99% confidence level or higher, or at a 99.87% confidence level for the minimal gravitylike couplings, regardless of whether assumptions are made on the production mechanism. Any mixed-parity spin-one state is excluded in the ZZ and WW modes at a greater than 99.999% confidence level. Under the hypothesis that the resonance is a spin-zero boson, the tensor structure of the interactions of the Higgs boson with two vector bosons ZZ, Zγ, γγ, and WW is investigated and limits on eleven anomalous contributions are set. Furthermore, the tighter constraints on anomalous HVV interactions are obtained by combining the HZZand HWW measurements. All observations are consistent with the expectations for the standard model Higgs boson with the quantum numbers JPC=0++.

  1. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    Our study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the H→ZZ,Zγ*,γ*γ*→4ℓ, H→WW→ℓνℓν, and H→γγ decay modes. The full data set recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 is used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. A wide range of spin-two models is excluded at a 99% confidence level or higher, or at a 99.87% confidence level for the minimal gravitylike couplings, regardless of whether assumptions are mademore » on the production mechanism. Any mixed-parity spin-one state is excluded in the ZZ and WW modes at a greater than 99.999% confidence level. Under the hypothesis that the resonance is a spin-zero boson, the tensor structure of the interactions of the Higgs boson with two vector bosons ZZ, Zγ, γγ, and WW is investigated and limits on eleven anomalous contributions are set. Furthermore, the tighter constraints on anomalous HVV interactions are obtained by combining the HZZand HWW measurements. All observations are consistent with the expectations for the standard model Higgs boson with the quantum numbers JPC=0++.« less

  2. Understanding structure and function in the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Lanyi, J K

    1998-12-15

    The atomic structure of bacteriorhodopsin and the outlines of its proton transport mechanism are now available. Photoisomerization of the retinal in the chromophore creates a steric and electrostatic conflict at the retinal binding site. The free energy gain sets off a sequence of reactions in which directed proton transfers take place between the protonated retinal Schiff base, Asp-85, and Asp-96. These internal steps, and other proton transfers at and near the two aqueous interfaces, add up to the translocation of a proton from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular side of the membrane. Bound water plays a crucial role in proton conduction in both extracellular and cytoplasmic regions, but the means by which the protons move from site to site differ. Proton release to the extracellular surface is through interaction of a hydrogen-bonded chain of identified aspartic acid, arginine, water, and glutamic acid residues with Asp-85, while proton uptake from the cytoplasmic surface utilizes a single aspartic acid, Asp-96, whose protonation state appears to be regulated by the protein conformation dependent hydration of this region. The directionality of the translocation is ensured by the accessibility of the Schiff base to the extracellular and cytoplasmic directions after the retinal is photoisomerized, as well as the changing proton affinities of the acceptor Asp-85 and donor Asp-96.

  3. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride–Molecular Ni Catalyst System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride (NCNCNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The NCNCNx–NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)−1 h–1 toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h–1, and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of NCNCNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited NCNCNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived “trapped electrons”, which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel. PMID:27337491

  4. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel.

  5. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel. PMID:27337491

  6. Hereditary folate malabsorption: A positively charged amino acid at position 113 of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) is required for folic acid binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lasry, Inbal; Berman, Bluma; Glaser, Fabian; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2009-08-28

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) mediates intestinal folate uptake at acidic pH. Some loss of folic acid (FA) transport mutations in PCFT from hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) patients cluster in R113, thereby suggesting a functional role for this residue. Herein, unlike non-conservative substitutions, an R113H mutant displayed 80-fold increase in the FA transport Km while retaining parental Vmax, hence indicating a major fall in folate substrate affinity. Furthermore, consistent with the preservation of 9% of parental transport activity, R113H transfectants displayed a substantial decrease in the FA growth requirement relative to mock transfectants. Homology modeling based on the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli transporter homologues EmrD and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter revealed that the R113H rotamer properly protrudes into the cytoplasmic face of the minor cleft normally occupied by R113. These findings constitute the first demonstration that a basic amino acid at position 113 is required for folate substrate binding.

  7. Rapid activation of sodium-proton exchange and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase in fibroblasts by G protein-coupled 5-HT1A receptor involves distinct signalling cascades.

    PubMed Central

    Garnovskaya, M N; Mukhin, Y; Raymond, J R

    1998-01-01

    These experiments tested the hypothesis that signalling elements involved in the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) mediate rapid activation of sodium-proton exchange (NHE) in fibroblasts when both signals are initiated by a single G protein-coupled receptor, the 5-HT1A receptor. Similarities between the two processes were comparable concentration-response curves and time-courses, and overlapping sensitivity to some pharmacological inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (staurosporine and genistein), and phosphoinositide 3'-kinase (wortmannin and LY204002). Activation of NHE was much more sensitive to the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase inhibitor (D609) than was ERK. Neither pathway was sensitive to manoeuvres designed to block PKC. In contrast, Src or related kinases appear to be required to activate ERK, but not NHE. Transfection of cDNA constructs encoding inactive mutant phosphoinositide 3'-kinase, Grb2, Sos, Ras, and Raf molecules were successful in attenuating ERK, but had essentially no effect upon NHE activation. Finally, PD98059, an inhibitor of mitogen activated/extracellular signal regulated kinase kinase, blocked ERK but not NHE activation. Thus, in CHO fibroblast cells, activation by the 5-HT1A receptor of ERK and NHE share a number of overlapping features. However, our studies do not support a major role for ERK, when activated by the 5-HT1A receptor, as a short-term upstream regulator of NHE activity. PMID:9461547

  8. Translocation of DNA across bacterial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Dreiseikelmann, B

    1994-01-01

    DNA translocation across bacterial membranes occurs during the biological processes of infection by bacteriophages, conjugative DNA transfer of plasmids, T-DNA transfer, and genetic transformation. The mechanism of DNA translocation in these systems is not fully understood, but during the last few years extensive data about genes and gene products involved in the translocation processes have accumulated. One reason for the increasing interest in this topic is the discussion about horizontal gene transfer and transkingdom sex. Analyses of genes and gene products involved in DNA transfer suggest that DNA is transferred through a protein channel spanning the bacterial envelope. No common model exists for DNA translocation during phage infection. Perhaps various mechanisms are necessary as a result of the different morphologies of bacteriophages. The DNA translocation processes during conjugation, T-DNA transfer, and transformation are more consistent and may even be compared to the excretion of some proteins. On the basis of analogies and homologies between the proteins involved in DNA translocation and protein secretion, a common basic model for these processes is presented. PMID:7968916

  9. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogenbirk, Marc A; Heideman, Marinus R; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-06-28

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of these rare genetic events requires a clear distinction between correlative and causative risk-determinants, where technical and analytical issues can be excluded. To meet this goal, we performed in-depth analyses of publicly available genome-wide datasets. In contrast to several recent reports, we demonstrate that chromosomal translocation risk is causally unrelated to promoter stalling (Spt5), transcriptional activity, or off-targeting activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Rather, an open chromatin configuration, which is not promoter-specific, explained the elevated translocation risk of promoter regions. Furthermore, the fact that gene size directly correlates with the translocation risk in mice and human cancers further demonstrated the general irrelevance of promoter-specific activities. Interestingly, a subset of translocations observed in cancer patients likely initiates from double-strand breaks induced by an access-independent process. Together, these unexpected and novel insights are fundamental in understanding the origin of chromosome translocations and, consequently, cancer. PMID:27303044

  10. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hogenbirk, Marc A.; Heideman, Marinus R.; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of these rare genetic events requires a clear distinction between correlative and causative risk-determinants, where technical and analytical issues can be excluded. To meet this goal, we performed in-depth analyses of publicly available genome-wide datasets. In contrast to several recent reports, we demonstrate that chromosomal translocation risk is causally unrelated to promoter stalling (Spt5), transcriptional activity, or off-targeting activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Rather, an open chromatin configuration, which is not promoter-specific, explained the elevated translocation risk of promoter regions. Furthermore, the fact that gene size directly correlates with the translocation risk in mice and human cancers further demonstrated the general irrelevance of promoter-specific activities. Interestingly, a subset of translocations observed in cancer patients likely initiates from double-strand breaks induced by an access-independent process. Together, these unexpected and novel insights are fundamental in understanding the origin of chromosome translocations and, consequently, cancer. PMID:27303044

  11. Measuring peptide translocation into large unilamellar vesicles.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Sara A; Nelson, Rachel B; Elmore, Donald E

    2012-01-27

    There is an active interest in peptides that readily cross cell membranes without the assistance of cell membrane receptors(1). Many of these are referred to as cell-penetrating peptides, which are frequently noted for their potential as drug delivery vectors(1-3). Moreover, there is increasing interest in antimicrobial peptides that operate via non-membrane lytic mechanisms(4,5), particularly those that cross bacterial membranes without causing cell lysis and kill cells by interfering with intracellular processes(6,7). In fact, authors have increasingly pointed out the relationship between cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides(1,8). A firm understanding of the process of membrane translocation and the relationship between peptide structure and its ability to translocate requires effective, reproducible assays for translocation. Several groups have proposed methods to measure translocation into large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUVs)(9-13). LUVs serve as useful models for bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes and are frequently used in peptide fluorescent studies(14,15). Here, we describe our application of the method first developed by Matsuzaki and co-workers to consider antimicrobial peptides, such as magainin and buforin II(16,17). In addition to providing our protocol for this method, we also present a straightforward approach to data analysis that quantifies translocation ability using this assay. The advantages of this translocation assay compared to others are that it has the potential to provide information about the rate of membrane translocation and does not require the addition of a fluorescent label, which can alter peptide properties(18), to tryptophan-containing peptides. Briefly, translocation ability into lipid vesicles is measured as a function of the Foster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between native tryptophan residues and dansyl phosphatidylethanolamine when proteins are associated with the external LUV membrane (Figure 1). Cell

  12. Simulations of cellulose translocation in the bacterial cellulose synthase suggest a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose

    DOE PAGES

    Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zimmer, Jochen; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-01-29

    cycle and may be widely relevant to polysaccharide synthesizing or degrading enzymes that couple catalysis with chain translocation.« less

  13. Simulations of cellulose translocation in the bacterial cellulose synthase suggest a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zimmer, Jochen; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-01-01

    may be widely relevant to polysaccharide synthesizing or degrading enzymes that couple catalysis with chain translocation. PMID:27143998

  14. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esboui, Mounir

    2015-07-01

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH3)2 complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH3)2 cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″(1πσ∗) and A'(1nσ∗) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A'(1ππ∗) and A″(1nπ∗) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two 1ππ∗-1πσ∗ conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.

  15. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Esboui, Mounir

    2015-07-21

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH3)2 complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH3)2 cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″((1)πσ*) and A'((1)nσ*) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A'((1)ππ*) and A″((1)nπ*) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two (1)ππ*-(1)πσ* conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.

  16. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Esboui, Mounir

    2015-07-21

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″({sup 1}πσ{sup ∗}) and A′({sup 1}nσ{sup ∗}) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′({sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}) and A″({sup 1}nπ{sup ∗}) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two {sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}-{sup 1}πσ{sup ∗} conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.

  17. Molecular studies of free and translocation trisomy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Lefort, G.

    1994-09-01

    Twenty cases of trisomy 13 were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra chromosome. Six cases had translocation trisomy: two de novo rob(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;13q)r(13). Eighteen of nineteen informative patients were consistant with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in any of the three t(13q;13q) cases indicate that all were most likely isochromosomes of post-meiotic origin. In addition, two free trisomy cases were compatible with a somatic origin. Two mosaic free trisomy-13 cases, however, were both consistent with a maternal meiotic origin. The patient with a paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13;14) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. One balanced (non-trisomic) case with a non-mosaic 45,-13,-13,+t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologs, as has been found for all homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. It is therefore also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. We cannot therefore infer anything about the origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the two cases with de novo t(13q;14q) plus a maternally derived trisomy 13.

  18. Proton conductance by the gramicidin water wire. Model for proton conductance in the F1F0 ATPases?

    PubMed Central

    Akeson, M; Deamer, D W

    1991-01-01

    The gramicidin channel contains a single strand of water molecules associated through hydrogen bonds. Previous work has shown that channels of similar size are formed by association of transmembrane alpha helices of synthetic leucine-serine peptides. Both types of channels translocate protons with considerable selectivity relative to other cations, and it has been proposed that the selectivity arises by proton "hopping" along hydrogen-bonded chains of water, whereas other cations must cross by ordinary diffusion processes. It is possible that a similar mechanism underlies proton transport in the Fo subunit of the F1F0 ATP synthase. Using the gramicidin channel as a model, we have tested whether a single strand of water is kinetically competent to translocate protons at a rate sufficient to support known rates of ATP synthesis. We found that the gramicidin channel saturates at approximately 530 pS of protonic current in 4 M HCl, more than sufficient for typical ATP synthesis rates. It follows that proton diffusion to a putative channel in Fo, rather than the channel itself, may limit ATP synthesis rates. PMID:1715764

  19. Translocation and Accumulation of Translocate in the Sugar Beet Petiole 1

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, D. R.; Saunders, M. A.; Cataldo, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Accumulation of translocate during steady-state labeling of photosynthate was measured in the source leaf petioles of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. monogerm hybrid). During an 8-hr period, 2.7% of the translocate or 0.38 μg carbon/min was accumulated per cm petiole. Material was stored mainly as sucrose and as compounds insoluble in 80% ethanol. The minimum peak velocity of translocation approached an average of 54 cm/hr as the specific activity of the 14CO2 pulse was progressively increased. The ratio of cross sectional area required for translocation to actual sieve tube area in the petiole was 1.2. A regression analysis of translocation rate versus sieve tube cross sectional area yielded a coefficient of 0.76. The specific mass transfer rate in the petiole was 1.4 g/hr cm2 phloem or 4.8 g/hr cm2 sieve tube. Histoautoradiographic studies indicated that translocation occurs through the area of phloem occupied by sieve tubes and companion cells while storage occurs in these cells plus cambium and phloem parenchyma cells. The ability of the petiole to act as a sink for translocate is consistent with the concept that storage along path tissue serves to buffer sucrose concentration in the translocate during periods of fluctuating assimilation. Images PMID:16657254

  20. Effect of the ATPase inhibitor protein IF{sub 1} on H{sup +} translocation in the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio; Mangiullo, Roberto; Papa, Sergio

    2009-06-19

    The H{sup +} F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP synthase complex of coupling membranes converts the proton-motive force into rotatory mechanical energy to drive ATP synthesis. The F{sub 1} moiety of the complex protrudes at the inner side of the membrane, the F{sub o} sector spans the membrane reaching the outer side. The IF{sub 1} component of the mitochondrial complex is a basic 10 kDa protein, which inhibits the F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP hydrolase activity. The mitochondrial matrix pH is the critical factor for the inhibitory binding of the central segment of IF{sub 1} (residue 42-58) to the F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits. We have analyzed the effect of native purified IF{sub 1} the IF{sub 1}-(42-58) synthetic peptide and its mutants on proton conduction, driven by ATP hydrolysis or by [K{sup +}] gradients, in bovine heart inside-out submitochondrial particles and in liposome-reconstituted F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex. The results show that IF{sub 1}, and in particular its central 42-58 segment, displays different inhibitory affinity for proton conduction from the F{sub 1} to the F{sub o} side and in the opposite direction. Cross-linking of IF{sub 1} to F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits inhibits the ATP-driven H{sup +} translocation but enhances H{sup +} conduction in the reverse direction. These observation are discussed in terms of the rotary mechanism of the F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex.

  1. A conserved asparagine in a P-type proton pump is required for efficient gating of protons.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Kira; Wielandt, Alex G; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J; Palmgren, Michael G

    2013-04-01

    The minimal proton pumping machinery of the Arabidopsis thaliana P-type plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2) consists of an aspartate residue serving as key proton donor/acceptor (Asp-684) and an arginine residue controlling the pKa of the aspartate. However, other important aspects of the proton transport mechanism such as gating, and the ability to occlude protons, are still unclear. An asparagine residue (Asn-106) in transmembrane segment 2 of AHA2 is conserved in all P-type plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases. In the crystal structure of the plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, this residue is located in the putative ligand entrance pathway, in close proximity to the central proton donor/acceptor Asp-684. Substitution of Asn-106 resulted in mutant enzymes with significantly reduced ability to transport protons against a membrane potential. Sensitivity toward orthovanadate was increased when Asn-106 was substituted with an aspartate residue, but decreased in mutants with alanine, lysine, glutamine, or threonine replacement of Asn-106. The apparent proton affinity was decreased for all mutants, most likely due to a perturbation of the local environment of Asp-684. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Asn-106 is important for closure of the proton entrance pathway prior to proton translocation across the membrane.

  2. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  3. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  4. Sequential translocation of an Escherchia coli two-partner secretion pathway exoprotein across the inner and outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Peter S; Bernstein, Harris D

    2010-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, a variety of high molecular weight 'exoproteins' are translocated across the outer membrane (OM) via the two-partner secretion (TPS) pathway by interacting with a dedicated transporter. It is unclear, however, whether the translocation of exoproteins across the OM is coupled to their translocation across the inner membrane (IM). To address this question, we separated the production of an Escherichia coli O157:H7 exoprotein (OtpA) and its transporter (OtpB) temporally by placing otpA and otpB under the control of distinct regulatable promoters. We found that when both full-length and truncated forms of OtpA were expressed prior to OtpB, a significant fraction of the exoprotein was secreted. The results indicate that OtpA can be translocated into the periplasm and briefly remain secretion-competent. Furthermore, by engineering cysteine residues into OtpA and using disulphide bond formation as a reporter of periplasmic localization, we obtained additional evidence that the C-terminus of OtpA enters the periplasm before the N-terminus is translocated across the OM even when OtpA and OtpB are expressed simultaneously. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the translocation of a TPS exoprotein across the OM can occur independently from its translocation across the IM.

  5. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  6. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    PubMed

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side. PMID:23507617

  7. Translocation by T7 RNA polymerase: a sensitively poised Brownian ratchet.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Sousa, Rui

    2006-04-21

    Studies of halted T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) elongation complexes (ECs) or of T7RNAP transcription against roadblocks due to DNA-bound proteins indicate that T7RNAP translocates via a passive Brownian ratchet mechanism. Crystal structures of T7RNAP ECs suggest that translocation involves an active power-stroke. However, neither solution studies of halted or slowed T7RNAP ECs, nor crystal structures of static complexes, are necessarily relevant to how T7RNAP translocates during rapid elongation. A recent single molecule study of actively elongating T7RNAPs provides support for the Brownian ratchet mechanism. Here, we obtain additional evidence for the existence of a Brownian ratchet during active T7RNAP elongation by showing that both rapidly elongating and halted complexes are equally sensitive to pyrophosphate. Using chemical nucleases tethered to the polymerase we achieve sub-ångström resolution in measuring the average position of halted T7RNAP ECs and find that the positional equilibrium of the EC is sensitively poised between pre-translocated and post-translocated states. This may be important in maximizing the sensitivity of the polymerase to sequences that cause pausing or termination. We also confirm that a crystallographically observed disorder to order transition in a loop formed by residues 589-612 also occurs in solution and is coupled to pyrophosphate or NTP release. This transition allows the loop to make interactions with the DNA that help stabilize the laterally mobile, ligand-free EC against dissociation.

  8. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, C.; van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  9. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  10. Translocation pathways for inhaled asbestos fibers.

    PubMed

    Miserocchi, G; Sancini, G; Mantegazza, F; Chiappino, Gerolamo

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the translocation of inhaled asbestos fibers based on pulmonary and pleuro-pulmonary interstitial fluid dynamics. Fibers can pass the alveolar barrier and reach the lung interstitium via the paracellular route down a mass water flow due to combined osmotic (active Na+ absorption) and hydraulic (interstitial pressure is subatmospheric) pressure gradient. Fibers can be dragged from the lung interstitium by pulmonary lymph flow (primary translocation) wherefrom they can reach the blood stream and subsequently distribute to the whole body (secondary translocation). Primary translocation across the visceral pleura and towards pulmonary capillaries may also occur if the asbestos-induced lung inflammation increases pulmonary interstitial pressure so as to reverse the trans-mesothelial and trans-endothelial pressure gradients. Secondary translocation to the pleural space may occur via the physiological route of pleural fluid formation across the parietal pleura; fibers accumulation in parietal pleura stomata (black spots) reflects the role of parietal lymphatics in draining pleural fluid. Asbestos fibers are found in all organs of subjects either occupationally exposed or not exposed to asbestos. Fibers concentration correlates with specific conditions of interstitial fluid dynamics, in line with the notion that in all organs microvascular filtration occurs from capillaries to the extravascular spaces. Concentration is high in the kidney (reflecting high perfusion pressure and flow) and in the liver (reflecting high microvascular permeability) while it is relatively low in the brain (due to low permeability of blood-brain barrier). Ultrafine fibers (length < 5 mum, diameter < 0.25 mum) can travel larger distances due to low steric hindrance (in mesothelioma about 90% of fibers are ultrafine). Fibers translocation is a slow process developing over decades of life: it is aided by high biopersistence, by inflammation-induced increase in permeability, by low steric

  11. Analyzing disease risks associated with translocations.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Anthony W; Vaughan-Higgins, Rebecca J

    2012-06-01

    Translocations of species are expected to be used increasingly to counter the undesirable effects of anthropogenic changes to ecosystems, including loss of species. Methods to assess the risk of disease associated with translocations have been compiled in a comprehensive manual of disease-risk analysis for movement of domestic animals. We used this manual to devise a qualitative method for assessing the probability of the occurrence of disease in wild animals associated with translocations. We adapted the method such that we considered a parasite (any agent of infectious or noninfectious disease) a hazard if it or the host had crossed an ecological or geographical barrier and was novel to the host. We included in our analyses hazards present throughout the translocation pathway derived from the interactions between host immunity and the parasite, the effect of parasites on populations, the effect of noninfectious disease agents, and the effect of stressors on host-parasite interactions. We used the reintroduction of Eurasian Cranes (Grus grus) to England to demonstrate our method. Of the 24 hazards identified, 1 was classified as high risk (coccidia) and 5 were medium risk (highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, Mycobacterium avium, Aspergillus fumigatus, tracheal worms [Syngamus sp. and Cyathostoma sp.], and Tetrameres spp.). Seventeen other hazards were considered low or very low risk. In the absence of better information on the number, identity, distribution, and pathogenicity of parasites of wild animals, there is uncertainty in the risk of disease to translocated animals and recipient populations. Surveys of parasites in source and destination populations and detailed health monitoring after release will improve the information available for future analyses of disease risk. We believe our method can be adapted to assess the risks of disease in other translocated populations. PMID:22533691

  12. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  13. Protein Translocation across the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Elisabet C.; Trueman, Steven F.; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum is a major site of protein biosynthesis in all eukaryotic cells, serving as the entry point for the secretory pathway and as the initial integration site for the majority of cellular integral membrane proteins. The core components of the protein translocation machinery have been identified, and high-resolution structures of the targeting components and the transport channel have been obtained. Research in this area is now focused on obtaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein translocation and membrane protein integration. PMID:23251026

  14. What drives the translocation of proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Peskin, C S; Oster, G F

    1992-01-01

    We propose that protein translocation across membranes is driven by biased random thermal motion. This "Brownian ratchet" mechanism depends on chemical asymmetries between the cis and trans sides of the membrane. Several mechanisms could contribute to rectifying the thermal motion of the protein, such as binding and dissociation of chaperonins to the translocating chain, chain coiling induced by pH and/or ionic gradients, glycosylation, and disulfide bond formation. This helps explain the robustness and promiscuity of these transport systems. Images PMID:1349170

  15. Hydrated Excess Protons Can Create Their Own Water Wires.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuxing; Swanson, Jessica M J; Kang, Seung-gu; Zhou, Ruhong; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-07-23

    Grotthuss shuttling of an excess proton charge defect through hydrogen bonded water networks has long been the focus of theoretical and experimental studies. In this work we show that there is a related process in which water molecules move ("shuttle") through a hydrated excess proton charge defect in order to wet the path ahead for subsequent proton charge migration. This process is illustrated through reactive molecular dynamics simulations of proton transport through a hydrophobic nanotube, which penetrates through a hydrophobic region. Surprisingly, before the proton enters the nanotube, it starts "shooting" water molecules into the otherwise dry space via Grotthuss shuttling, effectively creating its own water wire where none existed before. As the proton enters the nanotube (by 2-3 Å), it completes the solvation process, transitioning the nanotube to the fully wet state. By contrast, other monatomic cations (e.g., K(+)) have just the opposite effect, by blocking the wetting process and making the nanotube even drier. As the dry nanotube gradually becomes wet when the proton charge defect enters it, the free energy barrier of proton permeation through the tube via Grotthuss shuttling drops significantly. This finding suggests that an important wetting mechanism may influence proton translocation in biological systems, i.e., one in which protons "create" their own water structures (water "wires") in hydrophobic spaces (e.g., protein pores) before migrating through them. An existing water wire, e.g., one seen in an X-ray crystal structure or MD simulations without an explicit excess proton, is therefore not a requirement for protons to transport through hydrophobic spaces. PMID:25369445

  16. Hydrated Excess Protons Can Create Their Own Water Wires.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuxing; Swanson, Jessica M J; Kang, Seung-gu; Zhou, Ruhong; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-07-23

    Grotthuss shuttling of an excess proton charge defect through hydrogen bonded water networks has long been the focus of theoretical and experimental studies. In this work we show that there is a related process in which water molecules move ("shuttle") through a hydrated excess proton charge defect in order to wet the path ahead for subsequent proton charge migration. This process is illustrated through reactive molecular dynamics simulations of proton transport through a hydrophobic nanotube, which penetrates through a hydrophobic region. Surprisingly, before the proton enters the nanotube, it starts "shooting" water molecules into the otherwise dry space via Grotthuss shuttling, effectively creating its own water wire where none existed before. As the proton enters the nanotube (by 2-3 Å), it completes the solvation process, transitioning the nanotube to the fully wet state. By contrast, other monatomic cations (e.g., K(+)) have just the opposite effect, by blocking the wetting process and making the nanotube even drier. As the dry nanotube gradually becomes wet when the proton charge defect enters it, the free energy barrier of proton permeation through the tube via Grotthuss shuttling drops significantly. This finding suggests that an important wetting mechanism may influence proton translocation in biological systems, i.e., one in which protons "create" their own water structures (water "wires") in hydrophobic spaces (e.g., protein pores) before migrating through them. An existing water wire, e.g., one seen in an X-ray crystal structure or MD simulations without an explicit excess proton, is therefore not a requirement for protons to transport through hydrophobic spaces.

  17. Hydrated Excess Protons Can Create Their Own Water Wires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Grotthuss shuttling of an excess proton charge defect through hydrogen bonded water networks has long been the focus of theoretical and experimental studies. In this work we show that there is a related process in which water molecules move (“shuttle”) through a hydrated excess proton charge defect in order to wet the path ahead for subsequent proton charge migration. This process is illustrated through reactive molecular dynamics simulations of proton transport through a hydrophobic nanotube, which penetrates through a hydrophobic region. Surprisingly, before the proton enters the nanotube, it starts “shooting” water molecules into the otherwise dry space via Grotthuss shuttling, effectively creating its own water wire where none existed before. As the proton enters the nanotube (by 2–3 Å), it completes the solvation process, transitioning the nanotube to the fully wet state. By contrast, other monatomic cations (e.g., K+) have just the opposite effect, by blocking the wetting process and making the nanotube even drier. As the dry nanotube gradually becomes wet when the proton charge defect enters it, the free energy barrier of proton permeation through the tube via Grotthuss shuttling drops significantly. This finding suggests that an important wetting mechanism may influence proton translocation in biological systems, i.e., one in which protons “create” their own water structures (water “wires”) in hydrophobic spaces (e.g., protein pores) before migrating through them. An existing water wire, e.g., one seen in an X-ray crystal structure or MD simulations without an explicit excess proton, is therefore not a requirement for protons to transport through hydrophobic spaces. PMID:25369445

  18. Fibronectin Stimulates TRPV1 Translocation in Primary Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Patwardhan, Amol M.; Henry, Michael A.; Milam, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are highly variable in their composition and receptor recognition. Their ubiquitous expression profile has been linked to roles in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Recent work has identified certain ECM molecules that serve as dynamic signal modulators, versus the more-recognized role of chronic modulation of signal transduction. In this study, we investigated the role that fibronectin plays in the dynamic modulation of TRPV1 translocation to the plasma membrane in trigeminal ganglia (TG) sensory neurons. Confocal immunofluorescence analyses identify co-expression of the TRPV1 receptor with integrin subunits that bind fibronectin. TG neurons cultured upon or treated with fibronectin experienced a leftward shift in the EC50 of capsaicin-stimulated neuropeptide release. This fibronectin-induced increase in TRPV1 sensitivity to activation is coupled by an increase in plasma membrane expression of TRPV1, as well as an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of TRPV1 in TG neurons. Furthermore, TG neurons cultured on fibronectin demonstrated an increase in capsaicin-mediated Ca+2 accumulation relative to neurons cultured on poly-D-lysine. Data presented from these studies indicate that fibronectin stimulates tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent translocation of the TRPV1 receptor to the plasma membrane, identifying fibronectin as a critical component of the ECM capable of sensory neuron sensitization. PMID:19012739

  19. First experimental research in low energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yi-Ding; Long, Ji-Dong; He, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ding; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Ma, Chao-Fan; Zhao, Liang-Chao; Yang, Xing-Lin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yuan; Pang, Jian; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Fu-Xin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Proton radiography is a new scatheless diagnostic tool providing a potential development direction for advanced hydrotesting. Recently a low energy proton radiography system has been developed at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Phyiscs (CAEP). This system has been designed to use an 11 MeV proton beam to radiograph thin static objects. This system consists of a proton cyclotron coupled to an imaging beamline, which is the first domestic beamline dedicated to proton radiography experiments. Via some demonstration experiments, the radiography system is confirmed to provide clear pictures with spatial resolution ~100 μm within 40 mm field-of-view.

  20. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  1. Regulation of DNA Translocation Efficiency within the Chromatin Remodeler RSC/Sth1 Potentiates Nucleosome Sliding and Ejection.

    PubMed

    Clapier, Cedric R; Kasten, Margaret M; Parnell, Timothy J; Viswanathan, Ramya; Szerlong, Heather; Sirinakis, George; Zhang, Yongli; Cairns, Bradley R

    2016-05-01

    The RSC chromatin remodeler slides and ejects nucleosomes, utilizing a catalytic subunit (Sth1) with DNA translocation activity, which can pump DNA around the nucleosome. A central question is whether and how DNA translocation is regulated to achieve sliding versus ejection. Here, we report the regulation of DNA translocation efficiency by two domains residing on Sth1 (Post-HSA and Protrusion 1) and by actin-related proteins (ARPs) that bind Sth1. ARPs facilitated sliding and ejection by improving "coupling"-the amount of DNA translocation by Sth1 relative to ATP hydrolysis. We also identified and characterized Protrusion 1 mutations that promote "coupling," and Post-HSA mutations that improve ATP hydrolysis; notably, the strongest mutations conferred efficient nucleosome ejection without ARPs. Taken together, sliding-to-ejection involves a continuum of DNA translocation efficiency, consistent with higher magnitudes of ATPase and coupling activities (involving ARPs and Sth1 domains), enabling the simultaneous rupture of multiple histone-DNA contacts facilitating ejection.

  2. Familial cryptic translocation in Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Weyerts, L.K.; Wiley, J.E.; Loud, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    The majority of patients with Angelman syndrome have been shown to have a cytogenetic or molecular deletion on the maternally derived chromosome 15. We report on a case of Angelman syndrome in which this deletion occurs as an unbalanced cryptic translocation involving chromosomes 14 and 15. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome. Multiple cytogenetic studies were done without detecting any deletion. When DNA probes (Oncor) specific for the Prader Willi/Angelman locus became available, the patient was restudied and found to be deleted for {open_quotes}region A{close_quotes} (D15S11) but not for {open_quotes}region B{close_quotes} (GABRB3). No other abnormality was detected. The proband`s mother was then studied. The chromosome 15 marker probe and D15S11 were detected on different chromosomes. Using alpha-satellite probes, a cryptic 14;15 translocation was uncovered. This balanced translocation was also found to be carried by the sister of the proband. This case, along with a case presented at the 1993 ASHG meeting, illustrates the need for using acrocentric probes when studying Angelman syndrome patients. The proband was studied using additional probes specific for this region and found to be deleted for SNRPN but not for D15S10. The breakpoint of the translocation in this patient delineates the smallest deletion of the Angelman syndrome region reported to date and therefore may represent the specific gene involved.

  3. Safety of probiotics: translocation and infection.

    PubMed

    Liong, Min-Tze

    2008-04-01

    The long history of safety has contributed to the acceptance of probiotics as a safe food adjunct. Consequently, many probiotic products and their applications have been granted GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status. However, this classification has been frequently generalized for all probiotic strains regardless of their application. Cases of probiotics from the genera Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Enterococcus, and Bifidobacterium have been isolated from infection sites, leading to the postulation that these probiotics can translocate. Probiotic translocation is difficult to induce in healthy humans, and even if it does occur, detrimental effects are rare. Despite this, various reports have documented health-damaging effects of probiotic translocation in immunocompromised patients. Due to probiotics' high degree of safety and their morphological confusion with other pathogenic bacteria, they are often overlooked as contaminants and are least suspected as pathogens. However, the antibiotic resistance of some strains has increased the complexity of their eradication. Probiotic translocation and infection deserve further investigation and should become a facet of safety assessment so the negative effects of probiotics do not outweigh the benefits. PMID:18366533

  4. Safety of probiotics: translocation and infection.

    PubMed

    Liong, Min-Tze

    2008-04-01

    The long history of safety has contributed to the acceptance of probiotics as a safe food adjunct. Consequently, many probiotic products and their applications have been granted GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status. However, this classification has been frequently generalized for all probiotic strains regardless of their application. Cases of probiotics from the genera Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Enterococcus, and Bifidobacterium have been isolated from infection sites, leading to the postulation that these probiotics can translocate. Probiotic translocation is difficult to induce in healthy humans, and even if it does occur, detrimental effects are rare. Despite this, various reports have documented health-damaging effects of probiotic translocation in immunocompromised patients. Due to probiotics' high degree of safety and their morphological confusion with other pathogenic bacteria, they are often overlooked as contaminants and are least suspected as pathogens. However, the antibiotic resistance of some strains has increased the complexity of their eradication. Probiotic translocation and infection deserve further investigation and should become a facet of safety assessment so the negative effects of probiotics do not outweigh the benefits.

  5. Roles of the sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on vibrio cholerae metabolism, motility and osmotic stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Minato, Yusuke; Fassio, Sara R; Kirkwood, Jay S; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J; Faulkner, Wyatt J; Aagesen, Alisha M; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F; Häse, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology.

  6. Roles of the Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on Vibrio cholerae Metabolism, Motility and Osmotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Yusuke; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J.; Faulkner, Wyatt J.; Aagesen, Alisha M.; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F.; Häse, Claudia C.

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology. PMID:24811312

  7. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5460 Rodent... experienced in performing translocation testing shall include a substance known to produce translocations in..., and all female progeny should be discarded. (2) Testing for translocation heterozygosity. When...

  8. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5460 Rodent... experienced in performing translocation testing shall include a substance known to produce translocations in..., and all female progeny should be discarded. (2) Testing for translocation heterozygosity. When...

  9. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Genetic Toxicity § 798.5460 Rodent... experienced in performing translocation testing shall include a substance known to produce translocations in..., and all female progeny should be discarded. (2) Testing for translocation heterozygosity. When...

  10. Divergent developmental expression and function of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters PepT2 and PhT1 in regional brain slices of mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjun; Xie, Yehua; Keep, Richard F; Smith, David E

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated the developmental gene and protein expression of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs: peptide transporter, PepT1 and PepT2; peptide-histidine transporter, PhT1 and PhT2) in different regions of rodent brain, and the age-dependent uptake of a POT substrate, glycylsarcosine (GlySar), in brain slices. Slices were obtained from cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus of wildtype and PepT2 null mice, and from rats at different ages. Gene and protein expression were determined by real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses. Brain slice uptakes of radiolabeled glycylsarcosine were determined in the absence and presence of excess unlabeled glycylsarcosine or l-histidine, the latter being an inhibitor of PhT1/2 but not PepT1/2. As PepT2 and PhT1 transcripts were abundantly expressed in all three regions of mouse brain, little to no expression was observed for PepT1 and PhT2. PhT1 protein was present in brain regions of adult but not neonatal mice and expression levels increased with age in rats. Glycylsarcosine uptake, inhibition and transporter dominance did not show regional brain or species differences. However, there were clear age-related differences in functional activity, with PepT2 dominating in neonatal mice and rats, and PhT1 dominating in adult rodents. These developmental changes may markedly impact the neural activity of both endogenous and exogenous (drug) peptides/mimetics. Developmental gene and protein expression of peptide transporters was evaluated in various regions of rodent brain, along with age-dependent uptake of dipeptide. We found marked changes in protein expression and functional activity of PhT1 and PepT2, the former predominating in adult and the latter in neonate. These developmental changes may markedly impact the neural activity of endogenous and exogenous peptides/mimetics.

  11. Protonic transport through solitons in hydrogen-bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, L.; Jayanthi, S.; Muniyappan, A.; Gopi, D.

    2011-09-01

    We offer an alternative route for investigating soliton solutions in hydrogen-bonded (HB) chains. We invoke the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method coupled with symbolic computation to solve the governing equation of motion for proton dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of proton transfer in HB chains through bell-shaped soliton excitations, which trigger the bio-energy transport in most biological systems. This solitonic mechanism of proton transfer could play functional roles in muscular contraction, enzymatic activity and oxidative phosphorylation.

  12. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  13. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  14. The Macroscopic Rate of Nucleic Acid Translocation by Hepatitis C virus Helicase NS3h is Dependent on Both the Sugar and Base Moieties

    PubMed Central

    Khaki, Ali R.; Field, Cassandra; Malik, Shuja; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Leavitt, Stephanie A.; Wang, Ruth; Hung, Magdeleine; Sakowicz, Roman; Brendza, Katherine M.; Fischer, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The NS3 helicase (NS3h) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a 3′ to 5′ SF2 RNA and DNA helicase that is essential for the replication of HCV. We have examined the kinetic mechanism of translocation of NS3h along single-stranded nucleic acid with bases rU, dU and dT and have found that the macroscopic rate of translocation is dependent upon both the base and sugar moieties of the nucleic acid, with approximate macroscopic translocation rates of 3 nt/s (oligo-dT), 35 nt/s (oligo-dU), and 42 nt/s (oligo-rU), respectively. We found a strong correlation between the macroscopic translocation rates and the binding affinity of the translocating NS3h protein to the respective substrates such that weaker affinity corresponded to faster translocation. The values of K0.5 for NS3h translocation at a saturating ATP concentration are: (3.3 ± 0.4) μM nucleotide (poly-dT), (27 ± 2) μM nucleotide (poly-dU), and (36 ± 2) μM nucleotide (poly-rU). Furthermore, the results of isothermal titration of NS3h with these oligonucleotides suggest that differences in TΔS° are the principal source of the differences in the affinity of NS3h binding to these substrates. Interestingly, despite the differences in macroscopic translocation rates and binding affinities, the ATP coupling stoichiometry for NS3h translocation was identical for all three substrates, ~0.5 ATP molecules consumed per nucleotide translocated. This similar periodicity of ATP consumption implies a similar mechanism for NS3h translocation along RNA and DNA substrates. PMID:20451531

  15. The macroscopic rate of nucleic acid translocation by hepatitis C virus helicase NS3h is dependent on both sugar and base moieties.

    PubMed

    Khaki, Ali R; Field, Cassandra; Malik, Shuja; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Leavitt, Stephanie A; Wang, Ruth; Hung, Magdeleine; Sakowicz, Roman; Brendza, Katherine M; Fischer, Christopher J

    2010-07-16

    The nonstructural protein 3 helicase (NS3h) of hepatitis C virus is a 3'-to-5' superfamily 2 RNA and DNA helicase that is essential for the replication of hepatitis C virus. We have examined the kinetic mechanism of the translocation of NS3h along single-stranded nucleic acid with bases uridylate (rU), deoxyuridylate (dU), and deoxythymidylate (dT), and have found that the macroscopic rate of translocation is dependent on both the base moiety and the sugar moiety of the nucleic acid, with approximate macroscopic translocation rates of 3 nt s(-1) (oligo(dT)), 35 nt s(-1) (oligo(dU)), and 42 nt s(-1) (oligo(rU)), respectively. We found a strong correlation between the macroscopic translocation rates and the binding affinity of the translocating NS3h protein for the respective substrates such that weaker affinity corresponded to faster translocation. The values of K(0.5) for NS3h translocation at a saturating ATP concentration are as follows: 3.3+/-0.4 microM nucleotide (poly(dT)), 27+/-2 microM nucleotide (poly(dU)), and 36+/-2 microM nucleotide (poly(rU)). Furthermore, results of the isothermal titration of NS3h with these oligonucleotides suggest that differences in TDeltaS(0) are the principal source of differences in the affinity of NS3h binding to these substrates. Interestingly, despite the differences in macroscopic translocation rates and binding affinities, the ATP coupling stoichiometries for NS3h translocation were identical for all three substrates (approximately 0.5 ATP molecule consumed per nucleotide translocated). This similar periodicity of ATP consumption implies a similar mechanism for NS3h translocation along RNA and DNA substrates.

  16. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  17. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  18. What's In a Proton?

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  19. Translocation strategies for multiple species depend on interspecific interaction type.

    PubMed

    Plein, Michaela; Bode, Michael; Moir, Melinda L; Vesk, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Conservation translocations, anthropogenic movements of species to prevent their extinction, have increased substantially over the last few decades. Although multiple species are frequently moved to the same location, current translocation guidelines consider species in isolation. This practice ignores important interspecific interactions and thereby risks translocation failure. We model three different two-species systems to illustrate the inherent complexity of multispecies translocations and to assess the influence of different interaction types (consumer-resource, mutualism, and competition) on translocation strategies. We focus on how these different interaction types influence the optimal founder population sizes for successful translocations and the order in which the species are moved (simultaneous or sequential). Further, we assess the effect of interaction strength in simultaneous translocations and the time delay between translocations when moving two species sequentially. Our results show that translocation decisions need to reflect the type of interaction. While all translocations of interacting species require a minimum founder population size, which is demarked by an extinction boundary, consumer-resource translocations also have a maximum founder population limit. Above the minimum founder size, increasing the number of translocated individuals leads to a substantial increase in the extinction boundary of competitors and consumers, but not of mutualists. Competitive and consumer-resource systems benefit from sequential translocations, but the order of translocations does not change the outcomes for mutualistic interaction partners noticeably. Interspecific interactions are important processes that shape population dynamics and should therefore be incorporated into the quantitative planning of multispecies translocations. Our findings apply whenever interacting species are moved, for example, in reintroductions, conservation introductions, biological

  20. Translocation strategies for multiple species depend on interspecific interaction type.

    PubMed

    Plein, Michaela; Bode, Michael; Moir, Melinda L; Vesk, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Conservation translocations, anthropogenic movements of species to prevent their extinction, have increased substantially over the last few decades. Although multiple species are frequently moved to the same location, current translocation guidelines consider species in isolation. This practice ignores important interspecific interactions and thereby risks translocation failure. We model three different two-species systems to illustrate the inherent complexity of multispecies translocations and to assess the influence of different interaction types (consumer-resource, mutualism, and competition) on translocation strategies. We focus on how these different interaction types influence the optimal founder population sizes for successful translocations and the order in which the species are moved (simultaneous or sequential). Further, we assess the effect of interaction strength in simultaneous translocations and the time delay between translocations when moving two species sequentially. Our results show that translocation decisions need to reflect the type of interaction. While all translocations of interacting species require a minimum founder population size, which is demarked by an extinction boundary, consumer-resource translocations also have a maximum founder population limit. Above the minimum founder size, increasing the number of translocated individuals leads to a substantial increase in the extinction boundary of competitors and consumers, but not of mutualists. Competitive and consumer-resource systems benefit from sequential translocations, but the order of translocations does not change the outcomes for mutualistic interaction partners noticeably. Interspecific interactions are important processes that shape population dynamics and should therefore be incorporated into the quantitative planning of multispecies translocations. Our findings apply whenever interacting species are moved, for example, in reintroductions, conservation introductions, biological

  1. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  2. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation. PMID:21499600

  3. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation.

  4. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  5. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  6. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. PMID:24074929

  7. Histone modifications predispose genome regions to breakage and translocation

    PubMed Central

    Burman, Bharat; Zhang, Zhuzhu Z.; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Lieb, Jason D.; Misteli, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are well-established hallmarks of cancer cells and often occur at nonrandom sites in the genome. The molecular features that define recurrent chromosome breakpoints are largely unknown. Using a combination of bioinformatics, biochemical analysis, and cell-based assays, we identify here specific histone modifications as facilitators of chromosome breakage and translocations. We show enrichment of several histone modifications over clinically relevant translocation-prone genome regions. Experimental modulation of histone marks sensitizes genome regions to breakage by endonuclease challenge or irradiation and promotes formation of chromosome translocations of endogenous gene loci. Our results demonstrate that histone modifications predispose genome regions to chromosome breakage and translocations. PMID:26104467

  8. Impurity-induced double proton transfer in benzoic acid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtom, G. R.; Trommsdorff, H. P.; Hochstrasser, R. M.

    1986-10-01

    Fluorescence decays of thioindigo (TI) and selenoindigo (SI) in benzoic acid crystals are reported. The structures interconvert concomitantly with proton tunnelling in the host. Two benzoic acid dimers appear to be coupled to the guest transition. The double proton tunnelling rate constant is (1.67± 0.07) × 10 8s -1 for both the SI and TI guest.

  9. The Bacterial Twin-Arginine Translocation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Philip A.; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle; Georgiou, George

    2009-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is responsible for the export of folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria. Substrates for the Tat pathway include redox enzymes requiring cofactor insertion in the cytoplasm, multimeric proteins that have to assemble into a complex prior to export, certain membrane proteins, and proteins whose folding is incompatible with Sec export. These proteins are involved in a diverse range of cellular activities including anaerobic metabolism, cell envelope biogenesis, metal acquisition and detoxification, and virulence. The Escherichia coli translocase consists of the TatA, TatB, and TatC proteins, but little is known about the precise sequence of events that leads to protein translocation, the energetic requirements, or the mechanism that prevents the export of misfolded proteins. Owing to the unique characteristics of the pathway, it holds promise for biotechnological applications. PMID:16756481

  10. A new approach to polymer translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbeldam, Johan; Rostiashvili, Vakhtang; Milchev, Andrey; Vilgis, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Polymer translocation is ubiquitous in nature. It plays a role in phenomena like virus infections and in trafficking of proteins through pores in a cell membrane. Many theoretical models have been developed to explain scaling properties of simple polymer chains through tiny nanopores. This has not resolved the controversies in this field, however. In this paper we employ novel methods to shed light on the results that were obtained using the different models that are in use today. We use, for example fractional Brownian motion to explain the scaling of the variance in the translocation length with time and find good agreement between simulation results and theoretical predictions. An extension of the theory to nanopores with more complex geometries are discussed.

  11. Translocation in the nonpolytrichaceous moss grimmia laevigata

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, P. )

    1989-10-01

    A superficially rhizomatous habit suggested that the moss Grimmia laevigata might function as a clonal, rhizomatous plant and translocate photoassimilates to below ground organs, even though the species is outside the order Polytrichales, which includes the only mosses known to posses sieve cells. Labelling with {sup 14}CO{sub 2} indicated that at least 10% of newly assimilated carbon was translocated out of leafy shoot portions within 26 hr. Of this carbon, approximately 75% was apparently moved into leafless, basal shoot portions and 25% into below ground stems. Infrared gas analysis of net CO{sup 2} flux was used to check that labelling gave a realistic measure of photosynthesis. Physiological integration and clonal spread may account for the unusual ability of this moss to colonize extremely xeric microsites.

  12. Genes and translocations involved in POF.

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, David; Herrera, Luisa; Crisponi, Laura; Mumm, Steven; Percesepe, Antonio; Pellegrini, Massimo; Pilia, Giuseppe; Forabosco, Antonino

    2002-08-15

    Changes at a single autosomal locus and many X-linked loci have been implicated in women with gonadal dysgenesis [premature ovarian failure (POF) with deficits in ovarian follicles]. For the chromosome 3 locus, a forkhead transcription factor gene (FOXL2) has been identified, in which lesions result in decreased follicles by haploinsufficiency. In contrast, sporadic X; autosomal translocations are distributed at many points on the X, but concentrate in a critical region on Xq. The association of the breakpoints with genes involved in ovarian function is thus far weak (in four analyzed cases) and has not been related to pathology in other POF patients. While many more translocations can be analyzed in detail as the human genome sequence is refined, it remains possible that translocations like X monosomy (Turner syndrome) lead to POF not by interrupting specific genes important in ovarian development, but by causing aberrations in pairing or X-inactivation during folliculogenesis. It is noted that the critical region has unusual features, neighboring the X-inactivation center and including an 18 Mb region of very low recombination. These suggest that chromosome dynamics in the region may be sensitive to structural changes, and when modified by translocations might provoke apoptosis at meiotic checkpoints. Choices among models for the etiology of POF should be feasible based on studies of ovarian follicle development and attrition in mouse models. Studies would prominently include gene expression profiling of developmental-specific pathways in nascent ovaries with controlled levels of Foxl2 and interacting proteins, or with defined changes in the X chromosome.

  13. [Bacterial translocation from the nutritional perspective].

    PubMed

    de Oca, J

    1994-01-01

    A variety of situations involving loss of the physical integrity of the gastrointestinal barrier, excess intraluminal bacterial growth or immunological compromise of the host, have been shown experimentally to predispose to bacterial translocation. While colonization of the mesenteric ganglia is a mechanism which stimulates local immune defenses, distant colonization of other organs causes these defences to fail. In general, in the latter situation, a variety of factors must combine, notably the nutritional state or nutritional therapy. Protein malnutrition states do not alone generate bacterial translocation, but they do facilitate the distant dissemination of germs in situations such as endotoxemia. Bacterial translocation is objectivized after the prolonged use of total parenteral nutrition or of chemically defined non-fiber diets. The addition of fiber restores the architecture and physiology of the intestinal microvilli and prevents bacterial translocation in animals with a variety of morphological lesions of the intestinal barrier. While the results of the clinical studies are as yet not very conclusive, there is a clear link between bacteremia of intestinal origin and multiple organ failures. Nutritional support of patients with an acute metabolic compromise must, at least as inferred from the experimental studies, take account of the following factors: in the first place, the use of a preparation with a qualitatively and quantitatively suitable fiber content, to prevent atrophy of the intestinal villi; in the second place, the use of "scavenger" agents or physiological sweepers of the free radicals of oxygen, such as vitamin A, E or C or selenium; and, finally, day by day there is an increasing interest in the therapeutic use of substrates with immunomodulatory capacity, such as glutamine or arginine. On the other hand, the use must be questioned of substances such as Omega 3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids which are on their own able to increase lipidic

  14. A Translocation Motif in Relaxase TrwC Specifically Affects Recruitment by Its Conjugative Type IV Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Alperi, Anabel; Larrea, Delfina; Fernández-González, Esther; Dehio, Christoph; Zechner, Ellen L.

    2013-01-01

    Type IV secretion system (T4SS) substrates are recruited through a translocation signal that is poorly defined for conjugative relaxases. The relaxase TrwC of plasmid R388 is translocated by its cognate conjugative T4SS, and it can also be translocated by the VirB/D4 T4SS of Bartonella henselae, causing DNA transfer to human cells. In this work, we constructed a series of TrwC variants and assayed them for DNA transfer to bacteria and human cells to compare recruitment requirements by both T4SSs. Comparison with other reported relaxase translocation signals allowed us to determine two putative translocation sequence (TS) motifs, TS1 and TS2. Mutations affecting TS1 drastically affected conjugation frequencies, while mutations affecting either motif had only a mild effect on DNA transfer rates through the VirB/D4 T4SS of B. henselae. These results indicate that a single substrate can be recruited by two different T4SSs through different signals. The C terminus affected DNA transfer rates through both T4SSs tested, but no specific sequence requirement was detected. The addition of a Bartonella intracellular delivery (BID) domain, the translocation signal for the Bartonella VirB/D4 T4SS, increased DNA transfer up to 4% of infected human cells, providing an excellent tool for DNA delivery to specific cell types. We show that the R388 coupling protein TrwB is also required for this high-efficiency TrwC-BID translocation. Other elements apart from the coupling protein may also be involved in substrate recognition by T4SSs. PMID:23995644

  15. Mitochondrial proton and electron leaks

    PubMed Central

    Jastroch, Martin; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Mookerjee, Shona; Treberg, Jason R.; Brand, Martin D.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial proton and electron leak have a major impact on mitochondrial coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species. In the first part of this chapter, we address the molecular nature of the basal and inducible proton leak pathways, and their physiological importance. The basal leak is unregulated, and a major proportion can be attributed to mitochondrial anion carriers, while the proton leak through the lipid bilayer appears to be minor. The basal proton leak is cell-type specific and correlates with metabolic rate. The inducible leak through the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) and uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can be activated by fatty acids, superoxide, or peroxidation products. The physiological role of inducible leak through UCP1 in mammalian brown adipose tissue is heat production, whereas the roles of non-mammalian UCP1 and its paralogous proteins, in particular UCP2 and UCP3, are not yet resolved. The second part of the chapter focuses on the electron leak that occurs in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Exit of electrons prior to the reduction of oxygen to water at cytochrome c oxidase causes the production of superoxide. As the mechanisms of electron leak are crucial to understanding their physiological relevance, we summarize the mechanisms and topology of electron leak from Complex I and III in studies using isolated mitochondria. We also highlight recent progress and challenges of assessing electron leak in the living cell. Finally, we emphasise the importance of proton and electron leak as therapeutic targets in body weight regulation and insulin secretion. PMID:20533900

  16. A novel selection system for chromosome translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Rachel B; Ebran, Nathalie; Herrera, Anissa E; Lindsley, Janet E

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are common genetic abnormalities found in both leukemias and solid tumors. While much has been learned about the effects of specific translocations on cell proliferation, much less is known about what causes these chromosome rearrangements. This article describes the development and use of a system that genetically selects for rare translocation events using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A translocation YAC was created that contains the breakpoint cluster region from the human MLL gene, a gene frequently involved in translocations in leukemia patients, flanked by positive and negative selection markers. A translocation between the YAC and a yeast chromosome, whose breakpoint falls within the MLL DNA, physically separates the markers and forms the basis for the selection. When RAD52 is deleted, essentially all of the selected and screened cells contain simple translocations. The detectable translocation rates are the same in haploids and diploids, although the mechanisms involved and true translocation rates may be distinct. A unique double-strand break induced within the MLL sequences increases the number of detectable translocation events 100- to 1000-fold. This novel system provides a tractable assay for answering basic mechanistic questions about the development of chromosomal translocations. PMID:11973293

  17. Electrical-to-mechanical coupling in purple membranes: membrane as electrostrictive medium.

    PubMed Central

    Kietis, P; Vengris, M; Valkunas, L

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present acousto-electrical measurements performed on dry films of purple membranes (PM) of Halobacterium salinarium. The purpose of these measurements is to determine the relation between mechanical and electrical phenomena in bacteriorhodopsin and to define the role of the protein in the proton transfer process. Electrical-to-mechanical coupling in PMs manifests itself as direct and inverse piezoelectric effects. Measurements performed on the samples with different degrees of PM orientation and at various values of the externally applied cross-membrane electric field indicate that piezoelectric phenomena in PMs arise from the electric asymmetry of the membranes, i.e., they originate from electrostriction. Experiments with samples made of oriented PMs allow estimation of the value of the intrinsic cross-membrane electric field, which is approximately 10(8) V/m. A hypothetical model of PM is presented where the electrical-to-mechanical coupling is suggested to be the main driving force for the proton translocation against the Coulomb forces acting in the membrane. PMID:11259278

  18. 1000-fold enhancement in proton conductivity of a MOF using post-synthetically anchored proton transporters

    PubMed Central

    Shalini, Sorout; Dhavale, Vishal M.; Eldho, Kavalakal M.; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ajithkumar, Thallaseril G.; Vaidhyanathan, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Pyridinol, a coordinating zwitter-ionic species serves as stoichiometrically loadable and non-leachable proton carrier. The partial replacement of the pyridinol by stronger hydrogen bonding, coordinating guest, ethylene glycol (EG), offers 1000-fold enhancement in conductivity (10−6 to 10−3 Scm−1) with record low activation energy (0.11 eV). Atomic modeling coupled with 13C-SSNMR provides insights into the potential proton conduction pathway functionalized with post-synthetically anchored dynamic proton transporting EG moieties. PMID:27577681

  19. 1000-fold enhancement in proton conductivity of a MOF using post-synthetically anchored proton transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalini, Sorout; Dhavale, Vishal M.; Eldho, Kavalakal M.; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ajithkumar, Thallaseril G.; Vaidhyanathan, Ramanathan

    2016-08-01

    Pyridinol, a coordinating zwitter-ionic species serves as stoichiometrically loadable and non-leachable proton carrier. The partial replacement of the pyridinol by stronger hydrogen bonding, coordinating guest, ethylene glycol (EG), offers 1000-fold enhancement in conductivity (10‑6 to 10‑3 Scm‑1) with record low activation energy (0.11 eV). Atomic modeling coupled with 13C-SSNMR provides insights into the potential proton conduction pathway functionalized with post-synthetically anchored dynamic proton transporting EG moieties.

  20. 1000-fold enhancement in proton</