Science.gov

Sample records for protoplanetary discs 10-micron

  1. Grand Challenges in Protoplanetary Disc Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Ilee, John D.; Forgan, Duncan H.; Facchini, Stefano; Price, Daniel J.; Boneberg, Dominika M.; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Gonzalez, Jean-François; Hutchison, Mark A.; Kamp, Inga; Laibe, Guillaume; Lyra, Wladimir; Meru, Farzana; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Panić, Olja; Rice, Ken; Suzuki, Takeru; Teague, Richard; Walsh, Catherine; Woitke, Peter; Community authors

    2016-10-01

    The Protoplanetary Discussions conference-held in Edinburgh, UK, from 2016 March 7th-11th-included several open sessions led by participants. This paper reports on the discussions collectively concerned with the multi-physics modelling of protoplanetary discs, including the self-consistent calculation of gas and dust dynamics, radiative transfer, and chemistry. After a short introduction to each of these disciplines in isolation, we identify a series of burning questions and grand challenges associated with their continuing development and integration. We then discuss potential pathways towards solving these challenges, grouped by strategical, technical, and collaborative developments. This paper is not intended to be a review, but rather to motivate and direct future research and collaboration across typically distinct fields based on community-driven input, to encourage further progress in our understanding of circumstellar and protoplanetary discs.

  2. Radio Monitoring of Protoplanetary Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubach, Catarina; Tahli Maddison, Sarah; Wright, Chris M.; Wilner, David J.; Lommen, Dave J. P.; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2015-01-01

    We present new results from a radio monitoring survey conducted with ATCA where we measured the flux variability for 11 protoplanetary disks in the Chameoleon and Lupus star forming regions at 7 and 15 mm and 3+6 cm. We determined the source of the excess flux and discuss its effect on grain growth to cm-size pebbles. We found that for most targets the 7 mm flux variability is consistent with the presence of thermal free-free emission and that the targets with excess emission above thermal dust emission also have signatures of grain growth to cm-size pebbles. Our results indicate that the presence of other emission mechanisms does not seem to negatively affect the grain growth process.

  3. Rapid radiative clearing of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Owen, James E.

    2016-04-01

    The lack of observed transition discs with inner gas holes of radii greater than ˜50 au implies that protoplanetary discs dispersed from the inside out must remove gas from the outer regions rapidly. We investigate the role of photoevaporation in the final clearing of gas from low mass discs with inner holes. In particular, we study the so-called `thermal sweeping' mechanism which results in rapid clearing of the disc. Thermal sweeping was originally thought to arise when the radial and vertical pressure scalelengths at the X-ray heated inner edge of the disc match. We demonstrate that this criterion is not fundamental. Rather, thermal sweeping occurs when the pressure maximum at the inner edge of the dust heated disc falls below the maximum possible pressure of X-ray heated gas (which depends on the local X-ray flux). We derive new critical peak volume and surface density estimates for rapid radiative clearing which, in general, result in rapid dispersal happening less readily than in previous estimates. This less efficient clearing of discs by X-ray driven thermal sweeping leaves open the issue of what mechanism (e.g. far-ultraviolet heating) can clear gas from the outer disc sufficiently quickly to explain the non-detection of cold gas around weak line T Tauri stars.

  4. On the convective overstability in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the driving of low-level hydrodynamical activity in protoplanetary-disc dead zones. A small adverse radial entropy gradient, ordinarily stabilized by rotation, excites oscillatory convection (`convective overstability') when thermal diffusion, or cooling, is neither too strong nor too weak. I revisit the linear theory of the instability, discuss its prevalence in protoplanetary discs, and show that unstable modes are exact non-linear solutions in the local Boussinesq limit. Overstable modes cannot grow indefinitely, however, as they are subject to a secondary parametric instability that limits their amplitudes to relatively low levels. If parasites set the saturation level of the ensuing turbulence then the convective overstability is probably too weak to drive significant angular momentum transport or to generate vortices. But I also discuss an alternative, and far more vigorous, saturation route that generates radial `layers' or `zonal flows' (witnessed in semiconvection). Numerical simulations are required to determine which outcome is favoured in realistic discs, and consequently how important the instability is for disc dynamics.

  5. Cometary ices in forming protoplanetary disc midplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N.; Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Furuya, Kenji; Marboeuf, Ulysse; Thiabaud, Amaury; Harsono, Daniel; Visser, Ruud

    2016-10-01

    Low-mass protostars are the extrasolar analogues of the natal Solar system. Sophisticated physicochemical models are used to simulate the formation of two protoplanetary discs from the initial prestellar phase, one dominated by viscous spreading and the other by pure infall. The results show that the volatile prestellar fingerprint is modified by the chemistry en route into the disc. This holds relatively independent of initial abundances and chemical parameters: physical conditions are more important. The amount of CO2 increases via the grain-surface reaction of OH with CO, which is enhanced by photodissociation of H2O ice. Complex organic molecules are produced during transport through the envelope at the expense of CH3OH ice. Their abundances can be comparable to that of methanol ice (few per cent of water ice) at large disc radii (R > 30 au). Current Class II disc models may be underestimating the complex organic content. Planet population synthesis models may underestimate the amount of CO2 and overestimate CH3OH ices in planetesimals by disregarding chemical processing between the cloud and disc phases. The overall C/O and C/N ratios differ between the gas and solid phases. The two ice ratios show little variation beyond the inner 10 au and both are nearly solar in the case of pure infall, but both are subsolar when viscous spreading dominates. Chemistry in the protostellar envelope en route to the protoplanetary disc sets the initial volatile and prebiotically significant content of icy planetesimals and cometary bodies. Comets are thus potentially reflecting the provenances of the midplane ices in the solar nebula.

  6. The structure of protoplanetary discs around evolving young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders; Lambrechts, Michiel; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    The formation of planets with gaseous envelopes takes place in protoplanetary accretion discs on time scales of several million years. Small dust particles stick to each other to form pebbles, pebbles concentrate in the turbulent flow to form planetesimals and planetary embryos and grow to planets, which undergo substantial radial migration. All these processes are influenced by the underlying structure of the protoplanetary disc, specifically the profiles of temperature, gas scale height, and density. The commonly used disc structure of the minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) is a simple power law in all these quantities. However, protoplanetary disc models with both viscous and stellar heating show several bumps and dips in temperature, scale height, and density caused by transitions in opacity, which are missing in the MMSN model. These play an important role in the formation of planets, since they can act as sweet spots for forming planetesimals via the streaming instability and affect the direction and magnitude of type-I migration. We present 2D simulations of accretion discs that feature radiative cooling and viscous and stellar heating, and they are linked to the observed evolutionary stages of protoplanetary discs and their host stars. These models allow us to identify preferred planetesimal and planet formation regions in the protoplanetary disc as a function of the disc's metallicity, accretion rate, and lifetime. We derive simple fitting formulae that feature all structural characteristics of protoplanetary discs during the evolution of several Myr. These fits are straightforward for applying to modelling any growth stage of planets where detailed knowledge of the underlying disc structure is required. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Proto-planetary disc evolution and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosotti, Giovanni Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Planets form from gas and dust discs in orbit around young stars. The timescale for planet formation is constrained by the lifetime of these discs. The properties of the formed planetary systems depend thus on the evolution and final dispersal of the discs, which is the main topic of this thesis. Observations reveal the existence of a class of discs called "transitional", which lack dust in their inner regions. They are thought to be the last stage before the complete disc dispersal, and hence they may provide the key to understanding the mechanisms behind disc evolution. X-ray photoevaporation and planet formation have been studied as possible physical mechanisms responsible for the final dispersal of discs. However up to now, these two phenomena have been studied separately, neglecting any possible feedback or interaction. In this thesis we have investigated what is the interplay between these two processes. We show that the presence of a giant planet in a photo-evaporating disc can significantly shorten its lifetime, by cutting the inner regions from the mass reservoir in the exterior of the disc. This mechanism produces transition discs that for a given mass accretion rate have larger holes than in models considering only X-ray photo-evaporation, constituting a possible route to the formation of accreting transition discs with large holes. These discs are found in observations and still constitute a puzzle for the theory. Inclusion of the phenomenon called "thermal sweeping", a violent instability that can destroy a whole disc in as little as 10 4 years, shows that the outer disc left can be very short-lived (depending on the X-ray luminosity of the star), possibly explaining why very few non accreting transition discs are observed. However the mechanism does not seem to be efficient enough to reconcile with observations. In this thesis we also show that X-ray photo-evaporation naturally explains the observed correlation between stellar masses and accretion

  8. On the survival of zombie vortices in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, Geoffroy R. J.; Latter, Henrik

    2016-11-01

    Recently it has been proposed that the zombie vortex instability (ZVI) could precipitate hydrodynamical activity and angular momentum transport in unmagnetized regions of protoplanetary discs, also known as `dead zones'. In this Letter we scrutinize, with high-resolution 3D spectral simulations, the onset and survival of this instability in the presence of viscous and thermal physics. First, we find that the ZVI is strongly dependent on the nature of the viscous operator. Although the ZVI is easily obtained with hyperdiffusion, it is difficult to sustain with physical (second order) diffusion operators up to Reynolds numbers as high as 107. This sensitivity is probably due to the ZVI's reliance on critical layers, whose characteristic length-scale, structure, and dynamics are controlled by viscous diffusion. Second, we observe that the ZVI is sensitive to radiative processes, and indeed only operates when the Peclet number is greater than a critical value ˜104, or when the cooling time is longer than ˜10Ω-1. As a consequence, the ZVI struggles to appear at R ≳ 0.3 au in standard 0.01 M⊙ T Tauri disc models, though younger more massive discs provide a more hospitable environment. Together these results question the prevalence of the ZVI in protoplanetary discs.

  9. Photochemical-dynamical models of externally FUV irradiated protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Boubert, Douglas; Facchini, Stefano; Bisbas, Thomas G.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-09-01

    There is growing theoretical and observational evidence that protoplanetary disc evolution may be significantly affected by the canonical levels of far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation found in a star forming environment, leading to substantial stripping of material from the disc outer edge even in the absence of nearby massive stars. In this paper we perform the first full radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the flow from the outer rim of protoplanetary discs externally irradiated by such intermediate strength FUV fields, including direct modelling of the photon dominated region (PDR) which is required to accurately compute the thermal properties. We find excellent agreement between our models and the semi-analytic models of Facchini et al. (2016) for the profile of the flow itself, as well as the mass loss rate and location of their "critical radius". This both validates their results (which differed significantly from prior semi-analytic estimates) and our new numerical method, the latter of which can now be applied to elements of the problem that the semi-analytic approaches are incapable of modelling. We also obtain the composition of the flow, but given the simple geometry of our models we can only hint at some diagnostics for future observations of externally irradiated discs at this stage. We also discuss the potential for these models as benchmarks for future photochemical-dynamical codes.

  10. On the dynamics of planetesimals embedded in turbulent protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Richard P.; Gressel, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    Angular momentum transport and accretion in protoplanetary discs are generally believed to be driven by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) turbulence via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). The dynamics of solid bodies embedded in such discs (dust grains, boulders, planetesimals and planets) may be strongly affected by the turbulence, such that the formation pathways for planetary systems are determined in part by the strength and spatial distribution of the turbulent flow. We examine the dynamics of planetesimals, with radii between 1m and 10km, embedded in turbulent protoplanetary discs, using 3D MHD simulations. The planetesimals experience gas drag and stochastic gravitational forces due to the turbulent disc. We use, and compare the results from, local shearing box simulations and global models in this study. The main aims of this work are to examine: the growth, and possible saturation, of the velocity dispersion of embedded planetesimals as a function of their size and disc parameters; the rate of radial migration and diffusion of planetesimals; the conditions under which the results from shearing box and global simulations agree. We find good agreement between local and global simulations when shearing boxes of dimension 4H × 16H × 2H are used (H being the local scaleheight). The magnitude of the density fluctuations obtained is sensitive to the box size, due to the excitation and propagation of spiral density waves. This affects the stochastic forcing experienced by planetesimals. The correlation time associated with the stochastic forcing is also found to be a function of the box size and aspect ratio. The equilibrium radial velocity dispersion, σ(vr), obtained depends on the radii, Rp, of the planetesimals. Bodies with Rp = 50m achieve the smallest value with σ(vr) ~= 20ms-1. Smaller bodies are tightly coupled to the gas, and boulders with Rp = 1m attain a value of σ(vr) similar to the turbulent velocity of the gas (~100ms-1). Equilibrium values of

  11. From birth to death of protoplanetary discs: modelling their formation, evolution and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Kunitomo, Masanobu; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.

    2016-09-01

    The formation, evolution and dispersal processes of protoplanetary discs are investigated and the disc lifetime is estimated. The gravitational collapse of a pre-stellar core forms both a central star and a protoplanetary disc. The central star grows by accretion from the disc and irradiation by the central star heats up the disc and generates a thermal wind, which results in the disc's dispersal. Using the one-dimensional diffusion equation, we calculate the evolution of protoplanetary discs numerically. To calculate the disc evolution from formation to dispersal, we add source and sink terms that represent gas accretion from pre-stellar cores and photoevaporation, respectively. We find that the disc lifetimes of typical pre-stellar cores are around 2-4 million years (Myr). A pre-stellar core with high angular momentum forms a larger disc with a long lifetime, while a disc around an X-ray-luminous star has a short lifetime. Integrating disc lifetimes under various masses and angular velocities of pre-stellar cores and X-ray luminosities of young stellar objects, we obtain the disc fraction at a given stellar age and mean lifetime of the disc. Our model indicates that the mean lifetime of a protoplanetary disc is 3.7 Myr, which is consistent with the observational estimate from young stellar clusters. We also find that the dispersion of X-ray luminosity is needed to reproduce the observed disc fraction.

  12. Face-on accretion onto a protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnen, T. P. G.; Pols, O. R.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Stars are generally born in clustered stellar environments, which can affect their subsequent evolution. An example of this environmental influence can be found in globular clusters (GCs) harbouring multiple stellar populations. An evolutionary scenario in which a second (and possibly higher order) population is formed by the accretion of chemically enriched material onto the low-mass stars in the initial GC population has been suggested to explain the multiple stellar populations. The idea, dubbed early disc accretion, is that the low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars sweep up gas expelled by the more massive stars of the same generation into their protoplanetary disc as they move through the cluster core. The same process could also occur, to a lesser extent, in embedded stellar systems that are less dense. Aims: Using assumptions that represent the (dynamical) conditions in a typical GC, we investigate whether a low-mass star of 0.4 M⊙ surrounded by a protoplanetary disc can accrete a sufficient amount of enriched material to account for the observed abundances in so-called second generation GC stars. In particular, we focus on the gas-loading rate onto the disc and star, as well as on the lifetime and stability of the disc. Methods: We perform simulations at multiple resolutions with two different smoothed particle hydrodynamics codes and compare the results. Each code uses a different implementation of the artificial viscosity. Results: We find that the gas-loading rate is about a factor of two smaller than the rate based on geometric arguments, because the effective cross-section of the disc is smaller than its surface area. Furthermore, the loading rate is consistent for both codes, irrespective of resolution. Although the disc gains mass in the high-resolution runs, it loses angular momentum on a timescale of 104 yr. Two effects determine the loss of (specific) angular momentum in our simulations: (1) continuous ram pressure stripping and (2

  13. Giant planet formation in radially structured protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Gavin A. L.; Nelson, Richard P.

    2016-08-01

    Our recent N-body simulations of planetary system formation, incorporating models for the main physical processes thought to be important during the building of planets (i.e. gas disc evolution, migration, planetesimal/boulder accretion, gas accretion on to cores, etc.), have been successful in reproducing some of the broad features of the observed exoplanet population (e.g. compact systems of low-mass planets, hot Jupiters), but fail completely to form any surviving cold Jupiters. The primary reason for this failure is rapid inward migration of growing protoplanets during the gas accretion phase, resulting in the delivery of these bodies on to orbits close to the star. Here, we present the results of simulations that examine the formation of gas giant planets in protoplanetary discs that are radially structured due to spatial and temporal variations in the effective viscous stresses, and show that such a model results in the formation of a population of cold gas giants. Furthermore, when combined with models for disc photoevaporation and a central magnetospheric cavity, the simulations reproduce the well-known hot-Jupiter/cold-Jupiter dichotomy in the observed period distribution of giant exoplanets, with a period valley between 10 and 100 d.

  14. Streaming instability in the quasi-global protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalik, K.; Hanasz, M.; Wóltański, D.; Gawryszczak, A.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate streaming instability using two-fluid approximation (neutral gas and dust) in a quasi-global, unstratified protoplanetary disc, with the help of PIERNIK code. We compare amplification rate of the eigenmode in numerical simulations, with the corresponding growth resulting from the linear stability analysis of full system of Euler's equation including aerodynamic drag. Following Youdin & Goodman (2005), we show that (1) rapid dust clumping occurs due to the difference in azimuthal velocities of gas and dust, coupled by the drag force, (2) initial density perturbations are amplified by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate that the multifluid extension of the simple and efficient Relaxing TVD scheme, implemented in PIERNIK, leads to results, which are compatible with those obtained with other methods.

  15. Magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary discs: the effect of dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmeron, Raquel; Wardle, Mark

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the linear growth and vertical structure of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in weakly ionized, stratified protoplanetary discs. The magnetic field is initially vertical and dust grains are assumed to be well mixed with the gas over the entire vertical dimension of the disc. For simplicity, all the grains are assumed to have the same radius (a = 0.1,1 or 3μm) and constitute a constant fraction (1 per cent) of the total mass of the gas. Solutions are obtained at representative radial locations (R = 5 and 10 au) from the central protostar for a minimum-mass solar nebula model and different choices of the initial magnetic field strength, configuration of the diffusivity tensor and grain sizes. We find that when no grain are present, or they are >~1μm in radius, the mid-plane of the disc remains magnetically coupled for field strengths up to a few gauss at both radii. In contrast, when a population of small grains (a = 0.1μm) is mixed with the gas, the section of the disc within two tidal scaleheights from the mid-plane is magnetically inactive and only magnetic fields weaker than ~50 mG can effectively couple to the fluid. At 5 au, Ohmic diffusion dominates for z/H <~ 1 when the field is relatively weak (B <~ a few milligauss), irrespective of the properties of the grain population. Conversely, at 10 au this diffusion term is unimportant in all the scenarios studied here. High above the mid-plane (z/H >~ 5), ambipolar diffusion is severe and prevents the field from coupling to the gas for all B. Hall diffusion is dominant for a wide range of field strengths at both radii when dust grains are present. The growth rate, wavenumber and range of magnetic field strengths for which MRI-unstable modes exist are all drastically diminished when dust grains are present, particularly when they are small (a ~ 0.1μm). In fact, MRI perturbations grow at 5 au (10 au) for B <~ 160 mG (130 mG) when 3μm grains are mixed with the gas. This upper limit on the

  16. A revised condition for self-gravitational fragmentation of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S. Z.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Inutsuka, S.

    2016-06-01

    Fragmentation of protoplanetary discs due to gravitational instabilities is a candidate of a formation mechanism of binary stars, brown dwarfs, and gaseous giant planets. The condition for the fragmentation has been thought that the disc cooling time-scale is comparable to its dynamical time-scale. However, some numerical simulations suggest that the fragmentation does not occur even if the cooling time is small enough, or the fragmentation can occur even when the cooling is inefficient. To reveal a realistic condition for fragmentation of self-gravitating discs, we perform two-dimensional numerical simulations that take into account the effect of the irradiation of the central star and radiation cooling of the disc, and precisely investigate the structure of the spiral arms formed in the protoplanetary discs. We show that the Toomre Q parameter in the spiral arms is an essential parameter for fragmentation. The spiral arms fragment only when Q < 0.6 in the spiral arms. We have further confirmed that this fragmentation condition observed in the numerical simulations can be obtained from the linear stability analysis for the self-gravitating spiral arms. These results indicate that the process of fragmentation of protoplanetary discs is divided into two stages: formation of the spiral arms in the discs; and fragmentation of the spiral arm. Our work reduces the condition for the fragmentation of the protoplanetary discs to the condition of the formation of the spiral arm that satisfies Q < 0.6.

  17. Turbulent diffusion of large solids in a protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballido, Augusto; Bai, Xue-Ning; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2011-07-01

    We study the turbulent diffusion of solids in a protoplanetary disc, in order to discriminate between two existing analytical models of the turbulent diffusion process. These two models predict the same radial turbulent diffusion coefficient Dp, x for small particles (τs≪ 1), but differ in the value of Dp, x for large particles (τs≫ 1, where τs is the dimensionless particle stopping time, closely related to particle radius). The model given by Youdin & Lithwick (YL) takes into account orbital oscillations of the solids, while the other model given by Cuzzi, Dobrovolskis & Champney (CDC) does not. The CDC model predicts ? for τs≫ 1, but the YL model gives ?. To investigate, we perform 3D, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations. Turbulence in the disc is generated by the magnetorotational instability. The ATHENA code is used to solve the equations of ideal MHD in the shearing-box approximation, which allows us to model a local region of the disc with the relevant orbital dynamics. Solids are represented by Lagrangian particles that interact with the gas through drag, and are also subject to orbital forces. The aerodynamic coupling of particles to the gas is parametrized by τs. In one set of simulations, particle displacements along the radial direction are measured in a shearing box without vertical stratification of the gas density. In another simulation, the vertical component of stellar gravity is included, with a Gaussian gas density vertical profile, but the particle motion is restricted to fixed planes of constant height z. In both cases, the radial diffusion coefficient as a function of stopping time τs is in very good agreement with the YL model. To study particle vertical diffusion, we use the unstratified shearing box, in which we allow the effects of vertical gravity and turbulence on the particles to balance out, resulting in particle layers whose scaleheight varies approximately as ?. Based on this result and YL, we calculate a

  18. Blueshifted [O I] lines from protoplanetary discs: the smoking gun of X-ray photoevaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolano, Barbara; Owen, James E.

    2016-08-01

    Photoevaporation of protoplanetary discs by high-energy radiation from the central young stellar object is currently the favourite model to explain the sudden dispersal of discs from the inside out. While several theoretical works have provided a detailed pictured of this process, the direct observational validation is still lacking. Emission lines produced in these slow-moving protoplanetary disc winds may bear the imprint of the wind structure and thus provide a potential diagnostic of the underlying dispersal process. In this paper, we primarily focus on the collisionally excited neutral oxygen line at 6300 Å. We compare our models predictions to observational data and demonstrate a thermal origin for the observed blueshifted low-velocity component of this line from protoplanetary discs. Furthermore, our models show that while this line is a clear tell-tale sign of a warm, quasi-neutral disc wind, typical of X-ray photoevaporation, its strong temperature dependence makes it unsuitable to measure detailed wind quantities like mass-loss rate.

  19. Disruption of a proto-planetary disc by the black hole at the milky way centre.

    PubMed

    Murray-Clay, Ruth A; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Recently, an ionized cloud of gas was discovered plunging towards the supermassive black hole, SgrA*, at the centre of the Milky Way. The cloud is being tidally disrupted along its path to closest approach at ∼3,100 Schwarzschild radii from the black hole. Here we show that the observed properties of this cloud of gas can naturally be produced by a proto-planetary disc surrounding a low-mass star, which was scattered from the observed ring of young stars orbiting SgrA*. As the young star approaches the black hole, its disc experiences both photoevaporation and tidal disruption, producing a cloud. Our model implies that planets form in the Galactic centre, and that tidal debris from proto-planetary discs can flag low-mass stars, which are otherwise too faint to be detected.

  20. Disruption of a proto-planetary disc by the black hole at the milky way centre.

    PubMed

    Murray-Clay, Ruth A; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Recently, an ionized cloud of gas was discovered plunging towards the supermassive black hole, SgrA*, at the centre of the Milky Way. The cloud is being tidally disrupted along its path to closest approach at ∼3,100 Schwarzschild radii from the black hole. Here we show that the observed properties of this cloud of gas can naturally be produced by a proto-planetary disc surrounding a low-mass star, which was scattered from the observed ring of young stars orbiting SgrA*. As the young star approaches the black hole, its disc experiences both photoevaporation and tidal disruption, producing a cloud. Our model implies that planets form in the Galactic centre, and that tidal debris from proto-planetary discs can flag low-mass stars, which are otherwise too faint to be detected. PMID:22968695

  1. Characterization of global flow and local fluctuations in 3D SPH simulations of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, S. E.; Gonzalez, J.-F.

    2013-07-01

    A complete and detailed knowledge of the structure of the gaseous component in protoplanetary discs is essential to the study of dust evolution during the early phases of pre-planetesimal formation. The aim of this paper is to determine if three-dimensional accretion discs simulated by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method can reproduce the observational data now available and the expected turbulent nature of protoplanetary discs. The investigation is carried out by setting up a suite of diagnostic tools specifically designed to characterize both the global flow and the fluctuations of the gaseous disc. The main result concerns the role of the artificial viscosity implementation in the SPH method: in addition to the already known ability of SPH artificial viscosity to mimic a physical-like viscosity under specific conditions, we show how the same artificial viscosity prescription behaves like an implicit turbulence model. In fact, we identify a threshold for the parameters in the standard artificial viscosity above which SPH disc models present a cascade in the power spectrum of velocity fluctuations, turbulent diffusion and a mass accretion rate of the same order of magnitude as measured in observations. Furthermore, the turbulence properties observed locally in SPH disc models are accompanied by meridional circulation in the global flow of the gas, proving that the two mechanisms can coexist.

  2. The dynamics of inner dead-zone boundaries in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik N.; Balbus, Steven

    2012-08-01

    In protoplanetary discs, the inner radial boundary between the MRI turbulent ('active') and MRI quiescent ('dead') zones plays an important role in models of the disc evolution and in some planet formation scenarios. In reality, this boundary is not well-defined: thermal heating from the star in a passive disc yields a transition radius close to the star (<0.1 au), whereas if the disc is already MRI active, it can self-consistently maintain the requisite temperatures out to a transition radius of roughly 1 au. Moreover, the interface may not be static; it may be highly fluctuating or else unstable. In this paper, we study a reduced model of the dynamics of the active/dead zone interface that mimics several important aspects of a real disc system. We find that MRI-transition fronts propagate inwards (a 'dead front' suppressing the MRI) if they are initially at the larger transition radius, or propagate outwards (an 'active front' igniting the MRI) if starting from the smaller transition radius. In both cases, the front stalls at a well-defined intermediate radius, where it remains in a quasi-static equilibrium. We propose that it is this new, intermediate stalling radius that functions as the true boundary between the active and dead zones in protoplanetary discs. These dynamics are likely implicated in observations of variable accretion, such as FU Ori outbursts, as well as in those planet formation theories that require the accumulation of solid material at the dead/active interface.

  3. On the evolution of the snow line in protoplanetary discs - II. Analytic approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Livio, Mario

    2013-09-01

    We examine the evolution of the snow line in a protoplanetary disc that contains a dead zone (a region of zero or low turbulence). The snow line is within a self-gravitating part of the dead zone, and we obtain a fully analytic solution for its radius. Our formula could prove useful for future observational attempts to characterize the demographics of planets outside the snow line. External sources such as cosmic rays or X-rays from the central star can ionize the disc surface layers and allow the magnetorotational instability to drive turbulence there. We show that provided that the surface density in this layer is less than about 50 g cm-2, the dead zone solution exists, after an initial outbursting phase, until the disc is dispersed by photoevaporation. We demonstrate that the snow line radius is significantly larger than that predicted by a fully turbulent disc model, and that in our own Solar system it remains outside of the orbital radius of the Earth. Thus, the inclusion of a dead zone into a protoplanetary disc model explains how our Earth formed with very little water.

  4. Vortex formation in protoplanetary discs induced by the vertical shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Nelson, Richard P.; Umurhan, Orkan M.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of 2D and 3D hydrodynamic simulations of idealized protoplanetary discs that examine the formation and evolution of vortices by the vertical shear instability (VSI). In agreement with recent work, we find that discs with radially decreasing temperature profiles and short thermal relaxation time-scales, are subject to the axisymmetric VSI. In three dimensions, the resulting velocity perturbations give rise to quasi-axisymmetric potential vorticity perturbations that break up into discrete vortices, in a manner that is reminiscent of the Rossby wave instability. Discs with very short thermal evolution time-scales (i.e. τ ≤ 0.1 local orbit periods) develop strong vorticity perturbations that roll up into vortices that have small aspect ratios (χ ≤ 2) and short lifetimes (˜ a few orbits). Longer thermal time-scales give rise to vortices with larger aspect ratios (6 ≤ χ ≤ 10), and lifetimes that depend on the entropy gradient. A steeply decreasing entropy profile leads to vortex lifetimes that exceed the simulation run times of hundreds of orbital periods. Vortex lifetimes in discs with positive or weakly decreasing entropy profiles are much shorter, being 10s of orbits at most, suggesting that the subcritical baroclinic instability plays an important role in sustaining vortices against destruction through the elliptical instability. Applied to the outer regions of protoplanetary discs, where the VSI is most likely to occur, our results suggest that vortices formed by the VSI are likely to be short-lived structures.

  5. Influence of the water content in protoplanetary discs on planet migration and formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders

    2016-05-01

    The temperature and density profiles of protoplanetary discs depend crucially on the mass fraction of micrometre-sized dust grains and on their chemical composition. A larger abundance of micrometre-sized grains leads to an overall heating of the disc, so that the water ice line moves further away from the star. An increase in the water fraction inside the disc, maintaining a fixed dust abundance, increases the temperature in the icy regions of the disc and lowers the temperature in the inner regions. Discs with a larger silicate fraction have the opposite effect. Here we explore the consequence of the dust composition and abundance for the formation and migration of planets. We find that discs with low water content can only sustain outwards migration for planets up to 4 Earth masses, while outwards migration in discs with a larger water content persists up to 8 Earth masses in the late stages of the disc evolution. Icy planetary cores that do not reach run-away gas accretion can thus migrate to orbits close to the host star if the water abundance is low. Our results imply that hot and warm super-Earths found in exoplanet surveys could have formed beyond the ice line and thus contain a significant fraction in water. These water-rich super-Earths should orbit primarily around stars with a low oxygen abundance, where a low oxygen abundance is caused by either a low water-to-silicate ratio or by overall low metallicity.

  6. Strong effect of the cluster environment on the size of protoplanetary discs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincke, Kirsten; Breslau, Andreas; Pfalzner, Susanne

    2015-05-01

    Context. Most stars are born in clusters, thus the protoplanetary discs surrounding the newly formed stars might be influenced by this environment. Isolated star-disc encounters have previously been studied, and it was shown that very close encounters are necessary to completely destroy discs. However, relatively distant encounters are still able to change the disc size considerably. Aims: We quantify the importance of disc-size reduction that is due to stellar encounters in an entire stellar population. Methods: We modelled young, massive clusters of different densities using the code Nbody6 to determine the statistics of stellar encounter parameters. In a second step, we used these parameters to investigate the effect of the environments on the disc size. For this purpose, we performed a numerical experiment with an artificial initial disc size of 105 AU. Results: We quantify to which degree the disc size is more sensitive to the cluster environment than to the disc mass or frequency. We show that in all investigated clusters a large portion of discs is significantly reduced in size. After 5 Myr, the fraction of discs smaller than 1000 AU in ONC-like clusters with an average number density of ̅ρcluster ~ 60pc-3, the fraction of discs smaller than 1000 AU is 65%, while discs smaller than 100 AU make up 15%. These fractions increase to 84% and 39% for discs in denser clusters like IC 348 (̅ρcluster ~ 500pc-3). Even in clusters with a density four times lower than in the ONC (̅ρcluster ~ 15pc-3), about 43% of all discs are reduced to sizes below 1000 AU and roughly 9% to sizes below 100 AU. Conclusions: For any disc in the ONC that initially was larger than 1000 AU, the probability to be truncated to smaller disc sizes as a result of stellar encounters is quite high. Thus, among other effects, encounters are important in shaping discs and potentially forming planetary systems in stellar clusters.

  7. Thanatology in protoplanetary discs. The combined influence of Ohmic, Hall, and ambipolar diffusion on dead zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, Geoffroy; Kunz, Matthew W.; Fromang, Sébastien

    2014-06-01

    Protoplanetary discs are poorly ionised due to their low temperatures and high column densities and are therefore subject to three "non-ideal" magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects: Ohmic dissipation, ambipolar diffusion, and the Hall effect. The existence of magnetically driven turbulence in these discs has been a central question since the discovery of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Early models considered Ohmic diffusion only and led to a scenario of layered accretion, in which a magnetically "dead" zone in the disc midplane is embedded within magnetically "active" surface layers at distances of about 1-10 au from the central protostellar object. Recent work has suggested that a combination of Ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion can render both the midplane and surface layers of the disc inactive and that torques due to magnetically driven outflows are required to explain the observed accretion rates. We reassess this picture by performing three-dimensional numerical simulations that include all three non-ideal MHD effects for the first time. We find that the Hall effect can generically "revive" dead zones by producing a dominant azimuthal magnetic field and a large-scale Maxwell stress throughout the midplane, provided that the angular velocity and magnetic field satisfy Ω·B > 0. The attendant large magnetic pressure modifies the vertical density profile and substantially increases the disc scale height beyond its hydrostatic value. Outflows are produced but are not necessary to explain accretion rates ≲ 10-7 M⊙ yr-1. The flow in the disc midplane is essentially laminar, suggesting that dust sedimentation may be efficient. These results demonstrate that if the MRI is relevant for driving mass accretion in protoplanetary discs, one must include the Hall effect to obtain even qualitatively correct results. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Planetary system formation in thermally evolving viscous protoplanetary discs.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Richard P; Hellary, Phil; Fendyke, Stephen M; Coleman, Gavin

    2014-04-28

    Observations of extrasolar planets are providing new opportunities for furthering our understanding of planetary formation processes. In this paper, we review planet formation and migration scenarios and describe some recent simulations that combine planetary accretion and gas-disc-driven migration. While the simulations are successful at forming populations of low- and intermediate-mass planets with short orbital periods, similar to those that are being observed by ground- and space-based surveys, our models fail to form any gas giant planets that survive migration into the central star. The simulation results are contrasted with observations, and areas of future model development are discussed.

  9. Planetary system formation in thermally evolving viscous protoplanetary discs.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Richard P; Hellary, Phil; Fendyke, Stephen M; Coleman, Gavin

    2014-04-28

    Observations of extrasolar planets are providing new opportunities for furthering our understanding of planetary formation processes. In this paper, we review planet formation and migration scenarios and describe some recent simulations that combine planetary accretion and gas-disc-driven migration. While the simulations are successful at forming populations of low- and intermediate-mass planets with short orbital periods, similar to those that are being observed by ground- and space-based surveys, our models fail to form any gas giant planets that survive migration into the central star. The simulation results are contrasted with observations, and areas of future model development are discussed. PMID:24664913

  10. Synthesis of Organic Matter of Prebiotic Chemistry at the Protoplanetary Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snytnikov, Valeriy; Stoynovskaya, Olga; Rudina, Nina

    We have carried out scanning electron microscopic examination of CM carbonaceous chondrites meteorites Migey, Murchison, Staroe Boriskino aged more than 4.56 billion years (about 50 million years from the beginning of the formation of the Solar system). Our study confirmed the conclusion of Rozanov, Hoover and other researchers about the presence of microfossils of bacterial origin in the matrix of all these meteorites. Since the time of the Solar system formation is 60 - 100 million years, the primary biocenosis emerged in the protoplanetary disc of the Solar system before meteorites or simultaneously with them. It means that prebiological processes and RNA world appeared even earlier in the circumsolar protoplanetary disc. Most likely, this appearance of prebiotic chemistry takes place nowday in massive and medium-massive discs of the observed young stellar objects (YSO) class 0 and I. The timescale of the transition from chemical to biological evolution took less than 50 million years for the Solar system. Further evolution of individual biocenosis in a protoplanetary disc associated with varying physico-chemical conditions during the formation of the Solar system bodies. Biocenosis on these bodies could remove or develop under the influence of many cosmic factors and geological processes in the case of Earth. To complete the primary biosphere formation in short evolution time - millions of years - requires highly efficient chemical syntheses. In industrial chemistry for the efficient synthesis of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, methanol and other organic species, that are the precursors to obtain prebiotic compounds, catalytic reactors of high pressure are used. Thus (1) necessary amount of the proper catalyst in (2) high pressure areas of the disc can trigger these intense syntheses. The disc contains the solids with the size from nanoparticle to pebble. Iron and magnesium is catalytically active ingredient for such solids. The puzzle is a way to provide hydrogen

  11. On the dynamics of planetesimals embedded in turbulent protoplanetary discs with dead zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressel, Oliver; Nelson, Richard P.; Turner, Neal J.

    2011-08-01

    Accretion in protoplanetary discs is thought to be driven by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence via the magnetorotational instability. Recent work has shown that a planetesimal swarm embedded in a fully turbulent disc is subject to strong excitation of the velocity dispersion, leading to collisional destruction of bodies with radii Rp < 100 km. Significant diffusion of planetesimal semimajor axes also arises, leading to large-scale spreading of the planetesimal population throughout the inner regions of the protoplanetary disc, in apparent contradiction of constraints provided by the distribution of asteroids within the asteroid belt. In this paper, we examine the dynamics of planetesimals embedded in vertically stratified turbulent discs, with and without dead zones. Our main aims are to examine the turbulent excitation of the velocity dispersion, and the radial diffusion, of planetesimals in these discs. We employ 3D MHD simulations using the shearing box approximation, along with an equilibrium chemistry model that is used to calculate the ionization fraction of the disc gas as a function of time and position. Ionization is assumed to arise because of stellar X-rays, galactic cosmic rays and radioactive nuclei. In agreement with our previous study, we find that planetesimals in fully turbulent discs develop large random velocities that will lead to collisional destruction/erosion for bodies with sizes below 100 km, and undergo radial diffusion on a scale ˜2.5 au over a 5 Myr disc lifetime. But planetesimals in a dead zone experience a much reduced excitation of their random velocities, and equilibrium velocity dispersions lie between the disruption thresholds for weak and strong aggregates for sizes Rp≤ 100 km. We also find that radial diffusion occurs over a much reduced length-scale ˜0.25 au over the disc lifetime, this being consistent with Solar system constraints. We conclude that planetesimal growth via mutual collisions between smaller bodies cannot

  12. A SCUBA-2 850-μm survey of protoplanetary discs in the σ Orionis cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Cieza, Lucas A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Coulson, Iain M.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Koss, Michael; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results from a large 850-μm survey of the σ Orionis cluster using the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The 0.5° diameter circular region we surveyed contains 297 young stellar objects with an age estimated at about 3 Myr. We detect nine of these objects, eight of which have infrared excesses from an inner disc. We also serendipitously detect three non-stellar sources at >5σ that are likely background submillimetre galaxies. The nine detected stars have inferred disc masses ranging from 5 to about 17 MJup, assuming similar dust properties as Taurus discs and an interstellar medium gas-to-dust ratio of 100. There is a net positive signal towards the positions of the individually undetected infrared excess sources indicating a mean disc mass of 0.5 MJup. Stacking the emission towards those stars without infrared excesses constrains their mean disc mass to less than 0.3 MJup, or an equivalent Earth mass in dust. The submillimetre luminosity distribution is significantly different from that in the younger Taurus region, indicating disc mass evolution as star-forming regions age and the infrared excess fraction decreases. Submillimetre Array observations reveal CO emission towards four sources demonstrating that some, but probably not much, molecular gas remains in these relatively evolved discs. These observations provide new constraints on the dust and gas mass of protoplanetary discs during the giant planet building phase and provide a reference level for future studies of disc evolution.

  13. Did Jupiter's core form in the innermost parts of the Sun's protoplanetary disc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Sean N.; Izidoro, Andre; Bitsch, Bertram; Jacobson, Seth A.

    2016-05-01

    Jupiter's core is generally assumed to have formed beyond the snow line. Here we consider an alternative scenario that Jupiter's core may have accumulated in the innermost part of the protoplanetary disc. A growing body of research suggests that small particles (`pebbles') continually drift inward through the disc. If a fraction of drifting pebbles is trapped at the inner edge of the disc, several Earth-mass cores can quickly grow. Subsequently, the core may migrate outward beyond the snow line via planet-disc interactions. Of course, to reach the outer Solar system Jupiter's core must traverse the terrestrial planet-forming region. We use N-body simulations including synthetic forces from an underlying gaseous disc to study how the outward migration of Jupiter's core sculpts the terrestrial zone. If the outward migration is fast (τmig ˜ 104 yr), the core simply migrates past resident planetesimals and planetary embryos. However, if its migration is slower (τmig ˜ 105 yr) the core clears out solids in the inner disc by shepherding objects in mean motion resonances. In many cases, the disc interior to 0.5-1 AU is cleared of embryos and most planetesimals. By generating a mass deficit close to the Sun, the outward migration of Jupiter's core may thus explain the absence of terrestrial planets closer than Mercury. Jupiter's migrating core often stimulates the growth of another large (˜Earth-mass) core - that may provide a seed for Saturn's core - trapped in an exterior resonance. The migrating core also may transport a fraction of terrestrial planetesimals, such as the putative parent bodies of iron meteorites, to the asteroid belt.

  14. Curveballs in protoplanetary discs - the effect of the Magnus force on planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, John C.

    2015-10-01

    Spinning planetesimals in a gaseous protoplanetary disc may experience a hydrodynamical force perpendicular to their relative velocities. We examine the effect this force has on the dynamics of these objects using analytical arguments based on a simple laminar disc model and numerical integrations of the equations of motion for individual grains. We focus in particular on metre-sized boulders traditionally expected to spiral in to the central star in as little as 100 years from 1 au We find that there are plausible scenarios in which this force extends the lifetime of these solids in the disc by a factor of several. More importantly the velocities induced by the Magnus force can prevent the formation of planetesimals via gravitational instability in the inner disc if the size of the dust particles is larger than of the order of 10 cm. We find that the fastest growing linear modes of the streaming instability may still grow despite the diffusive effect of the Magnus force, but it remains to be seen how the Magnus force will alter the non-linear evolution of these instabilities.

  15. External photoevaporation of protoplanetary discs in sparse stellar groups: the impact of dust growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, Stefano; Clarke, Cathie J.; Bisbas, Thomas G.

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the mass-loss rates of photoevaporative winds launched from the outer edge of protoplanetary discs impinged by an ambient radiation field. We focus on mild/moderate environments (the number of stars in the group/cluster is N ≳ 50), and explore disc sizes ranging between 20 and 250 au. We evaluate the steady-state structures of the photoevaporative winds by coupling temperature estimates obtained with a photodissociation region code with 1D radial hydrodynamical equations. We also consider the impact of dust dragging and grain growth on the final mass-loss rates. We find that these winds are much more significant than have been appreciated hitherto when grain growth is included in the modelling: in particular, mass-loss rates ≳10-8 M⊙ yr-1 are predicted even for modest background field strengths (≳30 G0) in the case of discs that extend to R > 150 au. Grain growth significantly affects the final mass-loss rates by reducing the average cross-section at far-ultraviolet wavelengths, and thus allowing a much more vigorous flow. The radial profiles of observable quantities (in particular surface density, temperature and velocity patterns) indicate that these winds have characteristic features that are now potentially observable with ALMA. In particular, such discs should have extended gaseous emission that is dust depleted in the outer regions, characterized by a non-Keplerian rotation curve, and with a radially increasing temperature gradient.

  16. Self-organisation in protoplanetary discs. Global, non-stratified Hall-MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, William; Lesur, Geoffroy; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Context. Recent observations have revealed organised structures in protoplanetary discs, such as axisymmetric rings or horseshoe concentrations, evocative of large-scale vortices. These structures are often interpreted as the result of planet-disc interactions. However, these discs are also known to be unstable to the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) which is believed to be one of the dominant angular momentum transport mechanism in these objects. It is therefore natural to ask whether the MRI itself could produce these structures without invoking planets. Aims: The nonlinear evolution of the MRI is strongly affected by the low ionisation fraction in protoplanetary discs. The Hall effect in particular, which is dominant in dense and weakly ionised parts of these objects, has been shown to spontaneously drive self-organising flows in local, shearing box simulations. Here, we investigate the behaviour of global MRI-unstable disc models dominated by the Hall effect and characterise their dynamics. Methods: We validated our implementation of the Hall effect into the PLUTO code with predictions from a spectral method in cylindrical geometry. We then performed 3D unstratified Hall-MHD simulations of Keplerian discs for a broad range of Hall, Ohmic, and ambipolar Elsasser numbers. Results: We confirm the transition from a turbulent to an organised state as the intensity of the Hall effect is increased. We observe the formation of zonal flows, their number depending on the available magnetic flux and on the intensity of the Hall effect. For intermediate Hall intensity, the flow self-organises into long-lived magnetised vortices. Neither the addition of a toroidal field nor Ohmic or ambipolar diffusion change this picture drastically in the range of parameters we have explored. Conclusions: Self-organisation by the Hall effect is a robust phenomenon in global non-stratified simulations. It is able to quench turbulent transport and spontaneously produce axisymmetric

  17. Rossby wave instability and long-term evolution of dead zones in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Ryan; Lai, Dong; Méheut, Héloïse

    2016-04-01

    The physical mechanism of angular momentum transport in poorly ionized regions of protoplanetary discs, the dead zones (DZs), is not understood. The presence of a DZ naturally leads to conditions susceptible to the Rossby wave instability (RWI), which produces vortices and spiral density waves that may revive the DZ and be responsible for observed large-scale disc structures. We present a series of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the role of the RWI in DZs, including its impact on the long-term evolution of the disc and its morphology. The non-linear RWI can generate Reynolds stresses (effective α parameter) as large as 0.01-0.05 in the DZ, helping to sustain quasi-steady accretion throughout the disc. It also produces novel disc morphologies, including azimuthal asymmetries with m = 1, 2, and atypical vortex shapes. The angular momentum transport strength and morphology are most sensitive to two parameters: the radial extent of the DZ and the disc viscosity. The largest Reynolds stresses are produced when the radial extent of the DZ is less than its distance to the central star. Such narrow DZs lead to a single vortex or two coherent antipodal vortices in the quasi-steady state. The edges of wider DZs evolve separately, resulting in two independent vortices and reduced angular momentum transport efficiency. In either case, we find that, because of the Reynolds stresses generated by the non-linear RWI, gravitational instability is unlikely to play a role in angular momentum transport across the DZ, unless the accretion rate is sufficiently high.

  18. Global multifluid simulations of the magnetorotational instability in radially stratified protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers-Lee, D.; Ray, T. P.; Downes, T. P.

    2016-11-01

    The redistribution of angular momentum is a long standing problem in our understanding of protoplanetary disc (PPD) evolution. The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered a likely mechanism. We present the results of a study involving multifluid global simulations including Ohmic dissipation, ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect in a dynamic, self-consistent way. We focus on the turbulence resulting from the non-linear development of the MRI in radially stratified PPDs and compare with ideal magnetohydrodynamics simulations. In the multifluid simulations, the disc is initially set up to transition from a weak Hall-dominated regime, where the Hall effect is the dominant non-ideal effect but approximately the same as or weaker than the inductive term, to a strong Hall-dominated regime, where the Hall effect dominates the inductive term. As the simulations progress, a substantial portion of the disc develops into a weak Hall-dominated disc. We find a transition from turbulent to laminar flow in the inner regions of the disc, but without any corresponding overall density feature. We introduce a dimensionless parameter, αRM, to characterize accretion with αRM ≳ 0.1 corresponding to turbulent transport. We calculate the eddy turnover time, teddy, and compared this with an effective recombination time-scale, trcb, to determine whether the presence of turbulence necessitates non-equilibrium ionization calculations. We find that trcb is typically around three orders of magnitude smaller than teddy. Also, the ionization fraction does not vary appreciably. These two results suggest that these multifluid simulations should be comparable to single-fluid non-ideal simulations.

  19. Effects of photophoresis on the dust distribution in a 3D protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuello, N.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Pignatale, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    Photophoresis is a physical process based on momentum exchange between an illuminated dust particle and its gaseous environment. Its net effect in protoplanetary discs (PPD) is the outward transport of solid bodies from hot to cold regions. This process naturally leads to the formation of ring-shaped features where dust piles up. In this work, we study the dynamical effects of photophoresis in PPD by including the photophoretic force in the two-fluid (gas+dust) smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code developed by Barrière-Fouchet et al. (2005). We find that the conditions of pressure and temperature encountered in the inner regions of PPD result in important photophoretic forces, which dramatically affect the radial motion of solid bodies. Moreover, dust particles have different equilibrium locations in the disc depending on their size and their intrinsic density. The radial transport towards the outer parts of the disc is more efficient for silicates than for iron particles, which has important implications for meteoritic composition. Our results indicate that photophoresis must be taken into account in the inner regions of PPD to fully understand the dynamics and the evolution of the dust composition.

  20. The VAMPIRES instrument: imaging the innermost regions of protoplanetary discs with polarimetric interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Barnaby; Schworer, Guillaume; Tuthill, Peter; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier; Stewart, Paul; Martinache, Frantz

    2015-03-01

    Direct imaging of protoplanetary discs promises to provide key insight into the complex sequence of processes by which planets are formed. However, imaging the innermost region of such discs (a zone critical to planet formation) is challenging for traditional observational techniques (such as near-IR imaging and coronagraphy) due to the relatively long wavelengths involved and the area occulted by the coronagraphic mask. Here, we introduce a new instrument - Visible Aperture-Masking Polarimetric Interferometer for Resolving Exoplanetary Signatures (VAMPIRES) - which combines non-redundant aperture-masking interferometry with differential polarimetry to directly image this previously inaccessible innermost region. By using the polarization of light scattered by dust in the disc to provide precise differential calibration of interferometric visibilities and closure phases, VAMPIRES allows direct imaging at and beyond the telescope diffraction limit. Integrated into the SCExAO (Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics) system at the Subaru telescope, VAMPIRES operates at visible wavelengths (where polarization is high) while allowing simultaneous infrared observations conducted by HICIAO. Here, we describe the instrumental design and unique observing technique and present the results of the first on-sky commissioning observations, validating the excellent visibility and closure-phase precision which are then used to project expected science performance metrics.

  1. DIGIT survey of far-infrared lines from protoplanetary discs. II. CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeus, Gwendolyn; Salyk, Colette; Bruderer, Simon; Fedele, Davide; Maaskant, Koen; Evans, Neal J.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Montesinos, Benjamin; Herczeg, Greg; Bouwman, Jeroen; Green, Joel D.; Dominik, Carsten; Henning, Thomas; Vicente, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    CO is an important component of a protoplanetary disc as it is one of the most abundant gas phase species. Furthermore, observations of CO transitions can be used as a diagnostic of the gas, tracing conditions in both the inner and outer disc. We present Herschel/PACS spectroscopy of a sample of 22 Herbig Ae/Be (HAEBEs) and eight T Tauri stars (TTS), covering the pure rotational CO transitions from J = 14 → 13 up to J = 49 → 48. CO is detected in only five HAEBEs, namely AB Aur, HD 36112, HD 97048, HD 100546, and IRS 48, and in four TTS, namely AS 205, S CrA, RU Lup, and DG Tau. The highest transition detected is J = 36 → 35 with Eup of 3669 K, seen in HD 100546 and DG Tau. We construct rotational diagrams for the discs with at least three CO detections to derive Trot and find average temperatures of 270 K for the HAEBEs and 485 K for the TTS. The HD 100546 star requires an extra temperature component at Trot ~ 900-1000 K, suggesting a range of temperatures in its disc atmosphere, which is consistent with thermo-chemical disc models. In HAEBEs, the objects with CO detections all have flared discs in which the gas and dust are thermally decoupled. We use a small model grid to analyse our observations and find that an increased amount of flaring means higher line flux, as it increases the mass in warm gas. CO is not detected in our flat discs as the emission is below the detection limit. We find that HAEBE sources with CO detections have high LUV and strong PAH emission, which is again connected to the heating of the gas. In TTS, the objects with CO detections are all sources with evidence of a disc wind or outflow. For both groups of objects, sources with CO detections generally have high UV luminosity (either stellar in HAEBEs or due to accretion in TTS), but this is not a sufficient condition for the detection of the far-IR CO lines. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and

  2. Drag-driven instability of a dust layer in a magnetized protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadmehri, Mohsen; Oudi, Razieh; Rastegarzade, Gohar

    2016-09-01

    We study drag-driven instability in a protoplanetary disc consisting of a layer of single-sized dust particles which are coupled to the magnetized gas aerodynamically and the particle-to-gas feedback is included. We find a dispersion relation for axisymmetric linear disturbances and growth rate of the unstable modes are calculated numerically. While the secular gravitational instability in the absence of particle-togas feedback predicts the dust layer is unstable, magnetic fields significantly amplify the instability if the Toomre parameter for the gas component is fixed. We also show that even a weak magnetic field is able to amplify the instability more or less irrespective of the dust-gas coupling.

  3. Collision velocity of dust grains in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted the first comprehensive numerical investigation of the relative velocity distribution of dust particles in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs with a view to assessing the viability of planetesimal formation via direct collapse in such environments. The viability depends crucially on the large sizes that are preferentially collected in pressure maxima produced by transient spiral features (Stokes numbers, St ∼ 1); growth to these size scales requires that collision velocities remain low enough that grain growth is not reversed by fragmentation. We show that, for a single-sized dust population, velocity driving by the disc's gravitational perturbations is only effective for St > 3, while coupling to the gas velocity dominates otherwise. We develop a criterion for understanding this result in terms of the stopping distance being of the order of the disc scaleheight. Nevertheless, the relative velocities induced by differential radial drift in multi-sized dust populations are too high to allow the growth of silicate dust particles beyond St ∼ 10− 2 or 10−1 (10 cm to m sizes at 30 au), such Stokes numbers being insufficient to allow concentration of solids in spiral features. However, for icy solids (which may survive collisions up to several 10 m s−1), growth to St ∼ 1 (10 m size) may be possible beyond 30 au from the star. Such objects would be concentrated in spiral features and could potentially produce larger icy planetesimals/comets by gravitational collapse. These planetesimals would acquire moderate eccentricities and remain unmodified over the remaining lifetime of the disc. PMID:27346980

  4. Application of coherent 10 micron imaging lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    With the continuing progress in mid-IR array detector technology and high bandwidth fan-outs, i.f. electronics, high speed digitizers, and processing capability, true coherent imaging lidar is becoming a reality. In this paper experimental results are described using a 10 micron coherent imaging lidar.

  5. Far-infrared signatures and inner hole sizes of protoplanetary discs undergoing inside-out dust dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolano, Barbara; Koepferl, Christine; Owen, James; Robitaille, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    By means of radiative transfer simulation, we study the evolution of the far-infrared colours of protoplanetary discs undergoing inside-out dispersal, often referred to as transition discs. We show that a brightening of the mid- and far-infrared emission from these objects is a natural consequence of the removal of the inner disc. Our results can fully explain recent observations of transition discs in the Chamaleon and Lupus star-forming regions from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey, which shows a higher median for the 70 μm (Herschel PACS 1) band of known transition objects compared with primordial discs. Our theoretical results hence support the suggestion that the 70 μm band may be a powerful diagnostic for the identification of transition discs from photometry data, provided that the inner hole is larger than tens of au, depending on spectral type. Furthermore, we show that a comparison of photometry in the K, 12 μm and 70 μm bands to model tracks can provide a rough, but quick estimate of the inner hole size of these objects, provided their inclination is below ˜85° and the inner hole size is again larger than tens of au.

  6. The 10 micron spectral structure in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Campins, Humberto

    1989-01-01

    The 10 micron spectra of comets Halley (1982i), Wilson (1986l), Kohoutek (1973f) and Bradfield (1987s) are presented and compared. The silicate emission profiles of Halley and Bradfield are seen to be remarkably similar in that both contain a sharp break in the spectrum at 11.3 microns. Comet Bradfield does not show the same double peak structure seen in olivine and reported in Comet Halley be Campins and Ryan (1988) and Bregman, et al. (1987). The authors interpret the 11.3 micron signature as being due to olivine-type dust grains with at least some degree of crystallinity. Olivine alone is not enough to reproduce the shape of the 10 micron structure. However, in view of the authors' past success in fitting interstellar dust features with the emissivity profile obtained from amorphous grains produced by laser-vaporizing olivine, this is a very appealing identification. They note that there are significant variations in olivine spectra due to compositional differences, grain size distribution and related grain temperature variations to make the olivine identification tentative. They further tentatively identify the 9.8 micron feature in Halley as being due to either amorphorous olivine or a phyllosilicate (layer lattice). Neither the spectra of Halley, Kohoutek, nor Bradfield exhibited the 12.2 micron feature seen in Comet Wilson, which may prove diagnostic of the composition or thermal history differences between these comets. IR spectra of various mineral samples are discussed in terms of their match to cometary spectra.

  7. Building Chondrites: SPH Simulations of a Jet Flow in a 3D Protoplanetary Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatale, F. C.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Cuello, N.; Bourdon, B.; Fitoussi, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present SPH simulations of jet flows in 3D discs to investigate the transport of refractory material toward the outer cold disc regions. Dust grains are captured by the disc at distances up to 40 AU, with dust aggregates mimicking chondrites.

  8. A SCUBA-2 850-μm survey of protoplanetary discs in the IC 348 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieza, L.; Williams, J.; Kourkchi, E.; Andrews, S.; Casassus, S.; Graves, S.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present 850-μm observations of the 2-3 Myr cluster IC 348 in the Perseus molecular cloud using the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Our SCUBA-2 map has a diameter of 30 arcmin and contains ˜370 cluster members, including ˜200 objects with IR excesses. We detect a total of 13 discs. Assuming standard dust properties and a gas-to-dust-mass ratio of 100, we derive disc masses ranging from 1.5 to 16 MJUP. We also detect six Class 0/I protostars. We find that the most massive discs (MD > 3 MJUP; 850-μm flux > 10 mJy) in IC 348 tend to be transition objects according to the characteristic `dip' in their infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs). This trend is also seen in other regions. We speculate that this could be an initial conditions effect (e.g. more massive discs tend to form giant planets that result in transition disc SEDs) and/or a disc evolution effect (the formation of one or more massive planets results in both a transition disc SED and a reduction of the accretion rate, increasing the lifetime of the outer disc). A stacking analysis of the discs that remain undetected in our SCUBA-2 observations suggests that their median 850-μm flux should be ≲1 mJy, corresponding to a disc mass ≲0.3 MJUP (gas plus dust) or ≲1 M⊕ of dust. While the available data are not deep enough to allow a meaningful comparison of the disc luminosity functions between IC 348 and other young stellar clusters, our results imply that disc masses exceeding the minimum-mass solar nebula are very rare (≲1per cent) at the age of IC 348, especially around very low-mass stars.

  9. Observations of Herbig Ae/Be Stars with Herschel/PACS: The Atomic and Molecular Contents of Their Protoplanetary Discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeus, G.; Montesinos, B.; Mendigutia, I.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W. F.; Eiroa, C.; Grady, C. A.; Mathews, G.; Sandell, G.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Brittain, S.; Dent, W. R. F.; Howard, C.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.; Roberge, A.; Vandenbussche, B.; Williams, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    We observed a sample of 20 representative Herbig Ae/Be stars and 5 A-type debris discs with PACS onboard Herschel, as part of the GAS in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) project. The observations were done in spectroscopic mode, and cover the far-infrared lines of [OI], [CII], CO, CH+, H20, and OH. We have a [OI]63 micro/ detection rate of 100% for the Herbig Ae/Be and 0% for the debris discs. The [OI] 145 micron line is only detected in 25% and CO J = 18-17 in 45% (and fewer cases for higher J transitions) of the Herbig Ae/Be stars, while for [CII] 157 micron, we often find spatially variable background contamination. We show the first detection of water in a Herbig Ae disc, HD 163296, which has a settled disc. Hydroxyl is detected as well in this disc. First seen in HD 100546, CH+ emission is now detected for the second time in a Herbig Ae star, HD 97048. We report fluxes for each line and use the observations as line diagnostics of the gas properties. Furthermore, we look for correlations between the strength of the emission lines and either the stellar or disc parameters, such as stellar luminosity, ultraviolet and X-ray flux. accretion rate, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band strength, and flaring. We find that the stellar ultraviolet flux is the dominant excitation mechanism of [OI] 63 micron, with the highest line fluxes being found in objects with a large amount of flaring and among the largest PAH strengths. Neither the amount of accretion nor the X-ray luminosity has an influence on the line strength. We find correlations between the line flux of [OI]63 micron and [OI] 145 micron, CO J = IS-17 and [OI] 6300 A, and between the continuum flux at 63 micron and at 1.3 mm, while we find weak correlations between the line flux. of [OI] 63 micron and the PAH luminosity, the line flux of CO J = 3-2, the continuum flux at 63 pm, the stellar effective temperature, and the Br-gamma luminosity. Finally, we use a combination of the [OI] 63 micron and C(12)O J

  10. Towards detecting methanol emission in low-mass protoplanetary discs with ALMA: the role of non-LTE excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfenov, S. Yu.; Semenov, D. A.; Sobolev, A. M.; Gray, M. D.

    2016-08-01

    The understanding of organic content of protoplanetary discs is one of the main goals of the planet formation studies. As an attempt to guide the observational searches for weak lines of complex species in discs, we modelled the (sub)millimetre spectrum of gaseous methanol (CH3OH), one of the simplest organic molecules, in the representative T Tauri system. We used 1+1D disc physical model coupled to the gas-grain ALCHEMIC chemical model with and without 2D-turbulent mixing. The computed CH3OH abundances along with the CH3OH scheme of energy levels of ground and excited torsional states were used to produce model spectra obtained with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) 3D line radiative transfer code LIME. We found that the modelled non-LTE intensities of the CH3OH lines can be lower by factor of >10-100 than those calculated under assumption of LTE. Though population inversion occurs in the model calculations for many (sub)millimetre transitions, it does not lead to the strong maser amplification and noticeably high line intensities. We identify the strongest CH3OH (sub)millimetre lines that could be searched for with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in nearby discs. The two best candidates are the CH3OH 50 - 40A+ (241.791 GHz) and 5-1 - 4-1E (241.767 GHz) lines, which could possibly be detected with the ˜5σ signal-to-noise ratio after ˜3 h of integration with the full ALMA array.

  11. Spiral-driven accretion in protoplanetary discs. II. Self-similar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Lesur, Geoffroy; Fromang, Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    Context. Accretion discs are ubiquitous in the Universe, and it is crucial to understand how angular momentum and mass are radially transported in these objects. Aims: Here, we study the role played by non-linear spiral patterns within hydrodynamical and non-self-gravitating accretion discs assuming that external disturbances such as infall onto the disc may trigger them. Methods: To do so, we computed self-similar solutions that describe discs in which a spiral wave propagates. These solutions present shocks and critical sonic points that were analyzed. Results: We calculated the wave structure for all allowed temperatures and for several spiral shocks. In particular, we inferred the angle of the spiral pattern, the stress it exerts on the disc, and the associated flux of mass and angular momentum as a function of temperature. We quantified the rate of angular momentum transport by means of the dimensionless α parameter. For the thickest disc we considered (corresponding to h/r values of about one-third), we found values of α as high as 0.1 that scaled with the temperature T such that α ∝ T3 / 2 ∝ (h/r)3. The spiral angle scales with the temperature as arctan(r/h). Conclusions: These solutions suggests that perturbations occurring at disc outer boundaries, such as perturbations due to infall motions, can propagate deep inside the disc and therefore should not be ignored, even when considering small radii.

  12. Laboratory simulations of thermal annealing in proto-planetary discs - II. Crystallization of enstatite from amorphous thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droeger, J.; Burchard, M.; Lattard, D.

    2011-12-01

    Amorphous silicates of olivine and pyroxene composition are thought to be common constituents of circumstellar, interstellar, and interplanetary dust. In proto-planetary discs amorphous dust crystallize essentially as a result of thermal annealing. The present project aims at deciphering the kinetics of crystallization pyroxene in proto-planetary dust on the basis of experiments on amorphous thin films. The thin films are deposited on Si-wafers (111) by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The thin films are completely amorphous, chemically homogeneous (on the MgSiO3 composition) and with a continuous and flat surface. They are subsequently annealed for 1 to 216 h at 1073K and 1098K in a vertical quench furnace and drop-quenched on a copper block. To monitor the progress of crystallization, the samples are characterized by AFM and SEM imaging and IR spectroscopy. After short annealing durations (1 to 12 h) AFM and SE imaging reveal small shallow polygonal features (diameter 0.5-1 μm; height 2-3 nm) evenly distributed at the otherwise flat surface of the thin films. These shallow features are no longer visible after about 3 h at 1098 K, resp. >12 h at 1073 K. Meanwhile, two further types of features appear small protruding pyramids and slightly depressed spherolites. The orders of appearance of these features depend on temperature, but both persist and steadily grow with increasing annealing duration. Their sizes can reach about 12 μm. From TEM investigations on annealed thin films on the Mg2SiO4 composition we know that these features represent crystalline sites, which can be surrounded by a still amorphous matrix (Oehm et al. 2010). A quantitative evaluation of the size of the features will give insights on the progress of crystallization. IR spectra of the unprocessed thin films show only broad bands. In contrast, bands characteristic of crystalline enstatite are clearly recognizable in annealed samples, e.g. after 12 h at 1078 K. Small bands can also be assigned to

  13. The size of NGC 1068 at 10 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becklin, E. E.; Neugebauer, G.; Matthews, K.; Wynn-Williams, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    The data presented show that a majority of the 10-micron emission from NGC 1068 comes from an area with a diameter of about 60 pc. The measurements described were made at 10 microns on two nights at the 200-inch Hale telescope. The data obtained agree with the results obtained by Stein et al. (1973). An approach to reconcile the new data with the variability observed by Rieke and Low (1972) is also discussed.

  14. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: low-mass protoplanetary discs from a SCUBA-2 census of NGC 1333

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, P.; Greaves, J. S.; Scholz, A.; Hatchell, J.; Holland, W. S.; JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2015-02-01

    NGC 1333 is a 1-2 Myr old cluster of stars in the Perseus molecular cloud. We used 850 μm data from the Gould Belt Survey with SCUBA-2 on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to measure or place limits on disc masses for 82 Class II sources in this cluster. Eight disc candidates were detected; one is estimated to have mass of about 9 MJup in dust plus gas, while the others host only 2-4 MJup of circumstellar material. None of these discs exceeds the threshold for the `minimum mass solar nebula' (MMSN). This reinforces previous claims that only a small fraction of Class II sources at an age of 1-2 Myr have discs exceeding the MMSN threshold and thus can form a planetary system like our own. However, other regions with similarly low fractions of MMSN discs (IC 348, UpSco, σ Ori) are thought to be older than NGC 1333. Compared with coeval regions, the exceptionally low fraction of massive discs in NGC 1333 cannot easily be explained by the effects of UV radiation or stellar encounters. Our results indicate that additional environmental factors significantly affect disc evolution and the outcome of planet formation by core accretion.

  15. Structure in the nucleus of NGC 1068 at 10 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tresch-Fienberg, R.; Fazio, G. G.; Gezari, D. Y.; Lamb, G. M.; Shu, P. K.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Mccreight, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    New 8-13 micron array camera images of the central kiloparsec of Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 resolve structure that is similar to that observed at visible and radio wavelengths. The images reveal an infrared source which is extended and asymmetric, with its long axis oriented at P.A. 33 deg. Maps of the spatial distribution of 8-13 micron color temperature and warm dust opacity are derived from the multiwavelength infrared images. The results suggest that there exist two pointlike luminosity sources in the central region of NGC 1068, with the brighter source at the nucleus and the fainter one some 100 pc to the northeast. This geometry strengthens the possibility that the 10 micron emission observed from grains in the nucleus is powered by a nonthermal source. In the context of earlier visible and radio studies, these results considerably strengthen the case for jet-induced star formation in NGC 1068.

  16. Structure in the nucleus of NGC 1068 at 10 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tresch-Fienberg, R.; Fazio, G. G.; Gezari, D. Y.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Lamb, G. M.; Shu, P. K.; Mccreight, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    New 8 to 13 micron array camera images of the central kiloparsec of Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 resolve structure that is similar to that observed at visible and radio wavelengths. The images reveal an infrared source which is extended and asymmetric, with its long axis oriented at P.A. 33 deg. Maps of the spatial distribution of 8 to 13 micron color temperature and warm dust opacity are derived from the multiwavelength infrared images. The results suggest that there exist two pointlike luminosity sources in the central regions of NGC 1068, with the brighter source at the nucleus and the fainter one some 100 pc to the northeast. This geometry strengthens the possibility that the 10 micron emission observed from grains in the nucleus is powered by a nonthermal source. In the context of earlier visible and radio studies, these results considerably strengthen the case for jet induced star formation in NGC 1068.

  17. High spatial resolution 10 micron imaging of IRC + 10216

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Danchi, W. C.; Townes, C. H.; Mclaren, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Precise high-resolution 10-micron images of the carbon star IRC + 10216 have been obtained with a scanned linear array. The low noise and high dynamic range of these images permit deconvolution of the telescope point-spread function, revealing the radial brightness distribution of the circumstellar dust shell: approximate reflection symmetry is found in west-east scans, with a distinct division into two components of diameter about 0.40 and 2.2 arcsec. It is shown that this morphology is consistent with published interferometric data that had cast doubt upon an earlier, idealized two-component model. The observed brightness distribution implies that the circumstellar dust density may deviate substantially from the 1/r squared radial dependence expected for spherically symmetric outflow with constant velocity and constant rate of mass loss.

  18. The Beauty and Limitations of 10 Micron Heterodyne Interferometry (ISI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.

    2003-01-01

    Until recently, heterodyne interferometry at 10 microns has been the only successful technique for stellar interferometry in the very difficult atmospheric window from 9-12 microns. For most of its operational lifetime the U.C. Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer was a single-baseline two telescope (1.65 m aperture) system using CO2 lasers as local oscillators. This instrument was designed and constructed from 1983-1988, and first fringes were obtained at Mt. Wilson in June 1988. During the past few years, a third telescope was constructed and just recently the first closure phases were obtained at 11.15 microns. We discuss the history, physics and technology of heterodyne interferometry in the mid-infrared, and some key astronomical results that have come from this unique instrument.

  19. TIMMI, ESO's new 10 micron Camera/Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeufl, H. U.; Jouan, R.; Lagage, P. O.; Masse, P.; Mestreau, P.; Tarrius, A.

    TIMMI stands for Thermal Infrared Multi Mode Instrument. TIMMI allows for imaging (at present 16 filters available) with variable magnifications as well as limited long-slit spectroscopy in the 10micron atmospheric window. The instrument was built by the Service d'Astrophysique (SAP) according to ESO's specification in a period of two years. At the telescope the instrument is using the f35 chopping configuration in conjunction with the special adaptor unit. TIMMI control and primary data-acquisition is performed by an VME-based computer (under OS9) while final data storage and online data processing with ESO's image processing system MIDAS is done using an UNIX workstation. While TIMMI will provide new observational possibilities for the ESO users community it is also supposed to become a test-bed to gain experience for similar instrumentation at the VLT.

  20. The minimum mass of detectable planets in protoplanetary discs and the derivation of planetary masses from high-resolution observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosotti, Giovanni P.; Juhasz, Attila; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the minimum planet mass that produces observable signatures in infrared scattered light and submillimetre (submm) continuum images and demonstrate how these images can be used to measure planet masses to within a factor of about 2. To this end, we perform multi-fluid gas and dust simulations of discs containing low-mass planets, generating simulated observations at 1.65, 10 and 850 μm. We show that the minimum planet mass that produces a detectable signature is ˜15 M⊕: this value is strongly dependent on disc temperature and changes slightly with wavelength (favouring the submm). We also confirm previous results that there is a minimum planet mass of ˜20 M⊕ that produces a pressure maximum in the disc: only planets above this threshold mass generate a dust trap that can eventually create a hole in the submm dust. Below this mass, planets produce annular enhancements in dust outwards of the planet and a reduction in the vicinity of the planet. These features are in steady state and can be understood in terms of variations in the dust radial velocity, imposed by the perturbed gas pressure radial profile, analogous to a traffic jam. We also show how planet masses can be derived from structure in scattered light and submm images. We emphasize that simulations with dust need to be run over thousands of planetary orbits so as to allow the gas profile to achieve a steady state and caution against the estimation of planet masses using gas-only simulations.

  1. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, Dániel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2010-01-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  2. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, D.´niel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  3. Chemical abundances in the protoplanetary disc LV 2 (Orion): clues to the causes of the abundance anomaly in H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, Y. G.; Walsh, J. R.; Vílchez, J. M.; Péquignot, D.

    2011-04-01

    Optical integral field spectroscopy of the archetype protoplanetary disc LV 2 in the Orion nebula is presented, taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FLAMES/Argus fibre array. The detection of recombination lines (RLs) of C II and O II from this class of objects is reported, and the lines are utilized as abundance diagnostics. The study is complemented with the analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Faint Object Spectrograph ultraviolet and optical spectra of the target contained within the Argus field of view. By subtracting the local nebula background the intrinsic spectrum of the proplyd is obtained and its elemental composition is derived for the first time. The proplyd is found to be overabundant in carbon, oxygen and neon compared to the Orion nebula and the Sun. The simultaneous coverage over LV 2 of the C III]λ1908 and [O III]λ5007 collisionally excited lines (CELs) and C II and O II RLs has enabled us to measure the abundances of C2 + and O2 + for LV 2 with both sets of lines. The two methods yield consistent results for the intrinsic proplyd spectrum, but not for the proplyd spectrum contaminated by the generic nebula spectrum, thus providing one example where the long-standing abundance anomaly plaguing metallicity studies of H II regions has been resolved. These results would indicate that the standard forbidden-line methods used in the derivation of light metal abundances in H II regions in our own and other galaxies underestimate the true gas metallicity.

  4. Nonthermal 10 micron CO2 emission lines in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. A.; Betz, A. L.; Mclaren, R. A.; Townes, C. H.; Sutton, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    Mechanisms are examined for excitation of strong 10-micron CO2 emission lines seen on Mars and Venus. Line absorption of near-infrared solar flux directly by CO2 or H2O with collisional transfer of energy to CO2 are proposed as likely excitation mechanisms. Altitudes for peak 10-micron emission are estimated to be near 80 km for Mars and 120 km for Venus.

  5. Disc-planet interactions in subkeplerian discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, S.-J.

    2009-11-01

    Context: One class of protoplanetary disc models, the X-wind model, predicts strongly subkeplerian orbital gas velocities, a configuration that can be sustained by magnetic tension. Aims: We investigate disc-planet interactions in these subkeplerian discs, focusing on orbital migration for low-mass planets and gap formation for high-mass planets. Methods: We use linear calculations and nonlinear hydrodynamical simulations to measure the torque and look at gap formation. In both cases, the subkeplerian nature of the disc is treated as a fixed external constraint. Results: We show that, depending on the degree to which the disc is subkeplerian, the torque on low-mass planets varies between the usual type I torque and the one-sided outer Lindblad torque, which is also negative but an order of magnitude stronger. In strongly subkeplerian discs, corotation effects can be ignored, making migration fast and inward. Gap formation near the planet's orbit is more difficult in such discs, since there are no resonances close to the planet accommodating angular momentum transport. The location of the gap is shifted inwards with respect to the planet, leaving the planet on the outside of a surface density depression. Conclusions: Depending on the degree to which a protoplanetary disc is subkeplerian, disc-planet interactions can be very different from the usual Keplerian picture, making these discs in general more hazardous for young planets.

  6. Imaging Polarimetry of Protoplanetary and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarrott, S. M.; Scarrott, R. M. J.

    1995-11-01

    Imaging polarimetry maps are presented for a sample of bipolar proto-planetary and planetary nebulae (Frosty Leo, Roberts 22, Hen 401, MZ 3, NGC 2346, IC 4406 and J 320). Each of the highly polarized proto-planetary nebulae possesses a `polarization disc' which has been observed more frequently in nebulae associated with star forming regions. In order to account for the observed high levels of polarization in protoplanetary nebulae we consider the effects of a thin coating of a volatile material on refractory grains with an original size distribution typical of the interstellar medium. The planetary nebulae are seen in a mixture of reflected and emission light and their polarization patterns suggest that, in many instances, they are emission nebulae surrounded by an extensive envelope of reflection nebulosity. The origin of the skew-symmetry and ansae in the isophotal maps of proto-planetary and planetary nebulae are discussed in terms of binary stars and magnetic fields.

  7. Diffraction-limited spatial resolution of circumstellar shells at 10 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Townes, C. H.; Vanderwyck, A. H. B.

    1983-01-01

    A new spatial array instrument provided diffraction-limited mid-infrared intensity profiles of the type-M supergiant stars alpha Orionis and alpha Scorpii, both of which are known to exhibit excess 10 microns radiation due to the presence of circumstellar dust shells. In the case of alpha Ori, there is a marked asymmetry in the dust distribution, with peak intensity of dust emission a distance of 0.9 inches from the star.

  8. 10 micron spectral observations of SN1987A - The first year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, D. K.; Smith, C. H.; James, S. D.; Roche, P. F.; Hyland, A. R.; McGregor, P. J.

    1988-12-01

    Spectra of SN1987A in the 10-micron region taken on days 257 and 366-371 after core collapse are presented. The hydrogen/helium envelope is partially ionized at the few percent level and this provides the free-free continuum and hydrogenic lines. There is relative transparency in the midinfrared, while the bound electrons provide the X-ray opacity which is still considerable at day 370. The continuum appears to have become optically thin from about 6 months, and there may be a contribution from low ionization middle mass elements and the iron group. Apart from an excess between 8-9 microns which has been tentatively attributed to molecular SiO, there is no evidence of departure from the emission expected from an optically thin plasma, and no sign of any emission from dust.

  9. The circumstellar dust envelopes of red giant stars. I - M giant stars with the 10-micron silicate emission band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, O.; Nakada, Y.; Onaka, T.; Kamijo, F.; Tanabe, T.

    1990-01-01

    Spherical dust envelope models of red giant stars are constructed by solving the radiative transfer equations of the generalized two-stream Eddington approximation. The IRAS observations of M giant stars which show the 10-micron silicate emission band in IRAS LRS spectra are explained by the models with the dirty silicate grains with K proportional to lambda exp -1.5 for lambda greather than 28 microns. Under the assumption of steady mass flow in the envelope, this model analysis gives the following conclusions: (1) the strength of the silicate emission peak at 10 microns is a good indicator of the mass loss rate of the star, (2) no stars with the 10-microns silicate emission feature are observed in the range of mass loss rate smaller than 7 x 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr, and (3) the characteristic time of the mass loss process of M stars does not exceed a few 10,000 years.

  10. Infrared spectroscopy, imaging, and 10 micron photometry of Giclas 29-38

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokunaga, A. T.; Hodapp, K.-W.; Becklin, E. E.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Rigler, M.; Toomey, D.; Brown, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    An NIR spectrum and several images of Giclas 29-38, a white dwarf suspected to have a brown dwarf in orbit around it, are presented. There is no absorption feature in the spectrum that is deeper than 5 percent in the wavelength range 1.95-2.45 microns, from which it is inferred that there is no feature deeper than 10 percent at 2.4 microns from any brown dwarf companion. The IR spectrum does not yield any strong constraint on whether or not the thermal emission observed from G29-38 comes from a brown dwarf or dust. The 1.6- and 2.2-micron images of G29-38 appear indistinguishable from a point source with an upper limit of 0.4 arcsec for the separation of the white dwarf and the source of the excess IR emission. This corresponds to a projected linear separation of 5.6 AU. A 2sigma limit at 10 microns of 10 mJy constrains possible alternative models for the IR excess by emission from dust grains. While the present results do not show evidence for the suspected brown dwarf companion around G29-38, the presence of such an object cannot be ruled out.

  11. Dynamics of Astrophysical Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Preface; Names and addresses of participants; Conference photograph; 1. Spiral waves in Saturn's rings; 2. Structure of the Uranian rings; 3. Planetary rings: theory; 4. Simulations of light scattering in planetary rings; 5. Accretion discs around young stellar objects and the proto-Sun; 6. The ß Pictoris disc: a planetary rather than a protoplanetary one; 7. Optical polarimetry and thermal imaging of the disc axound ß Pictoris; 8. Observations of discs around protostars and young stars; 9. VLA observations of ammonia towaxd moleculax outflow sources; 10. Derivation of the physical properties of molecular discs by an MEM method; 11. Masers associated with discs around young stars; 12. The nature of polarisation discs axound young stars; 13. The correlation between the main parameters of the interstellar gas (including Salpeter's spectrum of masses) as a result of the development of turbulent Rossby waves; 14. Discs in cataclysmic variables and X-ray binaries; 15. A disc instability model for soft X-ray transients containing black holes; 16. X-ray variability from the accretion disc of NGC 5548; 17. Viscously heated coronae and winds around accretion discs; 18. Optical emission line profiles of symbiotic stars; 19. The effect of formation of Fell in winds confined to discs for luminous stars; 20. Observational evidence for accretion discs in active galactic nuclei; 21. The fuelling of active galactic nuclei by non-axisynlinetric instabilities; 22. The circum-nuclear disc in the Galactic centre; 23. Non-axisymmetric instabilities in thin self-gravitating differentially rotating gaseous discs; 24. Non-linear evolution of non-axisymmetric perturbations in thin self-gravitating gaseous discs; 25. Eccentric gravitational instabilities in nearly Keplerian discs; 26. Gravity mode instabilities in accretion tori; 27. The stability of viscous supersonic shear flows - critical Reynolds numbers and their implications for accretion discs; 28. Asymptotic analysis of overstable

  12. Gas in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2008-01-01

    Gas makes up the bulk of the mass in a protoplanetary disk, but it is much more difficult to observe than the smaller dust component. The l ifetime of gas in a disk has far-reaching consequences. including lim iting the time available for giant planet formation and controlling t he migration of planetary bodies of all sizes, from Jupiters to meter-sized planetesimals. Here I will discuss what is known about the gas component of protoplanetary disks, highlighting recent results from i nfrared studies with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Exciting upcoming o pportunities for gas studies will also be discussed. In particular, the first large far-IR survey of gas tracers from young disks will be p erformed using the Herschel Space Observatory, as part of the "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems" (GASPS) Open Time Key Project.

  13. Gas in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2008-01-01

    Gas makes up the bulk of the mass in a protoplanetary disk, but it is much more difficult to observe than the smaller dust component. The lifetime of gas in a disk has far-reaching consequences, including limiting the time available for giant planet formation and controlling the migration of planetary bodies of all sizes, from Jupiters to meter-sized planetesimals. Here I will discuss what is known about the gas component of protoplanetary disks, highlighting recent results from infrared studies with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Exciting upcoming opportunities for gas studies will also be discussed. In particular, the first large far-IR survey of gas tracers from young disks will be performed using the Herschel Space Observatory, as part of the 'Gas in Protoplanetary Systems' (GASPS) Open Time Key Project.

  14. Laboratory simulation of infrared astrophysical features. [Terrestrial silicate, meteoritic and lunar soil 10-micron spectral comparisons with comets Bennet and Kohoutek

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Laboratory infrared emission and absorption spectra have been taken of terrestrial silicates, meteorites, and lunar soils in the form of micrometer and submicrometer grains. The emission spectra were taken in a way that imitates telescopic observations. The purpose was to see which materials best simulate the 10-micron astrophysical feature. The emission spectra of dunite, fayalite, and Allende give a good fit to the 10-micron broadband emission feature of comets Bennett and Kohoutek. A study of the effect of grain size on the presence of the 10-micron emission feature of dunite shows that for particles larger than 37 microns no feature is seen. The emission spectrum of the Murray meteorite, a Type 2 carbonaceous chrondrite, is quite similar to the intermediate-resolution spectrum of comet Kohoutek in the 10-micron region. Hydrous silicates or amorphous magnesium silicates in combination with high-temperature condensates, such as olivine or anorthite, would yield spectra that match the intermediate-resolution spectrum of comet Kohoutek in the 10-micron region. Glassy olivine and glassy anorthite in approximately equal proportions would also give a spectrum that is a good fit to the cometary 10-micron feature.

  15. HNC IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Kastner, Joel

    2015-07-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3–2 toward the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3–2 and IRAM 30 m observations of HCN and HNC 1–0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1–0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. However, to realize the full potential of HNC as a disk tracer requires a combination of high SNR spatially resolved observations of HNC and HCN and disk-specific HNC chemical modeling.

  16. Lightning in the Protoplanetary Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning in the protoplanetary nebula has been proposed as a mechanism for creating meteoritic chondrules: enigmatic mm-sized silicate spheres formed in the nebula by the brief melting of cold precursors.

  17. X-ray Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks with ProDiMo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rab, Christian; Woitke, Peter; Güdel, Manuel; Min, Michiel; Diana Team

    2013-07-01

    X-ray emission is a common property of YSOs. T Tauri stars show X-ray luminosities up to 10^32 erg/s but also Herbig Ae/Be stars can have moderate X-ray emission in the range of 10^28 to 10^31 erg/s. We want to investigate the impact of X-ray radiation on the thermal and chemical structure of protoplanetary discs around these YSOs. Therefore we have added a new X-ray Radiative Transfer module to the radiation thermo-chemical code ProDiMo (Protoplanetary Disc Modeling) extending the existing implementation of X-ray chemistry implemented by Aresu et al. This new module considers gas and dust opacities (including scattering) and a possible X-ray background field. Further we added a new set of FUV - photoreactions to the X-ray chemistry module of ProDiMo as fast electrons created in X-ray ionisation can produce a significant secondary FUV radiation field by exciting atomic or molecular hydrogen. We discuss the importance of these processes on the thermal and chemical structure of the protoplanetary disc, and present them on the basis of a typical T Tauri disc model. This work is performed in the context of the EU FP7-project DIANA (www.diana-project.com).

  18. VLA Imaging of Protoplanetary Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilner, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Our program uses the techniques of millimeter interferometry to make high resolution observations of dust continuum emission to study the structure of protoplanetary disks around nearby stars. We continue to use the Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatories (NRAO) to make produce high angular resolution images, and we are improving our capabilities to interpret these observations with detailed numerical models. We have also made the first millimeter interferometer observations of protoplanetary disks in the southern hemisphere, using the recently upgraded Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), taking advantage of the techniques we have developed in our work on northern sources.

  19. Particle rings and astrophysical accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Norman Rostoker had a wide range of interests and significant impact on the plasma physics research at Cornell during the time he was a Cornell professor. His interests ranged from the theory of energetic electron and ion beams and strong particle rings to the related topics of astrophysical accretion discs. We outline some of the topics related to rings and discs including the Rossby wave instability which leads to formation of anticyclonic vortices in astrophysical discs. These vorticies are regions of high pressure and act to trap dust particles which in turn may facilitate planetesimals growth in proto-planetary disks and could be important for planet formation. Analytical methods and global 3D magneto-hydrodynamic simulations have led to rapid advances in our understanding of discs in recent years.

  20. Growth of eccentric modes in disc-planet interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssandier, Jean; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-05-01

    We formulate a set of linear equations that describe the behaviour of small eccentricities in a protoplanetary system consisting of a gaseous disc and a planet. Eccentricity propagates through the disc by means of pressure and self-gravity, and is exchanged with the planet via secular interactions. Excitation and damping of eccentricity can occur through Lindblad and corotation resonances, as well as viscosity. We compute normal modes of the coupled disc-planet system in the case of short-period giant planets orbiting inside an inner cavity, possibly carved by the stellar magnetosphere. Three-dimensional effects allow for a mode to be trapped in the inner parts of the disc. This mode can easily grow within the disc's lifetime. An eccentric mode dominated by the planet can also grow, although less rapidly. We compute the structure and growth rates of these modes and their dependence on the assumed properties of the disc.

  1. Thermodynamical Structure of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, S.; Turner, N.

    2009-12-01

    The thermodynamics of protoplanetary disks determines chemical and physical evolution of dust and gas in the disks, and thus is relevant for understanding the origin and formation of planetary systems. In this paper, the thermodynamical structure of protoplanetary disks around low-mass stars is studied using three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Local patches of the disk are modeled using the shearing box approximation with vertical gravity. For simplicity, the dust and gas are well mixed and have the same temperature, and ideal MHD is assumed. The frequency-integrated radiation field is evolved using the flux-limited diffusion approximation, adopting thermally averaged opacities. The heating arises from the dissipation of MHD turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability due to differential rotation of the disk, and the cooling comes from infrared radiation losses. Irradiation by the central star is treated by injecting appropriate amount of thermal energy near the disk photosphere for visible lights. The results indicate the heating is more concentrated in the disk atmosphere than in the classical model. The single-point heating rate in the atmosphere fluctuates by orders of magnitude over time intervals comparable to the orbital period due to magnetic reconnection and shocks, while the patch of disk overall sustains dynamical and thermodynamical equilibrium over many cooling times. We will discuss implications of our numerical results for line and continuum emission from protoplanetary disks.

  2. Modeling of growth and evaporation effects on the extinction of 1.0-micron solar radiation traversing stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of growth and evaporation of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols on the extinction of solar radiation traversing such an aerosol medium are reported for the case of 1.0-micron solar radiation. Modeling results show that aerosol extinction is not very sensitive to the change of ambient water vapor concentration, but is sensitive to ambient temperature changes, especially at low ambient temperatures and high ambient water vapor concentration. A clarification is given of the effects of initial aerosol size distribution and composition on the change of aerosol extinction due to growth and evaporation processes. It is shown that experiments designed to observe solar radiation extinction of aerosols may also be applied to the determination of observed changes in aerosol optical properties, environmental parameters, or the physical and optical characteristics of sulfate aerosols.

  3. Hybrid methods in planetesimal dynamics: formation of protoplanetary systems and the mill condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Glaschke, Patrick; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    The formation and evolution of protoplanetary discs remains a challenge from both a theoretical and numerical standpoint. In this work, we first perform a series of tests of our new hybrid algorithm presented in Glaschke, Amaro-Seoane and Spurzem (henceforth Paper I) that combines the advantages of high accuracy of direct-summation N-body methods with a statistical description for the planetesimal disc based on Fokker-Planck techniques. We then address the formation of planets, with a focus on the formation of protoplanets out of planetesimals. We find that the evolution of the system is driven by encounters as well as direct collisions and requires a careful modelling of the evolution of the velocity dispersion and the size distribution over a large range of sizes. The simulations show no termination of the protoplanetary accretion due to gap formation, since the distribution of the planetesimals is only subjected to small fluctuations. We also show that these features are weakly correlated with the positions of the protoplanets. The exploration of different impact strengths indicates that fragmentation mainly controls the overall mass-loss, which is less pronounced during the early runaway growth. We prove that the fragmentation in combination with the effective removal of collisional fragments by gas drag sets an universal upper limit of the protoplanetary mass as a function of the distance to the host star, which we refer to as the mill condition.

  4. On the evolution of multiple protoplanets embedded in a protostellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, P.; Nelson, R. P.

    2006-05-01

    Context: .Theory predicts that low mass protoplanets in a laminar protostellar disc will migrate into the central star prior to disc dispersal. It is known that protoplanets on orbits with eccentricity e ⪆ H/r, where H is the disc scale height and r is the radius, can halt or reverse their migration. Aims: .We examine whether a system of interacting protoplanetary cores can excite and sustain significant eccentricity of the population, allowing some planetary cores to survive in the disc over its lifetime. Methods: .We employ two distinct numerical schemes: an N-body code, adapted to include migration and eccentricity damping due to the gas disc via analytic prescriptions, and a hydrodynamics code that explicitly evolves a 2D protoplanetary disc model with embedded protoplanets. The former allows us to study the long term evolution, the latter to model the systems with greater fidelity but for shorter times. Results: .After a brief period of chaotic interaction between the protoplanets that involves scattering, orbital exchange, collisions and the formation of co-orbital planets, we find that the system settles into a quiescent state of inward migration. Differential migration causes the protoplanets to form a series of mean motion resonances, such that a planet is often in resonance with both its interior and exterior neighbours. This helps prevent close encounters and leads to the protoplanetary swarm, or subgroups within it, migrating inward at a uniform rate. In about 2 % of runs a single planet is scattered onto a distant orbit with significant eccentricity, allowing it to survive in the disc for ˜ 106 years. Over 20 % of runs produce co-orbital planets that survive for the duration of the simulation, occupying mutual horseshoe or tadpole orbits. Conclusions: .Disc-induced damping overwhelms eccentricity growth through planet-planet interactions, such that a protoplanetary swarm migrates inward. We suggest co-orbital planets may be observed in future

  5. The Herschel view of GAS in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS). First comparisons with a large grid of models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinte, C.; Woitke, P.; Ménard, F.; Duchêne, G.; Kamp, I.; Meeus, G.; Mathews, G.; Howard, C. D.; Grady, C. A.; Thi, W.-F.; Tilling, I.; Augereau, J.-C.; Dent, W. R. F.; Alacid, J. M.; Andrews, S.; Ardila, D. R.; Aresu, G.; Barrado, D.; Brittain, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Danchi, W.; Eiroa, C.; Fedele, D.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Heras, A.; Huelamo, N.; Krivov, A.; Lebreton, J.; Liseau, R.; Martin-Zaïdi, C.; Mendigutía, I.; Montesinos, B.; Mora, A.; Morales-Calderon, M.; Nomura, H.; Pantin, E.; Pascucci, I.; Phillips, N.; Podio, L.; Poelman, D. R.; Ramsay, S.; Riaz, B.; Rice, K.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Roberge, A.; Sandell, G.; Solano, E.; Vandenbussche, B.; Walker, H.; Williams, J. P.; White, G. J.; Wright, G.

    2010-07-01

    The Herschel GASPS key program is a survey of the gas phase of protoplanetary discs, targeting 240 objects which cover a large range of ages, spectral types, and disc properties. To interpret this large quantity of data and initiate self-consistent analyses of the gas and dust properties of protoplanetary discs, we have combined the capabilities of the radiative transfer code MCFOST with the gas thermal balance and chemistry code ProDiMo to compute a grid of ≈300 000 disc models (DENT). We present a comparison of the first Herschel/GASPS line and continuum data with the predictions from the DENT grid of models. Our objective is to test some of the main trends already identified in the DENT grid, as well as to define better empirical diagnostics to estimate the total gas mass of protoplanetary discs. Photospheric UV radiation appears to be the dominant gas-heating mechanism for Herbig stars, whereas UV excess and/or X-rays emission dominates for T Tauri stars. The DENT grid reveals the complexity in the analysis of far-IR lines and the difficulty to invert these observations into physical quantities. The combination of Herschel line observations with continuum data and/or with rotational lines in the (sub-)millimetre regime, in particular CO lines, is required for a detailed characterisation of the physical and chemical properties of circumstellar discs. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  6. Formation of Planets in a Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Video Gallery

    The artist conception shows a newly formed star surrounded by a swirling protoplanetary disk of dust and gas. Debris coalesces to create rocky 'planetesimals' that collide and grow to eventually fo...

  7. Modelling planet-forming circumstellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woitke, P.

    2012-03-01

    With the improved wavelength coverage and instrumental capabilities to observe planet-forming circumstellar discs in the X-ray regime, the UV, and the near, mid and far infrared (XMM, HST, VLT, Spitzer, Herschel, soon ALMA) there is an increasing scientific need to develop equally sophisticated models for the physical, radiative and chemical processes in these discs. The discs are composed of dust and gas spanning 10 orders of magnitude in density, and temperatures differ by a factor of about 100. There is hard irradiation that provokes various non-LTE effects, thermal and position de-coupling of icy dust and gas, and the differential rotation causes instabilities and mixing. In the last few years, new theoretical models have been developed that simulate different aspects of these complicated physical systems. I will focus mainly on models that model the chemical, radiative, and heating & cooling processes in these discs, pointing out some important coupling mechanism and feedbacks between them. In the new major European FP7-SPACE project DIANA, we will use these novel disc models to coherently analyse and interpret new multi-wavelength data sets from X-ray to cm, probing in physics and chemistry in protoplanetary dicsc at different radii and depths. The general aim of the new models is to arrive at a common understanding of dust and gas, over the full radial extent of the disc, and to make use of continuum and line observations to constrain dust and gas properties in the disc. I will discuss where the various near-IR to sub-mm emissions (CO ro-vib, high-J CO lines, sub-mm CO lines, Spitzer water, Herschel/PACS water, Herschel/HIFI water, Herschel/PACS atomic lines) originate from, and how they are influenced by disc shape, irradiation, dust properties, and the chemical and radiative details.

  8. VLA Imaging of Protoplanetary Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilner, David J.

    2004-01-01

    We summarize the major accomplishments of our program to use high angular resolution observations at millimeter wavelengths to probe the structure of protoplanetary disks in nearby regions of star formation. The primary facilities used in this work were the Very Large Array (VLA) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatories (NRAO) located in New Mexico, and the recently upgraded Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), located in Australia (to access sources in the far southern sky). We used these facilities to image thermal emission from dust particles in disks at long millimeter wavelengths, where the emission is optically thin and probes the full disk volume, including the inner regions of planet formation that remain opaque at shorter wavelengths. The best resolution obtained with the VLA is comparable to the size scales of the orbits of giant planets in our Solar System (< 10 AU).

  9. Chondrules and the Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewins, R. H.; Jones, Rhian; Scott, Ed

    2011-03-01

    Part I. Introduction: 1. Chondrules and the protoplanetary disk: An overview R. H. Hewins; Part. II. Chonrules, Ca-Al-Rich Inclusions and Protoplanetary Disks: 2. Astronomical observations of phenomena in protostellar disks L. Hartmann; 3. Overview of models of the solar nebula: potential chondrule-forming environments P. Cassen; 4. Large scale processes in the solar nebula A. P. Boss; 5. Turbulence, chondrules and planetisimals J. N. Cuzzi, A. R. Dobrovolskis and R. C. Hogan; 6. Chondrule formation: energetics and length scales J. T. Wasson; 7. Unresolved issues in the formation of chondrules and chondrites J. A. Wood; 8. Thermal processing in the solar nebula: constraints from refractory inclusions A. M. Davis and G. J. MacPherson; 9. Formation times of chondrules and Ca-Al-Rich inclusions: constraints from short-lived radionuclides T. D. Swindle, A. M. Davis, C. M. Hohenberg, G. J. MacPherson and L. E. Nyquist; 10. Formation of chondrules and chondrites in the protoplanetary nebula E. R. D. Scott, S. G. Love and A. N. Krot; Part III. Chondrule precursors and multiple melting: 11. Origin of refractory precursor components of chondrules K. Misawa and N. Nakamura; 12. Mass-independent isotopic effects in chondrites: the role of chemical processes M. H. Thiemens; 13. Agglomeratic chondrules: implications for the nature of chondrule precursors and formation by incomplete melting M. K. Weisberg and M. Prinz; 14. Constraints on chondrule precursors from experimental Data H. C. Connolly Jr. and R. H. Hewins; 15. Nature of matrix in unequilibrated chondrites and its possible relationship to chondrules A. J. Brearly; 16. Constraints on chondrite agglomeration from fine-grained chondrule Rims K. Metzler and A. Bischoff; 17. Relict grains in chondrules: evidence for chondrule recycling R. H. Jones; 18. Multiple heating of chondrules A. E. Rubin and A. N. Krot; 19. Microchondrule-bearing chondrule rims: constraints on chondrule formation A. N. Krot and A. E. Rubin; Part IV

  10. Dust dynamics in 2D gravito-turbulent discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Stone, James M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of solid bodies in protoplanetary discs are subject to the properties of any underlying gas turbulence. Turbulence driven by disc self-gravity shows features distinct from those driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We study the dynamics of solids in gravito-turbulent discs with two-dimensional (in the disc plane), hybrid (particle and gas) simulations. Gravito-turbulent discs can exhibit stronger gravitational stirring than MRI-active discs, resulting in greater radial diffusion and larger eccentricities and relative speeds for large particles (those with dimensionless stopping times tstopΩ > 1, where Ω is the orbital frequency). The agglomeration of large particles into planetesimals by pairwise collisions is therefore disfavoured in gravito-turbulent discs. However, the relative speeds of intermediate-size particles (tstopΩ ˜ 1) are significantly reduced as such particles are collected by gas drag and gas gravity into coherent filament-like structures with densities high enough to trigger gravitational collapse. First-generation planetesimals may form via gravitational instability of dust in marginally gravitationally unstable gas discs.

  11. Modeling Gas Distribution in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Martin; Lewis, Josiah; Brittain, Sean

    2010-07-01

    Protoplanetary accretion disks are disks of dust and gas which surround and feed material onto a forming star in the earliest stages of its evolution. One of the most useful methods for studying these disks is near infrared spectroscopy of rovibrational CO emission. This paper presents the methods in which synthetically generated spectra are modeled and fit to spectral data gathered from protoplanetary disks. This paper also discussed the methods in which this code can be improved by modifying the code to run a Monte Carlo analysis of best fit across the CONDOR cluster at Clemson University, thereby allowing for the creation of a catalog of protoplanetary disks with detailed information about them as gathered from the model.

  12. Multiwavelength search for protoplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Schmidt-Kaler, Theodor

    1994-01-01

    Infrared emission of circumstellar dust was observed for almost one hundred T Tauri stars. This dust is interpreted to be part of a protoplanetary disk orbiting the central star. T Tauri stars are young stellar objects and evolve into solar type stars. Planets are believed to form in these disks. The spectral energy distribution of a disk depends on its temperature profile. Different disk regions emit at different wavelengths. The disk-star boundary layer is hot and emits H(alpha) radiation. Inner disk regions at around 1 AU with a temperature of a few hundred Kelvin can be probed in near infrared wavelength regimes. Outer disk regions at around 100 AU distance from the star are colder and emit far infrared and sub-millimeter radiation. Also, X-ray emission from the stellar surface can reveal information on disk properties. Emission from the stellar surface and the boundary layer may be shielded by circumstellar gas and dust. T Tauri stars with low H(alpha) emission, i.e. no boundary layer, show stronger X-ray emission than classical T Tauri stars, because the inner disk regions of weak emission-line T Tauri stars may be clear of material. In this paper, first ROSAT all sky survey results on the X-ray emission of T Tauri stars and correlations between X-ray luminosity and properties of T Tauri disks are presented. Due to atmospheric absorption, X-ray and most infrared observations cannot be carried out on Earth, but from Earth orbiting satellites (e.g. IRAS, ROSAT, ISO) or from lunar based observatories, which would have special advantages such as a stable environment.

  13. ALMA observations of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogerheijde, Michiel

    2015-08-01

    The Universe is filled with planetary systems, as recent detections of exo-planets have shown. Such systems grow out of disks of gas and dust that surround newly formed stars. The ground work for our understanding of the structure, composition, and evolution of such disks has been laid with infrared telescopes in the 1980's, 1990's, and 2000's, as well as with millimeter interferometers operating in the United States, France, and Japan. With the construction of the Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array, a new era of studying planet-forming disks has started. The unprecedented leap in sensitivity and angular resolution that ALMA offers, has truely revolutionized our understanding of disks. No longer featureless objects consisting of gas and smalll dust, they are now seen to harbor a rich structure and chemistry. The ongoing planet-formation process sculpts many disks into systems of rings and arcs; grains grown to millimeter-sizes collect in high-pressure areas where they could grow out to asteroids or comets or further generations of planets. This wealth of new information directly addresses bottlenecks in our theoretical understanding of planet formation, such as the question how grains can grow past the 'meter-sized' barrier or overcome the 'drift barrier', and how gas and ice evolve together and ultimately determine the elemental compositions of both giant and terrestrial planets. I will review the recent ALMA results on protoplanetary disks, presenting results on individual objects and from the first populations studies. I will conclude with a forward look, on what we might expect from ALMA in this area for the years and decades to come.

  14. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, Hideko

    2010-10-20

    We have developed a high-resolution combined physical and chemical model of a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. Our aims were to use our model to calculate the chemical structure of disks on small scales (submilliarcsecond in the inner disk for objects at the distance of Taurus, {approx}140 pc) to investigate the various chemical processes thought to be important in disks and to determine potential molecular tracers of each process. Our gas-phase network was extracted from the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry to which we added gas-grain interactions including freezeout and thermal and non-thermal desorption (cosmic-ray-induced desorption, photodesorption, and X-ray desorption), and a grain-surface network. We find that cosmic-ray-induced desorption has the least effect on our disk chemical structure while photodesorption has a significant effect, enhancing the abundances of most gas-phase molecules throughout the disk and affecting the abundances and distribution of HCN, CN, and CS, in particular. In the outer disk, we also see enhancements in the abundances of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. X-ray desorption is a potentially powerful mechanism in disks, acting to homogenize the fractional abundances of gas-phase species across the depth and increasing the column densities of most molecules, although there remain significant uncertainties in the rates adopted for this process. The addition of grain-surface chemistry enhances the fractional abundances of several small complex organic molecules including CH{sub 3}OH, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} to potentially observable values (i.e., a fractional abundance of {approx}>10{sup -11}).

  15. Artificial Disc Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat this condition, alternatives to disc replacement include fusion, nonoperative care or no treatment. Typically, surgery is ... operative treatment for disc pain has been spinal fusion. This is a surgical procedure in which disc ...

  16. On the vertical-shear instability in astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Latter, H. N.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the linear stability of astrophysical discs exhibiting vertical shear, which arises when there is a radial variation in the temperature or entropy. Such discs are subject to a `vertical-shear instability', which recent non-linear simulations have shown to drive hydrodynamic activity in the MRI-stable regions of protoplanetary discs. We first revisit locally isothermal discs using the quasi-global reduced model derived by Nelson et al. This analysis is then extended to global axisymmetric perturbations in a cylindrical domain. We also derive and study a reduced model describing discs with power-law radial entropy profiles (`locally polytropic discs'), which are somewhat more realistic in that they possess physical (as opposed to numerical) surfaces. The fastest growing modes have very short wavelengths and are localized at the disc surfaces (if present), where the vertical shear is maximal. An additional class of modestly growing vertically global body modes is excited, corresponding to destabilized classical inertial waves (`r modes'). We discuss the properties of both types of modes, and stress that those that grow fastest occur on the shortest available length-scales (determined either by the numerical grid or the physical viscous length). This ill-posedness makes simulations of the instability difficult to interpret. We end with some brief speculation on the non-linear saturation and resulting angular momentum transport.

  17. Outwards migration for planets in stellar irradiated 3D discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lega, E.; Morbidelli, A.; Bitsch, B.; Crida, A.; Szulágyi, J.

    2015-09-01

    For the very first time we present 3D simulations of planets embedded in stellar irradiated discs. It is well known that thermal effects could reverse the direction of planetary migration from inwards to outwards, potentially saving planets in the inner, optically thick parts of the protoplanetary disc. When considering stellar irradiation in addition to viscous friction as a source of heating, the outer disc changes from a shadowed to a flared structure. Using a suited analytical formula it has been shown that in the flared part of the disc the migration is inwards; planets can migrate outwards only in shadowed regions of the disc, because the radial gradient of entropy is stronger there. In order to confirm this result numerically, we have computed the total torque acting on planets held on fixed orbits embedded in stellar irradiated 3D discs using the hydrodynamical code FARGOCA. We find qualitatively good agreement between the total torque obtained with numerical simulations and the one predicted by the analytical formula. For large masses (>20 M⊕) we find quantitative agreement, and we obtain outwards migration regions for planets up to 60 M⊕ in the early stages of accretional discs. We find nevertheless that the agreement with the analytic formula is quite fortuitous because the formula underestimates the size of the horseshoe region; this error is compensated by imperfect estimates of other terms, most likely the cooling rate and the saturation.

  18. The Origin and Evolution of Transition Discs: Successes, Problems, and Open Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, James E.

    2016-02-01

    Transition discs are protoplanetary discs that show evidence for large holes or wide gaps (with widths comparable to their radii) in their dust component. These discs could be giving us clues about the disc destruction mechanism or hints about the location and time-scales for the formation of planets. However, at the moment there remain key gaps in our theoretical understanding. The vast majority of transition discs are accreting onto their central stars, indicating that-at least close to the star-dust has been depleted from the gas by a very large amount. In this review, we discuss evidence for two distinct populations of transition discs: mm-faint-those with low mm-fluxes, small holes (≲ 10 AU), and low accretion rates (~ 10-10 - 10-9 M⊙ yr-1) and mm-bright-discs with large mm-fluxes, large holes (≳ 20 AU), and high accretion rates ~ 10-8 M⊙ yr-1. MM-faint transition discs are consistent with what would naively be expected from a disc undergoing dispersal; however, mm-bright discs are not, and are likely to be rare and long-lived objects. We discuss the two commonly proposed mechanisms for creating transition discs: photoevaporation and planet-disc interactions, with a particular emphasis on how they would evolve in these models, comparing these predictions to the observed population. More theoretical work on explaining the lack of optically thick, non-accreting transition discs is required in both the photoevaporation and planetary hypothesis, before we can start to use transition discs to constrain models of planet formation. Finally, we suggest that the few discs with primordial looking spectral energy distribution, but serendipitously imaged showing large cavities in the mm (e.g. MWC758 and WSB 60) may represent a hidden population of associated objects. Characterising and understanding how these objects fit into the overall paradigm may allow us to unravel the mystery of transition discs.

  19. PROTOPLANETARY DISK RESONANCES AND TYPE I MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, David

    2011-11-10

    Waves reflected by the inner edge of a protoplanetary disk are shown to significantly modify Type I migration, even allowing the trapping of planets near the inner disk edge for small planets in a range of disk parameters. This may inform the distribution of planets close to their central stars, as observed recently by the Kepler mission.

  20. Anticyclonic Vortex in a Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamyan, M. G.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of protoplanetary disks is studied in a local approximation. A solution in the form of an anticyclonic vortex with a triaxial-ellipsoidal shape is obtained with linear circulation of matter in the plane of rotation of the disk. The formation of planetesimals from dust by vortices of this type is examined.

  1. Gas Modelling in the Disc of HD 163296

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilling, I.; Woitke, P.; Meeus, G.; Mora, A.; Montesinos, B.; Riviere-Marichalar, P.; Eiroa, C.; Thi, W. -F.; Isella, A.; Roberge, A.; Martin-Zaidi, C.; Kamp, I.; Pinte, C.; Sandell, G.; Vacca, W. D.; Menard, F.; Mendigutia, I.; Duchene, G.; Dent, W. R. F.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present detailed model fits to observations of the disc around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. This well-studied object has an age of approx. 4Myr, with evidence of a circumstellar disc extending out to approx. 540AU. We use the radiation thermo-chemical disc code ProDiMo to model the gas and dust in the circumstellar disc of HD 163296, and attempt to determine the disc properties by fitting to observational line and continuum data. These include new Herschel/PACS observations obtained as part of the open-time key program GASPS (Gas in Protoplanetary Systems), consisting of a detection of the [Oi] 63 m line and upper limits for several other far infrared lines. We complement this with continuum data and ground-based observations of the CO-12 3-2, 2-1 and CO-13 J=1-0 line transitions, as well as the H2 S(1) transition. We explore the effects of stellar ultraviolet variability and dust settling on the line emission, and on the derived disc properties. Our fitting efforts lead to derived gas/dust ratios in the range 9-100, depending on the assumptions made. We note that the line fluxes are sensitive in general to the degree of dust settling in the disc, with an increase in line flux for settled models. This is most pronounced in lines which are formed in the warm gas in the inner disc, but the low excitation molecular lines are also affected. This has serious implications for attempts to derive the disc gas mass from line observations. We derive fractional PAH abundances between 0.007 and 0.04 relative to ISM levels. Using a stellar and UV excess input spectrum based on a detailed analysis of observations, we find that the all observations are consistent with the previously assumed disc geometry

  2. Redundant disc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barack, W. N.; Domas, P. A.; Beekman, S. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A rotatable disc is described that consists of parallel plates tightly joined together for rotation about a hub. Each plate is provided with several angularly projecting spaced lands. The lands of each plate are interposed in alternating relationship between the lands of the next adjacent plate. In this manner, circumferential displacement of adjacent sectors in any one plate is prevented in the event that a crack develops. Each plate is redundantly sized so that, in event of structural failure of one plate, the remaining plates support a proportionate share of the load of the failed plate. The plates are prevented from separating laterally through the inclusion of generally radially extending splines which are inserted to interlock cooperating, circumferentially adjacent lands.

  3. Protoplanetary and Debris Disk Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Donaldson, Jessica; Debes, John H.; Malumuth, Eliot; Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia J.; SEEDS Team

    2016-01-01

    The types of planets that form around other stars are highly dependent on their natal disk conditions. Therefore, the composition, morphology, and distribution of material in protoplanetary and debris disks are important for planet formation. Here we present the results of studies of two disk systems: AB Aur and AU Mic.The circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur has many interesting features, including spirals, asymmetries, and non-uniformities. However, comparatively little is known about the envelope surrounding the system. Recent work by Tang et al (2012) has suggested that the observed spiral armss may not in fact be in the disk, but instead are due to areas of increased density in the envelope and projection effects. Using Monte Carlo modeling, we find that it is unlikely that the envelope holds enough material to be responsible for such features and that it is more plausible that they form from disk material. Given the likelihood that gravitational perturbations from planets cause the observed spiral morphology, we use archival H band observations of AB Aur with a baseline of 5.5 years to determine the locations of possible planets.The AU Mic debris disk also has many interesting morphological features. Because its disk is edge on, the system is an ideal candidate for color studies using coronagraphic spectroscopy. Spectra of the system were taken by placing a HST/STIS long slit parallel to and overlapping the disk while blocking out the central star with an occulting fiducial bar. Color gradients may reveal the chemical processing that is occuring within the disk. In addition, it may trace the potential composition and architecture of any planetary bodies in the system because collisional break up of planetesimals produces the observed dust in the system. We present the resulting optical reflected spectra (5200 to 10,200 angstroms) from this procedure at several disk locations. We find that the disk is bluest at the innermost locations of the

  4. Vortex Formation in Vertically Stratified Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2013-10-01

    A central problem of planet formation is how to form large planetesimals in a turbulent protoplanetary disk. Recent work suggests that MRI turbulence would excite such large velocities that the planetesimals would collisionally fragment rather than grow. The structure of chondritic meteorites indicates a gentle nebular environment where chondrules are sorted by size and cemented together rapidly. Although it is well established that anticyclones can concentrate particles that are weakly coupled to the gas in protoplanetary disks, the conditions required for the formation and long-time stability of anticyclones in a vertically stratified disk are still highly uncertain. Fully three dimensional fluid dynamic simulations of protoplanetary disks are computationally expensive when one requires a computational domain that is large compared to the vertical scale height of the disk. An alternative simulation approach is to use potential temperature as the vertical coordinate so that the equations of motion resemble the shallow water equations (Dowling et al. 1998). We have therefore modified a multilayer shallow water simulation code to model the formation of vortices in a vertically stratified protoplanetary disk with a radial entropy gradient. Vertical stratification of the disk is modeled by using multiple layers, where each layer has a different constant value of the entropy. By forcing a slope in the interfaces between the layers, we impose a radial entropy gradient in the disk. Radiative heating and cooling causes vertical mass exchange between adjacent constant entropy layers according to a Newton cooling formula. We find that the formation of anticyclones is robust, and that these vortices actively excite density waves, which in turn, transport angular momentum through the disk. Our simulations therefore yield new insights on how the dusty dead zones of protoplanetary disks can transport angular momentum through the disk by purely hydrodynamic processes. Support

  5. STRUCTURE OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY ACTIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Kretke, Katherine A.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2010-10-01

    The radial drift of planetary cores poses a challenge to efficient planet formation in standard disk models. However, the rate of this migration is sensitive to both the surface density and temperature profiles of protoplanetary disks. In this paper, we present a new model to self-consistently calculate the structure of a protoplanetary disk in which the magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives angular momentum transport. In this model, we calculate a quasi-steady-state disk model including a schematic representation involving efficient angular momentum transport in the active region with decreased (but non-zero) angular momentum transport in the dead zone. We find that MRI affects not only the surface density distribution but also the temperature profile. In this paper, we present our method and the key novel features evident in our fiducial model. In subsequent papers, we will use this model to study the impact of MRI on the formation and migration of planets.

  6. Protoplanetary Formation and the FU Orionis Outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    The following three publications which reference the above grant from the NASA Origins of Solar Systems program are attached and form the final technical report for this project. The research involved comparisons of the spectral energy distributions of FU Orionis objects with theoretical models and associated studies of the structure of the outbursting accretion disks, as well as related studies on the effects of magnetic fields in disks, which will lead in the future to models of FU Orionis outbursts which include the effects of magnetic fields. The project was renewed under a new grant NAGW-4456, entitled 'Effects of FU Orionis Outbursts on Protoplanetary Disks'. Work now being prepared for publication deals more specifically with the issue of the effects of the outbursts on protoplanetary formation. Models of the spectral energy distribution of FU Orionis stars. A simple model of a buoyant magnetic dynamo in accretion disks and a numerical study of magnetic buoyancy in an accretion disk have been submitted.

  7. The far-infrared behaviour of Herbig Ae/Be discs: Herschel PACS photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, N.; Montesinos, B.; Meeus, G.; Marshall, J. P.; Mendigutía, I.; Sandell, G.

    2016-02-01

    Herbig Ae/Be objects are pre-main sequence stars surrounded by gas- and dust-rich circumstellar discs. These objects are in the throes of star and planet formation, and their characterisation informs us of the processes and outcomes of planet formation processes around intermediate mass stars. Here we analyse the spectral energy distributions of disc host stars observed by the Herschel open time key programme "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems". We present Herschel/PACS far-infrared imaging observations of 22 Herbig Ae/Bes and 5 debris discs, combined with ancillary photometry spanning ultraviolet to sub-millimetre wavelengths. From these measurements we determine the diagnostics of disc evolution, along with the total excess, in three regimes spanning near-, mid-, and far-infrared wavelengths. Using appropriate statistical tests, these diagnostics are examined for correlations. We find that the far-infrared flux, where the disc becomes optically thin, is correlated with the millimetre flux, which provides a measure of the total dust mass. The ratio of far-infrared to sub-millimetre flux is found to be greater for targets with discs that are brighter at millimetre wavelengths and that have steeper sub-millimetre slopes. Furthermore, discs with flared geometry have, on average, larger excesses than flat geometry discs. Finally, we estimate the extents of these discs (or provide upper limits) from the observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  8. Turbine disc sealing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-03-05

    A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

  9. Parker winds revisited: an extension to disc winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Timothy R.; Proga, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    A simple 1D dynamical model of thermally driven disc winds is proposed, based on the results of recent, 2.5D axisymmetric simulations. Our formulation of the disc wind problem is in the spirit of the original Parker and Bondi problems, namely we assume an elementary flow configuration consisting of an outflow following pre-defined trajectories in the presence of a central gravitating point mass. Viscosity and heat conduction are neglected. We consider two different streamline geometries, both comprised of straight lines in the (x, z)-plane: (i) streamlines that converge to a geometric point located at (x, z) = (0, -d) and (ii) streamlines that emerge at a constant inclination angle from the disc mid-plane (the x-axis, as we consider geometrically thin accretion discs). The former geometry is commonly used in kinematic models to compute synthetic spectra, while the latter, which exhibits self-similarity, is likely unused for this purpose, although it easily can be with existing kinematic models. We make the case that it should be, i.e. geometry (ii) leads to transonic wind solutions with substantially different properties owing to its lack of streamline divergence. Both geometries can be used to complement recent efforts to estimate photoevaporative mass-loss rates from protoplanetary discs. Pertinent to understanding our disc wind results, which are also applicable to X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei, is a focused discussion on lesser known properties of classic Parker wind solutions. We find that the parameter space corresponding to decelerating Parker wind solutions is made larger due to rotation and leads instead to disc wind solutions that always accelerate after the bulk velocity is slowed to a minimum value. Surprisingly, Keplerian rotation may allow for two different transonic wind solutions for the same physical conditions.

  10. X-rays Flares and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    2011-04-01

    X-ray observations of star forming regions show that magnetic reconnection flares are powerful and frequent in pre-main sequence solar-type stars. Well-defined samples in the Orion Nebula Cluster and Taurus clouds exhibit flares with peak X- ray luminosities Lx˜10^29 - 10^32 erg/s, orders of magnitude stronger and more frequent than contemporary solar flares. X-rays are emitted in magnetic loops extending 0.1-10 R * above the stellar surface and thus have a favorable geometry to irradiate the protoplanetary disk. Several lines of evidence - fluorescent iron X-ray emission line, forbidden [NeII] infrared line, and excited molecular bands - support X-ray irradiation of cold material in some young systems. Several astrophysical consequences of X-ray irradiation are outlined. As ionization fractions need only reach 10-12 to induce the magnetorotational instability and associated turbulence, X-rays may be the principal determinant of the extent of the viscous "active zone" and laminar "dead zone" in the layered accretion disk. X-ray irradiation may thus play a major role in planet formation processes: particle settling; meter-size inspiral; protoplanetary migration; and dissipation of the gaseous disk.

  11. Dust Coagulation in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W.; Henning, Th.; Mucha, R.

    1996-01-01

    The time evolution of dust particles in circumstellar disk-like structures around protostars and young stellar objects is discussed. In particular, we consider the coagulation of grains due to collisional aggregation. The coagulation of the particles is calculated by solving numerically the non-linear Smoluchowski equation. The different physical processes leading to relative velocities between the grains are investigated. The relative velocities may be induced by Brownian motion, turbulence and drift motion. Starting from different regimes which can be identified during the grain growth we also discuss the evolution of dust opacities. These opacities are important for both the derivation of the circumstellar dust mass from submillimeter/millimeter continuum observations and the dynamical behavior of the disks. We present results of our numerical studies of the coagulation of dust grains in a turbulent protoplanetary accretion disk described by a time-dependent one-dimensional (radial) alpha-model. For several periods and disk radii, mass distributions of coagulated grains have been calculated. From these mass spectra, we determined the corresponding Rosseland mean dust opacities. The influence of grain opacity changes due to dust coagulation on the dynamical evolution of a protostellar disk is considered. Significant changes in the thermal structure of the protoplanetary nebula are observed. A 'gap' in the accretion disk forms at the very frontier of the coagulation, i.e., behind the sublimation boundary in the region between 1 and 5 AU.

  12. The Structure and Composition of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Dan

    2011-04-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope observed all but a few percent of the 2500 protoplanetary disks within 500 parsecs of the Solar System, at the infrared wavelengths at which these objects produce most of their luminosity. The sample covers completely the mass range of hydrogen-burning stars, and penetrates well into the domain of brown dwarfs, as young as several hundred thousand years. It includes disks subjected to an extremely large range of environmental conditions, from the high-density, high-UV regions of massive star formation like the Orion A cloud, to the quiet expanses of exclusively low-mass star formation in the Taurus-Auriga cloud. Here we will offer a brief review of these results, with an eye to noting new constraints which the observations can place on the gas and plasma dynamics of the objects. In particular, the observations include demonstrations of dust settling and gap formation in protoplanetary disks, of grain growth and mineralization of the dust, and of the presence of prebiotic molecules, all on scales similar to the range of planetary orbits in our own Solar system. The results bear on the physics of formation of terrestrial and giant planets, and on radial transport of gas and dust in both the partially-ionized upper layers and in the neutral "dead zone" beneath.

  13. Corotation torques experienced by planets embedded in weakly magnetized turbulent discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruteau, C.; Fromang, S.; Nelson, R. P.; Masset, F.

    2011-09-01

    Context. The migration of low-mass planets, or type I migration, is driven by the differential Lindblad torque and the corotation torque in non-magnetic viscous models of protoplanetary discs. The corotation torque has recently received detailed attention, because of its ability to slow down, stall, or reverse type I migration. In laminar viscous disc models, the long-term evolution of the corotation torque is intimately related to viscous and thermal diffusion processes in the planet's horseshoe region. It is unclear how the corotation torque behaves in turbulent discs, and whether its amplitude is correctly predicted by viscous disc models. Aims: This paper is aimed at examining the properties of the corotation torque in discs where magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence develops as a result of the magnetorotational instability (MRI), considering a weak initial toroidal magnetic field. Methods: We present results of 3D MHD simulations carried out with two different codes. Non-ideal MHD effects and the disc's vertical stratification are neglected, and locally isothermal disc models are considered. The running time-averaged tidal torque exerted by the disc on a fixed planet is evaluated in three different disc models. Results: We first present simulation results with an inner disc cavity (planet trap). As in viscous disc models, the planet is found to experience a positive running time-averaged torque over several hundred orbits, which highlights the existence of an unsaturated corotation torque maintained in the long term in MHD turbulent discs. Two disc models with initial power-law density and temperature profiles are also adopted, in which the time-averaged tidal torque is found to be in decent agreement with its counterpart in laminar viscous disc models with similar viscosity alpha parameter at the planet location. Detailed analysis of the averaged torque density distributions indicates that the differential Lindblad torque takes very similar values in MHD

  14. Computer disc revolution.

    PubMed

    Nunnally, R H

    1994-05-01

    CD-ROM Computer Discs with read only memory are etched in polycarbonate discs that permit storage of up to 400,000 pages on a single disc. Use of this technology supplemented by access to the National Library of Medicine or a large information service brings the medical library to the rural physician's office. This allows pertinent journal information to be applied to day-to-day office practice. PMID:8034564

  15. A comparative study of disc-planet interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, M.; Edgar, R. G.; Artymowicz, P.; Ciecielag, P.; Cresswell, P.; D'Angelo, G.; Delgado-Donate, E. J.; Dirksen, G.; Fromang, S.; Gawryszczak, A.; Klahr, H.; Kley, W.; Lyra, W.; Masset, F.; Mellema, G.; Nelson, R. P.; Paardekooper, S.-J.; Peplinski, A.; Pierens, A.; Plewa, T.; Rice, K.; Schäfer, C.; Speith, R.

    2006-08-01

    We perform numerical simulations of a disc-planet system using various grid-based and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) codes. The tests are run for a simple setup where Jupiter and Neptune mass planets on a circular orbit open a gap in a protoplanetary disc during a few hundred orbital periods. We compare the surface density contours, potential vorticity and smoothed radial profiles at several times. The disc mass and gravitational torque time evolution are analysed with high temporal resolution. There is overall consistency between the codes. The density profiles agree within about 5 per cent for the Eulerian simulations. The SPH results predict the correct shape of the gap although have less resolution in the low-density regions and weaker planetary wakes. The disc masses after 200 orbital periods agree within 10 per cent. The spread is larger in the tidal torques acting on the planet which agree within a factor of 2 at the end of the simulation. In the Neptune case, the dispersion in the torques is greater than for Jupiter, possibly owing to the contribution from the not completely cleared region close to the planet.

  16. Chondrites and the Protoplanetary Disk, Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: Ca-, Al-Rich Inclusions and Ameoboid Olivine Aggregates: What We Know and Don t Know About Their Origin. Aluminium-26 and Oxygen Isotopic Distributions of Ca-Al-rich Inclusions from Acfer 214 CH Chondrite. The Trapping Efficiency of Helium in Fullerene and Its Implicatiion to the Planetary Science. Constraints on the Origin of Chondritic Components from Oxygen Isotopic Compositions. Role of Planetary Impacts in Thermal Processing of Chondrite Materials. Formation of the Melilite Mantle of the Type B1 CAIs: Flash Heating or Transport? The Iodine-Xenon System in Outer and Inner Portions of Chondrules from the Unnamed Antarctic LL3 Chondrite. Nucleosynthesis of Short-lived Radioactivities in Massive Stars. The Two-Fluid Analysis of the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in the Dust Layer of a Protoplanetary Disk: A Possible Path to the Planetesimal Formation Through the Gravitational Instability. Shock-Wave Heating Model for Chonodrule Formation: Heating Rate and Cooling Rate Constraints. Glycine Amide Hydrolysis with Water and OH Radical: A Comparative DFT Study. Micron-sized Sample Preparation for AFM and SEM. AFM, FE-SEM and Optical Imaging of a Shocked L/LL Chondrite: Implications for Martensite Formation and Wave Propagation. Infrared Spectroscopy of Chondrites and Their Components: A Link Between Meteoritics and Astronomy? Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of CAI and Their Mineral Components. The Origin of Iron Isotope Fractionation in Chondrules, CAIs and Matrix from Allende (CV3) and Chainpur (LL3) Chondrites. Protoplanetary Disk Evolution: Early Results from Spitzer. Kinetics of Evaporation-Condensation in a Melt-Solid System and Its Role on the Chemical Composition and Evolution of Chondrules. Oxygen Isotope Exchange Recorded Within Anorthite Single Crystal in Vigarano CAI: Evidence for Remelting by High Temperature Process in the Solar Nebula. Chondrule Forming Shock Waves in Solar Nebula by X-Ray Flares. Organic Globules with Anormalous

  17. Gas in Protoplanetary and Debris Disks: Insights from UV Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2008-01-01

    Over the last two decades, observations of protoplanetary and debris disks have played an important role in the new field of extrasolar planetary studies. Many are familiar with the extensive work on the cold circumstellar dust present in these disks done using infrared and sub-millimeter photometry and spectroscopy. However. UV spectroscopy has made some unique contributions by probing the elusive but vital gas component in protoplanetary and debris disks. In this talk, I will outline our picture of the evolution of protoplanetary disks and discuss the importance of the gas component. New insights obtained from UV spectroscopy will be highlighted, as well as some new puzzles. Finally, I will touch on upcoming studies of gas in protoplanetary and debris disks, some at UV wavelengths, some at far-IR and sub-mm wavelengths.

  18. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work, we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyα photons, since the Lyα line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more extended distribution of warm water vapor, while dust growth and settling tends to reduce the amount of warm water vapor. Based on typical assumptions regarding the elemental oxygen abundance and the water chemistry, the column density of warm water vapor can be as high as 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. A small amount of hot water vapor with temperature higher than ∼300 K exists in a more extended region in the upper atmosphere of the disk. Cold water vapor with temperature lower than 100 K is distributed over the entire disk, produced by photodesorption of the water ice.

  19. High-temperature Ionization in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desch, Steven J.; Turner, Neal J.

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the abundances of electrons and ions in the hot (≳500 K), dusty parts of protoplanetary disks, treating for the first time the effects of thermionic and ion emission from the dust grains. High-temperature ionization modeling has involved simply assuming that alkali elements such as potassium occur as gas-phase atoms and are collisionally ionized following the Saha equation. We show that the Saha equation often does not hold, because free charges are produced by thermionic and ion emission and destroyed when they stick to grain surfaces. This means the ionization state depends not on the first ionization potential of the alkali atoms, but rather on the grains’ work functions. The charged species’ abundances typically rise abruptly above about 800 K, with little qualitative dependence on the work function, gas density, or dust-to-gas mass ratio. Applying our results, we find that protoplanetary disks’ dead zone, where high diffusivities stifle magnetorotational turbulence, has its inner edge located where the temperature exceeds a threshold value ≈1000 K. The threshold is set by ambipolar diffusion except at the highest densities, where it is set by Ohmic resistivity. We find that the disk gas can be diffusively loaded onto the stellar magnetosphere at temperatures below a similar threshold. We investigate whether the “short-circuit” instability of current sheets can operate in disks and find that it cannot, or works only in a narrow range of conditions; it appears not to be the chondrule formation mechanism. We also suggest that thermionic emission is important for determining the rate of Ohmic heating in hot Jupiters.

  20. HIGH-TEMPERATURE IONIZATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, Steven J.; Turner, Neal J.

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the abundances of electrons and ions in the hot (≳500 K), dusty parts of protoplanetary disks, treating for the first time the effects of thermionic and ion emission from the dust grains. High-temperature ionization modeling has involved simply assuming that alkali elements such as potassium occur as gas-phase atoms and are collisionally ionized following the Saha equation. We show that the Saha equation often does not hold, because free charges are produced by thermionic and ion emission and destroyed when they stick to grain surfaces. This means the ionization state depends not on the first ionization potential of the alkali atoms, but rather on the grains’ work functions. The charged species’ abundances typically rise abruptly above about 800 K, with little qualitative dependence on the work function, gas density, or dust-to-gas mass ratio. Applying our results, we find that protoplanetary disks’ dead zone, where high diffusivities stifle magnetorotational turbulence, has its inner edge located where the temperature exceeds a threshold value ≈1000 K. The threshold is set by ambipolar diffusion except at the highest densities, where it is set by Ohmic resistivity. We find that the disk gas can be diffusively loaded onto the stellar magnetosphere at temperatures below a similar threshold. We investigate whether the “short-circuit” instability of current sheets can operate in disks and find that it cannot, or works only in a narrow range of conditions; it appears not to be the chondrule formation mechanism. We also suggest that thermionic emission is important for determining the rate of Ohmic heating in hot Jupiters.

  1. Nonazimuthal linear polarization in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas, H.; Ménard, F.; de Boer, J.; Pinte, C.; Avenhaus, H.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2015-10-01

    Several studies discussing imaging polarimetry observations of protoplanetary disks use the so-called radial Stokes parameters Qφ and Uφ to discuss the results. This approach has the advantage of providing a direct measure of the noise in the polarized images under the assumption that the polarization is only azimuthal, i.e., perpendicular to the direction toward the illuminating source. However, a detailed study of the validity of this assumption is currently missing. We aim to test whether departures from azimuthal polarization can naturally be produced by scattering processes in optically thick protoplanetary disks at near infrared wavelengths. We use the radiative transfer code MCFOST to create a generic model of a transition disk using different grain size distributions and dust masses. From these models we generate synthetic polarized images at 2.2 μm. We find that even for moderate inclinations (e.g., i = 40°), multiple scattering alone can produce significant (up to ~ 4.5% of the Qφ image, peak-to-peak) nonazimuthal polarization reflected in the Uφ images. We also find that different grain populations can naturally produce radial polarization (i.e., negative values in the Qφ images). Despite the simplifications of the models, our results suggest that caution is recommended when interpreting polarized images by only analyzing the Qφ and Uφ images. We find that there can be astrophysical signal in the Uφ images and negative values in the Qφ images, which indicate departures from azimuthal polarization. If significant signal is detected in the Uφ images, we recommend checking the standard Q and U images to look for departures from azimuthal polarization. On the positive side, signal in the Uφ images once all instrumental and data-reduction artifacts have been corrected for means that there is more information to be extracted regarding the dust population and particle density.

  2. Three-dimensional simulations of multiple protoplanets embedded in a protostellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, P.; Nelson, R. P.

    2008-05-01

    Context: Theory predicts that low-mass protoplanets in a protostellar disc migrate into the central star on a time scale that is short compared with the disc lifetime or the giant planet formation time scale. Protoplanet eccentricities of e⪆ H/r can slow or reverse migration, but previous 2D studies of multiple protoplanets embedded in a protoplanetary disc have shown that gravitational scattering cannot maintain significant planet eccentricities against disc-induced damping. The eventual fate of these systems was migration into the central star. Aims: Here we simulate the evolution of low-mass protoplanetary swarms in three dimensions. The aim is to examine both protoplanet survival rates and the dynamical structure of the resulting planetary systems, and to compare them with 2D simulations. Methods: We present results from a 3D hydrodynamic simulation of eight protoplanets embedded in a protoplanetary disc. We also present a suite of simulations performed using an N-body code, modified to include prescriptions for planetary migration and for eccentricity and inclination damping. These prescriptions were obtained by fitting analytic formulae to hydrodynamic simulations of planets embedded in discs with initially eccentric and/or inclined orbits. Results: As was found in two dimensions, differential migration produces groups of protoplanets in stable, multiple mean-motion resonances that migrate in lockstep, preventing prolonged periods of gravitational scattering. In almost all simulations, this leads to large-scale migration of the protoplanet swarm into the central star in the absence of a viable stopping mechanism. The evolution involves mutual collisions, occasional instances of large-scale scattering, and the frequent formation of the long-lived, co-orbital planet systems that arise in >30% of all runs. Conclusions: Disc-induced damping overwhelms eccentricity and inclination growth due to planet-planet interactions, leading to large-scale migration of

  3. Structure of evolving Accretion Discs and their Implications to the Formation of Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsch, Bertram; Morbidelli, A.; Crida, A.; Lega, E.

    2013-10-01

    Two features in a protoplanetary disc can have profound effects on planet formation. The first feature is "pressure bumps", i.e. local maxima in the gas surface density distribution that can arise e.g. at the inner edge of the dead zone. Pressure bumps stop the inward migration of small bodies undergoing gas drag (Brauer et al., 2008), promote the onset of the streaming instability (Johansen and Youdin, 2007), help the accretion of planetary embryos by the pebble-accretion process (Lambrechts and Johansen, 2012) and stop inward type-I migration by the planet-trap mechanism (Masset et al., 2006). The second feature is "scale height bumps", that originate from opacity transitions. The regions of the disc that are shadowed, where H/r decreases with r, allow planetary cores to migrate outwards due to entropy gradient effects (Paardekooper and Mellema (2006), Baruteau and Masset (2008)), until they reach the local minimum of the H/r profile (Bitsch et al. 2013). Thus, it is important to model the existence and the location of these structures in realistic protoplanetary discs. The structure of the disc is dependent on the mass-flux (accretion rate) through the disc, which determines the evolution of the density profile. This mass-flux changes in time, as the whole disc gets accreted onto the central star. We will show using 2D hydrodynamical models how the change of the accretion rate affects the disc structure and how this will change the sweet-spots for saving planetary cores from too rapid inward migration. We will focus here on "scale height bumps" in the disc that will change the alpha-viscosity and consequently the gas surface density (as the mass-flux is constant through the disc). Therefore the formation of pressure bumps is possible, whose prominence and effects on migration will be investigated in detail. This will give important indications of where and when in the disc the cores of giant planets and thus giant planets can form.

  4. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... 50. A herniated lumbar disc may also cause back pain, although back pain alone (without leg pain) can have many causes ... 90% success); surgery is less effective in relieving back pain. Nonsurgical treatment Your doctor may prescribe nonsurgical treatments ...

  5. Photophoresis in protoplanetary disks: a numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuello, N.; Pignatale, F. C.; Gonzalez, J.-F.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that rocky planets form in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks (PPD) about 1 - 10 AU from the star. However, theoretical calculations show that when particles reach the size for which the radial migration is the fastest they tend to be accreted very efficiently by the star. This is known as the radial-drift barrier. We explore the photophoresis in the inner regions of PPD as a possible mechanism for preventing the accretion of solid bodies onto the star. Photophoresis is the thermal creep induced by the momentum exchange of an illuminated solid particle with the surrounding gas. Recent laboratory experiments predict that photophoresis would be able to stop the inward drift of macroscopic bodies (from 1 mm to 1 m in size). This extra force has been included in our two-fluid (gas+dust) SPH code in order to study its efficiency. We show that the conditions of pressure and temperature encountered in the inner regions of PPD result in strong dynamical effects on the dust particles due to photophoresis. Our simulations show that there is a radial and a vertical sorting of the dust grains according to their sizes and their intrinsic densities. Thus, our calculations support the fact that photophoresis is a mechanism which can have a strong effect on the morphology of the inner regions of PPD, ultimately affecting the fate of planetesimals.

  6. PROTOPLANETARY MIGRATION IN TURBULENT ISOTHERMAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Baruteau, C.; Lin, D. N. C. E-mail: lin@ucolick.or

    2010-02-01

    In order to reproduce the statistical properties of the observed exoplanets, population synthesis models have shown that the migration of protoplanets should be significantly slowed down, and that processes stalling migration should be at work. Much current theoretical efforts have thus been dedicated to find physical effects that slow down, halt or even reverse migration. Many of these studies rely on the horseshoe drag, whose long-term evolution (saturated or not) is intimately related to the disk viscosity in laminar disk models. We investigate how the horseshoe drag exerted on a low-mass planet is altered by a more realistic treatment of the turbulence in protoplanetary disks. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed with a turbulence model that reproduces the main turbulence properties of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic calculations. We find that the horseshoe drag can remain unsaturated on the long term, depending on the turbulence strength. We show that the desaturation of the horseshoe drag by turbulence can be modeled by vortensity diffusion across the time-averaged planet's horseshoe region. At low-turbulence, the running-time-averaged torque is in good agreement with the total torque obtained for an equivalent laminar model, with a similar vortensity diffusion coefficient. At high turbulence, differences arise due to the time evolution of the averaged density profile with turbulence.

  7. The Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Mario; Turner, Neal J.

    2016-10-01

    Many stars host planets orbiting within one astronomical unit (AU). These close planets origins are a mystery that motivates investigating protoplanetary disks central regions.A key factor governing the conditions near the star is the silicate sublimation front, which largely determines where the starlight is absorbed, and which is often called the inner rim. We present the first radiation hydrodynamical modeling of the sublimation front in the disks around the young intermediate-mass stars called Herbig Ae stars. The models are axisymmetric, and include starlight heating, silicate grains sublimating and condensing to equilibrium at the local, timedependent temperature and density, and accretion stresses parametrizing the results of MHD magneto-rotational turbulence models.The results show for the first time the dynamical stability of the rim. Passing the model disks into Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations allows us to directly compare with observational constraints. The inner rim has a substantial radial extent, corresponding to several disk scale heights. A pressure maximum develops at the position of thermal ionization at temperatures about 1000 K. The pressure maximum is capable of halting solid pebbles radial drift and concentrating them in a zone where temperatures are sufficiently high for annealing to form crystalline silicates.

  8. TURBULENCE IN WEAKLY IONIZED PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Flock, M.; Henning, Th.; Klahr, H.

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the characteristic properties of self-sustained magneto-rotational instability (MRI) turbulence in low-ionized protoplanetary disks. We study the transition regime between active and dead zones, performing three-dimensional global non-ideal MHD simulations of stratified disks covering a range of magnetic Reynolds numbers between 2700 {approx}< R{sub m} {approx}< 6600. We found converged and saturated MRI turbulence for R{sub m} {approx}>5000 with a strength of {alpha}{sub SS} {approx} 0.01. Below R{sub m} {approx}< 5000, the MRI starts to decay at the midplane at first because the Elsasser number drops below 1. We find a transition regime between 3300{approx}

  9. Computing Temperatures in Optically Thick Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capuder, Lawrence F.. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    We worked with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to simulate the transfer of energy through protoplanetary disks, where planet formation occurs. The code tracks photons from the star into the disk, through scattering, absorption and re-emission, until they escape to infinity. High optical depths in the disk interior dominate the computation time because it takes the photon packet many interactions to get out of the region. High optical depths also receive few photons and therefore do not have well-estimated temperatures. We applied a modified random walk (MRW) approximation for treating high optical depths and to speed up the Monte Carlo calculations. The MRW is implemented by calculating the average number of interactions the photon packet will undergo in diffusing within a single cell of the spatial grid and then updating the packet position, packet frequencies, and local radiation absorption rate appropriately. The MRW approximation was then tested for accuracy and speed compared to the original code. We determined that MRW provides accurate answers to Monte Carlo Radiative transfer simulations. The speed gained from using MRW is shown to be proportional to the disk mass.

  10. High-resolution simulations of planetesimal formation in turbulent protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, A.; Klahr, H.; Henning, Th.

    2011-05-01

    We present high-resolution computer simulations of dust dynamics and planetesimal formation in turbulence generated by the magnetorotational instability. We show that the turbulent viscosity associated with magnetorotational turbulence in a non-stratified shearing box increases when going from 2563 to 5123 grid points in the presence of a weak imposed magnetic field, yielding a turbulent viscosity of α ≈ 0.003 at high resolution. Particles representing approximately meter-sized boulders concentrate in large-scale high-pressure regions in the simulation box. The appearance of zonal flows and particle concentration in pressure bumps is relatively similar at moderate (2563) and high (5123) resolution. In the moderate-resolution simulation we activate particle self-gravity at a time when there is little particle concentration, in contrast with previous simulations where particle self-gravity was activated during a concentration event. We observe that bound clumps form over the next ten orbits, with initial birth masses of a few times the dwarf planet Ceres. At high resolution we activate self-gravity during a particle concentration event, leading to a burst of planetesimal formation, with clump masses ranging from a significant fraction of to several times the mass of Ceres. We present a new domain decomposition algorithm for particle-mesh schemes. Particles are spread evenly among the processors and the local gas velocity field and assigned drag forces are exchanged between a domain-decomposed mesh and discrete blocks of particles. We obtain good load balancing on up to 4096 cores even in simulations where particles sediment to the mid-plane and concentrate in pressure bumps.

  11. A disc inside the bipolar planetary nebula M2-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykou, F.; Chesneau, O.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Lagadec, E.; Balick, B.; Smith, N.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: Bipolarity in proto-planetary and planetary nebulae is associated with events occurring in or around their cores. Past infrared observations have revealed the presence of dusty structures around the cores, many in the form of discs. Characterising those dusty discs provides invaluable constraints on the physical processes that govern the final mass expulsion of intermediate mass stars. We focus this study on the famous M2-9 bipolar nebula, where the moving lighthouse beam pattern indicates the presence of a wide binary. The compact and dense dusty core in the centre of the nebula can be studied by means of optical interferometry. Methods: M2-9 was observed with VLTI/MIDI at 39-47 m baselines with the UT2-UT3 and UT3-UT4 baseline configurations. These observations are interpreted using a dust radiative transfer Monte Carlo code. Results: A disc-like structure is detected perpendicular to the lobes, and a good fit is found with a stratified disc model composed of amorphous silicates. The disc is compact, 25 × 35 mas at 8 μm and 37 × 46 mas at 13 μm. For the adopted distance of 1.2 kpc, the inner rim of the disc is ~15 AU. The mass represents a few percent of the mass found in the lobes. The compactness of the disc puts strong constraints on the binary content of the system, given an estimated orbital period 90-120 yr. We derive masses of the binary components between 0.6-1.0 M⊙ for a white dwarf and 0.6-1.4 M⊙ for an evolved star. We present different scenarios on the geometric structure of the disc accounting for the interactions of the binary system, which includes an accretion disc as well. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, ESO N: 079.D-146.

  12. Formation of giant planets by fragmentation of protoplanetary disks.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Lucio; Quinn, Thomas; Wadsley, James; Stadel, Joachim

    2002-11-29

    The evolution of gravitationally unstable protoplanetary gaseous disks has been studied with the use of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations with unprecedented resolution. We have considered disks with initial masses and temperature profiles consistent with those inferred for the protosolar nebula and for other protoplanetary disks. We show that long-lasting, self-gravitating protoplanets arise after a few disk orbital periods if cooling is efficient enough to maintain the temperature close to 50 K. The resulting bodies have masses and orbital eccentricities similar to those of detected extrasolar planets.

  13. Cluster Dynamics Largely Shapes Protoplanetary Disk Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincke, Kirsten; Pfalzner, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    To what degree the cluster environment influences the sizes of protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars is still an open question. This is particularly true for the short-lived clusters typical for the solar neighborhood, in which the stellar density and therefore the influence of the cluster environment change considerably over the first 10 Myr. In previous studies, the effect of the gas on the cluster dynamics has often been neglected this is remedied here. Using the code NBody6++, we study the stellar dynamics in different developmental phases—embedded, expulsion, and expansion—including the gas, and quantify the effect of fly-bys on the disk size. We concentrate on massive clusters (M cl ≥ 103-6 ∗ 104 M Sun), which are representative for clusters like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) or NGC 6611. We find that not only the stellar density but also the duration of the embedded phase matters. The densest clusters react fastest to the gas expulsion and drop quickly in density, here 98% of relevant encounters happen before gas expulsion. By contrast, disks in sparser clusters are initially less affected, but because these clusters expand more slowly, 13% of disks are truncated after gas expulsion. For ONC-like clusters, we find that disks larger than 500 au are usually affected by the environment, which corresponds to the observation that 200 au-sized disks are common. For NGC 6611-like clusters, disk sizes are cut-down on average to roughly 100 au. A testable hypothesis would be that the disks in the center of NGC 6611 should be on average ≈20 au and therefore considerably smaller than those in the ONC.

  14. Linear stability of magnetized massive protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Min-Kai

    2014-07-20

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) and gravitational instability (GI) are the two principle routes to turbulent angular momentum transport in accretion disks. Protoplanetary disks (PPDs) may develop both. This paper aims to reinvigorate interest in the study of magnetized massive PPDs, starting from the basic issue of stability. The local linear stability of a self-gravitating, uniformly magnetized, differentially rotating, three-dimensional stratified disk subject to axisymmetric perturbations is calculated numerically. The formulation includes resistivity. It is found that the reduction in the disk thickness by self-gravity (SG) can decrease MRI growth rates; the MRI becomes global in the vertical direction, and MRI modes with small radial length scales are stabilized. The maximum vertical field strength that permits the MRI in a strongly self-gravitating polytropic disk with polytropic index Γ = 1 is estimated to be B{sub z,max}≃c{sub s0}Ω√(μ{sub 0}/16πG), where c{sub s0} is the midplane sound speed and Ω is the local angular velocity. In massive disks with layered resistivity, the MRI is not well localized to regions where the Elsasser number exceeds unity. For MRI modes with radial length scales on the order of the disk thickness, SG can enhance density perturbations, an effect that becomes significant in the presence of a strong toroidal field, and which depends on the symmetry of the underlying MRI mode. In gravitationally unstable disks where GI and MRI growth rates are comparable, the character of unstable modes can transition smoothly between MRI and GI. Implications for nonlinear simulations are discussed briefly.

  15. Induction Heating of Planetesimals in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Raymond L.; Roberge, W.

    2011-01-01

    Induction heating is a process originally proposed by Sonett et al. to explain thermal processing of asteroids, some of which were heated to temperatures >1000 K in the solar nebula. In the scenario of Sonett et al., the asteroids were heated during the Sun's T Tauri phase by a dense, fully-ionized solar wind. In their view an asteroid exposed to such a wind would "see” a motional electric field E=-v/c x B, where v is the wind velocity and B is the magnetic field in the wind's rest frame. If correct, the resulting electric polarization of the asteroidal material would produce electrical currents and heating via Ohmic dissipation. We revisit the induction heating mechanism to assess its possible relevance to planetesimals in weakly-ionized protoplanetary disks, where large magnetic fields of 0.1-1 G are predicted on a variety of grounds. Due to the high densities of these disks, we adopt a fluid approach for the plasma. We point out that E=-v/c x B is strictly speaking the electric field far from a planetesimal, where the plasma streams freely. At the planetesimal surface, viscous forces in a shear layer bring the plasma to rest and the motional electric field vanishes. We show that there is nevertheless a nonvanishing electric field produced indirectly via magnetic field perturbations in the shear layer. We calculate these perturbations by solving the equations of nonideal MHD, including Ohmic dissipation, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion. We use these results to find the electric field in- and outside a planetesimal and give quantitative estimates of the rates of heating by Ohmic dissipation, viscous dissipation, and energy dissipation associated with ambipolar diffusion.

  16. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field Br ˜ (10-4-10-2)(r/ AU)-2 G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ˜1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  17. The circumstellar disc of FS Tau B - a self-consistent model based on observations in the mid-infrared with NACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchschlager, Florian; Wolf, Sebastian; Madlener, David

    2016-10-01

    Protoplanetary discs are a byproduct of the star formation process. In the dense mid-plane of these discs, planetesimals and planets are expected to form. The first step in planet formation is the growth of dust particles from submicrometre-sized grains to macroscopic mm-sized aggregates. The grain growth is accompanied by radial drift and vertical segregation of the particles within the disc. To understand this essential evolutionary step, spatially resolved multi-wavelength observations as well as photometric data are necessary which reflect the properties of both disc and dust. We present the first spatially resolved image obtained with NACO at the VLT in the Lp band of the near edge-on protoplanetary disc FS Tau B. Based on this new image, a previously published Hubble image in H band and the spectral energy distribution from optical to millimetre wavelengths, we derive constraints on the spatial dust distribution and the progress of grain growth. For this purpose we perform a disc modelling using the radiative transfer code MC3D. Radial drift and vertical sedimentation of the dust are not considered. We find a best-fitting model which features a disc extending from 2 au to several hundreds au with a moderately decreasing surface density and Mdisc = 2.8 × 10-2 M⊙. The inclination amounts to i = 80°. Our findings indicate that substantial dust grain growth has taken place and that grains of a size equal to or larger than 1 mm are present in the disc. In conclusion, the parameters describing the vertical density distribution are better constrained than those describing the radial disc structure.

  18. Secular diffusion in discrete self-gravitating tepid discs. I. Analytic solution in the tightly wound limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouvry, J. B.; Pichon, C.; Chavanis, P. H.

    2015-09-01

    The secular evolution of an infinitely thin tepid isolated galactic disc made of a finite number of particles is described using the inhomogeneous Balescu-Lenard equation. Assuming that only tightly wound transient spirals are present in the disc, a WKB approximation provides a simple and tractable quadrature for the corresponding drift and diffusion coefficients. It provides insight into the physical processes at work during the secular diffusion of a self-gravitating discrete disc and makes quantitative predictions on the initial variations of the distribution function in action space. When applied to the secular evolution of an isolated stationary self-gravitating Mestel disc, this formalism predicts the initial importance of the corotation resonance in the inner regions of the disc leading to a regime involving radial migration and heating. It predicts in particular the formation of a ridge-like feature in action space, in agreement with simulations, but over-estimates the timescale involved in its appearance. Swing amplification is likely needed to resolve this discrepancy. In astrophysics, the inhomogeneous Balescu-Lenard equation and its WKB limit may also describe the secular diffusion of giant molecular clouds in galactic discs, the secular migration and segregation of planetesimals in proto-planetary discs, or even the long-term evolution of population of stars within the Galactic centre. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Tabbarah, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation. PMID:26483675

  20. Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavrukhina, Avgusta K.

    1991-01-01

    Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) characteristics of the chemical composition of molecular interstellar clouds; (2) properties and physico-chemical process in the genesis of interstellar dust grains; and (3) the isotope composition of volatiles in bodies of the Solar System.

  1. Dead Zones in protoplanetary disks : accumulation and coagulation of dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, S.; Taillifet, E.

    2011-10-01

    The growth of micronic dust to macroscopical sizes (>meter) in a turbulent protoplanetary disk is still largely debated. In particular the dust coagulation process must go through two barriers imposed by their coupling with the gas: the "meter" barrier due to an efficient radial migration of dust when their Stokes number is about one and the "fragmentation barrier" implied by the critical fragmentation velocity (around cm/s) preventing any further growth of particle when they reach a macroscopic size due to the two fast relative velocities of particles. So, paradoxically, a protoplanetary disks may seem quite a hostile place for dust-growth, despite the frequent detection of exoplanets showing that planetary formation is in fact an efficient process. We then explore a new possibility suggested by the stratified nature of a protoplanetary disk. Protoplanetary disks are expected to harbour nonionized regions in their mid-plane, the so called "dead zone" inside which the gas flow should be laminar. Dust coagulation in these regions could be quite effective and in addition, since they are regions of low diffusivity, they are expected to be able to accumulate efficiently dust. Using hybrid numerical simulations, coupling dustgrowth and dust dynamics, we explore how dust penetrate a dead-zone and how dust coagulate up to macroscopic sizes and compare it to coagulation efficiency in the active layers of the disk, subject to turbulence. Different disk structures will be explored and discussed. Implication for observations by ALMA will be also presented.

  2. Chondrites and the Protoplanetary Disk, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: On the Dynamical Evolution of a Nebula and Its Effect on Dust Coagulation and the Formation of Centimeter-sized Particles. The Mineralogy and Grain Properties of the Disk Surfaces in Three Herbig Ae/Be Stars. Astrophysical Observations of Disk Evolution Around Solar Mass Stars. The Systematic Petrology of Chondrites: A Consistent Approach to Assist Classification and Interpretation. Understanding Our Origins: Formation of Sun-like Stars in H II Region Environments. Chondrule Crystallization Experiments. Formation of SiO2-rich Chondrules by Fractional Condensation. Refractory Forsterites from Murchison (CM2) and Yamato 81020 (CO3.0) Chondrites: Cathodoluminescence, Chemical Compositions and Oxygen Isotopes. Apparent I-Xe Cooling Rates of Chondrules Compared with Silicates from the Colomera Iron Meteorite. Chondrule Formation in Planetesimal Bow Shocks: Physical Processes in the Near Vicinity of the Planetesimal. Genetic Relationships Between Chondrules, Rims and Matrix. Chondrite Fractionation was Cosmochemical; Chondrule Fractionation was Geochemical. Chondrule Formation and Accretion of Chondrite Parent Bodies: Environmental Constraints. Amoeboid Olivine Aggregates from the Semarkona LL3.0 Chondrite. The Evolution of Solids in Proto-Planetary Disks. New Nickel Vapor Pressure Measurements: Possible Implications for Nebular Condensates. Chemical, Mineralogical and Isotopic Properties of Chondrules: Clues to Their Origin. Maximal Size of Chondrules in Shock-Wave Heating Model: Stripping of Liquid Surface in Hypersonic Rarefied Gas Flow. The Nature and Origin of Interplanetary Dust: High Temperature Components. Refractory Relic Components in Chondrules from Ordinary Chondrites. Constraints on the Origin of Chondrules and CAIs from Short-lived and Long-lived Radionuclides. The Genetic Relationship Between Refractory Inclusions and Chondrules. Contemporaneous Chondrule Formation Between Ordinary and Carbonaceous Chondrites. Chondrules and

  3. The Evolving Properties of Water in a Dynamic Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, Fred

    2015-08-01

    Protoplanetary disks are dynamic objects, through which mass and angular momentum are transported as part of the final stages of pre-main sequence evolution of their central stars. These disks are also rich chemical factories, in which materials inherited from the interstellar medium are transformed through a series of reactions (involving, gases, solids, ions, and photons) to the eventual building blocks of the planets.The chemical and physical evolution of a protoplanetary disk are intimately connected. Both solids and gases are subjected to large-scale motions associated with disk evolution and diffusion within the gas. Solids also settle toward the disk midplane and migrate inwards due to gravity and gas drag. This dynamical evolution exposes primitive materials to a range of physical conditions (pressure, temperature, radiation environment) within the disk. It is the integrated effects of these environments that define the physical and chemical properties of a solid grain prior to its incorporation into a planetesimal or planet.Water serves as an interesting tracer of this evolution, as it would be processed in a variety of ways within a protoplanetary disk. I will discuss new methods that allow us to trace the dynamical movement of water vapor and ice throughout the lifetime of a protoplanetary disk and to determine the physical environments to which the water would be exposed. In particular, I will show how the early evolution of a protoplanetary disk impacts the D/H ratio of the water inherited by planetary materials. I will also explore how photodesorption of water by UV photons can lead to the formation of amorphous ice and thus the trapping of noble gases and other volatiles at levels that are much greater than predicted by equilibrium chemistry models. These effects combine to lead to constantly evolving properties of water during the early stages of planet formation. I will also discuss how the observed properties of Solar System bodies constrain these

  4. Revival of the Jumping Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H-J.

    2009-01-01

    Snap discs made of bimetal have many technical applications as thermostats. Jumping discs are a toy version of such snap discs. Besides giving technical information, we describe physical investigations. We show especially how, through simple measurements and calculations, you can determine the initial speed ([approximately equal to]3.5 m…

  5. How do accretion discs break?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Suzan

    2016-07-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. In this study, we first calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. We compare the disc precession torque with the disc viscous torque to determine whether the disc should warp or break. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. To check our analytical findings, we perform 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations using the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and enhances accretion on to the central object. For some inclinations, the disc goes through strong Kozai cycles. Disc breaking promotes markedly enhanced and variable accretion and potentially produces high-energy particles or radiation through shocks. This would have significant implications for all binary systems: e.g. accretion outbursts in X-ray binaries and fuelling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The behaviour we have discussed in this work is relevant to a variety of astrophysical systems, for example X-ray binaries, where the disc plane may be tilted by radiation warping, SMBH binaries, where accretion of misaligned gas can create effectively random inclinations and protostellar binaries, where a disc may be misaligned by a variety of effects such as binary capture/exchange, accretion after binary formation.

  6. The Chemistry of Optical Discs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, David

    2002-01-01

    Explains the chemistry used in compact discs (CD), digital versatile discs (DVD), and magneto-optical (MO) discs focusing on the steps of initial creation of the mold, the molding of the polycarbonate, the deposition of the reflective layers, the lacquering of the CDs, and the bonding of DVDs. (Contains 15 references.) (YDS)

  7. The Teddy Bears' Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurillard, Diana

    1985-01-01

    Reports an evaluation of the Teddy Bear disc, an interactive videodisc developed at the Open University for a second-level course in metallurgy and materials technology. Findings from observation of students utilizing the videodisc are reviewed; successful design features and design problems are considered; and development costs are outlined. (MBR)

  8. A self-consistent reduced model for dusty magnetorotationally unstable discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Balbus, Steven

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between settling of dust grains and magnetorotational instability (MRI) turbulence in protoplanetary discs is analysed. We use a reduced system of coupled ordinary differential equations to represent the interaction between the diffusion of grains and the inhibition of the MRI. The coupled equations are styled on a Landau equation for the turbulence and a Fokker-Planck equation for the diffusion. The turbulence-grain interaction is probably most relevant near the outer edge of the disc's quiescent, or 'dead' zone. Settling is most pronounced near the mid-plane, where a high dust concentration can self-consistently suppress the MRI. Under certain conditions, however, grains can reach high altitudes, a result of some observational interest. Finally, we show that the equilibrium solutions are linearly stable.

  9. ISO Spectroscopy of Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the chemical properties of the dust shells around protoplanetary nebulae (PPNs) through a study of their short-wavelength (6-45 micron) infrared spectra. PPNs are evolved stars in transition from the asymptotic giant branch to the planetary nebula stages. Spectral features in the 10 to 20 gm region indicate the chemical nature (oxygen- or carbon-rich), and the strengths of the features relate to the physical properties of the shells. A few bright carbon-rich PPNs have been observed to show PAH features and an unidentified 21 micron emission feature. We used the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to observe a sample of IRAS sources that have the expected properties of PPNs and for which we have accurate positions. Some of these have optical counterparts (proposal SWSPPN01) and some do not (SWSPPN02). We had previously observed these from the ground with near-infrared photometry and, for those with visible counterparts, visible photometry and spectroscopy, which we have combined with these new ISO data in the interpretation of the spectra. We have completed a study of the unidentified emission feature at 21 micron in eight sources. We find the shape of the feature to be the same in all of the sources, with no evidence of any substructure. The ratio of the emission peak to continuum ranges from 0.13 to 1.30. We have completed a study of seven PPNs and two other carbon-rich objects for which we had obtained ISO 2-45 micron observations. The unidentified emission features at 21 and 30 micron were detected in six sources, including four new detections of the 30 micron feature. This previously unresolved 30 micron feature was resolved and found to consist of a broad feature peaking at 27.2 micron (the "30 micron" feature) and a narrower feature peaking at 25.5 micron (the "26 micron" feature). This new 26 micron feature is detected in eight sources and is particularly strong in IRAS Z02229+6208 and 16594-4656. The unidentified

  10. Migration and growth of protoplanetary embryos. I. Convergence of embryos in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Liu, Beibei; Li, Hui

    2014-12-10

    According to the core accretion scenario, planets form in protostellar disks through the condensation of dust, coagulation of planetesimals, and emergence of protoplanetary embryos. At a few AU in a minimum mass nebula, embryos' growth is quenched by dynamical isolation due to the depletion of planetesimals in their feeding zone. However, embryos with masses (M{sub p} ) in the range of a few Earth masses (M {sub ⊕}) migrate toward a transition radius between the inner viscously heated and outer irradiated regions of their natal disk. Their limiting isolation mass increases with the planetesimals surface density. When M{sub p} > 10 M {sub ⊕}, embryos efficiently accrete gas and evolve into cores of gas giants. We use a numerical simulation to show that despite stream line interference, convergent embryos essentially retain the strength of non-interacting embryos' Lindblad and corotation torques by their natal disks. In disks with modest surface density (or equivalently accretion rates), embryos capture each other in their mutual mean motion resonances and form a convoy of super-Earths. In more massive disks, they could overcome these resonant barriers to undergo repeated close encounters, including cohesive collisions that enable the formation of massive cores.

  11. Mechanotransduction in intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lai, Po-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction plays a critical role in intracellular functioning—it allows cells to translate external physical forces into internal biochemical activities, thereby affecting processes ranging from proliferation and apoptosis to gene expression and protein synthesis in a complex web of interactions and reactions. Accordingly, aberrant mechanotransduction can either lead to, or be a result of, a variety of diseases or degenerative states. In this review, we provide an overview of mechanotransduction in the context of intervertebral discs, with a focus on the latest methods of investigating mechanotransduction and the most recent findings regarding the means and effects of mechanotransduction in healthy and degenerative discs. We also provide some discussion of potential directions for future research and treatments. PMID:25267492

  12. Biomechanics of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Palepu, V.; Kodigudla, M.; Goel, V. K.

    2012-01-01

    Disc degeneration and associated disorders are among the most debated topics in the orthopedic literature over the past few decades. These may be attributed to interrelated mechanical, biochemical, and environmental factors. The treatment options vary from conservative approaches to surgery, depending on the severity of degeneration and response to conservative therapies. Spinal fusion is considered to be the “gold standard” in surgical methods till date. However, the association of adjacent level degeneration has led to the evolution of motion preservation technologies like spinal arthroplasty and posterior dynamic stabilization systems. These new technologies are aimed to address pain and preserve motion while maintaining a proper load sharing among various spinal elements. This paper provides an elaborative biomechanical review of the technologies aimed to address the disc degeneration and reiterates the point that biomechanical efficacy followed by long-term clinical success will allow these nonfusion technologies as alternatives to fusion, at least in certain patient population. PMID:22745914

  13. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  14. [Cervical disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, C-H; Kandziora, F

    2012-12-01

    The cervical disc herniation is characterized by prolapsed nucleus pulposus material through the annulus into the spinal canal. The local mechanical or chemical irritation of neural structures typically leads to symptoms of radiculopathy, cervicocephalgia or myelopathy. Pronounced sensorimotor deficits or intractable pain constitute surgical treatment. In all other cases conservative treatment is indicated, including pain medication, active and passive physiotherapy, and local injections, respectively. Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is still the surgical treatment of choice. Predominantly, cages with or without plates are in use to obtain solid fusion. The implantation of a total disc replacement is a viable alternative, if no contraindications exist. Other surgical techniques may be performed in proper selected cases. The overall clinical and radiological results of both surgical and conservative treatment are good. PMID:23296562

  15. THE DISK IMAGING SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY WITH SMA. I. TAURUS PROTOPLANETARY DISK DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Qi Chunhua; Andrews, Sean M.; Espaillat, Catherine; Van Kempen, Tim A.; Wilner, David J.; Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2010-09-01

    Chemistry plays an important role in the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks, with implications for the composition of comets and planets. This is the first of a series of papers based on data from DISCS, a Submillimeter Array survey of the chemical composition of protoplanetary disks. The six Taurus sources in the program (DM Tau, AA Tau, LkCa 15, GM Aur, CQ Tau, and MWC 480) range in stellar spectral type from M1 to A4 and offer an opportunity to test the effects of stellar luminosity on the disk chemistry. The disks were observed in 10 different lines at {approx}3'' resolution and an rms of {approx}100 mJy beam{sup -1} at {approx}0.5 km s{sup -1}. The four brightest lines are CO 2-1, HCO{sup +} 3-2, CN 2{sub 33/4/2} - 1{sub 22/3/1}, and HCN 3-2, and these are detected toward all sources (except for HCN toward CQ Tau). The weaker lines of CN 2{sub 22}-1{sub 11}, DCO{sup +} 3-2, N{sub 2}H{sup +} 3-2, H{sub 2}CO 3{sub 03}-2{sub 02}, and 4{sub 14}-3{sub 13} are detected toward two to three disks each, and DCN 3-2 only toward LkCa 15. CH{sub 3}OH 4{sub 21}-3{sub 1} {sub 2} and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} are not detected. There is no obvious difference between the T Tauri and Herbig Ae sources with regard to CN and HCN intensities. In contrast, DCO{sup +}, DCN, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO are detected only toward the T Tauri stars, suggesting that the disks around Herbig Ae stars lack cold regions for long enough timescales to allow for efficient deuterium chemistry, CO freeze-out, and grain chemistry.

  16. Total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. PMID:24412045

  17. Spiral density waves in a young protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Laura M.; Carpenter, John M.; Andrews, Sean M.; Ricci, Luca; Isella, Andrea; Linz, Hendrik; Sargent, Anneila I.; Wilner, David J.; Henning, Thomas; Deller, Adam T.; Chandler, Claire J.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Lazio, Joseph; Menten, Karl M.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Storm, Shaye; Testi, Leonardo; Tazzari, Marco; Kwon, Woojin; Calvet, Nuria; Greaves, Jane S.; Harris, Robert J.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2016-09-01

    Gravitational forces are expected to excite spiral density waves in protoplanetary disks, disks of gas and dust orbiting young stars. However, previous observations that showed spiral structure were not able to probe disk midplanes, where most of the mass is concentrated and where planet formation takes place. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we detected a pair of trailing symmetric spiral arms in the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young star Elias 2-27. The arms extend to the disk outer regions and can be traced down to the midplane. These millimeter-wave observations also reveal an emission gap closer to the star than the spiral arms. We argue that the observed spirals trace shocks of spiral density waves in the midplane of this young disk.

  18. EFFECTS OF DUST FEEDBACK ON VORTICES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lubow, Stephen

    2014-11-10

    We carried out two-dimensional, high-resolution simulations to study the effect of dust feedback on the evolution of vortices induced by massive planets in protoplanetary disks. Various initial dust to gas disk surface density ratios (0.001-0.01) and dust particle sizes (Stokes number 4 × 10{sup –4}-0.16) are considered. We found that while dust particles migrate inward, vortices are very effective at collecting them. When dust density becomes comparable to gas density within the vortex, a dynamical instability is excited and it alters the coherent vorticity pattern and destroys the vortex. This dust feedback effect is stronger with a higher initial dust/gas density ratio and larger dust grain. Consequently, we found that the disk vortex lifetime can be reduced up to a factor of 10. We discuss the implications of our findings on the survivability of vortices in protoplanetary disks and planet formation.

  19. The Ice Line in Pre-Solar Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2012-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks contain abundant quantities of water molecules in both gas and solid phases. The distribution of these two phases in an evolving protoplanetary disk will have important consequences regarding water sequestration in planetary embryos. The boundary between gaseous and solid water is the "ice line" or "snow line" A simplified model that captures the complicated two-branched structure of the ice line is developed and compared with recent investigations. The effect of an evolving Sun is also included for the first time. This latter parameter could have important consequences regarding the thermodynamic state and the surface reaction environment for the time-dependent chemical reactions occurring during the 1- to 10-million-year lifetime of the pre-solar disk.

  20. Rotational instability in the outer region of protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Tomohiro; Nomura, Hideko; Takeuchi, Taku

    2014-05-20

    We analytically calculate the marginally stable surface density profile for the rotational instability of protoplanetary disks. The derived profile can be utilized for considering the region in a rotating disk where radial pressure gradient force is comparable to the gravitational force, such as an inner edge, steep gaps or bumps, and an outer region of the disk. In this paper, we particularly focus on the rotational instability in the outer region of disks. We find that a protoplanetary disk with a surface density profile of similarity solution becomes rotationally unstable at a certain radius, depending on its temperature profile and a mass of the central star. If the temperature is relatively low and the mass of the central star is high, disks have rotationally stable similarity profiles. Otherwise, deviation from the similarity profiles of surface density could be observable, using facilities with high sensitivity, such as ALMA.

  1. Protoplanetary Disk Heating and Evolution Driven by Spiral Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-11-01

    Scattered light imaging of protoplanetary disks often reveals prominent spiral arms, likely excited by massive planets or stellar companions. Assuming that these arms are density waves, evolving into spiral shocks, we assess their effect on the thermodynamics, accretion, and global evolution of the disk. We derive analytical expressions for the direct (irreversible) heating, angular momentum transport, and mass accretion rate induced by disk shocks of arbitrary amplitude. These processes are very sensitive to the shock strength. We show that waves of moderate strength (density jump at the shock ΔΣ/Σ ∼ 1) result in negligible disk heating (contributing at the ∼1% level to the energy budget) in passive, irradiated protoplanetary disks on ∼100 au scales, but become important within several au. However, shock heating is a significant (or even dominant) energy source in disks of cataclysmic variables, stellar X-ray binaries, and supermassive black hole binaries, heated mainly by viscous dissipation. Mass accretion induced by the spiral shocks is comparable to (or exceeds) the mass inflow due to viscous stresses. Protoplanetary disks featuring prominent global spirals must be evolving rapidly, in ≲0.5 Myr at ∼100 au. A direct upper limit on the evolution timescale can be established by measuring the gravitational torque due to the spiral arms from the imaging data. We find that, regardless of their origin, global spiral waves must be important agents of the protoplanetary disk evolution. They may serve as an effective mechanism of disk dispersal and could be related to the phenomenon of transitional disks.

  2. The Jets of the Proto-Planetary Nebula CRL 618

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, Angels; Raga, Alejandro C.; Velázquez, Pablo F.; Haro-Corzo, Sinhue; Kajdic, Primoz

    We present here the kinematic structure and the excitation conditions of the collimated outflows of the proto-planetary nebula CRL 618 based on high spatial resolution spectroscopy obtained with STIS onboard HST. The spectra obtained show a linear increase of the radial velocity with distance to the central source. We find that the emission line ratios observed in the clumpy lobes of CRL 618 are similar to high or low-excitation HH excitation class depending on the emission line ratio.

  3. Disc edge veins of Kraupa associated with optic disc drusen

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Andrea; Almela, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Disc edge veins of Kraupa are a rare anomaly of the retinal venous system in which the main trunk of the retinal vein disappeared into the margin of the optic disc instead of its centre. Methods: A 40-year-old woman was detected to have an anomaly in her left optic disc in a routine eye examination. The eyes had an anomaly of the retinal venous system in which all branches of the retinal vein joined in a common trunk that entered the disc margin inferonasally. The central retinal artery issued from the centre of the disc separately of the venous system. B-scan ultrasonografhy revealed the presence of hyperechoic imaging at the optic nerve head in both eyes. Results: We describe the association of disc edge veins of Kraupa with optic disc drusen. Conclusion: Vascular complications of optic disc drusen hav been described. We don’t know the implication of disc edge veins in the pathogenesis of these complications.

  4. Low extreme-ultraviolet luminosities impinging on protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Hendler, N. P.; Ricci, L.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Brooks, K. J.; Contreras, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The amount of high-energy stellar radiation reaching the surface of protoplanetary disks is essential to determine their chemistry and physical evolution. Here, we use millimetric and centimetric radio data to constrain the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) luminosity impinging on 14 disks around young (∼2-10 Myr) sun-like stars. For each object we identify the long-wavelength emission in excess to the dust thermal emission, attribute that to free-free disk emission, and thereby compute an upper limit to the EUV reaching the disk. We find upper limits lower than 10{sup 42} photons s{sup –1} for all sources without jets and lower than 5 × 10{sup 40} photons s{sup –1} for the three older sources in our sample. These latter values are low for EUV-driven photoevaporation alone to clear out protoplanetary material in the timescale inferred by observations. In addition, our EUV upper limits are too low to reproduce the [Ne II] 12.81 μm luminosities from three disks with slow [Ne II]-detected winds. This indicates that the [Ne II] line in these sources primarily traces a mostly neutral wind where Ne is ionized by 1 keV X-ray photons, implying higher photoevaporative mass loss rates than those predicted by EUV-driven models alone. In summary, our results suggest that high-energy stellar photons other than EUV may dominate the dispersal of protoplanetary disks around sun-like stars.

  5. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  6. The development of a protoplanetary disk from its natal envelope.

    PubMed

    Watson, Dan M; Bohac, C J; Hull, C; Forrest, William J; Furlan, E; Najita, J; Calvet, Nuria; d'Alessio, Paola; Hartmann, Lee; Sargent, B; Green, Joel D; Kim, Kyoung Hee; Houck, J R

    2007-08-30

    Class 0 protostars, the youngest type of young stellar objects, show many signs of rapid development from their initial, spheroidal configurations, and therefore are studied intensively for details of the formation of protoplanetary disks within protostellar envelopes. At millimetre wavelengths, kinematic signatures of collapse have been observed in several such protostars, through observations of molecular lines that probe their outer envelopes. It has been suggested that one or more components of the proto-multiple system NGC 1333-IRAS 4 (refs 1, 2) may display signs of an embedded region that is warmer and denser than the bulk of the envelope. Here we report observations that reveal details of the core on Solar System dimensions. We detect in NGC 1333-IRAS 4B a rich emission spectrum of H2O, at wavelengths 20-37 microm, which indicates an origin in extremely dense, warm gas. We can model the emission as infall from a protostellar envelope onto the surface of a deeply embedded, dense disk, and therefore see the development of a protoplanetary disk. This is the only example of mid-infrared water emission from a sample of 30 class 0 objects, perhaps arising from a favourable orientation; alternatively, this may be an early and short-lived stage in the evolution of a protoplanetary disk. PMID:17728752

  7. Heat distribution in disc brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenda, Frantisek; Soukup, Josef; Kampo, Jan

    2016-06-01

    This article is deals by the thermal analysis of the disc brake with floating caliper. The issue is solved by numerically. The half 2D model is used for solution in program ADINA 8.8. Two brake discs without the ventilation are solved. One disc is made from cast iron and the second is made from stainless steel. Both materials are an isotropic. By acting the pressure force on the brake pads will be pressing the pads to the brake disc. Speed will be reduced (slowing down). On the contact surface generates the heat, which the disc and pads heats. In the next part of article is comparison the maximum temperature at the time of braking. The temperatures of both materials for brake disc (gray cast iron, stainless steel) are compares. The heat flux during braking for the both materials is shown.

  8. Edge-on thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, A.; Katkov, I.; Chilingarian, I.; Silchenko, O.; Moiseev, A.; Borisov, S.

    2016-06-01

    Although thick stellar discs are detected in nearly all edge-on disc galaxies, their formation scenarios still remain a matter of debate. Due to observational difficulties, there is a lack of information about their stellar populations. Using the Russian 6-m telescope BTA we collected deep spectra of thick discs in three edge-on early-type disc galaxies located in different environments: NGC4111 in a dense group, NGC4710 in the Virgo cluster, and NGC5422 in a sparse group. We see intermediate age (4 ‑ 5 Gyr) metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ ‑0.2 ‑ 0.0 dex) stellar populations in NGC4111 and NGC4710. On the other hand, NGC5422 does not harbour young stars, its only disc is thick and old (10 Gyr) and its α-element abundance suggests a long formation epoch implying its formation at high redshift. Our results prove the diversity of thick disc formation scenarios.

  9. Enclosed rotary disc air pulser

    DOEpatents

    Olson, A. L.; Batcheller, Tom A.; Rindfleisch, J. A.; Morgan, John M.

    1989-01-01

    An enclosed rotary disc air pulser for use with a solvent extraction pulse olumn includes a housing having inlet, exhaust and pulse leg ports, a shaft mounted in the housing and adapted for axial rotation therein, first and second disc members secured to the shaft within the housing in spaced relation to each other to define a chamber therebetween, the chamber being in communication with the pulse leg port, the first disc member located adjacent the inlet port, the second disc member being located adjacent the exhaust port, each disc member having a milled out portion, the disc members positioned on the shaft so that as the shaft rotates, the milled out portions permit alternative cyclical communication between the inlet port and the chamber and the exhaust port and the chamber.

  10. Constraint of a planet mass from the depth and width of an observed gap on a protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro; Muto, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku

    2015-12-01

    In a protoplanetary disk, a large planet is able to create the so-called disk gap, which is a low gas density region along the planet's orbit, due to the gravitational interaction between the disc and the planet. The gap formation induced by the giant planet is a possible mechanism to explain the formation of the so-called pre-transition disks with a ring gap structure. If the gap is created by the planet, the gap shape, i.e., the depth and width, would represent the mass and location of the planet. At the present stage, many pre-transition disks have been observed by e.g., ALMA and Subaru telescopes. It is important for us to examine what properties of the planet are constrained from the observed gap if the planet is in the gap.We derived the relation between the depth of the observed gap and the planet mass in the gap based on the analytical model (Kanagawa et al. 2015a). This relation is a powerful tool to estimate the planet mass from the direct imaging of gaps in protoplanetary disks. We also applied this relation to the image of HL Tau' disk given by a part of the 2014 ALMA long baseline camphene and estimate the planet masses (Kanagawa et al 2015b).We also performed the numerical hydrodynamic simulation with the FARGO which is well-known code for the rotation disk, and found that the gap width becomes wider with a square root of the planet mass. Using this empirical relation for the gap width, we can also constrain the planet mass from the gap width.I'll talk about the relation between the gap depth, width and the planet, and the method for estimating the planet mass from the observed image of the disks.

  11. Five steps in the evolution from protoplanetary to debris disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, M. C.; Panić, O.; Kennedy, G. M.; Matrà, L.

    2015-06-01

    The protoplanetary disks seen around Herbig Ae stars eventually dissipate leaving just a tenuous debris disk, comprised of planetesimals and the dust derived from them, as well as possibly gas and planets. This paper uses the properties of the youngest (10-20 Myr) A star debris disks to consider the transition from protoplanetary to debris disk. It is argued that the physical distinction between these two classes should rest on the presence of primordial gas in sufficient quantities to dominate the motion of small dust grains (rather than on the secondary nature of the dust or its level of stirring). This motivates an observational classification based on the dust emission spectrum which is empirically defined so that A star debris disks require fractional excesses <3 at 12 μm and <2000 at 70 μm. We also propose that a useful hypothesis to test is that the planet and planetesimal systems seen on the main sequence are already in place during the protoplanetary disk phase, but are obscured or overwhelmed by the rest of the disk. This may be only weakly true if the architecture of the planetary system continues to change until frozen at the epoch of disk dispersal, or completely false if planets and planetesimals form during the relatively short dispersal phase. Five steps in the transition are discussed: (i) the well-known carving of an inner hole to form a transition disk; (ii) depletion of mm-sized dust in the outer disk, where it is noted that it is of critical importance to ascertain whether this mass ends up in larger planetesimals or is collisionally depleted; (iii) final clearing of inner regions, where it is noted that multiple debris-like mechanisms exist to replenish moderate levels of hot dust at later phases, and that these likely also operate in protoplanetary disks; (iv) disappearance of the gas, noting the recent discoveries of both primordial and secondary gas in debris disks which highlight our ignorance in this area and its impending enlightenment

  12. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  13. 26 CFR 1.6011-2 - Returns, etc., of DISC's and former DISC's.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Returns, etc., of DISC's and former DISC's. 1.6011-2 Section 1.6011-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...., of DISC's and former DISC's. (a) Records and information. Every DISC and former DISC (as defined...

  14. Secular diffusion in discrete self-gravitating tepid discs II. Accounting for swing amplification via the matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouvry, J. B.; Pichon, C.; Magorrian, J.; Chavanis, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    The secular evolution of an infinitely thin tepid isolated galactic disc made of a finite number of particles is investigated using the inhomogeneous Balescu-Lenard equation expressed in terms of angle-action variables. The matrix method is implemented numerically in order to model the induced gravitational polarisation. Special care is taken to account for the amplification of potential fluctuations of mutually resonant orbits and the unwinding of the induced swing amplified transients. Quantitative comparisons with N-body simulations yield consistent scalings with the number of particles and with the self-gravity of the disc: the fewer the particles and the colder the disc, the faster the secular evolution. Secular evolution is driven by resonances, but does not depend on the initial phases of the disc. For a Mestel disc with Q ~ 1.5, the polarisation cloud around each star boosts its secular effect by a factor of a thousand or more, accordingly promoting the dynamical relevance of self-induced collisional secular evolution. The position and shape of the induced resonant ridge are found to be in very good agreement with the prediction of the Balescu-Lenard equation, which scales with the square of the susceptibility of the disc. In astrophysics, the inhomogeneous Balescu-Lenard equation may describe the secular diffusion of giant molecular clouds in galactic discs, the secular migration and segregation of planetesimals in proto-planetary discs, or even the long-term evolution of population of stars within the Galactic centre. It could be used as a valuable check of the accuracy of N-body integrators on secular timescales. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgA copy of the linear matrix response code is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A129

  15. Determining the mid-plane conditions of circumstellar discs using gas and dust modelling: a study of HD 163296

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneberg, Dominika M.; Panić, Olja; Haworth, Thomas J.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Min, Michiel

    2016-09-01

    The mass of gas in protoplanetary discs is a quantity of great interest for assessing their planet formation potential. Disc gas masses are, however, traditionally inferred from measured dust masses by applying an assumed standard gas-to-dust ratio of g/d = 100. Furthermore, measuring gas masses based on CO observations has been hindered by the effects of CO freeze-out. Here we present a novel approach to study the mid-plane gas by combining C18O line modelling, CO snowline observations and the spectral energy distribution and selectively study the inner tens of au where freeze-out is not relevant. We apply the modelling technique to the disc around the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 with particular focus on the regions within the CO snowline radius, measured to be at 90 au in this disc. Our models yield the mass of C18O in this inner disc region of M_{C^{18}O}({<}90 au)˜ 2× 10^{-8} M⊙. We find that most of our models yield a notably low g/d < 20, especially in the disc mid-plane (g/d < 1). Our only models with a more interstellar medium (ISM)-like g/d require C18O to be underabundant with respect to the ISM abundances and a significant depletion of sub-micron grains, which is not supported by scattered light observations. Our technique can be applied to a range of discs and opens up a possibility of measuring gas and dust masses in discs within the CO snowline location without making assumptions about the gas-to-dust ratio.

  16. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, Ali; Boulahroud, Omar; Elasri, Abad; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2010-07-01

    Intraradicular lumbar disc herniation is a rare complication of disc disease that is generally diagnosed only during surgery. The mechanism for herniated disc penetration into the intradural space is not known with certainty, but adhesion between the radicular dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament was suggested as the most important condition. The authors report the first case of an intraradicular lumbar disc herniation without subdural penetration; the disc hernia was lodged between the two radicular dura layers. The patient, a 34-year-old soldier, was admitted with a 12-month history of low back pain and episodic left sciatica. Neurologic examination showed a positive straight leg raising test on the left side without sensory, motor or sphincter disturbances. Spinal CT scan and MRI exploration revealed a left posterolateral osteophyte formation at the L5-S1 level with an irregular large disc herniation, which migrated superiorly. An intradural extension was suspected. A left L5 hemilaminectomy and S1 foraminotomy were performed. The exploration revealed a large fragment of disc material located between the inner and outer layers of the left S1 radicular dura. The mass was extirpated without cerebrospinal fluid outflow. The postoperative course was uneventful. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation should be suspected when a swollen, hard and immobile nerve root is present intraoperatively.

  17. MINERAL PROCESSING BY SHORT CIRCUITS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ebel, Denton S.; D'Alessio, Paola E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org E-mail: debel@amnh.org

    2013-04-10

    Meteoritic chondrules were formed in the early solar system by brief heating of silicate dust to melting temperatures. Some highly refractory grains (Type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) also show signs of transient heating. A similar process may occur in other protoplanetary disks, as evidenced by observations of spectra characteristic of crystalline silicates. One possible environment for this process is the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow thought to drive accretion in these disks. Such flows generally form thin current sheets, which are sites of magnetic reconnection, and dissipate the magnetic fields amplified by a disk dynamo. We suggest that it is possible to heat precursor grains for chondrules and other high-temperature minerals in current sheets that have been concentrated by our recently described short-circuit instability. We extend our work on this process by including the effects of radiative cooling, taking into account the temperature dependence of the opacity; and by examining current sheet geometry in three-dimensional, global models of magnetorotational instability. We find that temperatures above 1600 K can be reached for favorable parameters that match the ideal global models. This mechanism could provide an efficient means of tapping the gravitational potential energy of the protoplanetary disk to heat grains strongly enough to form high-temperature minerals. The volume-filling nature of turbulent magnetic reconnection is compatible with constraints from chondrule-matrix complementarity, chondrule-chondrule complementarity, the occurrence of igneous rims, and compound chondrules. The same short-circuit mechanism may perform other high-temperature mineral processing in protoplanetary disks such as the production of crystalline silicates and CAIs.

  18. Mineral Processing by Short Circuits in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ebel, Denton S.; D'Alessio, Paola

    2013-04-01

    Meteoritic chondrules were formed in the early solar system by brief heating of silicate dust to melting temperatures. Some highly refractory grains (Type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) also show signs of transient heating. A similar process may occur in other protoplanetary disks, as evidenced by observations of spectra characteristic of crystalline silicates. One possible environment for this process is the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow thought to drive accretion in these disks. Such flows generally form thin current sheets, which are sites of magnetic reconnection, and dissipate the magnetic fields amplified by a disk dynamo. We suggest that it is possible to heat precursor grains for chondrules and other high-temperature minerals in current sheets that have been concentrated by our recently described short-circuit instability. We extend our work on this process by including the effects of radiative cooling, taking into account the temperature dependence of the opacity; and by examining current sheet geometry in three-dimensional, global models of magnetorotational instability. We find that temperatures above 1600 K can be reached for favorable parameters that match the ideal global models. This mechanism could provide an efficient means of tapping the gravitational potential energy of the protoplanetary disk to heat grains strongly enough to form high-temperature minerals. The volume-filling nature of turbulent magnetic reconnection is compatible with constraints from chondrule-matrix complementarity, chondrule-chondrule complementarity, the occurrence of igneous rims, and compound chondrules. The same short-circuit mechanism may perform other high-temperature mineral processing in protoplanetary disks such as the production of crystalline silicates and CAIs.

  19. TURBULENT LINEWIDTHS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: PREDICTIONS FROM NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Beckwith, Kris; Armitage, Philip J.

    2011-12-10

    Submillimeter observations of protoplanetary disks now approach the acuity needed to measure the turbulent broadening of molecular lines. These measurements constrain disk angular momentum transport, and furnish evidence of the turbulent environment within which planetesimal formation takes place. We use local magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) to predict the distribution of turbulent velocities in low-mass protoplanetary disks, as a function of radius and height above the mid-plane. We model both ideal MHD disks and disks in which Ohmic dissipation results in a dead zone of suppressed turbulence near the mid-plane. Under ideal conditions, the disk mid-plane is characterized by a velocity distribution that peaks near v {approx_equal} 0.1c{sub s} (where c{sub s} is the local sound speed), while supersonic velocities are reached at z > 3H (where H is the vertical pressure scale height). Residual velocities of v Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} c{sub s} persist near the mid-plane in dead zones, while the surface layers remain active. Anisotropic variation of the linewidth with disk inclination is modest. We compare our MHD results to hydrodynamic simulations in which large-scale forcing is used to initiate similar turbulent velocities. We show that the qualitative trend of increasing v with height, seen in the MHD case, persists for forced turbulence and is likely a generic property of disk turbulence. Percentage level determinations of v at different heights within the disk, or spatially resolved observations that probe the inner disk containing the dead zone region, are therefore needed to test whether the MRI is responsible for protoplanetary disk turbulence.

  20. New Approach to Diagnosing Properties of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we suggest that subjecting the observationally derived properties of protoplanetary disks to the evolutionary interpretation yields new insights into the working of those disks, and offers valuable constraints on their models. We propose that the global properties of individual disks, such as their accretion rates and disk masses, sorted by the mass of the central star, can be indexed by the age of the star to simulate the evolution of a single disk. Using data from published surveys of T Tauri stars, we show that accretion rate data, and disk mass data for the lowest mass stars, form well-defined evolutionary tracks. The higher mass stars show a definitive negative correlation between accretion rates and star ages. We use the time-dependent alpha-disk model of the viscous protoplanetary disk to link the theory to observations. The data are consistent with the standard theoretical paradigm, but not with the layered accretion model. The best fits to the data are obtained for the standard models that start with disks that are about one-third of the mass of the central star and have their angular momenta, j, and alpha-coefficients linked by the relationship j varies as Solar mass(exp 3/2)alpha(exp 1/3). The proportionality constant in this relationship, when derived from the accretion rate data, differs from the constant derived from the disk mass data. We argue that the accretion rate data are more reliable. Taking into account typical values of the specific angular momentum of disk-forming matter, we obtain alpha is greater than or equal to 10(exp -2). A complete time-dependent standard disk model, built on the parameters determined from the best-fit procedure, is presented. Such a model constitutes a good point of departure for various theoretical studies aimed at the issue of formation of planetary systems and the character of protoplanetary disks.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR MAGNESIUM ISOTOPE HETEROGENEITY IN THE SOLAR PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Kirsten K.; Trinquier, Anne; Paton, Chad; Schiller, Martin; Wielandt, Daniel; Connelly, James N.; Nordlund, Ake; Krot, Alexander N.; Bizzarro, Martin; Ivanova, Marina A.

    2011-07-10

    With a half-life of 0.73 Myr, the {sup 26}Al-to-{sup 26}Mg decay system is the most widely used short-lived chronometer for understanding the formation and earliest evolution of the solar protoplanetary disk. However, the validity of {sup 26}Al-{sup 26}Mg ages of meteorites and their components relies on the critical assumption that the canonical {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al ratio of {approx}5 x 10{sup -5} recorded by the oldest dated solids, calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), represents the initial abundance of {sup 26}Al for the solar system as a whole. Here, we report high-precision Mg-isotope measurements of inner solar system solids, asteroids, and planets demonstrating the existence of widespread heterogeneity in the mass-independent {sup 26}Mg composition ({mu}{sup 26}Mg*) of bulk solar system reservoirs with solar or near-solar Al/Mg ratios. This variability may represent heterogeneity in the initial abundance of {sup 26}Al across the solar protoplanetary disk at the time of CAI formation and/or Mg-isotope heterogeneity. By comparing the U-Pb and {sup 26}Al-{sup 26}Mg ages of pristine solar system materials, we infer that the bulk of the {mu}{sup 26}Mg* variability reflects heterogeneity in the initial abundance of {sup 26}Al across the solar protoplanetary disk. We conclude that the canonical value of {approx}5 x 10{sup -5} represents the average initial abundance of {sup 26}Al only in the CAI-forming region, and that large-scale heterogeneity-perhaps up to 80% of the canonical value-may have existed throughout the inner solar system. If correct, our interpretation of the Mg-isotope composition of inner solar system objects precludes the use of the {sup 26}Al-{sup 26}Mg system as an accurate early solar system chronometer.

  2. Rapid planetesimal formation in the inner protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drążkowska, Joanna; Windmark, Fredrik; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    Growth barriers, including the bouncing, fragmentation and radial drift problems, are still a big issue in planetesimal and thus planet formation theory. We present a new mechanism for very rapid planetesimal formation by sweep-up growth. Planetesimal formation is extremely fast in the inner protoplanetary disk where the growth rate exceeds the radial drift rate, leading to local planetesimal formation and pile-up inside of 1 AU. This scenario is very appealing particularly in the context of explaining the low mass of Mars, as well as the formation of recently discovered multi-transiting systems with tightly-packed inner planets.

  3. Vorticity and Wave Motion in a Compressible Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The impact of an isolated vortex in a compressible Keplerian disk is examined using higher order numerical solutions of the Euler and entropy-conserving Energy equations. The vortex is stretched by the background shear flow with longer lasting anticyclonic vortices persisting for about 10 vortex revolutions. Simultaneously, the vortex emits transient radial waves consisting mainly of axisymmetrical weak shock waves and a slower, nonaxisymmetric Rossby wave. These waves may contribute to certain transient events in protoplanetary disks. The vortex stretching and waves were found to have little long-term feedback on the baseline 'standard solar nebula' disk structure and confirm the extremely stable structure of non self-gravitating disks.

  4. Double-disc gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, Seth J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to an improvement in a conventional double-disc gate valve having a vertically movable gate assembly including a wedge, spreaders slidably engaged therewtih, a valve disc carried by the spreaders. When the gate assembly is lowered to a selected point in the valve casing, the valve discs are moved transversely outward to close inlet and outlet ports in the casing. The valve includes hold-down means for guiding the disc-and-spreader assemblies as they are moved transversely outward and inward. If such valves are operated at relatively high differential pressures, they sometimes jam during opening. Such jamming has been a problem for many years in gate valves used in gaseous diffusion plants for the separtion of uranium isotopes. The invention is based on the finding that the above-mentioned jamming results when the outlet disc tilts about its horizontal axis in a certain way during opening of the valve. In accordance with the invention, tilting of the outlet disc is maintained at a tolerable value by providing the disc with a rigid downwardly extending member and by providing the casing with a stop for limiting inward arcuate movement of the member to a preselected value during opening of the valve.

  5. Discs in misaligned binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawiraswattana, Krisada; Hubber, David A.; Goodwin, Simon P.

    2016-08-01

    We perform SPH simulations to study precession and changes in alignment between the circumprimary disc and the binary orbit in misaligned binary systems. We find that the precession process can be described by the rigid-disc approximation, where the disc is considered as a rigid body interacting with the binary companion only gravitationally. Precession also causes change in alignment between the rotational axis of the disc and the spin axis of the primary star. This type of alignment is of great important for explaining the origin of spin-orbit misaligned planetary systems. However, we find that the rigid-disc approximation fails to describe changes in alignment between the disc and the binary orbit. This is because the alignment process is a consequence of interactions that involve the fluidity of the disc, such as the tidal interaction and the encounter interaction. Furthermore, simulation results show that there are not only alignment processes, which bring the components towards alignment, but also anti-alignment processes, which tend to misalign the components. The alignment process dominates in systems with misalignment angle near 90°, while the anti-alignment process dominates in systems with the misalignment angle near 0° or 180°. This means that highly misaligned systems will become more aligned but slightly misaligned systems will become more misaligned.

  6. Medical Information on Optical Disc*

    PubMed Central

    Schipma, Peter B.; Cichocki, Edward M.; Ziemer, Susan M.

    1987-01-01

    Optical discs may permit a revolutionary change in the distribution and use of medical information. A single compact disc, similar in size to that used for digital audio recording, can contain over 500 million characters of information that is accessible by a Personal Computer. These discs can be manufactured at a cost lower than that of print on paper, at reasonable volumes. Software can provide the health care professional with nearly instantaneous access to the information. Thus, for the first time, the opportunity exists to have large local medical information collections. This paper describes an application of this technology in the field of Oncology.

  7. Accretion of solid materials onto circumplanetary disks from protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Maruta, Akito; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the accretion of solid materials onto circumplanetary disks from heliocentric orbits rotating in protoplanetary disks, which is a key process for the formation of regular satellite systems. In the late stage of the gas-capturing phase of giant planet formation, the accreting gas from protoplanetary disks forms circumplanetary disks. Since the accretion flow toward the circumplanetary disks affects the particle motion through gas drag force, we use hydrodynamic simulation data for the gas drag term to calculate the motion of solid materials. We consider a wide range of size for the solid particles (10{sup –2}-10{sup 6} m), and find that the accretion efficiency of the solid particles peaks around 10 m sized particles because energy dissipation of drag with circum-planetary disk gas in this size regime is most effective. The efficiency for particles larger than 10 m becomes lower because gas drag becomes less effective. For particles smaller than 10 m, the efficiency is lower because the particles are strongly coupled with the background gas flow, which prevents particles from accretion. We also find that the distance from the planet where the particles are captured by the circumplanetary disks is in a narrow range and well described as a function of the particle size.

  8. BONDI-HOYLE-LYTTLETON ACCRETION ONTO A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Moeckel, Nickolas; Throop, Henry B.

    2009-12-10

    Young stellar systems orbiting in the potential of their birth cluster can accrete from the dense molecular interstellar medium during the period between the star's birth and the dispersal of the cluster's gas. Over this time, which may span several Myr, the amount of material accreted can rival the amount in the initial protoplanetary disk; the potential importance of this 'tail-end' accretion for planet formation was recently highlighted by Throop and Bally. While accretion onto a point mass is successfully modeled by the classical Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton solutions, the more complicated case of accretion onto a star-disk system defies analytic solution. In this paper, we investigate via direct hydrodynamic simulations the accretion of dense interstellar material onto a star with an associated gaseous protoplanetary disk. We discuss the changes to the structure of the accretion flow caused by the disk, and vice versa. We find that immersion in a dense accretion flow can redistribute disk material such that outer disk migrates inward, increasing the inner disk surface density and reducing the outer radius. The accretion flow also triggers the development of spiral density features, and changes to the disk inclination. The mean accretion rate onto the star remains roughly the same with and without the presence of a disk. We discuss the potential impact of this process on planet formation, including the possibility of triggered gravitational instability, inclination differences between the disk and the star, and the appearance of spiral structure in a gravitationally stable system.

  9. MODELING MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS WITH DEAD ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Hirose, Shigenobu

    2011-12-01

    Turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI) crucially affects the evolution of solid bodies in protoplanetary disks. On the other hand, small dust particles stabilize MRI by capturing ionized gas particles needed for the coupling of the gas and magnetic fields. To provide an empirical basis for modeling the coevolution of dust and MRI, we perform three-dimensional, ohmic-resistive MHD simulations of a vertically stratified shearing box with an MRI-inactive 'dead zone' of various sizes and with a net vertical magnetic flux of various strengths. We find that the vertical structure of turbulence is well characterized by the vertical magnetic flux and three critical heights derived from the linear analysis of MRI in a stratified disk. In particular, the turbulent structure depends on the resistivity profile only through the critical heights and is insensitive to the details of the resistivity profile. We discover scaling relations between the amplitudes of various turbulent quantities (velocity dispersion, density fluctuation, vertical diffusion coefficient, and outflow mass flux) and vertically integrated accretion stresses. We also obtain empirical formulae for the integrated accretion stresses as a function of the vertical magnetic flux and the critical heights. These empirical relations allow us to predict the vertical turbulent structure of a protoplanetary disk for a given strength of the magnetic flux and a given resistivity profile.

  10. Understanding Protoplanetary Disk Structure through the Timescale of its Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, Kevin; Muzerolle, James; Balog, Zoltan; Herbst, William; Megeath, S. Thomas; Furlan, Elise; Gutermuth, Robert

    2012-12-01

    While most of our knowledge of protoplanetary disks is based on single snapshots of many systems, their evolution is in fact highly dynamic on short timescales. Previous surveys have found that the majority of young stellar objects are variable in the infrared, due to large structural perturbations of the inner disk, over the course of weeks and months. These studies of large samples of objects over two month observing windows have not been able to completely constrain the physical source of these fluctuations. We propose to use the variability timescale as a novel method for understanding the underlying physics processes setting the protoplanetary disk structure. With roughly one observation per day for 200 days, a more intensive monitoring campaign than has been previously attempted, we can distinguish between variability on the stellar rotation period (related to variable heating by star spots), the dynamical timescale (related to MRI effects and perturbation by a companion) and the thermal timescale (related to thermal waves in the disk). By focusing on a small field within the 2 Myr Chameleon star-forming region, we will obtain detailed light curves for ~16 young stellar objects, including a 15 Jupiter mass brown dwarf with a disk. This type of intensive, long baseline monitoring has not been attempted in the past, is only feasible with the observing capabilities of Spitzer, and has the potential to greatly advance our understanding of young stellar object evolution.

  11. Misaligned protoplanetary disks in a young binary star system.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Eric L N; Akeson, Rachel

    2014-07-31

    Many extrasolar planets follow orbits that differ from the nearly coplanar and circular orbits found in our Solar System; their orbits may be eccentric or inclined with respect to the host star's equator, and the population of giant planets orbiting close to their host stars suggests appreciable orbital migration. There is at present no consensus on what produces such orbits. Theoretical explanations often invoke interactions with a binary companion star in an orbit that is inclined relative to the planet's orbital plane. Such mechanisms require significant mutual inclinations between the planetary and binary star orbital planes. The protoplanetary disks in a few young binaries are misaligned, but often the measurements of these misalignments are sensitive only to a small portion of the inner disk, and the three-dimensional misalignment of the bulk of the planet-forming disk mass has hitherto not been determined. Here we report that the protoplanetary disks in the young binary system HK Tauri are misaligned by 60 to 68 degrees, such that one or both of the disks are significantly inclined to the binary orbital plane. Our results demonstrate that the necessary conditions exist for misalignment-driven mechanisms to modify planetary orbits, and that these conditions are present at the time of planet formation, apparently because of the binary formation process. PMID:25079553

  12. Dust Dynamics in Protoplanetary Disks: Parallel Computing with PVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente Marcos, Carlos; Barge, Pierre; de La Fuente Marcos, Raúl

    2002-03-01

    We describe a parallel version of our high-order-accuracy particle-mesh code for the simulation of collisionless protoplanetary disks. We use this code to carry out a massively parallel, two-dimensional, time-dependent, numerical simulation, which includes dust particles, to study the potential role of large-scale, gaseous vortices in protoplanetary disks. This noncollisional problem is easy to parallelize on message-passing multicomputer architectures. We performed the simulations on a cache-coherent nonuniform memory access Origin 2000 machine, using both the parallel virtual machine (PVM) and message-passing interface (MPI) message-passing libraries. Our performance analysis suggests that, for our problem, PVM is about 25% faster than MPI. Using PVM and MPI made it possible to reduce CPU time and increase code performance. This allows for simulations with a large number of particles (N ~ 105-106) in reasonable CPU times. The performances of our implementation of the pa! rallel code on an Origin 2000 supercomputer are presented and discussed. They exhibit very good speedup behavior and low load unbalancing. Our results confirm that giant gaseous vortices can play a dominant role in giant planet formation.

  13. Misaligned protoplanetary disks in a young binary star system.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Eric L N; Akeson, Rachel

    2014-07-31

    Many extrasolar planets follow orbits that differ from the nearly coplanar and circular orbits found in our Solar System; their orbits may be eccentric or inclined with respect to the host star's equator, and the population of giant planets orbiting close to their host stars suggests appreciable orbital migration. There is at present no consensus on what produces such orbits. Theoretical explanations often invoke interactions with a binary companion star in an orbit that is inclined relative to the planet's orbital plane. Such mechanisms require significant mutual inclinations between the planetary and binary star orbital planes. The protoplanetary disks in a few young binaries are misaligned, but often the measurements of these misalignments are sensitive only to a small portion of the inner disk, and the three-dimensional misalignment of the bulk of the planet-forming disk mass has hitherto not been determined. Here we report that the protoplanetary disks in the young binary system HK Tauri are misaligned by 60 to 68 degrees, such that one or both of the disks are significantly inclined to the binary orbital plane. Our results demonstrate that the necessary conditions exist for misalignment-driven mechanisms to modify planetary orbits, and that these conditions are present at the time of planet formation, apparently because of the binary formation process.

  14. EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE PATHWAYS TO DEUTERIUM ENHANCEMENTS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Wilner, David J.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.

    2012-04-20

    The distributions of deuterated molecules in protoplanetary disks are expected to depend on the molecular formation pathways. We use observations of spatially resolved DCN emission from the disk around TW Hya, acquired during ALMA science verification with a {approx}3'' synthesized beam, together with comparable DCO{sup +} observations from the Submillimeter Array, to investigate differences in the radial distributions of these species and hence differences in their formation chemistry. In contrast to DCO{sup +}, which shows an increasing column density with radius, DCN is better fit by a model that is centrally peaked. We infer that DCN forms at a smaller radii and thus at higher temperatures than DCO{sup +}. This is consistent with chemical network model predictions of DCO{sup +} formation from H{sub 2}D{sup +} at T < 30 K and DCN formation from additional pathways involving CH{sub 2}D{sup +} at higher temperatures. We estimate a DCN/HCN abundance ratio of {approx}0.017, similar to the DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +} abundance ratio. Deuterium fractionation appears to be efficient at a range of temperatures in this protoplanetary disk. These results suggest caution in interpreting the range of deuterium fractions observed in solar system bodies, as multiple formation pathways should be taken into account.

  15. Chemical Kinetics of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Monika; Tran, T.; Chiar, J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2012-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) comprise about 10% of the carbon in the interstellar medium. There is evidence of modification of PAHs in protoplanetary disks. What happens to these molecules as they are incorporated into protoplanetary disks? We address this question by investigating the chemical kinetics of PAHs in the disk environment. Kress et al. (2010) investigated the chemical behavior of PAHs at temperatures from 1000 to 2000 K at a pressure of 1e-6 bar, and proposed the concept of the 'soot line', analogous to the 'snow line' in the solar nebula. Inside of the soot line, PAHs are irreversibly destroyed via thermally-driven reactions. We will extend this study to more realistic disk conditions and timescales. In a related project (see poster by Tran, Chiar, et al.), we are investigating the differences in the PAH physical characteristics in quiescent dense clouds versus the environment around embedded protostars. Together, these studies will help us understand (1) the fate of interstellar PAHs in planet-forming disks and (2) the relationship between interstellar and solar system PAHs. We also will investigate the soot line in disks around sub-solar mass stars (e.g. M dwarfs). This work has been supported by the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory (PI: V. Meadows) and the NASA/EPOESS program (PI: C. Phillips).

  16. Formation of Explosive Comet in Proto-planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladysheva, O.

    2013-09-01

    The question about the formation of the comet's nucleus is examined, taking into account the peculiarities of the destruction of the Tunguska cosmic body. According to the suggested model, the comet's nucleus consists from ample quantity of organic coverings, one covering inserts into another covering, similar to Russian set of nesting dolls. The space between neighbouring coverings is filled by different size lumps and grains down to micron size. Comets were formed in the inner region of the solar system in the early stages of the evolution of the proto-planetary cloud. Proto-comets began to accumulate their mass on the periphery of protoplanetary nebula (far from the ecliptic), where the temperature decreases to <100 K. Then, under the influence of gravitation, comets many times crossed the plane of the ecliptic, performing relaxation oscillations. Coverings on comet surfaces formed during every crossing by the comet of the ecliptic area, where the temperature was high. During their oscillations, most comets were thrown out of the inner regions of the solar system by planetary perturbations in the Öpik-Oort cloud.

  17. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  18. Enlivening Physics, a Local Video Disc Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes how to make and use an inexpensive video disc of physics demonstrations. Discusses the background, production of the disc, subject of the disc including angular momentum, "monkey and the hunter" experiment, Doppler shift, pressure of a constant volume of gas thermometer, and wave effects, and using the disc in classroom. (YP)

  19. Disc pack cleaning table saves computer time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, J. T., Sr.

    1970-01-01

    Disc pack holding table is support frame upon which computer disc pack is loaded and protective cover released. This combination permits manual off-line cleaning of disc pack storage units at any time without shutting down the computer, and eliminates on-line disc drive unit to hold pack during cleaning.

  20. Decellularized allogeneic intervertebral disc: natural biomaterials for regenerating disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhijun; Chen, Kai; Shan, Zhi; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiying; Mo, Jian; Ma, Jianjun; Xu, Wenbing; Qin, An; Fan, Shunwu

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is associated with back pain and disc herniation. This study established a modified protocol for intervertebral disc (IVD) decellularization and prepared its extracellular matrix (ECM). By culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)(3, 7, 14 and 21 days) and human degenerative IVD cells (7 days) in the ECM, implanting it subcutaneously in rabbit and injecting ECM microparticles into degenerative disc, the biological safety and efficacy of decellularized IVD was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrated that cellular components can be removed completely after decellularization and maximally retain the structure and biomechanics of native IVD. We revealed that allogeneic ECM did not evoke any apparent inflammatory reaction in vivo and no cytotoxicity was found in vitro. Moreover, IVD ECM can induce differentiation of MSCs into IVD-like cells in vitro. Furthermore, allogeneic ECM microparticles are effective on the treatment of rabbit disc degeneration in vivo. In conclusion, our study developed an optimized method for IVD decellularization and we proved decellularized IVD is safe and effective for the treatment of degenerated disc diseases. PMID:26933821

  1. Particle dynamics in discs with turbulence generated by the vertical shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Moritz H. R.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-10-01

    Context. Among the candidates for generating turbulence in accretion discs in situations with low intrinsic ionization, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has become an interesting candidate, since it relies purely on a vertical gradient in the angular velocity. Existing numerical simulations have shown that α-values a few times 10-4 can be generated. Aims: The particle growth in the early planet formation phase is determined by the dynamics of embedded dust particles. Here, we address, in particular, the efficiency of VSI-turbulence in concentrating particles to generate overdensities and low collision velocities. Methods: We perform three-dimensional (3D) numerical hydrodynamical simulations of accretion discs around young stars that include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. The motion of embedded particles within a size range of a fraction of mm up to several m is followed using standard drag formula. Results: We confirm that, under realistic conditions, the VSI is able to generate turbulence in full 3D protoplanetary discs. The irradiated disc shows turbulence within 10 to 60 au. The mean radial motion of the gas is such that it is directed inward near the midplane and outward in the surface layers. We find that large particles drift inward with the expected speed, while small particles can experience phases of outward drift. Additionally, the particles show bunching behaviour with overdensities reaching five times the average value, which is strongest for dimensionless stopping times around unity. Conclusions: Particles in a VSI-turbulent discs are concentrated in large-scale turbulent eddies and show low relative speeds that allow for growing collisions. The reached overdensities will also enable the onset of streaming instabilities, further enhancing particle growth. The outward drift for small particles at higher disk elevations enable the transport of processed high temperature material in the solar system to greater distances.

  2. Effects of disc asymmetries on astrometric measurements. Can they mimic planets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Q.; Schneider, J.; Kennedy, G.; Souami, D.

    2016-07-01

    Astrometry covers a parameter space that cannot be reached by RV or transit methods to detect terrestrial planets on wide orbits. In addition, high accuracy astrometric measurements are necessary to measure the inclination of the planet's orbits. Here we investigate the principles of an artefact of the astrometric approach, namely the displacement of the photo-centre owing to inhomogeneities in a dust disc around the parent star. Indeed, theory and observations show that circumstellar discs can present strong asymmetries. We model the pseudo-astrometric signal caused by these inhomogeneities, asking whether a dust clump in a disc can mimic the astrometric signal of an Earth-like planet. We show that these inhomogeneities cannot be neglected when using astrometry to find terrestrial planets. We provide the parameter space for which these inhomogeneities can affect the astrometric signals but still not be detected by mid-IR observations. We find that a small cross section of dust corresponding to a cometary mass object is enough to mimic the astrometric signal of an Earth-like planet. Astrometric observations of protoplanetary discs to search for planets can also be affected by the presence of inhomogeneities. Some further tests are given to confirm whether an observation is a real astrometric signal from a planet or an impostor. Eventually, we also study the case where the cross-section of dust is high enough to provide a detectable IR-excess and to have a measurable photometric displacement by actual instruments such as Gaia, IRAC, or GRAVITY. We suggest a new method, which consists of using astrometry to quantify asymmetries (clumpiness) in inner debris discs that cannot be otherwise resolved.

  3. Composition of early planetary atmospheres - I. Connecting disc astrochemistry to the formation of planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cridland, A. J.; Pudritz, R. E.; Alessi, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a model of the early chemical composition and elemental abundances of planetary atmospheres based on the cumulative gaseous chemical species that are accreted on to planets forming by core accretion from evolving protoplanetary discs. The astrochemistry of the host disc is computed using an ionization-driven, non-equilibrium chemistry network within viscously evolving disc models. We accrete gas giant planets whose orbital evolution is controlled by planet traps using the standard core accretion model and track the chemical composition of the material that is accreted on to the protoplanet. We choose a fiducial disc model and evolve planets in three traps - water ice line, dead zone and heat transition. For a disc with a lifetime of 4.1 Myr, we produce two hot Jupiters (M = 1.43, 2.67 MJupiter, r = 0.15, 0.11 au) in the heat transition and ice line trap and one failed core (M = 0.003 MJupiter, r = 3.7 au) in the dead zone. These planets are found with mixing ratios for CO and H2O of 1.99 × 10-4 and 5.0 × 10-4, respectively, for both hot Jupiters. Additionally, for these planets we find CO2 and CH4, with mixing ratios of 1.8 × 10-6 → 9.8 × 10-10 and 1.1 × 10-8 → 2.3 × 10-10, respectively. These ranges correspond well with the mixing ratio ranges that have been inferred through the detection of emission spectra from hot Jupiters by multiple authors. We compute a carbon-to-oxygen ratio of 0.227 for the ice line planet and 0.279 for the heat transition planet. These planets accreted their gas inside the ice line, hence the sub-solar C/O.

  4. Imaginal Disc Transplantation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Tomonori; Paro, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Since Ephrussi and Beadle introduced imaginal disc transplantation to Drosophila research in 1936, the method played an important part towards a better understanding of disc patterning, tissue regeneration, and reprogramming phenomena like transdetermination. Despite increasing usage of high-throughput approaches towards solving biological problems this classical manual method is still in use for studying disc development in a semi-physiological context. Here we describe in detail a protocol and provide recommendations on the procedure in particular for analyzing the regenerative potential of imaginal disks. The steps consist of disc dissection and fragmentation, transplantation into the larval or adult abdomen, and the recovery of implants from the host abdomen. Additionally, we also describe how to make the special transplantation needle from a glass capillary. PMID:27659995

  5. Migration of Earth-sized planets in 3D radiative discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lega, E.; Crida, A.; Bitsch, B.; Morbidelli, A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we address the migration of small-mass planets in 3D radiative discs. Indeed, migration of small planets is known to be too fast inwards in locally isothermal conditions. However, thermal effects could reverse its direction, potentially saving planets in the inner, optically thick parts of the protoplanetary disc. This effect has been seen for masses larger than 5 Earth masses, but the minimum mass for this to happen has never been probed numerically, although it is of crucial importance for planet formation scenarios. We have extended the hydrodynamical code FARGO to 3D, with thermal diffusion. With this code, we perform simulations of embedded planets down to 2 Earth masses. For a set of discs' parameters for which outward migration has been shown in the range of [5, 35] Earth masses, we find that the transition to inward migration occurs for masses in the range [3, 5] Earth masses. The transition appears to be due to an unexpected phenomenon: the formation of an asymmetric cold and dense finger of gas driven by circulation and libration streamlines. We recover this phenomenon in 2D simulations where we control the cooling effects of the gas through a simple modelling of the energy equation.

  6. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  7. On the local stability of vortices in differentially rotating discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Railton, A. D.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2014-12-01

    In order to circumvent the loss of solid material through radial drift towards the central star, the trapping of dust inside persistent vortices in protoplanetary discs has often been suggested as a process that can eventually lead to planetesimal formation. Although a few special cases have been discussed, exhaustive studies of possible quasi-steady configurations available for dust-laden vortices and their stability are yet to be undertaken, thus their viability or otherwise as locations for the gravitational instability to take hold and seed planet formation is unclear. In this paper we generalize and extend the well-known Kida solution to obtain a series of steady-state solutions with varying vorticity and dust density distributions in their cores, in the limit of perfectly coupled dust and gas. We then present a local stability analysis of these configurations, considering perturbations localized on streamlines. Typical parametric instabilities found have growth rates of 0.05ΩP, where ΩP is the angular velocity at the centre of the vortex. Models with density excess can exhibit many narrow parametric instability bands while those with a concentrated vorticity source display internal shear which significantly affects their stability. However, the existence of these parametric instabilities may not necessarily prevent the possibility of dust accumulation in vortices.

  8. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power. PMID:25004532

  9. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  10. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in

  11. Self-consistent dynamical and thermodynamical evolutions of protoplanetary disks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, K.; Charnoz, S.; Taillifet, E.; Piau, L.

    2012-09-01

    Astronomical observations reveal the diversity of protoplanetary disk evolutions. In order to understand the global evolution of these disks from their birth, during the collapse of the molecular cloud, to their evaporation because of the stellar radiation, many processes with different timescales must be coupled: stellar evolution, thermodynamical evolution, photoevaporation, cloud collapse, viscous spreading... Simulating all these processes simultaneously is beyond the capacity of modern computers. However, by modeling the results of large scale simulations and coupling them with models of viscous evolution, we have designed a one dimension full model of disk evolution. In order to generate the most realistic protoplanetary disk, we minimize the number of input parameters and try to calculate most of them from self-consistent processes, as early as possible in the history of the disk; starting with the collapse of the molecular cloud that feeds the disk in gas. We start from the Hueso and Guillot, 2005 [2] model of disk evolution and couple the radiative transfer description of Calvet et al, 1991 [1] allowing us to handle a non-isothermal disk which midplane temperature is defined by an irradiation term form the central star and a viscous heating term depending on the optical depth of the disk. Our new model of the disk photosphere profile allows us to estimate self-consistent photosphere heights and midplane temperatures at the same time. We then follow the disk evolution using an upgrade of the viscous spreading equation from Lynden-Bell and Pringle, 1981 [3]. In particular, the molecular cloud collapse adds a time varying term to the temporal variation of the surface mass density of the disk, in the same manner that photo-evaporation introduces a density loss term. The central star itself is modeled using recent stellar evolution code described in Piau et al, 2011 [4]. Using the same temperature model in the vertical direction, we estimate 2D thermal maps of

  12. Chondrule Formation Mechanisms in Protoplanetary Disks from Textural and Mineralogical Evidence Preserved in Unequilibrated Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Martinez-Jimenez, M.; Tanbakouei, S.

    2016-08-01

    We study the chondrule size distribution of pristine chondrites in order to explore if it mimics that one expected from splattering due to stochastic collisions, or from thermal coagulation of micron-sized dust available in the protoplanetary disk.

  13. XENON IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK (PPD-Xe)

    SciTech Connect

    Marti, K.; Mathew, K. J.

    2015-06-20

    Relationships among solar system Xe components as observed in the solar wind, in planetary atmospheres, and in meteorites are investigated using isotopic correlations. The term PPD-Xe is used for components inferred to have been present in the molecular cloud material that formed the protoplanetary disk (PPD). The evidence of the lack of simple relationships between terrestrial atmospheric Xe and solar or meteoritic components is confirmed. Xe isotopic correlations indicate a heterogeneous PPD composition with variable mixing ratios of the nucleosynthetic component Xe-HL. Solar Xe represents a bulk PPD component, and the isotopic abundances did not change from the time of incorporation into the interior of Mars through times of regolith implantations to the present.

  14. Xenon in the protoplanetary disk (PPD-XE)

    SciTech Connect

    Marti, K.; Mathew, K. J.

    2015-06-18

    Relationships among solar system Xe components as observed in the solar wind (SW), in planetary atmospheres and in meteorites are investigated using isotopic correlations. The term PPD-Xe is used for components inferred to have been present in the molecular cloud material that formed the protoplanetary disk (PPD). The evidence of the lack of simple relationships between terrestrial atmospheric Xe and solar or meteoritic components is confirmed. Xe isotopic correlations indicate a heterogeneous PPD composition with variable mixing ratios of the nucleosynthetic component Xe-HL. Solar Xe represents a bulk PPD component, and the isotopic abundances did not change from the time of incorporation into the interior of Mars, through times of regolith implantations to the present.

  15. Xenon in the protoplanetary disk (PPD-XE)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marti, K.; Mathew, K. J.

    2015-06-18

    Relationships among solar system Xe components as observed in the solar wind (SW), in planetary atmospheres and in meteorites are investigated using isotopic correlations. The term PPD-Xe is used for components inferred to have been present in the molecular cloud material that formed the protoplanetary disk (PPD). The evidence of the lack of simple relationships between terrestrial atmospheric Xe and solar or meteoritic components is confirmed. Xe isotopic correlations indicate a heterogeneous PPD composition with variable mixing ratios of the nucleosynthetic component Xe-HL. Solar Xe represents a bulk PPD component, and the isotopic abundances did not change from the timemore » of incorporation into the interior of Mars, through times of regolith implantations to the present.« less

  16. Protoplanetary Nebula Evolution using the Beta Viscosity Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2003-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of a protoplanetary disk is an important component of the planet formation process. In particular, the dynamic and thermodynamic field plays a critical role in chemical evolution, the migration of dust particles in the nebula, and the radial transport of meteoritic components. The dynamic evolution is investigated using analytical solutions of the surface density transport equations using a turbulence model based on hydrodynamic generation of turbulence. It captures the major properties of the disk including region of separation between radial inflow and-outflow and the evolution of the central plane temperature. The analytical formulas are compared with available numerical solutions based on the alpha viscosity model. The beta viscosity model, heretofore used for steady-state disks, is shown to be a useful approximation for unsteady problems.

  17. CHARGING AND COAGULATION OF DUST IN PROTOPLANETARY PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, L. S.; Land, V.; Hyde, T. W.

    2012-01-01

    Combining a particle-particle, particle-cluster, and cluster-cluster agglomeration model with an aggregate charging model, the coagulation and charging of dust particles in plasma environments relevant for protoplanetary disks have been investigated, including the effect of electron depletion in high dust density environments. The results show that charged aggregates tend to grow by adding small particles and clusters to larger particles and clusters, and that cluster-cluster aggregation is significantly more effective than particle-cluster aggregation. Comparisons of the grain structure show that with increasing aggregate charge the compactness factor, {phi}{sub {sigma}}, decreases and has a narrower distribution, indicating a fluffier structure. Neutral aggregates are more compact, with larger {phi}{sub {sigma}}, and exhibit a larger variation in fluffiness. Overall, increased aggregate charge leads to larger, fluffier, and more massive aggregates.

  18. A Dwarf Transitional Protoplanetary Disk around XZ Tau B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Mayra; Macías, Enrique; Anglada, Guillem; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Zapata, Luis; Calvet, Nuria; Gómez, José F.; Nagel, Erick; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Torrelles, José M.; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of a dwarf protoplanetary disk around the star XZ Tau B that shows all the features of a classical transitional disk but on a much smaller scale. The disk has been imaged with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), revealing that its dust emission has a quite small radius of ˜3.4 au and presents a central cavity of ˜1.3 au in radius that we attribute to clearing by a compact system of orbiting (proto)planets. Given the very small radii involved, evolution is expected to be much faster in this disk (observable changes in a few months) than in classical disks (observable changes requiring decades) and easy to monitor with observations in the near future. From our modeling we estimate that the mass of the disk is large enough to form a compact planetary system.

  19. SEEDS Polarimetric Imagery of the AB Aur Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, John P.; Fukagawa, M.; Grady, C.; Hashimoto, J.; Hodapp, K.; Kudo, T.; Munetake, M.; Okamoto, Y.; Tamura, M.; SEEDS Team

    2011-01-01

    The Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) is a large survey which will be observing roughly 200 protoplanetary and debris disk systems over the next five years using the HiCIAO coronagraph + AO188 system on the Subaru telescope. We present new J-band polarimetric differential imagery of the proto-type Herbig Ae star, AB Aurigae, which diagnoses scattered light from the system between 20 - 540 AU at a resolution of roughly 8 AU. We discuss the morphology we observe in the outer disk region in the context of previous observations of the system, and compare/contrast the morphology in the inner disk region with recent H-band imagery of the system made with HiCIAO (Hashimoto et al 2010). This work was supported in part by NSF grants AST 0802230 and AST 1009314 and the AAS' Chretien International Research Grant.

  20. Numerical modelling of the formation process of planets from protoplanetary cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, N. N.; Eneyev, T. M.

    1979-01-01

    Evolution of the plane protoplanetary cloud, consisting of a great number of gravitationally interacting and uniting under collision bodies (protoplanets) moving in the central field of a large mass (the Sun or a planet), is considered. It is shown that in the course of protoplanetary cloud evolution the ring zones of matter expansion and compression occur with the subsequent development leading to formation of planets, rotating about their axes mainly directly. The principal numerical results were obtained through digital simulation of planetary accumulation.

  1. New Heating Mechanism of Asteroids in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Raymond L.; Roberge, W. G.

    2013-10-01

    Heating of asteroids in the early solar system has been mainly attributed to two mechanisms: the decay of short-lived radionuclides and the unipolar induction mechanism originally proposed in a classic series of papers by Sonett and collaborators. As originally conceived, unipolar induction heating is the result of the dissipation of current inside the body driven by a “motional electric field”, which appears in the asteroid’s reference frame when it is immersed in a fully-ionized, magnetized T-Tauri solar wind. However we point out a subtle conceptual error in the way that the electric field is calculated. Strictly speaking, the motional electric field used by Sonett et al. is the electric field in the free-streaming plasma far from the asteroid. For realistic assumptions about the plasma density in protoplanetary disks, the interaction between the plasma and asteroid cause the formation of a shear layer, in which the motional electric field decreases and even vanishes at the asteroid surface. We reexamine and improve the induction heating mechanism by: (1) correcting this conceptual error by using non-ideal multifluid MHD to self consistently calculate the velocity, magnetic, and electric fields in and around the shear layer; and (2) considering more realistic environments and scenarios that are consistent with current theories about protoplanetary disks. We present solutions for two highly idealized flows, which demonstrate that the electric field inside the asteroid is actually produced by magnetic field gradients in the shear layer, and can either vanish or be comparable to the fields predicted by Sonett et al. depending on the flow geometry. We term this new mechanism “electrodynamic heating”, calculate its possible upper limits, and compare them to heating generated by the decay of short-lived radionuclides.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF INITIAL ABUNDANCES ON NITROGEN IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-12-20

    The dominant form of nitrogen provided to most solar system bodies is currently unknown, though available measurements show that the detected nitrogen in solar system rocks and ices is depleted with respect to solar abundances and the interstellar medium. We use a detailed chemical/physical model of the chemical evolution of a protoplanetary disk to explore the evolution and abundance of nitrogen-bearing molecules. Based on this model, we analyze how initial chemical abundances provided as either gas or ice during the early stages of disk formation influence which species become the dominant nitrogen bearers at later stages. We find that a disk with the majority of its initial nitrogen in either atomic or molecular nitrogen is later dominated by atomic and molecular nitrogen as well as NH{sub 3} and HCN ices, where the dominant species varies with disk radius. When nitrogen is initially in gaseous ammonia, it later becomes trapped in ammonia ice except in the outer disk where atomic nitrogen dominates. For a disk with the initial nitrogen in the form of ammonia ice, the nitrogen remains trapped in the ice as NH{sub 3} at later stages. The model in which most of the initial nitrogen is placed in atomic N best matches the ammonia abundances observed in comets. Furthermore, the initial state of nitrogen influences the abundance of N{sub 2}H{sup +}, which has been detected in protoplanetary disks. Strong N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is found to be indicative of an N{sub 2} abundance greater than n{sub N{sub 2}}/n{sub H{sub 2}}>10{sup −6} in addition to tracing the CO snow line. Our models also indicate that NO is potentially detectable, with lower N gas abundances leading to higher NO abundances.

  3. Planetesimal and Protoplanet Dynamics in a Turbulent Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Mac Low, M.; Menou, K.

    2010-01-01

    In core accretion scenario of planet formation, kilometer-sized planetesimals are the building blocks toward planetary cores. Their dynamics, however, are strongly influenced by their natal protoplanetary gas disks. It is generally believed that these disks are turbulent, most likely due to magnetorotational instability. The resulting density perturbations in the gas render the movement of the particles a random process. Depending on its strength, this process might cause several interesting consequences in the course of planet formation, specifically the survivability of objects under rapid inward type-I migration and/or collisional destruction. Using the local-shearing-box approximation, we conduct numerical simulations of planetesimals moving in a turbulent, magnetized gas disk, either unstratified or vertically stratified. We produce a fiducial disk model with turbulent accretion of Shakura-Sunyaev alpha about 10-2 and root-mean-square density perturbation of about 10% and statistically characterize the evolution of the orbital properties of the particles moving in the disk. These measurements result in accurate calibration of the random process of particle orbital change, indicating noticeably smaller magnitudes than predicted by global simulations, although the results may depend on the size of the shearing box. We apply these results to revisit the survivability of planetesimals under collisional destruction or protoplanets under type-I migration. Planetesimals are probably secure from collisional destruction, except for kilometer-sized objects situated in the outer regions of a young protoplanetary disk. On the other hand, we confirm earlier studies of local models in that type-I migration probably dominates diffusive migration due to stochastic torques for most planetary cores and terrestrial planets. Discrepancies in the derived magnitude of turbulence between local and global simulations of magnetorotationally unstable disks remains an open issue, with

  4. Non-LTE Infrared Emission from Protoplanetary Disk Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, A.; Blake, G.

    2011-05-01

    Accurately characterizing protoplanetary disks (proplyds) is integral to understanding the formation and evolution of planetary systems. The chemical reactions and physical processes within a disk determine the abundances and variety of molecular building blocks available for planet formation. Observations at infrared to millimeter wavelengths confirm a plethora of organic molecules exist in proplyds, including H2O, OH, HCN, C2H2, CO, and CO2 (Carr & Najita, 2008; Pontoppidan et al., 2010). These molecules not only provide the solid material for ice+rock planetary cores, their line emission dominates the thermal balance in the disk and provides robust signatures to examine the dynamical evolution of protoplanetary environments. Thus, it is critical to understand molecular abundance profiles in disks and the processes that affect them. We aim to model molecular excitation in a sample of proplyds and thereby verify certain disk properties. Densities in the warm molecular layers of a disk are insufficient to ensure the conditions for local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), so the state of the gas must be computed precisely. We utilize a radiative transfer code to model the radiation field in the disk, coupled with an escape probability code to determine the excitation of a given molecule, to derive the non-LTE level populations. We then utilize a raytracer to generate spectral image cubes covering the entire disk. We will present results for CO, whose relatively stable abundance and strong emission features provide a good foundation from which we can further constrain the parameters of a disk. Using infrared spectra from the NIRSPEC instrument on the Keck Telescope, we constrain column densities, temperatures, and emitting radii for a suite of nearby proplyds.

  5. PROTOPLANETARY DISK STRUCTURE WITH GRAIN EVOLUTION: THE ANDES MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Akimkin, V.; Wiebe, D.; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya.; Zhukovska, S.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.; Vasyunin, A.; Birnstiel, T. E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru E-mail: zhukovska@mpia.de E-mail: henning@mpia.de E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-03-20

    We present a self-consistent model of a protoplanetary disk: 'ANDES' ('AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation'). ANDES is based on a flexible and extendable modular structure that includes (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. For the first time, grain evolution and time-dependent molecular chemistry are included in a protoplanetary disk model. We find that grain growth and sedimentation of large grains onto the disk midplane lead to a dust-depleted atmosphere. Consequently, dust and gas temperatures become higher in the inner disk (R {approx}< 50 AU) and lower in the outer disk (R {approx}> 50 AU), in comparison with the disk model with pristine dust. The response of disk chemical structure to the dust growth and sedimentation is twofold. First, due to higher transparency a partly UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the dense midplane. Second, the presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO there, while in adjacent upper layers the depletion is still effective. Molecular concentrations and thus column densities of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution, e.g., CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}CN, HNO, H{sub 2}O, HCOOH, HCN, and CO. We also show that time-dependent chemistry is important for a proper description of gas thermal balance.

  6. On the outer edges of protoplanetary dust disks

    SciTech Connect

    Birnstiel, Tilman; Andrews, Sean M. E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-01-10

    The expectation that aerodynamic drag will force the solids in a gas-rich protoplanetary disk to spiral in toward the host star on short timescales is one of the fundamental problems in planet formation theory. The nominal efficiency of this radial drift process is in conflict with observations, suggesting that an empirical calibration of solid transport mechanisms in a disk is highly desirable. However, the fact that both radial drift and grain growth produce a similar particle size segregation in a disk (such that larger particles are preferentially concentrated closer to the star) makes it difficult to disentangle a clear signature of drift alone. We highlight a new approach, by showing that radial drift leaves a distinctive 'fingerprint' in the dust surface density profile that is directly accessible to current observational facilities. Using an analytical framework for dust evolution, we demonstrate that the combined effects of drift and (viscous) gas drag naturally produce a sharp outer edge in the dust distribution (or, equivalently, a sharp decrease in the dust-to-gas mass ratio). This edge feature forms during the earliest phase in the evolution of disk solids, before grain growth in the outer disk has made much progress, and is preserved over longer timescales when both growth and transport effects are more substantial. The key features of these analytical models are reproduced in detailed numerical simulations, and are qualitatively consistent with recent millimeter-wave observations that find gas/dust size discrepancies and steep declines in dust continuum emission in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks.

  7. Viscous Instability Triggered by Layered Accretion in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Taku

    2015-12-01

    Layered accretion is one of the inevitable ingredients in protoplanetary disks when disk turbulence is excited by magnetorotational instabilities (MRIs). In the accretion, disk surfaces where MRIs fully operate have a high value of disk accretion rate (\\dot{M}), while the disk midplane where MRIs are generally quenched ends up with a low value of \\dot{M}. Significant progress on understanding MRIs has recently been made by a number of dedicated MHD simulations, which requires improvement of the classical treatment of α in 1D disk models. To this end, we obtain a new expression of α by utilizing an empirical formula that is derived from recent MHD simulations of stratified disks with ohmic diffusion. It is interesting that this new formulation can be regarded as a general extension of the classical α. Armed with the new α, we perform a linear stability analysis of protoplanetary disks that undergo layered accretion, and we find that a viscous instability can occur around the outer edge of dead zones. Disks become stable in using the classical α. We identify that the difference arises from Σ-dependence of \\dot{M}; whereas Σ is uniquely determined for a given value of \\dot{M} in the classical approach, the new approach leads to \\dot{M} that is a multivalued function of Σ. We confirm our finding both by exploring a parameter space and by performing the 1D, viscous evolution of disks. We finally discuss other nonideal MHD effects that are not included in our analysis but may affect our results.

  8. Spiral arms in scattered light images of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-01

    In the past few years, resolved observations with high angular resolution have revealed rich structures in gaseous protoplanetary disks. Among all discoveries, one of the most prominent is the giant double-spiral structure, found in MWC 758, SAO 206462, and HD 100453. The NIR images of these disks taken by Subaru/HiCIAO, VLT/NACO, and VLT/SPHERE showed two spiral arms at tens of AU from the center. The arms are very open with large pitch angles, and are in a nearly m=2 rotational symmetry. Although planets are known to be able to excite density waves in protoplanetary disks, fitting observations with linear theory of the density wave demands unreasonably big scale height in the disk, thus temperature, in order to make the arms as open as observed (and no need to mention the coincidence that they all have two nearly m=2 arms). Using 3D hydro and radiative transfer simulations, we find that a massive perturber (giant planet, brown dwarf, or stellar mass companion) can excite multiple spiral arms in the density structure, and the arms inside the perturber's orbit are very prominent in NIR scattered light images, in striking similarity with observations. Very recently, the perturber was found for the first time in the HD 100453 disk, as a M dwarf companion. This gives us great confidence of our models, and suggests that the double spirals in the other two objects, MWC 758 and SAO 206462, are very likely to be excited in a similar way, by a currently unseen perturber outside the arms. In particular, by measuring the angular distance between the two arms and comparing it with our models, we determine that the perturber in SAO 206462 is about 6 Jupiter mass.

  9. Gravitoturbulence in magnetized protostellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riols, A.; Latter, H.

    2016-08-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) features in several aspects of protostellar disc evolution, most notably in angular momentum transport, fragmentation, and the outbursts exemplified by FU Ori and EX Lupi systems. The outer regions of protostellar discs may also be coupled to magnetic fields, which could then modify the development of GI. To understand the basic elements of their interaction, we perform local 2D ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations with an imposed toroidal field. In the regime of moderate plasma beta, we find that the system supports a hot gravitoturbulent state, characterized by considerable magnetic energy and stress and a surprisingly large Toomre parameter Q ≳ 10. This result has potential implications for disc structure, vertical thickness, ionization, etc. Our simulations also reveal the existence of long-lived and dense `magnetic islands' or plasmoids. Lastly, we find that the presence of a magnetic field has little impact on the fragmentation criterion of the disc. Though our focus is on protostellar discs, some of our results may be relevant for the outer radii of AGN.

  10. Black hole accretion disc impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihajoki, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analytic model for computing the luminosity and spectral evolution of flares caused by a supermassive black hole impacting the accretion disc of another supermassive black hole. Our model includes photon diffusion, emission from optically thin regions and relativistic corrections to the observed spectrum and time-scales. We test the observability of the impact scenario with a simulated population of quasars hosting supermassive black hole binaries. The results indicate that for a moderate binary mass ratio of 0.3, and impact distances of 100 primary Schwarzschild radii, the accretion disc impacts can be expected to equal or exceed the host quasar in brightness at observed wavelength λ = 510 nm up to z = 0.6. We conclude that accretion disc impacts may function as an independent probe for supermassive black hole binaries. We release the code used for computing the model light curves to the community.

  11. Laboratory simulations of thermal annealing in proto-planetary discs - I. Crystallization of Mg silicates from sol gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenweber, A.; Burchard, M.; Lattard, D.

    2011-12-01

    Amorphous and crystalline dust particles are smallest components of accretionary processes within circumstellar disks. The transition characteristics of amorphous dust to crystalline particles highly influence the thermal structure of the circumstellar disk and therefore affect most other processes. Annealing experiments on different compositions on the MgO-SiO2 join yielded quite contrasting results on the crystallization kinetics of enstatite (Mg2SiO3) and forsterite (Mg2SiO4) (e.g. review of Wooden et al., 2005; Murata et al., 2009; Roskosz et al., 2009). The discrepancies may result from differences in the starting materials. To explore this factor, we have setup several experimental series, using different methods to prepare sol-gels on a variety of Mg/Si ratios. We have also tested different procedures to process the raw gel materials after precipitation. The final gels were annealed in a furnace at temperatures between 700 and 1500 °C for durations between 15min and 96h. MIR and FIR-spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, BSE imaging and EDX analyses were used to characterize the run products. On enstatite composition the 1500 °C run products consist of well crystallized enstatite polymorphs with very little forsterite. Products of runs between 700 and 800 °C contain both poorly crystallized phases and amorphous material. Between 800 and 780 °C at all run durations crystalline products are dominated by enstatite and show less forsterite. Run products at 750 °C change with run time from amorphous, to forsterite dominated and finally to enstatite dominated mixtures, the latter containing subordinated forsterite. At 700 °C amorphous run products are observed after short run times, but change to forsterite dominated mixtures after longer run times. Up to 24 hours no enstatite could be observed in the products at 700 °C. Preliminary results with the SEM reveal compositional heterogeneities after short run durations (up to 30 minutes), which reflect the formation of crystalline forsterite. On the Mg2SiO4 composition, heat treatment for 20 hours at temperatures as low as 450 °C already leads to the crystallization of forsterite. Our experimental results are partially in accord with the findings of Thompson et al. (2003) and Roskosz et al. (2009). They are, however, at odds with the observations of Murata et al. (2009) on composition 1.00 MgO * 1.07 SiO2, who record enstatite as the first crystalline phase at temperatures in the range 750-780°C. Further investigations are in progress to try to resolve these discrepancies.

  12. Chemical abundances in the protoplanetary disc LV 2 (Orion) - II. High-dispersion VLT observations and microjet properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, Y. G.; Walsh, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    Integral field spectroscopy of the LV 2 proplyd is presented taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT)/FLAMES Argus array at an angular resolution of 0.31 × 0.31 arcsec2 and velocity resolutions down to 2 km s-1 pixel-1. Following subtraction of the local M42 emission, the spectrum of LV 2 is isolated from the surrounding nebula. We measured the heliocentric velocities and widths of a number of lines detected in the intrinsic spectrum of the proplyd, as well as in the adjacent Orion nebula falling within a 6.6 × 4.2 arcsec2 field of view. It is found that far-ultraviolet to optical collisional lines with critical densities, Ncr, ranging from 103 to 109 cm-3 suffer collisional de-excitation near the rest velocity of the proplyd correlating tightly with their critical densities. Lines of low Ncr are suppressed the most. The bipolar jet arising from LV 2 is spectrally and spatially well detected in several emission lines. We compute the [O III] electron temperature profile across LV 2 in velocity space and measure steep temperature variations associated with the red-shifted lobe of the jet, possibly being due to a shock discontinuity. From the velocity-resolved analysis the ionized gas near the rest frame of LV 2 has Te= 9200 ± 800 K and Ne˜ 106 cm-3, while the red-shifted jet lobe has Te≈ 9000-104 K and Ne˜ 106-107 cm-3. The jet flow is highly ionized but contains dense semineutral clumps emitting neutral oxygen lines. The abundances of N+, O2 +, Ne2 +, Fe2 +, S+and S2 +are measured for the strong red-shifted jet lobe. Iron in the core of LV 2 is depleted by 2.54 dex with respect to solar as a result of sedimentation on dust, whereas the efficient destruction of dust grains in the fast microjet raises its Fe abundance to at least 30 per cent solar. Sulphur does not show evidence of significant depletion on dust, but its abundance both in the core and the jet is only about half solar. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programme 078.C-0247(A).

  13. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  14. Optical Disc Applications in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Pamela Q. J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a variety of library applications of optical disc storage technology, including CD-ROM, digital videodisc, and WORM. Research and development projects at the Library of Congress, National Library of Medicine, and National Agricultural Library are described, products offered by library networks are reviewed, and activities in academic and…

  15. Asymmetric features in the protoplanetary disk MWC 758

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisty, M.; Juhasz, A.; Boccaletti, A.; Avenhaus, H.; Milli, J.; Thalmann, C.; Dominik, C.; Pinilla, P.; Buenzli, E.; Pohl, A.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Birnstiel, T.; de Boer, J.; Bonnefoy, M.; Chauvin, G.; Christiaens, V.; Garufi, A.; Grady, C.; Henning, T.; Huelamo, N.; Isella, A.; Langlois, M.; Ménard, F.; Mouillet, D.; Olofsson, J.; Pantin, E.; Pinte, C.; Pueyo, L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The study of dynamical processes in protoplanetary disks is essential to understand planet formation. In this context, transition disks are prime targets because they are at an advanced stage of disk clearing and may harbor direct signatures of disk evolution. Aims: We aim to derive new constraints on the structure of the transition disk MWC 758, to detect non-axisymmetric features and understand their origin. Methods: We obtained infrared polarized intensity observations of the protoplanetary disk MWC 758 with VLT/SPHERE at 1.04 μm to resolve scattered light at a smaller inner working angle (0.093'') and a higher angular resolution (0.027'') than previously achieved. Results: We observe polarized scattered light within 0.53'' (148 au) down to the inner working angle (26 au) and detect distinct non-axisymmetric features but no fully depleted cavity. The two small-scale spiral features that were previously detected with HiCIAO are resolved more clearly, and new features are identified, including two that are located at previously inaccessible radii close to the star. We present a model based on the spiral density wave theory with two planetary companions in circular orbits. The best model requires a high disk aspect ratio (H/r ~ 0.20 at the planet locations) to account for the large pitch angles which implies a very warm disk. Conclusions: Our observations reveal the complex morphology of the disk MWC 758. To understand the origin of the detected features, the combination of high-resolution observations in the submillimeter with ALMA and detailed modeling is needed. Based on observations performed with VLT/SPHERE under program ID 60-9389(A).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgESO data is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/578/L6

  16. Modeling the PAH Emission Spectra of Protoplanetary and Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aigen; Lunine, J. I.

    2006-05-01

    The 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3 micron emission features of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have been detected in protoplanetary disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars and T Tauri stars and in debris disks around main-sequence stars. PAHs play an important role in the thermal budget and chemistry of the gas in the disk, by providing photoelectrons for heating the gas and large surface areas for chemical reactions. Stochastically heated by a single UV/visible photon, the PAH emission is spatially more extended than large grains and therefore, the disks can be more easily resolved at the PAH emission bands. We propose to model the PAH emission spectra of protoplanetary and debris disks obtained by Spitzer and ISO. We will first calculate the temperature probability distribution functions dP/dT for both neutral and ionized PAHs of a wide range of sizes, at a wide range of radial distances (from the central star) in disks illuminated by stars of a wide range of spectral types. By modeling the PAH emission of dust disks, we will be able (1) to derive the abundance, size and spatial distributions of PAHs; (2) to derive the PAH photoelectric heating rates which dominate the gas heating in the disk surface layers; and (3) to see how the abundance and properties of the PAHs vary among disks at different evolutionary stages and illuminated by stars of different parameters (e.g. luminosity, spectral type). This program will create a web-based ``library'' of the temperature distribution functions dP/dT of PAHs (and their emission spectra and photoelectric heating rates) as a function of size, charge state, and radial distance in disks illuminated by stars of different spectral types. This library, a useful tool for interpreting the PAH emission features of dust disks obtained by Spitzer and for understanding the disk chemistry, will be made publicly available by April 2007 via the WWW at http://www.missouri.edu/~lia/.

  17. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF TURBULENT PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND THE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, D.; Wiebe, D. E-mail: dwiebe@inasan.ru

    2011-10-01

    We study the influence of transport processes on the chemical evolution of DM Tau-like protoplanetary disks. Turbulent transport of gases and ices is implicitly modeled in full two dimensions (2D), using the mixing-length approximation, along with the time-dependent chemistry. We find that turbulent transport enhances abundances and column densities of many gas-phase species and ices, particularly, complex ones. The influence of turbulent mixing on disk chemistry is more pronounced in the inner, planet-forming disk region where gradients of temperature and high-energy radiation intensities are steeper than in the outer region. The molecules that are unresponsive to transport include, e.g., C{sub 2}H, C{sup +}, CH{sub 4}, CN, CO, HCN, HNC, H{sub 2}CO, OH, as well as water and ammonia ice. Their column densities computed with the laminar and 2D mixing model differ by a factor of {approx}< 2-5. Molecules whose vertical column densities in the laminar and dynamical models differ by up to two orders of magnitude include, e.g., C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, some carbon chains, CS, H{sub 2}CS, H{sub 2}O, HCO{sup +}, HCOOH, HNCO, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, NH{sub 3}, CO ice, H{sub 2}CO ice, CH{sub 3}OH ice, and electrons. Molecules whose column densities are altered by diffusion by more than two orders of magnitude include, e.g., C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}S, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SiO, SO, SO{sub 2}, long carbon chain ices, CH{sub 3}CHO ice, HCOOH ice, O{sub 2} ice, and OCN ice. We indicate several observable or potentially detectable tracers of transport processes in protoplanetary disks and the solar nebula, such as heavy hydrocarbon ices, complex organics, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO, SO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}S compared to CO and water ice.

  18. Study of the 10 micron continuum of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arefyev, V. N.; Dianov-Klokov, V. I.; Ivanov, V. M.; Sizov, N. I.

    1979-01-01

    Radiation attenuation by atmospheric water vapor is considered. A formula based on laboratory data is recommended for approximating continuous absorption in the spectra region in question. Data of full scale measurements and laboratory experiments are compared. It was concluded that only molecular absorption need be taken into account under clear atmospheric conditions during the warm part of the year, while in winter or in cloudy conditions, the effect of aerosol can be significant.

  19. Improved constraints on non-Newtonian forces at 10 microns

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, Andrew A.; Smullin, Sylvia J.; Weld, David M.; Chiaverini, John; Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2008-07-15

    Several recent theories suggest that light moduli or particles in 'large' extra dimensions could mediate macroscopic forces exceeding gravitational strength at length scales below a millimeter. Such new forces can be parameterized as a Yukawa-type correction to the Newtonian potential of strength {alpha} relative to gravity and range {lambda}. To extend the search for such new physics we have improved our apparatus utilizing cryogenic micro-cantilevers capable of measuring attonewton forces, which now includes a switchable magnetic force for calibration. Our most recent experimental constraints on Yukawa-type deviations from Newtonian gravity are more than 3 times as stringent as our previously published results and represent the best bound in the range of 5-15 {mu}m, with a 95% confidence exclusion of forces with |{alpha}|>14,000 at {lambda}=10 {mu}m.

  20. Sub-10-Micron and Respirable Particles in Lunar Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, B. L.; McKay, D. S.; Riofrio, L. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Gonzalez, C. P.

    2010-03-01

    Grain size analyses of Apollo 11 soil 10084 by a laser diffraction technique shows that this soil contains roughly 2% by volume in the respirable (2.5 µm and below) grain size, in agreement with our prior estimates based on extrapolation of sieve data.

  1. Receiver concepts for data transmission at 10 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, A. L.; Philipp, H. K.; Leeb, W. R.

    1984-05-01

    Receivers for digitally modulated CO2 laser signals are compared. Incoherent heterodyne receivers and coherent homodyne setups, including the linear phase locked loop (PLL) receiver, the low intermediate frequency translation loop, and the Costas loop receiver were studied. Experiments covered the homodyne systems, emphasizing the linear PLL receiver. Reliable phase lock of the receiver is achieved at carrier levels as low as 3 nW. Reception of signals phase shift keyed with a data rate of up to 150 Mbit/sec is demonstrated at subnanowatt sideband power levels.

  2. Spectrophotometry at 10 microns of T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    New 8-13 micron spectra of 32 T Tau, or related young, stars are presented. Silicate emission features are commonly seen. Absorptions occur less frequently but also match the properties of silicate materials. The shape of the emission feature suggests that a more crystalline grain is responsible in the T Tau stars than those of the Trapezium region. The evolution of the silicate component of the circumstellar shell around T Tau stars, and its dependence upon stellar wind activity, visual linear polarization, and extinction are investigated. Several correlations suggest that the shells are likely to be flattened, disklike structures rather than spherical.

  3. Peripheral Disc Margin Shape and Internal Disc Derangement: Imaging Correlation in Significantly Painful Discs Identified at Provocation Lumbar Discography

    PubMed Central

    Bartynski, W.S.; Rothfus, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  4. Peripheral disc margin shape and internal disc derangement: imaging correlation in significantly painful discs identified at provocation lumbar discography.

    PubMed

    Bartynski, W S; Rothfus, W E

    2012-06-01

    Annular margin shape is used to characterize lumbar disc abnormality on CT/MR imaging studies. Abnormal discs also have internal derangement including annular degeneration and radial defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between disc-margin shape and annular internal derangement on post-discogram CT in significantly painful discs encountered at provocation lumbar discography (PLD). Significantly painful discs were encountered at 126 levels in 86 patients (47 male, 39 female) studied by PLD where no prior surgery had been performed and response to intradiscal lidocaine after provocation resulted in either substantial/total relief or no improvement after lidocaine administration. Post-discogram CT and discogram imaging was evaluated for disc-margin characteristics (bulge/protrusion), features of disc internal derangement (radial annular defect [RD: radial tear/fissure/annular gap], annular degeneration) and presence/absence of discographic contrast leakage. In discs with focal protrusion, 50 of 63 (79%) demonstrated Grade 3 RD with 13 (21%) demonstrating severe degenerative change only. In discs with generalized-bulge-only, 48 of 63 (76%) demonstrated degenerative change only (primarily Dallas Grade 3) with 15 of 63 (24%) demonstrating a RD (Dallas Grade 3). Differences were highly statistically significant (p<0.001). Pain elimination with intra-discal lidocaine correlated with discographic contrast leakage (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape correlates with features of internal derangement in significantly painful discs encountered at PLD. Discs with focal protrusion typically demonstrate RD while generalized bulging discs typically demonstrated degenerative changes only (p<0.001). Disc-margin shape may provide an important imaging clue to the cause of chronic discogenic low back pain. PMID:22681741

  5. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. I. PLANETESIMAL DYNAMICS IN MASSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron

    2015-01-10

    About 20% of exoplanets discovered by radial velocity surveys reside in stellar binaries. To clarify their origin one has to understand the dynamics of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks within binaries. The standard description, accounting for only gas drag and gravity of the companion star, has been challenged recently, as the gravity of the protoplanetary disk was shown to play a crucial role in planetesimal dynamics. An added complication is the tendency of protoplanetary disks in binaries to become eccentric, giving rise to additional excitation of planetesimal eccentricity. Here, for the first time, we analytically explore the secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries such as α Cen and γ Cep under the combined action of (1) gravity of the eccentric protoplanetary disk, (2) perturbations due to the (coplanar) eccentric companion, and (3) gas drag. We derive explicit solutions for the behavior of planetesimal eccentricity e {sub p} in non-precessing disks (and in precessing disks in certain limits). We obtain the analytical form of the distribution of the relative velocities of planetesimals, which is a key input for understanding their collisional evolution. Disk gravity strongly influences relative velocities and tends to push the sizes of planetesimals colliding with comparable objects at the highest speed to small values, ∼1 km. We also find that planetesimals in eccentric protoplanetary disks apsidally aligned with the binary orbit collide at lower relative velocities than in misaligned disks. Our results highlight the decisive role that disk gravity plays in planetesimal dynamics in binaries.

  6. Phyllosilicate emission from protoplanetary disks: is the indirect detection of extrasolar water possible?

    PubMed

    Morris, Melissa A; Desch, Steven J

    2009-12-01

    Phyllosilicates are hydrous minerals formed by interaction between rock and liquid water, and are commonly found in meteorites that originate in the asteroid belt. Collisions between asteroids contribute to zodiacal dust, which therefore reasonably could include phyllosilicates. Collisions between planetesimals in protoplanetary disks may also produce dust that contains phyllosilicates. These minerals possess characteristic emission features in the mid-infrared and could be detectable in extrasolar protoplanetary disks. We have determined whether phyllosilicates in protoplanetary disks are detectable in the infrared, using instruments such as those on board the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). We calculated opacities for the phyllosilicates most common in meteorites and, using a two-layer radiative transfer model, computed the emission of radiation from a protoplanetary disk. We found that phyllosilicates present at the 3% level lead to observationally significant differences in disk spectra and should therefore be detectable with the use of infrared observations and spectral modeling. Detection of phyllosilicates in a protoplanetary disk would be diagnostic of liquid water in planetesimals in that disk and would demonstrate similarity to our own Solar System. We also discuss use of phyllosilicate emission to test the "water worlds" hypothesis, which proposes that liquid water in planetesimals should correlate with the inventory of short-lived radionuclides in planetary systems, especially (26)Al.

  7. DETECTION OF CH{sub 4} IN THE GV TAU N PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Gibb, Erika L.; Horne, David

    2013-10-20

    T Tauri stars are low mass young stars that may serve as analogs to the early solar system. Observations of organic molecules in the protoplanetary disks surrounding T Tauri stars are important for characterizing the chemical and physical processes that lead to planet formation. Searches for undetected molecules, particularly in the inner, planet forming regions of these disks are important for testing protoplanetary disk chemical models and for understanding the evolution of volatiles through the star and planet formation process. We used NIRSPEC on Keck 2 to perform a high resolution (λ/Δλ ∼ 25,000) L-band survey of T Tauri star GV Tau N. This object is one of two in which the simple organic molecules HCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} have been reported in absorption in the warm molecular layer of the protoplanetary disk. In this Letter, we report the first detection of methane, CH{sub 4}, in a protoplanetary disk. Specifically, we detected the ν{sub 3} band in absorption. We determined a rotational temperature of 750 ± 50 K and column density of (2.8 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 17} cm{sup –2}. Our results imply that CH{sub 4} originates in the warm molecular layer of the inner protoplanetary disk.

  8. The artificial disc: theory, design and materials.

    PubMed

    Bao, Q B; McCullen, G M; Higham, P A; Dumbleton, J H; Yuan, H A

    1996-06-01

    Low back pain is one of the most common medical conditions in the Western world. Disc degeneration, an inevitable process of aging, of variable rate and degree, is one of the major causes of low back pain. Currently, there are two major surgical interventions for treating conditions related to the degenerative disc: discectomy and fusion. Although discectomy and fusion produce a relatively good short-term clinical result in relieving pain, both these surgical treatments alter the biomechanics of the spine, possibly leading to further degeneration of the surrounding tissues and the discs at adjacent levels. Over the past 35 years, a tremendous effort has been made to develop an artificial disc to replace the degenerated disc. The goal is the restoration of the natural biomechanics of the segment after disc excision, thus relieving pain and preventing further degeneration at adjacent segments. However, the artificial disc faces a complex biomechanical environment which makes replication of the biomechanics difficult and long-term survival challenging to designs and materials. The purpose of this article is to examine the factors of importance in designing a disc replacement. Topics covered include the structure and function of the natural disc, the changes that occur with disc degeneration and existing methods of treatment for the degenerative spine. The progress in achieving a functional, long-lasting disc replacement is outlined.

  9. MORPHOLOGY OF THE RED RECTANGLE PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, N.; Kwok, Sun; Steffen, W. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2011-10-10

    The morphology of the Red Rectangle (RR) exhibits several singular attributes. Most prominent are a series of linear features perpendicular to the symmetry axis which appear as 'ladder rungs' across the nebula. At the edge of each 'rung' gas seemingly flows from bright knots in a parabolic shape toward the center of the nebula. We present a new model of the RR which explains these features as a projection effect of the more common concentric arcs seen in other proto-planetary nebulae (e.g., Egg Nebula). Using the three-dimensional morpho-kinematic modeling software SHAPE, we have created a model of the RR that consists of spherical shells evacuated by a bi-conical outflow. When the symmetry axis is oriented perpendicular to the line of sight, the spherical shells become linear, thereby reproducing the 'rungs' seen in the RR. When oriented at different inclinations, the linear features become spherical as observed in the Egg Nebula. The model also accurately reproduces the bright knots and the parabolic outflows from these knots that have proven difficult to explain in the past. Using this model, we are able to place a lower limit on the speed of the outflow of {approx}158 km s{sup -1}.

  10. Hydrocarbon Emission Rings in Protoplanetary Disks Induced by Dust Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergin, Edwin A.; Du, Fujun; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Blake, G. A.; Schwarz, K.; Visser, R.; Zhang, K.

    2016-11-01

    We report observations of resolved C2H emission rings within the gas-rich protoplanetary disks of TW Hya and DM Tau using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. In each case the emission ring is found to arise at the edge of the observable disk of millimeter-sized grains (pebbles) traced by submillimeter-wave continuum emission. In addition, we detect a C3H2 emission ring with an identical spatial distribution to C2H in the TW Hya disk. This suggests that these are hydrocarbon rings (i.e., not limited to C2H). Using a detailed thermo-chemical model we show that reproducing the emission from C2H requires a strong UV field and C/O > 1 in the upper disk atmosphere and outer disk, beyond the edge of the pebble disk. This naturally arises in a disk where the ice-coated dust mass is spatially stratified due to the combined effects of coagulation, gravitational settling and drift. This stratification causes the disk surface and outer disk to have a greater permeability to UV photons. Furthermore the concentration of ices that transport key volatile carriers of oxygen and carbon in the midplane, along with photochemical erosion of CO, leads to an elemental C/O ratio that exceeds unity in the UV-dominated disk. Thus the motions of the grains, and not the gas, lead to a rich hydrocarbon chemistry in disk surface layers and in the outer disk midplane.

  11. Interdependence of Electric Discharge and Magnetorotational Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranushi, Takayuki; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2012-11-01

    We study how the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in protoplanetary disks is affected by the electric discharge caused by the electric field in the resistive magnetohydrodynamic. We performed three-dimensional shearing box simulations with various values of plasma beta and electrical breakdown models. We find that the MRI is self-sustaining in spite of the high resistivity. The instability gives rise to the large electric field that causes the electrical breakdown, and the breakdown maintains the high degree of ionization required for the instability. The condition for this self-sustained MRI is set by the balance between the energy supply from the shearing motion and the energy consumed by ohmic dissipation. We apply the condition to various disk models and study where the active, self-sustained, and dead zones of MRI are located. In the fiducial minimum-mass solar-nebula model, the newly found sustained zone occupies only a limited volume of the disk. In the late-phase gas-depleted disk models, however, the sustained zone occupies a larger volume of the disk.

  12. Structure Formation through Magnetohydrodynamical Instabilities in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, K.; Tajima, T.; Horton, W.

    2000-12-01

    The shear flow instabilities under the presence of magnetic fields in the protoplanetary disk can greatly facilitate the formation of density structures that serve as seeds prior to the onset of the gravitational Jeans instability. Such a seeding process may explain several outstanding puzzles in the planetary genesis that are further compounded by the new discoveries of extrasolar planets and a new insight into the equation of state of dense matter. This puzzle also includes the apparent narrow window of the age difference of the Sun and the Earth. We evaluate the effects of the Parker, magnetorotational(Balbus-Hawley), and kinematic dynamo instabilities by comparing the properties of these instabilities. We calculate the mass spectra of aggregated density structures by the above mechanism in the radial direction for an axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) torus equiblium and power-law density profile models. The mass spectrum of the magnetorotational instability may describe the origin of giant planets away from the central star such as Jupiter. Our local three-dimentional MHD simulation indicates that the coupling of the Parker and magnetorotational instabilities creates spiral arms and gas blobs in the accretion disk, reinforcing the theory and model.

  13. Dust Evolution Can Produce Scattered Light Gaps in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnstiel, Tilman; Andrews, Sean M.; Pinilla, Paola; Kama, Mihkel

    2015-11-01

    Recent imaging of protoplanetary disks with high resolution and contrast have revealed a striking variety of substructure. Of particular interest are cases where near-infrared scattered light images show evidence for low-intensity annular “gaps.” The origins of such structures are still uncertain, but the interaction of the gas disk with planets is a common interpretation. We study the impact that the evolution of the solid material can have on the observable properties of disks in a simple scenario without any gravitational or hydrodynamical disturbances to the gas disk structure. Even with a smooth and continuous gas density profile, we find that the scattered light emission produced by small dust grains can exhibit ring-like depressions similar to those presented in recent observations. The physical mechanisms responsible for these features rely on the inefficient fragmentation of dust particles. The occurrence and position of the proposed “gap” features depend most strongly on the dust-to-gas ratio, the fragmentation threshold velocity, the strength of the turbulence, and the age of the disk, and should be generic (at some radius) for typically adopted disk parameters. The same physical processes can affect the thermal emission at optically thin wavelengths (˜1 mm), although the behavior can be more complex; unlike for disk-planet interactions, a “gap” should not be present at these longer wavelengths.

  14. Experimental study on bouncing barriers in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Kelling, T.; Wurm, G.; Köster, M.

    2014-03-10

    For dust aggregates in protoplanetary disks, a transition between sticking and bouncing in individual collisions at mm to cm sizes has been observed in the past. This leads to the notion of a bouncing barrier for which growth gets stalled. Here, we present long-term laboratory experiments on the outcome of repeated aggregate collisions at the bouncing barrier. About 100 SiO{sub 2} dust aggregates 1 mm in size were observed interacting with each other. Collisions occurred within a velocity range from below mm s{sup –1} up to cm s{sup –1}. Aggregates continuously interacted with each other over a period of 900 s. During this time, more than 10{sup 5} collisions occurred. Nearly 2000 collisions were analyzed in detail. No temporal stable net growth of larger aggregates was observed even though sticking collision occurred. Larger ensembles of aggregates sticking together were formed but were disassembled again during further collisional evolution. The concept of a bouncing barrier supports the formation of planetesimals by seeded collisional growth, as well as by gravitational instability favoring a significant total mass being limited to certain size ranges. Within our parameter set, the experiments confirm that bouncing barriers are one possible and likely evolutionary limit of self-consistent particle growth.

  15. Water in protoplanetary disks: Deuteration and turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Nomura, Hideko; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2013-12-10

    We investigate water and deuterated water chemistry in turbulent protoplanetary disks. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking turbulent mixing in a vertical direction. Water near the midplane is transported to the disk atmosphere by turbulence and is destroyed by photoreactions to produce atomic oxygen, while the atomic oxygen is transported to the midplane and reforms water and/or other molecules. We find that this cycle significantly decreases column densities of water ice at r ≲ 30 AU, where dust temperatures are too high to reform water ice effectively. The radial extent of such region depends on the desorption energy of atomic hydrogen. Our model indicates that water ice could be deficient even outside the sublimation radius. Outside this radius, the cycle decreases the deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio of water ice from ∼2 × 10{sup –2}, which is set by the collapsing core model, to 10{sup –4}-10{sup –2} in 10{sup 6} yr, without significantly decreasing the water ice column density. The resultant D/H ratios depend on the strength of mixing and the radial distance from the central star. Our finding suggests that the D/H ratio of cometary water (∼10{sup –4}) could be established (i.e., cometary water could be formed) in the solar nebula, even if the D/H ratio of water ice delivered to the disk was very high (∼10{sup –2}).

  16. Temperature fluctuations driven by magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Yang, Chao-Chin E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org E-mail: ccyang@astro.lu.se

    2014-08-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.

  17. GLOBAL DRAG-INDUCED INSTABILITIES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2013-07-20

    We use the Fokker-Planck equation and model the dispersive dynamics of solid particles in annular protoplanetary disks whose gas component is more massive than the particle phase. We model particle-gas interactions as hard sphere collisions, determine the functional form of diffusion coefficients, and show the existence of two global unstable modes in the particle phase. These modes have spiral patterns with the azimuthal wavenumber m = 1 and rotate slowly. We show that in ring-shaped disks, the phase-space density of solid particles increases linearly in time toward an accumulation point near the location of pressure maximum, while instabilities grow exponentially. Therefore, planetesimals and planetary cores can be efficiently produced near the peaks of unstable density waves. In this mechanism, particles migrating toward the accumulation point will not participate in the formation of planets, and should eventually form a debris ring like the main asteroid belt or classical Kuiper Belt objects. We present the implications of global instabilities to the formation of ice giants and terrestrial planets in the solar system.

  18. REEXAMINATION OF INDUCTION HEATING OF PRIMITIVE BODIES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, Raymond L.; Roberge, Wayne G. E-mail: roberw@rpi.edu

    2013-10-20

    We reexamine the unipolar induction mechanism for heating asteroids originally proposed in a classic series of papers by Sonett and collaborators. As originally conceived, induction heating is caused by the 'motional electric field' that appears in the frame of an asteroid immersed in a fully ionized, magnetized solar wind and drives currents through its interior. However, we point out that classical induction heating contains a subtle conceptual error, in consequence of which the electric field inside the asteroid was calculated incorrectly. The problem is that the motional electric field used by Sonett et al. is the electric field in the freely streaming plasma far from the asteroid; in fact, the motional field vanishes at the asteroid surface for realistic assumptions about the plasma density. In this paper we revisit and improve the induction heating scenario by (1) correcting the conceptual error by self-consistently calculating the electric field in and around the boundary layer at the asteroid-plasma interface; (2) considering weakly ionized plasmas consistent with current ideas about protoplanetary disks; and (3) considering more realistic scenarios that do not require a fully ionized, powerful T Tauri wind in the disk midplane. We present exemplary solutions for two highly idealized flows that show that the interior electric field can either vanish or be comparable to the fields predicted by classical induction depending on the flow geometry. We term the heating driven by these flows 'electrodynamic heating', calculate its upper limits, and compare them to heating produced by short-lived radionuclides.

  19. Chemistry in low-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions.

    PubMed

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2006-08-15

    When interstellar clouds collapse to form new stars and planets, the surrounding gas and dust become part of the infalling envelopes and rotating disks, thus providing the basic material from which new solar systems are formed. Instrumentation to probe the chemistry in low-mass star-forming regions has only recently become available. The results of a systematic program to study the abundances in solar-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions are presented. Surveys at submillimeter and infrared wavelengths reveal a rich chemistry, including simple and complex (organic) gases, ices, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and silicates. Each of these species traces different aspects of the physical and chemical state of the objects as they evolve from deeply embedded protostars to pre-main sequence stars with planet-forming disks. Quantitative information on temperatures, densities, and abundances is obtained through molecular excitation and radiative transfer models as well as from analysis of solid-state line profiles. The chemical characteristics are dominated by freeze-out in the coldest regions and ice evaporation in the warmer zones. In the surface layers of disks, UV radiation controls the chemistry. The importance of complementary laboratory experiments and calculations to obtain basic molecular data is emphasized.

  20. ASSEMBLY OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND INCLINATIONS OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Foucart, Francois; Lai, Dong

    2013-02-10

    The Kepler satellite has discovered a number of transiting planets around close binary stars. These circumbinary systems have highly aligned planetary and binary orbits. In this paper, we explore how the mutual inclination between the planetary and binary orbits may reflect the physical conditions of the assembly of protoplanetary disks and the interaction between protostellar binaries and circumbinary disks. Given the turbulent nature of star-forming molecular clouds, it is possible that the gas falling onto the outer region of a circumbinary disk and the central protostellar binary have different axes of rotation. Thus, the newly assembled circumbinary disk can be misaligned with respect to the binary. However, the gravitational torque from the binary produces a warp and twist in the disk, and the back-reaction torque tends to align the disk and the binary orbital plane. We present a new, analytic calculation of this alignment torque and show that the binary-disk inclination angle can be reduced appreciably after the binary accretes a few percent of its mass from the disk. Our calculation suggests that in the absence of other disturbances, circumbinary disks and planets around close (sub-AU) stellar binaries, for which mass accretion onto the proto-binary is very likely to have occurred, are expected to be highly aligned with the binary orbits, while disks and planets around wide binaries can be misaligned. Measurements of the mutual inclinations of circumbinary planetary systems can provide a clue to the birth environments of such systems.

  1. INTERDEPENDENCE OF ELECTRIC DISCHARGE AND MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Muranushi, Takayuki; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: okuzumi@nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2012-11-20

    We study how the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in protoplanetary disks is affected by the electric discharge caused by the electric field in the resistive magnetohydrodynamic. We performed three-dimensional shearing box simulations with various values of plasma beta and electrical breakdown models. We find that the MRI is self-sustaining in spite of the high resistivity. The instability gives rise to the large electric field that causes the electrical breakdown, and the breakdown maintains the high degree of ionization required for the instability. The condition for this self-sustained MRI is set by the balance between the energy supply from the shearing motion and the energy consumed by ohmic dissipation. We apply the condition to various disk models and study where the active, self-sustained, and dead zones of MRI are located. In the fiducial minimum-mass solar-nebula model, the newly found sustained zone occupies only a limited volume of the disk. In the late-phase gas-depleted disk models, however, the sustained zone occupies a larger volume of the disk.

  2. Weak Accretion in the Outer Regions of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Bai, X.; Stone, J. M.; Armitage, P. J.; Beckwith, K.

    2013-01-01

    I will present numerical simulations of turbulence in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks. In these regions, low ionization levels and gas densities lead to weak coupling between neutral and ionized gas, enhancing the effect of ambipolar diffusion drastically. Only very thin surface layers of the disk are well ionized due to FUV photons from the central star. Our simulations focus on turbulent accretion driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the absence of a vertical magnetic field penetrating the disk. The result is a form of layered accretion, akin to the Ohmic dead zone paradigm relevant to smaller disk radii; gas is only accreted through very thin surface layers that surround a magnetically inactive "ambipolar dead zone". We find that the measured accretion rates due to this strong ambipolar diffusion are too small, by at least an order of magnitude, to account for observations. I will discuss the implications of these results for disk evolution, and a promising solution to the problem by including a vertical magnetic field.

  3. DUST EVOLUTION CAN PRODUCE SCATTERED LIGHT GAPS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Birnstiel, Tilman; Andrews, Sean M.; Pinilla, Paola; Kama, Mihkel E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: mkama@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2015-11-01

    Recent imaging of protoplanetary disks with high resolution and contrast have revealed a striking variety of substructure. Of particular interest are cases where near-infrared scattered light images show evidence for low-intensity annular “gaps.” The origins of such structures are still uncertain, but the interaction of the gas disk with planets is a common interpretation. We study the impact that the evolution of the solid material can have on the observable properties of disks in a simple scenario without any gravitational or hydrodynamical disturbances to the gas disk structure. Even with a smooth and continuous gas density profile, we find that the scattered light emission produced by small dust grains can exhibit ring-like depressions similar to those presented in recent observations. The physical mechanisms responsible for these features rely on the inefficient fragmentation of dust particles. The occurrence and position of the proposed “gap” features depend most strongly on the dust-to-gas ratio, the fragmentation threshold velocity, the strength of the turbulence, and the age of the disk, and should be generic (at some radius) for typically adopted disk parameters. The same physical processes can affect the thermal emission at optically thin wavelengths (∼1 mm), although the behavior can be more complex; unlike for disk–planet interactions, a “gap” should not be present at these longer wavelengths.

  4. An Observational Study of Pulsations in Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian; Henson, Gary D.; Hillwig, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    We have been carrying out a long-term monitoring program to study the light variability in proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). PPNe are post-Asymptotic Giant Branch objects in transition between the AGB and PN phases in the evolution of low and intermediate-mass stars. As such, it is not surprising that they display pulsational variability. We have been carrying out photometric monitoring of 30 of these at the Valparaiso University campus observatory over the last 20 years, with the assistance of undergraduate students. The sample size has been enlarged over the past six years by observations made using telescopes in the SARA consortium at KPNO and CTIO. Periods have been determined for those of F-G spectral types. We have also enlarged the sample with PPNe from outside the Milky Way by determining periods of eight PPNe in the lower metalicity environment of the Magellanic Clouds. Periods for the entire sample range from 35 to 160 days. Some clear patterns have emerged, with those of higher temperature possessing shorter periods and smaller amplitudes, indicating a reduction in period and pulsation amplitude as the objects evolve. Radial velocity monitoring of several of the brightest of these has allowed us to document their changes in brightness, color, and size during a pulsation cycle. The results of this study will be presented. This research is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (most recently AST 1413660), with additional student support from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium.

  5. COMPACT DUST CONCENTRATION IN THE MWC 758 PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, S.; Casassus, S.; Perez, S.; Avenhaus, H.; Lyra, W.; Roman, P. E.; Wright, C. M.; Maddison, S. T.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of planetesimals requires that primordial dust grains grow from micron- to kilometer-sized bodies. Dust traps caused by gas pressure maxima have been proposed as regions where grains can concentrate and grow fast enough to form planetesimals, before radially migrating onto the star. We report new VLA Ka and Ku observations of the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star MWC 758. The Ka image shows a compact emission region in the outer disk, indicating a strong concentration of big dust grains. Tracing smaller grains, archival ALMA data in band 7 continuum shows extended disk emission with an intensity maximum to the northwest of the central star, which matches the VLA clump position. The compactness of the Ka emission is expected in the context of dust trapping, as big grains are trapped more easily than smaller grains in gas pressure maxima. We develop a nonaxisymmetric parametric model inspired by a steady-state vortex solution with parameters adequately selected to reproduce the observations, including the spectral energy distribution. Finally, we compare the radio continuum with SPHERE scattered light data. The ALMA continuum spatially coincides with a spiral-like feature seen in scattered light, while the VLA clump is offset from the scattered light maximum. Moreover, the ALMA map shows a decrement that matches a region devoid of scattered polarized emission. Continuum observations at a different wavelength are necessary to conclude whether the VLA-ALMA difference is an opacity or a real dust segregation.

  6. Measuring Protoplanetary Disk Gas Surface Density Profiles with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; McPartland, Conor

    2016-10-01

    The gas and dust are spatially segregated in protoplanetary disks due to the vertical settling and radial drift of large grains. A fuller accounting of the mass content and distribution in disks therefore requires spectral line observations. We extend the modeling approach presented in Williams & Best to show that gas surface density profiles can be measured from high fidelity 13CO integrated intensity images. We demonstrate the methodology by fitting ALMA observations of the HD 163296 disk to determine a gas mass, M gas = 0.048 M ⊙, and accretion disk characteristic size R c = 213 au and gradient γ = 0.39. The same parameters match the C18O 2–1 image and indicate an abundance ratio [12CO]/[C18O] of 700 independent of radius. To test how well this methodology can be applied to future line surveys of smaller, lower mass T Tauri disks, we create a large 13CO 2–1 image library and fit simulated data. For disks with gas masses 3–10 M Jup at 150 pc, ALMA observations with a resolution of 0.″2–0.″3 and integration times of ∼20 minutes allow reliable estimates of R c to within about 10 au and γ to within about 0.2. Economic gas imaging surveys are therefore feasible and offer the opportunity to open up a new dimension for studying disk structure and its evolution toward planet formation.

  7. Protoplanetary Disks in the Hostile Environment of Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Zapata, L.; Henney, W. J.; Puzia, T. H.; Tsamis, Y. G.

    2016-07-01

    We report the first direct imaging of protoplanetary disks in the star-forming region of Carina, the most distant massive cluster in which disks have been imaged. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA), the disks are observed around two young stellar objects (YSOs) that are embedded inside evaporating gaseous globules and exhibit jet activity. The disks have an average radius of 60 au and total masses of 30 and 50 {M}{Jup}. Given the measured masses, the minimum timescale required for planet formation (˜1–2 Myr) and the average age of the Carina population (˜1–4 Myr), it is plausible that young planets are present or their formation is currently ongoing in these disks. The non-detection of millimeter emission above the 4σ threshold (˜ 7{M}{Jup}) in the core of the massive cluster Trumpler 14, an area containing previously identified proplyd candidates, suggests evidence for rapid photo-evaporative disk destruction in the cluster’s harsh radiation field. This would prevent the formation of giant gas planets in disks located in the cores of Carina’s dense subclusters, whereas the majority of YSO disks in the wider Carina region remain unaffected by external photoevaporation.

  8. Chemistry in low-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions

    PubMed Central

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2006-01-01

    When interstellar clouds collapse to form new stars and planets, the surrounding gas and dust become part of the infalling envelopes and rotating disks, thus providing the basic material from which new solar systems are formed. Instrumentation to probe the chemistry in low-mass star-forming regions has only recently become available. The results of a systematic program to study the abundances in solar-mass protostellar and protoplanetary regions are presented. Surveys at submillimeter and infrared wavelengths reveal a rich chemistry, including simple and complex (organic) gases, ices, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and silicates. Each of these species traces different aspects of the physical and chemical state of the objects as they evolve from deeply embedded protostars to pre-main sequence stars with planet-forming disks. Quantitative information on temperatures, densities, and abundances is obtained through molecular excitation and radiative transfer models as well as from analysis of solid-state line profiles. The chemical characteristics are dominated by freeze-out in the coldest regions and ice evaporation in the warmer zones. In the surface layers of disks, UV radiation controls the chemistry. The importance of complementary laboratory experiments and calculations to obtain basic molecular data is emphasized. PMID:16894165

  9. Diffractive telescope for protoplanetary disks study in UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, W.; Koechlin, L.

    2015-12-01

    The direct observation of exoplanetary systems and their environment remains a technological challenge: on the one hand, because of the weak luminosity of objects surrounding the central star, and on the other hand, because of their small size compared to the distance from Earth. The fresnel imager is a concept of space telescope based on focusing by diffraction, developed by our team in Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie (IRAP). Its high photometric dynamics and its low angular resolution make it a competitive candidate. Currently we propose a space mission on board the International Space Station (ISS), observing in the ultraviolet band, in order to validate its capabilities in space and so increase the Technological Readiness Level (TRL), anticipating a larger mission in the future. To reach this goal, we have to provide some evolutions, like improving the design of Fresnel arrays or conceive a new chromatism corrector. This paper presents the evolutions for the ISS prototype and its possible applications like protoplanetary disks imaging.

  10. Protoplanetary Disks in the Hostile Environment of Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Zapata, L.; Henney, W. J.; Puzia, T. H.; Tsamis, Y. G.

    2016-07-01

    We report the first direct imaging of protoplanetary disks in the star-forming region of Carina, the most distant massive cluster in which disks have been imaged. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA), the disks are observed around two young stellar objects (YSOs) that are embedded inside evaporating gaseous globules and exhibit jet activity. The disks have an average radius of 60 au and total masses of 30 and 50 {M}{Jup}. Given the measured masses, the minimum timescale required for planet formation (˜1-2 Myr) and the average age of the Carina population (˜1-4 Myr), it is plausible that young planets are present or their formation is currently ongoing in these disks. The non-detection of millimeter emission above the 4σ threshold (˜ 7{M}{Jup}) in the core of the massive cluster Trumpler 14, an area containing previously identified proplyd candidates, suggests evidence for rapid photo-evaporative disk destruction in the cluster’s harsh radiation field. This would prevent the formation of giant gas planets in disks located in the cores of Carina’s dense subclusters, whereas the majority of YSO disks in the wider Carina region remain unaffected by external photoevaporation.

  11. Radiation Hydrodynamical Models of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Many stars host planets orbiting within one astronomical unit (AU). These close planets’ origins are a mystery that motivates investigating protoplanetary disks’ central regions. A key factor governing the conditions near the star is the silicate sublimation front, which largely determines where the starlight is absorbed, and which is often called the inner rim. We present the first radiation hydrodynamical modeling of the sublimation front in the disks around the young intermediate-mass stars called Herbig Ae stars. The models are axisymmetric, and include starlight heating, silicate grains sublimating and condensing to equilibrium at the local, timedependent temperature and density, and accretion stresses parametrizing the results of MHD magneto-rotational turbulence models. The results compare well with radiation hydrostatic solutions, and prove to be dynamically stable. Passing the model disks into Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that the models satisfy observational constraints on the inner rims’s location. A small optically-thin halo of hot dust naturally arises between the inner rim and the star. The inner rim has a substantial radial extent, corresponding to several disk scale heights. While the front’s overall position varies with the stellar luminosity, its radial extent depends on the mass accretion rate. A pressure maximum develops at the position of thermal ionization at temperatures about 1000 K. The pressure maximum is capable of halting solid pebbles’ radial drift and concentrating them in a zone where temperatures are su ciently high for annealing to form crystalline silicates.

  12. SNOW LINES AS PROBES OF TURBULENT DIFFUSION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.

    2014-07-20

    Sharp chemical discontinuities can occur in protoplanetary disks, particularly at ''snow lines'' where a gas-phase species freezes out to form ice grains. Such sharp discontinuities will diffuse out due to the turbulence suspected to drive angular momentum transport in accretion disks. We demonstrate that the concentration gradient—in the vicinity of the snow line—of a species present outside a snow line but destroyed inside is strongly sensitive to the level of turbulent diffusion (provided the chemical and transport timescales are decoupled) and provides a direct measurement of the radial ''Schmidt number'' (the ratio of the angular momentum transport to radial turbulent diffusion). Taking as an example the tracer species N{sub 2}H{sup +}, which is expected to be destroyed inside the CO snow line (as recently observed in TW Hya) we show that ALMA observations possess significant angular resolution to constrain the Schmidt number. Since different turbulent driving mechanisms predict different Schmidt numbers, a direct measurement of the Schmidt number in accretion disks would allow inferences to be made about the nature of the turbulence.

  13. DISPERSAL OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS BY CENTRAL WIND STRIPPING

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, I.; Johnstone, D.; Hollenbach, D.

    2009-07-20

    We present a model for the dispersal of protoplanetary disks by winds from either the central star or the inner disk. These winds obliquely strike the flaring disk surface and strip away disk material by entraining it in an outward radial-moving flow at the wind-disk interface, which lies several disk scale heights above the midplane. The disk dispersal time depends on the entrainment velocity, v{sub d} = {epsilon}c{sub s} , at which disk material flows into this turbulent shear layer interface, where {epsilon} is a scale factor and c{sub s} is the local sound speed in the disk surface just below the entrainment layer. If {epsilon} {approx} 0.1, a likely upper limit, the dispersal time at 1 AU is {approx}6 Myr for a disk with a surface density of 10{sup 3} g cm{sup -2}, a solar mass central star, and a wind with an outflow rate M-dot{sub w}=10{sup -8}M{sub odot}yr{sup -1} and terminal velocity v{sub w} = 200kms{sup -1}. When compared with photoevaporation and viscous evolution, wind stripping can be a dominant mechanism only for the combination of low accretion rates ({approx}<10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and wind outflow rates approaching these accretion rates. This case is unusual since generally outflow rates are {approx}<0.1 of accretion rates.

  14. Spirals in protoplanetary disks from photon travel time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, M.; Pinilla, P.; Heays, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    Spiral structures are a common feature in scattered-light images of protoplanetary disks, and of great interest as possible tracers of the presence of planets. However, other mechanisms have been put forward to explain them, including self-gravity, disk-envelope interactions, and dead zone boundaries. These mechanisms explain many spirals very well, but are unable to easily account for very loosely wound spirals and single spiral arms. We study the effect of light travel time on the shape of a shadow cast by a clump orbiting close (within ~ 1 au) of the central star, where there can be significant orbital motion during the light travel time from the clump to the outer disk and then to the sky plane. This delay in light rays reaching the sky plane gives rise to a variety of spiral- and arc-shaped shadows, which we describe with a general fitting formula for a flared, inclined disk. The three movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Inferring Planet Mass from Spiral Structures in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Dong, Ruobing

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations of protoplanetary disk have reported spiral structures that are potential signatures of embedded planets, and modeling efforts have shown that a single planet can excite multiple spiral arms, in contrast to conventional disk-planet interaction theory. Using two and three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations to perform a systematic parameter survey, we confirm the existence of multiple spiral arms in disks with a single planet, and discover a scaling relation between the azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary arm, {φ }{{sep}}, and the planet-to-star mass ratio q: {φ }{{sep}}=102^\\circ {(q/0.001)}0.2 for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses around a 1 solar mass star, and {φ }{{sep}}=180^\\circ for brown dwarf mass companions. This relation is independent of the disk’s temperature, and can be used to infer a planet’s mass to within an accuracy of about 30% given only the morphology of a face-on disk. Combining hydrodynamics and Monte-Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we verify that our numerical measurements of {φ }{{sep}} are accurate representations of what would be measured in near-infrared scattered light images, such as those expected to be taken by Gemini/GPI, Very Large Telescope/SPHERE, or Subaru/SCExAO in the future. Finally, we are able to infer, using our scaling relation, that the planet responsible for the spiral structure in SAO 206462 has a mass of about 6 Jupiter masses.

  16. [Innervation of the intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    García-Cosamalón, José; Fernández-Fernández, Javier; González-Martínez, Emilio; Ibáñez-Plágaro, Javier; Robla Costales, Javier; Martínez-Madrigal, Milton; López Muñíz, Alfonso; del Valle, Miguel Enrique; Vega, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Until very recently, intervertebral disc innervation was a subject of considerable debate. Nowadays, the introduction of inmunohistochemical techniques associated to specific antibodies and studies with retrograde tracers in nerves have allowed greater understanding of disc innervation in physiological and pathological conditions and also endings characteristics and their patterns of distribution in both situations. The existing controversies regarding structural basis of discogenic pain, have raised the interest of knowing the influence of innervation in back pain from discal origin and its characteristics. Today, we know that pathologic neoinnervation accompanying radial fissures is an important factor in the genesis of discogenic pain; within a complex mechanism in which other neurobiomechemical, inflammatory and biomechanical factors are involved. PMID:23582224

  17. Protoplanetary dust porosity and FU Orionis outbursts: Solving the mystery of Earth’s missing volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Alexander; Ebel, Denton S.

    2014-07-01

    The Earth is known to be depleted in volatile lithophile elements in a fashion that defies easy explanation. We resolve this anomaly with a model that combines the porosity of collisionally grown dust grains in protoplanetary disks with heating from FU Orionis events that dramatically raise protoplanetary disk temperatures. The heating from an FU Orionis event alters the aerodynamical properties of the dust while evaporating the volatiles. This causes the dust to settle, abandoning those volatiles. The success of this model in explaining the elemental composition of the Earth is a strong argument in favor of highly porous collisionally grown dust grains in protoplanetary disks outside our Solar System. Further, it demonstrates how thermal (or condensation based) alterations of dust porosity, and hence aerodynamics, can be a strong factor in planet formation, leading to the onset of rapid gravitational instabilities in the dust disk and the subsequent collapse that forms planetesimals.

  18. The Aerodynamics of a Flying Sports Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Jonathan R.; Crowther, William J.

    2001-11-01

    The flying sports disc is a spin-stabilised axi-symmetric wing of quite remarkable design. A typical disc has an approximate elliptical cross-section and hollowed out under-side cavity, such as the Frisbee(TM) disc. An experimental study of flying disc aerodynamics, including both spinning and non-spinning tests, has been carried out in the wind tunnel. Load measurements, pressure data and flow visualisation techniques have enabled an explanation of the flow physics and provided data for free-flight simulations. A computer simulation that predicts free-flight trajectories from a given set of initial conditions was used to investigate the dynamics of a flying disc. This includes a six-degree of freedom mathematical model of disc flight mechanics, with aerodynamic coefficients derived from experimental data. A flying sports disc generates lift through forward velocity just like a conventional wing. The lift contributed by spin is insignificant and does not provide nearly enough down force to support hover. Without spin, the disc tumbles ground-ward under the influence of an unstable aerodynamic pitching moment. From a backhand throw however, spin is naturally given to the disc. The unchanged pitching moment now results in roll, due to gyroscopic precession, stabilising the disc in free-flight.

  19. Constraining X-ray-Induced Photoevaporation of Protoplanetary Disks Orbiting Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzi, Kristina M.; Kastner, Joel H.; Rodriguez, David; Principe, David A.; Vican, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass, pre-main sequence stars possess intense high-energy radiation fields as a result of their strong stellar magnetic activity. This stellar UV and X-ray radiation may have a profound impact on the lifetimes of protoplanetary disks. We aim to constrain the X-ray-induced photoevaporation rates of protoplanetary disks orbiting low-mass stars by analyzing serendipitous XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of candidate nearby (D < 100 pc), young (age < 100 Myr) M stars identified in the GALEX Nearby Young-Star Survey (GALNYSS).

  20. A Meshless Method for Magnetohydrodynamics and Applications to Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.

    2012-08-01

    study. Nonetheless, how the test is posed circumvents the issues raised by tests starting from a sharp contact discontinuity yet it still shows the poor performance of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. We then comment on the connection between this behavior and the underlying lack of zeroth-order consistency in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics interpolation. In astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and electrodynamics simulations, numerically enforcing the divergence free constraint on the magnetic field has been difficult. We observe that for point-based discretization, as used in finite-difference type and pseudo-spectral methods, the divergence free constraint can be satisfied entirely by a choice of interpolation used to define the derivatives of the magnetic field. As an example we demonstrate a new class of finite-difference type derivative operators on a regular grid which has the divergence free property. This principle clarifies the nature of magnetic monopole errors. The principles and techniques demonstrated in this chapter are particularly useful for the magnetic field, but can be applied to any vector field. Finally, we examine global zoom-in simulations of turbulent magnetorotationally unstable flow. We extract and analyze the high-current regions produced in the turbulent flow. Basic parameters of these regions are abstracted, and we build one dimensional models including non-ideal MHD, and radiative transfer. For sufficiently high temperatures, an instability resulting from the temperature dependence of the Ohmic resistivity is found. This instability concentrates current sheets, resulting in the possibility of rapid heating from temperatures on the order of 600 Kelvin to 2000 Kelvin in magnetorotationally turbulent regions of protoplanetary disks. This is a possible local mechanism for the melting of chondrules and the formation of other high-temperature materials in protoplanetary disks.

  1. Measurements of Water Surface Snow Lines in Classical Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blevins, Sandra M.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Banzatti, Andrea; Zhang, Ke; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Salyk, Colette; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of far-infrared water lines from a sample of four protoplanetary disks around solar-mass stars, selected to have strong water emission at mid-infrared wavelengths. By combining the new Herschel spectra with archival Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy, we retrieve a parameterized radial surface water vapor distribution from 0.1 to 100 au using two-dimensional dust and line radiative transfer modeling. The surface water distribution is modeled with a step model composed of a constant inner and outer relative water abundance and a critical radius at which the surface water abundance is allowed to change. We find that the four disks have critical radii of ˜3-11 au, at which the surface water abundance decreases by at least 5 orders of magnitude. The measured values for the critical radius are consistently smaller than the location of the surface snow line, as predicted by the observed spectral energy distribution. This suggests that the sharp drop-off of the surface water abundance is not solely due to the local gas-solid balance, but may also be driven by the deactivation of gas-phase chemical pathways to water below 300 K. Assuming a canonical gas-to-dust ratio of 100, as well as coupled gas and dust temperatures Tgas = Tdust, the best-fit inner water abundances become implausibly high (0.01-1.0 {{{{H}}}2}-1). Conversely, a model in which the gas and dust temperatures are decoupled leads to canonical inner-disk water abundances of ˜ {10}-4 {{{H}}}2-1, while retaining gas-to-dust ratios of 100. That is, the evidence for gas-dust decoupling in disk surfaces is stronger than for enhanced gas-to-dust ratios.

  2. Radiation Hydrodynamics Models of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, M.; Fromang, S.; Turner, N. J.; Benisty, M.

    2016-08-01

    Many stars host planets orbiting within a few astronomical units (AU). The occurrence rate and distributions of masses and orbits vary greatly with the host star’s mass. These close planets’ origins are a mystery that motivates investigating protoplanetary disks’ central regions. A key factor governing the conditions near the star is the silicate sublimation front, which largely determines where the starlight is absorbed, and which is often called the inner rim. We present the first radiation hydrodynamical modeling of the sublimation front in the disks around the young intermediate-mass stars called Herbig Ae stars. The models are axisymmetric and include starlight heating silicate grains sublimating and condensing to equilibrium at the local, time-dependent temperature and density and accretion stresses parameterizing the results of MHD magnetorotational turbulence models. The results compare well with radiation hydrostatic solutions and prove to be dynamically stable. Passing the model disks into Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that the models satisfy observational constraints on the inner rim’s location. A small optically thin halo of hot dust naturally arises between the inner rim and the star. The inner rim has a substantial radial extent, corresponding to several disk scale heights. While the front’s overall position varies with the stellar luminosity, its radial extent depends on the mass accretion rate. A pressure maximum develops near the location of thermal ionization at temperatures of about 1000 K. The pressure maximum is capable of halting solid pebbles’ radial drift and concentrating them in a zone where temperatures are sufficiently high for annealing to form crystalline silicates.

  3. Tatooine Nurseries: Structure and Evolution of Circumbinary Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, David; Garmilla, José A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission provide motivation for understanding their birthplaces—protoplanetary disks around stellar binaries with separations ≲ 1 {{AU}}. We explore properties and evolution of such circumbinary disks focusing on modification of their structure caused by tidal coupling to the binary. We develop a set of analytical scaling relations describing viscous evolution of the disk properties, which are verified and calibrated using 1D numerical calculations with realistic inputs. Injection of angular momentum by the central binary suppresses mass accretion onto the binary and causes radial distribution of the viscous angular momentum flux {F}J to be different from that in a standard accretion disk around a single star with no torque at the center. Disks with no mass accretion at the center develop an {F}J profile that is flat in radius. Radial profiles of temperature and surface density are also quite different from those in disks around single stars. Damping of the density waves driven by the binary and viscous dissipation dominates heating of the inner disk (within 1-2 AU), pushing the ice line beyond 3-5 AU, depending on disk mass and age. Irradiation by the binary governs disk thermodynamics beyond ˜10 AU. However, self-shadowing by the hot inner disk may render central illumination irrelevant out to ˜20 AU. Spectral energy distribution of a circumbinary disk exhibits a distinctive bump around 10 μm, which may facilitate identification of such disks around unresolved binaries. Efficient tidal coupling to the disk drives orbital inspiral of the binary and may cause low-mass and relatively compact binaries to merge into a single star within the disk lifetime. We generally find that circumbinary disks present favorable sites for planet formation (despite their wider zone of volatile depletion), in agreement with the statistics of Kepler circumbinary planets.

  4. Magnetically Self-regulated Formation of Early Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Commerçon, Benoît; Chabrier, Gilles; Marchand, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The formation of protoplanetary disks during the collapse of molecular dense cores is significantly influenced by angular momentum transport, notably by the magnetic torque. In turn, the evolution of the magnetic field is determined by dynamical processes and non-ideal MHD effects such as ambipolar diffusion. Considering simple relations between various timescales characteristic of the magnetized collapse, we derive an expression for the early disk radius, r≃ 18 {au} {({η }{AD}/0.1{{s}})}2/9{({B}z/0.1{{G}})}-4/9{(M/0.1{M}ȯ )}1/3, where M is the total disk plus protostar mass, {η }{AD} is the ambipolar diffusion coefficient, and B z is the magnetic field in the inner part of the core. This is significantly smaller than the disks that would form if angular momentum was conserved. The analytical predictions are confronted against a large sample of 3D, non-ideal MHD collapse calculations covering variations of a factor 100 in core mass, a factor 10 in the level of turbulence, a factor 5 in rotation, and magnetic mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratios 2 and 5. The disk radius estimates are found to agree with the numerical simulations within less than a factor 2. A striking prediction of our analysis is the weak dependence of circumstellar disk radii upon the various relevant quantities, suggesting weak variations among class-0 disk sizes. In some cases, we note the onset of large spiral arms beyond this radius.

  5. Planetesimal Formation in the Dead Zone of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xuening; Stone, J. M.

    2010-10-01

    Planetesimals are building blocks of both terrestrial and giant planets, yet their formation remains a mystery. The main difficulty comes from the meter-size barrier: meter-sized bodies suffer from rapid radial drift towards the central star due to the gas drag. Recently, it has been found that the inclusion of back-reaction from solids to gas leads to a powerful drag instability: the streaming instability (SI). SI generates turbulence and is able to concentrate centimeter to meter sized bodies into dense clumps, triggering gravitational collapse to form planetesimals directly, bypassing the meter barrier. We conduct local 2D and 3D hybrid simulations of particles and gas in the midplane of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) using the Athena code. Particles and gas are coupled aerodynamically, characterized by the dimensionless stopping time κ=Ωts. Magnetorotational turbulence is neglected as appropriate for the dead zone of PPDs. Self-gravity is ignored since we focus on the precursor of planetesimal formation: particle clumping. We have systematically explored the parameter space relevant for planetesimal formation, including: 1) A wide distribution of particle sizes (κ) 2) The height-integrated solid to gas mass ratio (Z); and 3) The strength of the disk radial pressure gradient (Π). The saturated state of our simulations is characterized by particle settling balanced by turbulent diffusion due to the SI, and the particle drift velocities are well described by a multi-species NSH equilibrium, which generalizes the original Nakagawa-Sekiya-Hayashi solution to include multiple particle sizes. We find that favorable conditions for planetesimal formation via SI include: large particles (κ>0.01), large solid abundance (Z>0.01), and small pressure gradient (Π<0.05). Moreover, there exists two positive feedback loops with respect to the enrichment of local disk solid abundance and grain growth. These results suggest that planetesimal formation may be less difficult than

  6. The Distribution of Water in a Viscous Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, F. J.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of water in the solar nebula is important to understand for a number of reasons. Firstly, in the inner regions of the solar nebula, the concentration of water vapor is expected to have played a major role in determining its oxidation state, and therefore would control which minerals would form there. Secondly, in the outer nebula, water would be a major condensable, making up nearly 50% of the mass of the solids and thus possibly playing a role in determining where giant planets formed. Lastly, liquid water is important for forming and sustaining life, and therefore understanding where and how water was transported to the habitable zone of a a star is critical to understanding how common life may be in the galaxy. Because of its importance, the distribution of water in the solar nebula has been studied by a number of authors. The main transport mechanisms which would determine the distribution of water would be diffusion and gas drag migration. Water vapor and small solids would diffuse in the nebula, moving away from areas of high concentrations. Larger bodies, while also subject to diffusion, though to a lesser extent, would experience gas drag migration, causing them to move inwards with time. The bodies most affected by this transport mechanism would be on the order of 1 meter in size. As objects continued to grow larger, their inertia would also grow, making them nearly immobile to gas drag. While efforts have been made to understand how water would be distributed in a protoplanetary disk, none of the published models simultaneously consider the effects of nebular evolution, transport of material throughout the nebula, and the existence of solids of various sizes at a given location of the nebula. We are currently developing a model which allows for these effects and is consistent with models for the accretion of bodies in the solar nebula.

  7. Submillimeter Polarization Observation of the Protoplanetary Disk around HD 142527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake; Nagai, Hiroshi; Muto, Takayuki; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Pohl, Adriana; Fukagawa, Misato; Shibai, Hiroshi; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Murakawa, Koji

    2016-11-01

    We present the polarization observations toward the circumstellar disk around HD 142527 by using Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at the frequency of 343 GHz. The beam size is 0.″51 × 0.″44, which corresponds to the spatial resolution of ∼71 × 62 au. The polarized intensity displays a ring-like structure with a peak located on the east side with a polarization fraction of P = 3.26 ± 0.02%, which is different from the peak of the continuum emission from the northeast region. The polarized intensity is significantly weaker at the peak of the continuum where P = 0.220 ± 0.010%. The polarization vectors are in the radial direction in the main ring of the polarized intensity, while there are two regions outside at the northwest and northeast areas where the vectors are in the azimuthal direction. If the polarization vectors represent the magnetic field morphology, the polarization vectors indicate the toroidal magnetic field configuration on the main ring and the poloidal fields outside. On the other hand, the flip of the polarization vectors is predicted by the self-scattering of thermal dust emission due to the change of the direction of thermal radiation flux. Therefore, we conclude that self-scattering of thermal dust emission plays a major role in producing polarization at millimeter wavelengths in this protoplanetary disk. Also, this puts a constraint on the maximum grain size to be approximately 150 μm if we assume compact spherical dust grains.

  8. Magneto-thermal Disk Winds from Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Ye, Jiani; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are governed by disk angular-momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular-momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a one-dimensional model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on (1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfvén speed vAp, (2) the sound speed cs near the wind base, and (3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve {R}-2 scaling). When {v}{Ap}\\gg {c}{{s}}, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accelerated mainly by the pressure of the toroidal magnetic field. In both cases, the dominant role played by magnetic forces likely yields wind outflow rates that exceed purely hydrodynamical mechanisms. For typical PPD accretion-rate and wind-launching conditions, we expect vAp to be comparable to cs at the wind base. The resulting wind is heavily loaded, with a total wind mass-loss rate likely reaching a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. Implications for modeling global disk evolution and planet formation are also discussed.

  9. Formation of Primitive Bodies in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a simple model of global transport of solids in the protoplanetary nebula, including radial drift of large particles and diffusion of small ones. The model has been applied to the formation and redistribution of the Ca-A1 rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found in primitive chondrites. These objects form at much higher temperatures, and appear to be 1-3 million years older than, the dominant (chondrule) components found in the same parent bodies. A widespread concern has been the retention of CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can overwhelm inward drift, and prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for tines on the order of several Myr. An element of this model is rapid inward radial drift of boulder-sized primitive (carbon-rich) silicate material, more like Halley-dust than CI chondrites in the early days of the nebula. Thls process can enrich the abundance of silicate and carbon material in the inner nebula, and may provide possible explanations for both chemical and isotopic properties of CAIs. The predicted enhancement of CO relative to water might be of relevance to recent IR astronomical observations of CO in the inner disks of several actively accreting T Tauri stars. This process has applications to the transport and redistribution of volatiles in general. Depending on the rubble particle size distribution, rapid radial drift of boulder-sized solids can bring more material inwards across a condensation front, to evaporate, than can subsequently be removed by nebula advection or diffusion, until a strong local enhancement is produced which allows diffusive loss to balance the drifting source. Application of this process to enhancement of the abundance of water near the "ice line" will be discussed. Supported by the Origins of Solar Systems program.

  10. WATER VAPOR IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK OF DG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Podio, L.; Dougados, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.; Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Nisini, B.; Sandell, G.; Williams, J. P.; Testi, L.; Woitke, P.

    2013-03-20

    Water is key in the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the formation of comets and icy/water planets. While high-excitation water lines originating in the hot inner disk have been detected in several T Tauri stars (TTSs), water vapor from the outer disk, where most water ice reservoirs are stored, was only reported in the nearby TTS TW Hya. We present spectrally resolved Herschel/HIFI observations of the young TTS DG Tau in the ortho- and para-water ground-state transitions at 557 and 1113 GHz. The lines show a narrow double-peaked profile, consistent with an origin in the outer disk, and are {approx}19-26 times brighter than in TW Hya. In contrast, CO and [C II] lines are dominated by emission from the envelope/outflow, which makes H{sub 2}O lines a unique tracer of the disk of DG Tau. Disk modeling with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo indicates that the strong UV field, due to the young age and strong accretion of DG Tau, irradiates a disk upper layer at 10-90 AU from the star, heating it up to temperatures of 600 K and producing the observed bright water lines. The models suggest a disk mass of 0.015-0.1 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the estimated minimum mass of the solar nebula before planet formation, and a water reservoir of {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} Earth oceans in vapor and {approx}100 times larger in the form of ice. Hence, this detection supports the scenario of ocean delivery on terrestrial planets by the impact of icy bodies forming in the outer disk.

  11. Macroscopic dust in protoplanetary disks—from growth to destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Deckers, J.; Teiser, J.

    2014-12-01

    The collision dynamics of dusty bodies are crucial for planetesimal formation. Decimeter agglomerates are especially important in the different formation models. Therefore, in continuation of our experiments on mutual decimeter collisions, we investigate collisions of centimeter onto decimeter dust agglomerates in a small drop tower under vacuum conditions (p ≲ 5 × 10{sup –1} mbar) at a mean collision velocity of 6.68 ± 0.67 m s{sup –1}. We use quartz dust with irregularly shaped micrometer grains. Centimeter projectiles with different diameters, masses, and heights are used, their typical volume filling factor is Φ {sub p,} {sub m} = 0.466 ± 0.02. The decimeter agglomerates have a mass of about 1.5 kg, a diameter and height of 12 cm, and a mean filling factor of Φ {sub t,} {sub m} = 0.44 ± 0.004. At lower collision energies, only the projectile gets destroyed and mass is transferred to the target. The accretion efficiency decreases with increasing obliquity and increasing difference in filling factor, if the projectile is more compact than the target. The accretion efficiency increases with increasing collision energy for collision energies under a certain threshold. Beyond this threshold at 298 ± 25 mJ, catastrophic disruption of the target can be observed. This corresponds to a critical fragmentation strength Q* = 190 ± 16 mJ kg{sup –1}, which is a factor of four larger than expected. Analyses of the projectile fragments show a power-law size distribution with an average exponent of –3.8 ± 0.3. The mass distributions suggest that the fraction of smallest fragments increases for higher collision energies. This is interesting for impacts of small particles on large target bodies within protoplanetary disks, as smaller fragments couple better to the surrounding gas and re-accretion by gas drag is more likely.

  12. Towards a Global Evolutionary Model of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2016-04-01

    A global picture of the evolution of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is key to understanding almost every aspect of planet formation, where standard α-disk models have been continually employed for their simplicity. In the meantime, disk mass loss has been conventionally attributed to photoevaporation, which controls disk dispersal. However, a paradigm shift toward accretion driven by magnetized disk winds has taken place in recent years, thanks to studies of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects in PPDs. I present a framework of global PPD evolution aiming to incorporate these advances, highlighting the role of wind-driven accretion and wind mass loss. Disk evolution is found to be largely dominated by wind-driven processes, and viscous spreading is suppressed. The timescale of disk evolution is controlled primarily by the amount of external magnetic flux threading the disks, and how rapidly the disk loses the flux. Rapid disk dispersal can be achieved if the disk is able to hold most of its magnetic flux during the evolution. In addition, because wind launching requires a sufficient level of ionization at the disk surface (mainly via external far-UV (FUV) radiation), wind kinematics is also affected by the FUV penetration depth and disk geometry. For a typical disk lifetime of a few million years, the disk loses approximately the same amount of mass through the wind as through accretion onto the protostar, and most of the wind mass loss proceeds from the outer disk via a slow wind. Fractional wind mass loss increases with increasing disk lifetime. Significant wind mass loss likely substantially enhances the dust-to-gas mass ratio and promotes planet formation.

  13. Cooling Requirements for the Vertical Shear Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical shear instability (VSI) offers a potential hydrodynamic mechanism for angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks (PPDs). The VSI is driven by a weak vertical gradient in the disk’s orbital motion, but must overcome vertical buoyancy, a strongly stabilizing influence in cold disks, where heating is dominated by external irradiation. Rapid radiative cooling reduces the effective buoyancy and allows the VSI to operate. We quantify the cooling timescale tc needed for efficient VSI growth, through a linear analysis of the VSI with cooling in vertically global, radially local disk models. We find the VSI is most vigorous for rapid cooling with {t}{{c}}\\lt {{{Ω }}}{{K}}-1h| q| /(γ -1) in terms of the Keplerian orbital frequency, {{{Ω }}}{{K}}, the disk’s aspect-ratio, h\\ll 1, the radial power-law temperature gradient, q, and the adiabatic index, γ. For longer tc, the VSI is much less effective because growth slows and shifts to smaller length scales, which are more prone to viscous or turbulent decay. We apply our results to PPD models where tc is determined by the opacity of dust grains. We find that the VSI is most effective at intermediate radii, from ∼5 to ∼50 AU with a characteristic growth time of ∼30 local orbital periods. Growth is suppressed by long cooling times both in the opaque inner disk and the optically thin outer disk. Reducing the dust opacity by a factor of 10 increases cooling times enough to quench the VSI at all disk radii. Thus the formation of solid protoplanets, a sink for dust grains, can impede the VSI.

  14. Cluster Dynamics Largely Shapes Protoplanetary Disk Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincke, Kirsten; Pfalzner, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    To what degree the cluster environment influences the sizes of protoplanetary disks surrounding young stars is still an open question. This is particularly true for the short-lived clusters typical for the solar neighborhood, in which the stellar density and therefore the influence of the cluster environment change considerably over the first 10 Myr. In previous studies, the effect of the gas on the cluster dynamics has often been neglected this is remedied here. Using the code NBody6++, we study the stellar dynamics in different developmental phases—embedded, expulsion, and expansion—including the gas, and quantify the effect of fly-bys on the disk size. We concentrate on massive clusters (M cl ≥ 103–6 ∗ 104 M Sun), which are representative for clusters like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) or NGC 6611. We find that not only the stellar density but also the duration of the embedded phase matters. The densest clusters react fastest to the gas expulsion and drop quickly in density, here 98% of relevant encounters happen before gas expulsion. By contrast, disks in sparser clusters are initially less affected, but because these clusters expand more slowly, 13% of disks are truncated after gas expulsion. For ONC-like clusters, we find that disks larger than 500 au are usually affected by the environment, which corresponds to the observation that 200 au-sized disks are common. For NGC 6611-like clusters, disk sizes are cut-down on average to roughly 100 au. A testable hypothesis would be that the disks in the center of NGC 6611 should be on average ≈20 au and therefore considerably smaller than those in the ONC.

  15. Self-consistent Dynamical And Thermodynamical Evolutions Of Protoplanetary Disks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, Kevin; Charnoz, S.; Taillifet, E.; Piau, L.

    2012-10-01

    Astronomical observations reveal the diversity of protoplanetary disk evolutions. In order to understand the global evolution of these disks from their birth, during the collapse of the molecular cloud, to their evaporation because of the stellar radiation, many processes with different timescales must be coupled: stellar evolution, thermodynamical evolution, photoevaporation, cloud collapse, viscous spreading...By modeling the results of large scale simulations and coupling them with models of viscous evolution, we have designed a one dimension full model of disk evolution for which most parameters are self-consistently calculated at each time step. We integrate the Hueso and Guillot, 2005 model of disk evolution and couple the radiative transfer description of Calvet et al, 1991 allowing us to handle a non-isothermal disk. We also take into account the collapse of the molecular cloud that feeds the disk. Using the same temperature model in the vertical direction, we estimate 2D thermal maps of the disk. The central star itself is modeled using recent stellar evolution code described in Piau et al, 2011. We first test our model in the case of an already formed Minimum Mass solar Nebula, trying to match the observational constraints on the radial surface density gradients and photosphere height profiles of the Taurus-Auriga or Ophiucus disks for instance. We then follow the full long-term evolution of a disk fed by the collapse of the molecular cloud. We estimate disk temperatures and accretion rates and try to constrain the favourable zone for the formation of the first solids. This will help targeting future JWST observations.

  16. Self-consistent dynamical and thermodynamical evolutions of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillié, K.; Charnoz, S.; Taillifet, E.; Piau, L.

    2012-12-01

    Astronomical observations reveal the diversity of protoplanetary disk evolutions. In order to understand the global evolution of these disks from their birth, during the collapse of the molecular cloud, to their evaporation because of the stellar radiation, many processes with different timescales must be coupled: stellar evolution, thermodynamical evolution, photoevaporation, cloud collapse, viscous spreading... By modeling the results of large scale simulations and coupling them with models of viscous evolution, we have designed a one dimension full model of disk evolution for which most parameters are self-consistently calculated at each time step. We integrate the Hueso and Guillot, 2005 model of disk evolution and couple the radiative transfer description of Calvet et al, 1991 allowing us to handle a non-isothermal disk. We also take into account the collapse of the molecular cloud that feeds the disk. Using the same temperature model in the vertical direction, we estimate 2D thermal maps of the disk. The central star itself is modeled using recent stellar evolution code described in Piau et al, 2011. We first test our model in the case of an already formed Minimum Mass solar Nebula, trying to match the observational constraints on the radial surface density gradients and photosphere height profiles of the Taurus-Auriga or Ophiucus disks for instance. We then follow the full long-term evolution of a disk fed by the collapse of the molecular cloud. We estimate disk temperatures and accretion rates and try to constrain the favourable zone for the formation of the first solids. This will help targeting future JWST observations.

  17. Coupling Dynamical And Collisional Evolution Of Dust In Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, Sebastien

    2010-10-01

    Gaseous circumstellar disks are rich in dust and are thought to be both accretionaly and dynamically active. Unfortunately large bodies that could be embedded in these disks are still difficult to observe and their putative properties are indirectly inferred from the observable small dust content. It is why constraining the size distribution coupled with dust-dynamics is so critical. Unfortunately, coupling effects such as a realistic time-dependant dynamics, fragmentation and coagulation, has been recognized as numerically challenging and almost no attempt really succeeded with a generic approach. In these disks, the dust dynamics is driven by a variety of processes (gravity, gas drag, radiation pressure..) inducing a size-dependant dynamics, and, at the same time collisional evolution changes the local size distributions. These two effects are intimately coupled because the local dynamics and size-distribution determines the local collision rates, that, in-turn, determines the size-distribution and modifies the particle's dynamics. Here we report on a new algorithm that overcomes these difficulties by using a hybrid approach extending the work of Charnoz & Morbidelli (Icarus, 2004, 2007). We will briefly present the method and focus on gaseous protoplanetary disks either laminar or turbulent (the time dependant transport and dust evolution will be shown) . We will show how the taking into account of a 3D dynamics helps to determine disantengle the dust size-distribution in the disk's photosphere and in the midplane and thus may provide observational signatures of accretion. We will show how the coupling of turbulence with fragmentation may significantly affect the dust/ratio for the smallest bodies. Finally, we will show that an accurate description of the time dependant dynamics of larger dusts (those with Stokes numbers >= 1) may provide a possible path to the formation of bodies larger than the accretion barrier, through accretion in a transitory regime.

  18. Disc wear and entrapment in a Starr-Edwards mitral caged-disc valve.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Fukunaga, Shuji; Arinaga, Koichi

    2011-07-01

    A case of wear and entrapment of a polyethylene disc observed in a Starr-Edwards (SE) mitral caged-disc valve at 37 years after implantation is reported. A 66-year-old woman who had undergone mitral valve replacement with a SE disc valve 37 years previously was admitted to the authors' hospital. Cinefluoroscopy showed the polyethylene disc of the SE valve to have impinged against a calcified mass on the left ventricular posterior wall, causing a tipping motion of the disc during opening. The valve was successfully replaced at surgery. A macroscopic examination of the excised valve revealed wear of the polyethylene disc at sites where the disc abutted the cage struts, and where it impinged on the calcified mass. The long-term durability of the SE caged-disc valves has been favorable; however, when implanted for over 20 years, they should be carefully followed up.

  19. On the evolution of the protolunar disc.

    PubMed

    Ward, William R

    2014-09-13

    The structure and viscous evolution of a post-impact, protolunar disc is examined. The equations for a silicate disc in two-phase (vapour-liquid) equilibrium are employed to derive an analytical solution to vertical structure. Both a vertically mixed phase disc and a stratified disc, where a magma layer exists in the mid-plane surrounded by a vapour reservoir, are considered. The former largely reproduces the low gas mass fraction, x≪1, profiles of the disc described in earlier literature that proposed that the disc would hover on the brink of gravitational instability. In the latter, the vapour layer has x∼1 and is generally gravitationally stable, while the magma layer is vigorously unstable. The viscous evolution of the stratified model is then explored. Initially, the disc quickly settles to a quasi-steady state with a vapour reservoir containing the majority of the disc mass. The magma layer viscously spreads on a time scale of approximately 3-4 years, during which vapour continuously condenses into droplets that settle to the mid-plane, maintaining the magma surface density in spite of disc spreading. Material flowing inwards is accreted by the Earth; material flowing outwards past the Roche boundary can become incorporated into accreting moonlets. This evolution persists until the vapour reservoir is depleted in approximately 50-100 years, depending on its initial mass. PMID:25114314

  20. The quiescent phase of galactic disc growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Binney, James; Schönrich, Ralph

    2016-07-01

    We perform a series of controlled N-body simulations of growing disc galaxies within non-growing, live dark matter haloes of varying mass and concentration. Our initial conditions include either a low-mass disc or a compact bulge. New stellar particles are continuously added on near-circular orbits to the existing disc, so spiral structure is continuously excited. To study the effect of combined spiral and giant molecular cloud (GMC) heating on the discs, we introduce massive, short-lived particles that sample a GMC mass function. An isothermal gas component is introduced for a subset of the models. We perform a resolution study and vary parameters governing the GMC population, the histories of star formation and radial scale growth. Models with GMCs and standard values for the disc mass and halo density provide the right level of self-gravity to explain the age-velocity dispersion relation of the solar neighbourhood (Snhd). GMC heating generates remarkably exponential vertical profiles with scaleheights that are radially constant and agree with observations of galactic thin discs. GMCs are also capable of significantly delaying bar formation. The amount of spiral-induced radial migration agrees with what is required for the metallicity distribution of the Snhd. However, in our standard models, the outward-migrating populations are not hot enough vertically to create thick discs. Thick discs can form in models with high baryon fractions, but the corresponding bars are too long, the young stellar populations too hot and the discs flare considerably.

  1. Accretion Discs Show Their True Colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    Quasars are the brilliant cores of remote galaxies, at the hearts of which lie supermassive black holes that can generate enough power to outshine the Sun a trillion times. These mighty power sources are fuelled by interstellar gas, thought to be sucked into the hole from a surrounding 'accretion disc'. A paper in this week's issue of the journal Nature, partly based on observations collected with ESO's Very Large Telescope, verifies a long-standing prediction about the intensely luminous radiation emitted by these accretion discs. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 21/08 Uncovering the inner disc "Astronomers were puzzled by the fact that the best models of these discs couldn't quite be reconciled with some of the observations, in particular, with the fact that these discs did not appear as blue as they should be," explains lead-author Makoto Kishimoto. Such a discrepancy could be the signal that there was something very wrong with the models. With his colleagues, he investigated this discrepancy by studying the polarised light from six quasars. This enabled them to demonstrate that the disc spectrum is as blue as predicted. "The crucial observational difficulty here has been that the disc is surrounded by a much larger torus containing hot dust, whose light partly outshines that of the disc," says Kishimoto. "Because the light coming from the disc is scattered in the disc vicinity and thus polarised, by observing only polarised light from the quasars, one can uncover the buried light from the disc." In a similar way that a fisherman would wear polarised sunglasses to help get rid of the glare from the water surface and allow him to see more clearly under the water, the filter on the telescope allowed the astronomers to see beyond surrounding clouds of dust and gas to the blue colour of the disc in infrared light. The observations were done with the FORS and ISAAC instruments on one of the 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope, located in the Atacama

  2. Use of adipose stem cells and polylactide discs for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Mäenpää, Katja; Ellä, Ville; Mauno, Jari; Kellomäki, Minna; Suuronen, Riitta; Ylikomi, Timo; Miettinen, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    There is currently no suitable replacement for damaged temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs after discectomy. In the present study, we fabricated bilayer biodegradable polylactide (PLA) discs comprising a non-woven mat of poly(L/D)lactide (P(L/D)LA) 96/4 and a P(L/DL)LA 70/30 membrane plate. The PLA disc was examined in combination with adipose stem cells (ASCs) for tissue engineering of the fibrocartilaginous TMJ disc in vitro. ASCs were cultured in parallel in control and chondrogenic medium for a maximum of six weeks. Relative expression of the genes, aggrecan, type I collagen and type II collagen present in the TMJ disc extracellular matrix increased in the ASC-seeded PLA discs in the chondrogenic medium. The hypertrophic marker, type X collagen, was moderately induced. Alcian blue staining showed accumulation of sulphated glycosaminoglycans. ASC differentiation in the PLA discs was close to that observed in pellet cultures. Comparison of the mRNA levels revealed that the degree of ASC differentiation was lower than that in TMJ disc-derived cells and tissue. The pellet format supported the phenotype of the TMJ disc-derived cells under chondrogenic conditions and also enhanced their hyalinization potential, which is considered part of the TMJ disc degeneration process. Accordingly, the combination of ASCs and PLA discs has potential for the development of a tissue-engineered TMJ disc replacement. PMID:19474082

  3. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun Kun

    2015-11-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  4. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  5. Inward Radial Mixing of Interstellar Water Ices in the Solar Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacher, Lionel G.; Marrocchi, Yves; Verdier-Paoletti, Maximilien J.; Villeneuve, Johan; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    The very wide diversity of asteroid compositions in the main belt suggests significant material transport in the solar protoplanetary disk and hints at the presence of interstellar ices in hydrated bodies. However, only a few quantitative estimations of the contribution of interstellar ice in the inner solar system have been reported, leading to considerable uncertainty about the extent of radial inward mixing in the solar protoplanetary disk 4.56 Ga ago. We show that the pristine CM chondrite Paris contains primary Ca-carbonates whose O-isotopic compositions require an 8%-35% contribution from interstellar water. The presence of interstellar water in Paris is confirmed by its bulk D/H isotopic composition that shows significant D enrichment (D/H = (167 ± 0.2) × 10-6) relative to the mean D/H of CM chondrites ((145 ± 3) × 10-6) and the putative D/H of local CM water ((82 ± 1.5) × 10-6). These results imply that (i) efficient radial mixing of interstellar ices occurred from the outer zone of the solar protoplanetary disk inward and that (ii) chondrites accreted water ice grains from increasing heliocentric distances in the solar protoplanetary disk.

  6. Inward Radial Mixing of Interstellar Water Ices in the Solar Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacher, Lionel G.; Marrocchi, Yves; Verdier-Paoletti, Maximilien J.; Villeneuve, Johan; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    The very wide diversity of asteroid compositions in the main belt suggests significant material transport in the solar protoplanetary disk and hints at the presence of interstellar ices in hydrated bodies. However, only a few quantitative estimations of the contribution of interstellar ice in the inner solar system have been reported, leading to considerable uncertainty about the extent of radial inward mixing in the solar protoplanetary disk 4.56 Ga ago. We show that the pristine CM chondrite Paris contains primary Ca-carbonates whose O-isotopic compositions require an 8%–35% contribution from interstellar water. The presence of interstellar water in Paris is confirmed by its bulk D/H isotopic composition that shows significant D enrichment (D/H = (167 ± 0.2) × 10‑6) relative to the mean D/H of CM chondrites ((145 ± 3) × 10‑6) and the putative D/H of local CM water ((82 ± 1.5) × 10‑6). These results imply that (i) efficient radial mixing of interstellar ices occurred from the outer zone of the solar protoplanetary disk inward and that (ii) chondrites accreted water ice grains from increasing heliocentric distances in the solar protoplanetary disk.

  7. SMA and ALMA Studies of Protoplanetary-Disk Formation around Low-mass Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Chou, Ti-Lin; Aso, Yusuke; Saigo, Kazuya; Saito, Masao; Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomida, Kengo; Aikawa, Yuri; Tomisaka, Kohji; Koyamatsu, Shin; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.

    2015-08-01

    In this presentation, we will report our systematic observational studies of protoplanetary-disk formation around low-mass protostars with the SMA and ALMA. We have identified five Class 0-I protostellar systems (L1551 IRS 5, L1551 NE, L1489 IRS, L1527 IRS, and TMC-1A) associated with the r~100 - 300 AU scale Keplerian disks and the outer infalling envelopes. The infalling velocities of the envelope gas onto the Keplerian disks are found to be a factor ~3 smaller than the free-fall velocities of the central protostellar masses inferred from the inner Keplerian rotation. On the other hand, the rotational angular momenta in the infalling envelopes appear to smoothly connect to those of the inner Keplerian disks. Including the other disk sources found by previous observations, we have also found a growth of the disk radii as a function of the protostellar evolution. These results demonstrate how the central Keplerian disks around protostars, precursors of the protoplanetary disks, grow and evolve. We will compile these observational results in the context of an unified picture of protoplanetary-disk formation, and compare them to the latest theoretical predictions of protoplanetary-disk formation.

  8. RESIDENCE TIMES OF PARTICLES IN DIFFUSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISK ENVIRONMENTS. I. VERTICAL MOTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesla, F. J.

    2010-11-01

    The chemical and physical evolution of primitive materials in protoplanetary disks are determined by the types of environments they are exposed to and their residence times within each environment. Here, a method for calculating representative paths of materials in diffusive protoplanetary disks is developed and applied to understanding how the vertical trajectories that particles take impact their overall evolution. The methods are general enough to be applied to disks with uniform diffusivity, the so-called constant-{alpha} cases, and disks with a spatially varying diffusivity, such as expected in 'layered-disks'. The average long-term dynamical evolution of small particles and gaseous molecules is independent of the specific form of the diffusivity in that they spend comparable fractions of their lifetimes at different heights in the disk. However, the paths that individual particles and molecules take depend strongly on the form of the diffusivity leading to a different range of behavior of particles in terms of deviations from the mean. As temperatures, gas densities, chemical abundances, and photon fluxes will vary with height in protoplanetary disks, the different paths taken by primitive materials will lead to differences in their chemical and physical evolution. Examples of differences in gas phase chemistry and photochemistry are explored here. The methods outlined here provide a powerful tool that can be integrated with chemical models to understand the formation and evolution of primitive materials in protoplanetary disks on timescales of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years.

  9. Calculation of Protoplanetary Disk Lifetime Before Swept out by Sunshine Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, A. A.

    2006-08-01

    The generally accepted planetary cosmogony supposes that planets' formation took place under conditions determined by radiation of the central star. Nevertheless, its influence on protoplanetary disk considered being low, so the protoplanetary substance would not clip away for the time of planets' formation (about 10^7 ÷ 10^9^ yrs). An examination of this statement is the aim of presentation. Calculations of total sweeping out time of protoplanetary substance from the central area of the Solar system are presented. The Solar radiation was supposed to be stable and equal to its modern level - about 4*10^33 erg/sec. Initial parameters of protoplanetary disk were taken from classical planetary cosmogony (the thickness of disk is 10^6 km, surface density in this area is uniform: 10-12 gr/cm^2). Physical model of interaction of protoplanetary disk and solar radiation is quite simple. The radiation flux from the Sun inside narrow angular band occupied by disk was totally absorbed by its inner part due to its large opacity. Heated by absorbed energy gas and dust increased in volume and produced "edging" at the inner border of the disk. The "edging" will be ejected by additional radiation flux inside widened spatial angle of edging. So described process consists of two independent phases: arising of edging and its sweeping out. Our calculations show that whole process of ejection of "edging" to the periphery of the system lasts 7000-10000 years. The calculated traverse speed of warming-up area throw the disk is not constant, but it is not less than 10^4 km/year. So estimation of protoplanetary life time since the beginning of stellar activity of central body is in order of 10^5-5ṡ10^5 yrs. It is majority estimation, because we didn't consider the T-Taurus stage of the newly burned star that accelerates the process. Hence, the cosmogony of planetary system under sunshine has to be revised, as the lifetime of protoplanetary disk is too short for planetesimales formation

  10. The formation of discs in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Paul C.

    2010-11-01

    We review the properties of the discs that form around ‘sink particles’ in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of cluster formation, similar to those of Bate et al. (2003) and Bonnell et al. (2004), and compare them to the observed properties of discs in nearby star-forming regions. Contrary to previous suggestions, discs can form and survive in such an environment, despite the chaotic effects of competitive accretion. We find the discs are typically massive, with ratios of disc mass to central object mass of around 0.1, or higher, being typical. Naturally, the evolution of these discs is dominated by gravitational torques, and the more massive examples exhibit strong m=2 spiral modes. We also find that they can continuously grow over a period of 100,000 years, provided the central object is a single sink particle and the local density of sink particles is low. Discs that form around sink particles in the very centres of clusters tend to be shorter lived, but a single star can lose and gain a disc several times during the main accretion phase. However due to the nature of the turbulence in the cluster, the disc orientation can change dramatically over this time period, since disc-sink systems can accrete from counter-rotating envelopes. Since the competitive accretion process brings in material from large distances, the associated angular momentum can be higher than one would expect for an isolated star formation model. As such, we find that the discs are typically several hundred of AUs in extent, with the largest keplerian structures having radii of ~ 2000AU.

  11. Theory of Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Björnsson, Gunnlaugur; Pringle, James E.

    1999-03-01

    Part I. Observations of Black Holes: 1. Black holes in our Galaxy: observations P. Charles; 2. Black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei: observations G. M. Madejski; Part II. Physics Close to a Black Hole: 3. Physics of black holes I. D. Novikov; 4. Physics of black hole accretion M. A. Abramowicz; Part III. Turbulence, Viscosity: 5. Disc turbulence and viscosity A. Brandenburg; Part IV. Radiative Processes: 6. The role of electron-positron pairs in accretion flows G. Björnsson; 7. Accretion disc-corona models and X/Y-ray spectra of accreting black holes J. Poutanen; 8. Emission lines: signatures of relativistic rotation A. C. Fabian; Part V. Accretion Discs: 9. Spectral tests of models for accretion disks around black holes J. H. Krolik; 10. Advection-dominated accretion around black holes R. Narayan, R. Mahadevan and E. Quataert; 11. Accretion disc instabilities and advection dominated accretion flows J.-P. Lasota; 12. Magnetic field and multi-phase gas in AGN A. Celotti and M. J. Rees; Part V. Discs in Binary Black Holes: 13. Supermassive binary black holes in galaxies P. Artymowicz; Part VI. Stability of Accretion Discs: 14. Large scale perturbation of an accretion disc by a black hole binary companion J. C. B. Papaloizou, C. Terquem and D. N. C. Lin; 15. Stable oscillations of black hole accretion discs M. Nowak and D. Lehr; Part VI. Coherant Structures: 16. Spotted discs A. Bracco, A. Provenzale, E. A. Spiegel and P. Yecko; Self-organized critically in accretion discs P. Wiita and Y. Xiong; Summary: old and new advances in black hole accretion disc theory R. Svensson.

  12. Theory of Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Björnsson, Gunnlaugur; Pringle, James E.

    2010-08-01

    Part I. Observations of Black Holes: 1. Black holes in our Galaxy: observations P. Charles; 2. Black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei: observations G. M. Madejski; Part II. Physics Close to a Black Hole: 3. Physics of black holes I. D. Novikov; 4. Physics of black hole accretion M. A. Abramowicz; Part III. Turbulence, Viscosity: 5. Disc turbulence and viscosity A. Brandenburg; Part IV. Radiative Processes: 6. The role of electron-positron pairs in accretion flows G. Björnsson; 7. Accretion disc-corona models and X/Y-ray spectra of accreting black holes J. Poutanen; 8. Emission lines: signatures of relativistic rotation A. C. Fabian; Part V. Accretion Discs: 9. Spectral tests of models for accretion disks around black holes J. H. Krolik; 10. Advection-dominated accretion around black holes R. Narayan, R. Mahadevan and E. Quataert; 11. Accretion disc instabilities and advection dominated accretion flows J.-P. Lasota; 12. Magnetic field and multi-phase gas in AGN A. Celotti and M. J. Rees; Part V. Discs in Binary Black Holes: 13. Supermassive binary black holes in galaxies P. Artymowicz; Part VI. Stability of Accretion Discs: 14. Large scale perturbation of an accretion disc by a black hole binary companion J. C. B. Papaloizou, C. Terquem and D. N. C. Lin; 15. Stable oscillations of black hole accretion discs M. Nowak and D. Lehr; Part VI. Coherant Structures: 16. Spotted discs A. Bracco, A. Provenzale, E. A. Spiegel and P. Yecko; Self-organized critically in accretion discs P. Wiita and Y. Xiong; Summary: old and new advances in black hole accretion disc theory R. Svensson.

  13. Dust-trapping Rossby vortices in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheut, H.; Meliani, Z.; Varniere, P.; Benz, W.

    2012-09-01

    Context. One of the most challenging steps in planet formation theory is the one leading to the formation of planetesimals of kilometre size. A promising scenario involves the existence of vortices able to concentrate a large amount of dust and grains in their centres. Up to now this scenario has mostly been studied in 2D razor thin disks. A 3D study including, simultaneously, the formation and resulting dust concentration of the vortices with vertical settling, is still missing. Aims: The Rossby wave instability self-consistently forms 3D vortices, which have the unique quality of presenting a large-scale vertical velocity in their centre. Here we aim to study how this newly discovered effect can alter the dynamic evolution of the dust. Methods: We performed global 3D simulations of the RWI in a radially and vertically stratified disk using the code MPI-AMRVAC. After the growth phase of the instability, the gas and solid phases are modelled by a bi-fluid approach, where the dust is considered as a fluid without pressure. Both the drag force of the gas on the dust and the back reaction of the dust on the gas are included. Multiple grain sizes from 1 mm to 5 cm are used with a constant density distribution. Results: We obtain in a short timescale a high concentration of the largest grains in the vortices. Indeed, in 3 rotations the dust-to-gas density ratio grows from 10-2 to unity leading to a concentration of mass up to that of Mars in one vortex. The presence of the radial drift is also at the origin of a dust pile-up at the radius of the vortices. Lastly, the vertical velocity of the gas in the vortex causes the sedimentation process to be reversed, the mm size dust is lifted and higher concentrations are obtained in the upper layer than in the midplane. Conclusions: The Rossby wave instability is a promising mechanism for planetesimal formation, and the results presented here can be of particular interest in the context of future observations of protoplanetary

  14. Fossilized condensation lines in the Solar System protoplanetary disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, A.; Bitsch, B.; Crida, A.; Gounelle, M.; Guillot, T.; Jacobson, S.; Johansen, A.; Lambrechts, M.; Lega, E.

    2016-03-01

    The terrestrial planets and the asteroids dominant in the inner asteroid belt are water poor. However, in the protoplanetary disk the temperature should have decreased below water-condensation level well before the disk was photo-evaporated. Thus, the global water depletion of the inner Solar System is puzzling. We show that, even if the inner disk becomes cold, there cannot be direct condensation of water. This is because the snowline moves towards the Sun more slowly than the gas itself. Thus the gas in the vicinity of the snowline always comes from farther out, where it should have already condensed, and therefore it should be dry. The appearance of ice in a range of heliocentric distances swept by the snowline can only be due to the radial drift of icy particles from the outer disk. However, if a planet with a mass larger than 20 Earth mass is present, the radial drift of particles is interrupted, because such a planet gives the disk a super-Keplerian rotation just outside of its own orbit. From this result, we propose that the precursor of Jupiter achieved this threshold mass when the snowline was still around 3 AU. This effectively fossilized the snowline at that location. In fact, even if it cooled later, the disk inside of Jupiter's orbit remained ice-depleted because the flow of icy particles from the outer system was intercepted by the planet. This scenario predicts that planetary systems without giant planets should be much more rich in water in their inner regions than our system. We also show that the inner edge of the planetesimal disk at 0.7 AU, required in terrestrial planet formation models to explain the small mass of Mercury and the absence of planets inside of its orbit, could be due to the silicate condensation line, fossilized at the end of the phase of streaming instability that generated the planetesimal seeds. Thus, when the disk cooled, silicate particles started to drift inwards of 0.7 AU without being sublimated, but they could not be

  15. Evolution of protoplanetary disks with dynamo magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1994-01-01

    The notion that planetary systems are formed within dusty disks is certainly not a new one; the modern planet formation paradigm is based on suggestions made by Laplace more than 200 years ago. More recently, the foundations of accretion disk theory where initially developed with this problem in mind, and in the last decade astronomical observations have indicated that many young stars have disks around them. Such observations support the generally accepted model of a viscous Keplerian accretion disk for the early stages of planetary system formation. However, one of the major uncertainties remaining in understanding the dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks is the mechanism responsible for the transport of angular momentum and subsequent mass accretion through the disk. This is a fundamental piece of the planetary system genesis problem since such mechanisms will determine the environment in which planets are formed. Among the mechanisms suggested for this effect is the Maxwell stress associated with a magnetic field treading the disk. Due to the low internal temperatures through most of the disk, even the question of the existence of a magnetic field must be seriously studied before including magnetic effects in the disk dynamics. On the other hand, from meteoritic evidence it is believed that magnetic fields of significant magnitude existed in the earliest, PP-disk-like, stage of our own solar system's evolution. Hence, the hypothesis that PP disks are magnetized is not made solely on the basis of theory. Previous studies have addressed the problem of the existence of a magnetic field in a steady-state disk and have found that the low conductivity results in a fast diffusion of the magnetic field on timescales much shorter than the evolutionary timescale. Hence the only way for a magnetic field to exist in PP disks for a considerable portion of their lifetimes is for it to be continuously regenerated. In the present work, we present results on the self

  16. MAGNETOROTATIONAL-INSTABILITY-DRIVEN ACCRETION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Xuening

    2011-09-20

    Non-ideal MHD effects play an important role in the gas dynamics in protoplanetary disks (PPDs). This paper addresses the influence of non-ideal MHD effects on the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and angular momentum transport in PPDs using the most up-to-date results from numerical simulations. We perform chemistry calculations using a complex reaction network with standard prescriptions for X-ray and cosmic-ray ionizations. We first show that whether or not grains are included, the recombination time is at least one order of magnitude less than the orbital time within five disk scale heights, justifying the validity of local ionization equilibrium and strong coupling limit in PPDs. The full conductivity tensor at different disk radii and heights is evaluated, with the MRI active region determined by requiring that (1) the Ohmic Elsasser number {Lambda} be greater than 1 and (2) the ratio of gas to magnetic pressure {beta} be greater than {beta}{sub min}(Am) as identified in the recent study by Bai and Stone, where Am is the Elsasser number for ambipolar diffusion. With full flexibility as to the magnetic field strength, we provide a general framework for estimating the MRI-driven accretion rate M-dot and the magnetic field strength in the MRI active layer. We find that the MRI active layer always exists at any disk radius as long as the magnetic field in PPDs is sufficiently weak. However, the optimistically predicted M-dot in the inner disk (r = 1-10 AU) appears insufficient to account for the observed range of accretion rates in PPDs (around 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) even in the grain-free calculation, and the presence of solar abundance sub-micron grains further reduces M-dot by one to two orders of magnitude. Moreover, we find that the predicted M-dot increases with radius in the inner disk where accretion is layered, which would lead to runaway mass accumulation if disk accretion is solely driven by the MRI. Our results suggest that stronger

  17. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    The gas dynamics in protoplanetary disks (PPDs), particularly the level of turbulence as well as their global structure and evolution, are of crucial importance to many aspects of planet formation. Magnetic field is widely believed to play a crucial role in the gas dynamics, mainly via the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) or the magneto-centrifugal wind (MCW). In PPDs, however, these mechanisms are strongly affected by non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) effects, including Ohmic resistivity, Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion (AD), due to the weak ionization level in PPDs. While Ohmic resistivity has been routinely included in the study of PPD gas dynamics, the Hall effects and AD have been largely ignored, even though they play an equally, if not more, important role. In this thesis, the effect of AD is thoroughly explored via numerical simulations and the results are applied to estimate the effectiveness of the MRI in PPDs. The simulations show that MRI can always operate in the presence of AD for appropriate magnetic field strength and geometry. Stronger AD requires weaker magnetic field, and the most favorable field geometry involves the presence of both net vertical and net toroidal magnetic fluxes. Applying these results to PPDs, together with the results in the literature on the effect of Ohmic resistivity and the Hall term, a new theoretical framework is proposed to make optimistic estimates of the MRI-driven accretion rate. It is found that the MRI inevitably becomes inefficient in driving rapid accretion in the inner regions (˜ 1 AU) of PPDs. It becomes more efficient in the outer disk ( ≳ 15 AU), especially assisted by the presence of tiny grains. The fact that MRI becomes inefficient at the inner PPDs makes the MCW scenario a promising alternative. By performing vertically stratified shearing-box simulations of PPDs that simultaneously include the effects of both Ohmic resistivity and AD in a self-consistent manner, it is found that in the

  18. Determining protoplanetary disk gas masses from CO isotopologues line observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotello, A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Despite intensive studies of protoplanetary disks, there is still no reliable way to determine their total (gast+dust) mass and their surface density distribution, quantities that are crucial for describing both the structure and the evolution of disks up to the formation of planets. Aims: The goal of this work is to use less-abundant CO isotopologues, such as 13CO, C18O and C17O, detection of which is routine for ALMA, to infer the gas mass of disks. Isotope-selective effects need to be taken into account in the analysis, because they can significantly modify CO isotopologues' line intensities. Methods: CO isotope-selective photodissociation has been implemented in the physical-chemical code DALI (Dust And LInes) and more than 800 disk models have been run for a range of disk and stellar parameters. Dust and gas temperature structures have been computed self-consistently, together with a chemical calculation of the main atomic and molecular species. Both disk structure and stellar parameters have been investigated by varying the parameters in the grid of models. Total fluxes have been ray-traced for different CO isotopologues and for various low J-transitions for different inclinations. Results: A combination of 13CO and C18O total intensities allows inference of the total disk mass, although with non-negligible uncertainties. These can be overcome by employing spatially resolved observations, that is the disk's radial extent and inclination. Comparison with parametric models shows differences at the level of a factor of a few, especially for extremely low and high disk masses. Finally, total line intensities for different CO isotopologue and for various low-J transitions are provided and are fitted to simple formulae. The effects of a lower gas-phase carbon abundance and different gas-to-dust ratios are investigated as well, and comparison with other tracers is made. Conclusions: Disk masses can be determined within a factor of a few by comparing CO

  19. Use NASA GES DISC Data in ArcGIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wenli; Pham, Long B.; Kempler, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes GIS relevant data at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC), GES DISC Services and Support for GIS Users, and use cases of GES DISC data in ArcGIS.

  20. Changes in disc herniation after CT-guided Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD): MR findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brat, Hugues G.; Bouziane, Tarik; Lambert, Jean; Divano, Luisa

    2004-09-01

    The aim of Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD) is to vaporize a small portion of the nucleus pulposus. Clinical efficacy of this technique is largely proven. However, time-evolution of intervertebral disc and its hernia after PLDD is not known. This study analyses changes in disc herniation and its native intervertebral disc at a mean follow-up of 7.5 months after PLDD in asymptomatic patients. Main observations at MRI are appearance of a high signal on T2WI in the hernia in 59%, shrinking of the hernia in 66% and overall stability of disc height.

  1. The star formation history and accretion-disc fraction among the K-type members of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecaut, Mark J.; Mamajek, Eric E.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of a spectroscopic survey for new K- and M-type members of Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen), the nearest OB Association (˜100-200 pc). Using an X-ray, proper motion and colour-magnitude selected sample, we obtained spectra for 361 stars, for which we report spectral classifications and Li and Hα equivalent widths. We identified 156 new members of Sco-Cen, and recovered 51 previously published members. We have combined these with previously known members to form a sample of 493 solar-mass (˜0.7-1.3 M⊙) members of Sco-Cen. We investigated the star formation history of this sample, and re-assessed the ages of the massive main-sequence turn-off and the G-type members in all three subgroups. We performed a census for circumstellar discs in our sample using WISE infrared data and find a protoplanetary disc fraction for K-type stars of 4.4^{+1.6}_{-0.9} per cent for Upper Centaurus-Lupus and Lower Centaurus-Crux at ˜16 Myr and 9.0^{+4.0}_{-2.2} per cent for Upper Scorpius at ˜10 Myr. These data are consistent with a protoplanetary disc e-folding time-scale of ˜4-5 Myr for ˜1 M⊙ stars, twice that previously quoted, but consistent with the Bell et al. revised age scale of young clusters. Finally, we construct an age map of Scorpius-Centaurus which clearly reveals substructure consisting of concentrations of younger and older stars. We find evidence for strong age gradients within all three subgroups. None of the subgroups are consistent with being simple, coeval populations which formed in single bursts, but likely represents a multitude of smaller star formation episodes of hundreds to tens of stars each.

  2. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  3. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  4. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  5. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  6. 46 CFR 64.61 - Rupture disc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rupture disc. 64.61 Section 64.61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MARINE PORTABLE TANKS AND CARGO HANDLING SYSTEMS Pressure Relief Devices and Vacuum Relief Devices for MPTs § 64.61 Rupture disc. If a rupture...

  7. D-Zero Cryostat Supplemental Rupture Disc

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-03

    The common relief and rupture disc vent line requires a double disc assembly with vented interspace for accurate disc burst pressures. The first disc must take pump and purge vacuum loading, but be set to operate at 110% of the MAWP, 18.3 psig (ASME code). The available solution is 18.3 psig with a burst tolerance of +/- psig. The interspace should be locally vented by a flow limiting vent valve to decouple the vent line backpressure from the vessel rupture disc. The second disc must take the worst case vent line backpressure, the steady state value found in D-Zero engineering note 3740.000-EN-63 with all three cryostats simultaneously venting at the fire condition into the 4-inch x 6-inch and 6-inch x 8-inch sections. This value is less than 2 psid. The maximum rupture value for the second disc must be less than the minimum rupture value for the first disc less 2 psid i.e. < 16.3.

  8. The inner cavity of the circumnuclear disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, M.; Morris, M. R.; Frank, A.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Duschl, W. J.

    2016-06-01

    The circumnuclear disc (CND) orbiting the Galaxy's central black hole is a reservoir of material that can ultimately provide energy through accretion, or form stars in the presence of the black hole, as evidenced by the stellar cluster that is presently located at the CND's centre. In this paper, we report the results of a computational study of the dynamics of the CND. The results lead us to question two paradigms that are prevalent in previous research on the Galactic Centre. The first is that the disc's inner cavity is maintained by the interaction of the central stellar cluster's strong winds with the disc's inner rim, and secondly, that the presence of unstable clumps in the disc implies that the CND is a transient feature. Our simulations show that, in the absence of a magnetic field, the interaction of the wind with the inner disc rim actually leads to a filling of the inner cavity within a few orbital time-scales, contrary to previous expectations. However, including the effects of magnetic fields stabilizes the inner disc rim against rapid inward migration. Furthermore, this interaction causes instabilities that continuously create clumps that are individually unstable against tidal shearing. Thus the occurrence of such unstable clumps does not necessarily mean that the disc is itself a transient phenomenon. The next steps in this investigation are to explore the effect of the magnetorotational instability on the disc evolution and to test whether the results presented here persist for longer time-scales than those considered here.

  9. Disc cell senescence in intervertebral disc degeneration: Causes and molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chencheng; Liu, Huan; Yang, Minghui; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accumulation of senescent disc cells in degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD) suggests the detrimental roles of cell senescence in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). Disc cell senescence decreased the number of functional cells in IVD. Moreover, the senescent disc cells were supposed to accelerate the process of IDD via their aberrant paracrine effects by which senescent cells cause the senescence of neighboring cells and enhance the matrix catabolism and inflammation in IVD. Thus, anti-senescence has been proposed as a novel therapeutic target for IDD. However, the development of anti-senescence therapy is based on our understanding of the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence. In this review, we focused on the molecular mechanism of disc cell senescence, including the causes and various molecular pathways. We found that, during the process of IDD, age-related damages together with degenerative external stimuli activated both p53-p21-Rb and p16-Rb pathways to induce disc cell senescence. Meanwhile, disc cell senescence was regulated by multiple signaling pathways, suggesting the complex regulating network of disc cell senescence. To understand the mechanism of disc cell senescence better contributes to developing the anti-senescence-based therapies for IDD. PMID:27192096

  10. Dependence of optic disc parameters on disc area according to Heidelberg Retina Tomograph: Part II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machekhin, V.; Manaenkova, G.; Bondarenko, O.

    2007-05-01

    With the help of Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT-II) optic disc parameters in 211 eyes of 115 healthy patients with refraction Em +/- 3,0 D and 96 eyes of 72 patients with myopia 3,5-14,0 D without any signs of glaucoma were studied. Analysis of optic disc parameters were carried out in 5 groups of patients according to disc area: less than 1,5 mm2, 1,5- 2,5 mm2, 2,5-3,0 mm2, 3,0-3,5 mm2 and more than 3,5 mm2. An accurate depending on disc area was revealed for all optic disc parameters in all sectors, which was manifested by increasing cup disc and rim disc (area and volume) and other parameters. We consider it is necessary to use the proper tables for right interpretation of received data for early diagnosis of glaucoma.

  11. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  12. About detection of precessing circumpulsar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, Catia

    2016-08-01

    Detections of circumpulsar discs and planetary systems through electromagnetic observations appear quite rare. In the case of PSR 1931+24 and B0656+14, the hypothesis of a precessing disc penetrating the pulsar light cylinder is found consistent with radio and gamma observations from these stars. Disc self-occultation and precession may affect electromagnetic measurements. We investigate here under which conditions gravitational waves generated by circumpulsar disc precession may be detected by the proposed second-generation space interferometers DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and Big Bang Observer. The characteristics of circumpulsar detectable precessing discs are estimated as a function of distance from the Solar system. Speculations on detection rates are presented.

  13. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  14. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  15. The role of thermodynamics in disc fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatellos, Dimitris; Whitworth, Anthony P.

    2009-12-01

    Thermodynamics play an important role in determining the way a protostellar disc fragments to form planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We explore the effect that different treatments of radiative transfer have in simulations of fragmenting discs. Three prescriptions for the radiative transfer are used: (i) the diffusion approximation of Stamatellos et al.; (ii) the barotropic equation of state (EOS) of Goodwin et al. and (iii) the barotropic EOS of Bate et al. The barotropic approximations capture the general evolution of the density and temperature at the centre of each proto-fragment but (i) they do not make any adjustments for particular circumstances of a proto-fragment forming in the disc and (ii) they do not take into account thermal inertia effects that are important for fast-forming proto-fragments in the outer disc region. As a result, the number of fragments formed in the disc and their properties are different, when a barotropic EOS is used. This is important not only for disc studies but also for simulations of collapsing turbulent clouds, as in many cases in such simulations stars form with discs that subsequently fragment. We also examine the difference in the way proto-fragments condense out in the disc at different distances from the central star using the diffusion approximation and following the collapse of each proto-fragment until the formation of the second core (ρ ~= 10-3gcm-3). We find that proto-fragments forming closer to the central star tend to form earlier and evolve faster from the first to the second core than proto-fragments forming in the outer disc region. The former have a large pool of material in the inner disc region that they can accrete from and grow in mass. The latter accrete more slowly and they are hotter because they generally form in a quick abrupt event.

  16. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level

    PubMed Central

    Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  17. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level.

    PubMed

    Hakan, Tayfun; Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  18. Disc nucleus fortification for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Brad Bellotte, J; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal stability is attributed in part to osteoligamentous structures, including the vertebral body, facets, intervertebral discs, and posterior elements. The materials in this study provide an opportunity to augment the degenerated nucleus without removing native disc material, a procedure introduced here as "fortification." The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nucleus fortification on lumbar disc biomechanics. METHODS The authors performed in vitro analysis of human cadaveric functional spinal units (FSUs), along with characterization and quantification of movement of the units using biomechanical data in intact, disc-only, and fortified specimens. The units underwent removal of all posterior elements and annulus and were fortified by injecting a biogel into the nucleus pulposus. Each specimen was subjected to load testing, range of motion (ROM) quantification, and disc bulge measurements. Optoelectric tracking was used to quantify disc bulge. These criteria were assessed in the intact, disc-only, and fortified treatments. RESULTS Disc-only FSUs resulted in increased ROM when compared with intact and fortified conditions. Fortification of the FSU resulted in partial restoration of normal ROM in the treatment groups. Analysis of hysteresis loops showed more linear response in the fortified groups when compared with the intact and disc-only groups. CONCLUSIONS Disc nucleus fortification increases linearity and decreases ROM.

  19. Disc nucleus fortification for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Derrick A; Cook, Daniel J; Brad Bellotte, J; Oh, Michael Y; Whiting, Donald; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal stability is attributed in part to osteoligamentous structures, including the vertebral body, facets, intervertebral discs, and posterior elements. The materials in this study provide an opportunity to augment the degenerated nucleus without removing native disc material, a procedure introduced here as "fortification." The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nucleus fortification on lumbar disc biomechanics. METHODS The authors performed in vitro analysis of human cadaveric functional spinal units (FSUs), along with characterization and quantification of movement of the units using biomechanical data in intact, disc-only, and fortified specimens. The units underwent removal of all posterior elements and annulus and were fortified by injecting a biogel into the nucleus pulposus. Each specimen was subjected to load testing, range of motion (ROM) quantification, and disc bulge measurements. Optoelectric tracking was used to quantify disc bulge. These criteria were assessed in the intact, disc-only, and fortified treatments. RESULTS Disc-only FSUs resulted in increased ROM when compared with intact and fortified conditions. Fortification of the FSU resulted in partial restoration of normal ROM in the treatment groups. Analysis of hysteresis loops showed more linear response in the fortified groups when compared with the intact and disc-only groups. CONCLUSIONS Disc nucleus fortification increases linearity and decreases ROM. PMID:26771371

  20. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration.

  1. Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Ralph E.; Ilharreborde, Brice; Zhao, Kristin D.; Berglund, Lawrence J.; Bronfort, Gert; An, Kai-Nan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT The intervertebral disc is a common source of low back pain. Prospective studies suggest that treatments that intermittently distract the disc might be beneficial for chronic low back pain. Although the potential exists for distraction therapies to affect the disc biomechanically their effect on intradiscal stress is debated. PURPOSE To determine if distraction alone, distraction combined with flexion or distraction combined with extension can reduce nucleus pulposus pressure and posterior anulus compressive stress in cadaveric lumbar discs compared to simulated standing or lying. STUDY DESIGN Laboratory study using single cadaveric motion segments. OUTCOME MEASURES Strain gauge measures of nucleus pulposus pressure and compressive stress in the anterior and posterior annulus fibrosus METHODS Intradiscal stress profilometry was performed on 15 motion segments during 5 simulated conditions: standing, lying, and 3 distracted conditions. Disc degeneration was graded by inspection from 1 (normal) to 4 (severe degeneration). RESULTS All distraction conditions markedly reduced nucleus pressure compared to either simulated standing or lying. There was no difference between distraction with flexion and distraction with extension in regard to posterior annulus compressive stress. Discs with little or no degeneration appeared to distributed compressive stress differently than those with moderate or severe degeneration. CONCLUSIONS Distraction appears to predictably reduce nucleus pulposus pressure. The effect of distraction therapy on the distribution of compressive stress may be dependent in part on the health of the disc. PMID:17981092

  2. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  3. Stem cells sources for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, Gianluca; Russo, Fabrizio; Ambrosio, Luca; Loppini, Mattia; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2016-05-26

    Intervertebral disc regeneration field is rapidly growing since disc disorders represent a major health problem in industrialized countries with very few possible treatments. Indeed, current available therapies are symptomatic, and surgical procedures consist in disc removal and spinal fusion, which is not immune to regardable concerns about possible comorbidities, cost-effectiveness, secondary risks and long-lasting outcomes. This review paper aims to share recent advances in stem cell therapy for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration. In literature the potential use of different adult stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration has already been reported. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells, adipose tissue derived stem cells, synovial stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, olfactory neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, disc stem cells, and embryonic stem cells have been studied for this purpose either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, several engineered carriers (e.g., hydrogels), characterized by full biocompatibility and prompt biodegradation, have been designed and combined with different stem cell types in order to optimize the local and controlled delivery of cellular substrates in situ. The paper overviews the literature discussing the current status of our knowledge of the different stem cells types used as a cell-based therapy for disc regeneration. PMID:27247704

  4. Chemical separation of disc components using RAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojno, Jennifer; Kordopatis, Georges; Steinmetz, Matthias; McMillan, Paul; Matijevič, Gal; Binney, James; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Boeche, Corrado; Just, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K.; Siebert, Arnaud; Bienaymé, Olivier; Gibson, Brad K.; Zwitter, Tomaž; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Navarro, Julio F.; Parker, Quentin A.; Reid, Warren; Seabroke, George; Watson, Fred

    2016-10-01

    We present evidence from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey of chemically separated, kinematically distinct disc components in the solar neighbourhood. We apply probabilistic chemical selection criteria to separate our sample into α-low (`thin disc') and α-high (`thick disc') sequences. Using newly derived distances, which will be utilized in the upcoming RAVE DR5, we explore the kinematic trends as a function of metallicity for each of the disc components. For our α-low disc, we find a negative trend in the mean rotational velocity (Vφ) as a function of iron abundance ([Fe/H]). We measure a positive gradient ∂Vφ/∂[Fe/H] for the α-high disc, consistent with results from high-resolution surveys. We also find differences between the α-low and α-high discs in all three components of velocity dispersion. We discuss the implications of an α-low, metal-rich population originating from the inner Galaxy, where the orbits of these stars have been significantly altered by radial mixing mechanisms in order to bring them into the solar neighbourhood. The probabilistic separation we propose can be extended to other data sets for which the accuracy in [α/Fe] is not sufficient to disentangle the chemical disc components a priori. For such data sets which will also have significant overlap with Gaia DR1, we can therefore make full use of the improved parallax and proper motion data as it becomes available to investigate kinematic trends in these chemical disc components.

  5. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  6. A lumbar disc surgery predictive score card.

    PubMed

    Finneson, B E

    1978-06-01

    A lumbar disc surgery predictive score card or questionnaire has been developed to assess potential candidates for excision of a herniated lumbar disc who have not previously undergone lumbar spine surgery. It is not designed to encompass patients who are being considered for other types of lumbar spine surgery, such as decompressive laminectomy or fusion. In an effort to make the "score card" usable by almost all physicians who are involved in lumbar disc surgery, only studies which have broad acceptance and are generally employed are included. Studies which have less widespread use such as electromyogram, discogram, venogram, special psychologic studies (MMPI, pain drawings) have been purposely excluded.

  7. DISC1 genetics, biology and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    THOMSON, Pippa A.; MALAVASI, Elise L.V.; GRÜNEWALD, Ellen; SOARES, Dinesh C.; BORKOWSKA, Malgorzata; MILLAR, J. Kirsty

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are highly heritable, and in many individuals likely arise from the combined effects of genes and the environment. A substantial body of evidence points towards DISC1 being one of the genes that influence risk of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, and functional studies of DISC1 consequently have the potential to reveal much about the pathways that lead to major mental illness. Here, we review the evidence that DISC1 influences disease risk through effects upon multiple critical pathways in the developing and adult brain. PMID:23550053

  8. Strategies for regeneration of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Kalson, N S; Richardson, S; Hoyland, J A

    2008-09-01

    Low back pain resulting from degenerative disc disease is the most common cause of disability in the UK. Current low back pain treatments are aimed at either treating the symptoms of pain, or removing the source of pain itself, but do not address the biological basis of the disease. Our increasing understanding of the molecular biological basis for degenerative disc disease has enabled the development of strategies aimed at tackling the causes of degeneration. Here we review the progress that has been made in strategies using cells, biomaterials and growth factors aimed at regenerating the human intervertebral disc.

  9. [Lumbar disc herniation and andrological diseases].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bao-fang

    2015-10-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common male disease. In the past, More academic attention was directed to its relationship with lumbago and leg pain than to its association with andrological diseases. Studies show that central lumber intervertebral disc herniation may cause cauda equina injury and result in premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, priapism, and emission. This article presents an overview on the correlation between central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and andrological diseases, focusing on the aspects of etiology, pathology, and clinical progress, hoping to invite more attention from andrological and osteological clinicians. PMID:26665671

  10. DISK IMAGING SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY WITH SMA. II. SOUTHERN SKY PROTOPLANETARY DISK DATA AND FULL SAMPLE STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Qi Chunhua; Andrews, Sean M.; Espaillat, Catherine; Wilner, David J.; Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Kastner, Joel H.

    2011-06-20

    This is the second in a series of papers based on data from DISCS, a Submillimeter Array observing program aimed at spatially and spectrally resolving the chemical composition of 12 protoplanetary disks. We present data on six Southern sky sources-IM Lup, SAO 206462 (HD 135344b), HD 142527, AS 209, AS 205, and V4046 Sgr-which complement the six sources in the Taurus star-forming region reported previously. CO 2-1 and HCO{sup +} 3-2 emission are detected and resolved in all disks and show velocity patterns consistent with Keplerian rotation. Where detected, the emission from DCO{sup +} 3-2, N{sub 2}H{sup +} 3-2, H{sub 2}CO 3{sub 03} - 2{sub 02} and 4{sub 14} - 3{sub 13}, HCN 3-2, and CN 2{sub 33/4/2} - 1{sub 22/3/1} are also generally spatially resolved. The detection rates are highest toward the M and K stars, while the F star SAO 206462 has only weak CN and HCN emission, and H{sub 2}CO alone is detected toward HD 142527. These findings together with the statistics from the previous Taurus disks support the hypothesis that high detection rates of many small molecules depend on the presence of a cold and protected disk midplane, which is less common around F and A stars compared to M and K stars. Disk-averaged variations in the proposed radiation tracer CN/HCN are found to be small, despite a two orders of magnitude range of spectral types and accretion rates. In contrast, the resolved images suggest that the CN/HCN emission ratio varies with disk radius in at least two of the systems. There are no clear observational differences in the disk chemistry between the classical/full T Tauri disks and transitional disks. Furthermore, the observed line emission does not depend on the measured accretion luminosities or the number of infrared lines detected, which suggests that the chemistry outside of 100 AU is not coupled to the physical processes that drive the chemistry in the innermost few AU.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3970 - Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional implant).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interarticular disc prosthesis (interpositional... disc prosthesis (interpositional implant). (a) Identification. An interarticular disc prosthesis... Food and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any interarticular disc...

  12. Papers presented to the Conference on Chondrules and the Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are covered in the presented papers: (1) producing chondrules; (2) carbons, CAI's, and chondrules; (3) large scale processes in the solar nebula; (4) chondrule-matrix relationships in chondritic meteorites; (5) overview of nebula models; (6) constraints placed on the nature of chondrule precursors; (7) turbulent diffusion and concentration of chondrules in the protoplanetary nebula; (8) heating and cooling in the solar nebula; (9) crystallization trends of precursor pyroxene in ordinary chondrites; (10) precipitation induced vertical lightning in the protoplanetary nebula; (11) the role of chondrules in nebular fractionations of volatiles and other elements; (12) astronomical observations of phenomena in disks; (13) experimental constraints on models for origins of chondrules, and various other topics.

  13. THE SINTERING REGION OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES IN A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sirono, Sin-iti

    2011-07-10

    Icy grain aggregates are formed in the outer region of a protoplanetary nebula. The infall of these aggregates to the central star is due to gas drag, and their temperature increases as the infall proceeds. The icy molecules on the grain move to the neck where the grains get connected through sublimation and condensation of the molecules. This process is called sintering. As the sintering proceeds, the mechanical strength of the neck changes considerably, strongly affecting the collisional evolution of the aggregates. The timescale required for sintering is determined in this study, based on which the region where the sintering proceeds within a prescribed timescale is obtained. It is found that the region covers a substantial fraction of the protoplanetary nebula, and the location of the region depends on the temperature distribution inside the nebula. If the aggregate is stirred up and the temperature of the aggregate increases temporally, the sintering region spreads to the whole nebula.

  14. Archival-grade optical disc design and international standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Toru; Kojyo, Shinichi; Endo, Akihisa; Kodaira, Takuo; Mori, Fumi; Shimizu, Atsuo

    2015-09-01

    Optical discs currently on the market exhibit large variations in life span among discs, making them unsuitable for certain business applications. To assess and potentially mitigate this problem, we performed accelerated degradation testing under standard ISO conditions, determined the probable disc failure mechanisms, and identified the essential criteria necessary for a stable disc composition. With these criteria as necessary conditions, we analyzed the physical and chemical changes that occur in the disc components, on the basis of which we determined technological measures to reduce these degradation processes. By applying these measures to disc fabrication, we were able to develop highly stable optical discs.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectra of CO and [CI] in protoplanetary disks (Kama+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Carney, M.; Hogerheijde, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Fedele, D.; Baryshev, A.; Boland, W.; Gusten, R.; Aikutalp, A.; Choi, Y.; Endo, A.; Frieswijk, W.; Karska, A.; Klaassen, P.; Koumpia, E.; Kristensen, L.; Leurini, S.; Nagy, Z.; Perez Beaupuits, J.-P.; Risacher, C.; van der Marel, N.; van Kempen, T. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wyrowski, F.; Yildiz, U. A.

    2016-04-01

    APEX CHAMP+ and FLASH spectra of CI 1-0, CI 2-1, and CO 6-5 towards protoplanetary disks. The data was delivered from the telescope in reduced form and is on the Ta (K) scale. Baselines have been subtracted with low-order (order 0,1,2) polynomials. Observations were carried out from 2008 through 2013, with typical on-source exposure times of 10-60 min. (2 data files).

  16. ACCRETION THROUGH THE INNER EDGES OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS BY A GIANT SOLID STATE PUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Kelling, T.; Wurm, G.

    2013-09-01

    At the inner edge of a protoplanetary disk, solids are illuminated by stellar light. This illumination heats the solids and creates temperature gradients along their surfaces. Interactions with ambient gas molecules lead to a radial net gas flow. Every illuminated solid particle within the edge is an individual small gas pump transporting gas inward. In total, the inner edge can provide local mass flow rates as high as M-dot = 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  17. The Evolution of Gas in Protoplanetary Systems: The Herschel GASPS Open Time Key Programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, A.; Dent, W.

    2010-01-01

    The Gas in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory will be the first extensive, systematic survey of gas in circumstellar disks over the critical transition from gas-rich protoplanetary through to gas-poor debris. The brightest spectral lines from disks lie in the far-infrared and arise from radii spanning roughly 10 to 100 AU, where giant planets are expected to form. Herschel is uniquely able to observe this wavelength regime with the sensitivity to allow a large scale survey. We will execute a 2-phase study using the PACS instrument. Phase I is a spectroscopic survey about 250 young stars for fine structure emission lines of [CII] (at 157 microns) and [OI] (at 63 microns). In Phase II, the brightest sources will be followed up with additional PACS spectroscopy ([OI] at 145 microns and some rotational lines of water). We expect that the gas mass sensitivity will be more than an order of magnitude lower than that achieved by ISO and Spitzer or expected for SOFIA. We will also measure the dust continuum to an equivalent mass sensitivity. We will observe several nearby clusters with ages from 1 to 30 Myr, encompassing a wide range of disk masses and stellar luminosities. The sample covers disk evolution from protoplanetary disks through to young debris disks, i.e. the main epoch of planet formation. With this extensive dataset, the GASPS project will: 1) trace gas and dust in the planet formation region across a large multivariate parameter space, 2) provide the first definitive measurement of the gas dissipation timescale in disks, 3) elucidate the evolutionary link between protoplanetary and debris disks, 4) investigate water abundances in the planetforming regions of disks, and 5) provide a huge database of disk observations and models with long-lasting legacy value for follow-up studies.

  18. ON THE EVOLUTION OF DUST MINERALOGY, FROM PROTOPLANETARY DISKS TO PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Isa; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Olofsson, Johan; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Augereau, Jean-Charles

    2011-06-10

    Mineralogical studies of silicate features emitted by dust grains in protoplanetary disks and solar system bodies can shed light on the progress of planet formation. The significant fraction of crystalline material in comets, chondritic meteorites, and interplanetary dust particles indicates a modification of the almost completely amorphous interstellar medium dust from which they formed. The production of crystalline silicates, thus, must happen in protoplanetary disks, where dust evolves to build planets and planetesimals. Different scenarios have been proposed, but it is still unclear how and when this happens. This paper presents dust grain mineralogy (composition, crystallinity, and grain size distribution) of a complete sample of protoplanetary disks in the young Serpens cluster. These results are compared to those in the young Taurus region and to sources that have retained their protoplanetary disks in the older Upper Scorpius and {eta} Chamaeleontis stellar clusters, using the same analysis technique for all samples. This comparison allows an investigation of the grain mineralogy evolution with time for a total sample of 139 disks. The mean cluster age and disk fraction are used as indicators of the evolutionary stage of the different populations. Our results show that the disks in the different regions have similar distributions of mean grain sizes and crystallinity fractions ({approx}10%-20%) despite the spread in mean ages. Furthermore, there is no evidence of preferential grain sizes for any given disk geometry nor for the mean cluster crystallinity fraction to increase with mean age in the 1-8 Myr range. The main implication is that a modest level of crystallinity is established in the disk surface early on ({<=}1 Myr), reaching an equilibrium that is independent of what may be happening in the disk midplane. These results are discussed in the context of planet formation, in comparison with mineralogical results from small bodies in our own solar

  19. The development of spheroidal bodies theory for proto-planetary dynamics problem solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, A. M.

    2007-08-01

    There is not a full statistical equilibrium in a gas-dust proto-planetary cloud because of long relaxation time for proto-planet formation in own gravitational field. This protoplanetary system behavior can be described by Jeans equation in partial derivations relatively a distribution function. The problem for finding a general solution of Jeans equation is connected directly with an analytical expression for potential of gravitational field. Thus, the determination of gravitational potential is the main problem of statistical dynamics for proto-planetary system. The work shows this task of protoplanetary dynamics can be solved on the basis of spheroidal bodies theory [1]-[4]. Within the framework of this theory, cosmological bodies have fuzzy outlines and are represented by means of spheroidal forms. The proposed theory follows from the conception for forming a spheroidal body as a proto-planet from dust-like nebula; it permits to derive the form of distribution functions for an immovable spheroidal body [1],[2] and rotating one [3],[4] as well as their density masses (gravitational potentials and strengths) and also to find the distribution function of specific angular momentum for the rotating spheroidal body [4]. References: [1] A.M.Krot, Achievement in Modern Radioelectronics, 1996, no.8, pp.66-81 (in Russian). [2] A.M.Krot, Proc. SPIE's 13thAnnual Intern.Symp. "AeroSense", Orlando, Florida, USA, 1999, vol.3710, pp.1248-1259. [3] A.M.Krot, Proc. 35th COSPAR Scientific Assembly, Paris, France, 2004, Abstract A-00162. [4] A.Krot, Proc. EGU General Assembly, Vienna, Austria, 2006, Geophys. Res. Abstracts, vol.8, A-00216; SRef-ID: 1607-7962/gra/.

  20. Human Intervertebral Disc Internal Strain in Compression: The Effect of Disc Region, Loading Position, and Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Grace D.; Vresilovic, Edward J.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the disc is mechanical; therefore, degenerative changes in disc mechanics and the interactions between the annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) in nondegenerate and degenerate discs are important to functional evaluation. The disc experiences complex loading conditions, including mechanical interactions between the pressurized NP and the surrounding fiber-reinforced AF. Our objective was to noninvasively evaluate the internal deformations of nondegenerate and degenerate human discs under axial compression with flexion, neutral, and extension positions using magnetic resonance imaging and image correlation. The side of applied bending (e.g., anterior AF in flexion) had higher tensile radial and compressive axial strains, and the opposite side of bending exhibited tensile axial strains even though the disc was loaded under axial compression. Degenerated discs exhibited higher compressive axial and tensile radial strains, which suggest that load distribution through the disc subcomponents are altered with degeneration, likely due to the depressurized NP placing more of the applied load directly on the AF. The posterior AF exhibited higher compressive axial and higher tensile radial strains than the other AF regions, and the strains were not correlated with degeneration, suggesting this region undergoes high strains throughout life, which may predispose it to failure and tears. In addition to understanding internal disc mechanics, this study provides important new data into the changes in internal strain with degeneration, data for validation of finite element models, and provides a technique and baseline data for evaluating surgical treatments. PMID:21337394

  1. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompression of the lumbar disc. Result: Among the 19 cases of the regular PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 63.2%, and among the 40 cases of the modified PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: The modified PLDD has good effect on the treatment for lumbar disc herniation.

  2. SHORT CIRCUITS IN THERMALLY IONIZED PLASMAS: A MECHANISM FOR INTERMITTENT HEATING OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Alexander; McNally, Colin P.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: cmcnally@nbi.dk

    2012-12-10

    Many astrophysical systems of interest, including protoplanetary accretion disks, are made of turbulent magnetized gas with near-solar metallicity. Thermal ionization of alkali metals in such gas exceeds non-thermal ionization when temperatures climb above roughly 1000 K. As a result, the conductivity, proportional to the ionization fraction, gains a strong, positive dependence on temperature. In this paper, we demonstrate that this relation between the temperature and the conductivity triggers an exponential instability that acts similarly to an electrical short, where the increased conductivity concentrates the current and locally increases the Ohmic heating. This contrasts with the resistivity increase expected in an ideal magnetic reconnection region. The instability acts to focus narrow current sheets into even narrower sheets with far higher currents and temperatures. We lay out the basic principles of this behavior in this paper using protoplanetary disks as our example host system, motivated by observations of chondritic meteorites and their ancestors, dust grains in protoplanetary disks, that reveal the existence of strong, frequent heating events that this instability could explain.

  3. Three Dimensional Study of the Interaction of Supernova Ejecta with a Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Beatrice

    2008-03-01

    Recent isotopic analysis of chondrites shows evidence for live 60Fe in the early Solar System. Only supernovae can produce this short-lived radionuclide, indicating that our Solar System formed in such proximity. Observations of the Orion Nebula, the Eta Carina Nebula and the Eagle Nebula show that young protoplanetary disks, in the stage of forming solids, exist in the vicinity of OB stars. Confirming that our Solar System was subjected to supernova ejecta requires proving that protoplanetary disks can survive the event. A first step has already been carried out by our research group using a two dimensional axisymmetric model. For the following step, we have developed a three dimensional model of protoplanetary disk that allows us to study, as the function of the ejecta incidence and the mass of the disk, the capture of supernova material and the stripping induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. I will be presenting that model, the computational implication of such work, as well as preliminary results.

  4. Probing the Inner Regions of Protoplanetary Disks with CO Absorption Line Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin; Burgh, Eric B.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Schindhelm, Eric; Brown, Joanna M.; Brown, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the most commonly used tracer of molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. CO can be used to constrain the excitation and structure of the circumstellar environment. Absorption line spectroscopy provides an accurate assessment of a single line of sight through the protoplanetary disk system, giving more straightforward estimates of column densities and temperatures than CO and molecular hydrogen (H2) emission line studies. We analyze new observations of ultraviolet CO absorption from the Hubble Space Telescope along the sightlines to six classical T Tauri stars. Gas velocities consistent with the stellar velocities, combined with the moderate-to-high disk inclinations, argue against the absorbing CO gas originating in a fast-moving disk wind. We conclude that the far-ultraviolet observations provide a direct measure of the disk atmosphere or possibly a slow disk wind. The CO absorption lines are reproduced by model spectra with column densities in the range N(12CO) ~ 1016-1018 cm-2 and N(13CO) ~ 1015-1017 cm-2, rotational temperatures T rot(CO) ~ 300-700 K, and Doppler b-values, b ~ 0.5-1.5 km s-1. We use these results to constrain the line-of-sight density of the warm molecular gas (n CO ~ 70-4000 cm-3) and put these observations in context with protoplanetary disk models.

  5. LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF PLANET-INDUCED VORTICES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lubow, Stephen

    2014-06-20

    Recent observations of large-scale asymmetric features in protoplanetary disks suggest that large-scale vortices exist in such disks. Massive planets are known to be able to produce deep gaps in protoplanetary disks. The gap edges could become hydrodynamically unstable to the Rossby wave/vortex instability and form large-scale vortices. In this study we examine the long-term evolution of these vortices by carrying out high-resolution two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations that last more than 10{sup 4} orbits (measured at the planet's orbit). We find that the disk viscosity has a strong influence on both the emergence and lifetime of vortices. In the outer disk region where asymmetric features are observed, our simulation results suggest that the disk viscous α needs to be low, ∼10{sup –5}-10{sup –4}, to sustain vortices to thousands and up to 10{sup 4} orbits in certain cases. The chance of finding a vortex feature in a disk then decreases with smaller planet orbital radius. For α ∼ 10{sup –3} or larger, even planets with masses of 5 M {sub J} will have difficulty either producing or sustaining vortices. We have also studied the effects of different disk temperatures and planet masses. We discuss the implications of our findings on current and future protoplanetary disk observations.

  6. A SEMI-ANALYTICAL DESCRIPTION FOR THE FORMATION AND GRAVITATIONAL EVOLUTION OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Machida, Masahiro N. E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.jp E-mail: machida.masahiro.018@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2013-06-10

    We investigate the formation process of self-gravitating protoplanetary disks in unmagnetized molecular clouds. The angular momentum is redistributed by the action of gravitational torques in the massive disk during its early formation. We develop a simplified one-dimensional accretion disk model that takes into account the infall of gas from the envelope onto the disk and the transfer of angular momentum in the disk with an effective viscosity. First we evaluate the gas accretion rate from the cloud core onto the disk by approximately estimating the effects of gas pressure and gravity acting on the cloud core. We formulate the effective viscosity as a function of the Toomre Q parameter that measures the local gravitational stability of the rotating thin disk. We use a function for viscosity that changes sensitively with Q when the disk is gravitationally unstable. We find a strong self-regulation mechanism in the disk evolution. During the formation stage of protoplanetary disks, the evolution of the surface density does not depend on the other details of the modeling of effective viscosity, such as the prefactor of the viscosity coefficient. Next, to verify our model, we compare the time evolution of the disk calculated with our formulation with that of three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. The structures of the resultant disks from the one-dimensional accretion disk model agree well with those of the three-dimensional simulations. Our model is a useful tool for the further modeling of chemistry, radiative transfer, and planet formation in protoplanetary disks.

  7. [Spontaneous resolution of a lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, M; Serramito-García, R; Aran-Echabe, E; García-Allut, A

    2007-04-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common cause of lower leg radiculopathy and the most effective methods of treatment remain in question. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments may provide a successful outcome in appropriately selected patients. The spontaneous resolution of herniated lumbar discs is a well-established phenomenon. The authors present a case of spontaneous regression of a herniated lumbar nucleus pulpous in a patient with radiculopathy. PMID:17497061

  8. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOEpatents

    Mrochek, John E.; Dinsmore, Stanley R.; Chandler, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    A four-port disc valve for sampling erosive, high temperature process streams. A rotatable disc defining opposed first and second sampling cavities rotates between fired faceplates defining flow passageways positioned to be alternatively in axial alignment with the first and second cavities. Silicon carbide inserts and liners composed of .alpha. silicon carbide are provided in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities to limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation when used under harsh process conditions.

  9. Investigation of cryogenic rupture disc design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keough, J. B.; Oldland, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rupture disc designs of both the active (command actuated) and passive (pressure ruptured) types were evaluated for performance characteristics at cryogenic temperatures and for capability to operate in a variety of cryogens, including gaseous and liquid fluorine. The test results, coupled with information from literature and industry searches, were used to establish a statement of design criteria and recommended practices for application of rupture discs to cryogenic rocket propellant feed and vent systems.

  10. Spinal disc rehabilitation: a new technology.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C J

    1998-01-01

    Low back pain and "computer neck" are frequent complaints during visits to a physician. Back and neck pain affects up to 60% of all employees at some time in their careers and is personally and financially devastating. Repetitive mechanical stress leads to disc degeneration, loss of disc height, and other abnormalities. The PT machine, which is controlled and coordinated by onboard computer and fiberoptic feedback sensors, is the first biorobotic system that alleviates intradiscal pressure and myospasm.

  11. The diversity of thick galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparova, Anastasia V.; Katkov, Ivan Yu.; Chilingarian, Igor V.; Silchenko, Olga K.; Moiseev, Alexey V.; Borisov, Svyatoslav B.

    2016-07-01

    Although thick stellar discs are detected in nearly all edge-on disc galaxies, their formation scenarios still remain a matter of debate. Due to observational difficulties, there is a lack of information about their stellar populations. Using the Russian 6-m telescope BTA we collected deep spectra of thick discs in three edge-on S0-a disc galaxies located in different environments: NGC 4111 in a dense group, NGC 4710 in the Virgo cluster, and NGC 5422 in a sparse group. We see intermediate age (4-5 Gyr) metal rich ([Fe/H] ˜- 0.2…0.0 dex) stellar populations in NGC 4111 and NGC 4710. On the other hand, NGC 5422 does not harbour young stars, its disc is thick and old (10 Gyr), without evidence for a second component, and its α-element abundance suggests a 1.5-2 Gyr long formation epoch implying its formation at high redshift. Our results suggest the diversity of thick disc formation scenarios.

  12. Optic disc anomalies and frontonasal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkins, P; Lees, M; Lawson, J; Reardon, W; Leitch, J; Thorogood, P; Winter, R; Taylor, D

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To document the optic disc abnormalities in patients with frontonasal dysplasia in association with basal encephalocele.
METHODS—Names and hospital numbers of patients with midline clefts were obtained from the ophthalmology and genetics database. Six patients were identified who had the following common findings: midline facial cleft with midline cleft lip and palate; hypertelorism; absent corpus callosum; basal (sphenoethmoidal) encephalocele; and pituitary deficiency (five out of six cases). Ophthalmic examination was performed with fundal photography where possible.
RESULTS—Two patients had unilateral and one a bilateral peripapillary staphyloma. Two patients had bilateral optic disc hypoplasia and one appeared to have a peripapillary staphyloma in one eye and a morning glory disc in the other.
CONCLUSION—Optic disc abnormalities were found in all patients with this constellation of clinical findings. This association appears to represent a distinct subgroup within the spectrum of frontonasal dysplasia. The presence of midline facial anomalies and any dysplastic disc should alert the physician as to the presence of an encephalocele.

 Keywords: frontonasal dysplasia; optic disc; encephalocele PMID:9602627

  13. Circumplanetary disc or circumplanetary envelope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szulágyi, J.; Masset, F.; Lega, E.; Crida, A.; Morbidelli, A.; Guillot, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution (80 per cent of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000, 1500, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary discs (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a CPD is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Instead, the gas temperature at the planet's location, which depends on its accretion history, plays also fundamental role. The CPDs in the simulations are hot and cooling very slowly, they have very steep temperature and density profiles, and are strongly sub-Keplerian. Moreover, the CPDs are fed by a strong vertical influx, which shocks on the CPD surfaces creating a hot and luminous shock-front. In contrast, the pressure supported circumplanetary envelope is characterized by internal convection and almost stalled rotation.

  14. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Shafaq; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration are lower back pain and sciatica which may be aggravated by standing, walking, bending, straining and coughing. Methods This study was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012. Study was conducted on the diagnosed patients of lumbar disc degeneration. Diagnostic criteria were based upon abnormal findings in MRI. Patients with prior back surgery, spine fractures, sacroiliac arthritis, metabolic bone disease, spinal infection, rheumatoid arthritis, active malignancy, and pregnancy were excluded. Results During the targeted months, 163 patients of lumbar disc degeneration with mean age of 43.92±11.76 years, came into Neurosurgery department. Disc degeneration was most commonly present at the level of L4/L5 105 (64.4%).Commonest types of disc degeneration were disc herniation 109 (66.9%) and lumbar spinal stenosis 37 (22.7%). Spondylolisthesis was commonly present at L5/S1 10 (6.1%) and associated mostly with lumbar spinal stenosis 7 (18.9%). Conclusions Results reported the frequent occurrence of lumbar disc degenerative disease in advance age. Research efforts should endeavor to reduce risk factors and improve the quality of life. PMID:24353850

  15. Dynamic, six-axis stiffness matrix characteristics of the intact intervertebral disc and a disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Holsgrove, Timothy P; Gill, Harinderjit S; Miles, Anthony W; Gheduzzi, Sabina

    2015-11-01

    Thorough pre-testing is critical in assessing the likely in vivo performance of spinal devices prior to clinical use. However, there is a lack of data available concerning the dynamic testing of lumbar (porcine model) total disc replacements in all six axes under preload conditions. The aim of this study was to provide new data comparing porcine lumbar spinal specimen stiffness between the intact state and after the implantation of an unconstrained total disc replacement, in 6 degrees of freedom. The dynamic, stiffness matrix testing of six porcine lumbar isolated disc specimens was completed using triangle waves at a test frequency of 0.1 Hz. An axial preload of 500 N was applied during all testing. Specimens were tested both in the intact condition and after the implantation of the total disc replacement. Sixteen key stiffness terms were identified for the comparison of the intact and total disc replacement specimens, comprising the 6 principal stiffness terms and 10 key off-axis stiffness terms. The total disc replacement specimens were significantly different to the intact specimens in 12 of these key terms including all six principal stiffness terms. The implantation of the total disc replacement resulted in a mean reduction in the principal stiffness terms of 100%, 91%, and 98% in lateral bending, flexion-extension, and axial rotation, respectively. The novel findings of this study have demonstrated that the unconstrained, low-friction total disc replacement does not replicate the stiffness of the intact specimens. It is likely that other low-friction total disc replacements would produce similar results due to stiffness being actively minimised as part of the design of low-friction devices, without the introduction of stiffening elements or mechanisms to more accurately replicate the mechanical properties of the natural intervertebral disc. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, a method for the quantitative comparative mechanical function

  16. Preparation of ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine-medicated discs for disc diffusion assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Romet ( a blend of ormetoprim and sulfadimethoxine) is a type A medicated article for the manufacture of medicated feed in the catfish industry. Recently, the commercial manufacture of ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine susceptibility discs was discontinued. Ormetoprim-sulfadimethoxine discs were prepare...

  17. Modeling and optimization of an elastic arthroplastic disc for a degenerated disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouchani, Azadeh; Ravari, Mohammad; Mahmoudi, Farid

    2011-10-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the L3-L4 motion segment using ABAQUS v 6.9 has been developed. The model took into account the material nonlinearities and is imposed different loading conditions. In this study, we validated the model by comparison of its predictions with several sets of experimental data. Disc deformation under compression and segmental rotational motions under moment loads for the normal disc model agreed well with the corresponding in vivo studies. By linking ABAQUS with MATLAB 2010.a, we determined the optimal Young s modulus as well as the Poisson's ratio for the artificial disc under different physiologic loading conditions. The results of the present study confirmed that a well-designed elastic arthroplastic disc preferably has an annulus modulus of 19.1 MPa and 1.24 MPa for nucleus section and Poisson ratio of 0.41 and 0.47 respectively. Elastic artificial disc with such properties can then achieve the goal of restoring the disc height and mechanical function of intact disc under different loading conditions and so can reduce low back pain which is mostly caused due to disc degeneration.

  18. The outcome of protoplanetary dust growth: pebbles, boulders, or planetesimals?. I. Mapping the zoo of laboratory collision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttler, C.; Blum, J.; Zsom, A.; Ormel, C. W.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2010-04-01

    Context. The growth processes from protoplanetary dust to planetesimals are not fully understood. Laboratory experiments and theoretical models have shown that collisions among the dust aggregates can lead to sticking, bouncing, and fragmentation. However, no systematic study on the collisional outcome of protoplanetary dust has been performed so far, so that a physical model of the dust evolution in protoplanetary disks is still missing. Aims: We intend to map the parameter space for the collisional interaction of arbitrarily porous dust aggregates. This parameter space encompasses the dust-aggregate masses, their porosities and the collision velocity. With such a complete mapping of the collisional outcomes of protoplanetary dust aggregates, it will be possible to follow the collisional evolution of dust in a protoplanetary disk environment. Methods: We use literature data, perform laboratory experiments, and apply simple physical models to get a complete picture of the collisional interaction of protoplanetary dust aggregates. Results: We found four different kinds of sticking, two kinds of bouncing, and three kinds of fragmentation as possible outcomes in collisions among protoplanetary dust aggregates. Our best collision model distinguishes between porous and compact dust. We also differentiate between collisions among similar-sized and different-sized bodies. All in all, eight combinations of porosity and mass ratio can be discerned. For each of these cases, we present a complete collision model for dust-aggregate masses between 10-12 and 102 g and collision velocities in the range of 10-4 ldots 104 cm s-1 for arbitrary porosities. This model comprises the collisional outcome, the mass(es) of the resulting aggregate(s) and their porosities. Conclusions: We present the first complete collision model for protoplanetary dust. This collision model can be used for the determination of the dust-growth rate in protoplanetary disks. This paper is dedicated to the

  19. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael; Cho, Samuel Kang-Wook

    2015-06-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  20. Structures induced by companions in galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyziropoulos, P. E.; Efthymiopoulos, C.; Gravvanis, G. A.; Patsis, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    Using N-body simulations we study the structures induced on a galactic disc by repeated flybys of a companion in decaying eccentric orbit around the disc. Our system is composed by a stellar disc, bulge and live dark matter halo, and we study the system's dynamical response to a sequence of a companion's flybys, when we vary i) the disc's temperature (parameterized by Toomre's Q-parameter) and ii) the companion's mass and initial orbit. We use a new 3D Cartesian grid code: MAIN (Mesh-adaptive Approximate Inverse N-body solver). The main features of MAIN are reviewed, with emphasis on the use of a new Symmetric Factored Approximate Sparse Inverse (SFASI) matrix in conjunction with the multigrid method that allows the efficient solution of Poisson's equation in three space variables. We find that: i) companions need to be assigned initial masses in a rather narrow window of values in order to produce significant and more long-standing non-axisymmetric structures (bars and spirals) in the main galaxy's disc by the repeated flyby mechanism. ii) a crucial phenomenon is the antagonism between companion-excited and self-excited modes on the disc. Values of Q > 1.5 are needed in order to allow for the growth of the companion-excited modes to prevail over the the growth of the disc's self-excited modes. iii) We give evidence that the companion-induced spiral structure is best represented by a density wave with pattern speed nearly constant in a region extending from the ILR to a radius close to, but inside, corotation.

  1. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  2. Reconstructing the star formation history of the Milky Way disc(s) from chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snaith, O.; Haywood, M.; Di Matteo, P.; Lehnert, M. D.; Combes, F.; Katz, D.; Gómez, A.

    2015-06-01

    We develop a chemical evolution model to study the star formation history of the Milky Way. Our model assumes that the Milky Way has formed from a closed-box-like system in the inner regions, while the outer parts of the disc have experienced some accretion. Unlike the usual procedure, we do not fix the star formation prescription (e.g. Kennicutt law) to reproduce the chemical abundance trends. Instead, we fit the abundance trends with age to recover the star formation history of the Galaxy. Our method enables us to recover the star formation history of the Milky Way in the first Gyrs with unprecedented accuracy in the inner (R < 7-8 kpc) and outer (R > 9-10 kpc) discs, as sampled in the solar vicinity. We show that half the stellar mass formed during the thick-disc phase in the inner galaxy during the first 4-5 Gyr. This phase was followed by a significant dip in star formation activity (at 8-9 Gyr) and a period of roughly constant lower-level star formation for the remaining 8 Gyr. The thick-disc phase has produced as many metals in 4 Gyr as the thin-disc phase in the remaining 8 Gyr. Our results suggest that a closed-box model is able to fit all the available constraints in the inner disc. A closed-box system is qualitatively equivalent to a regime where the accretion rate maintains a high gas fraction in the inner disc at high redshift. In these conditions the SFR is mainly governed by the high turbulence of the interstellar medium. By z ~ 1 it is possible that most of the accretion takes place in the outer disc, while the star formation activity in the inner disc is mostly sustained by the gas that is not consumed during the thick-disc phase and the continuous ejecta from earlier generations of stars. The outer disc follows a star formation history very similar to that of the inner disc, although initiated at z ~ 2, about 2 Gyr before the onset of the thin-disc formation in the inner disc.

  3. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental lordosis alterations after TDA were reported in most cases, for both constrained and unconstrained disc prostheses. An increase in the load through the facet joints was documented, for both semi-constrained and unconstrained artificial discs, but with some contrasting results. Semi-constrained devices may be able to share a greater part of the load, thus protecting the surrounding biological structure from overloading and possible early degeneration, but may be more susceptible to wear. The next level of development will be the biomechanical integration of compression across the motion segment. All these findings need to be supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:18946684

  4. Crystallization of Self-Propelled Hard Discs.

    PubMed

    Briand, G; Dauchot, O

    2016-08-26

    We experimentally study the crystallization of a monolayer of vibrated discs with a built-in polar asymmetry, a model system of active liquids, and contrast it with that of vibrated isotropic discs. Increasing the packing fraction ϕ, the quasicontinuous crystallization reported for isotropic discs is replaced by a transition, or a crossover, towards a "self-melting" crystal. Starting from the liquid phase and increasing the packing fraction, clusters of dense hexagonal-ordered packed discs spontaneously form, melt, split, and merge, leading to a highly intermittent and heterogeneous dynamics. For a packing fraction larger than ϕ^{*}, a few large clusters span the system size. The cluster size distribution is monotonically decreasing for ϕ<ϕ^{*}, nonmonotonic for ϕ>ϕ^{*}, and is a power law at the transition. The system is, however, never dynamically arrested. The clusters permanently melt from place to place, forming droplets of an active liquid which rapidly propagate across the system. This self-melting crystalline state subsists up to the highest possible packing fraction, questioning the stability of the crystal for active discs unless it is at ordered close packing. PMID:27610889

  5. Lubrication regimes in lumbar total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, A; Shepherd, D E T

    2007-08-01

    A number of total disc arthroplasty devices have been developed. Some concern has been expressed that wear may be a potential failure mode for these devices, as has been seen with hip arthroplasty. The aim of this paper was to investigate the lubrication regimes that occur in lumbar total disc arthroplasty devices. The disc arthroplasty was modelled as a ball-and-socket joint. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to calculate the minimum film thickness of the fluid between the bearing surfaces. The lubrication regime was then determined for different material combinations, size of implant, and trunk velocity. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination operate with a boundary lubrication regime. A ceramic-ceramic material combination has the potential to operate with fluid-film lubrication. Disc arthroplasties with a metal-polymer or metal-metal material combination are likely to generate wear debris. In future, it is worth considering a ceramic-ceramic material combination as this is likely to reduce wear.

  6. Footprint mismatch in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Michaela, Gstoettner; Denise, Heider; Liebensteiner, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar disc arthroplasty has become a popular modality for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The dimensions of the implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae; the majority of these were cadaver studies. The fit of the prosthesis in the intervertebral space is of utmost importance. An undersized implant may lead to subsidence, loosening and biomechanical failure due to an incorrect center of rotation. The aim of the present study was to measure the dimensions of lumbar vertebrae based on CT scans and assess the accuracy of match in currently available lumbar disc prostheses. A total of 240 endplates of 120 vertebrae were included in the study. The sagittal and mediolateral diameter of the upper and lower endplates were measured using a digital measuring system. For the levels L4/L5 and L5/S1, an inappropriate size match was noted in 98.8% (Prodisc L) and 97.6% (Charite) with regard to the anteroposterior diameter. Mismatch in the anterior mediolateral diameter was noted in 79.3% (Prodisc L) and 51.2% (Charite) while mismatch in the posterior mediolateral diameter was observed in 91.5% (Prodisc L) and 78% (Charite) of the endplates. Surgeons and manufacturers should be aware of the size mismatch of currently available lumbar disc prostheses, which may endanger the safety and efficacy of the procedure. Larger footprints of currently available total disc arthroplasties are required. PMID:18791748

  7. Crystallization of Self-Propelled Hard Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, G.; Dauchot, O.

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally study the crystallization of a monolayer of vibrated discs with a built-in polar asymmetry, a model system of active liquids, and contrast it with that of vibrated isotropic discs. Increasing the packing fraction ϕ , the quasicontinuous crystallization reported for isotropic discs is replaced by a transition, or a crossover, towards a "self-melting" crystal. Starting from the liquid phase and increasing the packing fraction, clusters of dense hexagonal-ordered packed discs spontaneously form, melt, split, and merge, leading to a highly intermittent and heterogeneous dynamics. For a packing fraction larger than ϕ*, a few large clusters span the system size. The cluster size distribution is monotonically decreasing for ϕ <ϕ*, nonmonotonic for ϕ >ϕ*, and is a power law at the transition. The system is, however, never dynamically arrested. The clusters permanently melt from place to place, forming droplets of an active liquid which rapidly propagate across the system. This self-melting crystalline state subsists up to the highest possible packing fraction, questioning the stability of the crystal for active discs unless it is at ordered close packing.

  8. The debris disc around HIP 17439

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüppler, Christian; Löhne, Torsten; Krivov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme DUNES the debris disc around the K2 V star HIP 17439 was observed. In PACS images the disc emission is spatially clearly extended. A simultaneous analysis of photometric observations and radial brightness profiles from the resolved images provides valuable hints for the disc structure. In an analytical model we adopted power laws for the size and radial distribution of the circumstellar dust and tested two different scenarios: (1) a broad dust ring with a radial extent of about 200AU, (2) two independent dust rings separated by a gap of several tens of AU. Both models fit the spectral energy distribution and the radial profiles quite well. In case (1) the parameters found are consistent with dust stemming from an outer planetesimal belt at ~140AU and strong transport mechanisms that drag the particles inward. Model (2) would imply two planetesimal belts, producing a narrow inner and wider outer distribution of dust.

  9. Vertical oscillations of fluid and stellar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widrow, Lawrence M.; Bonner, Gage

    2015-06-01

    A satellite galaxy or dark matter subhalo that passes through a stellar disc may excite coherent oscillations in the disc perpendicular to its plane. We determine the properties of these modes for various self-gravitating plane symmetric systems (Spitzer sheets) using the matrix method of Kalnajs. In particular, we find an infinite series of modes for the case of a barotropic fluid. In general, for a collisionless system, there is a double series of modes, which include normal modes and/or Landau-damped oscillations depending on the phase space distribution function of the stars. Even Landau-damped oscillations may decay slowly enough to persist for several hundred Myr. We discuss the implications of these results for the recently discovered vertical perturbations in the kinematics of solar neighbourhood stars and for broader questions surrounding secular phenomena such as spiral structure in disc galaxies.

  10. Liquid Immersion Deep-UV Optical Disc Mastering for Blu-ray Disc Read-Only Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neijzen, Jaap H. M.; Meinders, Erwin R.; van Santen, Helmar

    2004-07-01

    The liquid immersion mastering technique has been successfully applied to the mastering of read-only memory (ROM) discs for the Blu-ray disc (BD) system. Replicated discs with a density corresponding to 25 GB in a single layer on a 12 cm disc showed a bottom jitter of less than 5%. Results concerning process latitude and disc uniformity are presented. A full-format 25 GB ROM disc containing over 2 h of high-definition video content has been mastered according to the BD target specification. The results obtained for a reduced channel bit length show the potential of liquid immersion mastering for densities beyond 31 GB per layer.

  11. Disc in Flames: Roles of TNF-α and IL-1β in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Zariel I.; Schoepflin, Zachary R.; Choi, Hyowon; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2016-01-01

    The intervertebral disc is an important mechanical structure that allows range of motion of the spinal column. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc, incited by aging, traumatic insult, genetic predisposition, or other factors, is often defined by functional and structural changes in the tissue, including excessive breakdown of the extracellular matrix, increased disc cell senescence and death, and compromised biomechanical function of the tissue. Intervertebral disc degeneration is strongly correlated with low back pain, which is a highly prevalent and costly condition, significantly contributing to loss in productivity and health care costs. Disc degeneration is a chronic, progressive condition, and current therapies are limited and often focused on symptomatic pain relief rather than curtailing the progression of the disease. Inflammatory processes, exacerbated by cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β are believed to be key mediators of disc degeneration and low back pain. In this review, we describe the contributions of TNF-α and IL-1β to changes seen during disc degeneration at the cellular and tissue level, new evidence suggesting a link between infection of the spine and low back pain, and the emerging therapeutic modalities aimed at combating these processes. PMID:26388614

  12. Effect of intervertebral disc degeneration on disc cell viability: a numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Galbusera, Fabio; Mietsch, Antje; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Neidlinger-Wilke, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc may be initiated and supported by impairment of the nutrition processes of the disc cells. The effects of degenerative changes on cell nutrition are, however, only partially understood. In this work, a finite volume model was used to investigate the effect of endplate calcification, water loss, reduction of disc height and cyclic mechanical loading on the sustainability of the disc cell population. Oxygen, lactate and glucose diffusion, production and consumption were modelled with non-linear coupled partial differential equations. Oxygen and glucose consumption and lactate production were expressed as a function of local oxygen concentration, pH and cell density. The cell viability criteria were based on local glucose concentration and pH. Considering a disc with normal water content, cell death was initiated in the centre of the nucleus for oxygen, glucose, and lactate diffusivities in the cartilaginous endplate below 20% of the physiological values. The initial cell population could not be sustained even in the non-calcified endplates when a reduction of diffusion inside the disc due to water loss was modelled. Alterations in the disc shape such as height loss, which shortens the transport route between the nutrient sources and the cells, and cyclic mechanical loads, could enhance cell nutrition processes. PMID:21970697

  13. Appearance of Keplerian discs orbiting Kerr superspinars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Schee, Jan

    2010-11-01

    We study optical phenomena related to the appearance of Keplerian accretion discs orbiting Kerr superspinars predicted by string theory. The superspinar exterior is described by standard Kerr naked singularity geometry breaking the black hole limit on the internal angular momentum (spin). We construct local photon escape cones for a variety of orbiting sources that enable us to determine the superspinars silhouette in the case of distant observers. We show that the superspinar silhouette depends strongly on the assumed edge where the external Kerr spacetime is joined to the internal spacetime governed by string theory and significantly differs from the black hole silhouette. The appearance of the accretion disc is strongly dependent on the value of the superspinar spin in both their shape and frequency shift profile. Apparent extension of the disc grows significantly with the growing spin, while the frequency shift grows with the descending spin. This behaviour differs substantially from the appearance of discs orbiting black holes enabling thus, at least in principle, to distinguish clearly the Kerr superspinars and black holes. In vicinity of a Kerr superspinar the non-escaped photons have to be separated to those captured by the superspinar and those being trapped in its strong gravitational field leading to self-illumination of the disc that could even influence its structure and cause self-reflection effect of radiation of the disc. The amount of trapped photons grows with descending superspinar spin. We thus can expect significant self-illumination effects in the field of Kerr superspinars with near-extreme spin a ~ 1.

  14. P-mode oscillation on slim discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Li; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2016-02-01

    We numerically investigate the thermally unstable accretion discs around spinning black holes with different spins. We adopted an additional evolutionary viscosity equation to replace the standard alpha-prescription based on the results of two MHD simulations. We find an interesting oscillation when accretion switches to slim disc mode. The oscillation arises from the sonic point of accretion flow and propagates outwards. We mimic the bolometric light-curve and find a series of harmonics on its power spectrum. The frequency ratio of those harmonics is a regular integer series. The lowest frequency of the harmonics is identical to the prediction of trapped p-mode in QPO theory.

  15. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOEpatents

    Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

    1986-01-07

    A four-port disc valve is described for sampling erosive, high temperature process streams. A rotatable disc defining opposed first and second sampling cavities rotates between fired faceplates defining flow passageways positioned to be alternatively in axial alignment with the first and second cavities. Silicon carbide inserts and liners composed of [alpha] silicon carbide are provided in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities to limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation when used under harsh process conditions. 1 fig.

  16. Progression of a lumbar disc extrusion.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Michael S; Alitz, Curtis

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 34-year-old woman who was referred to a physical therapist for a chief complaint of progressively worsening right buttock pain with paresthesias of the right posterior thigh and calf. Prior magnetic resonance imaging of the patient's lumbar spine revealed a large left paracentral disc extrusion at L5-S1. Following physical therapist intervention, the patient reported a new onset of left posterior thigh pain, with paresthesias of the dorsolateral aspect of the left foot. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging of the patient's lumbar spine revealed an increase in the size of the disc extrusion at L5-S1. PMID:25361862

  17. ELECTRIC CHARGING OF DUST AGGREGATES AND ITS EFFECT ON DUST COAGULATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2009-06-20

    Mutual sticking of dust aggregates is the first step toward planetesimal formation in protoplanetary disks. In spite that the electric charging of dust particles is well recognized in some contexts, it has been largely ignored in the current modeling of dust coagulation. In this study, we present a general analysis of the dust charge state in protoplanetary disks, and then demonstrate how the electric charging could dramatically change the currently accepted scenario of dust coagulation. First, we describe a new semianalytical method to calculate the dust charge state and gas ionization state self-consistently. This method is far more efficient than previous numerical methods, and provides a general and clear description of the charge state of a gas-dust mixture. Second, we apply this analysis to compute the collisional cross section of growing aggregates taking their charging into account. As an illustrative example, we focus on early evolutionary stages where the dust has been thought to grow into fractal (D {approx} 2) aggregates with a quasi-monodisperse (i.e., narrow) size distribution. We find that, for a wide range of model parameters, the fractal growth is strongly inhibited by the electric repulsion between colliding aggregates and eventually 'freezes out' on its way to the subsequent growth stage involving collisional compression. Strong disk turbulence would help the aggregates to overcome this growth barrier, but then it would cause catastrophic collisional fragmentation in later growth stages. These facts suggest that the combination of electric repulsion and collisional fragmentation would impose a serious limitation on dust growth in protoplanetary disks. We propose a possible scenario of dust evolution after the freezeout. Finally, we point out that the fractal growth of dust aggregates tends to maintain a low ionization degree and, as a result, a large magnetorotationally stable region in the disk.

  18. Protoplanetary disk formation and evolution models: DM Tau and GM Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Guillot, T.

    2002-09-01

    We study the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks using an axisymmetric turbulent disk model. We compare model results with observational parameters derived for the DM Tau and GM Aur systems. These are relatively old T Tauri stars with large and massive protoplanetary disks. Early disk formation is studied in the standard scenario of slowly rotating isothermal collapsing spheres and is strongly dependent on the initial angular momentum and the collapse accretion rate. The viscous evolution of the disk is integrated in time using the classical Alpha prescription of turbulence. We follow the temporal evolution of the disks until their characteristics fit the observed characteristics of DM Tau and GM Aur. We therefore obtain the set of model parameters that are able to explain the present state of these disks. We also study the disk evolution under the Beta parameterization of turbulence, recently proposed for sheared flows on protoplanetary disks. Both parameterizations allow explaining the present state of both DM Tau and GM Aur. We infer a value of Alpha between 5x10-3 to 0.02 for DM Tau and one order of magnitude smaller for GM Aur. Values of the Beta parameter are in accordance with theoretical predictions of Beta around 2x10-5 but with a larger dispersion on other model parameters, which make us favor the Alpha parameterization of turbulence. Implications for planetary system development in these systems are presented. In particular, GM Aur is a massive and slowly evolving disk where conditions are very favorable for planetesimal growth. The large value of present disk mass and the relatively small observed accretion rate of this system may also be indicative of the presence of an inner gas giant planet. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Programme Nationale de Planetologie. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doctoral fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  19. Effects of inclined star-disk encounter on protoplanetary disk size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandare, Asmita; Breslau, Andreas; Pfalzner, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    Most, if not all, young stars are initially surrounded by protoplanetary disks. Owing to the preferential formation of stars in stellar clusters, the protoplanetary disks around these stars may potentially be affected by the cluster environment. Various works have investigated the influence of stellar fly-bys on disks, although many of them consider only the effects due to parabolic, coplanar encounters often for equal-mass stars, which is only a very special case. We perform numerical simulations to study the fate of protoplanetary disks after the impact of parabolic star-disk encounter for the less investigated case of inclined up to coplanar, retrograde encounters, which is a much more common case. Here, we concentrate on the disk size after such encounters because this limits the size of the potentially forming planetary systems. In addition, with the possibilities that ALMA offers, now a direct comparison to observations is possible. Covering a wide range of periastron distances and mass ratios between the mass of the perturber and central star, we find that despite the prograde, coplanar encounters having the strongest effect on the disk size, inclined and even the least destructive retrograde encounters mostly also have a considerable effect, especially for close periastron passages. Interestingly, we find a nearly linear dependence of the disk size on the orbital inclination for the prograde encounters, but not for the retrograde case. We also determine the final orbital parameters of the particles in the disk such as eccentricities, inclinations, and semi-major axes. Using this information the presented study can be used to describe the fate of disks and also that of planetary systems after inclined encounters.

  20. A NEW RAYTRACER FOR MODELING AU-SCALE IMAGING OF LINES FROM PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Meijerink, Rowin; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2009-10-20

    The material that formed the present-day solar system originated in feeding zones in the inner solar nebula located at distances within approx20 AU from the Sun, known as the planet-forming zone. Meteoritic and cometary material contain abundant evidence for the presence of a rich and active chemistry in the planet-forming zone during the gas-rich phase of solar system formation. It is a natural conjecture that analogs can be found among the zoo of protoplanetary disks around nearby young stars. The study of the chemistry and dynamics of planet formation requires: (1) tracers of dense gas at 100-1000 K and (2) imaging capabilities of such tracers with 5-100 mas (0.5-20 AU) resolution, corresponding to the planet-forming zone at the distance of the closest star-forming regions. Recognizing that the rich infrared (2-200 mum) molecular spectrum recently discovered to be common in protoplanetary disks represents such a tracer, we present a new general ray-tracing code, RADLite, that is optimized for producing infrared line spectra and images from axisymmetric structures. RADLite can consistently deal with a wide range of velocity gradients, such as those typical for the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. The code is intended as a back-end for chemical and excitation codes, and can rapidly produce spectra of thousands of lines for grids of models for comparison with observations. Such radiative transfer tools will be crucial for constraining both the structure and chemistry of planet-forming regions, including data from current infrared imaging spectrometers and extending to the Atacama Large Millimeter Array and the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope and beyond.

  1. High-Temperature Mineral Formation by Short Circuits in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Hubbard, A.; McNally, C.; Ebel, D.; D'Alessio, P.

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent heating of solid materials in protoplanetary disks is attested to by meteoritical components such as chondrules and calcium-aluminum inclusions, by the presence of high temperature minerals in comet dust sampled by the Stardust mission, and by the observation of crystalline silicates at substantial radii in disks around young stars. Such heating requires an energy source and a physical mechanism to explain it. One plausible energy source is the differential rotation of a Keplerian disk. In most models of protoplanetary disks, this energy drives magnetized turbulence through magnetorotational instability everywhere outside of a transient dead zone. Magnetized turbulence very generally forms current sheets as energy cascades to smaller scales. In resistive media such as the gas in disks, these currents act as a heating source. The density of charge carriers in cold disks is too low for these currents to raise the gas to rock-melting temperatures immediately. However, temperatures can be raised to the range of 1000 K, sufficient to being ionizing alkali metals, locally decreasing the resistivity and increasing the turbulence. This triggers an exponential instability, leading to a narrow sheet of highly ionized, high temperature gas. The strongly varying resistivity acts as an anti-diffusive term in the induction equation, concentrating field in the sheet. Preliminary calculations using a one-dimensional simulation including both non-ideal MHD and radiative transfer suggest that rock-melting or vaporizing temperatures above 1800 K can easily be reached in these sheets. This could provide a widespread, intermittent, heating mechanism in protoplanetary disks sufficient to produce the observed high-temperature minerals.

  2. Large-scale magnetic field in the accretion discs of young stars: the influence of magnetic diffusion, buoyancy and Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaibrakhmanov, S. A.; Dudorov, A. E.; Parfenov, S. Yu.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the fossil magnetic field in the accretion and protoplanetary discs using the Shakura and Sunyaev approach. The distinguishing feature of this study is the accurate solution of the ionization balance equations and the induction equation with Ohmic diffusion, magnetic ambipolar diffusion, buoyancy and the Hall effect. We consider the ionization by cosmic rays, X-rays and radionuclides, radiative recombinations, recombinations onto dust grains, and also thermal ionization. The buoyancy appears as the additional mechanism of magnetic flux escape in the steady-state solution of the induction equation. Calculations show that Ohmic diffusion and magnetic ambipolar diffusion constraint the generation of the magnetic field inside the `dead' zones. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-vertical. The buoyancy constraints the toroidal magnetic field strength close to the disc inner edge. As a result, the toroidal and vertical magnetic fields become comparable. The Hall effect is important in the regions close to the borders of the `dead' zones because electrons are magnetized there. The magnetic field in these regions is quasi-radial. We calculate the magnetic field strength and geometry for the discs with accretion rates (10^{-8}-10^{-6}) {M}_{⊙} {yr}^{-1}. The fossil magnetic field geometry does not change significantly during the disc evolution while the accretion rate decreases. We construct the synthetic maps of dust emission polarized due to the dust grain alignment by the magnetic field. In the polarization maps, the `dead' zones appear as the regions with the reduced values of polarization degree in comparison to those in the adjacent regions.

  3. The effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression for the prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ming Wei; Liu, Wei; Feng, Wei; Ma, Nan

    2009-07-01

    Objective: to investigate the role of associated factors in the effectiveness of laser treatment for prolapsed lumber intervertebral disc. Method: 302 prolapsed lumber intervertebral discs in 212 patients were treated with percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Patients were followed up by 12month, the associated factors which affecting the effectiveness of treatment, ie age, duration of illness were analyzed. Results: Punctual Success rate was 100%. After 12 month's follow up, 86% successful outcomes were obtained, in which 93% successful outcomes were obtained in patients less than 50 years old, 92% successful outcomes was obtained in the patients whose duration of illness less than 1 year.

  4. In Quest of the Circumstellar Dust Shell Structure in Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, T.

    2015-12-01

    Dusty mass loss during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase of low to intermediate initial mass stars results in a physically-detached circumstellar dust shell, also known as a proto-planetary nebula (PPN), in the subsequent post-AGB phase. PPNe can be observed indirectly via dust-scattering in the optical/near-IR and directly via thermal dust emission in the IR. The PPN morphologies, especially in those that are optically thin, therefore, provide critical clues for the elusive mass loss mechanisms. Here, a quest in search of the innermost PPN structures in the past 15 years is summarized.

  5. DETECTION OF C{sub 60} IN THE PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA IRAS 01005+7910

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yong; Kwok Sun E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2011-04-01

    We report the first detection of buckminsterfullerene (C{sub 60}) in a protoplanetary nebula. The vibrational transitions of C{sub 60} at 7.0, 17.4, and 18.9 {mu}m are detected in the Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectrum of IRAS 01005+7910. This detection suggests that fullerenes are formed shortly after the asymptotic giant branch but before the planetary nebulae stage. A comparison with the observations of C{sub 60} in other sources is made and the implication for circumstellar chemistry is discussed.

  6. IUE observations of new A star candidate proto-planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    1994-01-01

    As a result of the detection of accreting gas in the A5e PMS Herbig Ae star, HR 5999, most of the observations for this IUE program were devoted to Herbig Ae stars rather than to main sequence A stars. Mid-UV emission at optical minimum light was detected for UX Ori (A1e), BF Ori (A5e), and CQ Tau (F2e). The presence of accreting gas in HD 45677 and HD 50138 prompted reclassification of these stars as Herbig Be stars rather than as protoplanetary nebulae. Detailed results are discussed.

  7. Cell transplantation in lumbar spine disc degeneration disease

    PubMed Central

    Hohaus, C.; Ganey, T. M.; Minkus, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common symptom, affecting nearly three-quarters of the population sometime in their life. Given that disc herniation is thought to be an extension of progressive disc degeneration that attends the normal aging process, seeking an effective therapy that staves off disc degeneration has been considered a logical attempt to reduce back pain. The most apparent cellular and biochemical changes attributable to degeneration include a decrease in cell density in the disc that is accompanied by a reduction in synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. With this in mind, one therapeutic strategy would be to replace, regenerate, or augment the intervertebral disc cell population, with a goal of correcting matrix insufficiencies and restoring normal segment biomechanics. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. We designed an animal study using the dog as our model to investigate this hypothesis by transplantation of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes into degenerated intervertebral discs. As a result we demonstrated that disc cells remained viable after transplantation; transplanted disc cells produced an extracellular matrix that contained components similar to normal intervertebral disc tissue; a statistically significant correlation between transplanting cells and retention of disc height could displayed. Following these results the Euro Disc Randomized Trial was initiated to embrace a representative patient group with persistent symptoms that had not responded to conservative treatment where an indication for surgical treatment was given. In the interim analyses we evaluated that patients who received autologous disc cell transplantation had greater pain reduction at 2 years compared with patients who did not receive cells following their discectomy surgery and discs in patients that

  8. Gaseous discs at intermediate redshifts from kinematic data modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipper, R.; Tamm, A.; Tenjes, P.; Tempel, E.

    2016-10-01

    Our purpose is to measure thickness of gaseous discs in 0 < z < 1.2 galaxies. As gas dispersions are sensitive to scale height of gaseous discs, we model the kinematics of galaxies using Jeans equations. The resulting thicknesses of gaseous discs at higher redshifts are more thicker (and arbitrary) while nearby ones are thinner. We also found that clumpiness of galaxy is a possible indicator of the gas disc thickness.

  9. Interactive Optical Disc Systems: Part 1: Analog Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessler, David W.

    1984-01-01

    Details distinction between digital and analog data, advantages of analog storage, and optical disc use to store analog data. Configuration and potential of three levels of laser disc systems are explained. Selection of display devices for use with laser disc systems and accessing audio data are addressed. (Continued in next issue.) (EJS)

  10. DISC1 as a therapeutic target for mental illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Hikida, Takatoshi; Gamo, Nao J.; Sawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many genetic studies have indicated that DISC1 is not merely “disrupted-in-schizophrenia,” but is more generally implicated in various brain dysfunctions associated with aberrant neurodevelopment and intracellular signaling pathways. Thus, the DISC1 gene is mildly associated with a variety of brain disorders, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism. This novel concept fits with the results from biological studies of DISC1, which include cell and animal models. Areas covered We review the molecular structure and functions of DISC1, particularly those in conjunction with its important interactors. Functions of these interacting proteins are also introduced under the concept of the “DISC1 interactome.” Finally, we discuss how the DISC1 interactome can provide potential therapeutic targets for mental illnesses. Expert opinion Modulation of DISC1 stability and post-transcriptional modifications may be key targets to address DISC1-related pathology. In addition, modulation of DISC1 interactors and the mechanisms of their interactions with DISC1 may also provide drug targets. Disc1 rodent models can subsequently be used as templates for in vivo validations of compounds designed for DISC1 and its interacting proteins. Furthermore, these rodents will serve as genetic models for schizophrenia and related conditions, especially in conjunction with their pathologies during the neurodevelopmental trajectory. PMID:23130881

  11. Morning glory disc anomaly with Chiari type I malformation.

    PubMed

    Arlow, Tim; Arepalli, Sruthi; Flanders, Adam E; Shields, Carol L

    2014-04-30

    Morning glory disc anomaly is a rare optic nerve dysplasia associated with various neovascular abnormalities. Due to these associations, children with morning glory disc anomaly have brain imaging and angiography to detect other congenital defects. The authors report the case of an infant with morning glory disc anomaly and coexisting Chiari type I malformation.

  12. Prognosis of intervertebral disc loss from diagnosis of degenerative disc disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Lin, A.; Tay, K.; Romano, W.; Osman, Said

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is one of the most common causes of low back pain, and is a major factor in limiting the quality of life of an individual usually as they enter older stages of life, the disc degeneration reduces the shock absorption available which in turn causes pain. Disc loss is one of the central processes in the pathogenesis of DDD. In this study, we investigated whether the image texture features quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be appropriate markers for diagnosis of DDD and prognosis of inter-vertebral disc loss. The main objective is to use simple image based biomarkers to perform prognosis of spinal diseases using non-invasive procedures. Our results from 65 subjects proved the higher success rates of the combination marker compared to the individual markers and in the future, we will extend the study to other spine regions to allow prognosis and diagnosis of DDD for a wider region.

  13. The Substitution-Elimination Mechanistic Disc Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonora, Paul T.; Yu Jin Lim

    2004-01-01

    A method designed to facilitate prediction of mechanism and products by developing critical thinking skills and reducing memorization is presented. The mechanistic disc method requiring students to utilize their understanding of charge stabilization, structural organic chemistry, and the fundamental mechanisms of aliphatic substitution and…

  14. Frictional Torque on a Rotating Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to motion often includes a dry frictional term independent of the speed of an object and a fluid drag term varying linearly with speed in the viscous limit. (At higher speeds, quadratic drag can also occur.) Here, measurements are performed for an aluminium disc mounted on bearings that is given an initial twist and allowed to spin…

  15. Disc valve for sampling erosive process streams

    DOEpatents

    Mrochek, J.E.; Dinsmore, S.R.; Chandler, E.W.

    1984-08-16

    This is a patent for a disc-type, four-port sampling valve for service with erosive high temperature process streams. Inserts and liners of ..cap alpha..-silicon carbide respectively, in the faceplates and in the sampling cavities, limit erosion while providing lubricity for a smooth and precise operation. 1 fig.

  16. Project DISC: Developing Indian Software Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobi, Carolyn

    Project DISC (Developing Indian Software Curriculum) was initiated in the Rapid City (South Dakota) school district to improve Native American children's reading and language arts ability and to provide them with microcomputer skills. During the summer of 1982, introductory computer activities were planned, a computer specialist was hired, and…

  17. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  18. Optical Disc Technology for Information Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumm, Eugenia K.

    1991-01-01

    This summary of the literature on document image processing from 1988-90 focuses on WORM (write once read many) technology and on rewritable (i.e., erasable) optical discs, and excludes CD-ROM. Highlights include vendors and products, standards, comparisons of storage media, software, legal issues, records management, indexing, and computer…

  19. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  20. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  1. Grain size segregation in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thebault, P.; Kral, Q.; Augereau, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Context. In most debris discs, dust grain dynamics is strongly affected by stellar radiation pressure. Because this mechanism is size-dependent, we expect dust grains to be spatially segregated according to their sizes. However, because of the complex interplay between radiation pressure, grain processing by collisions, and dynamical perturbations, this spatial segregation of the particle size distribution (PSD) has proven difficult to investigate and quantify with numerical models. Aims: We propose to thoroughly investigate this problem by using a new-generation code that can handle some of the complex coupling between dynamical and collisional effects. We intend to explore how PSDs behave in both unperturbed discs at rest and in discs pertubed by planetary objects. Methods: We used the DyCoSS code to investigate the coupled effect of collisions, radiation pressure, and dynamical perturbations in systems that have reached a steady-state. We considered two setups: a narrow ring perturbed by an exterior planet, and an extended disc into which a planet is embedded. For both setups we considered an additional unperturbed case without a planet. We also investigated the effect of possible spatial size segregation on disc images at different wavelengths. Results: We find that PSDs are always spatially segregated. The only case for which the PSD follows a standard dn ∝ s-3.5ds law is for an unperturbed narrow ring, but only within the parent-body ring itself. For all other configurations, the size distributions can strongly depart from such power laws and have steep spatial gradients. As an example, the geometrical cross-section of the disc is very rarely dominated by the smallest grains on bound orbits, as it is expected to be in standard PSDs in sq with q ≤ -3. Although the exact profiles and spatial variations of PSDs are a complex function of the set-up that is considered, we are still able to derive some reliable results that will be useful for image or SED

  2. Evolution of gas in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Quentin; Wyatt, Mark; Pringle, Jim

    2015-12-01

    A non negligible quantity of gas has been discovered in an increasing number of debris disc systems. ALMA high sensitivity and high resolution is changing our perception of the gaseous component of debris discs as CO is discovered in systems where it should be rapidly photodissociated. It implies that there is a replenishment mechanism and that the observed gas is secondary. Past missions such as Herschel probed the atomic part of the gas through O I and C II emission lines. Gas science in debris discs is still in its infancy, and these new observations raise a handful of questions concerning the mechanisms to create the gas and about its evolution in the planetary system when it is released. The latter question will be addressed in this talk as a self-consistent gas evolution scenario is proposed and is compared to observations for the peculiar case of β Pictoris.Our model proposes that carbon and oxygen within debris discs are created due to photodissociation of CO which is itself created from the debris disc dust (due to grain-grain collisions or photodesorption). The evolution of the carbon atoms is modelled as viscous spreading, with viscosity parameterised using an α model. The temperature, ionisation fraction and population levels of carbon are followed with a PDR model called Cloudy, which is coupled to the dynamical viscous α model. Only carbon gets ionised due to its lower ionisation potential than oxygen. The carbon gas disc can end up with a high ionisation fraction due to strong FUV radiation field. A high ionisation fraction means that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is very active, so that α is very high. Gas density profiles can be worked out for different input parameters such as the α value, the CO input rate, the location of the input and the incoming radiation field. Observability predictions can be made for future observations, and our model is tested on β Pictoris observations. This new gas evolution model fits the carbon and CO

  3. Scaling from discs to pleated devices.

    PubMed

    Giglia, Sal; Yavorsky, David

    2007-01-01

    Membrane discs offer a convenient format for evaluating membrane performance in normal flow filtration. However, while pleated devices of different sizes tend to scale in close proportion to their contained areas, they do not necessarily scale in direct proportion from flat discs. The objectives of this study are to quantify differences in performance among sterilizing-grade membrane devices as a function of device type and size, to develop an understanding of the factors that affect device scalability, and to develop a mathematical model to predict a cartridge-to-disc scalability factor based on membrane properties and porous support properties and dimensions. Measured and predicted normalized water permeability scalability factors for seven types of pleated cartridges, including 0.1-micro and 0.2-micro rated PES, and 0.2-micro rated polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sterilizing-grade filters in nominal 1-inch to 5-inch lengths, were determined. The results of this study indicate that pleated cartridge performance can be closely predicted based on 47-mm disc performance provided that a number of measured device parameters are properly accounted for, most importantly parasitic pressure losses in the filter device and plumbing connections, intrinsic membrane variability, true effective device filtration area, and the hydraulic properties of all porous support materials. Throughput scalability factors (discs to devices) tend to converge towards unity, especially for highly plugging streams. As the membrane fouls, the resistance through the membrane dominates other resistances, so the flux scales more linearly with membrane area and the overall scaling factor becomes close to one. The results of throughput tests on seven different cartridge types and five different challenge streams (with widely varying fouling characteristics) show that most of the throughput scaling factors were within +/-10% of 1.0. As part of this study, the effects of pressure and temperature were

  4. Influence of blade profile of disc cutter on numerical simulation of the disc slitting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, J.; Lu, J. B.; Yan, Q. S.; Li, S.

    2015-03-01

    The disc slitting machining experiments for electrical steel sheet were conducted to investigate the wear process of carbide alloy disc cutter and the slitting quality in the disc slitting process, and the blade contour shape of disc cutter in different slitting distance was measured by the surface profiler. A DEFORM-2D model, where the real blade profile or arc fitting profile was used as the blade contour of the cutter, was built to simulate the disc slitting process. Results show that the blade wear of disc cutter increases. The blade wear presents uneven in the side surface and cylindrical surface of the cutter, and the side wear is more serious with the increase of the slitting distance of electrical steel sheet. As the blade wear increases, the height of the rollover increases gradually, the height of the shear area increases at first and then decreases, but the height of the fracture area decreases at first and then increases. Compared with the arc fitting profile, the simulation surface morphology using the real blade profile is in good agreement with the experimental result. The variation of blade profile can change the distribution of the hydrostatic stress of sheet metal and the occurring and propagating of the crack, and the maximum hydrostatic stress can be used to estimate the change tendency of the fracture area.

  5. Enhancement of Overgrowth by Gene Interactions in Lethal(2)giant Discs Imaginal Discs from Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Buratovich, M. A.; Bryant, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Recessive lethal mutations of the lethal(2)giant discs (l(2)gd) and lethal(2)fat (l(2)ft) loci of Drosophila melanogaster cause imaginal disc hyperplasia during a prolonged larval stage. Imaginal discs from l(2)ft l(2)gd or Gl(2)gd double homozygotes show more extensive overgrowth than in either single homozygote, and double homozygous l(2)ft l(2)gd mitotic clones in adult flies show much more overgrowth than is seen in clones homozygous for either l(2)gd or l(2)ft alone. dachsous (ds) also acts as an enhancer of l(2)gd, producing dramatically overgrown discs and causing failure to pupariate in double homozygotes. The comb gap (cg) mutation, which also interacts with ds, greatly enhances the tendency of imaginal discs from l(2)gd larvae to duplicate as they overgrow. If l(2)gd homozygotes are made heterozygous for l(2)ft, then several discs duplicate, indicating that l(2)ft acts as a dominant enhancer of l(2)gd. l(2)ft also acts as a dominant enhancer of l(2)gd, and conversely l(2)gd acts as a dominant modifier of l(2)ft. The enhancement of overgrowth caused by various mutant combinations is accompanied by changes in expression of Decapentaplegic and Wingless. These results show that tumor suppressor genes act in combination to control cell proliferation, and that tissue hyperplasia can be associated with ectopic expression of genes involved in pattern formation. PMID:9335602

  6. Role of Cytokines in Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Pain and Disc-content

    PubMed Central

    Risbud, Makarand V.; Shapiro, Irving. M

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc is the major contributor to back/neck and radicular pain. It is characterized by an elevation in levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1 α/β, IL-6 and IL-17 secreted by the disc cells themselves; these cytokines promote matrix degradation, chemokine production and changes in cell phenotype. The resulting imbalance between catabolic and anabolic responses leads to degeneration, as well as herniation and radicular pain. Release of chemokines from degenerating discs promote infiltration and activation of T and B cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and mast cells further amplifying the inflammatory cascade. Immunocyte migration into the disc is accompanied by the appearance of microvasculature and nerve fibers arising from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). In this inflammatory milieu, neurogenic factors in particular nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF) generated by disc and immune cells induce expression of pain associated cation channels in DRGs. Depolarization of these channels is likely to promote discogenic and radicular pain and reinforce the cytokine-mediated degenerative cascade. Taken together, the enhanced understanding of the contribution of cytokines and immune cells to catabolic and nociceptive processes provide new targets for treating symptomatic disc disease. PMID:24166242

  7. SURFACE TEMPERATURE OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS PROBED BY ANNEALING EXPERIMENTS REFLECTING SPITZER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Gillot, Jessy; Leroux, Hugues; Capet, Frederic; Roussel, Pascal

    2009-12-20

    Pyroxenes and olivines are the dominant crystalline silicates observed in protoplanetary disks. Recent spectral observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope indicate that the abundance of olivine, generally associated with silica polymorphs, relative to pyroxene is higher in the outer cold part of the disk than in the inner warmer part. The interpretation of these unexpected results requires a comprehensive knowledge of the thermal processing of Mg-rich silicate dust. In this respect, amorphous analogs were thermally annealed to identify microscopic crystallization mechanisms. We show that pyroxenes are not produced in significant proportions below the glass transition temperature of the amorphous precursor. The annealing of amorphous enstatite leads to a mineralogical assemblage dominated by forsterite, with only minute amounts of pyroxenes at temperatures as high as the glass transition temperature of enstatite (1050 K). The decoupling of cation mobility in amorphous silicates, favors the crystallization of the most Mg-enriched silicates. These results are consistent with Spitzer observations of silicate dust and also with the documented mineralogy of presolar silicates, making the low-temperature annealing a likely formation process for these objects. Based on these laboratory experiments and Spitzer observations, it appears that the reported zoned mineralogy may directly records and calibrates the thermal gradient at the scale of protoplanetary disks.

  8. A New Model for Water Vapor/Ice Abundance in a Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2006-01-01

    Water is a unique substance in the protoplanetary nebula since both solid and gaseous phases coexist in large quantities. Quantitative estimates of their relative abundances are important parameters regarding the physical state of the nebula and planet formation processes. This new model is based on computing the chemical evolution of water molecules until its partial pressure is sufficient to pierce the vapor pressure curve for water. The point at which this occurs relative to its steady state values determines final gas/ice ratios. The wide range of temperatures and densities in typical protoplanetary disks result in a range of gadice ratios. It is found that although ice dominates the mid and far nebula, water vapor is predominant in the centerplane region of the near nebula and above the disk photosphere. An interesting near nebula effect is the appearance of a cloud of water ice at the temperature inversion elevation surrounded by vapor above and below. This work is partially supported by the NASA Astrobiology Institute.

  9. Efficiency of particle trapping in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2014-03-20

    We investigate the strength of axisymmetric local pressure maxima (zonal flows) in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks, where ambipolar diffusion reduces turbulent stresses driven by the magnetorotational instability. Using local numerical simulations we show that in the absence of net vertical magnetic fields, the strength of turbulence in the ambipolar dominated region of the disk is low and any zonal flows that are present are weak. For net fields strong enough to yield observed protostellar accretion rates, however, zonal flows with a density amplitude of 10%-20% are formed. These strengths are comparable to those seen in simulations of ideal MHD disk turbulence. We investigate whether these zonal flows are able to reverse the inward radial drift of solids, leading to prolonged and enhanced concentration as a prelude to planetesimal formation. For commonly assumed mean surface density profiles (surface density Σ∝r {sup –1/2} or steeper) we find that the predicted perturbations to the background disk profile do not correspond to local pressure maxima. This is a consequence of radial width of the simulated zonal flows, which is larger than was assumed in prior analytic models of particle trapping. These larger scale flows would only trap particles for higher amplitude fluctuations than observed. We conclude that zonal flows are likely to be present in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks and are potentially large enough to be observable, but are unlikely to lead to strong particle trapping.

  10. Measuring the Relative Contributions of Viscous Accretion and Photoevaporation to the Dispersal of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M. N.; Pascucci, I.; Rigliaco, E.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.

    2014-03-01

    Models of protoplanetary disk evolution suggest that photoevaporation driven by the central star and viscous evolution via gas accretion onto the star are the main mechanisms that drive disk dispersal. Viscous evolution has the ability to smoothly decrease the disk surface density, but photoevaporation can drastically change it by creating gaps in planet-forming regions that widen quickly over time. This quick gas dispersal can stop the migration of giant planets whose location affects the final delivery of volatiles (including water) to terrestrial planets. We selected a sample of twenty protoplanetary disks around T. Tauri stars in the Taurus region spanning all three main disk evolutionary stages, with a range of mass accretion rates. For this sample we have acquired high-resolution optical spectra with Keck/HIRES covering gas lines that trace both accretion and photoevaporation. We will present an analysis of the forbidden OI, SII, and NII lines and provide empirically determined mass loss rates as a function of disk evolutionary stage and mass accretion rate. This will enhance our understanding of the disk stage at which photoevaporation starts to dominate over viscous accretion.

  11. Diagnosing the Structure of the HD 163296 Protoplanetary Disk Via Coronagraphic Imaging Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Clampin, M.; Grady, C. A.; Sitko, M. L.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Fukagawa, M.; Hines, D. C.; Katoh, E.; Whitney, B. A.

    2008-01-01

    Coronagraphic imaging polarimetry is a high contrast imaging technique which can diagnose both the spatial distribution and size distribution of dust grains which comprise primordial protoplanetary disks. It can therefore be a useful tool to test our understanding of how the structure of young disks evolves through the era of gas giant planet formation. We report our initial analysis of the H-band polarized and total intensity of the nearby Herbig Ae star HD 163296, and characterize the morphology of the scattered light disk in the context of previous optical HST coronagraphic imagery. Our observations were obtained as part of a multi-epoch campaign designed to diagnose and correlate the behavior of the inner and outer regions of select protoplanetary disks. This campaign will help test recent suggestions (Sitko et al. 2008; Wisniewski et al. 2008) that that HD 163296 dis experiences the novel phenomenon of time-variable self-shadowing, whereby occasional changes in the scale height of the inner disk wall induces changes in the illumination of the outer disk.

  12. Shielding by water and OH in FUV and X-ray irradiated protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Ádámkovics, Máté; Glassgold, Alfred E.; Najita, Joan R. E-mail: aglassgold@berkeley.edu

    2014-05-10

    We present an integrated thermal-chemical model for the atmosphere of the inner region of a protoplanetary disk that includes irradiation by both far-ultraviolet (FUV) and X-ray radiation. We focus on how the photodissociation of H{sub 2}O and OH affects the abundances of these and related species and how it contributes to the heating of the atmosphere. The dust in the atmosphere plays several important roles, primarily as the site of H{sub 2} formation and by absorbing the FUV. Large amounts of water can be synthesized within the inner 4 AU of a disk around a typical classical T Tauri star. OH is found primarily at the top of a warm region where the gas temperature is T {sub g} ≈ 650-1000 K and H{sub 2}O is found below it, where the temperature is lower, T {sub g} ≈ 250-650 K. The amounts of H{sub 2}O and OH and the temperatures of the regions in which they formed are in agreement with recent Spitzer measurements and support the notion of the in situ production of water in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We find that the synthesized water is effective in shielding the disk mid-plane from stellar FUV radiation.

  13. Size-Selective Concentration of Chondrules and Other Small Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hogan, Robert C.; Paque, Julie M.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Size-selective concentration of particles in a weakly turbulent protoplanetary nebula may be responsible for the initial collection of chondrules and other constituents into primitive bodY precursors. This paper presents the main elements of this process of turbulent concentration. In the terrestrial planet region. both the characteristic size and size distribution of chondrules are explained. "Fluffier" particles would be concentrated in nebula regions which were at a lower density and/or more intensely turbulent. The spatial distribution of concentrated particle density obeys multifractal scaling, suggesting a close tie to the turbulent cascade process. This scaling behavior allows predictions of the probability distributions for concentration in the protoplanetary nebula to be made. Large concentration factors (less than 10(exp 5)) are readily obtained, implying that numerous zones of particle density significantly exceeding the gas density could exist. If most of the available solids were actually in chondrule sized particles, the ensuing particle mass density would become so large that the feedback effects on gas turbulence due to mass loading could no longer be neglected. This paper describes the process, presenting its basic elements and some implications, without including the effects of mass loading.

  14. From Dust Grains to Planetesimals: The Importance of the Streaming Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Youdin, Andrew N.; Li, Rixin

    2016-01-01

    Planetesimals are the precursors to planets, and understanding their formation is an essential step towards developing a complete theory of planet formation. For small solid particles (e.g., dust grains) to coagulate into planetesimals, however, requires that these particles grow beyond centimeter sizes; with traditional coagulation physics, this is very difficult. The streaming instability, which is a clumping process akin to the pile-up of cars in a traffic jam, generates sufficiently high solid densities that the mutual gravity between the clumped particles eventually causes their collapse towards planetesimal mass and size scales. Exploring this transition from dust grains to planetesimals is still in its infancy but is extremely important if we want to understand the basics of planet formation. Here, I present a series of high resolution, first principles numerical simulations of protoplanetary disk gas and dust to study the clumping of particles via the streaming instability and the subsequent collapse towards planetesimals. These simulations have been employed to characterize the planetesimal population as a function of radius in protoplanetary disks. The results of these simulations will be crucial for planet formation models to correctly explain the formation and configuration of solar systems.

  15. No Evidence for Protoplanetary Disk Destruction By OBS Stars in the MYStIX Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richert, Alexander J. W.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Kuhn, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Hubble Space Telescope images of proplyds in the Orion Nebula, as well as submillimeter/radio measurements, show that the dominant O7 star {θ }1Ori C photoevaporates nearby disks around pre-main-sequence stars. Theory predicts that massive stars photoevaporate disks within distances of the order of 0.1 pc. These findings suggest that young, OB-dominated massive H ii regions are inhospitable to the survival of protoplanetary disks and, subsequently, to the formation and evolution of planets. In the current work, we test this hypothesis using large samples of pre-main-sequence stars in 20 massive star-forming regions selected with X-ray and infrared photometry in the MYStIX survey. Complete disk destruction would lead to a deficit of cluster members with an excess in JHKS and Spitzer/IRAC bands in the vicinity of O stars. In four MYStIX regions containing O stars and a sufficient surface density of disk-bearing sources to reliably test for spatial avoidance, we find no evidence for the depletion of inner disks around pre-main-sequence stars in the vicinity of O-type stars, even very luminous O2-O5 stars. These results suggest that massive star-forming regions are not very hostile to the survival of protoplanetary disks and, presumably, to the formation of planets.

  16. Electron Heating in Magnetorotational Instability: Implications for Turbulence Strength in the Outer Regions of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shoji; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives vigorous turbulence in a region of protoplanetary disks where the ionization fraction is sufficiently high. It has recently been shown that the electric field induced by the MRI can heat up electrons and thereby affect the ionization balance in the gas. In particular, in a disk where abundant dust grains are present, the electron heating causes a reduction of the electron abundance, thereby preventing further growth of the MRI. By using the nonlinear Ohm's law that takes into account electron heating, we investigate where in protoplanetary disks this negative feedback between the MRI and ionization chemistry becomes important. We find that the “e-heating zone,” the region where the electron heating limits the saturation of the MRI, extends out up to 80 AU in the minimum-mass solar nebula with abundant submicron-sized grains. This region is considerably larger than the conventional dead zone whose radial extent is ∼20 AU in the same disk model. Scaling arguments show that the MRI turbulence in the e-heating zone should have a significantly lower saturation level. Submicron-sized grains in the e-heating zone are so negatively charged that their collisional growth is unlikely to occur. Our present model neglects ambipolar and Hall diffusion, but our estimate shows that ambipolar diffusion would also affect the MRI in the e-heating zone.

  17. DEAD ZONES AS THERMAL BARRIERS TO RAPID PLANETARY MIGRATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2010-02-20

    Planetary migration in standard models of gaseous protoplanetary disks is known to be very rapid ({approx}10{sup 5} years), jeopardizing the existence of planetary systems. We present a new mechanism for significantly slowing rapid planetary migration, discovered by means of radiative transfer calculations of the thermal structure of protoplanetary disks irradiated by their central stars. Rapid dust settling in a disk's dead zone-a region with very little turbulence-leaves a dusty wall at its outer edge. We show that the back-heating of the dead zone by this irradiated wall produces a positive gradient of the disk temperature, which acts as a thermal barrier to planetary migration which persists for the disk lifetime. Although we analyze in detail the migration of a super-Earth in a low-mass disk around an M star, our findings can apply to a wide variety of young planetary systems. We compare our findings with other potentially important stopping mechanisms and show that there are large parameter spaces for which dead zones are likely to play the most important role for reproducing the observed mass-period relation in longer planetary periods.

  18. Low-Mass Star Formation: From Molecular Cloud Cores to Protostars and Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inutsuka, S.-I.; Machida, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Iwasaki, K.

    2016-05-01

    This review describes realistic evolution of magnetic field and rotation of the protostars, dynamics of outflows and jets, and the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks. Recent advances in the protostellar collapse simulations cover a huge dynamic range from molecular cloud core density to stellar density in a self-consistent manner and account for all the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects, such as Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall current. We explain the emergence of the first core, i.e., the quasi-hydrostatic object that consists of molecular gas, and the second core, i.e., the protostar. Ohmic dissipation largely removes the magnetic flux from the center of a collapsing cloud core. A fast well-collimated bipolar jet along the rotation axis of the protostar is driven after the magnetic field is re-coupled with warm gas (˜103 K) around the protostar. The circumstellar disk is born in the "dead zone", a region that is de-coupled from the magnetic field, and the outer radius of the disk increases with that of the dead zone during the early accretion phase. The rapid increase of the disk size occurs after the depletion of the envelope of molecular cloud core. The effect of Hall current may create two distinct populations of protoplanetary disks.

  19. PHOTOELECTRIC CROSS-SECTIONS OF GAS AND DUST IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Bethell, T. J.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2011-10-10

    We provide simple polynomial fits to the X-ray photoelectric cross-sections (0.03 keV < E < 10 keV) for mixtures of gas and dust found in protoplanetary disks. Using the solar elemental abundances of Asplund et al., we treat the gas and dust components separately, facilitating the further exploration of evolutionary processes such as grain settling and gain growth. We find that blanketing due to advanced grain growth (a{sub max} > 1 {mu}m) can reduce the X-ray opacity of dust appreciably at E{sub X} {approx} 1 keV, coincident with the peak of typical T Tauri X-ray spectra. However, the reduction of dust opacity by dust settling, which is known to occur in protoplanetary disks, is probably a more significant effect. The absorption of 1-10 keV X-rays is dominated by gas opacity once the dust abundance has been reduced to about 1% of its diffuse interstellar value. The gas disk establishes a floor to the opacity at which point X-ray transport becomes insensitive to further dust evolution. Our choice of fitting function follows that of Morrison and McCammon, providing a degree of backward compatibility.

  20. Utilitarian Opacity Model for Aggregate Particles in Protoplanetary Nebulae and Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Estrada, Paul R.; Davis, Sanford S.

    2014-02-01

    As small solid grains grow into larger ones in protoplanetary nebulae, or in the cloudy atmospheres of exoplanets, they generally form porous aggregates rather than solid spheres. A number of previous studies have used highly sophisticated schemes to calculate opacity models for irregular, porous particles with sizes much smaller than a wavelength. However, mere growth itself can affect the opacity of the medium in far more significant ways than the detailed compositional and/or structural differences between grain constituents once aggregate particle sizes exceed the relevant wavelengths. This physics is not new; our goal here is to provide a model that provides physical insight and is simple to use in the increasing number of protoplanetary nebula evolution and exoplanet atmosphere models appearing in recent years, yet quantitatively captures the main radiative properties of mixtures of particles of arbitrary size, porosity, and composition. The model is a simple combination of effective medium theory with small-particle closed-form expressions, combined with suitably chosen transitions to geometric optics behavior. Calculations of wavelength-dependent emission and Rosseland mean opacity are shown and compared with Mie theory. The model's fidelity is very good in all comparisons we have made except in cases involving pure metal particles or monochromatic opacities for solid particles with sizes comparable to the wavelength.

  1. THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND THE M4 STAR RECX 5: WITNESSING THE INFLUENCE OF PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwman, J.; Juhasz, A.; Henning, Th.; Lawson, W. A.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Feigelson, E. D.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2010-11-10

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope low-resolution spectroscopy of the protoplanetary disk around the M4 star RECX 5, a low-mass member of the {approx}8 Myr old {eta} Chamaeleontis star cluster. Two features of the disk around RECX 5 set it apart from other young, low-mass stars with protoplanetary disks: its mineralogy and its disk geometry. Band strengths of the crystalline silicate forsterite are a factor of two higher than that typically observed in T Tauri star disks, indicative of a high forsterite mass fraction. Continuum fluxes of the disk are inconsistent with either a flaring or flattened structure, suggesting a complex disk geometry. Radiative transfer modeling of the spectrum suggests that the disk has a gap at a radius of r = 0.6 AU, and that the disk density at r < 33 AU is a factor of 100 lower than that of a continuous disk. A second disk gap might be centered at r = 24 AU. The RECX 5 disk has properties that are remarkably similar to the disk surrounding the Herbig Be star HD 100546, which is noted for having extreme mineralogy and geometry among Herbig star disks. Similar to a solution proposed for HD 100546, we speculate that the clearance of the RECX 5 disk at r < 33 AU is a consequence of the formation of a Saturn-mass planet, with the planet being responsible for the striking difference in both the spectral energy distribution and chemical composition of the dust around RECX 5.

  2. HST/WFC3 Imaging and Multi-Wavelength Characterization of Edge-On Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Carolina; Duchene, Gaspard; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Menard, Francois; Padgett, Deborah; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pinte, Christophe; Wolff, Schuyler

    2016-06-01

    Edge-on views of protoplanetary disk systems provide a unique observing opportunity to assess the vertical dust structure of the disk, an opportunity that is not possible at any other viewing angle due to projection effects and the acute brightness of the central star. Comparing high-resolution scattered light images of edge-on disks with synthetic images from radiative transfer modeling is a powerful approach to constrain the disk mass, structure and dust content, although analyses based on single-wavelength images lead to ambiguous conclusions. In order to resolve these ambiguities, and to probe the most tenuous regions at high elevation above the disk midplane, it is critical to obtain high-resolution images of such objects at the shortest possible wavelengths, where dust opacity is maximized. In this contribution, we present new WFC3 F475W Hubble Space Telescope images of 6 known edge-on protoplanetary disks. We produced color maps across the visible band to identify and characterize wavelength-dependent properties of these disks. In turn, these allow us to differentiate features that are related to the dust properties (opacity, scattering phase function) from those tracing the physical structure of the disk (in particular its vertical density profile). By probing a diverse set of disks with a uniform approach, we will be able to probe possible signs of evolution in this critical stage of planet formation.

  3. Mass constraint for a planet in a protoplanetary disk from the gap width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Muto, Takayuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Momose, Munetake

    2016-06-01

    A giant planet creates a gap in a protoplanetary disk, which might explain the observed gaps in protoplanetary disks. The width and depth of the gaps depend on the planet mass and disk properties. We have performed two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for various planet masses, disk aspect ratios, and viscosities, to obtain an empirical formula for the gap width. The gap width is proportional to the square root of the planet mass, -3/4 the power of the disk aspect ratio and -1/4 the power of the viscosity. This empirical formula enables us to estimate the mass of a planet embedded in the disk from the width of an observed gap. We have applied the empirical formula for the gap width to the disk around HL Tau, assuming that each gap observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations is produced by planets, and discussed the planet masses within the gaps. The estimate of planet masses from the gap widths is less affected by the observational resolution and dust filtration than that by the gap depth.

  4. Protoplanetary Disks in the Orion OMC1 Region Imaged with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, J. A.; Bally, J. M.; Ginsburg, A.; Sheehan, P. D.

    2016-07-01

    We present ALMA observations of the Orion Nebula that cover the OMC1 outflow region. Our focus in this paper is on compact emission from protoplanetary disks. We mosaicked a field containing ˜600 near-IR-identified young stars, around which we can search for sub-millimeter emission tracing dusty disks. Approximately 100 sources are known proplyds identified with the Hubble Space Telescope. We detect continuum emission at 1 mm wavelengths toward ˜20% of the proplyd sample, and ˜8% of the larger sample of near-IR objects. The noise in our maps allows 4σ detection of objects brighter than ˜1.5 mJy, corresponding to protoplanetary disk masses larger than 1.5 M J (using standard assumptions about dust opacities and gas-to-dust ratios). None of these disks are detected in contemporaneous CO(2-1) or C18O(2-1) observations, suggesting that the gas-to-dust ratios may be substantially smaller than the canonical value of 100. Furthermore, since dust grains may already be sequestered in large bodies in Orion Nebula cluster (ONC) disks, the inferred masses of disk solids may be underestimated. Our results suggest that the distribution of disk masses in this region is compatible with the detection rate of massive planets around M dwarfs, which are the dominant stellar constituent in the ONC.

  5. DETECTION OF N{sub 2}D{sup +} IN A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jane; Öberg, Karin I.

    2015-08-20

    Observations of deuterium fractionation in the solar system, and in interstellar and circumstellar material, are commonly used to constrain the formation environment of volatiles. Toward protoplanetary disks, this approach has been limited by the small number of detected deuterated molecules, i.e., DCO{sup +} and DCN. Based on ALMA Cycle 2 observations toward the disk around the T Tauri star AS 209, we report the first detection of N{sub 2}D{sup +} (J = 3–2) in a protoplanetary disk. These data are used together with previous Submillimeter Array observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 3–2) to estimate a disk-averaged D/H ratio of 0.3–0.5, an order of magnitude higher than disk-averaged ratios previously derived for DCN/HCN and DCO{sup +}/HCO{sup +} around other young stars. The high fractionation in N{sub 2}H{sup +} is consistent with model predictions. The presence of abundant N{sub 2}D{sup +} toward AS 209 also suggests that N{sub 2}D{sup +} and the N{sub 2}D{sup +}/N{sub 2}H{sup +} ratio can be developed into effective probes of deuterium chemistry, kinematics, and ionization processes outside the CO snow line of disks.

  6. ELECTROSTATIC BARRIER AGAINST DUST GROWTH IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. CLASSIFYING THE EVOLUTION OF SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sakagami, Masa-aki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Takeuchi, Taku

    2011-04-20

    Collisional growth of submicron-sized dust grains into macroscopic aggregates is the first step of planet formation in protoplanetary disks. These grains are expected to carry nonzero negative charges in the weakly ionized disks, but its effect on their collisional growth has not been fully understood so far. In this paper, we investigate how the charging affects the evolution of the dust size distribution properly taking into account the charging mechanism in a weakly ionized gas as well as porosity evolution through low-energy collisions. To clarify the role of the size distribution, we divide our analysis into two steps. First, we analyze the collisional growth of charged aggregates assuming a monodisperse (i.e., narrow) size distribution. We show that the monodisperse growth stalls due to the electrostatic repulsion when a certain condition is met, as was already expected in our previous work. Second, we numerically simulate dust coagulation using Smoluchowski's method to see how the outcome changes when the size distribution is allowed to freely evolve. We find that, under certain conditions, the dust undergoes bimodal growth where only a limited number of aggregates continue to grow, carrying a major part of the dust mass in the system. This occurs because remaining small aggregates efficiently sweep up free electrons to prevent the larger aggregates from being strongly charged. We obtain a set of simple criteria that allows us to predict how the size distribution evolves for a given condition. In Paper II, we apply these criteria to dust growth in protoplanetary disks.

  7. LIDT-DD: A new self-consistent debris disc model that includes radiation pressure and couples dynamical and collisional evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Q.; Thébault, P.; Charnoz, S.

    2013-10-01

    Context. In most current debris disc models, the dynamical and the collisional evolutions are studied separately with N-body and statistical codes, respectively, because of stringent computational constraints. In particular, incorporating collisional effects (especially destructive collisions) into an N-body scheme has proven a very arduous task because of the exponential increase of particles it would imply. Aims: We present here LIDT-DD, the first code able to mix both approaches in a fully self-consistent way. Our aim is for it to be generic enough to be applied to any astrophysical case where we expect dynamics and collisions to be deeply interlocked with one another: planets in discs, violent massive breakups, destabilized planetesimal belts, bright exozodiacal discs, etc. Methods: The code takes its basic architecture from the LIDT3D algorithm for protoplanetary discs, but has been strongly modified and updated to handle the very constraining specificities of debris disc physics: high-velocity fragmenting collisions, radiation-pressure affected orbits, absence of gas that never relaxes initial conditions, etc. It has a 3D Lagrangian-Eulerian structure, where grains of a given size at a given location in a disc are grouped into super-particles or tracers whose orbits are evolved with an N-body code and whose mutual collisions are individually tracked and treated using a particle-in-a-box prescription designed to handle fragmenting impacts. To cope with the wide range of possible dynamics for same-sized particles at any given location in the disc, and in order not to lose important dynamical information, tracers are sorted and regrouped into dynamical families depending on their orbits. A complex reassignment routine that searches for redundant tracers in each family and reassignes them where they are needed, prevents the number of tracers from diverging. Results: The LIDT-DD code has been successfully tested on simplified cases for which robust results have

  8. Tearing up a misaligned accretion disc with a binary companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Suzan; Nixon, Chris; King, Andrew; Price, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. We calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. We run hydrodynamical simulations to check these results, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and generally enhances accretion on to the central object. This applies in many cases of astrophysical accretion, e.g. supermassive black hole binaries and X-ray binaries.

  9. Counterrotating perfect fluid discs as sources of electrovacuum static spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Reyes, Gonzalo; González, Guillermo A.

    2004-11-01

    The interpretation of some electrovacuum spacetimes in terms of counterrotating perfect fluid discs is presented. The interpretation is made by means of an 'inverse problem' approach used to obtain disc sources of known static solutions of the Einstein Maxwell equations. In order to do such an interpretation, a detailed study is presented of the counterrotating model (CRM) for generic electrovacuum static axially symmetric relativistic thin discs with nonzero radial pressure. Four simple families of models of counterrotating charged discs based on Chazy Curzon-type, Zipoy Voorhees-type, Bonnor Sackfield-type and charged and magnetized Darmois electrovacuum metrics are considered, where we obtain some discs with a well-behaved CRM.

  10. Unravelling the Structure of Aspherical Protoplanetary Nebulae I. HST Imaging and OH Maser-Line Observations of Roberts 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, R.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Hekkert, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution wide-band, narrow-band and polarimetric images of the bipolar protoplanetary nebula Roberts 22 with the Wide-Field & Planetary Camera 2 on HST. OH maser-line emission has also been observed using the Australia Telescope Compact Array.

  11. Dipper discs not inclined towards edge-on orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, M.; Gaidos, E.; Williams, J. P.; Kennedy, G.; Wyatt, M. C.; LaCourse, D. M.; Jacobs, T. L.; Mann, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    The so-called dipper stars host circumstellar discs and have optical and infrared light curves that exhibit quasi-periodic or aperiodic dimming events consistent with extinction by transiting dusty structures orbiting in the inner disc. Most of the proposed mechanisms explaining the dips - i.e. occulting disc warps, vortices, and forming planetesimals - assume nearly edge-on viewing geometries. However, our analysis of the three known dippers with publicly available resolved sub-mm data reveals discs with a range of inclinations, most notably the face-on transition disc J1604-2130 (EPIC 204638512). This suggests that nearly edge-on viewing geometries are not a defining characteristic of the dippers and that additional models should be explored. If confirmed by further observations of more dippers, this would point to inner disc processes that regularly produce dusty structures far above the outer disc mid-plane in regions relevant to planet formation.

  12. Optic Disc Hemorrhage Is Related to Various Hemodynamic Findings by Disc Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae Young Lopilly; Jeong, Hyun Jin; Kim, Yoon Hee; Park, Chan Kee

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the hemodynamic characteristics of glaucoma eyes with disc hemorrhage (DH) by disc fluorescein angiography, and its relationship with glaucomatous changes of the optic disc and surrounding retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). Methods This study included 35 glaucoma eyes with DH who were followed up at least 5 years and had DH at presentation. Eyes were classified as eyes with DH at the border of localized RNFL defects and eyes with DH not related to localized RNFL defects. Prevalence of DH and location of the proximal border were recorded from disc photographs. Fluorescein angiography was performed 3 months after detecting the DH. Arm-retina time, arteriovenous transit time, disc filling time, choroidal filling time, and venous filling time were measured as retinal circulation parameters. The presence of disc filling defects and disc leaks were evaluated. Results There were 19 (54.3%) eyes with DH accompanying localized RNFL defects. The arm-retina time was prolonged in eyes with DH not related to RNFL defects (P = 0.044) and the arteriovenous transit time was prolonged in eyes with DH accompanying RNFL defects (P = 0.029). Among eyes with DH accompanying RNFL defects, 11 (57.9%) had vessel filling defects or delayed filling indicating blood flow stasis at the cup margin proximal to where DH occurred. Eyes with DH not related to RNFL defects did not show vessel filling defects or delayed filling. Conclusions and Relevance Eyes with DH related to RNFL defects showed prolonged arteriovenous transit time and had frequent vessel filling defects or delayed filling indicating blood flow stasis and thrombus formation at the site DH occurred. These findings suggest that vascular and hemodynamic changes due to glaucomatous structural changes cause DH in relation to localized RNFL defects. PMID:25879852

  13. The avian intervertebral disc arises from rostral sclerotome and lacks a nucleus pulposus: Implications for evolution of the vertebrate disc

    PubMed Central

    Bruggeman, Bradley J.; Maier, Jennifer A.; Mohiuddin, Yasmin S.; Powers, Rae; Lo, YinTing; Guimarães-Camboa, Nuno; Evans, Sylvia M.; Harfe, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Deterioration of the intervertebral discs is an unfortunate consequence of aging. The intervertebral disc in mammals is composed of three parts: a jelly-like center called the nucleus pulposus, the cartilaginous annulus fibrosus and anterior and posterior endplates that attach the discs to vertebrae. In order to understand the origin of the disc, we have investigated the intervertebral region of chickens. Surprisingly, our comparison of mouse and chicken discs revealed that chicken discs lack nuclei pulposi. In addition, the notochord, which in mice forms nuclei pulposi, was found to persist as a rod-like structure and express Shh throughout chicken embryogenesis. Our fate mapping data indicates that cells originating from the rostral half of each somite are responsible for forming the avian disc while cells in the caudal region of each somite form vertebrae. A histological analysis of mammalian and non-mammalian organisms suggests that nuclei pulposi are only present in mammals. PMID:22354863

  14. New Experiments with Spinning Metallic Discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.

    2003-01-01

    A number of recent advanced theories related to torsion properties of the space-time matrix predict the existence of an interaction between classically spinning objects. Indeed, some experimental data suggest that spinning magnetic bodies discernibly interact with Earth's natural fields. If there are interactions between rotating bodies then nuclear spins could be used for detection. Thus, assuming a spinning body induces a hypothetical torsion field, a sensor based on the giant magnetoresistance effect would detect local changes. Experimentally, spinning a brass wheel shielded from Earth's magnetic field showed no measurable change in signals; with no shielding a Faraday disc phenomenon was observed. Unexpected experimental measurements from the non-axial Faraday disc configuration were recorded and a theoretical model was derived to explain them.

  15. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Martin H.; Mehta, Vivek A.; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  16. Diaphragm paralysis from cervical disc lesions.

    PubMed

    Cloward, R B

    1988-01-01

    An opera singer, who "made her living with her diaphragm", developed a post-traumatic unilateral radiculopathy due to cervical disc lesions, C3 to C6. During one year of severe neck and left arm pain she gradually lost the ability to sing difficult operatic passages which brought an end to her music career. Following a three level anterior cervical decompression and fusion, the neck and arm pain was immediately relieved. One week later her voice and singing ability returned to its full strength and power permitting her to resume her activities as a vocalist. The diagnosis of paresis of the left hemi-diaphragm as part of the cervical disc syndrome was implied by postoperative retrospective inference.

  17. Inflammation in intervertebral disc degeneration and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Molinos, Maria; Almeida, Catarina R.; Caldeira, Joana; Cunha, Carla; Gonçalves, Raquel M.; Barbosa, Mário A.

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the major causes of low back pain, a problem with a heavy economic burden, which has been increasing in prevalence as populations age. Deeper knowledge of the complex spatial and temporal orchestration of cellular interactions and extracellular matrix remodelling is critical to improve current IVD therapies, which have so far proved unsatisfactory. Inflammation has been correlated with degenerative disc disease but its role in discogenic pain and hernia regression remains controversial. The inflammatory response may be involved in the onset of disease, but it is also crucial in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, if properly balanced it may contribute to tissue repair/regeneration as has already been demonstrated in other tissues. In this review, we focus on how inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration by describing observational and in vitro studies as well as in vivo animal models. Finally, we provide an overview of IVD regenerative therapies that target key inflammatory players. PMID:25673296

  18. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin H; Mehta, Vivek A; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation.

  19. [Diagnostics and therapy of spinal disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A; Reith, W

    2014-11-01

    Degenerative processes in a movement segment of the vertebral column, which can potentially give rise to herniation of elements of the nucleus pulposus, are complex and of variable clinical and radiological dimensions; however the mere assumption that degenerative changes precede disc herniation remains a matter of debate. By definition, spinal disc herniation (SDH) refers to components of the gelatinous nucleus pulposus protruding beyond the dorsal level of the vertebral body margin through tears in the annulus fibrosus. Clinical presentation may include pain, paresis and sensory disturbances. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of SDH. In the majority of patients a conservative approach with physical therapy exercises and adequate analgesic and antiphlogistic medical treatment results in a substantial improvement of symptoms. PMID:25398570

  20. Vertical cup/disc ratio in relation to optic disc size: its value in the assessment of the glaucoma suspect

    PubMed Central

    Garway-Heath, D.; Ruben, S.; Viswanathan, A.; Hitchings, R.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—The vertical cup/disc ratio (CDR) has long been used in the assessment of the glaucoma suspect, though the wide range of CDR values in the normal population limits its use. Cup size is related physiologically to disc size and pathologically to glaucomatous damage. Disc size can be measured at the slit lamp as the vertical disc diameter (DD). The ability of the CDR, in relation to DD, to identify glaucomatous optic discs was investigated.
METHODS—88 normal, 53 early glaucoma, and 59 ocular hypertensive subjects underwent stereoscopic optic disc photography and clinical biometry. Photographs were analysed in a masked fashion by computer assisted planimetry. The relation between vertical cup diameter and DD was explored by linear regression, and expressed in terms of CDR. The upper limit of normal was defined by the 95% prediction intervals of this regression (method 1) and by the upper 97.5 percentile for CDR (method 2). The sensitivity and specificity of CDR to identify an optic disc as glaucomatous was tested with these disc size dependent and disc size independent cut offs in small, medium, and large discs.
RESULTS—The CDR was related to DD by the equation CDR = (−1.31 + (1.194 × DD))/DD. The sensitivity in small, medium, and large discs was 80%, 60%, and 38% respectively for method 1 and 33%, 67%, and 63% respectively for method 2. Specificity was 98.9% (method 1) and 97.7% (method 2).
CONCLUSIONS—The CDR, relative to disc size, is useful clinically, especially to assist in identifying small glaucomatous discs.

 Keywords: cup/disc ratio; glaucoma; imaging PMID:9924296

  1. ALMA Survey of Lupus Protoplanetary Disks. I. Dust and Gas Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, M.; Williams, J. P.; van der Marel, N.; Carpenter, J. M.; Guidi, G.; Hogerheijde, M.; Mathews, G. S.; Manara, C. F.; Miotello, A.; Natta, A.; Oliveira, I.; Tazzari, M.; Testi, L.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; van Terwisga, S. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first high-resolution sub-millimeter survey of both dust and gas for a large population of protoplanetary disks. Characterizing fundamental properties of protoplanetary disks on a statistical level is critical to understanding how disks evolve into the diverse exoplanet population. We use the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) to survey 89 protoplanetary disks around stars with {M}* \\gt 0.1 {M}ȯ in the young (1–3 Myr), nearby (150–200 pc) Lupus complex. Our observations cover the 890 μm continuum and the 13CO and C18O 3–2 lines. We use the sub-millimeter continuum to constrain {M}{{dust}} to a few Martian masses (0.2–0.4 M ⊕) and the CO isotopologue lines to constrain {M}{{gas}} to roughly a Jupiter mass (assuming an interstellar medium (ISM)-like [{CO}]/[{{{H}}}2] abundance). Of 89 sources, we detect 62 in continuum, 36 in 13CO, and 11 in C18O at \\gt 3σ significance. Stacking individually undetected sources limits their average dust mass to ≲ 6 Lunar masses (0.03 M ⊕), indicating rapid evolution once disk clearing begins. We find a positive correlation between {M}{{dust}} and M *, and present the first evidence for a positive correlation between {M}{{gas}} and M *, which may explain the dependence of giant planet frequency on host star mass. The mean dust mass in Lupus is 3× higher than in Upper Sco, while the dust mass distributions in Lupus and Taurus are statistically indistinguishable. Most detected disks have {M}{{gas}}≲ 1 {M}{{Jup}} and gas-to-dust ratios \\lt 100, assuming an ISM-like [{CO}]/[{{{H}}}2] abundance; unless CO is very depleted, the inferred gas depletion indicates that planet formation is well underway by a few Myr and may explain the unexpected prevalence of super-Earths in the exoplanet population.

  2. ALMA Survey of Lupus Protoplanetary Disks. I. Dust and Gas Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, M.; Williams, J. P.; van der Marel, N.; Carpenter, J. M.; Guidi, G.; Hogerheijde, M.; Mathews, G. S.; Manara, C. F.; Miotello, A.; Natta, A.; Oliveira, I.; Tazzari, M.; Testi, L.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; van Terwisga, S. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first high-resolution sub-millimeter survey of both dust and gas for a large population of protoplanetary disks. Characterizing fundamental properties of protoplanetary disks on a statistical level is critical to understanding how disks evolve into the diverse exoplanet population. We use the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) to survey 89 protoplanetary disks around stars with {M}* \\gt 0.1 {M}⊙ in the young (1-3 Myr), nearby (150-200 pc) Lupus complex. Our observations cover the 890 μm continuum and the 13CO and C18O 3-2 lines. We use the sub-millimeter continuum to constrain {M}{{dust}} to a few Martian masses (0.2-0.4 M ⊕) and the CO isotopologue lines to constrain {M}{{gas}} to roughly a Jupiter mass (assuming an interstellar medium (ISM)-like [{CO}]/[{{{H}}}2] abundance). Of 89 sources, we detect 62 in continuum, 36 in 13CO, and 11 in C18O at \\gt 3σ significance. Stacking individually undetected sources limits their average dust mass to ≲ 6 Lunar masses (0.03 M ⊕), indicating rapid evolution once disk clearing begins. We find a positive correlation between {M}{{dust}} and M *, and present the first evidence for a positive correlation between {M}{{gas}} and M *, which may explain the dependence of giant planet frequency on host star mass. The mean dust mass in Lupus is 3× higher than in Upper Sco, while the dust mass distributions in Lupus and Taurus are statistically indistinguishable. Most detected disks have {M}{{gas}}≲ 1 {M}{{Jup}} and gas-to-dust ratios \\lt 100, assuming an ISM-like [{CO}]/[{{{H}}}2] abundance; unless CO is very depleted, the inferred gas depletion indicates that planet formation is well underway by a few Myr and may explain the unexpected prevalence of super-Earths in the exoplanet population.

  3. The Astral Curved Disc of Chevroches (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devevey, F. Rousseau, A.

    2009-08-01

    The excavation of the unexplored secondary agglomeration in Chevroches (Nièvre), from 2001 to 2002, directed by F. Devevey (INRAP), has led to the discovery of an astrological bronze curved disc of a type unknown in the ancient world; it is inscribed with three lines in Greek transcribing Egyptian an Roman months, and the twelve signs of the zodiac. This article presents the first observations.

  4. Inner disc obscuration in GRS 1915+105 based on relativistic slim disc model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierdayanti, K.; Sadowski, A.; Mineshige, S.; Bursa, M.

    2013-11-01

    We study the observational signatures of the relativistic slim disc of 10 M⊙ black hole, in a wide range of mass accretion rate, dot{m}, dimensionless spin parameter, a*, and viewing angle, i. In general, the innermost temperature, Tin, increases with the increase of i for a fixed value of dot{m} and a*, due to the Doppler effect. However, for i > 50° and dot{m}>dot{m}_turn, Tin starts to decrease with the increase of dot{m}. This is a result of self-obscuration - the radiation from the innermost hot part of the disc is blocked by the surrounding cooler part. The value of dot{m}_turn and the corresponding luminosities depend on a* and i. Such obscuration effects cause an interesting behaviour on the disc luminosity (Ldisc)-Tin plane for high inclinations. In addition to the standard disc branch which appears below dot{m}_turn and which obeys L_disc ∝ T_in4 relation, another branch above dot{m}_turn, which is nearly horizontal, may be observed at luminosities close to the Eddington luminosity. We show that these features are likely observed in a Galactic X-ray source, GRS 1915+105. We support a high spin parameter (a* > 0.9) for GRS 1915+105 since otherwise the high value of Tin and small size of the emitting region (rin < 1rS) cannot be explained.

  5. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  6. Accretion disc origin of the Earth's water.

    PubMed

    Vattuone, Luca; Smerieri, Marco; Savio, Letizia; Asaduzzaman, Abu Md; Muralidharan, Krishna; Drake, Michael J; Rocca, Mario

    2013-07-13

    Earth's water is conventionally believed to be delivered by comets or wet asteroids after the Earth formed. However, their elemental and isotopic properties are inconsistent with those of the Earth. It was thus proposed that water was introduced by adsorption onto grains in the accretion disc prior to planetary growth, with bonding energies so high as to be stable under high-temperature conditions. Here, we show both by laboratory experiments and numerical simulations that water adsorbs dissociatively on the olivine {100} surface at the temperature (approx. 500-1500 K) and water pressure (approx. 10⁻⁸ bar) expected for the accretion disc, leaving an OH adlayer that is stable at least up to 900 K. This may result in the formation of many Earth oceans, provided that a viable mechanism to produce water from hydroxyl exists. This adsorption process must occur in all disc environments around young stars. The inevitable conclusion is that water should be prevalent on terrestrial planets in the habitable zone around other stars. PMID:23734050

  7. Testing hydrodynamics schemes in galaxy disc simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, C. G.; Dobbs, C.; Pettitt, A.; Konstandin, L.

    2016-08-01

    We examine how three fundamentally different numerical hydrodynamics codes follow the evolution of an isothermal galactic disc with an external spiral potential. We compare an adaptive mesh refinement code (RAMSES), a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHNG), and a volume-discretized mesh-less code (GIZMO). Using standard refinement criteria, we find that RAMSES produces a disc that is less vertically concentrated and does not reach such high densities as the SPHNG or GIZMO runs. The gas surface density in the spiral arms increases at a lower rate for the RAMSES simulations compared to the other codes. There is also a greater degree of substructure in the SPHNG and GIZMO runs and secondary spiral arms are more pronounced. By resolving the Jeans length with a greater number of grid cells, we achieve more similar results to the Lagrangian codes used in this study. Other alterations to the refinement scheme (adding extra levels of refinement and refining based on local density gradients) are less successful in reducing the disparity between RAMSES and SPHNG/GIZMO. Although more similar, SPHNG displays different density distributions and vertical mass profiles to all modes of GIZMO (including the smoothed particle hydrodynamics version). This suggests differences also arise which are not intrinsic to the particular method but rather due to its implementation. The discrepancies between codes (in particular, the densities reached in the spiral arms) could potentially result in differences in the locations and time-scales for gravitational collapse, and therefore impact star formation activity in more complex galaxy disc simulations.

  8. Accretion disc origin of the Earth's water.

    PubMed

    Vattuone, Luca; Smerieri, Marco; Savio, Letizia; Asaduzzaman, Abu Md; Muralidharan, Krishna; Drake, Michael J; Rocca, Mario

    2013-07-13

    Earth's water is conventionally believed to be delivered by comets or wet asteroids after the Earth formed. However, their elemental and isotopic properties are inconsistent with those of the Earth. It was thus proposed that water was introduced by adsorption onto grains in the accretion disc prior to planetary growth, with bonding energies so high as to be stable under high-temperature conditions. Here, we show both by laboratory experiments and numerical simulations that water adsorbs dissociatively on the olivine {100} surface at the temperature (approx. 500-1500 K) and water pressure (approx. 10⁻⁸ bar) expected for the accretion disc, leaving an OH adlayer that is stable at least up to 900 K. This may result in the formation of many Earth oceans, provided that a viable mechanism to produce water from hydroxyl exists. This adsorption process must occur in all disc environments around young stars. The inevitable conclusion is that water should be prevalent on terrestrial planets in the habitable zone around other stars.

  9. Basics of videodisc and optical disc technology

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, J.

    1983-11-01

    The optical videodisc is now being used for archival storage of photographs and for records management. The spacedisc project, co-sponsored by nasa and drew university's center for aerospace education, is a prime example of using a videodisc to store individual photographs, slides, and motion sequences with an accompanying paper index. These discs are also used in schools in an interactive individualized learning carrel under microcomputer control. Museums also are using discs as complements to exhibits as well as in cataloging and in classification, information storage and retrieval systems. Ongoing imaginative applications of the optical videodisc include surrogate travel, job performance aids, simulators, electronic malls, and travelogues. Eventually, one will see the videodisc and computer technology with artificial intelligence programs used by the medical community and others. Optical disc and videodisc technology have opened up new horizons for information processing, storage and retrieval, education and training. Regardless of whether a mass consumer market materializes, optical recording technology will play a major role in the future design and development of information systems in the late 1980s and beyond.

  10. Gradient composite materials for artificial intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Migacz, Katarzyna; Chłopek, Jan; Morawska-Chochół, Anna; Ambroziak, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Composites with the gradient of Young's modulus constitute a new group of biomimetic materials which affect the proper distribution of stresses between the implant and the bone. The aim of this article was to examine the mechanical properties of gradient materials based on carbon fibre-polysulfone composite, and to compare them to the properties of a natural intervertebral disc. Gradient properties were provided by different orientation or volume fraction of carbon fibres in particular layers of composites. The results obtained during in vitro tests displayed a good durability of the gradient materials put under long-term static load. However, the configuration based on a change in the volume fraction of the fibres seems more advantageous than the one based on a change of the fibres' orientation. The materials under study were designed to replace the intervertebral disc. The effect of Young's modulus of the material layers on the stress distribution between the tissue and the implant was analyzed and the biomimetic character of the gradient composites was stated. Unlike gradient materials, the pure polysulfone and the non-gradient composite resulted in the stress concentration in the region of nucleus pulposus, which is highly disadvantageous and does not occur in the stress distribution of natural intervertebral discs.

  11. Deterioration of Mechanical Properties of Discs in Chronically Inflamed TMJ

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.D.; Cui, S.J.; Liu, Y.; Luo, Q.; Du, R.J.; Kou, X.X.; Zhang, J.N.; Zhou, Y.H.; Gan, Y.H.

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs frequently undergo degenerative changes in arthritis. However, the biomechanical properties of pathogenic discs remain to be explored. In this study, we evaluated the effects of chronic inflammation on the biomechanical properties of TMJ discs in rats. Chronic inflammation of TMJs was induced by double intra-articular injections of complete Freund’s adjuvant for 5 weeks, and biomechanical properties and ultrastructure of the discs were examined by mechanical testing, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The instantaneous compressive moduli of the anterior and posterior bands of discs in inflamed TMJs were decreased significantly compared with those in the control group. The instantaneous tensile moduli of the discs of inflamed TMJs also showed significant decreases in both the anterior-posterior and mesial-lateral directions. The relaxation moduli of the discs of inflamed TMJs showed nearly the same tendency as the instantaneous moduli. The surfaces of the discs of inflamed TMJs became rough and porous due to the loss of the superficial gel-like stratum, with many collagen fibers exposed and degradation of the sub-superficial collagen fibrils. Our results suggested that chronic inflammation of TMJ could lead to deterioration of mechanical properties and alteration of disc ultrastructure, which might contribute to TMJ disc displacement. PMID:25266714

  12. Be discs in binary systems - I. Coplanar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoglou, Despina; Carciofi, Alex C.; Vieira, Rodrigo G.; Cyr, Isabelle H.; Jones, Carol E.; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Rivinius, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Be stars are surrounded by outflowing circumstellar matter structured in the form of decretion discs. They are often members of binary systems, where it is expected that the decretion disc interacts both radiatively and gravitationally with the companion. In this work we study how various orbital (period, mass ratio and eccentricity) and disc (viscosity) parameters affect the disc structure in coplanar binaries. The main effects of the secondary on the disc are its truncation and the accumulation of material inwards of truncation. We find two limiting cases with respect to the effects of eccentricity: in circular or nearly circular prograde orbits, the disc maintains a rotating, constant in shape, configuration, which is locked to the orbital phase. The disc structure appears smaller in size, more elongated and more massive for small viscosity parameter, small orbital separation and/or high mass ratio. In highly eccentric orbits, the effects are more complex, with the disc structure strongly dependent on the orbital phase. We also studied the effects of binarity in the disc continuum emission. Since the infrared and radio SED are sensitive to the disc size and density slope, the truncation and matter accumulation result in considerable modifications in the emergent spectrum. We conclude that binarity can serve as an explanation for the variability exhibited in observations of Be stars, and that our model can be used to detect invisible companions.

  13. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of Optic Disc Perfusion in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yali; Wei, Eric; Wang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Xinbo; Morrison, John C.; Parikh, Mansi; Lombardi, Lori H.; Gattey, Devin M.; Armour, Rebecca L.; Edmunds, Beth; Kraus, Martin F.; Fujimoto, James G.; Huang, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare optic disc perfusion between normal and glaucoma subjects using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography and detect optic disc perfusion changes in glaucoma. Design Observational, cross-sectional study. Participants Twenty-four normal subjects and 11 glaucoma patients were included. Methods One eye of each subject was scanned by a high-speed 1050 nm wavelength swept-source OCT instrument. The split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm (SSADA) was used to compute three-dimensional optic disc angiography. A disc flow index was computed from four registered scans. Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) was used to measure disc rim area, and stereo photography was used to evaluate cup/disc ratios. Wide field OCT scans over the discs were used to measure retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) thickness. Main Outcome Measurements Variability was assessed by coefficient of variation (CV). Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by sensitivity and specificity. Comparisons between glaucoma and normal groups were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Correlations between disc flow index, structural assessments, and visual field (VF) parameters were assessed by linear regression. Results In normal discs, a dense microvascular network was visible on OCT angiography. This network was visibly attenuated in glaucoma subjects. The intra-visit repeatability, inter-visit reproducibility, and normal population variability of the optic disc flow index were 1.2%, 4.2%, and 5.0% CV respectively. The disc flow index was reduced by 25% in the glaucoma group (p = 0.003). Sensitivity and specificity were both 100% using an optimized cutoff. The flow index was highly correlated with VF pattern standard deviation (R2 = 0.752, p = 0.001). These correlations were significant even after accounting for age, cup/disc area ratio, NFL, and rim area. Conclusions OCT angiography, generated by the new SSADA algorithm, repeatably measures optic disc perfusion. OCT

  14. On the origin of exponential galaxy discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Aaron A.

    2009-06-01

    One of the most important unresolved issues for galaxy formation theory is to understand the origin of exponential galaxy discs. We use a disc galaxy evolution model to investigate whether galaxies with exponential surface brightness profiles can be produced in a cosmologically motivated framework for disc galaxy formation. Our model follows the accretion, cooling and ejection of baryonic mass, as a function of radius, inside growing dark matter haloes. The surface density profile of the disc is determined by detailed angular momentum conservation, starting from the distribution of specific angular momentum as found in cosmological simulations. Exponential and quasi-exponential discs can be produced by our model through a combination of supernova-driven galactic outflows (which preferentially remove low angular momentum material), intrinsic variation in the angular momentum distribution of the halo gas and the inefficiency of star formation at large radii. We use observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) New York University Value Added Catalog (NYU-VAGC) to show that the median Sérsic index of late-type galaxies is a strong function of stellar mass. For blue galaxies, low-mass galaxies have n ~= 1.3, while high-mass galaxies have n ~= 4, with a transition mass of Mstar ~= 2.5 × 1010Msolar. Our model with energy-driven outflows correctly reproduces this trend, whereas our models with momentum-driven outflows and no outflows overpredict the Sérsic indices in low-mass galaxies. We show that the observed fraction of `bulge-less' exponential galaxies is a strong function of stellar mass. For Milky Way mass galaxies (Vrot ~= 220kms-1, Mstar ~= 1011Msolar), less than 0.1 per cent of blue galaxies are bulge-less, whereas for M33 mass galaxies (Vrot ~= 120kms-1, Mstar ~= 1010Msolar) bulge-less and quasi-bulge-less galaxies are more common, with 45 per cent of blue galaxies having the Sérsic index n < 1.5. These results suggest that the difficulty of

  15. Ferromagnetism and Particle Collisions: Applications to Protoplanetary Disks and the Meteoritical Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The meteoritical record shows both iron partitioning and tungsten isotopic partitioning between the matrix and chondrules. Tungsten is not abundant enough to have driven its own isotopic partitioning, but if tungsten were correlated with iron then ferromagnetic interaction grains could help explain both observations. We derive a practical parameterization for the increase in particle–particle collision rates caused by mutually attracting particle magnetic dipole moments. While the appropriate magnetic parameters remain uncertain, we show that ambient magnetic fields in protoplanetary disks are expected to be strong enough to magnetize iron metal bearing dust grains sufficiently to drive large increases in their collision rates. Such increased collision rates between iron-metal-rich grains could help preserve primordial iron and W isotopic inhomogeneities, and would help explain why the meteoritical record shows their partitioning in the solar nebula. The importance of magnetic interactions for larger grains whose growth is balanced by fragmentation is less clear and will require future laboratory or numerical studies.

  16. SHADOWS CAST BY A WARP IN THE HD 142527 PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, S.; Perez, S.; Casassus, S.

    2015-01-10

    Detailed observations of gaps in protoplanetary disks have revealed structures that drive current research on circumstellar disks. One such feature is the two intensity nulls seen along the outer disk of the HD 142527 system, which are particularly well traced in polarized differential imaging. Here we propose that these are shadows cast by the inner disk. The inner and outer disk are thick, in terms of the unit-opacity surface in the H band, so that the shape and orientation of the shadows inform on the three-dimensional structure of the system. Radiative transfer predictions on a parametric disk model allow us to conclude that the relative inclination between the inner and outer disks is 70° ± 5°. This finding taps the potential of high-contrast imaging of circumstellar disks, and bears consequences on the gas dynamics of gapped disks, as well as on the physical conditions in the shadowed regions.

  17. Ferromagnetism and Particle Collisions: Applications to Protoplanetary Disks and the Meteoritical Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The meteoritical record shows both iron partitioning and tungsten isotopic partitioning between the matrix and chondrules. Tungsten is not abundant enough to have driven its own isotopic partitioning, but if tungsten were correlated with iron then ferromagnetic interaction grains could help explain both observations. We derive a practical parameterization for the increase in particle-particle collision rates caused by mutually attracting particle magnetic dipole moments. While the appropriate magnetic parameters remain uncertain, we show that ambient magnetic fields in protoplanetary disks are expected to be strong enough to magnetize iron metal bearing dust grains sufficiently to drive large increases in their collision rates. Such increased collision rates between iron-metal-rich grains could help preserve primordial iron and W isotopic inhomogeneities, and would help explain why the meteoritical record shows their partitioning in the solar nebula. The importance of magnetic interactions for larger grains whose growth is balanced by fragmentation is less clear and will require future laboratory or numerical studies.

  18. Detection of accreting gas toward HD 45677 - A newly recognized, Herbig Be proto-planetary system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Shepherd, D.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.; Perez, M. R.; De Winter, D.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection of high-velocity, accreting gas toward the BE(e) star with IR excess and bipolar nebula, HD 45677. High-velocity (+200 to +400 km/s), variable column density gas is visible in all IUE spectra from 1979 to 1992 in transitions of Si II, C II, Al III, Fe III, Si IV, and C IV. Low-velocity absorption profiles from low oscillator strength transitions of Si II, Fe II, and Zn II exhibit double-peaked absorption profiles similar to those previously reported in optical spectra of FU Orionis objects. The UV absorption data, together with previously reported analyses of the IR excess and polarization of this object, suggest that HD 45677 is a massive, Herbig Be star with an actively accreting circumstellar, protoplanetary disk.

  19. Detection of accreting gas toward HD 45677: A newly recognized, Herbig Be proto-planetary system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Shepherd, D.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.; Perez, M. R.; Dewinter, D.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report detection of high velocity, accreting gas toward the Be star with IR excess and bipolar nebula, HD 45677. High velocity (+200 to +400 km/s), variable column density gas is visible in all IUE spectra from 1979-1992 in transitions of Si II, C II, Al III, Fe III, Si IV, and C IV. Low-velocity absorption profiles from low oscillator-strength transitions of Si II, Fe II, and Zn II exhibit double-peaked absorption profiles similar to those previously reported in optical spectra of FU Orionis objects. The UV absorption data, together with previously reported analyses of the IR excess and polarization of this object, suggest that HD 45677 is a massive, Herbig Be star with an actively accreting circumstellar, proto-planetary disk.

  20. PHOTOPHORESIS IN A DILUTE, OPTICALLY THICK MEDIUM AND DUST MOTION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org

    2015-11-20

    We derive expressions for the photophoretic force on opaque spherical particles in a dilute gas in the optically thick regime where the radiation field is in local thermal equilibrium. Under those conditions, the radiation field has a simple form, leading to well defined analytical approximations for the photophoretic force that also consider both the internal thermal conduction within the particle, and the effects of heat conduction and radiation to the surrounding gas. We derive these results for homogeneous spherical particles; and for the double layered spheres appropriate for modeling solid grains with porous aggregate mantles. Then, as a specific astrophysical application of these general physical results, we explore the parameter space relevant to the photophoresis driven drift of dust in protoplanetary disks. We show that highly porous silicate grains have sufficiently low thermal conductivities that photophoretic effects, such as significant relative velocities between particles with differing porosity or levitation above the midplane, are expected to occur.

  1. Early scattering of the solar protoplanetary disk recorded in meteoritic chondrules

    PubMed Central

    Marrocchi, Yves; Chaussidon, Marc; Piani, Laurette; Libourel, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Meteoritic chondrules are submillimeter spherules representing the major constituent of nondifferentiated planetesimals formed in the solar protoplanetary disk. The link between the dynamics of the disk and the origin of chondrules remains enigmatic. Collisions between planetesimals formed at different heliocentric distances were frequent early in the evolution of the disk. We show that the presence, in some chondrules, of previously unrecognized magnetites of magmatic origin implies the formation of these chondrules under impact-generated oxidizing conditions. The three oxygen isotopes systematic of magmatic magnetites and silicates can only be explained by invoking an impact between silicate-rich and ice-rich planetesimals. This suggests that these peculiar chondrules are by-products of the early mixing in the disk of populations of planetesimals from the inner and outer solar system. PMID:27419237

  2. Photophoresis in a Dilute, Optically Thick Medium and Dust Motion in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We derive expressions for the photophoretic force on opaque spherical particles in a dilute gas in the optically thick regime where the radiation field is in local thermal equilibrium. Under those conditions, the radiation field has a simple form, leading to well defined analytical approximations for the photophoretic force that also consider both the internal thermal conduction within the particle, and the effects of heat conduction and radiation to the surrounding gas. We derive these results for homogeneous spherical particles; and for the double layered spheres appropriate for modeling solid grains with porous aggregate mantles. Then, as a specific astrophysical application of these general physical results, we explore the parameter space relevant to the photophoresis driven drift of dust in protoplanetary disks. We show that highly porous silicate grains have sufficiently low thermal conductivities that photophoretic effects, such as significant relative velocities between particles with differing porosity or levitation above the midplane, are expected to occur.

  3. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE CO SNOW LINE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Livio, Mario

    2014-03-10

    CO is thought to be a vital building block for prebiotic molecules that are necessary for life. Thus, understanding where CO existed in a solid phase within the solar nebula is important for understanding the origin of life. We model the evolution of the CO snow line in a protoplanetary disk. We find that the current observed location of the CO snow line in our solar system, and in the solar system analog TW Hydra, cannot be explained by a fully turbulent disk model. With time-dependent disk models we find that the inclusion of a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) can resolve this problem. Furthermore, we obtain a fully analytic solution for the CO snow line radius for late disk evolutionary times. This will be useful for future observational attempts to characterize the demographics and predict the composition and habitability of exoplanets.

  4. On the Evolution of the CO Snow Line in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Livio, Mario

    2014-03-01

    CO is thought to be a vital building block for prebiotic molecules that are necessary for life. Thus, understanding where CO existed in a solid phase within the solar nebula is important for understanding the origin of life. We model the evolution of the CO snow line in a protoplanetary disk. We find that the current observed location of the CO snow line in our solar system, and in the solar system analog TW Hydra, cannot be explained by a fully turbulent disk model. With time-dependent disk models we find that the inclusion of a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) can resolve this problem. Furthermore, we obtain a fully analytic solution for the CO snow line radius for late disk evolutionary times. This will be useful for future observational attempts to characterize the demographics and predict the composition and habitability of exoplanets.

  5. AN EXAMINATION OF COLLISIONAL GROWTH OF SILICATE DUST IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kadono, Toshihiko; Wada, Koji

    2014-03-10

    N-body simulations of collisions of dust aggregates in protoplanetary disks performed so far have revealed that silicate aggregates suffer from catastrophic disruption if the collision velocities are higher than about 10 m s{sup –1}, which is much lower than those expected in the disks. This is mainly due to the low surface energy of the quartz used in the simulations. We find a simple relation between the surface energy and melting temperature for various materials including those of astrophysical interest, and show that the surface energy of the quartz used in the previous simulations is much lower than the present estimate. This result may provide a way out of the difficulty of growing silicate dust inside the snowline in disks. We show that silicate dust can evade catastrophic disruption and grow even at high-velocity collisions expected in the disks if one takes the present estimate of the surface energy into account.

  6. Soft X-Ray Irradiation of Silicates: Implications for Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Chen, Y.-J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Huang, C.-H.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Venezia, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate films submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted sol-gel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg2SiO4 stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray-irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  7. Early scattering of the solar protoplanetary disk recorded in meteoritic chondrules.

    PubMed

    Marrocchi, Yves; Chaussidon, Marc; Piani, Laurette; Libourel, Guy

    2016-07-01

    Meteoritic chondrules are submillimeter spherules representing the major constituent of nondifferentiated planetesimals formed in the solar protoplanetary disk. The link between the dynamics of the disk and the origin of chondrules remains enigmatic. Collisions between planetesimals formed at different heliocentric distances were frequent early in the evolution of the disk. We show that the presence, in some chondrules, of previously unrecognized magnetites of magmatic origin implies the formation of these chondrules under impact-generated oxidizing conditions. The three oxygen isotopes systematic of magmatic magnetites and silicates can only be explained by invoking an impact between silicate-rich and ice-rich planetesimals. This suggests that these peculiar chondrules are by-products of the early mixing in the disk of populations of planetesimals from the inner and outer solar system.

  8. A Study of Light Variability in a Sample of Proto-planetary Nebula Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seider, Aaron M.; Rotter, H. M.; Bain, A. L.; Hrivnak, B. J.; Lu, W.

    2013-06-01

    We are continuing our long-term observational study of light variability in proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe) and PPN candidates. In this poster, we present preliminary results from a five-year study of a subset of 18 objects. All were observed using the 0.4-m telescope at the Valparaiso University Observatory. We find that they all varied in brightness, by 0.12 to 0.74 mag in V. Periods have been found for 8 out of 18 objects, and they range from 27 to 125 days. These variations are due to the pulsation of the stars. The goal is to find the amplitude and period of the variations, which can be used to investigate the internal structure of the stars. We present the results of this study and show some sample light curves. Funding is acknowledged from the NSF (AST 1009974) and the Indiana Space Grant Consortium.

  9. Development of a Method for the Observation of Lightning in Protoplanetary Disks Using Ion Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranushi, Takayuki; Akiyama, Eiji; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Nomura, Hideko; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose observational methods for detecting lightning in protoplanetary disks. We do so by calculating the critical electric field strength in the lightning matrix gas (LMG), the parts of the disk where the electric field is strong enough to cause lightning. That electric field accelerates multiple positive ion species to characteristic terminal velocities. In this paper, we present three distinct discharge models with corresponding critical electric fields. We simulate the position-velocity diagrams and the integrated emission maps for the models. We calculate the measure-of-sensitivity values for detection of the models and for distinguishing between the models. At the distance of TW Hya (54 pc), LMG that occupies 2π in azimuth and has 25 AU < r < 50 AU is detectable at 1200σ to 4000σ. The lower limits of the radii of 5σ-detectable LMG clumps are between 1.6 AU and 5.3 AU, depending on the models.

  10. Soft X-Ray Irradiation of Silicates: Implications for Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Chen, Y.-J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Huang, C.-H.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Venezia, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate films submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted sol–gel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg2SiO4 stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray-irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  11. Early scattering of the solar protoplanetary disk recorded in meteoritic chondrules.

    PubMed

    Marrocchi, Yves; Chaussidon, Marc; Piani, Laurette; Libourel, Guy

    2016-07-01

    Meteoritic chondrules are submillimeter spherules representing the major constituent of nondifferentiated planetesimals formed in the solar protoplanetary disk. The link between the dynamics of the disk and the origin of chondrules remains enigmatic. Collisions between planetesimals formed at different heliocentric distances were frequent early in the evolution of the disk. We show that the presence, in some chondrules, of previously unrecognized magnetites of magmatic origin implies the formation of these chondrules under impact-generated oxidizing conditions. The three oxygen isotopes systematic of magmatic magnetites and silicates can only be explained by invoking an impact between silicate-rich and ice-rich planetesimals. This suggests that these peculiar chondrules are by-products of the early mixing in the disk of populations of planetesimals from the inner and outer solar system. PMID:27419237

  12. SEEDS J-band Polarimetric Imagery of the AB Aur Protoplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, J.; Fukagawa, M.; Grady, C.; Hashimoto, J.; Kudo, T.; Munetake, M.; Okamoto, Y.; Tamura, M.; Hodapp, K.; SEEDS Team

    2010-10-01

    The Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) is a large survey which will be observing roughly 200 protoplanetary and debris disk systems over the next five years using the HiCIAO coronagraph + AO188 system on the Subaru telescope. We present new J-band polarimetric differential imagery of the proto-type Herbig Ae star, AB Aurigae, which diagnoses scattered light from the system between 20 - 540 AU at a resolution of roughly 8 AU. We discuss the morphology we observe in the outer disk region in the context of previous observations of the system, and compare/contrast the morphology in the inner disk region with recent H-band imagery of the system made with HiCIAO(Hashimoto et al 2010).

  13. Segmental mobility, disc height and patient-reported outcomes after surgery for degenerative disc disease: a prospective randomised trial comparing disc replacement and multidisciplinary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, L G; Brinckmann, P; Hellum, C; Rossvoll, I; Leivseth, G

    2013-01-01

    This prospective multicentre study was undertaken to determine segmental movement, disc height and sagittal alignment after total disc replacement (TDR) in the lumbosacral spine and to assess the correlation of biomechanical properties to clinical outcomes.A total of 173 patients with degenerative disc disease and low back pain for more than one year were randomised to receive either TDR or multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MDR). Segmental movement in the sagittal plane and disc height were measured using distortion compensated roentgen analysis (DCRA) comparing radiographs in active flexion and extension. Correlation analysis between the range of movement or disc height and patient-reported outcomes was performed in both groups. After two years, no significant change in movement in the sagittal plane was found in segments with TDR or between the two treatment groups. It remained the same or increased slightly in untreated segments in the TDR group and in this group there was a significant increase in disc height in the operated segments. There was no correlation between segmental movement or disc height and patient-reported outcomes in either group.In this study, insertion of an intervertebral disc prosthesis TDR did not increase movement in the sagittal plane and segmental movement did not correlate with patient-reported outcomes. This suggests that in the lumbar spine the movement preserving properties of TDR are not major determinants of clinical outcomes.

  14. The comet-like composition of a protoplanetary disk as revealed by complex cyanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Guzmán, Viviana V.; Furuya, Kenji; Qi, Chunhua; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M.; Loomis, Ryan; Wilner, David J.

    2015-04-01

    Observations of comets and asteroids show that the solar nebula that spawned our planetary system was rich in water and organic molecules. Bombardment brought these organics to the young Earth's surface. Unlike asteroids, comets preserve a nearly pristine record of the solar nebula composition. The presence of cyanides in comets, including 0.01 per cent of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) with respect to water, is of special interest because of the importance of C-N bonds for abiotic amino acid synthesis. Comet-like compositions of simple and complex volatiles are found in protostars, and can readily be explained by a combination of gas-phase chemistry (to form, for example, HCN) and an active ice-phase chemistry on grain surfaces that advances complexity. Simple volatiles, including water and HCN, have been detected previously in solar nebula analogues, indicating that they survive disk formation or are re-formed in situ. It has hitherto been unclear whether the same holds for more complex organic molecules outside the solar nebula, given that recent observations show a marked change in the chemistry at the boundary between nascent envelopes and young disks due to accretion shocks. Here we report the detection of the complex cyanides CH3CN and HC3N (and HCN) in the protoplanetary disk around the young star MWC 480. We find that the abundance ratios of these nitrogen-bearing organics in the gas phase are similar to those in comets, which suggests an even higher relative abundance of complex cyanides in the disk ice. This implies that complex organics accompany simpler volatiles in protoplanetary disks, and that the rich organic chemistry of our solar nebula was not unique.

  15. Planet filtering at the inner edges of dead zones in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Julien; Nelson, Richard P.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The interface between the dead zone and the inner active zone in a protoplanetary disk provides a promising region where the inward migration of planets may be halted owing to the existence of strong corotation torques. Recent work has indicated that this region may be prone to supporting a vortex cycle, during which vortices form at the dead-active zone interface and migrate into the active region before being destroyed, after which a new vortex forms and the cycle repeats. Aims: The aim of this paper is to examine the interaction between migrating planets and this vortex cycle, and to determine the conditions under which planets are able to remain trapped at the dead-active zone interface. Methods: We use the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) codes PLUTO and RAMSES to perform 2D viscous disk simulations and 3D MHD simulations of protoplanetary disks containing migrating planets. A temperature switch is used to control the effective viscosity at the dead-active zone interface. Results: We find that both low mass and non-gap forming higher mass planets are able to escape from the planet trap at the inner edge of the dead zone as a result of their interaction with the migrating vortices, whereas intermediate mass planets remain trapped for the duration of simulation run times. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the vortex cycle causes the dead zone inner edge to act as an effective and mass-dependent planet filter, allowing some planets to pass through this region and others to remain there over long timescales.

  16. FROM DUST TO PLANETESIMALS: AN IMPROVED MODEL FOR COLLISIONAL GROWTH IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Garaud, Pascale; Meru, Farzana; Galvagni, Marina; Olczak, Christoph

    2013-02-20

    Planet formation occurs within the gas- and dust-rich environments of protoplanetary disks. Observations of these objects show that the growth of primordial submicron-sized particles into larger aggregates occurs at the earliest evolutionary stages of the disks. However, theoretical models of particle growth that use the Smoluchowski equation to describe collisional coagulation and fragmentation have so far failed to produce large particles while maintaining a significant population of small grains. This has generally been attributed to the existence of two barriers impeding growth due to bouncing and fragmentation of colliding particles. In this paper, we demonstrate that the importance of these barriers has been artificially inflated through the use of simplified models that do not take into account the stochastic nature of the particle motions within the gas disk. We present a new approach in which the relative velocities between two particles are described by a probability distribution function that models both deterministic motion (from the vertical settling, radial drift, and azimuthal drift) and stochastic motion (from Brownian motion and turbulence). Taking both into account can give quite different results to what has been considered recently in other studies. We demonstrate the vital effect of two 'ingredients' for particle growth: the proper implementation of a velocity distribution function that overcomes the bouncing barrier and, in combination with mass transfer in high-mass-ratio collisions, boosts the growth of larger particles beyond the fragmentation barrier. A robust result of our simulations is the emergence of two particle populations (small and large), potentially explaining simultaneously a number of longstanding problems in protoplanetary disks, including planetesimal formation close to the central star, the presence of millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles far out in the disk, and the persistence of {mu}m-sized grains for millions of

  17. Chemical complexity in protoplanetary disks in the era of ALMA and Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, C.

    2016-05-01

    Comets provide a unique insight into the molecular composition and complexity of the material in the primordial solar nebula. Recent results from the Rosetta mission, currently monitoring comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in situ, and ALMA (the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array) have demonstrated a tantalising link between the chemical complexity now confirmed in disks (via the detection of gas-phase cf.CH3CN Öberg et al. [13]) and that confirmed on the surface of 67P (Goesmann et al. [3]), raising questions concerning the chemical origin of such species (cloud or inheritance versus disk synthesis). Results from an astrochemical model of a protoplanetary disk are presented in which complex chemistry is included and in which it is assumed that simple ices only are inherited from the parent molecular cloud. The model results show good agreement with the abundances of several COMs observed on the surface of 67P with Philae/COSAC. Cosmic-ray and X-ray-induced photoprocessing of predominantly simple ices inherited by the protoplanetary disk is sufficient to generate a chemical complexity similar to that observed in comets. This indicates that the icy COMs detected on the surface of 67P may have a disk origin. The results also show that gas-phase cf.CH3CN is abundant in the inner warm disk atmosphere where hot gas-phase chemistry dominates and potentially erases the ice chemical signature. Hence, cf.CH3CN may not be an unambiguous tracer of the complex organic ice reservoir. However, a better understanding of the hot gas-phase chemistry of cf.CH3CN is needed to confirm this preliminary conclusion.

  18. The comet-like composition of a protoplanetary disk as revealed by complex cyanides.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Karin I; Guzmán, Viviana V; Furuya, Kenji; Qi, Chunhua; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M; Loomis, Ryan; Wilner, David J

    2015-04-01

    Observations of comets and asteroids show that the solar nebula that spawned our planetary system was rich in water and organic molecules. Bombardment brought these organics to the young Earth's surface. Unlike asteroids, comets preserve a nearly pristine record of the solar nebula composition. The presence of cyanides in comets, including 0.01 per cent of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) with respect to water, is of special interest because of the importance of C-N bonds for abiotic amino acid synthesis. Comet-like compositions of simple and complex volatiles are found in protostars, and can readily be explained by a combination of gas-phase chemistry (to form, for example, HCN) and an active ice-phase chemistry on grain surfaces that advances complexity. Simple volatiles, including water and HCN, have been detected previously in solar nebula analogues, indicating that they survive disk formation or are re-formed in situ. It has hitherto been unclear whether the same holds for more complex organic molecules outside the solar nebula, given that recent observations show a marked change in the chemistry at the boundary between nascent envelopes and young disks due to accretion shocks. Here we report the detection of the complex cyanides CH3CN and HC3N (and HCN) in the protoplanetary disk around the young star MWC 480. We find that the abundance ratios of these nitrogen-bearing organics in the gas phase are similar to those in comets, which suggests an even higher relative abundance of complex cyanides in the disk ice. This implies that complex organics accompany simpler volatiles in protoplanetary disks, and that the rich organic chemistry of our solar nebula was not unique. PMID:25855455

  19. Vortex cycles at the inner edges of dead zones in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Julien; Fromang, Sébastien; Latter, Henrik; Meheut, Heloise

    2015-01-01

    Context. In protoplanetary disks, the inner boundary between the turbulent and laminar regions is a promising site for planet formation because solids may become trapped at the interface itself or in vortices generated by the Rossby wave instability. The disk thermodynamics and the turbulent dynamics at that location are entwined because of the importance of turbulent dissipation to thermal ionization and, conversely, of thermal ionization to turbulence. However, most previous work has neglected this dynamical coupling and have thus missed a crucial element of the physics in this region. Aims: In this paper, we aim to determine how the interplay between ionization and turbulence affects the formation and evolution of vortices at the interface between the active and the dead zones. Methods: Using the Godunov code RAMSES, we performed a 3D magnetohydrodynamic global numerical simulation of a cylindrical model of an MRI-turbulent protoplanetary disk, including thermodynamical effects and a temperature-dependant resistivity. The comparison with an analogous 2D viscous simulation was extensively used to help identify the relevant physical processes and the disk's long-term evolution. Results: We find that a vortex forms at the interface as a result of Rossby wave instability, migrates inward, and penetrates the active zone where it is destroyed by turbulent motions. Subsequently, a new vortex emerges a few tens of orbits later at the interface, and the new vortex migrates inward too. The sequence repeats itself, resulting in cycles of vortex formation, migration, and disruption. This surprising behaviour is successfully reproduced using two different codes. We characterize this vortex life cycle and discuss its implications for planet formation at the dead-active interface. Our results also call for a better understanding of vortex migration in complex thermodynamical environments. Conclusions: Our simulations highlight the importance of thermodynamical processes for

  20. TURBULENCE IN THE OUTER REGIONS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. WEAK ACCRETION WITH NO VERTICAL MAGNETIC FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Beckwith, Kris; Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2013-02-10

    We use local numerical simulations to investigate the strength and nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks, where ambipolar diffusion is the dominant non-ideal MHD effect. The simulations include vertical stratification and assume zero net vertical magnetic flux. We employ a super time-stepping technique to ameliorate the Courant restriction on the diffusive time step. We find that in idealized stratified simulations, with a spatially constant ambipolar Elsasser number Am, turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) behaves in a similar manner as in prior unstratified calculations. Turbulence dies away for Am {<=} 1, and becomes progressively more vigorous as ambipolar diffusion is decreased. Near-ideal MHD behavior is recovered for Am {>=} 10{sup 3}. In the intermediate regime (10 {<=} Am {<=} 10{sup 3}) ambipolar diffusion leads to substantial increases in both the period of the MRI dynamo cycle and the characteristic scales of magnetic field structures. To quantify the impact of ambipolar physics on disk accretion, we run simulations at 30 AU and 100 AU that include a vertical Am profile based upon far-ultraviolet (FUV) ionized disk models. These models develop a vertically layered structure analogous to the Ohmic dead zone that is present at smaller radii. We find that, although the levels of surface turbulence can be strong (and consistent with constraints on turbulent line widths at these radii), the inferred accretion rates are at least an order of magnitude smaller than those observed in T Tauri stars. This discrepancy is very likely due to the assumption of zero vertical magnetic field in our simulations and suggests that vertical magnetic fields are essential for MRI-driven accretion in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks.